Science.gov

Sample records for industry issues management

  1. Effects of Internal Rhetoric on Management Response to External Issues: How Corporate Culture Failed the Asbestos Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates how corporate culture stifled adaptive efforts of strategic planners, operations managers, industrial hygienists, and issue monitors in the asbestos industry thereby leading it to the brink of bankruptcy. (MG)

  2. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: Creating a global corporate network to undermine public health

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Intinarelli, Gina; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-01

    Background The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Methods Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. Results The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI) was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. Conclusion The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when threatened by the globalization of

  3. Dairy manure and plant nutrient management issues affecting water quality and the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, L E

    1994-07-01

    Specific requirements for dairy manure management to protect water quality from nutrient pollution depend on the organization of individual farms. Further, the management requirements and options are different for point (farmstead) and nonpoint (field-applied) sources of pollution from farms. A formal management process can guide decisions about existing crop nutrient utilization potential, provide a framework for tracking nutrients supplied to crops, and identify future requirements for dairy manure management to protect water quality. Farm managers can use the process to plan daily activities, to assess annual nutrient management performance, and to chart future requirements as herd size increases. Agronomic measures of nutrient balance and tracking of inputs and outputs for various farm management units can provide the quantitative basis for management to allocate better manure to fields, to modify dairy rations, or to develop alternatives to on-farm manure application. Changes in agricultural production since World War II have contributed to a shift from land-based dairy production to a reliance on capital factors of production supplied by the dairy industry. Meanwhile, management of dairy manure to meet increasingly stringent water quality protection requirements is still a land-based activity. Involving the dairy industry and off-farm stakeholders as participants in the management process for field, farm, and regional dairy production can be the basis for decision-making to reconcile the sometimes conflicting demands of production and water quality protection. PMID:7929961

  4. Industrial Hygiene Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    This breakout session is a traditional conference instrument used by the NASA industrial hygiene personnel as a method to convene personnel across the Agency with common interests. This particular session focused on two key topics, training systems and automation of industrial hygiene data. During the FY 98 NASA Occupational Health Benchmarking study, the training system under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was deemed to represent a "best business practice." The EPA has invested extensively in the development of computer based training covering a broad range of safety, health and environmental topics. Currently, five compact disks have been developed covering the topics listed: Safety, Health and Environmental Management Training for Field Inspection Activities; EPA Basic Radiation Training Safety Course; The OSHA 600 Collateral Duty Safety and Health Course; and Key program topics in environmental compliance, health and safety. Mr. Chris Johnson presented an overview of the EPA compact disk-based training system and answered questions on its deployment and use across the EPA. This training system has also recently been broadly distributed across other Federal Agencies. The EPA training system is considered "public domain" and, as such, is available to NASA at no cost in its current form. Copies of the five CD set of training programs were distributed to each NASA Center represented in the breakout session. Mr. Brisbin requested that each NASA Center review the training materials and determine whether there is interest in using the materials as it is or requesting that EPA tailor the training modules to suit NASA's training program needs. The Safety, Health and Medical Services organization at Ames Research Center has completed automation of several key program areas. Mr. Patrick Hogan, Safety Program Manager for Ames Research Center, presented a demonstration of the automated systems, which are described by the following: (1) Safety

  5. Issues in Coastal Zone Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Derrin

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the following issues relevant to coastal zone management: overcrowding, resource exploitation, pollution, agriculture, fisheries, industrial, and other uses. Describes conflicts and trade-offs in management typified by fragmented agency decision making. Discusses implications of the greenhouse effect, sustainable development, and the…

  6. Issues management made easier

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, L.

    1993-10-01

    Increases in ES&H compliance issues within the past few years have necessitated a formal process by which DOE facilities address these issues. In May 1991, ANL-W implemented the ANL-W Issues Management System (IMS) to facilitate the management of compliance issues and scheduling of corrective action plans with limited resources. The central focus of this process is a computer database, Integrated Resource Management System (IRMS), which allows quick retrieval of compliance information, organization of compliance issues based on a risk-based prioritization methodology, and tracking of corrective action plans. Without the IRMS, the ANL-W Issues Management System would have been difficult to administer and manage. ANL-W has used the IRMS for both audit preparation and audit response, most noticeably the preparation and subsequent response to the 1991 Tiger Team audit. The IRMS was used to track ANL-W Self-Assessment corrective action plans, provide instant information to Tiger Team members regarding Self-Assessment findings, produce prioritized lists of Tiger Team concerns for developing corrective action plans, and track Tiger Team corrective action plans. Status reports to senior, laboratory management regarding the Tiger Team corrective action plan are produced based on information provided by the IRMS. This paper discusses the criteria used for selecting the IRMS, implementation of the Issues Management System using the IRMS, lessons learned, and the future evolution of the IRMS.

  7. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  8. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  9. Issues Management Tool

    2010-12-31

    IMTool performs the following: • The IMTool can manage issues, actions, and activities from one screen. • Provides enhanced and intuitive searching, sorting, and filtering capabilities. Grids allow for filtering any column instantly by any data heading. • IMTool uses drop-down menus to ensure date is entered accurately with consistency. • User-friendly system – highly utilized commitment tracking screen functions. Information is viewed on the left side of the screen and managed on the right.

  10. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    PubMed

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity.

  11. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    PubMed

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity. PMID:26652980

  12. Data Confidentiality and Integrity Issues and Role of Information Security Management Standard, Policies and Practices - An Empirical Study of Telecommunication Industry in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Syed Irfan; Nabi, Syed Waqar; Tipu, Syed Awais Ahmed; Haqqi, Bushra; Abid, Zahra; Alghathbar, Khaled

    The amount of data communications is increasing each day and with it comes the issues of assuring its security. This research paper explores the information security management issues with respect to confidentiality and integrity and the impact of Information Security Management Standards, Policies and Practices (ISMSPP) on information security. This research has been conducted on the telecommunication industry of Pakistan that was ranked 9th globally in 2009 in terms of subscription. The research methodology was case study based in which perceptions were gathered as well as thematic analysis of the interviews was done. The research focus is on breach of data integrity and confidentiality by the internal users in the industry and the perception of improvement, if any, of the data security due to implementation of security management policies and controls. The results show that information security measure are perceived to have a positive impact on reducing data confidentiality and integrity breaches but still falls short of what is required. It concludes that security policies might improve the situation provided, firstly, that the top managements takes information security seriously, and secondly, the non-technical human aspects of the issues are taken into consideration.

  13. Issues affecting the industrial powerhouse and powerhouse operation

    SciTech Connect

    Dessette, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    The growth of industrial boilre regulatory issues is discussed. These issues include environmental issues, e.g., monitoring, air toxics, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions, ozone transport, waste management, Title V permits, new source reviews etc., energy issues, e.g., competitive sourcing, global climate change, energy efficiency and renewables, and government affairs issues, e.g., cost effectiveness risk assessment, and amendment of the 1990 Clean Air Acts.

  14. Correctness issues in workflow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, Mohan; Ramamritham, Krithi

    1996-12-01

    Workflow management is a technique to integrate and automate the execution of steps that comprise a complex process, e.g., a business process. Workflow management systems (WFMSs) primarily evolved from industry to cater to the growing demand for office automation tools among businesses. Coincidentally, database researchers developed several extended transaction models to handle similar applications. Although the goals of both the communities were the same, the issues they focused on were different. The workflow community primarily focused on modelling aspects to accurately capture the data and control flow requirements between the steps that comprise a workflow, while the database community focused on correctness aspects to ensure data consistency of sub-transactions that comprise a transaction. However, we now see a confluence of some of the ideas, with additional features being gradually offered by WFMSs. This paper provides an overview of correctness in workflow management. Correctness is an important aspect of WFMSs and a proper understanding of the available concepts and techniques by WFMS developers and workflow designers will help in building workflows that are flexible enough to capture the requirements of real world applications and robust enough to provide the necessary correctness and reliability properties. We first enumerate the correctness issues that have to be considered to ensure data consistency. Then we survey techniques that have been proposed or are being used in WFMSs for ensuring correctness of workflows. These techniques emerge from the areas of workflow management, extended transaction models, multidatabases and transactional workflows. Finally, we present some open issues related to correctness of workflows in the presence of concurrency and failures.

  15. Industry perspective on regulation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, C.

    1994-12-31

    Current industry estimates indicate that regulatory compliance costs for retail crop protection chemical and fertilizer dealers will on average increase 300% from 1990 to 1997. Even though recent studies show that most dealers are willing to proactively comply with environmental and worker safety regulations, the impact of over-regulation could be substantial. The agrichemical industry must begin to develop and implement a strategy to increase compliance with needed regulations and prohibit duplicative or unnecessary regulations.

  16. Guidelines help managers deal with ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Gould, G R; Younkins, E W

    1989-07-01

    While a great deal of effort has been devoted to improving financial management techniques in the healthcare industry, little attention has been paid to addressing the ethical issues facing financial managers. In the years ahead, the ability to evaluate the ethical aspects of alternative courses of action may be as important as technical and managerial skills.

  17. Economic Issues in Mass Communication Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosse, James N.; Dertouzos, James N.

    A general discussion covering both the common problems and features of the full range of the mass media industries, and some economic notions central to understanding them, opens this report, followed by introductory essays for individual industries and consideration of public policy issues. The basic economic considerations common to the field…

  18. Software management issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.

    1990-06-01

    The difficulty of managing the software in large HEP collaborations appears to becoming progressively worst with each new generation of detector. If one were to extrapolate to the SSC, it will become a major problem. This paper explores the possible causes of the difficulty and makes suggestions on what corrective actions should be taken.

  19. Issues in groundwater management

    SciTech Connect

    Smerdon, E.T.; Jordon, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that the solution to future water problems in Texas will require more effective management of the water resources. New supplies to meet future needs are not without limit; therefore, the solution to the problem will have to come from better water conservation as well as by providing new supplies. In some cases, conservation and reuse may be the only feasible answer. To accomplish what is needed will require the best efforts of all Texans. And good research programs will be required to discover ways to improve on what has been done in the past. This publication contains the proceedings of a symposium entitled ''Groundwater--Crisis or Opportunity,'' which was held in San Antonio October 29-31, 1984. It was one of several efforts related to water resources undertaken cooperatively in recent years by The University of Texas at Austin and The Texas A and M University System. The papers in this proceedings discuss the groundwater problems of the future in Texas.

  20. [Metalworking industry management evolution].

    PubMed

    Mattucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the evolution drivers of the management systems in the metalworking industry, mainly characterized as "automotive", starting with the "mass production" model, followed for the development of Italian industry in the '50. Through the socio-economic changes of the '90/10, the metalworking plants were deeply restructured with the introduction of computers in the production systems, and then with the first global benchmarks such as the "lean production", towards the needed operational flexibility to respond to the market dynamics. Plants change radically, company networks become real, ICT services are fundamental elements for the integration. These trends help visualizing a new "Factory of the Future" for the years 2020/30, where the competition will be based on the socio-economical, technological and environmental factors included in the "Competitive Sustainable Manufacturing" paradigm. PMID:22073665

  1. Management Issues & Innovation. Chapter 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TCs) that deal with management issues and innovations within TCs. Papers include: (1) "Support or Restriction of TCs: Governmental Interation vs. Self-Reliance" (Richard Pruss); (2) "Governmental Support: A Swedish Perspective" (Lars Bremberg); (3)…

  2. Biodiversity and Industry Ecosystem Management

    PubMed

    COLEMAN

    1996-11-01

    / The term biodiversity describes the array of interacting, genetically distinct populations and species in a region, the communities they comprise, and the variety of ecosystems of which they are functioning parts. Ecosystem health, a closely related concept, is described in terms of a process identifying biological indicators, end points, and values. The decline of populations or species, an accelerating trend worldwide, can lead to simplification of ecosystem processes, thus threatening the stability and sustainability of ecosystem services directly relevant to human welfare in the chain of economic and ecological relationships. The challenge of addressing issues of such enormous scope and complexity has highlighted the limitations of ecology-as-science. Additionally, biosphere-scale conflicts seem to lie beyond the scope of conventional economics, leading to differences of opinion about the commodity value of biodiversity and of the services that intact ecosystems provide. In the face of these uncertainties, many scientists and economists have adopted principles that clearly assign burdens of proof to those who would promote the loss of biodiversity and that also establish "near-trump" (preeminent) status for ecological integrity. Electric utility facilities and operations impact biodiversity whenever construction, operation, or maintenance of generation, delivery, and support facilities alters landscapes and habitats and thereby impacts species. Although industry is accustomed to dealing with broad environmental concerns (such as global warming or acid rain), the biodiversity issue invokes hemisphere-wide, regional, local, and site-specific concerns all at the same time. Industry can proactively address these issues of scope and scale in two main ways: first, by aligning strategically with the broad research agenda put forth by informed scientists and institutions; and second, by supporting focused management processes whose results will contribute

  3. Biodiversity and Industry Ecosystem Management

    PubMed

    COLEMAN

    1996-11-01

    / The term biodiversity describes the array of interacting, genetically distinct populations and species in a region, the communities they comprise, and the variety of ecosystems of which they are functioning parts. Ecosystem health, a closely related concept, is described in terms of a process identifying biological indicators, end points, and values. The decline of populations or species, an accelerating trend worldwide, can lead to simplification of ecosystem processes, thus threatening the stability and sustainability of ecosystem services directly relevant to human welfare in the chain of economic and ecological relationships. The challenge of addressing issues of such enormous scope and complexity has highlighted the limitations of ecology-as-science. Additionally, biosphere-scale conflicts seem to lie beyond the scope of conventional economics, leading to differences of opinion about the commodity value of biodiversity and of the services that intact ecosystems provide. In the face of these uncertainties, many scientists and economists have adopted principles that clearly assign burdens of proof to those who would promote the loss of biodiversity and that also establish "near-trump" (preeminent) status for ecological integrity. Electric utility facilities and operations impact biodiversity whenever construction, operation, or maintenance of generation, delivery, and support facilities alters landscapes and habitats and thereby impacts species. Although industry is accustomed to dealing with broad environmental concerns (such as global warming or acid rain), the biodiversity issue invokes hemisphere-wide, regional, local, and site-specific concerns all at the same time. Industry can proactively address these issues of scope and scale in two main ways: first, by aligning strategically with the broad research agenda put forth by informed scientists and institutions; and second, by supporting focused management processes whose results will contribute

  4. Outage management and health physics issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2007-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: India: a potential commercial opportunity, a U.S. Department of Commerce Report, by Joe Neuhoff and Justin Rathke; The changing climate for nuclear energy, by Skip Bowman, Nuclear Energy Insitute; Selecting protective clothing, by J. Mark Price, Southern California Edison; and Succssful refurbishment outage, by Sudesh K. Gambhir, Omaha Public Power District. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Containment radiation monitoring spiking, by Michael W. Lantz and Robert Routolo, Arizona Public Service Company; Improved outage performance, by Michael Powell and Troy Wilfong, Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Stop repacking valves and achieve leak-free performance, by Kenneth Hart, PPL Susquehanna LLC; and Head assembly upgrade package, by Timothy Petit, Dominion Nuclear.

  5. Biodiversity and industry ecosystem management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William G.

    1996-11-01

    The term biodiversity describes the array of interacting, genetically distinct populations and species in a region, the communities they comprise, and the variety of ecosystems of which they are functioning parts. Ecosystem health, a closely related concept, is described in terms of a process identifying biological indicators, end points, and values. The decline of populations or species, an accelerating trend worldwide, can lead to simplification of ecosystem processes, thus threatening the stability and sustainability of ecosystem services directly relevant to human welfare in the chain of economic and ecological relationships. The challenge of addressing issues of such enormous scope and complexity has highlighted the limitations of ecology-as-science. Additionally, biosphere-scale conflicts seem to lie beyond the scope of conventional economics, leading to differences of opinion about the commodity value of biodiversity and of the services that intact ecosystems provide. In the face of these uncertainties, many scientists and economists have adopted principles that clearly assign burdens of proof to those who would promote the loss of biodiversity and that also establish “near-trump” (preeminent) status for ecological integrity. Electric utility facilities and operations impact biodiversity whenever construction, operation, or maintenance of generation, delivery, and support facilities alters landscapes and habitats and thereby impacts species. Although industry is accustomed to dealing with broad environmental concerns (such as global warming or acid rain), the biodiversity issue invokes hemisphere-wide, regional, local, and site-specific concerns all at the same time. Industry can proactively address these issues of scope and scale in two main ways: first, by aligning strategically with the broad research agenda put forth by informed scientists and institutions; and second, by supporting focused management processes whose results will contribute

  6. Biodiversity and industry ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    Biodiversity describes the array of interacting, genetically distinct populations and species in a region, the communities they are functioning parts. Ecosystem health is a process identifying biological indicators, end points, and values. The decline of populations or species, an accelerating trend worldwide, can lead to simplification of ecosystem processes, thus threatening the stability an sustainability of ecosystem services directly relevant to human welfare in the chain of economic and ecological relationships. The challenge of addressing issues of such enormous scope and complexity has highlighted the limitations of ecology-as-science. Additionally, biosphere-scale conflicts seem to lie beyond the scope of conventional economics, leading to differences of opinion about the commodity value of biodiversity and of the services that intact ecosystems provide. In the fact of these uncertainties, many scientists and economists have adopted principles that clearly assign burdens of proof to those who would promote the loss of biodiversity and that also establish {open_quotes}near-trump{close_quotes} (preeminent) status for ecological integrity. Electric utility facilities and operations impact biodiversity whenever construction, operation, or maintenance of generation, delivery, and support facilities alters landscapes and habitats and thereby impacts species. Although industry is accustomed to dealing with broad environmental concerns (such as global warming or acid rain), the biodiversity issue invokes hemisphere-side, regional, local, and site-specific concerns all at the same time. Industry can proactively address these issues of scope and scale in two main ways: first, by aligning strategically with the broad research agenda put forth by informed scientists and institutions; and second, by supporting focused management processes whose results will contribute incrementally to the broader agenda of rebuilding or maintaining biodiversity. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Disease management contracting: legal issues.

    PubMed

    Dunst, I

    1996-01-01

    The legal issues surrounding disease management (DM) agreements can be complex and confusing to participants whose primary expertise is in the management or providing of health care. Because DM is such a rapidly evolving field, attorneys can provide invaluable guidance in avoiding legal pitfalls that can arise from the partners' sometimes-differing goals and expectations. Although managed-care organizations (MCOs) are generally already familiar with the legal issues in DM, the independent partners in DM agreements, often drug companies, may be less familiar with the various state and federal licensing and regulatory requirements that may apply to their DM activities. For this reason, it is important that, unless they are prepared to take on the responsibilities involved with licensing and regulation, independent partners of MCOs should contractually state that they are not "health care providers" and should not engage in activities that would make them subject to regulation. In addition, partnership contracts must be carefully defined to avoid running afoul of federal and state anti-kickback laws, which prohibit certain impermissible inducements to purchase health care products or services covered by Medicare/Medicaid.

  8. Outage managment and health physics issue, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2008-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include: Outage optimization initiatives, by George B. Beam, AREVA NP, Inc.; New plant based on excellent track records, by Jim Scarola, Progress Energy; Meeting customer needs and providing environmental benefits, by Peter S. Hastings, Duke Energy; Plants with 3-D design, by Jack A. Bailey, Tennessee Valley Authority; and Highest quality with exceptional planning, by Jason A. Walls, Duke Energy. Industry innovation articles include: Integrated exposure reduction plan, by Ed Wolfe, Exelon; Performance-based radiation worker training, by Joe Giuffre and Timothy Vriezerma, American Electric Power.

  9. Solar technology and the insurance industry: Issues and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Deering, A.; Thornton, J. P.

    1999-07-01

    Today's insurance industry strongly emphasizes developing cost-effective hazard mitigation programs, increasing and retaining commercial and residential customers through better service, educating customers on their exposure and vulnerabilities to natural disasters, collaborating with government agencies and emergency management organizations, and exploring the use of new technologies to reduce the financial impact of disasters. Solar technology can be used in underwriting, claims, catastrophe response, loss control, and risk management. This report will address the above issues, with an emphasis on pre-disaster planning and mitigation alternatives. It will also discuss how energy efficiency and renewable technologies can contribute to reducing insurance losses and offer suggestions on how to collaborate with the utility industry and how to develop educational programs for business and consumers.

  10. Scaling issues in sustainable river basin management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, Jos; Froebich, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable river basin management implies considering the whole river basin when managing the water resources. Management measures target at dividing the water over different uses (nature, agriculture, industry, households) thereby avoiding calamities like having too much, too little or bad quality water. Water management measures are taken at the local level, usually considering the sub-national and sometimes national effects of such measures. A large part of the world's freshwater resources, however, is contained in river basins and groundwater systems that are shared by two or more countries. Sustainable river basin management consequently has to encompass local, regional, national and international scales. This requires coordination over and cooperation between these levels that is currently compressed into the term 'water governance' . Governance takes into account that a large number of stakeholders in different regimes (the principles, rules and procedures that steer management) contribute to policy and management of a resource. Governance includes the increasing importance of basically non-hierarchical modes of governing, where non-state actors (formal organizations like NGOs, private companies, consumer associations, etc.) participate in the formulation and implementation of public policy. Land use determines the run-off generation and use of irrigation water. Land use is increasingly determined by private sector initiatives at local scale. This is a complicating factor in the governance issue, as in comparison to former developments of large scale irrigation systems, planning institutions at state level have then less insight on actual water consumption. The water management regime of a basin consequently has to account for the different scales of water management and within these different scales with both state and non-state actors. The central elements of regimes include the policy setting (the policies and water management strategies), legal setting

  11. Environmental issues in operations management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthulingam, Suresh

    Adoption of sustainable operating practices is becoming an increasingly important issue for many organizations in the world today. In this dissertation, I use empirical methods to investigate factors that influence the adoption of sustainable practices and also identify issues that may hinder the adoption of such practices. I explore these issues in two diverse settings. In Chapter 1, I investigate the adoption and non-adoption of energy efficiency initiatives using a database of over 100,000 recommendations provided to more than 13,000 small and medium sized manufacturing firms. Even though the average payback across all recommendations is just over one year, many of these profitable opportunities are not implemented. Using a probit instrumental variable model, I identify four biases in the adoption of these recommendations. First, managers are myopic as they miss out on many profitable opportunities. Second, managers are more influenced by upfront costs than by net benefits when evaluating such initiatives. Third, adoption of a recommendation depends not only on its characteristics but also on the sequence in which the recommendations are presented. Adoption rates are higher for initiatives appearing early in a list of recommendations. Finally, adoption is not influenced by the number of options provided to decision makers. This contributes to the debate about whether or not choice overload occurs. We highlight decision biases previously unobserved in the Operations Management literature using field data rather than experimental data. We draw implications for enhancing adoption of energy efficiency initiatives and for other decision contexts where a collection of process improvement recommendations are made to firms. In Chapter 2, I examine the depth of adoption of the voluntary LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards for green buildings. Depth of adoption refers to the extent to which the buildings adopt practices related to the standard

  12. Industry Studies of Wage Inequality. Extra Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2001

    2001-01-01

    The seven papers use data from particular industries to examine the nature and causes of recent changes in earnings equality in the United States. They provide perspectives from banking, telecommunications, semiconductors, steel, grocery, truck driving, apparel, and imaging industries on recent debates regarding the influence that technological…

  13. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This new collection of papers on aerospace management issues contains a history of NASA program and project management, some lessons learned in the areas of management and budget from the Space Shuttle Program, an analysis of tools needed to keep large multilayer programs organized and on track, and an update of resources for NASA managers. A wide variety of opinions and techniques are presented.

  14. Incentive Issues in Information Security Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chul Ho

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation studies three incentive issues in information security management. The first essay studies contract issues between a firm that outsources security functions and a managed security service provider (MSSP) that provides security functions to the firm. Since MSSP and firms cannot observe each other's actions, both can suffer…

  15. Industrial Organizational Psychology: Today's Critical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharf, James C.

    The Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) of the American Psychological Association is dominated by the health care providers whose agenda in issuing accreditation standards and influencing state licensing requirements may be as much to protect the clinician from less expensive competition as it is to protect the client. Tension exists between the…

  16. Management issues in automated audit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.A.; Hochberg, J.G.; Wilhelmy, S.K.; McClary, J.F.; Christoph, G.G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses management issues associated with the design and implementation of an automated audit analysis system that we use to detect security events. It gives the viewpoint of a team directly responsible for developing and managing such a system. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) as a case in point. We examine issues encountered at Los Alamos, detail our solutions to them, and where appropriate suggest general solutions. After providing an introduction to NADIR, we explore four general management issues: cost-benefit questions, privacy considerations, legal issues, and system integrity. Our experiences are of general interest both to security professionals and to anyone who may wish to implement a similar system. While NADIR investigates security events, the methods used and the management issues are potentially applicable to a broad range of complex systems. These include those used to audit credit card transactions, medical care payments, and procurement systems.

  17. Commercial fishing industry deaths - forensic issues.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2013-04-01

    The commercial fishing industry has one of the highest injury and mortality rates of all occupational areas. This results from the nature of the work involving vessels often manned by only a few individuals who are working with heavy-duty equipment in dangerous environments at all hours. Economic pressures may force inappropriately geared vessels to operate further out to sea than is safe. Deaths result from a wide variety of situations involving vessel loss, falls overboard, fire and explosions, cable entanglements and gas exposure. Autopsies are often difficult as there are no diagnostic features of either drowning or hypothermia and features may be obscured by putrefaction and postmortem animal predation. The forensic implications of deaths in the fishing industry are reviewed.

  18. Pediatric Cushing's disease: Management Issues.

    PubMed

    Savage, Martin O; Storr, Helen L

    2012-12-01

    Cushing's disease (CD), caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary corticotroph adenoma, is the commonest cause of Cushing syndrome in children over 5 years of age. It is rare in the pediatric age range and presents difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Key presenting features include weight gain, growth failure and change in facial appearance. Most pediatric endocrinologists have limited experience managing children or adolescents with CD and thus benefit from close consultation with adult colleagues. We describe a diagnostic protocol which broadly follows the model for adult patients. Treatment strategies are examined and appraised. The management of pediatric CD patients after cure is also discussed. PMID:23565371

  19. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This collection of papers and resources on aerospace management issues is inspired by a desire to benefit from the lessons learned from past projects and programs. Inherent in the NASA culture is a respect for divergent viewpoints and innovative ways of doing things. This publication presents a wide variety of views and opinions. Good management is enhanced when program and project managers examine the methods of veteran managers, considering the lessons they have learned and reflected on their own guiding principles.

  20. Issue Management and the Australian Gun Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    Examines the rise and fall of media coverage of the issues of gun control and political conflict in Australia after an incident of mass murder in April 1996. Aims to reveal the issue management process that occurred and the hidden agendas that motivated the political and media activity. Demonstrates the media's role in the creation of issue…

  1. Ethical Issues in Volunteer Management and Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netting, F. Ellen

    1987-01-01

    Examines the ethical issues surrounding President Reagan's directive to "Go back to the voluntary sector." Discusses trends which currently affect ethical issues of managing volunteer agencies/programs. Recommends proactive steps to be taken in developing the potential of voluntary organizations, identifying organizations' bases of support,…

  2. Management issues in systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Mooz, Hal; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron

    1993-01-01

    When applied to a system, the doctrine of successive refinement is a divide-and-conquer strategy. Complex systems are sucessively divided into pieces that are less complex, until they are simple enough to be conquered. This decomposition results in several structures for describing the product system and the producing system. These structures play important roles in systems engineering and project management. Many of the remaining sections in this chapter are devoted to describing some of these key structures. Structures that describe the product system include, but are not limited to, the requirements tree, system architecture and certain symbolic information such as system drawings, schematics, and data bases. The structures that describe the producing system include the project's work breakdown, schedules, cost accounts and organization.

  3. 7 CFR 1980.488 - Guaranteed industrial development bond issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Guaranteed industrial development bond issues. 1980.488 Section 1980.488 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial...

  4. 7 CFR 1980.488 - Guaranteed industrial development bond issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Guaranteed industrial development bond issues. 1980.488 Section 1980.488 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial...

  5. 7 CFR 1980.488 - Guaranteed industrial development bond issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Guaranteed industrial development bond issues. 1980.488 Section 1980.488 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial...

  6. 7 CFR 1980.488 - Guaranteed industrial development bond issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Guaranteed industrial development bond issues. 1980.488 Section 1980.488 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial...

  7. 7 CFR 1980.488 - Guaranteed industrial development bond issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Guaranteed industrial development bond issues. 1980.488 Section 1980.488 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial...

  8. Some technical issues in managing PCBs.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhifu; Buekens, Alfons; Liu, Jie; Chen, Tong; Lu, Shengyong; Li, Xiaodong; Cen, Kefa

    2014-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were important industrial chemicals featuring high thermal and chemical stability and low flammability. They were widely used as dielectric and thermal fluid in closed electro-technical applications (transformers, capacitors…) and also in numerous dispersive uses, ranking from auto-copying paper to sealant or coatings. During the 1960s, severe environmental consequences started becoming apparent. The stability of PCBs contributed to their persistence in the environment, their lipophilic character to bio-magnification. Fish-eating species seemed threatened in their existence. In Japan and in Taiwan, thousands of people consumed PCB-contaminated oil. The production of PCBs stopped completely during the 1980s. Usage could continue in closed applications only. In this paper, particular attention is given to two issues: the cleaning of PCB electric transformers and the potential impact of PCB-containing building materials. Other contributions will cover the management and treatment of PCB-contaminated soil, sludge or fly ash. The complete survey is being prepared by request of the Knowledge Center for Engineers and Professionals. PMID:23812787

  9. Some technical issues in managing PCBs.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhifu; Buekens, Alfons; Liu, Jie; Chen, Tong; Lu, Shengyong; Li, Xiaodong; Cen, Kefa

    2014-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were important industrial chemicals featuring high thermal and chemical stability and low flammability. They were widely used as dielectric and thermal fluid in closed electro-technical applications (transformers, capacitors…) and also in numerous dispersive uses, ranking from auto-copying paper to sealant or coatings. During the 1960s, severe environmental consequences started becoming apparent. The stability of PCBs contributed to their persistence in the environment, their lipophilic character to bio-magnification. Fish-eating species seemed threatened in their existence. In Japan and in Taiwan, thousands of people consumed PCB-contaminated oil. The production of PCBs stopped completely during the 1980s. Usage could continue in closed applications only. In this paper, particular attention is given to two issues: the cleaning of PCB electric transformers and the potential impact of PCB-containing building materials. Other contributions will cover the management and treatment of PCB-contaminated soil, sludge or fly ash. The complete survey is being prepared by request of the Knowledge Center for Engineers and Professionals.

  10. Pharmacologic issues in management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    DeSevo, Gina; Klootwyk, Jacqueline

    2012-06-01

    A significant portion of the adult population uses one or more medications on a regular basis to manage chronic conditions. As the number of medications that patients are prescribed increases, an increase in pharmacologic-related issues and complications may occur, such as polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, medication nonadherence and nonpersistence, and adverse drug reactions and events. Risk factors and consequences of these issues have been identified and are discussed in this article. In addition, a review is presented of the numerous methods that have been evaluated to help prevent and minimize these pharmacologic issues in the management of chronic disease.

  11. Assessing Institutional Effectiveness: Issues, Methods, and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    This collection of 12 papers was presented at a 1987 conference at which speakers presented personal perspectives on institutional effectiveness. Papers are organized under three major headings: "Managing Quality: Methods and Outcomes,""Institutional Response," and "Special Issues." Titles include: (1) "Managing the Meaning of Institutional…

  12. Issues for small businesses with waste management.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Janice; Walker, Elizabeth; Wang, Calvin

    2008-07-01

    Participation by small and medium enterprise (SME) in corporate social responsibility issues has been found to be lacking. This is a critical issue, as individually SMEs may have little impact on the environment but their collective footprint is significant. The management style and ethical stance of the owner-manager affects business decision making and therefore has a direct impact on the environmental actions of the business. Although adoption of environmental practices to create competitive advantage has been advocated, many businesses see implementation as a cost which cannot be transferred to their customers. After a brief review of pertinent literature this paper reports on an exploratory investigation into the issue. Results show that whereas owner-managers of small enterprises express concern regarding the environment, this does not then translate into better waste management practices.

  13. Issues for small businesses with waste management.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Janice; Walker, Elizabeth; Wang, Calvin

    2008-07-01

    Participation by small and medium enterprise (SME) in corporate social responsibility issues has been found to be lacking. This is a critical issue, as individually SMEs may have little impact on the environment but their collective footprint is significant. The management style and ethical stance of the owner-manager affects business decision making and therefore has a direct impact on the environmental actions of the business. Although adoption of environmental practices to create competitive advantage has been advocated, many businesses see implementation as a cost which cannot be transferred to their customers. After a brief review of pertinent literature this paper reports on an exploratory investigation into the issue. Results show that whereas owner-managers of small enterprises express concern regarding the environment, this does not then translate into better waste management practices. PMID:17445961

  14. The Implications of Industrial Management for the Administration of Industrial Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the functions and principles of industrial management, compares educational and industrial organization, and notes industrial management techniques applicable to industrial education administration. (MF)

  15. Rotorcraft Health Management Issues and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Huff, Edward M.; Augustin, Michael; Safa-Bakhsh, Robab; Ephraim, Piet; Grabil, Paul; Decker, Harry J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of health management issues and challenges that are specific to rotorcraft. Rotorcraft form a unique subset of air vehicles in that their propulsion system is used not only for propulsion, but also serves as the primary source of lift and maneuvering of the vehicle. No other air vehicle relies on the propulsion system to provide these functions through a transmission system with single critical load paths without duplication or redundancy. As such, health management of the power train is a critical and unique part of any rotorcraft health management system. This paper focuses specifically on the issues and challenges related to the dynamic mechanical components in the main power train. This includes the transmission and main rotor mechanisms. This paper will review standard practices used for rotorcraft health management, lessons learned from fielded trials, and future challenges.

  16. Financial, operational issues entangle Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Kalkhof, C J

    1992-08-01

    Federal and state governments may soon require provision of managed care to the Medicaid eligible segment of the community. HMO financial managers must develop financial and operational plans prior to entering into negotiations for the development of a contract with a state. Key financial and operational issues related to Medicaid aid categories, contracting with providers, general administration, and product design must be addressed to minimize financial risk.

  17. Why the tobacco industry fears the passive smoking issue.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S; Borland, R; Hill, D; Owen, N; Woodward, S

    1990-01-01

    The tobacco industry has identified the passive smoking issue as the single most important problem confronting its economic future. During the 1980s, the industry has been engaged in an elaborate and expensive international campaign seeking to refute the evidence against passive smoking's effects on health and to position the issue as one essentially concerned with civil liberties and smokers' "rights." There are three main reasons for the industry's concern: first, the passive smoking issue allows a widening of the definition of smoking beyond its discussion as a personal habit, legitimizing it as a social problem; second, successful cases of litigation against employers by workers with histories of chronic exposure to environmental tobacco smoke have created an industrial climate of concern leading to workplace smoking restrictions and bans, and third, the proliferation of smoking restrictions reduces smoking opportunities and thus reduces total cigarette consumption and hence financial returns to the industry. Based on the results of a large Australian study of a workplace smoking ban, an estimated 654.88 million cigarettes with a retail value of $A6,549 thousand would be forgone annually in Australia alone if 50 percent of white-collar worksites were to ban smoking. Finally, the passive smoking issue can be considered a Trojan horse to its less discussed effects: the reduced morbidity and mortality likely to result in smokers from the significant reductions in smoking frequency that occur with the proliferation of smoking restrictions introduced in the name of concern for the health of nonsmokers. PMID:2384286

  18. Local Area Network Management: An Unresolved Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howden, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of management issues involved with local area networks (LAN) among information organizations focuses on a project at the University of North Texas that was designed to investigate problems associated with LAN. Topics discussed include purchasing decisions for hardware and software, and integration among various groups of users. (Eight…

  19. Codes of practice and related issues in biomedical waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, D.; Watt, C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the development of a National Code of Practice for biomedical waste management in Australia. The 10 key areas addressed by the code are industry mission statement; uniform terms and definitions; community relations - public perceptions and right to know; generation, source separation, and handling; storage requirements; transportation; treatment and disposal; disposal of solid and liquid residues and air emissions; occupational health and safety; staff awareness and education. A comparison with other industry codes in Australia is made. A list of outstanding issues is also provided; these include the development of standard containers, treatment effectiveness, and reusable sharps containers.

  20. Air quality assessment and management: Local and regional issues. Current issue paper number 23

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, L.

    1998-12-31

    This paper provides and overview of the assessment and management of air quality in Ontario, with an emphasis on local and regional air quality rather than continental or global concerns such as acid rain and long-range transport of contaminants. It outlines some of the ways in which air quality is monitored in the province and describes some policy issues identified by experts and stakeholders. Sections of the paper cover the following: Ambient air quality monitoring; control of vehicle emissions; regulation and monitoring of industrial emissions; and the incorporation of local airshed management units in provincial regulations.

  1. University-Industry Research Agreements: Major Negotiation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Stephen

    1985-01-01

    Three categories of issues about which universities and industry often differ in research agreements are discussed: (1) major philosophical differences between universities and for-profit organizations; (2) complex intellectual property law and regulations of such forms as computer software and biological materials; and (3) differences in drafting…

  2. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  3. Enrollment Management & the Enrollment Industry: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author begins to examine the connections between institutional enrollment management efforts and the various external for-profit, and not-for-profit, businesses that have become part of the enrollment management industry. This essay is an effort to map the relationships between institutions, the enrollment industry, and more…

  4. [Emerging issues concerning hygiene in the Russian aluminum industry].

    PubMed

    Roslyĭ, O F; Gurvich, V B; Plotko, É G; Kuz'min, S V; Fedoruk, A A; Roslaia, N A; Iarushin, S V; Kuz'min, D V

    2012-01-01

    In this study the data of multiyear investigations of occupational and environmental hazards at different enterprises of the Russian aluminum industry are presented. Basing on these data, we have been elaborated the algorithm and methodological approaches on management of the occupational and ecology-related risks using hygienic safety criteria, risk evaluation technique, epidemiological and economic analysis.

  5. EPA issues draft general permits for industrial stormwater discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    EPA on Nov. 16, 1990, issued stormwater discharge regulations associated with industrial activity'' under the authority of CWA's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Those regulations established NPDES permit application requirements for industrial and certain municipal separate stormwater discharge systems. Three permit application options were made available for industrial stormwater discharges -- filing an individual application, becoming a participant in a group application or filing a notice of intent to be covered under a general permit and its requirements. The Agency of Nov. 19 proposed a draft general permit for group applications. Industrial dischargers choosing the group option previously were required to file in two parts. Part 1 was due by Sept. 30, 1991, and Part 2 was due by Oct. 1, 1992. The proposed permit would apply to industrial facilities, including certain Indian lands, in selected areas of EPA Regions I, II, III, IV, VI, VIII, IX and X. The permit would cover industrial stormwater discharges to US waters, and would include discharges transmitted through large, medium-sized and other municipal separate storm sewer systems.

  6. Taste and odour issues in South Korea's drinking water industry.

    PubMed

    Bae, B U; Shin, H S; Choi, J J

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews taste and odour (T&O) issues of South Korea's water industry. For this purpose, an overview of the water supply systems and drinking water standards is presented and some results from citizen surveys for customer satisfaction are included. A case study is presented in which the water intake was shifted from inside a main reservoir to a downstream location due to T&O problems. It is true that the South Korean water industry has long relied on the tolerance of consumers for periodic T&O events. Recently the South Korean water industry has become aware that the T&O problems are at the centre of consumers' concerns and has taken several positive approaches. These include monitoring T&O events using sensory and instrumental methods, installation of a baffled-channel PAC contactor and application of advanced water treatment processes.

  7. Strategic Issues in University Information Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosendaal, Hans E.

    This chapter represents a specific view on university management. It sequentially discusses different organizational levels of e-teaching, starting with general management, e-science developments and what this means to universities, and business models followed by focusing on specific teaching issues. The chapter sets out to discuss the development of the university from a loose federation of faculties into a more integrated university, such as, e.g., an entrepreneurial university. This development is also driven by the introduction of the bachelors/masters system - a process which leads to the need for an institutional strategy introducing institutional quality management and has to be accompanied by the independent accreditation of research and teaching. Applying the model of strategic positioning to the university as a whole leads to the introduction of the university entrepreneur. The model is used to describe structural issues and the relations between the primary processes of research and teaching with the secondary processes. e-science is introduced as a further step toward the universal sharing of scientific results and to analyze the kind of incentives that will be required to attain this goal of making information an even more integral part of the research and teaching process.

  8. Road safety issues for bus transport management.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, Salvatore; Di Graziano, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppina

    2013-11-01

    Because of the low percentage of crashes involving buses and the assumption that public transport improves road safety by reducing vehicular traffic, public interest in bus safety is not as great as that in the safety of other types of vehicles. It is possible that less attention is paid to the significance of crashes involving buses because the safety level of bus systems is considered to be adequate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of bus managers with respect to safety issues and the potential effectiveness of various technologies in achieving higher safety standards. Bus managers were asked to give their opinions on safety issues related to drivers (training, skills, performance evaluation and behaviour), vehicles (maintenance and advanced devices) and roads (road and traffic safety issues) in response to a research survey. Kendall's algorithm was used to evaluate the level of concordance. The results showed that the majority of the proposed items were considered to have great potential for improving bus safety. The data indicated that in the experience of the participants, passenger unloading and pedestrians crossing near bus stops are the most dangerous actions with respect to vulnerable users. The final results of the investigation showed that start inhibition, automatic door opening, and the materials and internal architecture of buses were considered the items most strongly related to bus passenger safety. Brake assistance and vehicle monitoring systems were also considered to be very effective. With the exception of driver assistance systems for passenger and pedestrian safety, the perceptions of the importance of other driver assistance systems for vehicle monitoring and bus safety were not unanimous among the bus company managers who participated in this survey. The study results showed that the introduction of new technologies is perceived as an important factor in improving bus safety, but a better understanding

  9. Road safety issues for bus transport management.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, Salvatore; Di Graziano, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppina

    2013-11-01

    Because of the low percentage of crashes involving buses and the assumption that public transport improves road safety by reducing vehicular traffic, public interest in bus safety is not as great as that in the safety of other types of vehicles. It is possible that less attention is paid to the significance of crashes involving buses because the safety level of bus systems is considered to be adequate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of bus managers with respect to safety issues and the potential effectiveness of various technologies in achieving higher safety standards. Bus managers were asked to give their opinions on safety issues related to drivers (training, skills, performance evaluation and behaviour), vehicles (maintenance and advanced devices) and roads (road and traffic safety issues) in response to a research survey. Kendall's algorithm was used to evaluate the level of concordance. The results showed that the majority of the proposed items were considered to have great potential for improving bus safety. The data indicated that in the experience of the participants, passenger unloading and pedestrians crossing near bus stops are the most dangerous actions with respect to vulnerable users. The final results of the investigation showed that start inhibition, automatic door opening, and the materials and internal architecture of buses were considered the items most strongly related to bus passenger safety. Brake assistance and vehicle monitoring systems were also considered to be very effective. With the exception of driver assistance systems for passenger and pedestrian safety, the perceptions of the importance of other driver assistance systems for vehicle monitoring and bus safety were not unanimous among the bus company managers who participated in this survey. The study results showed that the introduction of new technologies is perceived as an important factor in improving bus safety, but a better understanding

  10. Measles: pathology, management and public health issues.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Jackie; Rouse, Jo; Pinfield, Jenny

    2014-05-27

    Measles is a highly contagious viral disease that continues to occur in epidemics in the UK despite efforts to eradicate it. In the acute stage, measles is associated with several complications including otitis media, but some of the most severe consequences of the disease occur months and even years after the initial infection. Worldwide, measles contributes significantly to deaths in childhood and places an additional burden on families already living with the consequence of poverty and conflict. This article aims to develop the reader's understanding of measles, including its pathophysiology, management and associated public health issues.

  11. Recognizing and managing boundary issues in case management.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J

    2000-01-01

    Much of the literature on worker-client boundaries in clinical practice is based on assumptions that the relationship between the two parties is structured and formal. These assumptions do not always apply in community-based case management practice, where the worker and client interact in a wide variety of settings and circumstances. The relative informality of case management makes the establishment of appropriate worker-client boundaries both critical and difficult. In this article key principles for recognizing and managing boundary issues are presented and discussed. PMID:11107659

  12. [Health services waste management: a biosafety issue].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Leila Posenato; Zanetti-Ramos, Betina Giehl

    2004-01-01

    The subject of "health services waste" is controversial and widely discussed. Biosafety, the principles of which include safeguarding occupational health, community health, and environmental safety, is directly involved in the issue of medical waste management. There are controversies as to the risks posed by medical waste, as evidenced by diverging opinions among authors: some advocate severe approaches on the basis that medical waste is hazardous, while others contend that the potential for infection from medical waste is nonexistent. The Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has published resolution RDC 33/2003 to standardize medical waste management nationwide. There is an evident need to implement biosafety procedures in this area, including heath care workers' training and provision of information to the general population.

  13. 75 FR 39091 - RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC... Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC)....

  14. 75 FR 61552 - RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC... Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC) SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC) DATES:...

  15. 75 FR 27618 - RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC... Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC)....

  16. Key issues for sustainable urban stormwater management.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A E; Fernandes, J N; David, L M

    2012-12-15

    Since ancient times, it is understood that stormwater from constructed areas should be managed somehow. Waste and pollution transported by stormwater poses quantity and quality problems, affecting public health and the quality of the environment. Sanitation infrastructures in urbanized regions have different development levels and the perception of stormwater changed considerably during the centuries and especially in recent years. Still, there is an evident worldwide heterogeneity when analyzing the lack of studies on urban stormwater conducted in some Asian or African countries. Strategies for sustainable stormwater management are needed at different decision levels (political, regional or local scale, for instance) but all of them need information and a clear understanding of the possibilities that are at stake as well as the main consequences of each decision. A sound approach to stormwater management should be flexible, based on local characteristics, and should take into consideration temporal, spatial and administrative factors and law, among other issues. Economic or technical constraints define different decision scenarios. Best Management Practices should be seen as an opportunity for development and improvement of social, educational and environmental conditions in urbanized and surrounding areas. Therefore they require an ample perspective and the participation of different stakeholders. High-quality decision needs time and a fair overview of the problem: the purpose of this document is to contribute to sustainable stormwater management, informing on the most relevant factors that should be assessed and their interaction. A flowchart has been produced and is presented, indicating the most relevant steps, processes and information that should be taken into account in urban development.

  17. North American migratory bird management issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.H.; Ryan, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    As human population and industry have grown in North America, land-use practices have greatly altered the landscape. As a result of this changed landscape, several migratory bird populations have declined in recent years. For waterbirds, there have been several milestones: the 1986 North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) and the 1989 North American Wetlands Conservation Act. As a result, the United States and Canada have established 12 habitat and 2 species joint ventures. The primary emphasis of waterfowl management in Canada-U.S. has been land purchase and lease, wetland restoration, and coordination of harvest rates. Because of its different biological and cultural context, Mexico has established other conservation priorities. Mexico has had a long-standing concern to conserve its biodiversity and, in addition, conservation of Mexican resources goes hand in hand with human community development. Unlike Canada-U.S., wetland conservation projects in'Mexico include information gathering, environmental education, and management planning for its 32 priority wetlands. For migratory landbirds' scientists attribute declines in several migrant populations to forest fragmentation on the breeding grounds, deforestation on the wintering grounds, pesticide poisoning, or the cumulative effects of habitat changes. In 1990, the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Program, commonly known as Partners in Flight-Aves de las Americas-was initiated. The next step that is being proposed is the formation of a habitat conservation plan for landbirds modeled after the NAWMP. Management of migratory birds requires a strong international approach in order to coordinate actions for the benefit of migratory birds, their habitats, and the uses they provide.

  18. How technology transfer issues are managed

    SciTech Connect

    Sink, C.H.; Easley, K.R.

    1991-12-31

    In 1989, Secretary of Energy James Watkins made a commitment to accelerate DOE compliance with all applicable laws and standards aimed at protecting human health and the environment. At a minimum, this pledge requires the remediation of the 1989 inventory of chemical, radioactive, and mixed wastes at DOE production sites by 2019. The 1989 Complex inventory consisted of more than 3,700 sites, encompassing more than 26,000 acres contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In addition, over 500 surplus sites are awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties have contaminated soils (e.g., uranium tailings). Moreover, these problems exist at both inactive sites, where the primary focus is on environmental restoration, and at active sites, where the major emphasis is on improved waste management techniques. Although some of DOE`s problems are considered unique due to radioactivity, most forms of contamination resident in the Complex are not; rather, contaminants such as waste chemicals (e.g., inorganics), organics (e.g., fuels and solvents), halogenated organics (e.g., PCBs) and heavy metals commonly result in conventional industrial processes. Although certain other forms of contamination are more unique to DOE operations (e.g., radioactive materials, explosives, and pyrophorics), they are not exclusive to DOE. As DOE develops innovative solutions to these and related waste problems, it is imperative that technology systems and lessons learned be transferred from DOE sites and its R and D laboratories to private industry to maximize the nation`s return on environmental management technology investments.

  19. Disability Management in Industry: A Joint Labor-Management Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruyere, Susanne M.; Shrey, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews impact of labor relations on employee disability and subsequent work disruptions. Model disability management programs illustrating joint support by labor and management are reviewed. Key features of these cooperative industry-based programs are presented, with implications for rehabilitation practice in disability management service…

  20. International trade and waste and fuel management issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Innovative financing and workforce planning, by Donna Jacobs, Entergy Nuclear; Nuclear power - a long-term need, by John C. Devine, Gerald Goldsmith and Michael DeLallo, WorleyParsons; Importance of loan guarantee program, by Donald Hintz; EPC contracts for new plants, by Dave Barry, Shaw Power Group; GNEP and fuel recycling, by Alan Hanson, AREVA NC Inc.; Safe and reliable reactor, by Kiyoshi Yamauchi, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.; Safe, small and simple reactors, by Yoshi Sakashita, Toshiba Corporation; Nuclear power in Thailand, by Tatchai Sumitra, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology; and, Nuclear power in Vietnam, by Tran Huu Phat, Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission. The Industry Innovation article this issue is Rectifying axial-offset-anomaly problems, by Don Adams, Tennessee Valley Authority. The Plant Profile article is Star of Stars Excellence, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.

  1. Performance issues for a changing electric power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    Extremely cold weather created record demands for electricity in the eastern two-thirds of the United States during the week of January 16, 1994. Fuel-related problems, mostly the result of transportation constraints resulting from ice accumulation on roads and water-ways, and unexpected generating capacity outages at utilities and nonutilities resulted in demand not being met. Some utilities asked nonessential customers along with State governments and a portion of the Federal Government to shut down. Two electric control areas, the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection (PJM) and Virginia Electric & Power Company (VEPCO), instituted rolling blackouts. This disturbance was reported widely in the press and, along with other disturbances, peaked renewed interest in the reliability of the electric power system. The renewed interest in reliability has coincided with substantial changes that are beginning to occur in the structure and competitiveness of the electric power industry. Juxtaposing the question of reliability and the issue of changing industry structure leads to the central concern of this report: What effect, if any, will the changing structure of the industry have on the reliability of the system?

  2. Managing risks and hazardous in industrial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Almaula, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate that it makes good business sense to identify risks and hazards of an operation and take appropriate steps to manage them effectively. Developing and implementing an effective risk and hazard management plan also contibutes to other industry requirements and standards. Development of a risk management system, key elements of a risk management plan, and hazards and risk analysis methods are outlined. Comparing potential risk to the cost of prevention is also discussed. It is estimated that the cost of developing and preparing the first risk management plan varies between $50,000 to $200,000. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Health and safety issues relating to Maine's fishing industry.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Allison P; Roy, Joyce; Stacey-Scott, Norma; Joy, Joanne E A; Bogdan, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The Maine Agricultural Safety and Health Program performed a needs assessment to determine the health and safety concerns of Maine's fishing community. Information for the assessment was obtained from clinicians, focus groups of wives of fishers, and government agencies. Reports from the United States Coast Guard showed that during 1993-1994, sixty-five people were injured on commercial fishing vessels and eight people died. Decompression illness was the most frequently reported non-fatal injury (n = 15). Chronic injuries reported by clinicians included back pain, tendinitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, dysbaric osteonecrosis. Clinicians and family members were also concerned about hand and arm infections from the bait and sun exposure. Family health issues and access to care are addressed in the report. Recommendations include, in part, increasing surveillance, reducing barriers to access, increasing clinicians' knowledge about the fishing industry, and fostering collaboration between agencies providing health and safety information to fishers.

  4. Ethical Issues in Managed Care: Perspectives in Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belar, Cynthia D.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a reaction to Cooper and Gottlieb's (this issue) article titled, "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Challenges that many issues addressed by Cooper and Gottlieb have been longstanding in the profession. Argues against the belief that the managed care environment is fraught with more ethical…

  5. 26 CFR 1.103-10 - Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption for certain small issues of industrial... Income § 1.103-10 Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds. (a) In general... “exempt small issues”) and bonds issued to refund certain issues (referred to in this section as...

  6. 26 CFR 1.103-10 - Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption for certain small issues of industrial... Income § 1.103-10 Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds. (a) In general... “exempt small issues”) and bonds issued to refund certain issues (referred to in this section as...

  7. 26 CFR 1.103-10 - Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption for certain small issues of industrial... Income § 1.103-10 Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds. (a) In general... “exempt small issues”) and bonds issued to refund certain issues (referred to in this section as...

  8. 26 CFR 1.103-10 - Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption for certain small issues of industrial... Income § 1.103-10 Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds. (a) In general... “exempt small issues”) and bonds issued to refund certain issues (referred to in this section as...

  9. 26 CFR 1.103-10 - Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exemption for certain small issues of industrial... Income § 1.103-10 Exemption for certain small issues of industrial development bonds. (a) In general... “exempt small issues”) and bonds issued to refund certain issues (referred to in this section as...

  10. Current Situation and Issue of Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Inah; Rhie, Jeongbae; Yoon, Jo-Duk; Kim, Jinsoo

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI) has a history of about 50 yr, and is the oldest social insurance system in Korea. After more than 20 times of revision improvements in benefits, its contents and claim systems have been upgraded. It became the protector of injured workers and their families, and at the same time became the system which could cope with both financial burden of employers and their responsibilities. However, there are some issues to be reformed to upgrade the IACI: 1) the problems in the approval system of occupational diseases, 2) quality improvement of workers' compensation medical care, 3) vocational rehabilitation and return to work, 4) workers' compensation premiums and out-of-pocket money of injured workers, 5) issues in application of IACI. Growth of IACI cannot be achieved by an effort of an individual. Efforts by workers, owners, and government, in addition to physicians and welfare professionals toward the same goal are required for the next level improvement of IACI. PMID:22661871

  11. From industrial safety to corporate health management.

    PubMed

    Zink, K J

    2005-04-15

    Occupational health and safety is one of the most important topics of ergonomics. In many countries the practical issues are addressed in worker protection laws or rules and most companies have some sort of occupational health and safety system. As with many other ergonomics approaches, such activities are often necessary because of legal requirements. Such efforts are often viewed by management as primarily cost intensive. To change this image, it would be helpful to have a more positive, management-oriented approach. Corporate health management as a module of an integrated management system can fulfil this goal.

  12. Relationship between time management in construction industry and project management performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Najuwa; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, construction industry particularly in Malaysia struggle in achieving status of eminent time management for construction project. Project managers have a great responsibility to keep the project success under time of project completion. However, studies shows that delays especially in Malaysian construction industry still unresolved due to weakness in managing the project. In addition, quality of time management on construction projects is generally poor. Due to the progressively extended delays issue, time performance becomes an important subject to be explored to investigate delay factors. The method of this study is review of literature towards issues in construction industry which affecting time performance of project in general by focusing towards process involved for project management. Based on study, it was found that knowledge, commitment, cooperation are the main criteria as an overall to manage the project into a smooth process during project execution until completion. It can be concluded that, the strength between project manager and team members in these main criteria while conducting the project towards good time performance is highly needed. However, there is lack of establishment towards factors of poor time performance which strongly related with project management. Hence, this study has been conducted to establish factors of poor time performance and its relations with project management.

  13. Effective executive management in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hoang; Kleiner, Brian H

    2005-01-01

    Along with the boom in information technology and vast development in genomic and proteomic discoveries, the pharmaceutical and biotech industries have been provided the means and tools to create a new page in medicinal history. They are now able to alter the classic ways to cure complex diseases thanks to the completion of the human genome project. To be able to compete in this industry, pharmaceutical management has to be effective not only internally but also externally in socially acceptable conduct. The first department that requires focus is marketing and sales. As the main driving force to increase revenues and profits, marketing and sales employees should be highly motivated by compensation. Also, customer relationships should be maintained for long-term gain. As important as marketing, research and development requires the financial support as well as the critical decision making to further expand the product pipeline. Similarly, finance and technologies should be adequately monitored and invested to provide support as well as prepare for future expansion. On top of that, manufacturing processes and operations are operated per quality systems and FDA guidelines to ensure high quality. Human Resources, on the other hand, should carry the managing and motivation from upper management through systematic recruitment, adequate training, and fair compensation. Moreover, effective management in a pharmaceutical would also require the social welfare and charity to help patients who cannot afford the treatment as well as improving the organization's image. Last but not least, the management should also prepare for the globalization of the industry. Inevitably, large pharmaceutical companies are merging with each other or acquiring smaller companies to enhance the competitive advantages as well as expand their product mix. For effectiveness in a pharmaceutical industry, management should focus more than just the daily routine tasks and short-term goals. Rather, they

  14. Effective executive management in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hoang; Kleiner, Brian H

    2005-01-01

    Along with the boom in information technology and vast development in genomic and proteomic discoveries, the pharmaceutical and biotech industries have been provided the means and tools to create a new page in medicinal history. They are now able to alter the classic ways to cure complex diseases thanks to the completion of the human genome project. To be able to compete in this industry, pharmaceutical management has to be effective not only internally but also externally in socially acceptable conduct. The first department that requires focus is marketing and sales. As the main driving force to increase revenues and profits, marketing and sales employees should be highly motivated by compensation. Also, customer relationships should be maintained for long-term gain. As important as marketing, research and development requires the financial support as well as the critical decision making to further expand the product pipeline. Similarly, finance and technologies should be adequately monitored and invested to provide support as well as prepare for future expansion. On top of that, manufacturing processes and operations are operated per quality systems and FDA guidelines to ensure high quality. Human Resources, on the other hand, should carry the managing and motivation from upper management through systematic recruitment, adequate training, and fair compensation. Moreover, effective management in a pharmaceutical would also require the social welfare and charity to help patients who cannot afford the treatment as well as improving the organization's image. Last but not least, the management should also prepare for the globalization of the industry. Inevitably, large pharmaceutical companies are merging with each other or acquiring smaller companies to enhance the competitive advantages as well as expand their product mix. For effectiveness in a pharmaceutical industry, management should focus more than just the daily routine tasks and short-term goals. Rather, they

  15. UW-Stout's Bachelor's in Industrial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmann, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management (BSIM) was designed for technical college graduates with work experience because the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) recognized a need among adult students with technical college degrees. The program was developed to provide these students with an opportunity to earn baccalaureate degrees…

  16. Risk Management Issues - An Aerospace Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2011-01-01

    Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks--risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements.. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner, Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  17. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This volume is the third in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the attitude of the program manager, program control and performance measurement, risk management, cost plus award fee contracting, lessons learned from the development of the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS), small projects management, and age distribution of NASA scientists and engineers. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  18. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This volume is the eighth in an ongoing series addressing current topics and lessons learned in NASA program and project management. Articles in this volume cover the following topics: (1) power sources for the Galileo and Ulysses Missions; (2) managing requirements; (3) program control of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission; (4) project management method; (5) career development for project managers; and (6) resources for NASA managers.

  19. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This volume is the third in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the attitude of the program manager, program control and performance measurement, risk management, cost plus award fee contracting, lessons learned from the development of the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS), small projects management, and age distribution of NASA scientists and engineers. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  20. Industrial Accidents Triggered by Natural Hazards: an Emerging Risk Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Basco, Anna; Salzano, Ernesto; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-05-01

    Natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, flooding or hurricanes have recently and dramatically hit several countries worldwide. Both direct and indirect consequences involved the population, causing on the one hand a high number of fatalities and on the other hand so relevant economical losses that the national gross product may be affected for many years. Loss of critical industrial infrastructures (electricity generation and distribution, gas pipelines, oil refineries, etc.) also occurred, causing further indirect damage to the population. In several cases, accident scenarios with large releases of hazardous materials were triggered by these natural events, causing so-called "Natech events", in which the overall damage resulted from the simultaneous consequences of the natural event and of the release of hazardous substances. Toxic releases, large fires and explosions, as well as possible long-term environmental pollution, economical losses, and overloading of emergency systems were recognised by post-event studies as the main issues of these Natech scenarios. In recent years the increasing frequency and severity of some natural hazards due to climate change has slowly increased the awareness of Natech risk as an emerging risk among the stakeholders. Indeed, the iNTeg-Risk project, co-funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Program specifically addresses these scenarios among new technological issues on public safety. The present study, in part carried out within the iNTeg-Risk project, was aimed at the analysis and further development of methods and tools for the assessment and mitigation of Natech accidents. Available tools and knowledge gaps in the assessment of Natech scenarios were highlighted. The analysis mainly addressed the potential impact of flood, lightning and earthquake events on industrial installations where hazardous substances are present. Preliminary screening methodologies and more detailed methods based on

  1. Transition costs in the electricity industry: A summary of issues

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.; Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

    1996-10-01

    Progress is evident as the restructuring debate in the U.S. electricity industry completes its third year. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission released a final rule on transmission open access-a key element to facilitate more efficient wholesale markets. The majority of states have initiated investigations or discussions on restructuring retail markets. Yet hurdles remain in formulating and implementing state-level restructuring proposals. Perhaps foremost among these hurdles is the issue of transition costs (the potential monetary losses experienced by utilities, consumers, and other economic actors as a result of government initiatives to transform electricity generation from a regulated to a competitive market). Transition costs are approximately equal to the difference between the embedded cost for generation services under traditional cost-of-service regulation and the competitive-market price for power. When government takes action to open current monopoly franchises to multiple generation providers and the competitive-market price falls below embedded generation costs, then transition costs will arise. Transition costs will include one or more of the following four classes of costs: (1) assets, primarily utility-owned power plants; (2) liabilities, primarily long-term power-purchase and fuel-supply contracts; (3) regulatory assets, including deferred expenses and costs that regulators allow utilities to place on their balance sheets; and (4) public-policy programs, such as energy efficiency, low-income programs, and research and development. What is at issue in the transition-cost debate? The debate turns on four questions: (1) How large are the potential transition costs from restructuring? (2) How are these costs estimated? (3) What, if anything, might be done to address these costs? (4) Who will ultimately pay for any remaining costs and how? This paper summarizes some of the key results from a project at ORNL that addresses these four questions.

  2. Issues in natural resources management in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Thapa, G B; Weber, K E

    1994-05-01

    The use and management of public and private natural resources is greatly affected by institutional, politicoeconomic, and socioeconomic factors. These factors operate in tandem at the household, regional, national, and international levels in affecting resource management. Any policy that focuses only on one dimension of the problem, such as population growth, and ignores such issues as poverty, environmentally unsuitable cropping systems, and the unavailability of nonfarm employment opportunities will be inadequate. National policies must consider structural factors: resource use, property rights regimes, poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, and population growth. A comprehensive strategy should account for these structural features, be tailored to regional circumstances, and have the input of local governments. Local governments and communities must be in a position to implement and monitor resource management. Hardin identified common property as a major contributor to land degradation and declining forest resources in developing countries. Only with a common agreement by the community to invest in planting trees and managing pastures can communal lands benefit multiple users in the long and short run. Social forestry projects have failed due to poor community participation, fragmented communities, poor social organization, and disputes over the distribution of profits. Traditional communal hunting and gathering activities adhered to institutional regulation; with the inception of urbanization, industrialization, and monetization of agriculture, the destruction of forests and pasture began. There was an increased need for food for the urban population; a small and powerful group of politicians, social leaders, and administrators retained access to public or "crown" lands and disenfranchised small and marginal farmers and the landless poor from previously accessible lands. Land redistribution schemes have not effectively distributed land resources. Commercial

  3. Government and Industry Issues for Expanding Commercial Markets into Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, the Foresight and Governance Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C, organized a "Global Foresight Workshop" in partnership with NASA and in cooperation with other Federal Agencies to provide integrated consideration of broad challenges for the 2lst century. Many long-range goals for the nation were discussed and selected, among them were space related goals of interest to NASA. During much of the Agency's history, NASA advanced studies have focused consistently on the challenges of science-driven space exploration and operations. However, workshop findings indicate little interest in these goals unless they can also solve national and global issues. Many technologies and space development studies indicate great potential to enable new, important commercial markets in space that could address the many global challenges facing America in this century. But communication of these ideas are lacking. In conclusion, it appears that the commercial development of space could have broad implications on many impending problems, including energy resources, environmental impact, and climate changes. The challenge will be to develop a consistent coordinated effort among the many industries and Agencies that should be involved in opening this new frontier for these new commercial markets.

  4. Industrial ecology: an emerging management science.

    PubMed Central

    Piasecki, B

    1992-01-01

    Pollution is a complex equation, compounded by population, rate of consumption, and toxic emissions per unit of resource consumed. This article defines industrial ecology as a management science that focuses a corporation's expertise on the third variable. Thus, industrial ecology is involved with changing the efficiency of machines, not just changing the law or a firm's compliance strategy. This article also explores how this emphasis allows a profoundly different orientation than the end-of-the-pipe regulatory approach of the last 20 yr. PMID:11607271

  5. A view of software management issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manley, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Software Development Environment (SDE) Panel addressed key programmatic, scope, and structural issues raised by its members and the general audience regarding the proposed software development environment for the Space Station program. The general team approach taken by this group led to a consensus on 18 recommendations to NASA mangament regarding the acquisition and definition of the SDE. This approach was keyed by the initial issues presentation given to the general audience. Additional issues (for a total of 23) were developed by the panelists in their first closed session from which key areas were selected and discussed in open session. These discussions led to key recommendations which are summarized and described.

  6. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This volume is the fifth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover: an overview of the project cycle; SE&I management for manned space flight programs; shared experiences from NASA Programs and Projects - 1975; cost control for Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973; and the Space Shuttle - a balancing of design and politics. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  7. Ocean Sustainability Issues Are Focus of Industry Gathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-05-01

    How can industry operate in the oceans sustainably? Is there a broadly agreed upon definition of sustainability? How can industry and others deal with conflicting uses in the oceans? These were among the questions explored at a recent ocean industry leadership conference that brought together several hundred participants from business, nongovernmental organizations, and governments from around the world.

  8. Hunting and Wildlife Management. Issue Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, three lesson plans, student data sheets, and a poster. The overview discusses hunting as a tool for wildlife management, the management of wildlife populations and hunter participation in providing research data, and the…

  9. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor); Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the ninth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover evolution of NASA cost estimating; SAM 2; National Space Science Program: strategies to maximize science return; and human needs, motivation, and results of the NASA culture surveys. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  10. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This volume is the sixth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover evolution of NASA cost estimating; SAM 2; National Space Science Program: strategies to maximize science return; and human needs, motivation, and results of the NASA culture surveys. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  11. Chronic pain management: legal and licensure issues.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Legal and licensure issues are an inevitable aspect of treating patients with chronic pain. Clinicians need to ensure compliance with state medical board and federal guidelines. Prescription drug abuse continues to be a significant problem. Despite the legalization of medical marijuana in some states, there is currently no medical indication for prescribing marijuana; the exceptions are dronabinol and nabilone. These are approved by the Food and Drug Administration for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, and dronabinol also is approved for anorexia in patients with AIDS or cancer. Other legal issues concern establishment of chronic pain as a basis for disability status. Clinicians often are asked to provide a letter or assessment, such as a functional capacity evaluation, for documenting disability. Referral to a physical medicine and rehabilitation subspecialist or physical therapist for this evaluation should be considered. Balancing legal and licensure issues with the best interests of the patient can be challenging for clinicians. PMID:25970871

  12. Management of waste from stone processing industry.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, K; Joseph, Kurian

    2007-10-01

    Characteristics of waste generated in stone processing industries, impact of its current disposal practices and waste recycling potential were assessed by field studies. The physical and chemical characteristics of waste are comparable to construction materials like sand and cement. The environmental issues due to the disposal of waste including that on ambient air quality were identified at respective disposal sites. It was found that the waste can be used to replace about 60% of sand and 10% of cement in concrete. Similarly the waste can replace 40% of clay in clay bricks with affecting its compressive strength.

  13. Exploring new issues for coastal lagoons monitoring and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; De Wit, Rutger

    2012-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are productive and highly vulnerable ecosystems, but their management is still problematic mostly because they constitute transitional interface between terrestrial and marine domains. The "4th European Conference on Coastal Lagoon Research - Research and Management for the conservation of coastal lagoon ecosystems, South North comparisons", was focused on the scientific research on coastal lagoons and the management for their conservation and sustainable use. Selected contributions were considered in this special issue of Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science "Research and Management for the conservation of coastal lagoon ecosystems" as they deal with three important aspects for coastal lagoons management: (1) the design of monitoring programmes using biological compartments, (2) the ecosystem functioning and the impacts of perturbations and (3) ecosystem trajectories particularly after ecosystem restoration. Here we introduce the selected papers published in this issue, place these contributions in the perspective of the science-management interface and discuss new issues for coastal lagoon management.

  14. 14 CFR 91.1014 - Issuing or denying management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1014 Issuing or denying management specifications. (a) A person... manager on behalf of the fractional owners if, after investigation, the Administrator finds that the... equipped in accordance with the requirements of this chapter and is able to conduct safe operations...

  15. Ethical issues in the diagnosis and management of fetal disorders.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Ruth; Childs, Richardo

    2012-10-01

    The ethics of diagnosis and management of fetal genetic disorders are particularly controversial because of the contested status of the fetus and perceptions of genetics. An additional complicating factor is the potential conflict between mother and fetus. Ethical issues in diagnosis include the nature and purpose of the diagnosis itself, and management of the information. Management of the disorder includes issues of termination as an option, and the emerging field of fetal gene therapy with associated issues of somatic versus germ-line interventions. PMID:22901734

  16. Managing Colleges and Universities: Issues for Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.; Summers, Randal W., Ed.

    This collection of papers highlights topics relating to leadership in higher education. After a "Foreword" (Dean L. Hubbard) and "Introduction" (Allan M. Hoffman and Randal W. Summers), the 12 chapters are: (1) "Organizational Structure, Management, and Leadership for the Future" (Richard Alfred and Scott Rosevear); (2) "The Practitioner's…

  17. Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: management issues.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome represent two of the most commonly encountered functional somatic syndromes in clinical practice. Both have been contentious diagnoses in the past, and this diagnostic dispute has resulted in a therapeutic nihilism that has been of great detriment to their management and to alleviation of the intense suffering and disability that they have caused their innumerable sufferers. A new age has dawned in terms of a better understanding of these syndromes' physiology and improved approaches to their management. Here, the diagnosis and management of these closely related disorders are discussed, with particular reference to the recent empirical evidence that has come to light as a consequence of neurophysiological insights and robustly designed randomised clinical trials. Much work remains to be done in this vein, but we are better placed to facilitate recovery from these disorders than we have been previously. Whilst remission should always be a goal, complete symptom resolution is not the norm, but 'moderate' improvements are certainly attainable with appropriate management. PMID:25832515

  18. Somerville Charter School: Management Issues and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Office of the Inspector General, Boston.

    Somerville Charter School was among 24 Massachusetts charter schools included in a study undertaken by the Office of the Inspector General in March 1998. The office identified weaknesses in the contracting practices, procurement procedures, and financial management of some schools, including Somerville. These weaknesses could undermine the…

  19. Career Management Issues of Female Business Expatriates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selmer, Jan; Leung, Alicia S. M.

    2002-01-01

    Responses to a career management survey from 309 male and 79 female business expatriates revealed that, controlling for demographic differences, females could less often meet their career goals with the corporation. They were less likely to regard expatriation as a useful career move. Explanations were derived from relevant research literature.…

  20. An Empirical Study of Industrial Engineering and Management Curriculum Reform in Fostering Students' Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Kuang; Jiang, Bernard C.; Hsu, Kuang-Yiao

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a creativity-fostering program in industrial engineering and management (IE&M) curriculum reform. Fostering creativity in students has become a crucial issue in industrial engineering education. In a survey of previous studies, we found few on IE&M curriculum reform. In particular, no…

  1. NORM Management in the Oil & Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Michael; Mously, Khalid; Fageeha, Osama; Nassar, Rafat

    2008-08-01

    It has been established that Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) accumulates at various locations along the oil/gas production process. Components such as wellheads, separation vessels, pumps, and other processing equipment can become NORM contaminated, and NORM can accumulate in sludge and other waste media. Improper handling and disposal of NORM contaminated equipment and waste can create a potential radiation hazard to workers and the environment. Saudi Aramco Environmental Protection Department initiated a program to identify the extent, form and level of NORM contamination associated with the company operations. Once identified the challenge of managing operations which had a NORM hazard was addressed in a manner that gave due consideration to workers and environmental protection as well as operations' efficiency and productivity. The benefits of shared knowledge, practice and experience across the oil & gas industry are seen as key to the establishment of common guidance on NORM management. This paper outlines Saudi Aramco's experience in the development of a NORM management strategy and its goals of establishing common guidance throughout the oil and gas industry.

  2. Project Management Software for Distributed Industrial Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrojević, M.; Medjo, B.; Rakin, M.; Sedmak, A.

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a new software solution for project management, intended mainly to use in industrial environment. The main concern of the proposed solution is application in everyday engineering practice in various, mainly distributed industrial companies. Having this in mind, special care has been devoted to development of appropriate tools for tracking, storing and analysis of the information about the project, and in-time delivering to the right team members or other responsible persons. The proposed solution is Internet-based and uses LAMP/WAMP (Linux or Windows - Apache - MySQL - PHP) platform, because of its stability, versatility, open source technology and simple maintenance. Modular structure of the software makes it easy for customization according to client specific needs, with a very short implementation period. Its main advantages are simple usage, quick implementation, easy system maintenance, short training and only basic computer skills needed for operators.

  3. Industrial demand side management: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, M.F.; Conger, R.L.; Foley, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides an overview of and rationale for industrial demand side management (DSM) programs. Benefits and barriers are described, and data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey are used to estimate potential energy savings in kilowatt hours. The report presents types and examples of programs and explores elements of successful programs. Two in-depth case studies (from Boise Cascade and Eli Lilly and Company) illustrate two types of effective DSM programs. Interviews with staff from state public utility commissions indicate the current thinking about the status and future of industrial DSM programs. A comprehensive bibliography is included, technical assistance programs are listed and described, and a methodology for evaluating potential or actual savings from projects is delineated.

  4. Global climate change policy issues related to the movement of industry from developed to rapidly industrializing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Waltemath, L.A.

    1990-10-01

    Global climate change policies adopted by developed countries may encourage industries to move to countries with less restrictive policies. The purpose of this study is to identify policy-driven issues that may result in such a movement. This report (1) summarizes the conclusions of previous studies that have explored the relationship between environmental regulations and industrial movement, (2) identifies and summarizes existing and proposed US global climate change policy options, and (3) discusses issues and topics relating to possible industrial relocation because of the global climate change policy options. It concludes with recommendations for further research. Although federal global climate change policy options are the primary focus of this report, some international and regional efforts addressing this issue are also included. A potential regional industrial migration issue is highlighted. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, D.; Busch, J.; Starrs, T.

    1997-07-01

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  6. Developmental issues in managing children with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savinetti-Rose, B

    1994-01-01

    Children who are newly diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are expected to learn a substantial amount of new information within a few hospital days. It is important for nurses who design lesson plans for the child with IDDM to assess the child's developmental capabilities in relation to the necessary skills required of diabetes management and understand the family influence on the child's ability to perform self-care. PMID:8159478

  7. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  8. PEP Deployment and Bandwidth Management Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younghusband, Charles; Slade, Peter; Weaver, Jeff

    This paper will discuss current deployment scenarios for Performance Enhancement Proxies (PEP) technologies in broadband satellite access systems from the perspective of one PEP technology provider. Recent improvements such as DVB-S2 can provide substantial gains at the link layer. In order to achieve further efficiency gains, the satellite industry is now forced to look elsewhere - namely other layers in the data communications network stack. Satellite terminal manufacturers are now moving beyond basic TCP acceleration techniques to more comprehensive optimization techniques that incorporate advances in data compression and flexibility for more deployment scenarios. Some of the advances for PEP technology are in part due to CPU and memory technology advances, resulting in increasingly affordable access to computing power, allowing PEP manufacturers deliver substantial performance and bandwidth savings gains.

  9. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  10. Usability issues in Learning Management Systems (LMS).

    PubMed

    Muniz, Maria Isabella de Porto Alegre; Moraes, Anamaria de

    2012-01-01

    This project is about the usability of Learning Management Systems (LMS), focusing on the specific case of the open source system Moodle. Specifically, this project is about communication and collaboration tools that are used by teachers on the system. This study investigates whether usability problems hamper the use teachers make of these tools. Focused interviews were conducted with professionals working in distance education and the answers of the respondents were subjected to techniques of content analysis in order to obtain data for developing the tools needed to prove the hypothesis. PMID:22316825

  11. Issues Management: End of First Decade Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert L.; Cousino, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that issues management is a robust contribution to the public relations discipline. Offers additional rationale for empowering public relations practitioners by involving them in strategic planning, making them responsible for issue scanning and monitoring, integrating their advice into standards of corporate social responsibility, and…

  12. Manual control models of industrial management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman, E. R. F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The industrial engineer is often required to design and implement control systems and organization for manufacturing and service facilities, to optimize quality, delivery, and yield, and minimize cost. Despite progress in computer science most such systems still employ human operators and managers as real-time control elements. Manual control theory should therefore be applicable to at least some aspects of industrial system design and operations. Formulation of adequate model structures is an essential prerequisite to progress in this area; since real-world production systems invariably include multilevel and multiloop control, and are implemented by timeshared human effort. A modular structure incorporating certain new types of functional element, has been developed. This forms the basis for analysis of an industrial process operation. In this case it appears that managerial controllers operate in a discrete predictive mode based on fast time modelling, with sampling interval related to plant dynamics. Successive aggregation causes reduced response bandwidth and hence increased sampling interval as a function of level.

  13. Unique patient issues: early interventions and management.

    PubMed

    Combelles, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Patient cases that present with recurring fertilization failure or complete abnormality in either the oocytes or sperm before fertilization are uncommon, yet they are devastating. This review presents several such instances, including oocyte maturation blocks, empty follicle syndrome, oocyte activation failures, defects in sperm phospholipase C isoform ζ, sperm structural anomalies, spontaneous oocyte activation, and unexplained cases. Diagnostic efforts have not only provided insight into possible etiologies but also have helped manage such challenging cases. Interventions may comprise cellular, molecular, or genetic analyses of gametes, as well as functional assays and/or modified treatment strategies. Consequently, infertility professionals can increasingly rely on evidence-based counseling with respect to prognosis and treatment options.

  14. Developing an Intranet: Tool Selection and Management Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, David C.

    1998-01-01

    Moving corporate systems onto an intranet will increase the data traffic within the corporate network, which necessitates a high-quality management process to the intranet. Discusses costs and benefits of adopting an intranet, tool availability and selection criteria, and management issues for developing an intranet. (Author/AEF)

  15. Gender and Management Issues in Education. An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Pat, Ed.; Owen, Patricia, Ed.

    In this book, women in senior educational management positions discuss issues of internationality, management, gender, and education in various developing countries. Contributors examine power relations within organizations; choices men and women make that affect how they plan their lives, education, and careers; and characteristics of men and…

  16. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis: programmatic management issues.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Kumar, A M V; Satyanarayana, S; Lin, Y; Zachariah, R; Lönnroth, K; Kapur, A

    2015-08-01

    In August 2011, the World Health Organization and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched the Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to guide policy makers and implementers in combatting the epidemics of both diseases. Progress has been made, and includes identifying how best to undertake bidirectional screening for both diseases, how to provide optimal treatment and care for patients with dual disease and the most suitable framework for monitoring and evaluation. Key programmatic challenges include the following: whether screening should be directed at all patients or targeted at those with high-risk characteristics; the most suitable technologies for diagnosing TB and diabetes in routine settings; the best time to screen TB patients for DM; how to provide an integrated, coordinated approach to case management; and finally, how to persuade non-communicable disease programmes to adopt a cohort analysis approach, preferably using electronic medical records, for monitoring and evaluation. The link between DM and TB and the implementation of the collaborative framework for care and control have the potential to stimulate and strengthen the scale-up of non-communicable disease care and prevention programmes, which may help in reducing not only the global burden of DM but also the global burden of TB.

  17. Fish and boats: fisheries management issues in Northland.

    PubMed

    Winder, Gordon M; Rees, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand fisheries management has been the focus of a great deal of research, largely because of the early, and very successful, introduction of a neoliberal property regime in the country's commercial fisheries. Less attention has been paid to the other management activities of New Zealand's Ministry of Fisheries. This paper outlines the fisheries management issues arising over the last decade in the region to the north of Auckland and the practices of the Ministry as it worked to address them.

  18. Teacher Education in Industrialized Nations: Issues in Changing Social Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimahara, Nobuo K., Ed; Holowinsky, Ivan Z., Ed.

    The original essays in this book examine reform-related issues in teacher education in Great Britain, Canada, Japan, Ukraine, the United States, and Western Europe. They also review the social context of the teacher, the economics and value of teaching, the pace of change, government policy and teacher control of the profession, and the evolving…

  19. Performance Issues for a Changing Electric Power Industry

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of some of the factors affecting reliability within the electric bulk power system. Historical and projected data related to reliability issues are discussed on a national and regional basis. Current research on economic considerations associated with reliability levels is also reviewed.

  20. A review of air quality issues and compliance for the asphalt paving industry in Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, B.F.; Caughlin, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    The Maryland Air and Radiation Management Administration (ARMA) conducted a Sector Initiative in order to achieve a compliance audit of the asphalt paving industry sector in Maryland. This sector is commonly referred to as the hot-mix asphalt (HMA) industry. There are 59 HMA production plants in Maryland. Each asphalt production facility was reviewed to determine their compliance status with federal NSPS requirements (stack particulate and visible emission requirements), as well as with Maryland's more comprehensive and generally more restrictive requirements including visible emission, particulate matter, air toxics, dust, nuisance, odor, and other criteria pollutant requirements. The study included reviewing past data (stack test reports, inspections, VE observations, complaint histories) and conducting new inspections and observations at all 59 of the plants. The study also included conducting new particulate stack tests (Summer of 1998) at nine HMA plants. The historic data demonstrated general compliance with stack-tested particulate emission rates. The new stack tests all demonstrated compliance with applicable particulate limits. Visible emissions observations revealed a lesser degree of compliance. Asphalt plants, if not carefully controlled, can be a major source of nuisance complaints. Complaint histories were also reviewed. This paper presents detailed results of ARMA's compliance review of the asphalt industry in Maryland. This includes test results, compliance determinations, and compliance rates. Other issues including impacts on surrounding communities, changing Department of Transportation requirements, and air toxics requirements are also reviewed.

  1. Fuel quality issues in the oil heat industry

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, Wai-Lin

    1992-12-01

    The quality of fuel oil plays an essential role in combustion performance and efficient operation of residential heating equipment. With the present concerns by the oil-heat industry of declining fuel-oil quality, a study was initiated to identify the factors that have brought about changes in the quality of distillate fuel. A background of information will be provided to the industry, which is necessary to deal with the problems relating to the fuel. The high needs for servicing heating equipment are usually the result of the poor handling characteristics of the fuel during cold weather, the buildup of dirt and water in storage tanks, and microbial growth. A discussion of how to deal with these problems is presented in this paper. The effectiveness of fuel additives to control these problems of quality is also covered to help users better understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Test data have been collected which measure and compare changes in the properties of fuel using selected additives.

  2. Thermal management in heavy vehicles : a review identifying issues and research requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M. W.

    1999-01-15

    Thermal management in heavy vehicles is cross-cutting because it directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, engine/component life, driver comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and aerodynamics. It follows that thermal management is critical to the design of large (class 6-8) trucks, especially in optimizing for energy efficiency and emissions reduction. Heat rejection requirements are expected to increase, and it is industry's goal to develop new, innovative, high-performance cooling systems that occupy less space and are lightweight and cost-competitive. The state of the art in heavy vehicle thermal management is reviewed, and issues and research areas are identified.

  3. Adaptive management of natural resources-framework and issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management, an approach for simultaneously managing and learning about natural resources, has been around for several decades. Interest in adaptive decision making has grown steadily over that time, and by now many in natural resources conservation claim that adaptive management is the approach they use in meeting their resource management responsibilities. Yet there remains considerable ambiguity about what adaptive management actually is, and how it is to be implemented by practitioners. The objective of this paper is to present a framework and conditions for adaptive decision making, and discuss some important challenges in its application. Adaptive management is described as a two-phase process of deliberative and iterative phases, which are implemented sequentially over the timeframe of an application. Key elements, processes, and issues in adaptive decision making are highlighted in terms of this framework. Special emphasis is given to the question of geographic scale, the difficulties presented by non-stationarity, and organizational challenges in implementing adaptive management. ?? 2010.

  4. National policies for biosphere greenhouse gas management: issues and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kennett, Steven A

    2002-11-01

    Biosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) management consists of preserving and enhancing terrestrial carbon pools and producing biomass as a fossil fuel substitute. The discussion of this topic has focused primarily on carbon-accounting and project-level issues, particularly relating to carbon sequestration as a source of emissions credits under the Kyoto Protocol. While international consensus on these matters is needed, this paper argues that an important domestic policy agenda also deserves attention. National policies for biosphere GHG management are necessary to bring about large-scale changes in land-use, forestry, and agricultural practices and can address some of the technical and policy issues that have proven to be particularly problematic from carbon-accounting and project-level perspectives. These policies should minimize land-use and resource-management conflicts, account for collateral benefits, and ensure institutional compatibility with existing resource-management regimes. Issues relating to project permanence, leakage, and transaction costs should also be addressed. A range of policy instruments should be used and biosphere GHG management should be one component of an integrated approach to environmental and resource management. Countries promoting biosphere GHG management as an important element of their climate change strategies should be developing these domestic policies to complement international negotiations and to demonstrate that carbon sequestration and biomass production can make an effective contribution to the stabilization of atmospheric GHG concentrations.

  5. Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

  6. Management of the industry/research organization interface

    SciTech Connect

    John, B.; Spiliopoulos, J.M.; Beazley, J.; Harvey, T.J.M.; Gillies, A.D.S.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of a consultancy undertaken to assess management processes in research projects to improve communication between research organizations and the mining industry through the development of an improved mode of operation and customer interface is discussed. The consultancy was conducted using the Nadler and Tushman Congruency Model of Organizational Behavior to assess components of a project's inputs, transformation process and outputs for their degree of congruence or fit. As an example the University of Queensland (UQ) managed ACARP project Maximizing Coal Production in the Presence of Hydrogen Sulfide (H{sub 2}S) Seam Gas was used for illustration. An action research process was used to collect data on the project organization and history, observations made of group project meetings and interviews undertaken with project staff and representatives of the mining industry and the UQ. The findings highlighted major differences in culture between the university and industry, inadequate planning and strategy development, ineffective inter-group communication, high and conflicting demands on time, and in some cases a poor fit between individuals and tasks. Recommendations proposed to address these issues are presented as two groups, those applicable to the current H{sub 2}S Project and those for future similar research projects. They involve improved strategies for inter-group and interpersonal communication, role clarification, project administration and organizational learning and assessment. The proposed interventions are relatively simple, easily implemented and inexpensive. They have the potential to improve the fit between the components of the organization as well as between the organization and its environment, enhance efficiency and effectiveness and improve the relationship between the university and industry to ensure future collaborative research projects and access to external funding.

  7. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track IV: Policy and Standards Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers making up Track IV of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE; an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track IV is on policy and standards issues and the papers include: "Developing Guidelines…

  8. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track VII: Applications and Technology Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers making up Track VII of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track VII is on applications and technology issues, and the papers include: "The Effect…

  9. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track VI: Academic Computing Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers making up Track VI of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track VI is on academic computing issues, and the papers include: "Loan-a-Mac: A…

  10. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track I: Planning and Strategy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers making up Track I of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track I is on planning and strategy issues, and the papers include: "Strategic Information…

  11. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track V: Telecommunications and Networking Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers making up Track V of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track V is on telecommunications and networking issues and the papers include: "Networking…

  12. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track II: Funding and Accountability Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers making up Track II of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym for the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track II is on funding and accountability issues, and the papers include: "A Checklist…

  13. Issues in management of artificial intelligence based projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, P. A.; Freeman, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    Now that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is gaining acceptance, it is important to examine some of the obstacles that still stand in the way of its progress. Ironically, many of these obstacles are related to management and are aggravated by the very characteristcs that make AI useful. The purpose of this paper is to heighten awareness of management issues in AI development and to focus attention on their resolution.

  14. Sustainability issues and opportunities in the sugar and sugar-bioproduct industries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like many other industries, the sugar and sugar-bioproduct industries are facing important sustainability issues. The relatively low and fluctuating profit for sugar, surpluses of sugar, world-wide trend to produce alternative, renewable bio-based fuels and chemicals to those derived from petroleum...

  15. Allergy to methyldibromoglutaronitrile/phenoxyethanol (Euxyl k 400): regulatory issues, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management.

    PubMed

    Aakhus, Angela E; Warshaw, Erin M

    2011-05-01

    Methyldibromoglutaronitrile/phenoxyethanol (Euxyl K 400) is a preservative found in both personal care products and industrial sources. Although Euxyl K 400 initially appeared to have low sensitizing potential, increased prevalence of contact allergy to Euxyl K 400 led to regulatory intervention. This review summarizes the history, epidemiology, and management of contact allergy to Euxyl K 400. Issues related to patch-test preparations are also discussed.

  16. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  17. Chaos Theory as a Model for Managing Issues and Crises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Priscilla

    1996-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to model public relations situations in which the salient feature is volatility of public perceptions. Discusses the premises of chaos theory and applies them to issues management, the evolution of interest groups, crises, and rumors. Concludes that chaos theory is useful as an analogy to structure image problems and to raise…

  18. Human Resource Management Issues. Symposium 22. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on human resource management issues consists of three presentations. "Work and Family Conflict: A Review of the Theory and Literature" (Susan R. Madsen) explores the literature related to work and family conflict and its possible implications to human resource development (HRD) theory and practice. It presents four existing…

  19. At Issue: Classroom Management and Safety, an Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pricer, Wayne F.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of the horrific shootings at Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois University, many colleges and universities have begun to reexamine and reevaluate classroom management strategies and practices. Several institutions have taken additional steps to try to deal with the issue of physical safety in the classroom. This article presents an…

  20. How Managing Editors View and Deal with Newspaper Ethical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas

    1987-01-01

    Claims there is awareness and concern about journalism ethics among daily newspaper managing editors. Asserts that although ethical issues are being addressed to some degree, greater efforts could be made to see that reporters and editors are apprised of codes of ethics. (MM)

  1. Issue Management by School Superintendents: Final Report. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Anne S.; Pondy, Louis R.

    Four papers generated by a broader study of issues management in three suburban Chicago school districts are collected here. "Achieving Routine" focuses on the effective routinization of organizational change, in this case a curriculum decision, through the use of administrative mechanisms and the conceptual linkage of the new to established…

  2. Bias versus Fairness: The Social Utility of Issues Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard Alan

    1990-01-01

    Identifies the lack of a common conceptual grounding in education, theory, and ideology as three critical factors missing in issues management. Suggests this lack leads to the failure of organizations to communicate readily how they and their leadership stand on crucial concerns. (KEH)

  3. Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Caren C.; Gottleib, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the evolution of managed care and reviews basic biomedical ethics and ethical decision-making models. Examines specific ethical issues and offers suggestions for practice, research, and education and training. Concludes with a research agenda, a review of projected general trends in health care delivery, and a discussion of counseling…

  4. Carbon management: an oil industry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannery, Brian

    2002-03-01

    Projections indicate that future energy use and associated CO2 emissions will grow substantially to fuel economic growth and prosperity. Consequently, restrictions on energy demand would have significant economic and social impacts— especially in developing countries where efforts to alleviate poverty and meet essential needs, as well as aspirations, will require large increases in future energy use. Global CO2 emissions today arise roughly as follows: (Coal: 40affected by availability, cost, convenience, security and environmental concerns. In the use of oil (primarily for transportation) in the world's economy, industry operations account for about 13fuel use by customers. Consideration of scenarios to reduce future emissions shows that social, environmental and economic costs are sensitive to many uncertain factors, especially the availability and performance of technologies that may become available. In particular, implementation of new energy technology systems requires extensive human and physical infrastructure to function, and takes decades to put in place. The ultimate cost and capability to reduce global emissions depends on development, commercialization, and widespread global use of currently non-commercial technologies. Technology research should aim to devise options that reduce costs, improve performance, meet regulatory and safety concerns, and foster acceptance of potential new technologies, such as carbon sequestration and the production, distribution and use of hydrogen. Programs to address carbon management should not focus on optimizing options based on today's limited understanding and costly systems, but rather, on identifying and overcoming fundamental barriers, so that more economic and effective options become available in the future.

  5. Women's Path to Management in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study examined the employment patterns of women working in the United Kingdom's hotel and catering industry and the opportunities for vocational education that would lead to careers in management. Sixty-four women from different sectors of the industry were interviewed (including women in senior and middle management and some still looking to be…

  6. Integrating energy and environmental management in wood furniture industry.

    PubMed

    Gordić, Dušan; Babić, Milun; Jelić, Dubravka; Konćalović, Davor; Vukašinović, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise, industrial plants (even those of energy nonintensive industries such as furniture industry) need effective way to reduce the amount of energy they consume. Besides, there are a number of economic and environmental reasons why a company should consider environmental management initiatives. This paper provides a detailed guideline for implementing joint energy and environmental management system in wood furniture industrial company. It covers in detail all essential aspects of the system: initial system assessment, organization, policy development, energy and environmental auditing, action plan development, system promotion, checking system performance, and management review.

  7. Integrating Energy and Environmental Management in Wood Furniture Industry

    PubMed Central

    Babić, Milun; Jelić, Dubravka; Konćalović, Davor; Vukašinović, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise, industrial plants (even those of energy nonintensive industries such as furniture industry) need effective way to reduce the amount of energy they consume. Besides, there are a number of economic and environmental reasons why a company should consider environmental management initiatives. This paper provides a detailed guideline for implementing joint energy and environmental management system in wood furniture industrial company. It covers in detail all essential aspects of the system: initial system assessment, organization, policy development, energy and environmental auditing, action plan development, system promotion, checking system performance, and management review. PMID:24587734

  8. Developing and Managing University-Industry Research Collaborations through a Process Methodology/Industrial Sector Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbin, Simon P.

    2010-01-01

    A management framework has been successfully utilized at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom to improve the process for developing and managing university-industry research collaborations. The framework has been part of a systematic approach to increase the level of research contracts from industrial sources, to strengthen the…

  9. Approaches of the German food industry for addressing the issue of food losses.

    PubMed

    Richter, Beate; Bokelmann, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    In the food industry the subject of food losses is of great importance due to economic balance and an efficient application of resources as well as the development of an efficient food chain system. This paper presents the explorative results of a quantitative survey of leading companies of the German food industry to evaluate the relevance and handling of this issue. The investigation reveals that the topic food losses have a high significance in the food industry which will probably increase in future. A sample breakdown by branches indicates that the issue has the highest relevance for companies in the confectionery industry. These companies as well as those in the meat and fish industry want to consider the subject prospectively more powerful in their companies. Across the food industry, there is no communication to consumers of the efforts concerning food losses. And companies in the confectionery industry and in the fruit and vegetable industry rather want to engage more powerful in this topic if consumers' interest increases. But in order to minimize food losses at all stages along the supply chain, communication and collaboration at all stages is essential, especially the communication to consumers. Thus, it has to be verified whether a suitable communication can lead to advantages in competition and become an important issue for companies to differentiate from competitors.

  10. Approaches of the German food industry for addressing the issue of food losses.

    PubMed

    Richter, Beate; Bokelmann, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    In the food industry the subject of food losses is of great importance due to economic balance and an efficient application of resources as well as the development of an efficient food chain system. This paper presents the explorative results of a quantitative survey of leading companies of the German food industry to evaluate the relevance and handling of this issue. The investigation reveals that the topic food losses have a high significance in the food industry which will probably increase in future. A sample breakdown by branches indicates that the issue has the highest relevance for companies in the confectionery industry. These companies as well as those in the meat and fish industry want to consider the subject prospectively more powerful in their companies. Across the food industry, there is no communication to consumers of the efforts concerning food losses. And companies in the confectionery industry and in the fruit and vegetable industry rather want to engage more powerful in this topic if consumers' interest increases. But in order to minimize food losses at all stages along the supply chain, communication and collaboration at all stages is essential, especially the communication to consumers. Thus, it has to be verified whether a suitable communication can lead to advantages in competition and become an important issue for companies to differentiate from competitors. PMID:26691601

  11. [The workplace injury trends in the petrochemical industry: from data analysis to risk management].

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe; Martini, Benedetta

    2013-01-01

    The most recent INAIL data show that, in 2009-2011, the accident frequency rate and the severity rate of workplace injuries in the chemical industry are lower than for the total non-agricultural workforce. The chemical industry, primarily because of the complex and hazardous work processes, requires an appropriate system for assessing and monitoring specific risks.The implementation of Responsible Care, a risk management system specific for the chemical industry, in 1984, has represented a historical step in the process of critical awareness of risk management by the chemical companies. Responsible Care is a risk management system specifically designed on the risk profiles of this type of enterprise, which integrates safety, health and environment. A risk management system, suitable for the needs of a chemical company, should extend its coverage area, beyond the responsible management of products throughout the entire production cycle, to the issues of corporate responsibility.

  12. Attitudes toward the Skilled Trades: Employment Issues in the Precision Metalworking Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    A national cross section of 2,502 adult Americans and owners or managers of 800 companies in the precision metalworking industry were surveyed to study public attitudes toward working in this industry and to explore recent recruiting and training practices in the precision metalworking field. The survey results indicated that Americans as a whole…

  13. Medical waste. The growing issues of management and disposal.

    PubMed

    Fay, M F; Beck, W C; Fay, J M; Kessinger, M K

    1990-06-01

    When addressing the impact of medical waste management and regulatory controls on the health care industry, it is important to remember that as long as modern medicine continues to maintain and sustain its current quality of life and wellness standards, industry will continue to generate various byproducts that have adverse effects on both people and the environment. It is important, therefore, to carefully evaluate the impact of societal demands. Unless government, industry, environmental groups, and health care providers abandon their current adversarial relationships and work together to solve shared problems, there will be no improvement in the growing problem of medical waste. The long-term solutions to today's growing waste problems depend to a great extent on human factors and the willingness of industry, medical community, and governmental bodies to cooperate with each other, recognizing the cause-effect relationship of a continued demand for disposable products. There are many pieces to the waste management puzzle. Obviously, surgeons cannot perform surgery without exposure to blood, tissue or body fluids, and nurses cannot maintain asepsis without sterile products. Because the health care team cannot totally eliminate the source of medical waste, they must learn to more effectively manage and control it. Health care professionals must encourage industry and government to work together to develop standards for products and materials used as barriers and use more biodegradable materials. Health care facilities must learn to minimize the amount of medical waste designated as regulated or infectious. Segregating potentially infectious material from clean waste at the point of generation may reduce both volume and cost.

  14. Plant Profiles - Industrial Energy Management in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    This 24-page brochure profiles industrial manufacturing firms who are achieving significant energy savings in their plants. The DOE Office of Industrial Technologies six plant-of-the-year nominees are featured, and an additional 10 projects from other companies are also highlighted. Information on OIT's awards and recognition process, and information on OIT and BestPractices is also included.

  15. Building Research Relationships With Managed Care Organizations: Issues and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    LEIN, CATHERINE; COLLINS, CLARE; LYLES, JUDITH S.; HILLMAN, DONALD; SMITH, ROBERT C.

    2006-01-01

    Managed care is now the dominant form of healthcare in the United States. The need for clinical research about the organization, delivery, and outcomes of primary care services in managed care models is high, yet access to managed care organizations as sites for clinical research may be problematic. The purpose of this article is to describe issues involved in obtaining access to managed care settings for clinical research and practical strategies for successful collaboration using literature review and case description. Three steps for developing collaborative relationships with managed care organizations (MCOs) are presented: 1) assessment of organizational structure, history, and culture; 2) finding common ground; and 3) project implementation. These steps are discussed within the context of MCO systems issues and a relationship-centered approach to communication between researchers and individuals from the MCO. Successful relationships with MCOs for clinical research are possible when careful attention is paid to inclusion of MCOs as collaborators in the development of the research questions and design, and as partners in the research implementation process. PMID:17203136

  16. Ethical issues in managed care: a Catholic Christian perspective.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Edmund D

    1997-03-01

    A Christian analysis of the moral conflicts that exist among physicians and health care institutions requires a detailed treatment of the ethical issues in managed care. To be viable, managed care, as with any system of health care, must be economically sound and morally defensible. While managed care is per se a morally neutral concept, as it is currently practiced in the United States, it is morally dubious at best, and in many instances is antithetical to a Catholic Christian ethics of health care. The moral status of any system of managed care ought to be judged with respect to its congruence with Gospel teachings about the care of the sick, Papal Encyclicals, and the documents of the Second Vatican Council. In this essay, I look at the important conceptual or definitional issues of managed care, assess these concerns over against the source and content of a Catholic ethic of health care, and outline the necessary moral requirements of any licit system of health care.

  17. Legal issues in medical management of violent and threatening patients.

    PubMed

    Dickens, B M

    1986-11-01

    The responsibility of professionals in the medical management of violent and threatening patients is discussed using the Tarasoff case (American) and the Lawson case (Canadian) as landmark cases influencing subsequent jurisprudence. It is becoming increasingly important to be aware of the court's interpretations in such areas as confidentiality, predictions regarding dangerousness, the duty to warn, and the legal duty to strangers to the therapist/patient relationship. A number of other issues relating to the risks involved in management of patients potentially dangerous as a result of the use of drugs are also discussed.

  18. Contentious issues in research on trafficked women working in the sex industry: study design, ethics, and methodology.

    PubMed

    Cwikel, Julie; Hoban, Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    The trafficking of women and children for work in the globalized sex industry is a global social problem. Quality data is needed to provide a basis for legislation, policy, and programs, but first, numerous research design, ethical, and methodological problems must be addressed. Research design issues in studying women trafficked for sex work (WTSW) include how to (a) develop coalitions to fund and support research, (b) maintain a critical stance on prostitution, and therefore WTSW (c) use multiple paradigms and methods to accurately reflect WTSW's reality, (d) present the purpose of the study, and (e) protect respondents' identities. Ethical issues include (a) complications with informed consent procedures, (b) problematic access to WTSW (c) loss of WTSW to follow-up, (d) inability to intervene in illegal acts or human rights violations, and (e) the need to maintain trustworthiness as researchers. Methodological issues include (a) constructing representative samples, (b) managing media interest, and (c) handling incriminating materials about law enforcement and immigration.

  19. Demand side management integration issues: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The integration of a Demand Side Management (DSM) system into a utility begins as soon as the first DSM pilot program is conceived and continues through implementation until the complete system is installed. Florida Power and Light Company for its DSM implementation has considered two integration issues through the different implementation phases: viability demonstration of the DSM system, and user participation in the formulation of the system. DSM should address at any time the viability concerns of customer acceptance and customer demand reduction levels. These two concerns on viability must be examined throughout the life of the project. The second integration issue, user participation, was deemed necessary since acceptance of a poorly understood system is difficult and rejection of a system which does not fulfill the user needs is almost guaranteed. Proper consideration of the viability and user participation issues will greatly enhance DSM system integration into the utility.

  20. Ethical issues in the management of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Sara

    2014-06-01

    The focus of this article is on clinical ethics issues in the thyroid disease context. Clinical ethics is a subspecialty of bioethics that deals with bedside ethical dilemmas that specifically involve the provider-patient relationship. Such issues include consent and capacity; weighing therapeutic benefits against risks and side-effects; innovative therapies; end of life care; unintended versus intentional harms to patients or patient populations; and healthcare access. This article will review core ethical principles for practice, as well as the moral and legal requirements of informed consent. It will then discuss the range of unique and universal ethical issues and considerations that present in the management of autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid cancer.

  1. A life cycle model of public policy issues in health care: the importance of strategic issues management.

    PubMed

    Rakich, J S; Feit, M D

    2001-01-01

    Public policy affects health and social services organizations. Senior management has a responsibility to prevent inappropriate demands of stakeholders from predominating and to influence the outcome of public policy to the benefit of their organization through the strategic issues management process. This article presents a public policy issue life cycle model, life-cycle stages and suggested strategies, paths issues can take in the life cycle, and factors that affect issue paths. An understanding of these dynamics can aid senior managers in shaping and changing public policy issues and lessening external environment threats to their organization.

  2. Material Management Program Can Attract Local Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magad, Eugene L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the material management certificate and the associate in applied science degree programs at William Rainey Harper College, Palatine, Illinois. Material management functions include purchasing, production control, inventory control, material handling, warehousing, packaging, computer applications, and transportation. (MF)

  3. A success paradigm for project managers in the aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Barry Jon

    Within the aerospace industry, project managers traditionally have been selected based on their technical competency. While this may lead to brilliant technical solutions to customer requirements, a lack of management ability can result in failed programs that over-run on cost, are late to critical path schedules, fail to fully utilize the diversity of talent available within the program team, and otherwise disappoint key stakeholders. This research study identifies the key competencies that a project manager should possess in order to successfully lead and manage a project in the aerospace industry. The research attempts to show evidence that within the aerospace industry, it is perceived that management competency is more important to project management success than only technical competence.

  4. Next-generation remediation management: Unique challenges and critical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, G.; Foster, S.

    1995-12-31

    Fifteen years ago, an entire professional and service industry sprang into existence in the United States with the creation of the Superfund program. This national endeavor, defined by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and a host of related environmental laws intended to address the blight of hazardous wastes, tossed a potpourri of experts, professionals, scientists, technical specialists, and contractors into a bowl with industry managers, government officials, and lawyers to create a new blend of multi-disciplinary projects that sought to clean the environment by applying a combination of science and technology mixed with threats of lawsuits, fines, and terms in prison. It was this very odd mix of knowledge and expertise, combined with institutional processes and penalties, that provided, many environmental professionals with careers. They became the multi-disciplinary project and program managers of the environmental industry. The job was to employ this process in a way that creates some good for the environment and value for their clients.

  5. Customer relationship management in the contract pharmaceutical industry: an exploratory study for measuring success.

    PubMed

    Kros, John F; Nadler, Scott; Molis, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Managing customer relationships is a very important issue in business-to-business markets. This research investigates the growing number of available resources defining Customer Relationship Management (CRM) efforts, and how they are being applied within the Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing industry. Exploratory study results using face-to-face and telephone questionnaires based on four criteria for rating a company's CRM efforts are presented. Data was collected from large Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing companies in the US market. The results and conclusions are discussed relating how the Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing industry is implementing CRM including some potential steps to take when considering a CRM initiative. PMID:18048307

  6. Digging Deeper: Crisis Management in the Coal Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara M.; Horsley, J. Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This study explores crisis management/communication practices within the coal industry through the lens of high reliability organization (HRO) concepts and sensemaking theory. In-depth interviews with industry executives and an analysis of an emergency procedures manual were used to provide an exploratory examination of the status of crisis…

  7. Waste Material Management: Energy and materials for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This booklet describes DOE`s Waste Material Management (WMM) programs, which are designed to help tap the potential of waste materials. Four programs are described in general terms: Industrial Waste Reduction, Waste Utilization and Conversion, Energy from Municipal Waste, and Solar Industrial Applications.

  8. An Investigation of the Applicability of Modern Management Processes by Industrial Managers in Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauter, Geza Peter

    This study noted American concepts of modern management which Turkish industrial managers tend to find difficult: identified cultural, economic, and other factors that impede application of modern management processes; and compared the practices of American overseas managers with those of Turkish managers of domestic firms. Managerial performance…

  9. 75 FR 7305 - RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC) Revised Agenda...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC... RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC) revised agenda--rescheduled.../Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee (ATMAC) revised agenda--rescheduled meeting. DATES:...

  10. Assessment of Industrial Attachment: Issues and Concerns of Chinhoyi University of Technology's Undergraduate Degree Programme, Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinyemba, Fredreck; Bvekerwa, Sailos T.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings from an action research that explored industrial attachment supervision and assessment issues and concerns of CUT's (Chinhoyi University of Technology) undergraduate degree programme. The study was motivated by the observation that there is no research project contacted in order to determine the social and economic…

  11. Psychiatric Training Program Engagement with the Pharmaceutical Industry: An Educational Issue, Not Strictly an Ethical One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the educational and ethical issues involved in interactions between departments of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry. METHODS: The author analyzes the history of attitudes toward pharmaceutical companies, various conflicting ethical principles that apply, and areas of confluence and conflict of interest between…

  12. The Revolution in Banking and the Financial Services Industry. Series on Public Issues No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Donald R.

    It is the premise of this booklet, one of a series intended to apply economic principles to major social and political issues of the day, that a revolution in the banking and financial services industry is altering not only the fundamental nature of the services offered but the character of the organizations themselves. The purpose of the essay is…

  13. Management Trainees in the Hotel Industry: What Do Managers Expect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of a survey of 118 United Kingdom hotel managers (53 percent response) with a similar study of 75 U.S. managers found key differences reflecting the impact of cultures on management expectations. Significant similarities support development of an internationally transferable core curriculum for hotel management. (SK)

  14. Pulp and Paper Industry Effluent Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, George W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from pulp and paper industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review focuses on: (1) receiving water, toxicity, and effluent characterization; (2) pulping liquor disposal and recovery; and (3) physicochemical and biological treatment. A list of 238 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Transformation of Indian Sponge Iron Industry Vis-à-vis Quality Management: A Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorantiwar, V. S.; Shrivastava, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    Since the last 30 years, the Indian Sponge Iron (SI) industry has grown by leaps and bounds. Though the sector has undergone rapid growth in recent past, the growth graph is not likely to be sustained due to multiple geo-political and other related factors. Besides, the opening up of the economy has given unprecedented importance to the issues pertaining to quality at all levels i.e. from raw material to the product, without forgetting the actual processing that takes place in the industrial units. In view of absence of a clear cut, valid and reliable quality management framework for the SI industry, this review was carried out to determine the research gaps and further research needs specifically for this sector. The literature review indicated that there is a dearth of literature pertaining to SI industry in general and the quality management issue in this industry in particular. Hence, there is a need to identify critical factors that govern the quality in the SI industry, specifically for the Indian industries. Furthermore, the use of mathematical models are also desired so as to improve its application on wider scale.

  16. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  17. Management of soil systems for the disposal of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, J C

    1981-01-01

    Research continues to provide improved information about the toxicity of materials, their transport in soil, and the kinetics of detoxification that is most useful in evaluating alternative approaches for safely managing industrial wastes. The placement of industrial wastes into soil systems is a satisfactory management approach if the material is nontoxic, if the soil has the capability of detoxifying the material, or if the soil prevents the material from entering the biosphere. Examples from the literature of successful applications of industrial wastes to soil are discussed.

  18. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  19. Women, Aging, and HIV: Clinical Issues and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Womack, Julie A.; Brandt, Cynthia A.; Justice, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Women are living longer with HIV infection. How best to manage the multiple co-morbidities and polypharmacy that are a hallmark of HIV infected individuals has not been studied. We explore incorporating principles of gerontology, particularly multimorbidity and polypharmacy, to optimize the health of HIV infected women. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy are important issues for HIV infected women. Incorporating a gerontologic approach may optimize outcomes until research provides more definitive answers as to how best to collaborate with HIV infected women to provide them with optimal care. A case study is used to guide the discussion. PMID:24932161

  20. Prioritising coastal zone management issues through fuzzy cognitive mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Meliadou, Aleka; Santoro, Francesca; Nader, Manal R; Dagher, Manale Abou; Al Indary, Shadi; Salloum, Bachir Abi

    2012-04-30

    Effective public participation is an essential component of Integrated Coastal Zone Management implementation. To promote such participation, a shared understanding of stakeholders' objectives has to be built to ultimately result in common coastal management strategies. The application of quantitative and semi-quantitative methods involving tools such as Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping is presently proposed for reaching such understanding. In this paper we apply the Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping tool to elucidate the objectives and priorities of North Lebanon's coastal productive sectors, and to formalize their coastal zone perceptions and knowledge. Then, we investigate the potential of Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping as tool for support coastal zone management. Five round table discussions were organized; one for the municipalities of the area and one for each of the main coastal productive sectors (tourism, industry, fisheries, agriculture), where the participants drew cognitive maps depicting their views. The analysis of the cognitive maps showed a large number of factors perceived as affecting the current situation of the North Lebanon coastal zone that were classified into five major categories: governance, infrastructure, environment, intersectoral interactions and sectoral initiatives. Furthermore, common problems, expectations and management objectives for all sectors were exposed. Within this context, Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping proved to be an essential tool for revealing stakeholder knowledge and perception and understanding complex relationships. PMID:22325583

  1. Common management issues in pediatric patients with mild bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease and mild platelet function defects are among the most common disorders seen by pediatric hematologists. The management and prevention of bleeding in these patients can be challenging, as there are limited published data to guide clinical practice, and a complete lack of randomized clinical trials. Desmopressin (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytics are the mainstays of treatment in these patients, yet the optimal dosing and timing of these agents to prevent or resolve bleeding, while minimizing adverse side effects, is sometimes unclear. DDAVP-induced hyponatremia is a particularly under-recognized complication in children with bleeding disorders who undergo surgery. Clinicians need to be aware of local measures that are equally important in treating problems such as epistaxis and surgical bleeding. This review will discuss the published literature and provide practical suggestions regarding four common management issues in the care of children and adolescents with mild bleeding disorders: epistaxis, heavy menstrual bleeding, dental extractions, and tonsillectomy.

  2. Surgical management of advanced gastric cancer: An evolving issue.

    PubMed

    Marano, L; Polom, K; Patriti, A; Roviello, G; Falco, G; Stracqualursi, A; De Luca, R; Petrioli, R; Martinotti, M; Generali, D; Marrelli, D; Di Martino, N; Roviello, F

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, gastric cancer represents the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Although the overall 5-year survival for resectable disease was more than 70% in Japan due to the implementation of screening programs resulting in detection of disease at earlier stages, in Western countries more than two thirds of gastric cancers are usually diagnosed in advanced stages reporting a 5-year survival rate of only 25.7%. Anyway surgical resection with extended lymph node dissection remains the only curative therapy for non-metastatic advanced gastric cancer, while neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapies can improve the outcomes aimed at the reduction of recurrence and extension of survival. High-quality research and advances in technologies have contributed to well define the oncological outcomes and have stimulated many clinical studies testing multimodality managements in the advanced disease setting. This review article aims to outline and discuss open issues in current surgical management of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26632080

  3. Issues of in-vehicle ITS information management

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents issues associated with the introduction into road vehicles of multiple information sources related to the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). Also, an argument is made for an In-Vehicle Information System (IVIS) to manage messages from the associated Intelligent Transportation System Services, as well as other information to be presented to the driver. The IVIS serves as the interface between the driver and all the information sources, including both input from and information display to the driver. Increasingly, aftermarket systems, such as routing and navigation aids, collision avoidance warning systems, yellow pages, can be added to vehicles to aid in travel and/or the conduct of business in the vehicle. The installation of multiple devices, each with its own driver interface, increases the likelihood of driver distraction and thus the risk of an accident. However, introduction of an IVIS raises a number of issues which relate to things such as proprietary messages, message prioritization across devices from different manufacturers, and safe access to the vehicle manufacturer`s proprietary data bus. These issues are the focus of this paper. Sections 1 and 2 of this paper present short summarizes of the efforts in a variety of areas related to in-vehicle information systems. In the first two sections, a summary of two Department of Transportation (DOT) initiatives is followed by a description of US standards development efforts. Next is a brief consideration of institutional, jurisdictional and legal issues associated with in-vehicle systems and the accompanying infrastructure. Section 3 of the paper is devoted to systems integration and driver interface engineering issues.

  4. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  5. Automation Power Energy Management Strategy for Mobile Telecom Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong-Ching; Chen, Jung-Chin; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Huang, Yi-Chao

    The aim of this research is to study the power energy cost reduction of the mobile telecom industry through the supervisor control and data acquisition (SCADA) system application during globalization and liberalization competition. Yet this management system can be proposed functions: operating monitors, the analysis on load characteristics and dropping the cost of management.

  6. Managing corporate capabilities:theory and industry approaches.

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, Adam M.

    2007-02-01

    This study characterizes theoretical and industry approaches to organizational capabilities management and ascertains whether there is a distinct ''best practice'' in this regard. We consider both physical capabilities, such as technical disciplines and infrastructure, and non-physical capabilities such as corporate culture and organizational procedures. We examine Resource-Based Theory (RBT), which is the predominant organizational management theory focused on capabilities. RBT seeks to explain the effect of capabilities on competitiveness, and thus provide a basis for investment/divestment decisions. We then analyze industry approaches described to us in interviews with representatives from Goodyear, 3M, Intel, Ford, NASA, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing. We found diversity amongst the industry capability management approaches. Although all organizations manage capabilities and consider them to some degree in their strategies, no two approaches that we observed were identical. Furthermore, we observed that theory is not a strong driver in this regard. No organization used the term ''Resource-Based Theory'', nor did any organization mention any other guiding theory or practice from the organizational management literature when explaining their capabilities management approaches. As such, we concluded that there is no single best practice for capabilities management. Nevertheless, we believe that RBT and the diverse industry experiences described herein can provide useful insights to support development of capabilities management approaches.

  7. Ethical issues in patient safety: Implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ethical issues impacting the phenomenon of patient safety and to present implications for nursing management. Previous knowledge of this perspective is fragmented. In this discussion, the main drivers are identified and formulated in 'the ethical imperative' of patient safety. Underlying values and principles are considered, with the aim of increasing their visibility for nurse managers' decision-making. The contradictory nature of individual and utilitarian safety is identified as a challenge in nurse management practice, together with the context of shared responsibility and identification of future challenges. As a conclusion, nurse managers play a strategic role in patient safety. Their role is to incorporate ethical values of patient safety into decision-making at all levels in an organization, and also to encourage clinical nurses to consider values in the provision of care to patients. Patient safety that is sensitive to ethics provides sustainable practice where the humanity and dignity of all stakeholders are respected.

  8. Integrated Imaging and Vision Techniques for Industrial Inspection: A Special Issue on Machine Vision and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Ukida, H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Forsyth, D. S.

    2010-06-05

    Imaging- and vision-based techniques play an important role in industrial inspection. The sophistication of the techniques assures high- quality performance of the manufacturing process through precise positioning, online monitoring, and real-time classification. Advanced systems incorporating multiple imaging and/or vision modalities provide robust solutions to complex situations and problems in industrial applications. A diverse range of industries, including aerospace, automotive, electronics, pharmaceutical, biomedical, semiconductor, and food/beverage, etc., have benefited from recent advances in multi-modal imaging, data fusion, and computer vision technologies. Many of the open problems in this context are in the general area of image analysis methodologies (preferably in an automated fashion). This editorial article introduces a special issue of this journal highlighting recent advances and demonstrating the successful applications of integrated imaging and vision technologies in industrial inspection.

  9. Stakeholder analysis for industrial waste management systems.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Oliver; Harvey, Joan; Tollin, Nicola

    2009-02-01

    Stakeholder approaches have been applied to the management of companies with a view to the improvement of all areas of performance, including economic, health and safety, waste reduction, future policies, etc. However no agreement exists regarding stakeholders, their interests and levels of importance. This paper considers stakeholder analysis with particular reference to environmental and waste management systems. It proposes a template and matrix model for identification of stakeholder roles and influences by rating the stakeholders. A case study demonstrates the use of these and their ability to be transferred to other circumstances and organizations is illustrated by using a large educational institution.

  10. Environmental management practices in the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries: implementation strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Massoud, May A; Makarem, N; Ramadan, W; Nakkash, R

    2015-03-01

    This research attempts to provide an understanding of the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries' environmental management strategies, priorities, and perceptions as well as drivers, barriers, and incentives regarding the implementation of the voluntary ISO 14001 Environmental Management System. Accordingly, a semistructured in-depth interview was conducted with the pharmaceutical industries. The findings revealed a significant lack of knowledge about the standard among the industries. The main perceived drivers for adopting the ISO 14001 are improving the companies' image and overcoming international trade. The main perceived barriers for acquiring the standard are the lack of government support and the fact that ISO 14001 is not being legally required or enforced by the government. Moreover, results revealed that adopting the ISO 14001 standard is not perceived as a priority for the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries. Although the cost of certification was not considered as a barrier for the implementation of ISO 14001, the majority of the pharmaceutical industries are neither interested nor willing to adopt the Standard if they are not exposed to any regulatory pressure or external demand. They are more concerned with quality and safety issues with the most adopted international standard among the industries being the ISO 9001 quality management system. This study highlights the aspect that financial barriers are not always the hurdles for implementing environmental management strategies in developing countries and underscores the need for regulatory frameworks and enforcement.

  11. Natural resources management: Issues and lessons from Rwanda. Occasional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, S.T.

    1990-04-01

    Rwanda is an exception among low-income developing countries in that it has given high priority to environmental and natural resource management (NRM) issues. The paper describes A.I.D.'s support for these efforts and explores the possibility of integrating them into agricultural and rural development programs in Rwanda and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. Major findings include: Government support is a prerequisite to developing the long-term strategies needed to address specific NRM issues; Developing appropriate NRM technologies is a complex undertaking requiring site-specific applied research; Donors should appreciate the difficulty host countries face in balancing NRM with development, conservation, and equity objectives; USAID/Rwanda assistance has covered a wide range of NRM activities, many of them complementary to those of other donors, some part of a coordinated multi-donor effort; and The Mission's program includes several innovative and potentially replicable approaches, including the promotion of ecotourism in conjunction with wildlife conservation and park management, and agroforestry and fish farming to conserve soil and water resources while increasing farm productivity. Since such activities often require costly investments and yield their ecological and economic benefits only in the long term, a broader framework than simple cost-benefit analysis might be needed in attempting to incorporate them into USAID/Rwanda's agricultural and rural development portfolio.

  12. Evolution of hospital industrial engineering: from scientific management to total quality management.

    PubMed

    Sahney, V K

    1993-01-01

    Industrial engineering applications in the hospital industry first began in 1910. This paper traces the evolution of hospital industrial engineering in five distinct phases. For each of the major phases, this paper presents the contributions made by industrial engineers. Many of the techniques advocated by industrial engineers are now being taught to hospital employees as hospitals introduce total quality management (TQM) within the health-care industry. TQM introduction has meant a new role for industrial engineers, as that of a teacher, coach, and a facilitator. This new role holds much promise for the improvement of quality and productivity in health care.

  13. Information Resource Management for Industrial Information Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosa, Marta

    This paper argues that the function of educational programs is to convey a sense of reality and an understanding of the open-endedness of information needs and situations; only such a reality orientation can instill the necessary flexibility in information professionals for effectively managing change. There is a growing consensus among…

  14. Security issues at the Department of Energy and records management

    SciTech Connect

    NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

    2000-03-13

    In order to discuss the connection between security issues within the Department of Energy and records management, the author covers a bit of security history and talks about what she calls ``the Amazing Project''. Initiated in late May 1999, it was to be a tri-laboratory (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of Livermore, California, Los Alamos National Laboratory of Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California) project. The team that formed was tasked to develop the best set of security solutions that still enabled weapon mission work to get done and the security solutions were to be the same set for everyone. The amazing project was called ''The Integrated Security Management Project'', or ''ISecM' for short. She'll describe why she thinks this project was so amazing and what it accomplished. There's a bit of sad news about the project, but then she'll move onto discuss what was learned at Sandia as a result of the project and what they're currently doing in records management.

  15. The burden and management of dyslipidemia: practical issues.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Alyssa B; Chen, Chin-Yu; Burton, Wayne N; Edington, Dee W

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study is to describe briefly the burden of dyslipidemia, and to discuss and present strategies for health professionals to improve dyslipidemia management, based on a review of selected literature focusing on interventions for dyslipidemia treatment adherence. Despite the availability of effective lifestyle and pharmaceutical therapies for dyslipidemias, they continue to present a significant economic burden in the United States. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of dyslipidemias is unsatisfactory. The reasons for medication nonadherence are complex and specific to each patient. The lack of progress in achieving optimal lipid targets is caused by many factors: patient (medication adherence, cost of medication, literacy), medication (adverse effects, complexity of regimen), provider (lack of adherence to evidence-based practice guidelines, poor communication), and the US healthcare system (being focused on acute care rather than prevention, lack of continuity of care, general lack of use of an electronic health record). Combined interventions that target each part of the system have been effective in improving treatment adherence and achieving lipid goals. Patients, providers, pharmacists, and employers all play a role in management of dyslipidemia. No single approach will solve the complex issue of improving dyslipidemia management. The required lifestyle changes are known and effective medications are available. The challenge is for all interested parties-including nurses, nurse practitioners, doctors, pharmacists, other health care professionals, employers, and health plans-to help patients achieve behavioral changes.

  16. Availability and Utilization of Opioids for Pain Management: Global Issues

    PubMed Central

    Manjiani, Deepak; Paul, D. Baby; Kunnumpurath, Sreekumar; Kaye, Alan David; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain can significantly influence an individual's health status and can have serious negative consequences: poor nutrition, decreased appetite, abnormal sleep patterns, fatigue, and impairment of daily living activities. Pain can cause psychological impairment and decrease healing and recovery from injuries and illness. A hallmark of many chronic conditions, pain affects more patients' lives than diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and cancer combined. However, many chronic sufferers do not have access to effective pain management for a variety of reasons, including limited access, restrictions, and personal and cultural biases. Methods This review summarizes issues of access, distribution, and cultural bias with regard to opioid agents and seeks to clarify the challenges related to opioid delivery. The considerable negative physical and mental consequences of chronic pain are discussed for the general and palliative care population. Results Opioids are an effective treatment for various intractable painful conditions, but problems in global opioid access for safe and rational use in pain management contribute to unnecessary suffering. These problems persist despite increased understanding in recent years of the pathophysiology of pain. Conclusions Comprehensive guidelines for goal-directed and patient-friendly chronic opiate therapy will potentially enhance the outlook for future chronic pain management. The improvement of pain education in undergraduate and postgraduate training will benefit patients and clinicians. The promise of new medications, along with the utilization of multimodal approaches, has the potential to provide effective pain relief to future generations of sufferers. PMID:24940131

  17. The Management of Stray Radiation Issues in Space Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.

    1995-10-01

    The performance of infrared and submillimeter systems can be severely degraded by stray light. Stray light includes off-axis radiation, system diffraction and scattering effects, and thermal self-emission. The purpose of this paper is to identify several keys to preventing system degradation due to stray radiation. The first key is to apply stray light design rules and analysis techniques early in the program before the design is finalized. A systems level analysis using stray light analysis software is often necessary in order to identify more subtle problems and to assess the magnitude of their effect on system performance. Another key is to address contamination control and the choice of surface coatings early in the program. The management of stray radiation issues is extremely cost-effective, if begun early in the program, and can reduce later schedule hardships.

  18. Managing for biodiversity: Emerging ideas for the electric utility industry-summary statement

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.; Fraser, M.; Ragone, S.

    1996-11-01

    The conference entitled {open_quotes}Managing for Biodiversity: Emerging ideas for the Electric Utility Industry{close_quotes} was held in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA, during 19-20 March 1996. This paper provides an overview of the key points, conclusions, and recommendations from both the presentations/papers and the discussions throughout the conference. Topics covered in this article are the following: sustainable development: challenge for utilities; Stewardship issues; where do we go from here-EPRI perspective. 34 refs.

  19. Human resource management in the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, J; Kleiner, B H

    1998-01-01

    Human resource management practices with special reference to the latest developments of the 1990s such as environmental effects and managing diversity, were investigated. The purpose of the study was to unveil how the health care industry can benefit from these new concepts, as well as to describe how the traditional health care facilities can adapt these new ideas. Specific examples were provided to illustrate this point. In compilation of this report, both primary and secondary research was used. As primary research, many reputable individuals in the health care industry were consulted, and asked to comment on the rough draft of this report. Secondary sources included many journal articles, original researches and books that were written on this technical subject. It can be concluded from this research, that the health care industry should adapt the latest methods to compete and survive, such as use more marketing tools to attract human resource management personnel from other industries, promote diversity at the work place, promote from within the company, and cross-train personnel whenever possible. Health care industry has generally lagged behind other industries in securing high-performance individuals and marketing personnel; however, with the development of health maintenance organizations, this trend is changing.

  20. [Allergen management in the food industry].

    PubMed

    Röder, Martin; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Due to the lack of causative immunotherapies, individuals with food allergies have to rely on correct labelling for even minute amounts of allergenic constituents. It is not relevant to the allergic whether the source of the culprit food is an ingredient or an allergen that entered the food unintentionally, as is the case with so-called cross-contacts or hidden allergens.Efficient allergen management is the manufacturer's prerequisite for coping with allergenic foods in the food production environment and handling them in a way that avoids cross-contact. If it is technically not feasible to eliminate cross-contacts entirely, it must be ensured that these cross-contacts do not enter the final product without being detected.This article discusses measures that should be considered in allergen management. Examples include recording all relevant allergens in the production facility, staff sensitization and training, and taking into account all areas of production from incoming raw materials to outgoing goods.For the evaluation of unavoidable cross-contacts, it is possible today to draw on data from clinical trials for many of the substances that are subject to labelling. This data can be used to assess the risk of the final product.However, the data from threshold studies is not legally binding, so it is left to the manufacturer to assess the level up to which the food is safe for the allergic. In particular the non-harmonized approach of the EU member countries' food safety authorities currently represents a major obstacle, as this can lead to food recalls even though existing levels were evaluated as being safe according to the risk assessments performed. PMID:27299344

  1. Process models: analytical tools for managing industrial energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Balzer, C; Sparrow, F T

    1980-01-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy systems is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for managing industrial energy systems.

  2. Solid industrial wastes and their management in Asegra (Granada, Spain).

    PubMed

    Casares, M L; Ulierte, N; Matarán, A; Ramos, A; Zamorano, M

    2005-01-01

    ASEGRA is an industrial area in Granada (Spain) with important waste management problems. In order to properly manage and control waste production in industry, one must know the quantity, type, and composition of industrial wastes, as well as the management practices of the companies involved. In our study, questionnaires were used to collect data regarding methods of waste management used in 170 of the 230 businesses in the area of study. The majority of these companies in ASEGRA are small or medium-size, and belong to the service sector, transport, and distribution. This was naturally a conditioning factor in both the type and management of the wastes generated. It was observed that paper and cardboard, plastic, wood, and metals were the most common types of waste, mainly generated from packaging (49% of the total volume), as well as material used in containers and for wrapping products. Serious problems were observed in the management of these wastes. In most cases they were disposed of by dumping, and very rarely did businesses resort to reuse, recycling or valorization. Smaller companies encountered greater difficulties when it came to effective waste management. The most frequent solution for the disposal of wastes in the area was dumping. PMID:15936934

  3. Terrestrial pollutant runoff to the Great Barrier Reef: An update of issues, priorities and management responses.

    PubMed

    Brodie, J E; Kroon, F J; Schaffelke, B; Wolanski, E C; Lewis, S E; Devlin, M J; Bohnet, I C; Bainbridge, Z T; Waterhouse, J; Davis, A M

    2012-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is a World Heritage Area and contains extensive areas of coral reef, seagrass meadows and fisheries resources. From adjacent catchments, numerous rivers discharge pollutants from agricultural, urban, mining and industrial activity. Pollutant sources have been identified and include suspended sediment from erosion in cattle grazing areas; nitrate from fertiliser application on crop lands; and herbicides from various land uses. The fate and effects of these pollutants in the receiving marine environment are relatively well understood. The Australian and Queensland Governments responded to the concerns of pollution of the GBR from catchment runoff with a plan to address this issue in 2003 (Reef Plan; updated 2009), incentive-based voluntary management initiatives in 2007 (Reef Rescue) and a State regulatory approach in 2009, the Reef Protection Package. This paper reviews new research relevant to the catchment to GBR continuum and evaluates the appropriateness of current management responses.

  4. Terrestrial pollutant runoff to the Great Barrier Reef: An update of issues, priorities and management responses.

    PubMed

    Brodie, J E; Kroon, F J; Schaffelke, B; Wolanski, E C; Lewis, S E; Devlin, M J; Bohnet, I C; Bainbridge, Z T; Waterhouse, J; Davis, A M

    2012-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is a World Heritage Area and contains extensive areas of coral reef, seagrass meadows and fisheries resources. From adjacent catchments, numerous rivers discharge pollutants from agricultural, urban, mining and industrial activity. Pollutant sources have been identified and include suspended sediment from erosion in cattle grazing areas; nitrate from fertiliser application on crop lands; and herbicides from various land uses. The fate and effects of these pollutants in the receiving marine environment are relatively well understood. The Australian and Queensland Governments responded to the concerns of pollution of the GBR from catchment runoff with a plan to address this issue in 2003 (Reef Plan; updated 2009), incentive-based voluntary management initiatives in 2007 (Reef Rescue) and a State regulatory approach in 2009, the Reef Protection Package. This paper reviews new research relevant to the catchment to GBR continuum and evaluates the appropriateness of current management responses. PMID:22257553

  5. Fluid management in living donor hepatectomy: Recent issues and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the safety of healthy living liver donors is widely recognized during donor hepatectomy which is associated with blood loss, transfusion, and subsequent post-operative morbidity. Although the low central venous pressure (CVP) technique can still be effective, it may not be advantageous concerning the safety of healthy donors undergoing hepatectomy. Emerging evidence suggests that stroke volume variation (SVV), a simple and useful index for fluid responsiveness and preload status in various clinical situations, can be applied as a guide for fluid management to reduce blood loss during living donor hepatectomy. Synthetic colloid solutions are also associated with serious adverse events such as the use of renal replacement therapy and transfusion in critically ill or septic patients. However, it is uncertain whether the intra-operative use of colloid solution is associated with similarly adverse effects in patients undergoing living donor hepatectomy. In this review article we discuss the recent issues regarding the low CVP technique and the high SVV method, i.e., maintaining 10%-20% of SVV, for fluid management in order to reduce blood loss during living donor hepatectomy. In addition, we briefly discuss the effects of intra-operative colloid or crystalloid administration for surgical rather than septic or critically ill patients. PMID:26668500

  6. Public and political issues in HLW management: The Spanish approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, V.; Molina, M.

    1993-12-31

    ENRESA (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A.), is a State-owned company, founded in 1985 and is responsible for radioactive waste management in Spain. ENRESA`s activities are carried out in accordance with a General Radioactive Waste Plant approved by the Spanish Government. In Spain, as in most countries, the public is concerned about many of the activities involving radioactive or rad-waste management; this concern arises for different reasons, but mainly due to lack of information on the matter. This situation leads to the information available being misused by certain politicians, green groups and media, which serves to increase the distrust with which the public sometimes views responsible companies and institutions. At the root of both these problems is a lack of political consensus regarding development of the activity. To gain public acceptance, it would be necessary to develop a long-term information policy, since in the field of communications results are only ever achieved in the long term. ENRESA is carrying out an on-going Communication Plan (CP), implemented successfully in the areas surrounding a low- and intermediate-level waste disposal site and a disused uranium mill in which remedial actions are currently being performed. Implementation of this plan at national level is being accomplished stepwise. This document deals with the most relevant issues relating to the radioactive waste situation in Spain and with the efforts made in communications.

  7. Language and Cultural Skills for Travel Industry Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwamura, Susan Grohs

    Program objectives and assessment results of language courses taught at the School of Travel Industry Management (TIM) of the University of Hawaii are discussed. In addition to preparing students to speak with employees and clientele in Mandarin, Japanese, French, and Spanish, these courses include the study of cultural practices and values that…

  8. Managing the Partnership between Higher Education and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Jana B.; Norgaard, Rolf

    Ways to develop and manage partnerships between colleges and industry are discussed. The broad educational, economic, social, and political contexts supporting such partnerships are reviewed, along with the important supporting roles of government and third parties. The dynamics of different partnership arrangements are examined, including…

  9. ISO 14001 ENVIRONMENTL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new USEPA documents address environmental management systems (EMS) from the perspectives of government and industry and are offered as tools for understanding the process of the ISO 14000 Standards development and usefulness of an EMS approach. The first document, ISO 14001 -...

  10. Human Factor Management in a Region Under Industrialization - A Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muszynski, Marek; Kowalewski, Andrzej

    Numerous studies conducted by the Committee for Studies on Regions under Industrialization of the Polish Academy of Sciences provide the basis for historical analysis and regional comparison relative to concept formation, program guidelines, and program implementation procedures for rational human factor management. The exhaustion of Poland's…

  11. Subject Journal Review: Personnel Management and Industrial Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Georgianna

    1984-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 35 primary journals devoted to personnel management and industrial psychology in such categories as human resource planning, employee training, compensation, and employment law. History of the field, journal selection, journal specializations (for practitioners and academicians), journal indexing/abstracting,…

  12. Instructional Management Plans for the Cooperative Industrial Education Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    These Instructional Management Plans (IMPs) are designed to assist teacher-coordinators of cooperative industrial education (CIE) in the design of application experiences for each task of each core competency area. They are intended to help the CIE teacher-coordinator direct the learning of occupational competencies by helping the student-learners…

  13. Management Science/Industrial Engineering Techniques to Reduce Food Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Murray

    This paper examines the contributions of Industrial Engineering and Management Science toward reduction in the cost of production and distribution of food. Food processing firms were requested to respond to a questionnaire which asked for examples of their use of various operations research tools and information on the number of operations…

  14. Earnings Management before Rights Issues and the Subsequent Cash Transfer in Chinese Firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Bi-Huei

    2009-08-01

    Unlike private enterprises in developed markets, political influence is profound upon Chinese state-dominated firms. Under this consideration, this paper demonstrates how political impact interferes in Chinese managers' decisions. State-assigned managers were found to deliberately transfer cash raised via rights issues from the public shareholders to the state by cash dividends in order to please Chinese politicians. Especially, to meet the regulatory requirement of rights issues, managers from firms which distributed more cash dividends in the same year of rights issues were more likely to inflate earnings before rights issues. The earnings inflation which managers use to boost firm's incomes is defined as "earnings management." Furthermore, the empirical results also exhibit that firm's close relationship with the state enables managers to obtain approvals of rights issues easily, which reduces the firm's earnings management tendency. The manager's incentives of earnings management is closely attributed to the political intervention.

  15. Environmental management in fishery-based industries. Working papers in industrial planning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-19

    The main objectives of this study are to present technical information and costs related to waste management in the seafood processing industry. Although there is a lack of published data on environmental management in the fish processing industry in developing countries, the focus is on seafood processors in developing countries drawing upon developed countries' experiences as relevant. Recovery and utilization of seafood wastes, both from wastewater and solid wastes, can be good policy for protecting the environment and for the seafood processing industry. Various options, such as production of fish meal, fish silage, and mince are explored. Fish silage, for example, is generally suggested as an option for waste utilization in small operations, whereas production of fish meal is more suitable for large plants.

  16. The photovoltaic industry on the path to a sustainable future--environmental and occupational health issues.

    PubMed

    Bakhiyi, Bouchra; Labrèche, France; Zayed, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    As it supplies solar power, a priori considered harmless for the environment and human health compared with fossil fuels, the photovoltaic (PV) industry seems to contribute optimally to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and, overall, to sustainable development. However, considering the forecast for rapid growth, its use of potentially toxic substances and manufacturing processes presenting health and safety problems may jeopardize its benefits. This paper aims to establish a profile of the PV industry in order to determine current and emerging environmental and health concerns. A review of PV system life cycle assessments, in light of the current state of the industry and its developmental prospects, reveals information deficits concerning some sensitive life cycle indicators and environmental impacts, together with incomplete information on toxicological data and studies of workers' exposure to different chemical and physical hazards. Although solar panel installation is generally considered relatively safe, the occupational health concerns related to the growing number of hazardous materials handled in the PV industry warrants an all-inclusive occupational health and safety approach in order to achieve an optimal equilibrium with sustainability. To prevent eco-health problems from offsetting the benefits currently offered by the PV industry, manufacturers should cooperate actively with workers, researchers and government agencies toward improved and more transparent research, the adoption of specific and stricter regulations, the implementation of preventive risk management of occupational health and safety and, lastly, greater responsibilization toward PV systems from their design until their end of life. PMID:25168128

  17. The photovoltaic industry on the path to a sustainable future--environmental and occupational health issues.

    PubMed

    Bakhiyi, Bouchra; Labrèche, France; Zayed, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    As it supplies solar power, a priori considered harmless for the environment and human health compared with fossil fuels, the photovoltaic (PV) industry seems to contribute optimally to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and, overall, to sustainable development. However, considering the forecast for rapid growth, its use of potentially toxic substances and manufacturing processes presenting health and safety problems may jeopardize its benefits. This paper aims to establish a profile of the PV industry in order to determine current and emerging environmental and health concerns. A review of PV system life cycle assessments, in light of the current state of the industry and its developmental prospects, reveals information deficits concerning some sensitive life cycle indicators and environmental impacts, together with incomplete information on toxicological data and studies of workers' exposure to different chemical and physical hazards. Although solar panel installation is generally considered relatively safe, the occupational health concerns related to the growing number of hazardous materials handled in the PV industry warrants an all-inclusive occupational health and safety approach in order to achieve an optimal equilibrium with sustainability. To prevent eco-health problems from offsetting the benefits currently offered by the PV industry, manufacturers should cooperate actively with workers, researchers and government agencies toward improved and more transparent research, the adoption of specific and stricter regulations, the implementation of preventive risk management of occupational health and safety and, lastly, greater responsibilization toward PV systems from their design until their end of life.

  18. Consumerism in the financial services industry: lessons for managed care.

    PubMed

    Peyser, N; Wong, A

    2000-01-01

    Managed care today is being shaped by the emergence of a savvier, better informed health care consumer. Facing a strikingly similar consumer movement over the past two decades, the banking industry experienced a market transformation that holds important lessons for managed care. Nontraditional entrants in the financial services industry, offering focused "monoline" products and services closely analogous to "carve-out" providers in health care, targeted rising consumer demands and stronger preferences. Banks in time answered these formidable new competitive forces with innovative consolidation and globalization strategies. The most successful initiatives in healthcare, as in banking, will focus on satisfying the consumer's hunger for information, improved levels of service, and enhanced outcomes. Managed care plans may play a lead role in accelerating the impact of consumerism by bridging the disconnect between patients and their purchasing decisions. PMID:11010386

  19. NICKEL PLATING: INDUSTRY PRACTICES, CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared under the direction of EPA's ORD to assist the metal finishing community with the management of nickel plating environmental issues. This report provides the rationale for developing the document, identifies the intended user audience, and presents the fr...

  20. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management:: A Collection of Papers on Aerospace Management Issues (Supplement 11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Papers address the following topics: NASA's project management development process; Better decisions through structural analysis; NASA's commercial technology management system; Today's management techniques and tools; Program control in NASA - needs and opportunities; and Resources for NASA managers.

  1. Monitoring asthma in childhood: management-related issues.

    PubMed

    Rottier, Bart L; Eber, Ernst; Hedlin, Gunilla; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Mantzourani, Eva; Kulkarni, Neeta

    2015-06-01

    Management-related issues are an important aspect of monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice. This review summarises the literature on practical aspects of monitoring including adherence to treatment, inhalation technique, ongoing exposure to allergens and irritants, comorbid conditions and side-effects of treatment, as agreed by the European Respiratory Society Task Force on Monitoring Asthma in Childhood. The evidence indicates that it is important to discuss adherence to treatment in a non-confrontational way at every clinic visit, and take into account a patient's illness and medication beliefs. All task force members teach inhalation techniques at least twice when introducing a new inhalation device and then at least annually. Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, combustion-derived air pollutants, house dust mites, fungal spores, pollens and pet dander deserve regular attention during follow-up according to most task force members. In addition, allergic rhinitis should be considered as a cause for poor asthma control. Task force members do not screen for gastro-oesophageal reflux and food allergy. Height and weight are generally measured at least annually to identify individuals who are susceptible to adrenal suppression and to calculate body mass index, even though causality between obesity and asthma has not been established. In cases of poor asthma control, before stepping up treatment the above aspects of monitoring deserve closer attention.

  2. Nuclear waste management issues: a multidisciplinary evaluation framework.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.

    1980-02-01

    Initially, this paper characterizes the nuclear waste problem that requires analysis to establish the rationale for an interdisciplinary approach to resolve it. The problem characterization also explains why the specific concern with contaminated groundwater and intrusion through drilling has been selected for the focus of the panel meeting. The Nominal Group Technique (NGT), the group process format chosen for the experts' deliberations, is explained in some detail and its value in facilitating the desired dialogue is described. The dialogue is organized around the various issue areas that would be of concern to a program manager dealing with the potential problem of radioactivity escaping to the biosphere through human intrusion into contaminated groundwater. The participants are identified by professional discipline so that the dialogue can be presented in a realistic fashion. Both the content of the dialogue and its format are evaluated. Particular attention is given to their usefulness in generating a cross-section of subissues and factors that should be addressed when analyzing the waste disposal system's adequacy to prevent contaminated groundwater escaping to the biosphere.

  3. Identity Management Systems in Healthcare: The Issue of Patient Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenens, Els

    According to a recent recommendation of the European Commission, now is the time for Europe to enhance interoperability in eHealth. Although interoperability of patient identifiers seems promising for matters of patient mobility, patient empowerment and effective access to care, we see that today there is indeed a considerable lack of interoperability in the field of patient identification. Looking from a socio-technical rather than a merely technical point of view, one can understand the fact that the development and implementation of an identity management system in a specific healthcare context is influenced by particular social practices, affected by socio-economical history and the political climate and regulated by specific data protection legislations. Consequently, the process of making patient identification in Europe more interoperable is a development beyond semantic and syntactic levels. In this paper, we gives some examples of today’s patient identifier systems in Europe, discuss the issue of interoperability of (unique) patient identifiers from a socio-technical point of view and try not to ignore the ‘privacy side’ of the story.

  4. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.; Barnes, V.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Fawcett-Long, J.; Toquam, J.; Baker, K.; Wieringa, D.; Olson, J.; Christensen, J.

    1989-05-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas of nuclear power plants are fit for duty. This report supplements information previously published in NUREG/CR-5227, Fitness for Duty in the Nuclear Power Industry: A Review of Technical Issues (Barnes et al., 1988). The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in both of these reports is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other fitness concerns are discussed. This report addresses issues pertaining to workers' use and misuse of alcohol, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs as fitness-for-duty concerns; responds to several questions raised by NRC Commissioners; discusses subversion of the chemical testing process and methods of preventing such subversion; and examines concerns about the urinalysis cutoff levels used when testing for marijuana metabolites, amphetamines, and phencyclidine (PCP).

  5. Empirical Analysis of Green Supply Chain Management Practices in Indian Automobile Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthra, S.; Garg, D.; Haleem, A.

    2014-04-01

    Environmental sustainability and green environmental issues have an increasing popularity among researchers and supply chain practitioners. An attempt has been made to identify and empirically analyze green supply chain management (GSCM) practices in Indian automobile industry. Six main GSCM practices (having 37 sub practices) and four expected performance outcomes (having 16 performances) have been identified by implementing GSCM practices from literature review. Questionnaire based survey has been made to validate these practices and performance outcomes. 123 complete questionnaires were collected from Indian automobile organizations and used for empirical analysis of GSCM practices in Indian automobile industry. Descriptive statistics have been used to know current implementation status of GSCM practices in Indian automobile industry and multiple regression analysis has been carried out to know the impact on expected organizational performance outcomes by current GSCM practices adopted by Indian automobile industry. The results of study suggested that environmental, economic, social and operational performances improve with the implementation of GSCM practices. This paper may play an important role to understand various GSCM implementation issues and help practicing managers to improve their performances in the supply chain.

  6. Characteristics and management of infectious industrial waste in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.-C. Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-11-15

    Infectious industrial waste management in Taiwan is based on the specific waste production unit. In other countries, management is based simply on whether the producer may lead to infectious disease. Thus, Taiwan has a more detailed classification of infectious waste. The advantage of this classification is that it is easy to identify the sources, while the disadvantage lies in the fact that it is not flexible and hence increases cost. This study presents an overview of current management practices for handling infectious industrial waste in Taiwan, and addresses the current waste disposal methods. The number of small clinics in Taiwan increased from 18,183 to 18,877 between 2003 and 2005. Analysis of the data between 2003 and 2005 showed that the majority of medical waste was general industrial waste, which accounted for 76.9%-79.4% of total medical waste. Infectious industrial waste accounted for 19.3%-21.9% of total medical waste. After the SARS event in Taiwan, the amount of infectious waste reached 19,350 tons in 2004, an increase over the previous year of 4000 tons. Waste minimization was a common consideration for all types of waste treatment. In this study, we summarize the percentage of plastic waste in flammable infectious industrial waste generated by medical units, which, in Taiwan was about 30%. The EPA and Taiwan Department of Health have actively promoted different recycling and waste reduction measures. However, the wide adoption of disposable materials made recycling and waste reduction difficult for some hospitals. It has been suggested that enhancing the education of and promoting communication between medical units and recycling industries must be implemented to prevent recyclable waste from entering the incinerator.

  7. A personal overview of accidents and risk management in the recreational diving industry.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Bret

    2010-09-01

    Recently the recreational diving industry has experienced an increase in accidents and fatalities (per capita, based on reliable estimates of diver populations). Many of these incidents have resulted from a degradation of training standards for 'performance-based' learning of skills and knowledge, both for students and the instructors, dive masters, and assistants who are responsible for their initial training and subsequent courses aimed at 'advanced' curricula. The industry has also seen a decline in the experience and practical expertise of diving leadership staff responsible for the management of resorts and liveaboard diving operations. The resulting incidents have led to a rise in legal actions and settlement costs or trial verdicts. The important contributing issues in accident causation are discussed. A fundamental lack of understanding of how to effectively use the tools of risk management (waivers and releases, defensive teaching, good record keeping), as well as inadequate pre-training screening that might eliminate some participants based on age, physical condition, or pre-existing medical issues, are contributing to this increase. These factors also complicate the efficient management of litigation through the courts. The costs associated with litigation are now causing increased insurance premiums, reduced scope of coverage for some activities, and outright denial to some seeking insurance. This paper provides a personal perspective based on a 40-year involvement in all aspects of the diving industry and extensive experience in the litigation process as a consultant and expert witness. PMID:23111912

  8. Management of dermatitis in the rubber manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Toeppen-Sprigg, B

    1999-01-01

    Dermatitis in the rubber industry has diminished markedly in this century, but the problem still is the second most common occupational disease. Contributing agents include natural rubber, as latex concentrate or dry crumb, as well as the various additives used for conditioning. Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention all have roles in reduction of incidence and severity of impairment. The choice of gloves and skin care methods must be based on a consideration of the efficacy of the materials and the environment in which they will be used. Careful attention to diagnosis yields benefits in treatment course and impairment reduction. Teamwork by occupational physicians, nurses, industrial hygienists, employees, and management is required. PMID:10495486

  9. Organizational culture and knowledge management in the electric power generation industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Robert D.

    Scarcity of knowledge and expertise is a challenge in the electric power generation industry. Today's most pervasive knowledge issues result from employee turnover and the constant movement of employees from project to project inside organizations. To address scarcity of knowledge and expertise, organizations must enable employees to capture, transfer, and use mission-critical explicit and tacit knowledge. The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory research was to examine the relationship between and among organizations within the electric power generation industry developing knowledge management processes designed to retain, share, and use the industry, institutional, and technical knowledge upon which the organizations depend. The research findings show that knowledge management is a business problem within the domain of information systems and management. The risks associated with losing mission critical-knowledge can be measured using metrics on employee retention, recruitment, productivity, training and benchmarking. Certain enablers must be in place in order to engage people, encourage cooperation, create a knowledge-sharing culture, and, ultimately change behavior. The research revealed the following change enablers that support knowledge management strategies: (a) training - blended learning, (b) communities of practice, (c) cross-functional teams, (d) rewards and recognition programs, (e) active senior management support, (f) communication and awareness, (g) succession planning, and (h) team organizational culture.

  10. Environmental Monitoring and the Gas Industry: Program Manager Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory D. Gillispie

    1997-12-01

    This document has been developed for the nontechnical gas industry manager who has the responsibility for the development of waste or potentially contaminated soil and groundwater data or must make decisions based on such data for the management or remediation of these materials. It explores the pse of common analytical chemistry instrumentation and associated techniques for identification of environmentally hazardous materials. Sufficient detail is given to familiarize the nontechnical reader with the principles behind the operation of each technique. The scope and realm of the techniques and their constituent variations are portrayed through a discussion of crucial details and, where appropriate, the depiction of real-life data. It is the author's intention to provide an easily understood handbook for gas industry management. Techniques which determine the presence, composition, and quantification of gas industry wastes are discussed. Greater focus is given to traditional techniques which have been the mainstay of modem analytical benchwork. However, with the continual advancement of instrumental principles and design, several techniques have been included which are likely to receive greater attention in fiture considerations for waste-related detection. Definitions and concepts inherent to a thorough understanding of the principles common to analytical chemistry are discussed. It is also crucial that gas industry managers understand the effects of the various actions which take place before, during, and after the actual sampling step. When a series of sample collection, storage, and transport activities occur, new or inexperienced project managers may overlook or misunderstand the importance of the sequence. Each step has an impact on the final results of the measurement process; errors in judgment or decision making can be costly. Specific techniques and methodologies for the collection, storage, and transport of environmental media samples are not described or

  11. Industrial water demand management and cleaner production potential: a case of three industries in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Mlilo, Sipho; Broome, Jeff; Lumbroso, Darren

    The combination of water demand management and cleaner production concepts have resulted in both economical and ecological benefits. The biggest challenge for developing countries is how to retrofit the industrial processes, which at times are based on obsolete technology, within financial, institutional and legal constraints. Processes in closed circuits can reduce water intake substantially and minimise resource input and the subsequent waste thereby reducing pollution of finite fresh water resources. Three industries were studied in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe to identify potential opportunities for reducing water intake and material usage and minimising waste. The industries comprised of a wire galvanising company, soft drink manufacturing and sugar refining industry. The results show that the wire galvanising industry could save up to 17% of water by recycling hot quench water through a cooling system. The industry can eliminate by substitution the use of toxic materials, namely lead and ammonium chloride and reduce the use of hydrochloric acid by half through using an induction heating chamber instead of lead during the annealing step. For the soft drink manufacturing industry water intake could be reduced by 5% through recycling filter-backwash water via the water treatment plant. Use of the pig system could save approximately 12 m 3/month of syrup and help reduce trade effluent fees by Z30/m 3 of “soft drink”. Use of a heat exchanger system in the sugar refining industry can reduce water intake by approximately 57 m 3/100 t “raw sugar” effluent volume by about 28 m 3/100 t “raw sugar”. The water charges would effectively be reduced by 52% and trade effluent fees by Z3384/100 t “raw sugar” (57%). Proper equipment selection, equipment modification and good house-keeping procedures could further help industries reduce water intake and minimise waste.

  12. Strategic Issues in Quality Management: 1. Theoretical Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship between strategic management and quality management concepts in a library and information services setting. Conceptual frameworks are presented and a new strategic quality management framework, inspired by the Japanese policy deployment approach, is developed that also discusses total quality management. (Author/LRW)

  13. [Chemical risk assessment in the construction industry: principles and critical issues].

    PubMed

    Manno, M

    2012-01-01

    Risk assessment (RA) represents the first step to ensure the protection of the workers' health in all work sectors, production and services included. For this reason RA has become a legal duty for the occupational physician in his/her professional activity. The basic concepts of RA have been developed as a formal procedure for the management of chemical risks but they are currently applied to protect human health against all types of occupational and environmental risk factors. In the construction industry, in particular, chemical risk assessment is specially difficult due to the complexity of the working condition, and the variability and multiplicity of exposure. The critical aspects of RA in the construction industry will be discussed here, in the attempt to highlight how the occupational physician, making use of traditional and new tools, including biological monitoring, can address and partly overcome them.

  14. Overlooked issues of snakebite management: time for strategic approach.

    PubMed

    Girish, K S; Kemparaju, K

    2011-01-01

    Snakebite is a medical emergency in many parts of the world, particularly in the temperate regions. According to 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) report, there are about 5 million snakebite incidences resulting in 2.5 million envenoming, and 125,000 deaths occur annually. Most affected are the healthy individuals like children and farming populations with resource poor settings and away from health care centers in low-income countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. In view of this, the WHO has declared snakebite as an ignored health crisis and a tropical disease. Although the death rate has reduced markedly due to anti-venom regiment, several limitations of it offer scope for better understanding of various ignored issues. Currently, snakebite therapeutics facing plethora of scientific, technological and public health challenges, including secondary/long term complications that have not been given importance so far. Because of dearth of knowledge, venom researchers and medical practitioners from affected countries worldwide should join together to accomplish this scenario. In view of this, the present review provides a broader perspective on the possible production and application of highly effective therapeutic master anti-venom, designing master diagnostic kit and also to deal with the inefficacy of anti-venom therapy against local manifestations and secondary complications of snakebite. The review demands thorough understanding of venom pharmacology, inculcating new strategies to handle and to enhance the efficacy of snakebite management and urge the governing systems of affected countries to take steps to curtail accidental debilitation and death rate of healthy individuals due to snakebite.

  15. From "Embrace and Change" to "Engage and Change": Trade Union Renewal and New Management Strategies in the UK Automotive Industry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Paul; Wass, Victoria

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 32 British union representatives and a survey of 200 auto workers found that union strength was renewed because of new management techniques in industry, which have increased local autonomy. Unions are directly engaged in the issues involved in teamwork, quality control, and flexible manufacturing. (SK)

  16. NGOs and gender policy: some issues from the south Indian silk-reeling industry.

    PubMed

    Mayoux, L

    1993-10-01

    In India, silk reeling, the middle stage in silk production, is potentially very profitable, and the silk industry has been required to adopt gender-aware policies such as appointing female staff and introducing gender sensitization training. To date, policies designed to encourage women's entrepreneurship in the reeling industry have been unsuccessful. Men have appropriated credit issued in women's names, and no women's cooperatives are currently in operation. The policies designed to encourage female entrepreneurship in reeling woefully overlooked the complexity of this work which involves a substantial investment of capital and significant risk. Women and girls continue to work as unpaid family workers and wage laborers without the benefits of governmental policies to protect their interests. In fact, attempts to introduce labor legislation to protect women have been blocked on the national level by the powerful Reelers' Association. Policies which address gender issues in the family and in the wider context of the silk industry are also lacking, and there is a wide variation in how women are able or unable to manipulate their positions to their advantage. Women's inabilities are the root cause of their inability to become entrepreneurs and improve their labor status. Nongovernmental organizations can enhance entrepreneurship and cooperative development by improving training in all aspects of running a business and in group formation. Women laborers must organize to improve wages and working conditions, and women must be able to increase their control over income and resources and their access to the outside world even as they decrease the time spent on unpaid reproductive labor. PMID:12320732

  17. Arsenal of democracy in the face of change: Issues and policy options in industrial preparedness planning

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Hardy, B.H.

    1990-03-01

    This paper is one of a set of working papers that serves as a background material to a FEMA-sponsored study of Industrial Mobilization planning. It identifies issues that will lead to policy alternatives in support of industrial preparedness. To do this, a simple framework cross classifying types of economic interaction between the DOD and the private sector, given peacetime, surge, and mobilization requirements. Next, policy recommendations from ten recent studies are examined. These came from a variety of different groups and focused on potential actions by DOD, FEMA, Congress, the Navy, and others. These are summarized and restated to match the cross classification framework. The planning framework is then used to organize a set of recommendations around three themes --- acquisition and public/private sector relationships technology and factor input enhancing activities, and offshore sourcing and international competitiveness. The DOD has already addressed the acquisition issue at great length and has implemented the bulk of its findings. These will undoubtedly increase the effectiveness and efficiency of its operations. It cannot, however, by itself fully rationalize the acquisition process so that incentives to achieve greater efficiency are fully passed on to contractors. DOD can, however, revise its acquisition process so that surge provisions are a deliberate step in the contract of each sensitive procurement, and could require a surge analysis for each action, steps that would highlight preparations for surge. DOD should consider the creation of a new institution similar to, but more generic than SEMATECH to handle its activities that directly enhance the defense industrial base. It should also support the creation of a body whose goal it is to identify non-neutralities in government policy. 23 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs.

  18. Hazardous waste management in Chilean main industry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Navia, Rodrigo; Bezama, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    The new "Hazardous Waste Management Regulation" was published in the Official Newspaper of the Chilean Republic on 12 June 2003, being in force 365 days after its publication (i.e., 12 June 2004). During the next 180 days after its publication (i.e., until 12 December 2004), each industrial facility was obligated to present a "Hazardous Waste Management Plan" if the facility generates more than 12 ton/year hazardous wastes or more than 12 kg/year acute toxic wastes. Based on the Chilean industrial figures and this new regulation, hazardous waste management plans were carried out in three facilities of the most important sectors of Chilean industrial activity: a paper production plant, a Zn and Pb mine and a sawmill and wood remanufacturing facility. Hazardous wastes were identified, classified and quantified in all facilities. Used oil and oil-contaminated materials were determined to be the most important hazardous wastes generated. Minimization measures were implemented and re-use and recycling options were analyzed. The use of used oil as alternative fuel in high energy demanding facilities (i.e., cement facilities) and the re-refining of the used oil were found to be the most suitable options. In the Zn and Pb mine facility, the most important measure was the beginning of the study for using spent oils as raw material for the production of the explosives used for metals recovery from the rock. In Chile, there are three facilities producing alternative fuels from used oil, while two plants are nowadays re-refining oil to recycle it as hydraulic fluid in industry. In this sense, a proper and sustainable management of the used oil appears to be promissory. PMID:18337002

  19. Environmental management system vs green specifications: how do they complement each other in the construction industry?

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick T I; Chan, Edwin H W; Chau, C K; Poon, C S; Chun, K P

    2011-03-01

    Environmental Management System (EMS) has been one of the important tools for sustainable construction for around two decades. However, many issues concerning sustainable development have not been properly addressed, and there is a need for the introduction of green specifications to advance green performance in construction through contract management. This paper defines green specifications, identifies the reasons for adopting green specifications and highlights the environmental issues that may not be addressed by solely adopting EMS. It also presents the results of a recent survey of practitioners concerning their opinions towards green specifications and possible impacts arising from their adoption. From the results of the survey, a framework for developing green specifications is deemed valuable for the cities striving for sustainability. Interestingly, the level of acceptable changes brought about by green specifications as perceived by different industry stakeholders is found to be unrelated to whether they were from organizations implementing EMS or not.

  20. Civil Protection issues in urban management of natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru, Maria; Georgescu, Sever; Goretti, Agostino; Markus, Michael

    2010-05-01

    This paper reviews different approaches of collaboration with the Civil Protection across Europe, from the experience of the author. The first contact came working as a research assistant at the Universität Karlsruhe (TH), Germany, in frame of the SFB (Collaborative Research Centre) 461 "Strong earthquakes", which featured a collaboration Germany-Romania. The subproject C7, where involved, about Novel Rescue technologies was a collaboration between the Institute for Technology and Management in Construction, formerly Institute for Construction Management and Machinery, and the Romanian Civil Protection. The scientific results of the project were to be lated implemented by the Civil Protection. In course of the work contacts were done also through the work of the research associate, sub-project leader, in the THW (German Technical Assistance). Later on work continued at the same institute but in frame of the Research Training Network "Natural Disasters" when also contacts with the Romanian representative to the European Earthquake Engineering Association, were established. Working further in the same field of Natural Disasters, especially seismic risk, brought the author to the ROSE School in Pavia, Italy, researches of which closely collaborate with the EUCENTRE, founded, among other institutions, by the Italian Civil Protection. Particularly the collaboration with specialists from the Italian Civil Protection resulted in several initiatives, such as: - paper contribution to a special issue edited by the author, - organisation of EGU sessions on the topic of "Natural Hazards' Impact on Urban Areas and Infrastructure", - invited review of papers, - attendance of short course coordinated at the ROSE School on post-earthquake safety assessment, - ellaboration of scientific projects submitted for funding on the topic of earthquake hazard impact at various geographic scales, - further publication collaborations are in work, - it is intended to improve the collaboration

  1. Ethical, environmental and social issues for machine vision in manufacturing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Bruce G.; Whelan, Paul F.

    1995-10-01

    Some of the ethical, environmental and social issues relating to the design and use of machine vision systems in manufacturing industry are highlighted. The authors' aim is to emphasize some of the more important issues, and raise general awareness of the need to consider the potential advantages and hazards of machine vision technology. However, in a short article like this, it is impossible to cover the subject comprehensively. This paper should therefore be seen as a discussion document, which it is hoped will provoke more detailed consideration of these very important issues. It follows from an article presented at last year's workshop. Five major topics are discussed: (1) The impact of machine vision systems on the environment; (2) The implications of machine vision for product and factory safety, the health and well-being of employees; (3) The importance of intellectual integrity in a field requiring a careful balance of advanced ideas and technologies; (4) Commercial and managerial integrity; and (5) The impact of machine visions technology on employment prospects, particularly for people with low skill levels.

  2. Solid waste management in the hospitality industry: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Sanaa I; Arafat, Hassan A

    2014-12-15

    Solid waste management is a key aspect of the environmental management of establishments belonging to the hospitality sector. In this study, we reviewed literature in this area, examining the current status of waste management for the hospitality sector, in general, with a focus on food waste management in particular. We specifically examined the for-profit subdivision of the hospitality sector, comprising primarily of hotels and restaurants. An account is given of the causes of the different types of waste encountered in this sector and what strategies may be used to reduce them. These strategies are further highlighted in terms of initiatives and practices which are already being implemented around the world to facilitate sustainable waste management. We also recommended a general waste management procedure to be followed by properties of the hospitality sector and described how waste mapping, an innovative yet simple strategy, can significantly reduce the waste generation of a hotel. Generally, we found that not many scholarly publications are available in this area of research. More studies need to be carried out on the implementation of sustainable waste management for the hospitality industry in different parts of the world and the challenges and opportunities involved. PMID:25194519

  3. Solid waste management in the hospitality industry: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Sanaa I; Arafat, Hassan A

    2014-12-15

    Solid waste management is a key aspect of the environmental management of establishments belonging to the hospitality sector. In this study, we reviewed literature in this area, examining the current status of waste management for the hospitality sector, in general, with a focus on food waste management in particular. We specifically examined the for-profit subdivision of the hospitality sector, comprising primarily of hotels and restaurants. An account is given of the causes of the different types of waste encountered in this sector and what strategies may be used to reduce them. These strategies are further highlighted in terms of initiatives and practices which are already being implemented around the world to facilitate sustainable waste management. We also recommended a general waste management procedure to be followed by properties of the hospitality sector and described how waste mapping, an innovative yet simple strategy, can significantly reduce the waste generation of a hotel. Generally, we found that not many scholarly publications are available in this area of research. More studies need to be carried out on the implementation of sustainable waste management for the hospitality industry in different parts of the world and the challenges and opportunities involved.

  4. Managing Death Issues in the School. Monograph Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Bob; Morgan, Dan

    Many schools have been dealing with youth suicide and other death-related issues. From the experiences of the schools and other community organizations have emerged workable practices and procedures which can be implemented for general use. Schools can now develop and implement comprehensive plans to deal with death issues using a variety of…

  5. Current issues surrounding the definition of trans-fatty acids: implications for health, industry and food labels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Proctor, Spencer D

    2013-10-01

    The definition of trans-fatty acids (TFA) was established by the Codex Alimentarius to guide nutritional and legislative regulations to reduce TFA consumption. Currently, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is excluded from the TFA definition based on evidence (primarily preclinical studies) implying health benefits on weight management and cancer prevention. While the efficacy of CLA supplements remains inconsistent in randomised clinical trials, evidence has emerged to associate supplemental CLA with negative health outcomes, including increased subclinical inflammation and oxidative stress (particularly at high doses). This has resulted in concerns regarding the correctness of excluding CLA from the TFA definition. Here we review recent clinical and preclinical literature on health implications of CLA and ruminant TFA, and highlight several issues surrounding the current Codex definition of TFA and how it may influence interpretation for public health. We find that CLA derived from ruminant foods differ from commercial CLA supplements in their isomer composition/distribution, consumption level and bioactivity. We conclude that health concerns associated with the use of supplemental CLA do not repudiate the exclusion of all forms of CLA from the Codex TFA definition, particularly when using the definition for food-related purposes. Given the emerging differential bioactivity of TFA from industrial v. ruminant sources, we advocate that regional nutrition guidelines/policies should focus on eliminating industrial forms of trans-fat from processed foods as opposed to all TFA per se.

  6. Teacher, Lecturer or Labourer? Performance Management Issues in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Kim; Seifert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Education management has increasingly been dominated by the norms and requirements of general management ideologies that focus on performance controls and target achievements. Under this regime, solving the labour problem--relatively low productivity--has taken precedence over all other forms of management. In pursuit of this objective senior…

  7. Human Resources Management: Issues for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devanna, Mary Anne; And Others

    This collection of five articles examines the role and influence of human resources management (HRM) in strategic planning in major American companies. The first article, "Human Resources Management: A Strategic Perspective," by Mary Anne Devanna, Charles Fombrun, and Noel Tichy, describes how to conduct a human resource management audit to assess…

  8. E-waste: impacts, issues and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mumtaz; Mumtaz, Saniea

    2014-01-01

    The present electronic era has seen massive proliferation of electrical and electronic equipment especially during the last two decades. These gadgets have become indispensable components of human life. The gravity of this sensitive 21st century problem is being felt by relevant stakeholders from the community to global level. Consequently, the annual global generation of e-waste is estimated to be 20-50 million tons. According to the Basel Action Network, 500 million computers contain 287 billion kilograms (kg) plastics; 716.7 million kg lead; and 286,700 kg mercury. These gadgets contain over 50 elements from the periodic table. The lethal components include heavy metals (like cadmium, mercury, copper, nickel, lead, barium, hexavalent chromium and beryllium); phosphor; plastics; and brominated flame retardants. These are persistent, mobile, and bioaccumulative toxins that remain in the environment but their forms are changed and are carcinogens, mutagens and teratogens. The ensuing hazardous waste has created deleterious impacts on physical, biological and socioeconomic environments. The lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere of Earth are being gravely polluted. Human beings and other biodiversity face fatal diseases, such as cancer, reproductive disorders, neural damages, endocrine disruptions, asthmatic bronchitis, and brain retardation. Marginal populations of developing countries living in squatter/slums are most vulnerable. Numerous issues are associated with uncontrolled generation, unscientific and environmentally inappropriate recycling processes for the extraction of heavy and precious metals (e.g., gold, platinum, and silver), illegal transboundary shipments from advanced to developing countries and weak conventions/legislations at global and national levels. Although the Basel Convention has been ratified by most countries, illicit trading/trafficking of hazardous substances remains unchecked, sometimes "disguised" as donations. The fact

  9. Coordination of care in disease management: opportunities and financial issues.

    PubMed

    Mosley, C

    2000-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and pre-ESRD require higher utilization of health care resources. Current reimbursement modalities contribute to the fragmentation of care, and inadequate financial information obscures the fiscal impact disease management's coordination of care can have for this population. Ignoring the extreme costs of the first 3 months of hemodialysis underestimates costs by as much as 16%. Potential areas of coordination and the financial benefits are discussed. In each venue of the care settings of a patient with chronic renal failure (CRF) they may receive excellent service. Too often there is not optimal coordination of care between these venues, and in fact the fragmentation of care can cause unnecessary wear and tear on the patient, and increases the overall expense to a health care system. Understanding sources of fragmentation, reimbursement effects, and potential corrections will enhance the patient's voyage through the system. This article provides some examples of the discoordination that presently exists and financial implications especially during the transition onto dialysis. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), each arena of care has criteria established to quantitate quality. None of the settings, whether it is the dialysis unit, the hospital, the skilled nursing facility, or the physician's office, exists in the absence of regulations. These may be state or federal, National Council on Quality Assurance (NCQA), Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS), water standards, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), fire codes, physician peer review, Medicare billing, Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA), the ESRD networks, credentialing, health maintenance organization (HMO) insurance requirements, pharmacy benefits and formularies, safe harbors, "antikickback," or National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-DOQI) guidelines. For all the providers of care

  10. E-waste: impacts, issues and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mumtaz; Mumtaz, Saniea

    2014-01-01

    The present electronic era has seen massive proliferation of electrical and electronic equipment especially during the last two decades. These gadgets have become indispensable components of human life. The gravity of this sensitive 21st century problem is being felt by relevant stakeholders from the community to global level. Consequently, the annual global generation of e-waste is estimated to be 20-50 million tons. According to the Basel Action Network, 500 million computers contain 287 billion kilograms (kg) plastics; 716.7 million kg lead; and 286,700 kg mercury. These gadgets contain over 50 elements from the periodic table. The lethal components include heavy metals (like cadmium, mercury, copper, nickel, lead, barium, hexavalent chromium and beryllium); phosphor; plastics; and brominated flame retardants. These are persistent, mobile, and bioaccumulative toxins that remain in the environment but their forms are changed and are carcinogens, mutagens and teratogens. The ensuing hazardous waste has created deleterious impacts on physical, biological and socioeconomic environments. The lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere of Earth are being gravely polluted. Human beings and other biodiversity face fatal diseases, such as cancer, reproductive disorders, neural damages, endocrine disruptions, asthmatic bronchitis, and brain retardation. Marginal populations of developing countries living in squatter/slums are most vulnerable. Numerous issues are associated with uncontrolled generation, unscientific and environmentally inappropriate recycling processes for the extraction of heavy and precious metals (e.g., gold, platinum, and silver), illegal transboundary shipments from advanced to developing countries and weak conventions/legislations at global and national levels. Although the Basel Convention has been ratified by most countries, illicit trading/trafficking of hazardous substances remains unchecked, sometimes "disguised" as donations. The fact

  11. Florida's salt-marsh management issues: 1991-98.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D B; O'Bryan, P D; Rey, J R

    1999-06-01

    During the 1990s, Florida has continued to make important strides in managing salt marshes for both mosquito control and natural resource enhancement. The political mechanism for this progress continues to be interagency cooperation through the Florida Coordinating Council on Mosquito Control and its Subcommittee on Managed Marshes (SOMM). Continuing management experience and research has helped refine the most environmentally acceptable source reduction methods, which typically are Rotational Impoundment Management or Open Marsh Water Management. The development of regional marsh management plans for salt marshes within the Indian River Lagoon by the SOMM has helped direct the implementation of the best management practices for these marshes. Controversy occasionally occurs concerning what management technique is most appropriate for individual marshes. The most common disagreement is over the benefits of maintaining an impoundment in an "open" vs. "closed" condition, with the "closed" condition, allowing for summer mosquito control flooding or winter waterfowl management. New federal initiatives influencing salt-marsh management have included the Indian River Lagoon-National Estuary Program and the Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program. A new Florida initiative is the Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Eco-system Management Program with continuing involvement by the Surface Water Improvement and Management program. A developing mitigation banking program has the potential to benefit marsh management but mosquito control interests may suffer if not handled properly. Larvicides remain as an important salt-marsh integrated pest management tool with the greatest acreage being treated with temephos, followed by Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and methoprene. However, over the past 14 years, use of biorational larvicides has increased greatly.

  12. Violations of service fairness and legal ramifications: the case of the managed care industry.

    PubMed

    Chan, M

    2002-04-01

    Adapted from Chan's (2000) model depicting success of litigation, this paper argues that with the application of various legislation, health maintenance organizations' (HMOs') violations of service fairness to each group: enrollees, physicians, and hospitals give rise to each group's lawsuits against the HMOs. Various authors (Bowen et al., 1999; Seiders and Berry, 1998) indicate that justice concepts such as distributive, procedural, and interactional justice can be applied to the area of service fairness. The violation of these underlying justice principles with HMOs' service unfairness to enrollees, physicians, and hospitals is examined. A general synopsis of the ethical issues in the managed care industry is provided. The various lawsuits launched by each group: enrollees, physicians, and hospitals together with the key statutes used are discussed. This paper also highlights the provisions and ramifications of the 11 April 2000 landmark agreement that Aetna made with Texas Attorney General John Cornyn to settle the 1998 lawsuit brought against the company. Lastly, the current ethical issues in the managed care industry are further discussed. The value of this paper can be adapted to the study of organizations' service fairness violations in other industries or in the educational, governmental, and not-for-profit sectors both nationally and internationally. PMID:12206168

  13. Managing laboratory automation in a changing pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, M L

    1995-01-01

    The health care reform movement in the USA and increased requirements by regulatory agencies continue to have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry and the laboratory. Laboratory management is expected to improve effciency by providing more analytical results at a lower cost, increasing customer service, reducing cycle time, while ensuring accurate results and more effective use of their staff. To achieve these expectations, many laboratories are using robotics and automated work stations. Establishing automated systems presents many challenges for laboratory management, including project and hardware selection, budget justification, implementation, validation, training, and support. To address these management challenges, the rationale for project selection and implementation, the obstacles encountered, project outcome, and learning points for several automated systems recently implemented in the Quality Control Laboratories at Eli Lilly are presented. PMID:18925014

  14. Health risk management in the Tasmanian abalone diving industry.

    PubMed

    Smart, David

    2010-06-01

    Risk management is a systematic process applied to all aspects of diving operations. The process aims to reduce accidents and adverse outcomes to a minimum. Risk results from a combination of probability and consequence, and where this combination has major or extreme impact, the risk should not be tolerated. Over the four years 2001-2004, the incidence of decompression illness amongst abalone divers in Tasmania was 1.4 cases per 100 divers per year. Risk management in diving encompasses medical fitness, education and training, dive planning, equipment and maintenance, emergency procedures and equipment, and continual vigilance to remedy new risks as they are identified. There is still much to achieve in the Tasmanian abalone diving industry in all areas of risk management.

  15. Managing laboratory automation in a changing pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, M L

    1995-01-01

    The health care reform movement in the USA and increased requirements by regulatory agencies continue to have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry and the laboratory. Laboratory management is expected to improve effciency by providing more analytical results at a lower cost, increasing customer service, reducing cycle time, while ensuring accurate results and more effective use of their staff. To achieve these expectations, many laboratories are using robotics and automated work stations. Establishing automated systems presents many challenges for laboratory management, including project and hardware selection, budget justification, implementation, validation, training, and support. To address these management challenges, the rationale for project selection and implementation, the obstacles encountered, project outcome, and learning points for several automated systems recently implemented in the Quality Control Laboratories at Eli Lilly are presented.

  16. Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Diane E. Hoffmann

    2003-09-12

    On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the

  17. Issues that Drive Waste Management Technology Development for Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Levri, Julie A.; Hogan, John A.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    Waste management technologies for space life support systems are currently at low development levels. Manual compaction of waste in plastic bags and overboard disposal to earth return vehicles are the primary current waste management methods. Particularly on future missions, continuance of current waste management methods would tend to expose the crew to waste hazards, forfeit recoverable resources such as water, consume valuable crew time, contaminate planetary surfaces, and risk return to Earth of extraterrestrial life. Improvement of waste management capabilities is needed for adequate management of wastes. Improvements include recovery of water and other resources, conversion of waste to states harmless to humans, long-term containment of wastes, and disposal of waste. Current NASA requirements documents on waste management are generally not highly detailed. More detailed requirements are needed to guide the development of waste management technologies that will adequately manage waste. In addition to satisfying requirements, waste management technologies must also recover resources. Recovery of resources such as water and habitat volume can reduce mission cost. This paper explores the drivers for waste management technology development including requirements and resource recovery.

  18. Developing and Using Benchmarks for Eddy Current Simulation Codes Validation to Address Industrial Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayos, M.; Buvat, F.; Costan, V.; Moreau, O.; Gilles-Pascaud, C.; Reboud, C.; Foucher, F.

    2011-06-01

    To achieve performance demonstration, which is a legal requirement for the qualification of NDE processes applied on French nuclear power plants, the use of modeling tools is a valuable support, provided that the employed models have been previously validated. To achieve this, in particular for eddy current modeling, a validation methodology based on the use of specific benchmarks close to the actual industrial issue has to be defined. Nonetheless, considering the high variability in code origin and complexity, the feedback from experience on actual cases has shown that it was critical to define simpler generic and public benchmarks in order to perform a preliminary selection. A specific Working Group has been launched in the frame of COFREND, the French Association for NDE, resulting in the definition of several benchmark problems. This action is now ready for mutualization with similar international approaches.

  19. Performance issues in management of the Space Station Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    The onboard segment of the Space Station Information System (SSIS), called the Data Management System (DMS), will consist of a Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) token-ring network. The performance of the DMS in scenarios involving two kinds of network management is analyzed. In the first scenario, how the transmission of routine management messages impacts performance of the DMS is examined. In the second scenario, techniques for ensuring low latency of real-time control messages in an emergency are examined.

  20. Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management [Special Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Marshall; Brandt, Craig C; Christensen, Sigurd W; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Ham, Kenneth; Kszos, Lynn A; Loar, James M; McCracken, Kitty; Morris, Gail Wright; Peterson, Mark J; Ryon, Michael G; Smith, John G; Southworth, George R; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

  1. Geographical location and key sensitivity issues of post-industrial regions in Europe.

    PubMed

    Stuczynski, Tomasz; Siebielec, Grzegorz; Korzeniowska-Puculek, Renata; Koza, Piotr; Pudelko, Rafal; Lopatka, Artur; Kowalik, Monika

    2009-04-01

    Primary objectives of our work were to spatially delineate post industrial areas of the EU-27 and indicate key environmental, social and economic sensitivity issues for these regions. The density of industrial sites within NUTS-x regions for EU-27 countries was assessed by using CORINE 2000 land cover layer. A development of postindustrial society in Europe represents a strong geographic diversity. There are distinct historical and current differences between regions which form major groups, comprising similar internal characteristics and definable trends in environmental and socioeconomic sense. Regions grouped into postindustrial clusters are fundamentally different from the European average, and are facing specific problems related to global market and political changes. Eastern postindustrial regions can be characterized as socially and economically weak, exhibiting high unemployment rate, low GDP, negative population growth and a strong environmental pressure, represented by a high density of dump sites. Most of the western EU postindustrial areas have been successfully recovered and moved into new economy as shown by most of the indicators. In urban postindustrial zones, however, emission sources of pollutants seem to continually be a major problem--not necessarily in terms of exceeding thresholds, but through a remarkable difference in the amount of pollutants produced relative to other regions. PMID:18437515

  2. Press Releases Issued by Supplements Industry Organisations and Non-Industry Organisations in Response to Publication of Clinical Research Findings: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael T. M.; Gamble, Greg; Bolland, Mark J.; Grey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary supplement use is increasing despite lack of evidence of benefits, or evidence of harm. Press releases issued by the supplements industry might contribute to this situation by using ‘spin’ (strategies to hype or denigrate findings) to distort the results of clinical studies. We assessed press releases issued in response to publication of clinical studies on dietary supplements. Methods and Findings We analyzed 47 supplements industry press releases and 91 non-industry press releases and news stories, generated in response to 46 clinical studies of dietary supplements published between 1/1/2005 and 5/31/2013. The primary outcome was ‘spin’ content and direction. We also assessed disposition towards use of dietary supplements, reporting of study information, and dissemination of industry press releases. More supplements industry press releases (100%) contained ‘spin’ than non-industry media documents (55%, P<0.001). Hyping ‘spin’ scores were higher in industry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting benefit of supplements (median ‘spin’ score 3.3, 95% CI 1.0–5.5 vs 0.5, 0–1.0; P<0.001). Denigratory ‘spin’ scores were higher in industry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting no effect (6.0, 5.0–7.0 vs 0, 0–0; P<0.001) or harm (6.0, 5.5–7.5 vs 0, 0–0.5; P<0.001) from a supplement. Industry press releases advocated supplement use in response to >90% of studies that reported no benefit, or harm, of the supplement. Industry press releases less frequently reported study outcomes, sample size, and estimates of effect size than non-industry media documents (all P<0.001), particularly for studies that reported no benefit of supplements. Industry press releases were referenced by 148 news stories on the websites of 6 organizations that inform manufacturers, retailers and consumers of supplements. Conclusions Dietary supplements industry press releases issued in response to clinical research

  3. Handbook of Classroom Management: Research, Practice, and Contemporary Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evertson, Carolyn M., Ed.; Weinstein, Carol S., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom management is a topic of enduring concern for teachers, administrators, and the public. It consistently ranks as the first or second most serious educational problem in the eyes of the general public, and beginning teachers consistently rank it as their most pressing concern during their early teaching years. Management problems continue…

  4. The Strategic Management of Human Capital: Issues and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett

    2008-01-01

    Most recently a number of school districts, with support from growing numbers of philanthropic foundations, have been honing in on the strategic management of human capital(SMHC)--which has been defined as "the acquisition, development, performance management and retention of top talent." Granted, over the last two decades policymakers and…

  5. Framing the issues of resistance management in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean insect-pest complex consists of both long-established and new invasive pests. Management of these pests has been achieved by various means, but often relies heavily on the application of insecticides and the development of insect-resistant soybean varieties. Pest management practitione...

  6. NORM management in the oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Cowie, M; Mously, K; Fageeha, O; Nassar, R

    2012-01-01

    It has been established that naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may accumulate at various locations along the oil and gas production process. Components such as wellheads, separation vessels, pumps, and other processing equipment can become contaminated with NORM, and NORM can accumulate in the form of sludge, scale, scrapings, and other waste media. This can create a potential radiation hazard to workers, the general public, and the environment if certain controls are not established. Saudi Aramco has developed NORM management guidelines, and is implementing a comprehensive strategy to address all aspects of NORM management that aim to enhance NORM monitoring; control of NORM-contaminated equipment; control of NORM waste handling and disposal; and protection, awareness, and training of workers. The benefits of shared knowledge, best practice, and experience across the oil and gas industry are seen as key to the establishment of common guidance. This paper outlines Saudi Aramco's experience in the development of a NORM management strategy, and its goals of establishing common guidance throughout the oil and gas industry.

  7. Managing Scarce Water Resources in China's Coal Power Industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Lijin; Fu, Xiaotian; Zhao, Zhongnan

    2016-06-01

    Coal power generation capacity is expanding rapidly in the arid northwest regions in China. Its impact on water resources is attracting growing concerns from policy-makers, researchers, as well as mass media. This paper briefly describes the situation of electricity-water conflict in China and provides a comprehensive review on a variety of water resources management policies in China's coal power industry. These policies range from mandatory regulations to incentive-based instruments, covering water withdrawal standards, technological requirements on water saving, unconventional water resources utilization (such as reclaimed municipal wastewater, seawater, and mine water), water resources fee, and water permit transfer. Implementing these policies jointly is of crucial importance for alleviating the water stress from the expanding coal power industry in China.

  8. Managing Scarce Water Resources in China's Coal Power Industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Lijin; Fu, Xiaotian; Zhao, Zhongnan

    2016-06-01

    Coal power generation capacity is expanding rapidly in the arid northwest regions in China. Its impact on water resources is attracting growing concerns from policy-makers, researchers, as well as mass media. This paper briefly describes the situation of electricity-water conflict in China and provides a comprehensive review on a variety of water resources management policies in China's coal power industry. These policies range from mandatory regulations to incentive-based instruments, covering water withdrawal standards, technological requirements on water saving, unconventional water resources utilization (such as reclaimed municipal wastewater, seawater, and mine water), water resources fee, and water permit transfer. Implementing these policies jointly is of crucial importance for alleviating the water stress from the expanding coal power industry in China. PMID:26908125

  9. Framework for managing mycotoxin risks in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert C; Ford, Randall M; Helander, Mary E; Marecki, Janusz; Natarajan, Ramesh; Ray, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    We propose a methodological framework for managing mycotoxin risks in the food processing industry. Mycotoxin contamination is a well-known threat to public health that has economic significance for the food processing industry; it is imperative to address mycotoxin risks holistically, at all points in the procurement, processing, and distribution pipeline, by tracking the relevant data, adopting best practices, and providing suitable adaptive controls. The proposed framework includes (i) an information and data repository, (ii) a collaborative infrastructure with analysis and simulation tools, (iii) standardized testing and acceptance sampling procedures, and (iv) processes that link the risk assessments and testing results to the sourcing, production, and product release steps. The implementation of suitable acceptance sampling protocols for mycotoxin testing is considered in some detail.

  10. Managing Scarce Water Resources in China's Coal Power Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Lijin; Fu, Xiaotian; Zhao, Zhongnan

    2016-06-01

    Coal power generation capacity is expanding rapidly in the arid northwest regions in China. Its impact on water resources is attracting growing concerns from policy-makers, researchers, as well as mass media. This paper briefly describes the situation of electricity-water conflict in China and provides a comprehensive review on a variety of water resources management policies in China's coal power industry. These policies range from mandatory regulations to incentive-based instruments, covering water withdrawal standards, technological requirements on water saving, unconventional water resources utilization (such as reclaimed municipal wastewater, seawater, and mine water), water resources fee, and water permit transfer. Implementing these policies jointly is of crucial importance for alleviating the water stress from the expanding coal power industry in China.

  11. The Database Business: Managing Today--Planning for Tomorrow. Issues and Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitchison, T. M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Current issues and the future of the database business are discussed in five papers. Topics covered include aspects relating to the quality of database production; international ownership in the U.S. information marketplace; an overview of pricing strategies in the electronic information industry; and pricing issues from the viewpoints of online…

  12. Patient satisfaction measurement in the disease management industry.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaikat; Fawson, Paul; Cherrington, Graham; Douglas, Kathleen; Friedman, Neal; Maljanian, Rose; Fitzner, Karen; Tang, Pei; Soper, Steven; Wood, Steven

    2005-10-01

    In mid-2004, the Disease Management Association of America (DMAA) Patient Satisfaction Workgroup in association with J.D. Power and Associates (JDPA) conducted a literature review and a member survey to gain an understanding of the nature of patient satisfaction measurement as it pertains to disease management (DM) programs within the DM industry. A review of the relevant literature indicates that perhaps, with the exception of diabetes disease management, there are no prevalent, systematic, or statistically validated approaches for measuring patient satisfaction within the disease management industry. Most existing studies tend to focus on the effectiveness of a disease management program on clinical outcomes, with patient satisfaction measured only as a part of a battery of "outcome" measures. However, many of these studies do find positive associations between patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. A majority of the 49 respondents who completed the member feedback survey hold relatively high positions in their organizations. The vast majority of respondents indicate their organizations conduct patient satisfaction surveys that assess overall satisfaction, satisfaction with materials and information provided, and with staff members. Patient satisfaction surveys are most common among the five common chronic diseases: diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery disease (CAD), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). More than three in four respondents agree that patient satisfaction measurement is important to the long-term success of their programs. Respondents also indicate that along with intelligence on patients' overall satisfaction with the program, they would also like to gain an understanding of whether or not their programs actually help manage the patient's medical condition. Eight survey instruments currently in use and submitted by study participants were also reviewed. Most of these instruments are relatively short

  13. Managing the interface with marketing to improve delivery of pharmacovigilance within the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under pressure to improve the scientific quality of its decisions concerning the benefit and risks of its products while ensuring compliance with acceptable standards of marketing. All those in a pharmaceutical company who currently work within pharmacovigilance should be encouraged to lead from the front to examine ongoing marketing activities to see how they can be adapted more towards pharmacovigilance and risk management. The current irony is that the personnel who have the greatest influence on benefit-risk decisions of a product are not necessarily those who acknowledge that they are performing pharmacovigilance. Indeed, for all concerned, whether their orientation is scientific and commercial, effective communication with prescribers and consumers usually underpins product success. Also, a substantial 'marketing' budget is culturally acceptable for the pharmaceutical industry so it is logical to assume that resource for postmarketing activity is often made available. Given these realities, I suggest we should strive for an integrated marketing and risk-management plan based on the best available evidence and that being fully aware and in control of the safety issues for your products is the best way to commercialise them successfully. This approach can still be consistent with other corporate responsibilities such as trying to reduce the financial burden of product development. If this article stimulates further debate about how the pharmaceutical industry can more effectively organise resources and operations to support pharmacovigilance, risk management, and marketing, then it will have achieved its purpose.

  14. Managing the interface with marketing to improve delivery of pharmacovigilance within the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under pressure to improve the scientific quality of its decisions concerning the benefit and risks of its products while ensuring compliance with acceptable standards of marketing. All those in a pharmaceutical company who currently work within pharmacovigilance should be encouraged to lead from the front to examine ongoing marketing activities to see how they can be adapted more towards pharmacovigilance and risk management. The current irony is that the personnel who have the greatest influence on benefit-risk decisions of a product are not necessarily those who acknowledge that they are performing pharmacovigilance. Indeed, for all concerned, whether their orientation is scientific and commercial, effective communication with prescribers and consumers usually underpins product success. Also, a substantial 'marketing' budget is culturally acceptable for the pharmaceutical industry so it is logical to assume that resource for postmarketing activity is often made available. Given these realities, I suggest we should strive for an integrated marketing and risk-management plan based on the best available evidence and that being fully aware and in control of the safety issues for your products is the best way to commercialise them successfully. This approach can still be consistent with other corporate responsibilities such as trying to reduce the financial burden of product development. If this article stimulates further debate about how the pharmaceutical industry can more effectively organise resources and operations to support pharmacovigilance, risk management, and marketing, then it will have achieved its purpose. PMID:15154832

  15. Managing Contracts For Educational Equity: Emerging Trends and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented expansion of the influence of the private sector in all aspects of public education. Across the United States, test publishers, software companies, virtual charter school operators, and other industries are rapidly moving to take advantage of the significant revenues made available by public policies.…

  16. Issues in NASA program and project management. Special report: 1995 conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the tenth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the 1996 Conference as follows: international partnerships; industry/interagency collaboration; technology transfer; and project management development process. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  17. Transferability of Industrial Management Concepts to Healthcare Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Dario; Villa, Agostino; MacCarthy, Bart; Bellomo, D.

    The paper presents the preliminary results of a RTD project devoted to the transfer of concepts and methods, originally developed in the industrial area, to the subject of healthcare services where a profitable application is envisaged. The approach is based on drawing out the analogies between supply chains, composed by a network of resources connected by transport devices, and the local networks of healthcare services (family doctors, specialists, ambulatories, first aid centers, hospitals) to which patients are directed. The crucial task of efficiently and effectively managing a territorial network of healthcare service centers is modeled by using control theory concepts, and application conditions are discussed.

  18. Medicaid and Managed Care: Key Data, Trends, and Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... states except Alaska, New Hampshire, and Wyoming reported operating comprehensive MMC programs as of October 2010. 1 ... 000. In addition to PACE, 11 states report operating additional capitated, managed long-term care programs, in ...

  19. Managed care contracting issues in integrated delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stewart, E E

    1996-01-01

    This article is a checklist for use by health care providers in reviewing proposed managed care contracting agreements. This checklist is not an exhaustive list, but is intended to be used as a framework for review.

  20. The Caring Approach and Social Issues in Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Brian K.; Dunn, Craig P.

    2005-01-01

    Most of the conversation, in both research and teaching circles, regarding stakeholder theory has been conducted in the language of absolute principles, of outcomes, and of responding to stakeholders to achieve organizational outcomes. More recently, conversations have occurred that have a different perspective on social issues in management…

  1. Nonrenewal of Probationary Teachers. School Management Advisor, Issue 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This document addresses legal requirements for and issues in the nonrenewal of probationary teachers in North Carolina. The interpretive analysis section points out that in order to protect itself against a charge of nonrenewal based on prohibited reasons, the school board must develop a written record that documents factors for its decision. A…

  2. Managing Campus Security: Issues for Police Officers at Public Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, William O.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    To maximize the effectiveness of their campus security systems while minimizing the institution's exposure to liability, campus administrators must understand the legal context in which their police or security personnel are operating as agents of authority. Some of these policy and behavior issues are explained. (MSE)

  3. Management and Leadership Issues for School Building Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, James

    2014-01-01

    School principals are confronted with a variety of issues as they provide leadership and organization to their schools. Evidence is growing that successful school leaders influence achievement through the support and development of effective teachers and the implementation of effective organizational practice (Davis, Darling-Hammond, LaPointe,…

  4. Certificate Suspension and Revocation. School Management Advisor, Issue 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This document describes the legal requirements for certificate suspension and revocation of North Carolina public-school teachers. Associated with its ability to administer teacher certification in the state, the State Board of Education also has the authority to suspend or revoke certificates. A question-and-answer section addresses issues of…

  5. [Immuno-haematology and blood bank inventory and issue management].

    PubMed

    Madre, F; Benoist, F; Chandesris, C; Nicola, N

    2010-12-01

    Blood bank management must ensure the correct blood product issuance in the right time. For this purpose, patient clinical and immuno-haematological data have to be taken into consideration. Inventory composition, by blood group and phenotype, blood product providing possibilities and transport delays are determining factors. Finally, a good management relies also on the use of consensually written procedures and the monitoring of pertinent indicators.

  6. Industrial Program of Waste Management - Cigeo Project - 13033

    SciTech Connect

    Butez, Marc; Bartagnon, Olivier; Gagner, Laurent; Advocat, Thierry; Sacristan, Pablo; Beguin, Stephane

    2013-07-01

    The French Planning Act of 28 June 2006 prescribed that a reversible repository in a deep geological formation be chosen as the reference solution for the long-term management of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste. It also entrusted the responsibility of further studies and design of the repository (named Cigeo) upon the French Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), in order for the review of the creation-license application to start in 2015 and, subject to its approval, the commissioning of the repository to take place in 2025. Andra is responsible for siting, designing, implementing, operating the future geological repository, including operational and long term safety and waste acceptance. Nuclear operators (Electricite de France (EDF), AREVA NC, and the French Commission in charge of Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies (CEA) are technically and financially responsible for the waste they generate, with no limit in time. They provide Andra, on one hand, with waste packages related input data, and on the other hand with their long term industrial experiences of high and intermediate-level long-lived radwaste management and nuclear operation. Andra, EDF, AREVA and CEA established a cooperation agreement for strengthening their collaborations in these fields. Within this agreement Andra and the nuclear operators have defined an industrial program for waste management. This program includes the waste inventory to be taken into account for the design of the Cigeo project and the structural hypothesis underlying its phased development. It schedules the delivery of the different categories of waste and defines associated flows. (authors)

  7. Management approaches to integrated solid waste in industrialized zones in Jordan: A case of Zarqa City

    SciTech Connect

    Mrayyan, Bassam; Hamdi, Moshrik R. . E-mail: moshrik@hu.edu.jo

    2006-07-01

    There is a need to recognize the difficulties experienced in managing waste and to understand the reasons for those difficulties, especially in developing countries such as Jordan. Zarqa is a Governorate located in central Jordan, which has 2874 registered industries, making up more than 52% of the total industries in the country. Zarqa Governorate suffers from serious solid waste problems. These problems arise from an absence of adequate policies, facilitating legislation, and an environmentally enthused public, which therefore have a negative impact on the environment and health. Solid waste generation in Zarqa Governorate has increased exponentially and has polluted natural resources and the environment. A significant change in municipal solid waste generation was evident between the years 1994 and 2000. The Zarqa Governorate generated 482 tons/day in 2002 with a per capita rate of 0.44 kg/cap-day [Consulting Engineers, 2002, Feasibility study for the treatment of industrial wastewater in Zarqa Governorate. A project funded by METAP and Zarqa Chamber of Industry. Unpublished report]. This manuscript assesses the current operational and management practices of solid waste in the Zarqa Governorate; and evaluates the associated issues of solid waste collection, storage, transport, disposal and recycling in developing countries. The lack of techniques, financial funds and awareness among public and private sectors form an obstacle for achieving a successful environmental program. Several options are proposed to address management goals. Although Jordan became the first country in the Middle East to adopt a national environmental strategy; waste disposal is still largely uncontrolled and large quantities of waste go uncollected. Ensuring proper management of solid wastes, enforcing regulations, and implementing proper environmental awareness programs that will enhance the public understanding and achieve greater efficiency, are the findings of this study.

  8. Microorganisms in metalworking fluids: current issues in research and management.

    PubMed

    Trafny, Elżbieta A

    2013-03-01

    The microbial contamination of water miscible metalworking fluids (MWFs) is a serious problem in metal industry. A good maintenance of MWF re-circulation systems can extend the lifetime of coolants and ensure the quality of the tools produced. In MWFs, as in the other water-based environments, microorganisms usually live in the form of biofilms, the communities of bacteria and fungi attached to the surface of sumps, metal parts and also to each other. Biofilms exhibit very high resistance to biocides. The effect of biocides that are used as additives to MWFs to control the growth of the bacterial and fungal microbiomes (microorganisms characteristic to the individual coolant system) have become the subject of research only in recent years. There are also only sparse reports on the impact of biocides on microorganisms growing in biofilms in MWF installations. Fast growing mycobacteria are important members of these biofilm communities. Their presence has recently been linked with the occurrence of cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, a serious respiratory disorder in the metal industry employees. The new, relatively fast and inexpensive techniques to assess the species diversity within MWF microbiomes and their population size should be developed in order to control the microorganisms' proliferation in MWFs and to diminish the occupational exposure to harmful bioaerosols in metal industry. PMID:23526197

  9. Managing psychosocial issues in a family with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Judith M; Murphy, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Managing diabetes in a child or teen requires constant attention and adjustment of insulin, carbohydrate intake, and activity level. Intensive diabetes management has the potential to improve diabetes outcomes; however, negotiating the many lifestyle accommodations essential to optimal diabetes control can place a significant burden on some children and families. Parenting a child with diabetes also involves a complex process of helping the child to achieve age-appropriate independence while assuring the child's safety in managing his or her diabetes. Each developmental stage brings new challenges to achieving the delicate balance between optimal diabetes control and age-appropriate independence in self-care management. Despite the laborious and intensive nature of diabetes treatment, an overarching goal of parenting a child with diabetes is to ensure that the family's quality of life is maintained and the child is able to participate in all academic and social activities that their peers enjoy. Although many families adapt and thrive, others struggle to make these adjustments. Working with families who are overwhelmed, encouraging them to identify and develop networks involving schools, extended family, community, and church groups can help them to increase available support. Helping families to access treatment when they are struggling can relieve further pain and improve management adherence and diabetes outcomes. Nurses are in a key position to evaluate the family's adaptive and coping skills and assist them to negotiate the psychosocial challenges that living with diabetes entails. PMID:21164317

  10. Future Training Issues in Australia's Industries. A Collection of the Papers Presented at the NCVER 1998 Conference: Industry Training Outlook '98 (Sydney, Australia, October 12-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Penelope, Ed.

    This book contains 31 papers from a conference on future training issues in Australia's industries. The following papers are included: "Training Development in Australia" (Chris Ellison); "Meeting National and Employer Training Requirements" (Mark Paterson); "Meeting Employee Training Requirements" (Bill Mansfield); "Training Challenges in…

  11. An operational centre for managing major chemical industrial accidents.

    PubMed

    Kiranoudis, C T; Kourniotis, S P; Christolis, M; Markatos, N C; Zografos, K G; Giannouli, I M; Androutsopoulos, K N; Ziomas, I; Kosmidis, E; Simeonidis, P; Poupkou, N

    2002-01-28

    The most important characteristic of major chemical accidents, from a societal perspective, is their tendency to produce off-site effects. The extent and severity of the accident may significantly affect the population and the environment of the adjacent areas. Following an accident event, effort should be made to limit such effects. Management decisions should be based on rational and quantitative information based on the site specific circumstances and the possible consequences. To produce such information we have developed an operational centre for managing large-scale industrial accidents. Its architecture involves an integrated framework of geographical information system (GIS) and RDBMS technology systems equipped with interactive communication capabilities. The operational centre was developed for Windows 98 platforms, for the region of Thriasion Pedion of West Attica, where the concentration of industrial activity and storage of toxic chemical is immense within areas of high population density. An appropriate case study is given in order to illuminate the use and necessity of the operational centre. PMID:11744201

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Behavioral Issues in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Manoochehri, Masood; Huey, Edward D.

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is an umbrella term for several different disorders. In behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), patients show deterioration in cognition and social behavior. New diagnostic criteria proposed by the International Behavioral Variant FTD Consortium provide greater sensitivity in diagnosing bvFTD. Current pharmacological management of symptoms relies on medications borrowed from treating Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and psychiatric disorders. The evidence for using AD medications such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is questionable. Psychiatric medications can be helpful. Trazodone or SSRIs can have some efficacy in reducing disinhibition, repetitive behaviors, sexually inappropriate behaviors, and hyperorality. Small doses of atypical antipsychotics may be helpful in decreasing agitation and verbal outbursts. Non-pharmacological management includes caregiver education and support and behavioral interventions. While symptomatic treatments are likely to remain important behavior management tools, targeting the underlying pathology of bvFTD with disease-modifying agents will hopefully be the future of treatment. PMID:22847063

  13. Economic issues and the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1995-09-01

    Enormous financial resources are expended worldwide on the treatment of the urologic complications and symptoms induced by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Even for its surgical management, where the best data exist, current international accounting of these expenditures remains very poorly documented. On February 8, 1994, the Department of Health and Human Services of the US government released clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of BPH. Imaging of the upper urinary tract as a routine diagnostic procedure is not recommended in these guidelines unless a comorbidity indicating its need exists. Diagnostic cystoscopy to assist in the decision of the need to treat is not recommended. Adherence to these two principles along with adherence to the strategies of management presented in the guidelines and discussed herein has the potential of achieving profound financial savings without impairing quality of care worldwide.

  14. Methodology for industrial solid waste management: implementation to sludge management in Asturias (Spain).

    PubMed

    Mesa Fernández, José M; Palacios, Henar Morán; Alvarez Cabal, José V; Martínez Huerta, Gemma M

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays, the industry produces an enormous amount of solid waste that has very negative environmental effects. Owing to waste variety and its scattered sites of production, selecting the most proper solid waste treatment is difficult. Simultaneously, social concern about environmental sustainability rises every day and, as a consequence, improvement on waste treatment systems is being demanded. However, when a waste treatment system is being designed, not only environmental but also technical and economic issues should be considered. This article puts forward a methodology to provide industrial factories with an easy way to identify, evaluate and select the most suitable solid waste treatment.

  15. Spanish high level radioactive waste management system issues

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, A.; Veganzones, A.

    1993-12-31

    The Empresa Nacional de Residuous Radiactivos, S.A. (ENRESA) was set up in 1984 as a state-owned limited liability company to be responsible for the management of all kinds of radioactive wastes in Spain. This paper provides an overview of the strategy and main lines of action stated in the third General Radioactive Waste Plan, currently in force, for the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level wastes, as well as an outline of the main related projects, either being developed or foreseen. Aspects concerning the organizational structure, the economic and financing system and the international co-operational are also included.

  16. Issues in NASA program and project management. Special Report: 1993 conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, ED (Editor); Kishiyama, Jenny S. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This volume is the seventh in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the 1993 Conference: perspectives in NASA program/project management; the best job in aerospace; improvements in project management at NASA; strategic planning...mapping the way to NASA's future; new NASA procurement initiatives; international cooperation; and industry, government and university partnership. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  17. Special Issue: Biography in Management and Organisational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Sarah; And Others

    1992-01-01

    "Autobiographical Awareness as a Catalyst" (Torbert, Fisher); "Biography in Management and Organisational Development [OD]" (Jones); "Careers" (Davies); "Biography Work and Women's Development" (Farrell); "Biography as a Research Method for Investigating OD" (Salama); "Biographical Approach to Business Strategy" (Leary); "Biographical Research"…

  18. SABIS International Charter School: Management Issues and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Office of the Inspector General, Boston.

    SABIS International Charter School was among 24 Commonwealth charter schools included in a study undertaken by the Office of the Inspector General in March 1998. The Office identified weaknesses in the contracting practices, procurement procedures, and financial management. Findings include: (1) the Board of Trustees did not employ sound business…

  19. Total Quality Management: Empirical, Conceptual, and Practical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackman, J. Richard; Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) has become a U.S. social movement. This commentary analyzes the writings of W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran, and Kaoru Ishikawa to assess TQM's coherence, distinctiveness, and likely perseverance. Rhetoric is winning over substance, unrelated interventions are being herded under the TQM banner, and research is not…

  20. Making Our Buildings Safer: Security Management and Equipment Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses three major components of library security: physical security of the environment; operating procedures for library staff, the public, and security personnel; and a contract security force (or campus security in academic institutions.) Topics include risk management; maintenance; appropriate technology, including security systems and…

  1. ISSUES OF BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE DESIGN TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today, many municipalities are implementing low-cost best management practices (BMPs). Structural control BMPs involve building a structure of some kind to store stormwater until it can be discharged into a nearby receiving water. Commonly used structural treatment BMPs include...

  2. Approaching Reflexivity through Reflection: Issues for Critical Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbert, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This conceptual article seeks to develop insights for teaching reflexivity in undergraduate management classes through developing processes of critical reflection. Theoretical inferences to support this aim are developed and organized in relation to four principles. They are as follows: first, preparing and making space for reflection in the…

  3. Strategic Issues in Quality Management: 2. Survey Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanssen, Carl Gustav

    1996-01-01

    Examines how and to what extent business-oriented libraries and information centers in the Nordic countries have implemented strategic quality management (SQM), drawing from theoretical considerations in an earlier article. An operational assessment model is proposed and empirical findings from a survey of business information services are…

  4. Solid waste management for climate change policy in industrial countries, newly industrialized countries, and developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Horng, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Although the First FCCC COP did not reach agreement on controlling greenhouse gases, the intention of international society on limiting climate change problems is obvious. Among the important greenhouse gases of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O, the control of CO{sub 2} emission is more important for industrial countries than for the others due to their large emission. The CO{sub 2} reduction for export-oriented NICs (Newly Industrialized Countries) is a growth-limited or -killing policy that will severely hurt the national economics and will be carefully evaluated before taking any action. On the other hand, the reduction of methane emission by proper managing solid wastes, especially landfills, stands for good short- and long-term investments for NICs and developing countries. A 50 to 90% CH{sub 4} recovery from landfill is feasible and profitable, but the methane recovery technology or capital cost needs to come from industrial countries. Taking the example in Taiwan, more than 60% of methane emission is from landfills. A medium 50% reduction can contribute to more than 5% reduction of CO{sub 2} equivalent basis on global warming potentials (GWPs). However, the landfill gas recovery program is still under demonstration without actual applications.

  5. Risk management in the competitive electric power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, Robert William

    From 1990 until present day, the electric power industry has experienced dramatic changes worldwide. This recent evolution of the power industry has included creation and multiple iterations of competitive wholesale markets in many different forms. The creation of these competitive markets has resulted in increased short-term volatility of power prices. Vertically integrated utilities emerged from years of regulatory controls to now experience the need to perform risk assessment. The goal of this dissertation is to provide background and details of the evolution of market structures combined with examples of how to apply price risk assessment techniques such as Value-at-Risk (VaR). In Chapter 1, the history and evolution of three selected regional markets, PJM, California, and England and Wales is presented. A summary of the commonalities and differences is presented to provide an overview of the rate of transformation of the industry in recent years. The broad area of risk management in the power industry is also explored through a State-of-the-Art Literature Survey. In Chapter 2, an illustration of risk assessment to power trading is presented. The techniques of Value-at-Risk and Conditional Value-at-Risk are introduced and applied to a common scenario. The advantages and limitations of the techniques are compared through observation of their results against the common example. Volatility in the California Power Markets is presented in Chapter 3. This analysis explores the California markets in the summer of 2000 including the application of VaR analysis to the extreme volatility observed during this period. In Chapter 4, CVaR is applied to the same California historical data used in Chapter 3. In addition, the unique application of minimizing the risk of a power portfolio by minimizing CVaR is presented. The application relies on recent research into CVaR whereby the portfolio optimization problem can be reduced to a Linear Programming problem.

  6. A hypertext environmental regulations manager for the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Pecore, J.S.; Hazlett, W.G.; Blaylock, R.

    1996-11-01

    A hypertext environmental regulations manager for the state of New Mexico has been created for the petroleum engineer. With the growing need for an understanding of environmental regulations, the hypertext system is designed to store environmental information and regulations and present them in an interactive and intuitive manner. This research will demonstrate the advantages of an on-line system to provide the unfamiliar engineer a logical methodology to comprehend the environmental aspect of the petroleum industry. Environmental operating guidelines are easily accessed by using a point and click method. The environmental guidelines recommended by the Oil Conservation Division (OLD), the regulatory agency for the petroleum industry in New Mexico, are presented as the primary focus of this work. These guidelines are categorized by five subject areas most useful to the petroleum engineer: drilling, production, pipeline and abandonment operations, and leaks, spill and release response. The manager also supplies the permitting requirements and procedures for environmentally sensitive operations such as drilling, injection and enhanced recovery and abandonment operations referenced to the OCD general operating rules and regulations for oil and gas exploration and production. The permitting procedures section also presents the necessary forms to be filed for such operations. Written in HTML (HyperText Markup Language), the manager s read using a browser such as Netscape. With the hypertext format, the program also furnishes Internet links to environmental information and resources like the EPA and the United States Congressional federal regulations in addition to commercial environmental World Wide Web sites. This system can be expanded to include not only environmental but all operating regulations for any state or country and is an effective method for future electronic filing of regulatory forms.

  7. Ethical issues at the university-industry interface: a way forward?

    PubMed

    Evans, G R; Packham, D E

    2003-01-01

    This paper forms an introduction to this issue, the contents of which arose directly or indirectly from a conference in May 2001 on Corruption of scientific integrity?--The commercialisation of academic science. The introduction, in recent decades, of business culture and values into universities and research institutions is incompatible with the openness which scientific and all academic pursuit traditionally require. It has given rise to a web of problems over intellectual property and conflict of interest which has even led to corporate sponsors' suppressing unfavourable results of clinical trials, to the detriment of patients' health. Although there are those who see the norms of science developing to recognise the importance of instrumental science aiming at specific goals and of knowledge judged by its value in a context of application, none justifies the covert manipulation of results by vested interest. Public awareness of these problems is growing and creating a climate of opinion where they may be addressed. We suggest a way forward by the introduction of nationally and internationally-accepted guidelines for industrial collaboration which contain proper protections of the core purposes of universities and of the independence of their research. Some codes suggested for this purpose are discussed. We note that some universities are moving to adopt such codes of conduct, but argue the need for strong support from the government through its funding bodies.

  8. The Western Energy Corridor Initiative: Unconventional Fuel Development Issues, Impacts, and Management Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfsberg, A.; Hagood, M.; Pasqualini, D.; Wood, T.; Wilson, C.; Witkowski, M.; Levitt, D.; Pawar, R.; Keating, G.; Ziock, H.

    2008-12-01

    The United States is increasingly dependent on imported oil and gas; commodities for which other nations are competing and for which future supply may be inadequate to support our transportation fuel needs. Therefore, a renewed interest in 'harder-to-get' unconventional fuels has emerged in both industry and government with directed focus on world class hydrocarbon resources within a corridor extending from Canada southward through the Rocky Mountain States. Within this Western Energy Corridor, co-located with significant conventional hydrocarbon and renewable energy resources, lie some of the world's richest unconventional hydrocarbon resources in oil shales, oil sands and coal for coal-to-liquid conversion. However, development of these resources poses substantial environmental concerns as well as increasing competition for limited resources of water and habitat. With large-scale energy development in the predominantly rural region, local communities, infrastructures, and economies will face increasing demands for roads, electricity, law enforcement, labor, and other support services. The Western Energy Corridor Initiative (WECI) seeks to develop an integrated assessment of the impacts of unconventional fuel development, the interrelationships of planned energy developments in different basins, and the resultant demands placed on the region. This initial WECI study focuses on two of the most important current issues for industry, regulators, and stakeholders -- the assessment of carbon and water resources issues, impacts, and management strategies. Through scenario analyses using coupled systems and process level models, this study investigates the viability of integrated development of multiple energy resources in a carbon neutral and environmentally acceptable manner, and the interrelationships of various energy resource development plans. The modeling framework is designed to extend to include infrastructure, employment, training, fiscal and economic demands

  9. 75 FR 1116 - RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic... RTCA Government/Industry Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee. DATES: The meeting will be...

  10. Issues in health care: interventional pain management at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2007-03-01

    Emerging strategies in health care are extremely important for interventional pain physicians, as well as with the payors in various categories. While most Americans, including the US Congress and Administration, are looking for ways to provide affordable health care, the process of transformation and emerging health care strategies are troubling for physicians in general, and interventional pain physicians in particular. With the new Congress, only new issues rather than absolute solutions seem to emerge. Interventional pain physicians will continue to face the very same issues in the coming years that they have faced in previous years including increasing national health care spending, physician payment reform, ambulatory surgery center reform, and pay for performance. The national health expenditure data continue to extend the spending pattern that has characterized the 21st century, with US health spending continuing to outpace inflation and accounting for a growing share of the national economy. Health care spending in 2005 was $2.0 trillion or $6,697 per person and represented 16% of the gross domestic product. In 2005, Medicare spending reached $342 billion, while Medicaid spending was $315 billion. Physician and clinical services occupied approximately 21% of all US health care spending in 2005, reaching $421.2 billion. Overall, health spending in the US is expected to double to $4.1 trillion by 2016, then consuming 20% of the nation's gross domestic product, up from the current 16%. It is predicted that by 2016 the government will be paying 48.7% of the nation's health care bill, up from 38% in 1970 and 40% in 1990. The Medicare Physician Payment system based on the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula continues to be a major issue for physicians. The Congressional Budget Office has projected budget implications of change in the SGR mechanism, with consideration for allowing payment rates to increase by the amount of medical inflation, costing Medicare an

  11. [Critical research issues in nursing policy and management: a healthcare system perspective].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jwo-Leun; Chen, Wen-Yi; Hung, Chin-Tun; Hsu, Ming-Yi

    2011-06-01

    This study explores critical research issues in nursing policy and management in Taiwan from a healthcare system perspective that considers resources, programmes and organisations, service delivery, policy and management, and economic support. Findings suggest the following: In terms of resources, priority issues include quantity planning, active surveillance, planning methodology, and estimation of work life expectancies for nursing manpower. In terms of programmes ÷ organisations and delivery, priority issues include skill mix, task shifting, nationwide nursing work surveys, and nursing manpower structure and utilization. In terms of policy/management and economic support, priority issues included minimum nursing manpower requirements by law or medical institution standards and the relationship between the social insurance payment system and development of the nursing profession. The last section of this paper makes suggestions on practical ways to improve nursing policy and management research in Taiwan.

  12. Psychosocial issues in ventricular assist device implantation and management.

    PubMed

    Petty, Michael; Bauman, Lillian

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is to increase quantity and quality of life (QOL) in patients with systolic heart failure refractory to medical therapies. A key contributor to the success in MCS therapy is a comprehensive assessment of the candidate for device implantation. A crucial element of that assessment is an evaluation of the individual's psychosocial status, recommended by most current MCS guidelines. By focusing on criteria including drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse, ability to learn and problem solve, history of adherence to medical regimens, and adequate psychosocial support following implant, the team has an opportunity to create an individualized post-discharge plan that addresses identified gaps and optimizes the patient's likelihood for success. Information gathered also provides the team with a setting in which to discuss the patient's personal goals for the therapy and advanced care planning. We explore all of these issues and offer recommendations for approaching psychosocial assessment for MCS patients.

  13. Air quality management in China: issues, challenges, and options.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzed the control progress and current status of air quality, identified the major air pollution issues and challenges in future, proposed the long-term air pollution control targets, and suggested the options for better air quality in China. With the continuing growth of economy in the next 10-15 years, China will face a more severe situation of energy consumption, electricity generation and vehicle population leading to increase in multiple pollutant emissions. Controlling regional air pollution especially fine particles and ozone, as well as lowering carbon emissions from fossil fuel consumption will be a big challenge for the country. To protect public health and the eco-system, the ambient air quality in all Chinese cities shall attain the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) and ambient air quality guideline values set by the World Health Organization (WHO). To achieve the air quality targets, the emissions of SO2, NOx, PM10, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) should decrease by 60%, 40%, 50%, and 40%, respectively, on the basis of that in 2005. A comprehensive control policy focusing on multiple pollutants and emission sources at both the local and regional levels was proposed to mitigate the regional air pollution issue in China. The options include development of clean energy resources, promotion of clean and efficient coal use, enhancement of vehicle pollution control, implementation of synchronous control of multiple pollutants including SO2, NOx, VOC, and PM emissions, joint prevention and control of regional air pollution, and application of climate friendly air pollution control measures.

  14. Quality issues in tissue banking: quality management systems - a review.

    PubMed

    Von Versen, R; Mönig, H J; Salai, M; Bettin, D

    2000-01-01

    The situation in tissue banking changed radically and fundamentally at the beginning of the 1990s. The essential causes are on the one hand, the continually increasing demand for human cells and tissue and other biological material for clinical use and research, and on the other hand, the rapid progress in the medical, technical and natural sciences. Biotechnology in particular, has profited from this. Modern tissue banks could no longer be imagined without its methods.A consequence of these developments and a prerequisite for the fulfilment of the derived requirements is the necessity for national and international cooperation as well as the harmonisation of ethical principles and quality assurance standards and regulations (von Versen (1999) Ann Chir Gynaecol 88: 215-220). The introduction of an all-encompassing Quality Management System (QMS) is a suitable instrument for this purpose.After the presentation of explanations and definitions of quality terminology, this article describes the use of the international standard ISO 9000 as a general QMS, which embraces both the specific methodology as well as the general aspects of Quality Management (research and development, design control, education and training, documentation, traceability, management control, corrective action, etc.) in tissue banking. The individual elements of this system are explained and selected examples are described. The authors look upon this QMS as an indispensable instrument for harmonisation and international cooperation in tissue banking.Finally, the use of such a standard would be a positive sign to the regulatory authorities and the public that tissue banking is making a visible effort to introduce a world-class QMS in its operations.

  15. A Knowledge Management Model for Firms in the Financial Services Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Held, Carsten; Duncan, Glen; Yanamandram, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    The financial services industry faces many demanding challenges. Firms within this industry are predominantly knowledge-based, as are most of the industry's products, processes and services. The application of knowledge management represents a clear opportunity for financial services firms to confront challenges. However, no industry specific…

  16. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management. Special Report: 1997 Conference. Project Management Now and in the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics Considered Include: NASA's Shared Experiences Program; Core Issues for the Future of the Agency; National Space Policy Strategic Management; ISO 9000 and NASA; New Acquisition Initiatives; Full Cost Initiative; PM Career Development; PM Project Database; NASA Fast Track Studies; Fast Track Projects; Earned Value Concept; Value-Added Metrics; Saturn Corporation Lessons Learned; Project Manager Credibility.

  17. Issues for Active State Management of the JTPA Title III Grant: A Guide for State Planners and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reesman, Cilla J.

    This technical assistance guide presents the various options available to state planners and managers in considering five elements of active grant management. Each element is treated in a separate chapter. Chapter 1 addresses issues surrounding the setting of policies that ensure that Title III grants complement state agendas. Chapter 2 concerns…

  18. How to manage conflicts of interest with industry?

    PubMed

    Schowalter, John E

    2008-04-01

    The use of medications has risen steadily in psychiatry. Perhaps in response, during the past few years there has been increasing scrutiny of alleged unethical behaviours by medical researchers, educators, and practitioners secondary to influence by the pharmaceutical industry. Research is quite consistent that gifts and generous financial arrangements can dampen skepticism, sometimes unconsciously, and thereby persuade recipients to advocate for or prescribe medications that are more expensive, but no more effective, than alternatives. Interestingly, this research-backed premise that physicians can be lured by gifts remains often disbelieved by recipients. Adding to such inducements to prescribe new, expensive medications are pressures from patients due to the increasing ubiquity of direct-to-consumer advertising. Criticism from patient advocate groups, government agencies, and the press has sparked debate within the profession. Many medical journals, academic medical centre research and educational endeavours, and medical organizations are reviewing policies to eliminate, or better manage, their conflicts of interest with industry. The basic ethical standard is that although pharmaceutical companies' primary concern is for its shareholders, physicians' primary concern must be for their patients. PMID:18386202

  19. The Importance of Building and Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in the Areas of Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-07-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry ' s involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  20. Multiple Case Study of Event Management Curricula and Industry Professionals' Expectations of New Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Premila A.

    2016-01-01

    The event management segment of the hospitality industry has experienced tremendous growth in recent years. As a result, demand for qualified event management professionals continues to increase. To help prepare qualified professionals for the event management industry, higher education institutions in the United States are now offering…

  1. Ethical issues in using data from quality management programs.

    PubMed

    Nerenz, David R

    2009-08-01

    Since the advent of formal, data-driven quality improvement programs in health care in the late 1980s and early 1990s, there are have been questions raised about requirements for ethical committee review of quality improvement activities. A form of consensus emerged through a series of articles published between 1996 and 2007, but there is still significant variation among ethics review committees and individual project leaders in applying broad policies on requirements for committee review and/or written informed consent by participants. Recent developments in quality management, particularly the creation and use of multi-site disease registries, have raised new questions about requirements for review and consent, since the activities often have simultaneous research and quality improvement goals. This article discusses ways in which policies designed for local quality improvement projects and data bases may be adapted to apply to multi-site registries and research projects related to them. PMID:19365642

  2. Loans for medical students: the issue of manageability.

    PubMed

    Weiler, W C

    1976-06-01

    Unless there is a shift in student aid policy for medical students to a greater proportion of scholarships or grants, increased student borrowing is inevitable. This paper is concerned with the structure of student loan programs and with altering the repayment features of the programs for the convenience of the student borrower. In this context the Guaranteed Student Loan Program is analyzed and its current limitations discussed. A variant of the GSL program having an income contingent repayment feature is proposed. Computer simulations of loan repayments with the proposed income contingent variant and the current program using current and projected data on physicians' incomes are developed. Based on the results of these simulations, some conclusions regarding the manageability of repayments with the proposed loan program are presented.

  3. Ethical issues in the management of neonatal surgical anomalies.

    PubMed

    Caniano, Donna A

    2004-06-01

    This article provides a framework for thinking about three areas in neonatal surgery that contain potential moral and ethical concerns for pediatric surgeons and the parents of a newborn and/or fetus with a surgical anomaly. The utilization of life-sustaining therapy for neonates has made survival possible for many infants with serious birth defects. Sometimes the use of these treatments is problematic in terms of their actual benefit to the infant and the potential for enhancing their future quality of life. Second, the prenatal diagnosis of congential anomalies has made counseling of the prospective parents a routine part of pediatric surgical practice and raises the issue of how best to advise and support a couple whose fetus has a significant birth defect. Finally, pediatric surgeons have a responsibility to their patients and society to provide the highest quality of care. This may involve participation in multi-institutional clinical trials, so that the optimal care of a surgical neonate with a congenital or acquired condition is ascertained by rigorous prospective research evaluation. PMID:15283103

  4. Psychosocial issues in ventricular assist device implantation and management

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Lillian

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is to increase quantity and quality of life (QOL) in patients with systolic heart failure refractory to medical therapies. A key contributor to the success in MCS therapy is a comprehensive assessment of the candidate for device implantation. A crucial element of that assessment is an evaluation of the individual’s psychosocial status, recommended by most current MCS guidelines. By focusing on criteria including drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse, ability to learn and problem solve, history of adherence to medical regimens, and adequate psychosocial support following implant, the team has an opportunity to create an individualized post-discharge plan that addresses identified gaps and optimizes the patient’s likelihood for success. Information gathered also provides the team with a setting in which to discuss the patient’s personal goals for the therapy and advanced care planning. We explore all of these issues and offer recommendations for approaching psychosocial assessment for MCS patients. PMID:26793339

  5. Personal health records: key adoption issues and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Raisinghani, Mahesh S; Young, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Electronic Personal Health Records (PHRs) has been perceived as the tool to empower consumers to become active decision-makers of their healthcare instead of leaving the decision to providers. However, there has been the lack of enthusiasm and adoption of PHRs. This paper examines the current healthcare climate and attempts to understand the major challenges associated with PHRs adoption. The paper-based and fragmented healthcare system is no longer appropriate for the digital economy of the 21st century. The integrated health information technology system is the solution to transform clinical practice to consumer centric and information driven. Tools such as PHRs are means to an end that provide better, safer and more affordable healthcare for consumers. However, there has been little research conducted to demonstrate PHR's tangible value, despite the widespread perceived value of these technologies. Although survey data reveals that there is a lack of awareness among the public, consumers are receptive to this concept, especially when a physician recommends it. Key issues in adopting PHRs and strategies for successful implementation of PHRs are discussed.

  6. Fuel switching issues in the industrial sector. Topical report, June 1992-November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, M.O.; Sloan, M.; Breese, M.; Hogan, T.

    1993-12-01

    The study addresses the potential for fuel switching in the industrial sector, primarily in the context of switching away from natural gas to residual fuel oil. The industrial sector consumes more natural gas than any other end use sector and, since the mid-1980's, has experienced a growing demand for natural gas. While it is often overshadowed by prospects for expanded gas use in the electricity utility sector, the industrial sector remains a major source of growth potential for the future. Petroleum, particularly residual fuel oil, would be the major near term competitor to natural gas in the industrial sector. Although some gas to coal fuel switching is possible in the industrial sector, primarily in industrial boilers, gas consumption in the industrial sector is not as vulnerable to competition from coal as it is in larger electric utility boilers.

  7. Management of eWork health issues: a new perspective on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Elizabeth; Strong, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Contact centres are vehicles for a rapidly growing group of knowledge workers, or eWorkers. Using computers and high-speed telecommunications connections as work tools, these employees spend long hours performing mentally demanding work while maintaining static, physically stressful, seated positions. The complex interplay between job demands, work environment, and individual differences combine to produce high levels of physical discomfort among eWorkers. This paper discusses a new view that has emerged, one that focuses on the management rather than the elimination of work related upper limb disorders (WRULD) and computer vision syndrome (CVS) issues that are prevalent among eWorkers. It also reviews a cultural shift among practitioners and business that moves towards a consultative process and the sharing of knowledge among all stakeholders. The controlled work conditions and large single location workforce found within contact centres provide the opportunity to understand the personal and industry cost of eWork injuries and the ability to develop and review new multifaceted interventions. Advances in training and workplace design aimed at decreasing discomfort and injury and reducing the associated economic burden may then be adapted for all eWorkforce groups. PMID:20164612

  8. Management of eWork health issues: a new perspective on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Elizabeth; Strong, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Contact centres are vehicles for a rapidly growing group of knowledge workers, or eWorkers. Using computers and high-speed telecommunications connections as work tools, these employees spend long hours performing mentally demanding work while maintaining static, physically stressful, seated positions. The complex interplay between job demands, work environment, and individual differences combine to produce high levels of physical discomfort among eWorkers. This paper discusses a new view that has emerged, one that focuses on the management rather than the elimination of work related upper limb disorders (WRULD) and computer vision syndrome (CVS) issues that are prevalent among eWorkers. It also reviews a cultural shift among practitioners and business that moves towards a consultative process and the sharing of knowledge among all stakeholders. The controlled work conditions and large single location workforce found within contact centres provide the opportunity to understand the personal and industry cost of eWork injuries and the ability to develop and review new multifaceted interventions. Advances in training and workplace design aimed at decreasing discomfort and injury and reducing the associated economic burden may then be adapted for all eWorkforce groups.

  9. Major Elements and Issues in Performance Management System: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Eul-Kyoo

    2006-01-01

    Due to rapidly changing business environment, HRD practitioners are unprecedentedly demanded to actively participate in improving organizational effectiveness as performance management specialist. The purpose of this study was to examine and discuss major elements and issues in performance management system through an extensive literature review…

  10. Environmental Management Accounting in the Taiwanese Higher Education Sector: Issues and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Huei-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of managing the major environmental costs from an accounting perspective. The current state of practices for managing the costs associated with the consumption of electricity, water and paper, as well as the generation of wastes within three universities in Taiwan, was investigated. The…

  11. Sustainable Land Management and Adult Education: Issues for the Stakeholders of Australia's Tropical Savannas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    Sustainable land management is an important consideration for stakeholders in Australia's tropical savannas. Land-management-education providers must deal with issues of access and the impact of values and perceptions on behavior. Adult educators must take on the role of negotiating attitudes and beliefs among stakeholders. (SK)

  12. Librarians as Members of Integrated Institutional Information Programs: Management and Organizational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Rachael K.; Fuller, Sherrilynne S.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the roles and relationships that developed among librarians, faculty, and higher education institutions in the Integrated Academic Information Management Systems environment, funded by the National Library of Medicine. Organizational and management issues that emerged as librarians became integral to teaching and administration are…

  13. Networked information: Management issues for the acquisitions librarian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Gregory

    1994-01-01

    Historically, libraries have been the depositories and public access points to both domestic and international government information. A change in the information seeking behavior of the public is driving a change in government information publishing and dissemination. Patrons who traditionally used libraries for access to printed government information have become familiar and comfortable with the electronic environment. These data users are showing an increased interest in certain types of government information in electronic format, including indexes, numeric files, statistics, and hypertext documents. Government response to increased demand for electronic information has led to a flurry of special initiatives, with the production of information products on diskette, CD-ROM, and dissemination via the Internet. Libraries, and acquisitions units in particular, are being challenged to provide consistent and timely management of the information. The rapidly developing communications infrastructure, which frequently redesigns access to the information environment, poses significant obstacles to, and the tremendous opportunities for, making large bodies of government information available to a broad base of users.

  14. Current Issues in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an uncommon disease most often associated with occupational asbestos exposure and is steadily increasing in worldwide incidence. Patients typically present at an older age, with advanced clinical stage and other medical comorbidities, making management quite challenging. Despite great efforts, the prognosis of MPM remains poor, especially at progression after initial treatment. Macroscopic complete resection of MPM can be achieved through extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) or extended (ie, radical) pleurectomy (e-P/D) in selected patients and can result in prolonged survival when incorporated into a multimodality approach. Given the morbidity associated with surgical resection of MPM, optimizing identification of appropriate patients is essential. Unfortunately, most patients are not candidates for EPP or e-P/D due to advanced stage, age, and/or medical comorbidity. Pemetrexed and platinum combination chemotherapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for patients with unresectable disease because the combination is associated with improved survival and quality of life in treated patients. However, MPM eventually becomes resistant to initial therapy, and benefit to further lines of therapy has not been substantiated in randomized clinical trials. Translational research has provided exciting insights into tumorigenesis, biomarkers, and immune response in MPM, leading to the development of multiple novel therapeutic agents that are currently in clinical trials. These advances hold the promise of a new era in the treatment of MPM and suggest that this disease will not be left behind in the war on cancer. PMID:25061089

  15. Environmental quality of Long Island Sound: Assessment and management issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, D.A.; Farrow, D.R.G.; Robertson, A. ); Monahan, R. ); Stacey, P.E. )

    1991-09-01

    Estimated pollutant loadings to Long Island Sound (LIS) are presented and discussed in the context of current information on population trends and land-use characteristics within the drainage basin of the sound. For the conventional pollutants (BOD, N, and P) and for most of the metals examined, the fluxes to LIS from wastewater treatment plants approach or exceed the fluxes from riverine sources. Urban runoff is a significant source for only a few contaminants, such as lead and petroleum hydrocarbons. Atmospheric flux estimates made for other areas are extrapolated to LIS, and this source appears to be significant for lead, zinc, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated pesticides. Continued population growth is projected through 2010, both in the urban centers of the western sound and in the coastal counties surrounding the central and eastern portions of LIS. This growth will place increased pollution pressure on the sound and increased demands on already scarce coastal and estuarine land-use categories. Close interaction between environmental planners, managers, and scientists is required to identify effective control strategies for reducing existing pollutant stress to the sound and for minimizing the effects of future development.

  16. Contemporary issues in the management of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B; Königs, Christoph; James, Andra H

    2016-08-31

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder. Bleeding scores in VWD, focused in particular on mucosal bleeding, can be very useful in the diagnosis and validation of different types of treatment. The results of an extended prospective study with a large amount of information on clinical phenotype and implications in treatment are reviewed in this article. Treatment of mucosal and joint bleeding in severe VWD remains difficult in some patients. Due to the lack of data on the use of prophylaxis in these patients it is difficult to establish optimal treatment regimens. An overview of the literature, with a focus on the ongoing PRO.WILL study, is provided here. Furthermore, understanding the changes in von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels during pregnancy is very important for establishing the optimal management strategy for pregnancy and delivery in women with VWD. A recently published prospective observational cohort study in women with and without VWD during the postpartum period provides important data that should allow the improvement of postpartum treatment protocols.

  17. Management issues in chronic viral hepatitis: hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sievert, William

    2002-04-01

    The natural history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and intervention with antiviral therapy are closely linked issues that cause the greatest controversy and concern for the person infected with HCV, as well as for the clinician involved in the assessment and treatment of people with chronic HCV infection. The outstanding challenge of natural history is to identify the person who is likely to develop serious liver disease, and to make that determination early in the course of chronic HCV infection when treatment is likely to be of the greatest benefit. Significant advances in the therapy of chronic HCV infection have occurred over the past decade. A sustained virological response (SVR), defined as undetectable HCV-RNA in blood 6 months after completing antiviral treatment, is the best indicator of a beneficial treatment effect. Relapse, breakthrough or non-response should all be regarded as unsuccessful outcomes of therapy. Interferons are still the mainstay of antiviral therapy for chronic HCV infection. The combination of interferon and ribavirin has improved SVR by decreasing the relapse rate. Treatment responses vary according to host factors such as age and gender, fibrotic severity and to viral factors like genotype and viral load. Patients with genotype 1 HCV and a high viral load require 12 months of treatment to achieve a SVR in approximately 30%, compared to those with genotypes 2 or 3 who achieve a SVR in approximately 65% after 6 months. Patients who relapse after an end-of-treatment response to interferon monotherapy have a good chance of responding to combination interferon and ribavirin given for 6 months, but a longer treatment course should be considered in less optimal cases. At present, the treatment of those with non-response is less clear, but there is interest in more intense forms of interferon therapy, such as induction dosing or pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin. Clinicians need to be aware of the common side

  18. Pediatric issues in disaster management, part 2: evacuation centers and family separation/reunification.

    PubMed

    Mace, Sharon E; Sharieff, Ghazala; Bern, Andrew; Benjamin, Lee; Burbulys, Dave; Johnson, Ramon; Schreiber, Merritt

    2010-01-01

    Although children and infants are likely to be victims in a disaster and are more vulnerable in a disaster than adults, disaster planning and management has often overlooked the specific needs of pediatric patients. We discuss key components of disaster planning and management for pediatric patients including emergency medical services, hospital/facility issues, evacuation centers, family separation/reunification, children with special healthcare needs, mental health issues, and overcrowding/surge capacity. Specific policy recommendations and an appendix with detailed practical information and algorithms are included. The first part of this three part series on pediatric issues in disaster management addresses the emergency medical system from the field to the hospital and surge capacity including the impact of crowding. The second part addresses the appropriate set up and functioning of evacuation centers and family separation and reunification. The third part deals with special patient populations: the special healthcare needs patient and mental health issues. PMID:20701172

  19. Construction waste management based on industrial management models: a Swedish case study.

    PubMed

    Stenis, Jan

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating the true internal costs of construction waste, aimed at promoting environmentally friendly waste management. The study employs cost-benefit analysis, contribution margin analysis, the polluter-pays principle and a mathematical model: the model for Efficient Use of Resources for Optimal Production Economy (EUROPE), which has been introduced previously by the author for assigning industrial costs to waste. The calculations are performed on construction waste created in a case study of a building project. Moreover, waste is regarded as, in a business sense, having the same basic status as any normal industrial product, namely the 'equality principle'. Application of the methodology is suggested to create incentives for environmental and profitability improvement in construction companies and other types of industrial sectors. The results of the case study show the generation of construction waste to substantially decrease the final operating income, due to the internal shadow price cost it creates. This paper is intended to reduce the gap between the choice of waste management procedures and their economic impact, the overall objective being to accomplish an improved industrial environmental situation.

  20. Current issues in the management of tuberculosis in Europe.

    PubMed

    Zellweger, J P

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis is a rare disease in Europe, so that most medical doctors never see a case and, although they know that the disease exists, they usually do not include it among the differential diagnosis of many respiratory or general disorders. Why is it, therefore, still important to speak about TB? This paper analysis some reasons: 1) TB is rare but has not disappeared. In Europe, some 400,000 cases are registered each year, with a slight decreasing tendency over the last few years but great disparities between countries and regions; 2) TB is more frequent in some risk groups, particularly among patients born in a country with a high incidence of disease or in persons exposed to the contact with TB, like close relatives of infectious patients. In EU/EEA, the majority of TB cases are observed among foreign-born persons; 3) if infected, some persons have a higher risk to develop TB. Small children and persons with viral or drug-induced immunosuppression (for instance anti-TNF) must be screened and protected if infected; 4) cases of TB among migrants generally occur after the entry in the country, from reactivation of latent TB acquired before. The border screening does not offer a garantee that the disease has been detected. Due attention to incurring symptoms and easy access to care must be maintained during the whole stay in the country for all foreign-born persons; 5) one of the major threats for the future is the progressive increase in the number of cases resistant to first-line drugs (Multidrug-resistant TB or MDR-TB) in several regions of the world, particularly in Eastern Europe; 6) due to decreasing knowledge and experience with the diagnosis and management of TB, many cases are diagnosed at a late stage. Medical doctors are encouraged to share their questions with experts and refer to existing Guidelines.

  1. Contemporary issues in the evaluation and management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Popovic, V

    2015-12-01

    treatment modalities fail to completely control the disease and prevent the associated morbidity and mortality. This article reviews the advances in our understanding of pituitary adenoma, the guidance in evaluation and management of different subtypes of pituitary adenomas and the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Dose assessment for management alternatives for NORM-contaminated equipment within the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, D.L.; Smith, K.P.

    1995-08-01

    The contamination of drilling and production equipment by naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is a growing concern for the petroleum industry and regulators. Large volumes of NORM-contaminated scrap metal are generated by the industry each year. The contamination generally occurs as surface contamination on the interior of water-handling equipment. The source of this contamination is accumulation of by-product wastes, in the form of scale and sludge contaminated with NORM that are generated by extraction processes. The primary radionuclides of concern in petroleum industry NORM-wastes are radium-226 (Ra-226), and radium-228 (Ra-228). These isotopes are members of the uranium-238 and thorium-232 decay series, respectively. The uranium and thorium isotopes, which are naturally present in the subsurface formations from which hydrocarbons are extracted, are largely immobile and remain in the subsurface. The more soluble radium can become mobilized in the formation water and be transported to the surface in the produced water waste stream. The radium either remains in solution or precipitates in scale or sludge deposits, depending on water salinity and on temperature and pressure phase changes. NORM-containing scale consists of radium that has coprecipitated with barium, calcium, or strontium sulfates, and sludge typically consists of radium-containing silicates and carbonates. This assessment is limited to the evaluation of potential radiological doses from management options that specifically involve recycle and reuse of contaminated metal. Doses from disposal of contaminated equipment are not addressed. Radiological doses were estimated for workers and the general public for equipment decontamination and smelting. Results of this assessment can be used to examine policy issues concerning the regulation and management of NORM-contaminated wastes generated by the petroleum industry.

  3. Commercial and Industrial Base Intermittent Resource Management Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Sporborg, Pamela; Sheik, Imran; Huffaker, Erich; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-11-30

    This scoping study summarizes the challenges with integrating wind and solar generation into the California's electricity grid. These challenges include: Smoothing intra-hour variability; - Absorbing excess renewable energy during over-generation periods; - Addressing morning and evening ramping periods. In addition, there are technical challenges to integrating retail demand response (DR) triggered by the wholesale conditions into the CAISO markets. The study describes the DR programs available to the consumers through the utilities in California and CAISO's ancillary services market because an integration of the wholesale and retail DR requires an understanding of these different offerings and the costs associated with acquiring them. Demand-side active and passive storage systems are proposed as technologies that may be used to mitigate the effects of intermittence due to renewable generation. Commercial building technologies as well as industrial facilities with storage capability are identified as targets for the field tests. Two systems used for ancillary services communications are identified as providing the triggers for DR enablement. Through the field tests, issues related to communication, automation and flexibility of demand-side resources will be explored and the performance of technologies that participate in the field tests will be evaluated. The major outcome of this research is identifying and defining flexibility of DR resources and optimized use of these resources to respond to grid conditions.

  4. Arsenal of democracy in the face of change: Issues underlying the implementation of industrial mobilization policy

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkerhoff, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper reviews the background and current status of industrial preparedness in the United States and analyzes ways to implement new policy procedures. What will it take to assure that the United States can be mobilize its industry rapidly to support a major conventional war The report reaches nine important conclusions: (1) Mobilization and industrial preparedness policy must be linked and integrated with other aspects of national security policy and the national military strategy. (2) The United States cannot reverse the flow of time and go back to a period of industrial superiority and self-sufficiency. (3) The United States must come to grips with its responsibilities for providing war materiel for Allies. (4) Similarly, the United States must recognize the interdependency of international trade and industrial production. (5) Graduated Mobilization Response needs to be adopted by the government and DOD and integrated into industrial preparedness policy. (6) The DOD industrial surge program should be fully funded. (7) Industrial preparedness planning should be funded now on a priority basis. (8) Organizational responsibilities and relationships for industrial preparedness have to be clarified, strengthened, and supported. (9) Finally, it is necessary to pay attention to this problem now. The report concludes by suggesting that the United States must develop a unified, clear statement of preparedness policy, linked with other security/military policies and strategies. This must be accomplished with some swiftness, and with the cognizance of current (and most likely to continue) domestic an international economic interdependencies.

  5. Occupational Health Management in the Lead Industry: The Korean Experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In 1967, the problem of occupational lead exposure came to public attention in Korea. Since then, regular progress has been made in lowering workplace lead exposures, instituting new workplace controls, and implementing health examinations of exposed workers. Past serious lead poisoning episodes made it possible to introduce biological monitoring programs on a voluntary basis in high-lead-exposure facilities in Korea. Industry-specific occupational health services for lead workers in Korea during the last 22 years can be categorized into three phases. During the first phase (1988-1993), efforts were directed at increasing awareness among workers about the hazards of lead exposure, biological monitoring of blood zinc protoporphyrin began, and a respiratory protection program was introduced. During the second phase (1994-1997), a computerized health management system for lead workers was developed, blood-lead measurement was added to biologic monitoring, and engineering controls were introduced in the workplace to lower air-lead levels to comply with air-lead regulations. Finally, during the third phase (1998-present), a new biomarker, bone-lead measurement by X-ray fluorescence, was introduced. Bone-lead measurement proved to be useful for assessing body burden and to demonstrate past lead exposure in retired workers. Occupational health service practice for lead workers, including the industry-specific group occupational health system, has brought considerable success in the prevention of lead poisoning and in reducing the lead burden in Korean lead workers during the last several decades. The successful achievement of prevention of lead poisoning in Korea was a result of the combined efforts of lead workers, employers, relevant government agencies, and academic institutes. PMID:22953192

  6. Study of integration issues to realize the market potential of OTEC energy in the aluminum industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Jr., M. S.; Thiagarajan, V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Markel, A. L.; Snyder, III, J. E.; Sprouse, A. M.; Leshaw, D.

    1980-09-01

    The various integration issues are studied which must be considered to realize the market potential for the use of OTEC by the aluminum industry. The chloride reduction process has been identified as an attractive candidate for use with OTEC systems, and drained-cathode Hall cells and two alternative chloride reduction processes are considered. OTEC power system and plantships for the different processes are described. Aluminum industry characteristics important for OTEC considerations are given, including economic models and case history analyses. Appended are supporting cost estimates and energy bridge concepts for getting OTEC energy to shore. (LEW)

  7. Managing produced water from coal seam gas projects: implications for an emerging industry in Australia.

    PubMed

    Davies, Peter J; Gore, Damian B; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the environmental problems, impacts and risks associated with the generation and disposal of produced water by the emerging coal seam gas (CSG) industry and how it may be relevant to Australia and similar physical settings. With only limited independent research on the potential environmental impacts of produced water, is it necessary for industry and government policy makers and regulators to draw upon the experiences of related endeavours such as mining and groundwater extraction accepting that the conclusions may not always be directly transferrable. CSG is widely touted in Australia as having the potential to provide significant economic and energy security benefits, yet the environmental and health policies and the planning and regulatory setting are yet to mature and are continuing to evolve amidst ongoing social and environmental concerns and political indecision. In this review, produced water has been defined as water that is brought to the land surface during the process of recovering methane gas from coal seams and includes water sourced from CSG wells as well as flowback water associated with drilling, hydraulic fracturing and gas extraction. A brief overview of produced water generation, its characteristics and environmental issues is provided. A review of past lessons and identification of potential risks, including disposal options, is included to assist in planning and management of this industry. PMID:25783163

  8. Managing produced water from coal seam gas projects: implications for an emerging industry in Australia.

    PubMed

    Davies, Peter J; Gore, Damian B; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the environmental problems, impacts and risks associated with the generation and disposal of produced water by the emerging coal seam gas (CSG) industry and how it may be relevant to Australia and similar physical settings. With only limited independent research on the potential environmental impacts of produced water, is it necessary for industry and government policy makers and regulators to draw upon the experiences of related endeavours such as mining and groundwater extraction accepting that the conclusions may not always be directly transferrable. CSG is widely touted in Australia as having the potential to provide significant economic and energy security benefits, yet the environmental and health policies and the planning and regulatory setting are yet to mature and are continuing to evolve amidst ongoing social and environmental concerns and political indecision. In this review, produced water has been defined as water that is brought to the land surface during the process of recovering methane gas from coal seams and includes water sourced from CSG wells as well as flowback water associated with drilling, hydraulic fracturing and gas extraction. A brief overview of produced water generation, its characteristics and environmental issues is provided. A review of past lessons and identification of potential risks, including disposal options, is included to assist in planning and management of this industry.

  9. Case analysis online: a strategic management case model for the health industry.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Anne; Bearden, Eithne

    2004-01-01

    Despite the plethora of methods and tools available to support strategic management, the challenge for health executives in the next century will relate to their ability to access and interpret data from multiple and intricate communication networks. Integrated digital networks and satellite systems will expand the scope and ease of sharing information between business divisions, and networked systems will facilitate the use of virtual case discussions across universities. While the internet is frequently used to support clinical decisions in the healthcare industry, few executives rely upon the internetfor strategic analysis. Although electronic technologies can easily synthesize data from multiple information channels, research as well as technical issues may deter their application in strategic analysis. As digital models transform access to information, online models may become increasingly relevant in designing strategic solutions. While there are various pedagogical models available to support the strategic management process, this framework was designed to enhance strategic analysis through the application of technology and electronic research. A strategic analysis framework, which incorporated internet research and case analysis in a strategic managementcourse, is described alongwith design and application issues that emerged during the case analysis process.

  10. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-08-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  11. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  12. Photovoltaic commercialization: an analysis of legal issues affecting a government-accelerated solar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.

    1980-06-01

    The Photovoltaics Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 is discussed. Legal issues, including solar access, the need for performance standards, the effects of building codes on photovoltaic system use and commercialization, and manufacturer and installer performance guarantees, are examined. Electric utility policies are examined, including interconnection, and rates and legal issues affecting them. (LEW)

  13. Ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs in a restructuredelectri city industry: Issues and options for regulators andlegislators

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph; Goldman, Charles; Nadel, Stephen

    1998-05-01

    Electric industry restructuring requires state regulators and legislators to re-examine the purposes served by and the continuing need for ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs, as well as the mechanisms to collect funds for these programs and the institutions appropriate to administer them. This paper offers background to these issues and a series of recommendations based on analysis of recent state experiences. Our recommendations are summarized.

  14. THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING YEARBOOK 1967-68, A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE FOR TRAINING OFFICERS AND THEIR MANAGEMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    CONTENTS OF THE BRITISH INDUSTRIAL YEARBOOK FOR 1967-68 APPEAR IN 12 SECTIONS. SECTION 1 REVIEWS THE PRESENT INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SITUATION, INCLUDING THE AIMS OF THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING ACT OF 1964. SECTION 2 COVERS THE TRAINING OF OPERATIVES, CRAFTSMEN, TECHNICIANS, TECHNOLOGISTS, COMMERCIAL AND CLERICAL WORKERS, SUPERVISORS AND MANAGERS, AND…

  15. Senate Forum on Shale Gas Development Explores Environmental and Industry Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources brought together industry and environmental leaders for a 23 May forum that focused on industry best practices and environmental concerns related to the current shale gas boom. The boom in shale gas development has been brought about in large part through advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") to increase shale oil and gas production.

  16. Financial reporting system outline of key issues in the energy industries

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    An outline is provided of key energy policy issues and topics that may be pertinent to potential uses of data collected by the Energy Information Administration's Financial Reporting System (FRS). The outline is submitted in fulfillment of Task I of contract no. DE-AC01-81EI-10752. The outline will be followed in Task II by bibliographic search of the current literature on these key issues and in subsequent Tasks by an analysis of the applicability of FRS data to the relevant issues.

  17. Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, C.; Lee, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Ma, D.C.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-10-01

    In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal.

  18. Issues Affecting Education and Work in the Eighties: Efficiency versus Industrial Democracy, A Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Arthur G.

    1977-01-01

    The author examines the debate between John Dewey and the Social Efficiency philosophers in the early 1900's over vocational education to show that tensions today over that issue have antecedents dating from the beginning of the century. (MJB)

  19. Public and political issues in radioactive waste management in the Federal Republic of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Neis, A.

    1993-12-31

    The Federal Government`s radioactive waste management concept and regulations governing formal public participation in licensing procedures for radioactive waste management facilities are presented. The paper focuses on public and political issues arising from widely diverging views in different social groups on nuclear energy and on radioactive waste management. The resulting conflict between Federal and Laender (Federal constituent states) authorities and the actual course of public participation in a licensing procedure are illustrated with the example of planned final disposal of radioactive waste in the Konrad mine. Major national efforts to overcome the unsatisfying present situation are presented and the role of international consensus is briefly touched. Concluding remarks will particularly justify admissibility and emphasize the need to discuss and eventually decide on radioactive waste management issues regardless of diverging views on nuclear energy.

  20. The structure of the alcohol industry as it relates to transportation issues.

    PubMed

    Single, E W

    1987-12-01

    The alcoholic beverage industry has undergone marked changes in its structure over the past several decades, and these changes have important implications to drinking and driving problems. In Canada and elsewhere, the industry has been generally transformed from a large set of small firms owned by entrepreneurs to a very small set of large international corporations with extensive and complex intercorporate connections. After describing trends in alcohol consumption and patterns of drinking, this paper examines the structure of the beverage alcohol industry in Canada. It is found that the distilling and brewing industries are highly concentrated and oligopolistic, while viticulture is more fragmented and regional in character. With regard to impact on drinking and driving problems, there are both positive and negative effects. On one hand, barriers to entry into the market are high and competition thereby restricted, thus avoiding certain excesses associated with fierce competition. Further, the large distillers and brewers, being able to afford advertising outlays and the temporary unprofitability necessary to introduce new products, have introduced lower alcohol content beverages which may eventually have a positive impact on drinking and driving incidents. On the other hand, there is little doubt that the industry structure greatly facilitates the promotion of alcohol consumption and, by contributing to the increased exposure of drivers to alcohol, thus exacerbates drinking and driving problems.

  1. A COMPARISON OF GREEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AMONG INDUSTRIES SECTORS IN CHINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    This paper aims to examine the differences of Green supply chain management (GSCM) implementation among chemical, automobile and machinery industries in China based on a questionnaire survey designed by Industrial Ecology at two industrial parks in Shenyang city. Exploratory factor analysis and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the data. The main result was that the GSCM practices of the three industries are still at a beginning stage. The level of GSCM practices of automobile industry (promoted by international market competition) was higher than those of chemical and machinery industry (promoted by domestic laws and policies).

  2. Overview of contemporary issues of forest research and management in China.

    PubMed

    He, Hong S; Shifley, Stephen R; Thompson, Frank R

    2011-12-01

    With 207 million ha of forest covering 22% of its land area, China ranks fifth in the world in forest area. Rapid economic growth, climate change, and forest disturbances pose new, complex challenges for forest research and management. Progress in meeting these challenges is relevant beyond China, because China's forests represent 34% of Asia's forests and 5% of the worlds' forests. To provide a broader understanding of these management challenges and of research and policies that address them, we organized this special issue on contemporary forest research and management issues in China. At the national level, papers review major forest types and the evolution of sustainable forestry, the development of China's forest-certification efforts, the establishment of a forest inventory system, and achievements and challenges in insect pest control in China. Papers focused on Northern China address historical, social, and political factors that have shaped the region's forests; the use of forest landscape models to assess how forest management can achieve multiple objectives; and analysis and modeling of fuels and fire behavior. Papers addressing Central and South China describe the "Grain for Green" program, which converts low productivity cropland to grassland and woodland to address erosion and soil carbon sequestration; the potential effects of climate change on CO(2) efflux and soil respiration; and relationships between climate and net primary productivity. China shares many forest management and research issues with other countries, but in other cases China's capacity to respond to forest management challenges is unique and bears watching by the rest of the world.

  3. Overview of Contemporary Issues of Forest Research and Management in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong S.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Thompson, Frank R.

    2011-12-01

    With 207 million ha of forest covering 22% of its land area, China ranks fifth in the world in forest area. Rapid economic growth, climate change, and forest disturbances pose new, complex challenges for forest research and management. Progress in meeting these challenges is relevant beyond China, because China's forests represent 34% of Asia's forests and 5% of the worlds' forests. To provide a broader understanding of these management challenges and of research and policies that address them, we organized this special issue on contemporary forest research and management issues in China. At the national level, papers review major forest types and the evolution of sustainable forestry, the development of China's forest-certification efforts, the establishment of a forest inventory system, and achievements and challenges in insect pest control in China. Papers focused on Northern China address historical, social, and political factors that have shaped the region's forests; the use of forest landscape models to assess how forest management can achieve multiple objectives; and analysis and modeling of fuels and fire behavior. Papers addressing Central and South China describe the "Grain for Green" program, which converts low productivity cropland to grassland and woodland to address erosion and soil carbon sequestration; the potential effects of climate change on CO2 efflux and soil respiration; and relationships between climate and net primary productivity. China shares many forest management and research issues with other countries, but in other cases China's capacity to respond to forest management challenges is unique and bears watching by the rest of the world.

  4. Potential and policy issues of industrial cogeneration in the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    A partial solution to the problems created by the high cost of imported energy affecting the economic well-being of the Dominican Republic is outlined. The introduction of cogeneration into the industrial sector could save a significant amount of imported fuel. COENER, a domestic government program, provides for private-sector cogeneration which, if implemented, could provide as much as 10% of the country's installed electrical-generating capacity. Results of an Agency for International Development study, reported here, indicate that the industries most likely to benefit from the cogeneration scheme and the institutional and regulatory barriers that must be overcome if a cogeneration program is to be successful.

  5. Fitness for duty in the nuclear industry: Update of the technical issues 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, N.; Grant, T.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an update of information on the technical issues surrounding the creation, implementation, and maintenance of fitness-for-duty (FFD) policies and programs. It has been prepared as a resource for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and nuclear power plant personnel who deal with FFD programs. It contains a general overview and update on the technical issues that the NRC considered prior to the publication of its original FFD rule and the revisions to that rule (presented in earlier NUREG/CRs). It also includes chapters that address issues about which there is growing concern and/or about which there have been substantial changes since NUREG/CR-5784 was published. Although this report is intended to support the NRC`s rule making on fitness for duty, the conclusions of the authors of this report are their own and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the NRC.

  6. How Do Community Colleges Serve Business and Industry? A Review of Issues Discussed in the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jim

    The educational literature provides evidence of the increasing role of community colleges in serving business and industry. By providing pre-service education for persons entering the labor market or continuing education for employed individuals who seek skills upgrading, community colleges have made businesses a major consumer of college…

  7. Enterprise Curriculum for Creative Industries Students: An Exploration of Current Attitudes and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Charlotte; Naudin, Annette

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report on the current state and attitudes towards Enterprise Curriculum within higher education (HE) for the creative industries sector. It is based on preliminary findings from the Creative Enterprise Conference (2006) held at UCE Birmingham, which examined the role of HEs in developing future entrepreneurs in this…

  8. Rural Issues in Rehabilitation Service Delivery: A Goodwill Industries of America Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Carmen O.; Foley, Jeffrey C.

    1992-01-01

    This article uses survey data to describe some common elements among rural vocational rehabilitation programs and differentiate them from their urban counterparts. The survey of 173 Goodwill Industries centers brought 78 responses. Thirteen centers (17%) characterized themselves as entirely rural; 22 (28%) as nonrural, and 43 organizations said…

  9. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, V.; Fleming, I.; Grant, T.; Hauth, J.; Hendrickson, J.; Kono, B.; Moore, C.; Olson, J.; Saari, L.; Toquam, J.; Wieringa, D.; Yost, P.; Hendrickson, P.; Moon, D.; Scott, W.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas in nuclear power plants are fit for duty. The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in the report is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other sources of impairment on the job are discussed. The report examines the prevalence of fitness-for-duty problems and discusses the use and effects of illicit drugs, prescription drugs, over-the-counter preparations and alcohol. The ways in which fitness-for-duty concerns are being addressed in both public- and private-sector industries are reviewed, and a description is provided of fitness-for-duty practices in six organizations that, like the nuclear industry, are regulated and whose operations can affect public health and safety. Methods of ensuring fitness for duty in the nuclear industry are examined in detail. The report also addresses methods of evaluating the effectiveness of fitness-for-duty programs in the nuclear power industry.

  10. MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT OF WATER FROM HARD-ROCK MINES {ENGINEERING ISSUE}

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Engineering Issue document on treatment of mining waters is a practical guide to understanding and selecting technologies for the environmental management of waste materials and effluents at hard-rock mines. For the purposes of this discussion, hard-rock mining primarily ref...

  11. A CASE STUDY IN RISK MANAGEMENT ISSUES: PERCHLORATE IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk management brings together many issues. While some of these are scientific in nature, many come down to policy and even emotion. As a result, striking a balance among competing objectives can be difficult. This is especially true when problems are localized or solutions are ...

  12. Changing Our Future: Issues in Leadership and Management Skills and the Information Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Prue

    This paper explores the issues and opportunities for information providers in a digital environment where the skills of management of change and leadership are necessary to create vital and healthy organizations. The first section discusses challenges of the digital environment and skills for the information profession, including the impact of…

  13. Managing and Mobilising Talent in Malaysia: Issues, Challenges and Policy Implications for Malaysian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azman, Norzaini; Sirat, Morshidi; Pang, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The future of Malaysia as a high-income and competitive nation largely depends on its pool of highly skilled human capital. Hence, the issue of human capital development has taken centre stage in numerous reform agendas of Malaysia. This paper seeks to provide examples of policy initiatives aimed at facilitating the management of highly educated…

  14. A Survey of UK University Web Management: Staffing, Systems and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Andrew; Emmott, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to summarize the findings of a survey of UK universities about how their websites are managed and resourced, which technologies are in use, and what are seen as the main issues and priorities. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a web-based questionnaire distributed in summer 2006, which received…

  15. New Public Management and the New Professionalism in Education: Framing the Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary; Herr, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an introductory frame for this special issue dedicated to New Public Management and the New Professional Educator. We will introduce the five articles and how they analyze the characteristics of NPM and this emerging new professional as well as forms of educator resistance and advocacy.

  16. Teaching an Issues-Based Interdisciplinary Course: Diversity in Management and Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Mary Ann; Higby, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examine their experiences of coteaching an intensive, interdisciplinary elective course for MBA students: Diversity in Management and Marketing. They address otherness, dialogue, energy, and change within this course and clarify issues that can arise when coteaching interdisciplinary courses. The authors list implications for…

  17. Community Colleges: Institutional Researchers and the Management Issues of the Eighties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, R. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the following factors influencing the role of community college institutional researchers: the current emphasis on proposal writing and grant management, fiscal constraints, mission expansion, marketing, program evaluations, faculty/administrator relations, institutional credibility and change, college planning, and issues of the 1980s.…

  18. Pathways to a Sustainable Future: A Curriculum Guide for Maine Schools Exploring Waste Management Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chewonki Foundation, Wiscasset, ME.

    This action guide is designed to help students and teachers become aware of the concepts and issues of waste management, and to motivate them to action in the classroom, school, home, and community. The guide emphasizes interdisciplinary activities that concentrate on the process of problem solving. Activities are identified by appropriate grade…

  19. Tackling a Problematic Behavior Management Issue: Teachers' Intervention in Childhood Bullying Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kolbert, Jered B.

    2008-01-01

    In coping with and addressing a common child behavioral problem, classroom teachers may benefit from viewing bullying as a behavior management issue in the educational setting. The authors offer eight suggestions that specifically address childhood bullying problems in the classroom. Teachers can add these to their toolkit of behavior management…

  20. Developing Design and Management Skills for Senior Industrial Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbanic, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    In Canadian engineering institutions, a significant design experience must occur in the final year of study. In the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems at the University of Windsor, unsolved, open ended projects sponsored by industrial partners from a variety of sectors are provided to the student teams in order for them to apply…

  1. Beyond the Boundary: Science, Industry, and Managing Symbiosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Birgitte Gorm

    2011-01-01

    Whether celebratory or critical, STS research on science-industry relations has focused on the blurring of boundaries and hybridization of codes and practices. However, the vocabulary of boundary and hybrid tends to reify science and industry as separate in the attempt to map their relation. Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center…

  2. e-Consent design and implementation issues for health information managers.

    PubMed

    Grain, Heather

    2004-01-01

    This article outlines and discusses a number of e-consent issues concerning an individual's access to information held in electronic health records. Through research conducted with general practices and health consumers, the following issues have been identified: limitation of health professionals' access to records; the ability of the individuals to limit access to their records and to indicate the circumstances within which access would be permitted; the degree of the health professional's awareness of restricted or total access to a patient's record; audit trails through which an individual can track the path of a record; and the individual's nomination of an agent authorised to control access to their record. These issues affect system developments and Health Information Managers, and key challenges to Health Information Managers in the electronic health record environment are also highlighted.

  3. A methodology to incorporate life cycle analysis and the triple bottom line mechanism for sustainable management of industrial enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Lin, Li

    2004-02-01

    Since 1970"s, the environmental protection movement has challenged industries to increase their investment in Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) techniques and management tools. Social considerations for global citizens and their descendants also motivated the examination on the complex issues of sustainable development beyond the immediate economic impact. Consequently, industrial enterprises have started to understand sustainable development in considering the Triple Bottom Line (TBL): economic prosperity, environmental quality and social justice. For the management, however, a lack of systematic ECM methodologies hinders their effort in planning, evaluating, reporting and auditing of sustainability. To address this critical need, this research develops a framework of a sustainable management system by incorporating a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of industrial operations with the TBL mechanism. A TBL metric system with seven sets of indices for the TBL elements and their complex relations is identified for the comprehensive evaluation of a company"s sustainability performance. Utilities of the TBL indices are estimated to represent the views of various stakeholders, including the company, investors, employees and the society at large. Costs of these indices are also captured to reflect the company"s effort in meeting the utilities. An optimization model is formulated to maximize the economic, environmental and social benefits by the company"s effort in developing sustainable strategies. To promote environmental and social consciousness, the methodology can significantly facilitate management decisions by its capabilities of including "non-business" values and external costs that the company has not contemplated before.

  4. Qualitative Phenomenological Study of Data Management Information System Deployments: Financial Services Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Dannie J.

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of financial services industry change managers to understand the genesis of low data management information system project adoption rates. The goal of the study was to find methods to improve data management information system adoption rates. The participant pool consisted of 19…

  5. Planning, Management and Evaluation: Realizing PIC Potential. Private Industry Council Guide. Working Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This Planning, Management, and Evaluation (PME) guide was developed by the National Alliance of Business as part of its program of management assistance for Private Industry Councils (PICs). The guide is a tool which PICs can use to improve their capability to plan, manage, and evaluate the programs which they administer, and to establish locally…

  6. 75 FR 10806 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... continuation of the Regulatory Project Management Site Tours and Regulatory Interaction Program (the Site Tours... performance in its regulatory project management staff. CDER seeks to significantly enhance review efficiency... about project management procedures (but not drug-specific information) with industry...

  7. Waking a sleeping giant: the tobacco industry's response to the polonium-210 issue.

    PubMed

    Muggli, Monique E; Ebbert, Jon O; Robertson, Channing; Hurt, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    The major tobacco manufacturers discovered that polonium was part of tobacco and tobacco smoke more than 40 years ago and attempted, but failed, to remove this radioactive substance from their products. Internal tobacco industry documents reveal that the companies suppressed publication of their own internal research to avoid heightening the public's awareness of radioactivity in cigarettes. Tobacco companies continue to minimize their knowledge about polonium-210 in cigarettes in smoking and health litigation. Cigarette packs should carry a radiation-exposure warning label.

  8. Quality and management of wastewater in sugar industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Pradeep Kumar; Sahu, Omprakash

    2015-02-01

    Wastewater from sugar industries is one that has complex characteristics and is considered a challenge for environmental engineers in terms of treatment as well as utilization. Before treatment and recycling, determination of physicochemical parameter is an important mechanism. Many different types of techniques are introduced and modified for the purpose, but depend upon the water quality parameters. The main aim of this study is to determine the physicochemical characteristics of sugar industry waste water by the standard method and minimize the fresh water consumption in sugar industry by water pinch methodology.

  9. Tobacco industry use of corporate social responsibility tactics as a sword and a shield on secondhand smoke issues.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lissy C

    2009-01-01

    The tobacco industry has used corporate social responsibility tactics to improve its corporate image with the public, press, and regulators who increasingly have grown to view it as a merchant of death. There is, however, an intractable problem that corporate social responsibility efforts can mask but not resolve: the tobacco industry's products are lethal when used as directed, and no amount of corporate social responsibility activity can reconcile that fundamental contradiction with ethical corporate citizenship. This study's focus is to better understand the tobacco industry's corporate social responsibility efforts and to assess whether there has been any substantive change in the way it does business with regard to the issue of exposure to secondhand smoke. The results show that the industry has made no substantial changes and in fact has continued with business as usual. Although many of the tobacco companies' tactics traditionally had been defensive, they strove for a way to change to a more offensive strategy. Almost without exception, however, their desire to appear to be good corporate citizens clashed with their aversion to further regulation and jeopardizing their legal position, perhaps an irreconcilable conflict. Despite the switch to offense, in 2006 a federal judge found the companies guilty of racketeering.

  10. Labor and Management Build Skills in the Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moy, Debbie

    1998-01-01

    The San Francisco Hotels Partnership is a consortium of hotel operators and unions that addresses skill-development needs in the hospitality industry. Participating workers were very satisfied with the opportunity to learn communication, problem solving, and teamwork skills. (SK)

  11. Industrial effluent quality, pollution monitoring and environmental management.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S; Hammad, Waleed S

    2008-12-01

    Royal Commission Environmental Control Department (RC-ECD) at Yanbu industrial city in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has established a well-defined monitoring program to control the pollution from industrial effluents. The quality of effluent from each facility is monitored round the clock. Different strategic measures have been taken by the RC-ECD to implement the zero discharge policy of RC. Industries are required to pre-treat the effluent to conform pretreatment standards before discharging to central biological treatment plant. Industries are not allowed to discharge any treated or untreated effluent in open channels. After treatment, reclaimed water must have to comply with direct discharge standards before discharge to the sea. Data of industrial wastewater collected from five major industries and central industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWTP) is summarized in this report. During 5-year period, 3,705 samples were collected and analyzed for 43,436 parameters. There were 1,377 violations from pretreatment standards from all the industries. Overall violation percentage was 3.17%. Maximum violations were recorded from one of the petrochemical plants. The results show no significant pollution due to heavy metals. Almost all heavy metals were within RC pretreatment standards. High COD and TOC indicates that major pollution was due to hydrocarbons. Typical compounds identified by GC-MS were branched alkanes, branched alkenes, aliphatic ketones, substituted thiophenes, substituted phenols, aromatics and aromatic alcohols. Quality of treated water was also in compliance with RC direct discharge standards. In order to achieve the zero discharge goal, further studies and measures are in progress.

  12. Managing an evolution: Deregulation of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, S.K.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses the emerging competitive situation in the electric power industry as deregulation of electric utilities looms on the horizon. The paper supports this change, and the competition it will bring, but urges caution as changes are instituted, and the regulatory bodies decide how and how much to free, and at what rates. The reason for his urge for caution comes from historical experience of other industries, which were smaller and had less direct impact on every American.

  13. Heavy equipment maintenance wastes and environmental management in the mining industry.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Turlough F

    2002-10-01

    Maintenance wastes, if not managed properly, represent significant environmental issues for mining operations. Petroleum hydrocarbon liquid wastes were studied at an Australian site and a review of the literature and technology vendors was carried out to identify oil/water separation technologies. Treatment technologies and practices for managing oily wastewater, used across the broader mining industry in the Asia-Pacific region, were also identified. Key findings from the study were: (1) primary treatment is required to remove grease oil contamination and to protect secondary oily wastewater treatment systems from being overloaded; (2) selection of an effective secondary treatment system is dependent on influent oil droplet size and concentration, suspended solids concentration, flow rates (and their variability), environmental conditions, maintenance schedules and effectiveness, treatment targets and costs; and (3) oily wastewater treatment systems, based on mechanical separation, are favoured over those that are chemically based, as they simplify operational requirements. Source reduction, through housekeeping, equipment and reagent modifications, and segregation and/or consolidation of hydrocarbon waste streams, minimizes treatment costs, safety and environmental impact.

  14. [Organization and management of nationalized pharmaceutical industry in Slovakia from 1945 to 1948].

    PubMed

    Senček, Richard R

    2013-02-01

    The paper discusses a short but important period in the history of pharmaceutical industry with regard to Slovakia. The complicated post-war situation required peremptory interventions from the state, which attempted to secure the operation of strategic firms by means of National Administration Boards and nationalization. The firms which were nationalized by this measure were managed by the Ministry of Industry. They included also the pharmaceutical firms nationalized in Slovakia. The situation which produced contradictory responses in society and political scene culminated in the communist coup detat and nationalization of virtually all industries.Key words: nationalization pharmaceutical industry Ministry of Industry.

  15. Integrated Systems for NGS Data Management and Analysis: Open Issues and Available Solutions.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Valerio; Ceol, Arnaud; Ogier, Alessandro G E; de Pretis, Stefano; Galeota, Eugenia; Kishore, Kamal; Bora, Pranami; Croci, Ottavio; Campaner, Stefano; Amati, Bruno; Morelli, Marco J; Pelizzola, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have deeply changed our understanding of cellular processes by delivering an astonishing amount of data at affordable prices; nowadays, many biology laboratories have already accumulated a large number of sequenced samples. However, managing and analyzing these data poses new challenges, which may easily be underestimated by research groups devoid of IT and quantitative skills. In this perspective, we identify five issues that should be carefully addressed by research groups approaching NGS technologies. In particular, the five key issues to be considered concern: (1) adopting a laboratory management system (LIMS) and safeguard the resulting raw data structure in downstream analyses; (2) monitoring the flow of the data and standardizing input and output directories and file names, even when multiple analysis protocols are used on the same data; (3) ensuring complete traceability of the analysis performed; (4) enabling non-experienced users to run analyses through a graphical user interface (GUI) acting as a front-end for the pipelines; (5) relying on standard metadata to annotate the datasets, and when possible using controlled vocabularies, ideally derived from biomedical ontologies. Finally, we discuss the currently available tools in the light of these issues, and we introduce HTS-flow, a new workflow management system conceived to address the concerns we raised. HTS-flow is able to retrieve information from a LIMS database, manages data analyses through a simple GUI, outputs data in standard locations and allows the complete traceability of datasets, accompanying metadata and analysis scripts. PMID:27200084

  16. Integrated Systems for NGS Data Management and Analysis: Open Issues and Available Solutions.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Valerio; Ceol, Arnaud; Ogier, Alessandro G E; de Pretis, Stefano; Galeota, Eugenia; Kishore, Kamal; Bora, Pranami; Croci, Ottavio; Campaner, Stefano; Amati, Bruno; Morelli, Marco J; Pelizzola, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have deeply changed our understanding of cellular processes by delivering an astonishing amount of data at affordable prices; nowadays, many biology laboratories have already accumulated a large number of sequenced samples. However, managing and analyzing these data poses new challenges, which may easily be underestimated by research groups devoid of IT and quantitative skills. In this perspective, we identify five issues that should be carefully addressed by research groups approaching NGS technologies. In particular, the five key issues to be considered concern: (1) adopting a laboratory management system (LIMS) and safeguard the resulting raw data structure in downstream analyses; (2) monitoring the flow of the data and standardizing input and output directories and file names, even when multiple analysis protocols are used on the same data; (3) ensuring complete traceability of the analysis performed; (4) enabling non-experienced users to run analyses through a graphical user interface (GUI) acting as a front-end for the pipelines; (5) relying on standard metadata to annotate the datasets, and when possible using controlled vocabularies, ideally derived from biomedical ontologies. Finally, we discuss the currently available tools in the light of these issues, and we introduce HTS-flow, a new workflow management system conceived to address the concerns we raised. HTS-flow is able to retrieve information from a LIMS database, manages data analyses through a simple GUI, outputs data in standard locations and allows the complete traceability of datasets, accompanying metadata and analysis scripts.

  17. Integrated Systems for NGS Data Management and Analysis: Open Issues and Available Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valerio; Ceol, Arnaud; Ogier, Alessandro G. E.; de Pretis, Stefano; Galeota, Eugenia; Kishore, Kamal; Bora, Pranami; Croci, Ottavio; Campaner, Stefano; Amati, Bruno; Morelli, Marco J.; Pelizzola, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have deeply changed our understanding of cellular processes by delivering an astonishing amount of data at affordable prices; nowadays, many biology laboratories have already accumulated a large number of sequenced samples. However, managing and analyzing these data poses new challenges, which may easily be underestimated by research groups devoid of IT and quantitative skills. In this perspective, we identify five issues that should be carefully addressed by research groups approaching NGS technologies. In particular, the five key issues to be considered concern: (1) adopting a laboratory management system (LIMS) and safeguard the resulting raw data structure in downstream analyses; (2) monitoring the flow of the data and standardizing input and output directories and file names, even when multiple analysis protocols are used on the same data; (3) ensuring complete traceability of the analysis performed; (4) enabling non-experienced users to run analyses through a graphical user interface (GUI) acting as a front-end for the pipelines; (5) relying on standard metadata to annotate the datasets, and when possible using controlled vocabularies, ideally derived from biomedical ontologies. Finally, we discuss the currently available tools in the light of these issues, and we introduce HTS-flow, a new workflow management system conceived to address the concerns we raised. HTS-flow is able to retrieve information from a LIMS database, manages data analyses through a simple GUI, outputs data in standard locations and allows the complete traceability of datasets, accompanying metadata and analysis scripts. PMID:27200084

  18. Nurse managers' experience with ethical issues in six government hospitals in Malaysia: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nurse managers have the burden of experiencing frequent ethical issues related to both their managerial and nursing care duties, according to previous international studies. However, no such study was published in Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' experience with ethical issues in six government hospitals in Malaysia including learning about the way they dealt with the issues. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in August-September, 2010 involving 417 (69.2%) of total 603 nurse managers in the six Malaysian government hospitals. Data were collected using three-part self-administered questionnaire. Part I was regarding participants' demographics. Part II was about the frequency and areas of management where ethical issues were experienced, and scoring of the importance of 11 pre-identified ethical issues. Part III asked how they dealt with ethical issues in general; ways to deal with the 11 pre-identified ethical issues, and perceived stress level. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and Pearson's Chi-square. Results A total of 397 (95.2%) participants experienced ethical issues and 47.2% experienced them on weekly to daily basis. Experiencing ethical issues were not associated with areas of practice. Top area of management where ethical issues were encountered was "staff management", but "patient care" related ethical issues were rated as most important. Majority would "discuss with other nurses" in dealing generally with the issues. For pre-identified ethical issues regarding "patient care", "discuss with doctors" was preferred. Only 18.1% referred issues to "ethics committees" and 53.0% to the code of ethics. Conclusions Nurse managers, regardless of their areas of practice, frequently experienced ethical issues. For dealing with these, team-approach needs to be emphasized. Proper understanding of the code of ethics is needed to provide basis for reasoning. PMID:22085735

  19. 76 FR 22154 - Powered Industrial Trucks Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information Collection (Paperwork) Requirements AGENCY... solicits public comments concerning its proposal to extend OMB approval of the information collection requirements contained in the Powered Industrial Trucks Standard (29 CFR 1910.178). The information...

  20. Communicating worst-case scenarios: neighbors' views of industrial accident management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B; Chess, Caron

    2003-08-01

    The prospect of industrial accidents motivated the U.S. Congress to require in the Clean Air Act of 1990 that manufacturing facilities develop Risk Management Plans (RMP) to submit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) by July 1999. Industry worried that the requirement to communicate to the public a "worst-case scenario" would arouse unnecessary and counterproductive fears among industry neighbors. We report here the results of focus groups and surveys with such neighbors, focusing particularly upon their reactions to messages about a hypothetical worst-case scenario and management of these risks by industry, government, and other parties. Our findings confirmed our hypotheses that citizens would be skeptical of the competence and trustworthiness of these managers and that this stance would color their views of industrial-facility accident risks. People with job ties to industry or who saw industrial benefits to the community as exceeding its risks had more positive views of industrial risks, but still expressed great concern about the risk and doubt about accident management. Notwithstanding these reactions, overall respondents welcomed this and other related information, which they wanted their local industries to supply. Respondents were not more reassured by additional text describing management of accidents by government and industry. However, respondents did react very positively to the concept of community oversight to review plant safety. Claims about the firm's moral obligation or financial self-interest in preventing accidents were also received positively. Further research on innovative communication and management of accident risks is warranted by these results, even before recent terrorist attacks made this topic more salient. PMID:12926575

  1. Overview of contemporary issues of forest research and management in China.

    PubMed

    He, Hong S; Shifley, Stephen R; Thompson, Frank R

    2011-12-01

    With 207 million ha of forest covering 22% of its land area, China ranks fifth in the world in forest area. Rapid economic growth, climate change, and forest disturbances pose new, complex challenges for forest research and management. Progress in meeting these challenges is relevant beyond China, because China's forests represent 34% of Asia's forests and 5% of the worlds' forests. To provide a broader understanding of these management challenges and of research and policies that address them, we organized this special issue on contemporary forest research and management issues in China. At the national level, papers review major forest types and the evolution of sustainable forestry, the development of China's forest-certification efforts, the establishment of a forest inventory system, and achievements and challenges in insect pest control in China. Papers focused on Northern China address historical, social, and political factors that have shaped the region's forests; the use of forest landscape models to assess how forest management can achieve multiple objectives; and analysis and modeling of fuels and fire behavior. Papers addressing Central and South China describe the "Grain for Green" program, which converts low productivity cropland to grassland and woodland to address erosion and soil carbon sequestration; the potential effects of climate change on CO(2) efflux and soil respiration; and relationships between climate and net primary productivity. China shares many forest management and research issues with other countries, but in other cases China's capacity to respond to forest management challenges is unique and bears watching by the rest of the world. PMID:22075940

  2. Electric industry restructuring and environmental issues: A comparative analysis of the experience in California, New York, and Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    Since the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) issued its April 20, 1994, Blue Book proposal to restructure the regulation of electric utilities in California to allow more competition, over 40 states have initiated similar activities. The question of how major public policy objectives such as environmental protection, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and assistance to low-income customers can be sustained in the new competitive environment is also an important element being considered. Because many other states will undergo restructuring in the future, the experience of the {open_quotes}early adopter{close_quotes} states in addressing public policy objectives in their electric service industry restructuring processes can provide useful information to other states. The Competitive Resource Strategies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Utility Technologies, is interested in documenting and disseminating the experience of the pioneering states. The Center for Energy Analysis and Applications of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory assisted the Office of Utility Technologies in this effort with a project on the treatment of environmental issues in electric industry restructuring.

  3. Using Role-Play to Enhance Foodborne Illness Crisis Management Capacity in the Produce Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreske, Audrey; Ducharme, Diane; Gunter, Chris; Phister, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illness outbreaks have measurable public health effects and often lead to negative produce industry impacts. Reducing loss following a crisis event requires a management plan, although many fresh produce industry members don't have one. Evidence-based workshops using a role-play simulated outbreak were delivered to impact crisis…

  4. University-Industry Collaboration, Knowledge Management and Enterprise Innovation Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jin; Wei, Shiyang

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study is concerned with university-industry collaboration from a knowledge management perspective. The authors introduce the concepts of "enterprise-level core elements" to define the principle status of an enterprise during university-industry collaboration, and "network embeddedness" as an indication of the closeness of the…

  5. Industrial Information Service Managers: Expectations of, and Support of, the Educational Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchobanoff, James B.; Price, Jack A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses qualities needed by library school graduates to fill positions in industrial special libraries and the skills industrial library managers expect to be included in the curricula of library schools. Topics addressed include professional knowledge and skills, interpersonal skills and personal characteristics, personal and professional…

  6. Issues and recommendations associated with distributed computation and data management systems for the space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The primary purpose of the report is to explore management approaches and technology developments for computation and data management systems designed to meet future needs in the space sciences.The report builds on work presented in previous reports on solar-terrestrial and planetary reports, broadening the outlook to all of the space sciences, and considering policy issues aspects related to coordiantion between data centers, missions, and ongoing research activities, because it is perceived that the rapid growth of data and the wide geographic distribution of relevant facilities will present especially troublesome problems for data archiving, distribution, and analysis.

  7. Key issues in the management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: latest developments and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic multisystem disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of SLE has led to the development of biologic agents, primarily targeting B cells and others inhibiting costimulatory molecules, type I interferons and cytokines such as interleukin-6. Several of these agents have been studied in clinical trials; some have shown promise while others have yielded disappointing results. Economic and regulatory issues continue to hamper the availability of such therapies for SLE patients. With increasing recognition that recurrent flares of disease activity lead to long-term damage accrual, one of the most important recent developments in patient management has been the concept of treat-to-target in SLE while minimizing patient exposure to excessive corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive therapy. This article reviews these key issues in SLE management, outlining recent developments and clinical implications for patients. PMID:26622325

  8. Managing Social Capital as Knowledge Management - Some Specification and Representation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elisabeth; Graham, Martin; Kennedy, Jessie; Taylor, Katharine

    2003-01-01

    This research attempts to identify how social capital is manifest within the contexts of small firm networks that rely on rapid turnover of projects. Presents work to date that converts tacit knowledge into sets of explicit and manageable local data, and provides examples of information visualizations for profiling and retrieval that support the…

  9. A Review of Enrollment Management: Issues and Strategies. Management/Marketing Special Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ed; And Others

    This report presents findings and recommendations from a project undertaken by the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) to determine reasons for a decline in business course enrollments and develop strategies to increase enrollments in management and marketing programs throughout the district. Following background information on the…

  10. Planning for integrated solid waste management at the industrial Park level: A case of Tianjin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Yong . E-mail: ecoplan@dlut.edu.cn; Zhu Qinghua; Haight, Murray

    2007-07-01

    Industrial parks play a significant role in the production and use of goods and services. The proper management of solid waste is a major challenge for industrial parks due to the large quantity of wastes and the variability of waste characteristics from these types of developments. Therefore, integrated solid waste management has become very crucial to the industrial park managers. Such an approach requires industrial park managers to assess the overall use of resources, and to seek waste reduction, reuse and recycling opportunities both at the individual company level and among different tenant companies. The adoption of this method can bring both economic and environmental benefits. This paper introduces the planning efforts of a real case in China. It first presents the basic information on Tianjin Economic Development Area (TEDA), and then introduces its current practices on solid waste management. The main focus of this paper is to describe how to plan an integrated solid waste management system at TEDA. Benefits and challenges are all identified and analyzed. The experiences and methods from this case study should be applied in other industrial parks so as to improve the overall eco-efficiency of the whole industrial park.

  11. Planning for integrated solid waste management at the industrial park level: a case of Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Zhu, Qinghua; Haight, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Industrial parks play a significant role in the production and use of goods and services. The proper management of solid waste is a major challenge for industrial parks due to the large quantity of wastes and the variability of waste characteristics from these types of developments. Therefore, integrated solid waste management has become very crucial to the industrial park managers. Such an approach requires industrial park managers to assess the overall use of resources, and to seek waste reduction, reuse and recycling opportunities both at the individual company level and among different tenant companies. The adoption of this method can bring both economic and environmental benefits. This paper introduces the planning efforts of a real case in China. It first presents the basic information on Tianjin Economic Development Area (TEDA), and then introduces its current practices on solid waste management. The main focus of this paper is to describe how to plan an integrated solid waste management system at TEDA. Benefits and challenges are all identified and analyzed. The experiences and methods from this case study should be applied in other industrial parks so as to improve the overall eco-efficiency of the whole industrial park.

  12. Through the Eyes of Higher Education Attorneys: How Department Chairs Are Navigating the Waters of Legal Issues and Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustoles, Carol L. J.

    2012-01-01

    Legal and risk management issues substantially impact the operations of colleges and universities, which face escalating compliance requirements in an increasingly litigious environment. Failing to assess legal liability issues and to constructively address them with risk management processes create vulnerability to claims and litigation,…

  13. Managing the Industrial Labor Relations Process in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julius, Daniel J., Ed.

    This book contains 25 essays on the subject of industrial relations divided into the following parts: Essays and their authors are as follows: "The Context of Collective Bargaining in American Colleges and Universities" (Kenneth P. Mortimer); "Transformation of the U.S. Collective Bargaining System: The Impact on Higher Education" (James P.…

  14. Qualitative Phenomenological Examination of IT Project Management in Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ly, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what caused IT projects to fail at a high rate in the pharmaceutical industry. IT projects failures delayed development of new drugs that can help save lives. It was imperative to evaluate what caused project failures because the collateral damage was delay in drug development. This qualitative…

  15. TRAINING IN INDUSTRY--THE MANAGEMENT OF LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BASS, BERNARD M.; VAUGHAN, JAMES A.

    THE PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING BEHAVIOR DERIVED THROUGH LABORATORY STUDY CAN BE EXTENDED TO EXPLAIN MUCH OF THE COMPLEX LEARNING REQUIRED IN INDUSTRIAL TRAINING PROGRAMS. A REVIEW OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN LEARNING INTRODUCES FOUR BASIC CONCEPTS--DRIVE, STIMULUS, RESPONSE, AND REINFORCER--AND DISCUSSES CLASSICAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONDITIONING…

  16. Decision-support systems for natural-hazards and land-management issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinitz, Laura; Forney, William; Byrd, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at the USGS Western Geographic Science Center are developing decision-support systems (DSSs) for natural-hazards and land-management issues. DSSs are interactive computer-based tools that use data and models to help identify and solve problems. These systems can provide crucial support to policymakers, planners, and communities for making better decisions about long-term natural hazards mitigation and land-use planning.

  17. A study for safety and health management problem of semiconductor industry in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chin-Jung; Wang, Hui-Ming; Feng, Wen-Yang; Tseng, Feng-Yi

    2008-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to discuss and explore the safety and health management in semiconductor industry. The researcher practically investigates and interviews the input, process and output of the safety and health management of semiconductor industry by using the questionnaires and the interview method which is developed according to the framework of the OHSAS 18001. The result shows that there are six important factors for the safety and health management in Taiwan semiconductor industry. 1. The company should make employee clearly understand the safety and health laws and standards. 2. The company should make the safety and health management policy known to the public. 3. The company should put emphasis on the pursuance of the safety and health management laws. 4. The company should prevent the accidents. 5. The safety and health message should be communicated sufficiently. 6. The company should consider safety and health norm completely.

  18. Producer responsibility for e-waste management: key issues for consideration - learning from the Swiss experience.

    PubMed

    Khetriwal, Deepali Sinha; Kraeuchi, Philipp; Widmer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life. This paper briefly introduces the concept of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and its applicability in the area of the end-of-life management of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE). It then examines the decade-long experience of Switzerland in using EPR to manage its e-waste, elaborating on the experience of the Swiss system in overcoming specific issues, and finally wrapping up with a synopsis of the lessons for policy makers. We consider each issue as an enquiry of questions confronting a policy maker and the choices that may present themselves. The five issues discussed are: (i) the challenges in getting an EPR based system started; (ii) securing financing to ensure a self-sustaining and smooth functioning system; (iii) organising a logistics network for the take back and collection of the e-waste; (iv) ensuring compliance of the various actors involved; and finally (v) reducing the threat of monopolistic practices.

  19. Producer responsibility for e-waste management: key issues for consideration - learning from the Swiss experience.

    PubMed

    Khetriwal, Deepali Sinha; Kraeuchi, Philipp; Widmer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life. This paper briefly introduces the concept of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and its applicability in the area of the end-of-life management of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE). It then examines the decade-long experience of Switzerland in using EPR to manage its e-waste, elaborating on the experience of the Swiss system in overcoming specific issues, and finally wrapping up with a synopsis of the lessons for policy makers. We consider each issue as an enquiry of questions confronting a policy maker and the choices that may present themselves. The five issues discussed are: (i) the challenges in getting an EPR based system started; (ii) securing financing to ensure a self-sustaining and smooth functioning system; (iii) organising a logistics network for the take back and collection of the e-waste; (iv) ensuring compliance of the various actors involved; and finally (v) reducing the threat of monopolistic practices. PMID:18162284

  20. Management of an occupational health program within an industrial setting. Perspectives of a corporate medical director.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, T J

    1984-04-01

    In this review, I have tried to identify and call to the attention of occupational health program managers what I consider to be some of the major occupational health issues and concerns facing industry. It is obvious that we have a sizable task ahead as we stand back and contemplate the scope and complexity of these matters. One of my colleagues coined an apt phrase: "We need to master the probable and manage the unpredictable." In the midst of all these opportunities, and faced with the constraints of the economy, the occupational health program manager must carefully evaluate his/her company needs vis-à-vis society's desires and requirements, and then prioritize and plan accordingly. In this plethora of challenges, I would encourage you to be innovative and to welcome the new, but not discard those features of past occupational health programs that have stood the test of time. Let us remember, too, that a good physician and nurse should always be available to counsel employees and help them address their needs. Our concern for our employee-patients should be more than a preoccupation about potential exposures to chemicals, radiation, and other toxic substances. However, even in the case of occupational exposures and illness, through that physician or nurse-patient relationship we may be the only individuals in a position to learn of subtle, adverse health effects. Personal interaction between the employee and the physician or nurse must be maintained and, in the long term, technological advances may in fact allow them more time to counsel and heal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Commercialization issues of MEMS/MST/micromachines: an updated industry report card on the barriers to commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, Roger H.

    2000-11-01

    The last five years have witnessed unprecedented interest in MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems), MST (Microsystem Technologies) and Micromachines (M3). Of great interest has been the creation of many new companies whose desire it is to commercialize the technology. During 1999 and 2000, an unprecedented number of startups, especially in the optical MEMS sector, have been created. It is estimated that there are over 750 companies, research institutes, and universities currently involved with M3 worldwide. Over 150 of these are U.S. based companies who wish to commercialize this technology. This paper addresses a number of the significant issues associated with the barriers that have existed to the successful commercialization of M3 by new as well as established companies. These issues include R & D, marketing, infrastructure support and venture capital funding. An M3 'Report Card' is provided assessing current status of the industry with respect to these issues and comparing the grades with those reported in June 1998 and June 1999. Recommended strategies are provided that are expected to help overcome these barriers to commercialization. Current (2000) market and projections for the year 2004 are provided.

  2. Ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs in a restructured electricity industry: Issues, options, and unanswered questions

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, J.; Goldman, C.; Kito, S.

    1996-08-01

    Regulated utilities have, in the past, been responsible for {open_quotes}Public purpose{close_quotes} programs that contribute to the general social good, such as energy-efficiency programs. In several states, continuation of these programs has become a critical issue in forging the consensus required to proceed with restructuring. As a result of reviewing the restructuring process in several states, we expect this trend to continue, but do not believe a single, generic approach can or should be defined. Instead, we expect a variety of solutions based on considerations unique to individual states or regions. To help structure these discussions in states struggling with this issue, we pose a series of questions and describe a range of possible answers: (1) We encourage state public utility commissions and legislatures to provide clear guidance on goals. (2) Close attention to the primary objectives for energy efficiency is important because the objectives influence the choices of programs and activities to be supported. (3) We advocate that states adopt a pragmatic approach to resolving the potentially contentious issue of determining whether or not utilities should continue to have primary responsibility for program administration, management, and design. The approach we propose involves assessing a utility`s past performance, its cur-rent commitment to energy-efficiency activities, and the potential conflicts of interest presented, if the utility retains a central role in administering energy-efficiency programs after restructuring. (4) A state should first assess policy options to mitigate adverse incentives and conflicts of interest in the utility before examining the possibility of having a non-utility entity assume responsibility for designing and managing energy-efficiency activities. (5) If a state does pursue non-utility administration for ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs, explicit attention must be paid to governance and accountability issues.

  3. Mini-review: Assessing the drivers of ship biofouling management--aligning industry and biosecurity goals.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ian; Scianni, Christopher; Hewitt, Chad; Everett, Richard; Holm, Eric; Tamburri, Mario; Ruiz, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling exerts a frictional and cost penalty on ships and is a direct cause of invasion by marine species. These negative consequences provide a unifying purpose for the maritime industry and biosecurity managers to prevent biofouling accumulation and transfer, but important gaps exist between these sectors. This mini-review examines the approach to assessments of ship biofouling among sectors (industry, biosecurity and marine science) and the implications for existing and emerging management of biofouling. The primary distinctions between industry and biosecurity in assessment of vessels biofouling revolve around the resolution of biological information collected and the specific wetted surface areas of primary concern to each sector. The morphological characteristics of biofouling and their effects on propulsion dynamics are of primary concern to industry, with an almost exclusive focus on the vertical sides and flat bottom of hulls and an emphasis on antifouling and operational performance. In contrast, the identity, biogeography, and ecology of translocated organisms is of highest concern to invasion researchers and biosecurity managers and policymakers, especially as it relates to species with known histories of invasion elsewhere. Current management practices often provide adequate, although not complete, provision for hull surfaces, but niche areas are well known to enhance biosecurity risk. As regulations to prevent invasions emerge in this arena, there is a growing opportunity for industry, biosecurity and academic stakeholders to collaborate and harmonize efforts to assess and manage biofouling of ships that should lead to more comprehensive biofouling solutions that promote industry goals while reducing biosecurity risk and greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. Commitment to and preparedness for sustainable supply chain management in the oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Wan Ahmad, Wan Nurul K; Rezaei, Jafar; Tavasszy, Lóránt A; de Brito, Marisa P

    2016-09-15

    Our current dependency on the oil and gas (O&G) industry for economic development and social activities necessitates research into the sustainability of the industry's supply chains. At present, studies on sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices in the industry do not include firm-internal factors that affect the sustainability strategies employed by different functional areas of its supply chains. Our study aims to address this gap by identifying the relevant internal factors and exploring their relationship with SSCM strategies. Specifically, we discuss the commitment to and preparedness for sustainable practices of companies that operate in upstream and downstream O&G supply chain. We study the impact of these factors on their sustainability strategies of four key supply chain functions: supplier management, production management, product stewardship and logistics management. The analyses of data collected through a survey among 81 companies show that management preparedness may enhance sustainable supply chain strategies in the O&G industry more than commitment does. Among the preparedness measures, management of supply chain operational risks is found to be vital to the sustainability of all supply chain functions except for production management practices. The findings also highlight the central importance of supplier and logistics management to the achievement of sustainable O&G supply chains. Companies must also develop an organizational culture that encourages, for example, team collaboration and proactive behaviour to finding innovative sustainability solutions in order to translate commitment to sustainable practices into actions that can produce actual difference to their SSCM practices. PMID:27233046

  5. Commitment to and preparedness for sustainable supply chain management in the oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Wan Ahmad, Wan Nurul K; Rezaei, Jafar; Tavasszy, Lóránt A; de Brito, Marisa P

    2016-09-15

    Our current dependency on the oil and gas (O&G) industry for economic development and social activities necessitates research into the sustainability of the industry's supply chains. At present, studies on sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices in the industry do not include firm-internal factors that affect the sustainability strategies employed by different functional areas of its supply chains. Our study aims to address this gap by identifying the relevant internal factors and exploring their relationship with SSCM strategies. Specifically, we discuss the commitment to and preparedness for sustainable practices of companies that operate in upstream and downstream O&G supply chain. We study the impact of these factors on their sustainability strategies of four key supply chain functions: supplier management, production management, product stewardship and logistics management. The analyses of data collected through a survey among 81 companies show that management preparedness may enhance sustainable supply chain strategies in the O&G industry more than commitment does. Among the preparedness measures, management of supply chain operational risks is found to be vital to the sustainability of all supply chain functions except for production management practices. The findings also highlight the central importance of supplier and logistics management to the achievement of sustainable O&G supply chains. Companies must also develop an organizational culture that encourages, for example, team collaboration and proactive behaviour to finding innovative sustainability solutions in order to translate commitment to sustainable practices into actions that can produce actual difference to their SSCM practices.

  6. Misfit and Match: The Frontline Management Initiative in the Community Services and Health Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Ian; Smith, Chris Selby; Wright, Liz

    The application of frontline management training in the community and health services (CS&H) industry in Victoria, Australia, was examined through interviews with managers of 11 user and 11 provider organizations in the public and private sectors. The study focused on the following topics: (1) the appropriateness of the Frontline Management…

  7. Plant and Industry Experience. MAS-122. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to use plant and industry experience to improve plant safety and reliability. The following topics are covered in the module's individual…

  8. Industrial Safety. MAS-123. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to promote and monitor the industrial safety program at their plant. The following topics are covered in the module's individual sections:…

  9. Configuration management issues and objectives for a real-time research flight test support facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yergensen, Stephen; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are some of the critical issues and objectives pertaining to configuration management for the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of Ames Research Center. The primary mission of the WATR is to provide a capability for the conduct of aeronautical research flight test through real-time processing and display, tracking, and communications systems. In providing this capability, the WATR must maintain and enforce a configuration management plan which is independent of, but complimentary to, various research flight test project configuration management systems. A primary WATR objective is the continued development of generic research flight test project support capability, wherein the reliability of WATR support provided to all project users is a constant priority. Therefore, the processing of configuration change requests for specific research flight test project requirements must be evaluated within a perspective that maintains this primary objective.

  10. Cleaning up DOE`s weapons sites: Issues of organization and management

    SciTech Connect

    Morzinski, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Many Department of Energy facilities across the United States are seriously contaminated with radioactive and other hazardous wastes. Decades of focus on weapons production and inadequate attention to long-term solutions for dealing with those wastes have resulted in tremendous problems. The Department of Energy recognizes the seriousness of those problems and is addressing them. In some cases existing management systems are being used to accomplish the new mission of environmental cleanup, and in other cases new systems have been created to help carry out that mission. Widespread criticism of those efforts to data are evidence that the management systems being used may not be appropriate for the job. In particular, it appears that some management systems aren`t producing desired results because they are not well aligned with the people and tasks for whom they are intended, and these issues are discussed in this report.

  11. Introduction to special issue. Careful conversations: adolescents managing their parents' access to information.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Loes; Laird, Robert D

    2010-04-01

    Stattin and Kerr's (2000; Kerr & Stattin, 2000) seminal work challenged our understanding of parental monitoring, shifted attention to adolescents' agency as information managers, and pushed researchers to focus more on their measures and to think more about the interactional and relational processes that keep, or fail to keep, parents informed. Spurred by this reinterpretation of "parental monitoring", research has shifted in the last decade from a nearly exclusive focus on parents' role in socializing adolescents through monitoring their whereabouts, friendships, and activities, to a broader recognition of, and appreciation for, adolescents' active role in strategically managing their parents' access to information. This special issue showcases this new perspective by gathering a set of studies focusing collectively on a wide variety of information management strategies and exploring bidirectional links with indicators of youths' psychosocial adjustment and parent-child relationship qualities. PMID:19897234

  12. Managing ethical issues in sexual violence research using a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Duma, S E; Khanyile, T D; Daniels, F

    2009-03-01

    Conducting research in the area of sexual violence has complex ethical and practical challenges for the researcher. Managing ethical issues in sexual violence is important and can be achieved through the use of pilot studies. The primary purpose of the pilot study was to identify and manage potential ethical and practical problems that could jeopardise the main study or violate the ethical and human rights of participants in the main study on women's journey of recovery from sexual assault. The secondary purpose was to collect preliminary data in order to determine the human, financial and time resources needed for a planned study. The methods and processes used in conducting the pilot study in the study on women's journey of recovery are discussed according to each of the objectives of the pilot study, methods used to achieve the objective, observations or findings made during the pilot study, and implications for the main study. This article aims to demonstrate how a pilot study was used to manage identified potential ethical and practical research issues during the recruitment of participants and data collection for the research that was conducted by the first author to investigate women's journey of recovery from sexual assault trauma within the first week following sexual assault.

  13. Web-Based Geospatial Tools to Address Hazard Mitigation, Natural Resource Management, and Other Societal Issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn,, Paul P.

    2009-01-01

    Federal, State, and local government agencies in the United States face a broad range of issues on a daily basis. Among these are natural hazard mitigation, homeland security, emergency response, economic and community development, water supply, and health and safety services. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) helps decision makers address these issues by providing natural hazard assessments, information on energy, mineral, water and biological resources, maps, and other geospatial information. Increasingly, decision makers at all levels are challenged not by the lack of information, but by the absence of effective tools to synthesize the large volume of data available, and to utilize the data to frame policy options in a straightforward and understandable manner. While geographic information system (GIS) technology has been widely applied to this end, systems with the necessary analytical power have been usable only by trained operators. The USGS is addressing the need for more accessible, manageable data tools by developing a suite of Web-based geospatial applications that will incorporate USGS and cooperating partner data into the decision making process for a variety of critical issues. Examples of Web-based geospatial tools being used to address societal issues follow.

  14. Industry Agreement Acts and environmental management in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollick, Malcolm

    1983-05-01

    In Australia many major developments are authorized by agreements negotiated between companies and the state government and ratified by Parliament as Agreement Acts The means by which these are negotiated and ratified, their terms, and their legal status are thus of great importance to Australian resource and environmental management These aspects are examined, revealing a lessening of the tendency to provide special rights and privileges and a trend towards the inclusion of more resource and environmental management provisions in the Acts It is argued that major developments require special conditions beyond the scope of general laws in order to control their social and environmental side effects, and that Agreements Acts could be a valuable means to this end Ways of improving them from this point of view are discussed

  15. Environmental issues and management strategies for waste electronic and electrical equipment.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Timothy G

    2011-06-01

    Issues surrounding the impact and management of discarded or waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) have received increasing attention in recent years. This attention stems from the growing quantity and diversity of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) used by modern society, the increasingly rapid turnover of EEE with the accompanying burden on the waste stream, and the occurrence of toxic chemicals in many EEE components that can pose a risk to human and environmental health if improperly managed. In addition, public awareness of the WEEE or "e-waste" dilemma has grown in light of popular press features on events such as the transition to digital television and the exportation of WEEE from the United States and other developed countries to Africa, China, and India, where WEEE has often not been managed in a safe manner (e.g., processed with proper safety precautions, disposed of in a sanitary landfill, combusted with proper air quality procedures). This paper critically reviews current published information on the subject of WEEE. The definition, magnitude, and characteristics of this waste stream are summarized, including a detailed review of the chemicals of concern associated with different components and how this has changed and continues to evolve over time. Current and evolving management practices are described (e.g., reuse, recycling, incineration, landfilling). This review discusses the role of regulation and policies developed by governments, institutions, and product manufacturers and how these initiatives are shaping current and future management practices.

  16. The management of hamstring injury--Part 1: Issues in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Wayne; Pollard, Henry

    2005-05-01

    Hamstring injuries are the most prevalent muscle injury in sports involving rapid acceleration and maximum speed running. Injury typically occurs in an acute manner through an eccentric mechanism at the terminal stages of the swing phase of gait. Biceps femoris is most commonly injured. Re-injury rates are high and management is a challenge given the complex multi-factorial aetiology. The high rates of hamstring injury and re-injury may result from a lack of high-quality research into the aetiological factors underlying injury. Re-injury may also result from inaccuracy in diagnosis that results from the potential multi-factorial causes of these conditions. Inaccuracy in diagnosis could lead to multiple potential diagnoses that may result in the implementation of variable management protocols. Whilst potentially useful, such variability may also lead to the implementation of sub-optimal management strategies. Previous hamstring injury is the most recognized risk factor for injury, which indicates that future research should be directed at preventative measures. Much anecdotal and indirect evidence exists to suggest that several non-local factors contribute to injury, which may be addressed through the application of manual therapy. However, this connection has been neglected in previous research and literature. This paper will explore and speculate on this potential connection and offer some new contributive factors for hamstring injury management. This first paper of a two part series on hamstring injury will explore diagnostic issues relevant to hamstring injury and the second will investigate various established and speculative management approaches.

  17. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    SciTech Connect

    McKane, Aimee; Desai, Deann; Matteini, Marco; Meffert, William; Williams, Robert; Risser, Roland

    2009-08-01

    Industry utilizes very complex systems, consisting of equipment and their human interface, which are organized to meet the production needs of the business. Effective and sustainable energy efficiency programs in an industrial setting require a systems approach to optimize the integrated whole while meeting primary business requirements. Companies that treat energy as a manageable resource and integrate their energy program into their management practices have an organizational context to continually seek opportunities for optimizing their energy use. The purpose of an energy management system standard is to provide guidance for industrial and commercial facilities to integrate energy efficiency into their management practices, including fine-tuning production processes and improving the energy efficiency of industrial systems. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy management as one of its top five priorities for standards development. The new ISO 50001 will establish an international framework for industrial, commercial, or institutional facilities, or entire companies, to manage their energy, including procurement and use. This standard is expected to achieve major, long-term increases in energy efficiency (20percent or more) in industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide.This paper describes the impetus for the international standard, its purpose, scope and significance, and development progress to date. A comparative overview of existing energy management standards is provided, as well as a discussion of capacity-building needs for skilled individuals to assist organizations in adopting the standard. Finally, opportunities and challenges are presented for implementing ISO 50001 in emerging economies and developing countries.

  18. Close cooperation between science, management and industry benefits sustainable exploitation of the Falkland Islands squid fisheries.

    PubMed

    Arkhipkin, A; Barton, J; Wallace, S; Winter, A

    2013-10-01

    The Falkland Islands fishing industry is unique, as 60-80% of its annual catch consists of two squid species, Illex argentinus and Doryteuthis gahi. Short annual life cycles make both species susceptible to intra-annual environmental changes, resulting in large biomass fluctuations that must be addressed in management of the stocks. In the D. gahi fishery, short chains of communication between science, management and industry allow effective cooperation in the interest of long-term sustainable exploitation. The industry is responsive to short-notice requests for in-season information about the fishery. Management takes into account both scientific advice and industry recommendations, through ongoing consultations before and during the fishing seasons. As a result of this cooperation, D. gahi is one of the best managed squid fisheries in the world with local fishing companies being amongst the largest and most profitable enterprises in the Falklands economy. The I. argentinus fishery has the same potential, but a further level of cooperative management is needed as this squid is a straddling stock between several countries and the high seas. Development of a regional fisheries management organization in the South Atlantic Ocean is required to control multilateral exploitation and ensure long-term sustainability of I. argentinus stocks.

  19. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  20. Comfortably, Safely, and Without Shame: Defining Menstrual Hygiene Management as a Public Health Issue.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marni; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Nathanson, Constance; Parker, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the menstrual hygiene management challenges facing schoolgirls in low-income-country contexts have gained global attention. We applied Gusfield's sociological analysis of the culture of public problems to better understand how this relatively newly recognized public health challenge rose to the level of global public health awareness and action. We similarly applied the conceptualization by Dorfman et al. of the role of public health messaging in changing corporate practice to explore the conceptual frames and the news frames that are being used to shape the perceptions of menstrual hygiene management as an issue of social justice within the context of public health. Important lessons were revealed for getting other public health problems onto the global-, national-, and local-level agendas.

  1. Comfortably, Safely, and Without Shame: Defining Menstrual Hygiene Management as a Public Health Issue.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marni; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Nathanson, Constance; Parker, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the menstrual hygiene management challenges facing schoolgirls in low-income-country contexts have gained global attention. We applied Gusfield's sociological analysis of the culture of public problems to better understand how this relatively newly recognized public health challenge rose to the level of global public health awareness and action. We similarly applied the conceptualization by Dorfman et al. of the role of public health messaging in changing corporate practice to explore the conceptual frames and the news frames that are being used to shape the perceptions of menstrual hygiene management as an issue of social justice within the context of public health. Important lessons were revealed for getting other public health problems onto the global-, national-, and local-level agendas. PMID:25973831

  2. Emission inventory management system for the pulp and paper industry in the State of Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, C.

    1996-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) have caused the pulp and paper industry to be confronted with environmental regulations which require an intense expansion of emission inventories. Under Title III of the CAAA, the recently promulgated Cluster Rule has compelled pulp and paper mills to prepare a thorough emission inventory of hazardous air pollutants. Title V of the CAAA requires major source facilities to prepare and submit an operating permit application. The operating permit application must include a complete emission inventory of regulated pollutants. In addition to these regulatory requirements at the federal level, the pulp and paper industry in the state of Louisiana is subject to two annual emission inventory reporting requirements by state regulations. Subsequently, a database management system was designed to consolidate these various emission inventories. This paper examines the need for collecting and managing emission data in the pulp and paper industry and the how the database management system serves to fulfill this need.

  3. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses. PMID:27091048

  4. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses.

  5. Land and Resource Management Issues Relevant to Deploying In-Situ Thermal Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Tanana, Heather; Kline, Michelle

    2011-02-28

    Utah is home to oil shale resources containing roughly 1.3 trillion barrels of oil equivalent and our nation’s richest oil sands resources. If economically feasible and environmentally responsible means of tapping these resources can be developed, these resources could provide a safe and stable domestic energy source for decades to come. In Utah, oil shale and oil sands resources underlay a patchwork of federal, state, private, and tribal lands that are subject to different regulatory schemes and conflicting management objectives. Evaluating the development potential of Utah’s oil shale and oil sands resources requires an understanding of jurisdictional issues and the challenges they present to deployment and efficient utilization of emerging technologies. The jurisdictional patchwork and divergent management requirements inhibit efficient, economic, and environmentally sustainable development. This report examines these barriers to resource development, methods of obtaining access to landlocked resources, and options for consolidating resource ownership. This report also examines recent legislative efforts to wrest control of western public lands from the federal government. If successful, these efforts could dramatically reshape resource control and access, though these efforts appear to fall far short of their stated goals. The unintended consequences of adversarial approaches to obtaining resource access may outweigh their benefits, hardening positions and increasing tensions to the detriment of overall coordination between resource managers. Federal land exchanges represent a more efficient and mutually beneficial means of consolidating management control and improving management efficiency. Independent of exchange proposals, resource managers must improve coordination, moving beyond mere consultation with neighboring landowners and sister agencies to coordinating actions with them.

  6. Perspectives on three issues facing the transportation manager in the nineties. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.A.; Marzette, D.; McCoy, B.

    1999-03-01

    The nineties have been a period of tremendous change for the transportation industry. The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, Clean Air Act Amendments, Americans with Disabilities Act, and increasing gender and ethnic diversity have caused agencies to reassess their standard operating procedures. Greater knowledge has been sought by senior level transportation officials in an effort to prepare agencies for the changing policy, including, seminars and workshops, revisions to policy manuals, and strengthened procedures regarding how issues will be resolved. This research examines the level and nature of direct impacts on the transportation organization. Major legislative changes and mandates have imposed the need for changes in how transportation systems operate. Transportation professionals continue to be challenged to develop plans and implement services that respond to mandates within the framework of the legislation.

  7. The case for municipal waste combustion. Solid waste managers face numerous planning issues

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, B.W.

    1996-11-01

    As they look to the future of the municipal waste combustion (MWC) and waste-to-energy (WTE) industries, municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion decision-makers face increasingly federal regulations, judicial activity and public scrutiny. Public perception issues remain prodigious hurdles, as the public is undaunted in its opposition to siting new facilities near populated areas. This situation is partly the result of an increased focus by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on combustors, which has led to better informed community leaders and activists. In addition, state and federal legislation and judicial decisions often fail to support expansion of WTE markets, inferring that combustors are unsafe. Major pollutants of concern are the following: NO{sub x}, CO, SO{sub 2}, HCL, Hg, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ar, Be, Cr, chlorides, dioxin, and furans.

  8. Health-related biotechnology in Africa: managing the legislative and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Andanda, A P

    2007-01-01

    The challenges that most African countries face in an attempt to join the ongoing quest for the development and transfer of the products derived from health biotechnology are threefold: High research costs, inadequate regulatory capacity and unfavourable intellectual property arrangements. It is argued in this paper that these challenges are representative of the legislative and regulatory issues that require proper management in order to enable African countries to focus on the key research areas that are related to the burden of diseases that are prevalent in the region and to harness the products of such research for the benefit of the region. This paper discusses the challenges involved in managing the legislative and regulatory issues in health biotechnology and proposes specific ideas on the way forward for Africa. The methodology used is a review of the manner in which three African countries, Cameroon, Kenya and Nigeria, have encountered and dealt with such regulatory challenges. The review is carried out from policy and legal analysis perspectives.

  9. Design principles and issues of rights expression languages for digital rights management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2005-07-01

    Digital rights management (DRM) provides a unified approach to specifying, interpreting, enforcing and managing digital rights throughout the entire life cycle of digital assets. Using a declarative rights expression language (REL) for specifying rights and conditions in the form of licenses, as opposite to some other approaches (such as data structures and imperative languages), has been considered and adopted as a superior technology for implementing effective, interoperable and scalable DRM systems. This paper discusses some principles and issues for designing RELs, based on the experiences of developing a family of REL"s (DPRL, XrML 1.x, XrML 2.0 and MPEG REL). It starts with an overview of a family tree of the past and current REL"s, and their development history, followed by an analysis of their data models and a comparison with access-control oriented models. It then presents a number of primary design principles such as syntactic and semantic un-ambiguity, system interoperability, expressiveness in supporting business models and future extensibility, and discusses a number of key design issues such as maintaining stateful information, multi-tier issuance of rights, meta rights, identification of individual and aggregate objects, late-binding of to-beidentified entities, as well as some advanced ones on revocation and delegation of rights. The paper concludes with some remarks on REL profiling and extension for specific application domains.

  10. Water Plan 2030: A Dynamic Education Model for Teaching Water Management Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupprecht, C.; Washburne, J.; Lansey, K.; Williams, A.

    2006-12-01

    Dynamic educational tools to assist teachers and students in recognizing the impacts of water management decisions in a realistic context are not readily available. Water policy issues are often complex and difficult for students trying to make meaningful connections between system components. To fill this need, we have developed a systems modeling-based educational decision support system (DSS) with supplementary materials. This model, called Water Plan 2030, represents a general semi-arid watershed; it allows users to examine water management alternatives by changing input values for various water uses and basin conditions and immediately receive graphical outputs to compare decisions. The main goal of our DSS model is to foster students' abilities to make knowledgeable decisions with regard to water resources issues. There are two reasons we have developed this model for traditional classroom settings. First, the DSS model provides teachers with a mechanism for educating students about inter-related hydrologic concepts, complex systems and facilitates discussion of water resources issues. Second, Water Plan 2030 encourages student discovery of cause/effect relationships in a dynamic, hands-on environment and develops the ability to realize the implications of water management alternatives. The DSS model has been utilized in an undergraduate, non-major science class for 5 course hours, each of the past 4 semesters. Accompanying the PC-based model are supplementary materials to improve the effectiveness of implementation by emphasizing important concepts and guiding learners through the model components. These materials include in-class tutorials, introductory questions, role-playing activities and homework extensions that have been revised after each user session, based on student and instructor feedback. Most recently, we have developed individual lessons that teach specific model functions and concepts. These modules provide teachers the flexibility to adapt

  11. Report: future industrial solid waste management in pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ), Iran.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarani, Babak; Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza Alavi; Mokhtarani, Nader; Khaledi, Hossein Jomeh

    2006-06-01

    The Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ) is located in the south of Iran, on the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf. This area was established in 1998 for the utilization of south Pars field oil and gas resources. This field is one of the largest gas resources in the world and contains about 6% of the total fossil fuels known. Petrochemical industries, gas refineries and downstream industries are being constructed in this area. At present there are three gas refineries in operation and five more gas refineries are under construction. In this study, different types of solid waste including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial wastes were investigated separately. The aim of the study was to focus on the management of the industrial wastes in order to minimize the environmental impact. In the first stage, the types and amounts of industrial waste in PSEEZ were evaluated by an inventory. The main types of industrial waste are oil products (fuel oil, light oil, lubricating oil), spent catalysts, adsorbents, resins, coke, wax and packaging materials. The waste management of PSEEZ is quite complex because of the different types of industry and the diversity of industrial residues. In some cases recycling/reuse of waste is the best option, but treatment and disposal are also necessary tools. Recently a design has been prepared for a disposal site in PSEEZ for the industrial waste that cannot be reused or recycled. The total surface area of this disposal site where the industrial waste should be tipped for the next 20 years was estimated to be about 42 000 m2.

  12. Report: future industrial solid waste management in pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ), Iran.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarani, Babak; Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza Alavi; Mokhtarani, Nader; Khaledi, Hossein Jomeh

    2006-06-01

    The Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ) is located in the south of Iran, on the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf. This area was established in 1998 for the utilization of south Pars field oil and gas resources. This field is one of the largest gas resources in the world and contains about 6% of the total fossil fuels known. Petrochemical industries, gas refineries and downstream industries are being constructed in this area. At present there are three gas refineries in operation and five more gas refineries are under construction. In this study, different types of solid waste including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial wastes were investigated separately. The aim of the study was to focus on the management of the industrial wastes in order to minimize the environmental impact. In the first stage, the types and amounts of industrial waste in PSEEZ were evaluated by an inventory. The main types of industrial waste are oil products (fuel oil, light oil, lubricating oil), spent catalysts, adsorbents, resins, coke, wax and packaging materials. The waste management of PSEEZ is quite complex because of the different types of industry and the diversity of industrial residues. In some cases recycling/reuse of waste is the best option, but treatment and disposal are also necessary tools. Recently a design has been prepared for a disposal site in PSEEZ for the industrial waste that cannot be reused or recycled. The total surface area of this disposal site where the industrial waste should be tipped for the next 20 years was estimated to be about 42 000 m2. PMID:16784172

  13. Monitoring and managing microbes in aquaculture - Towards a sustainable industry.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Gram, Lone

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms are of great importance to aquaculture where they occur naturally, and can be added artificially, fulfilling different roles. They recycle nutrients, degrade organic matter and, occasionally, they infect and kill the fish, their larvae or the live feed. Also, some microorganisms may protect fish and larvae against disease. Hence, monitoring and manipulating the microbial communities in aquaculture environments hold great potential; both in terms of assessing and improving water quality, but also in terms of controlling the development of microbial infections. Using microbial communities to monitor water quality and to efficiently carry out ecosystem services within the aquaculture systems may only be a few years away. Initially, however, we need to thoroughly understand the microbiomes of both healthy and diseased aquaculture systems, and we need to determine how to successfully manipulate and engineer these microbiomes. Similarly, we can reduce the need to apply antibiotics in aquaculture through manipulation of the microbiome, i.e. by the use of probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that fish pathogenic bacteria in live feed can be controlled by probiotics and that mortality of infected fish larvae can be reduced significantly by probiotic bacteria. However, the successful management of the aquaculture microbiota is currently hampered by our lack of knowledge of relevant microbial interactions and the overall ecology of these systems.

  14. Understanding and Managing Zoonotic Risk in the New Livestock Industries

    PubMed Central

    Waage, Jeff; Barnett, Tony; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Rushton, Jonathan; Rudge, James W.; Loevinsohn, Michael E.; Scoones, Ian; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Ben S.; White, Lisa J.; Goh, Shan; Horby, Peter; Wren, Brendan; Gundogdu, Ozan; Woods, Abigail; Coker, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In many parts of the world, livestock production is undergoing a process of rapid intensification. The health implications of this development are uncertain. Intensification creates cheaper products, allowing more people to access animal-based foods. However, some practices associated with intensification may contribute to zoonotic disease emergence and spread: for example, the sustained use of antibiotics, concentration of animals in confined units, and long distances and frequent movement of livestock. Objectives: Here we present the diverse range of ecological, biological, and socioeconomic factors likely to enhance or reduce zoonotic risk, and identify ways in which a comprehensive risk analysis may be conducted by using an interdisciplinary approach. We also offer a conceptual framework to guide systematic research on this problem. Discussion: We recommend that interdisciplinary work on zoonotic risk should take into account the complexity of risk environments, rather than limiting studies to simple linear causal relations between risk drivers and disease emergence and/or spread. In addition, interdisciplinary integration is needed at different levels of analysis, from the study of risk environments to the identification of policy options for risk management. Conclusion: Given rapid changes in livestock production systems and their potential health implications at the local and global level, the problem we analyze here is of great importance for environmental health and development. Although we offer a systematic interdisciplinary approach to understand and address these implications, we recognize that further research is needed to clarify methodological and practical questions arising from the integration of the natural and social sciences. PMID:23665854

  15. Monitoring and managing microbes in aquaculture - Towards a sustainable industry.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Gram, Lone

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms are of great importance to aquaculture where they occur naturally, and can be added artificially, fulfilling different roles. They recycle nutrients, degrade organic matter and, occasionally, they infect and kill the fish, their larvae or the live feed. Also, some microorganisms may protect fish and larvae against disease. Hence, monitoring and manipulating the microbial communities in aquaculture environments hold great potential; both in terms of assessing and improving water quality, but also in terms of controlling the development of microbial infections. Using microbial communities to monitor water quality and to efficiently carry out ecosystem services within the aquaculture systems may only be a few years away. Initially, however, we need to thoroughly understand the microbiomes of both healthy and diseased aquaculture systems, and we need to determine how to successfully manipulate and engineer these microbiomes. Similarly, we can reduce the need to apply antibiotics in aquaculture through manipulation of the microbiome, i.e. by the use of probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that fish pathogenic bacteria in live feed can be controlled by probiotics and that mortality of infected fish larvae can be reduced significantly by probiotic bacteria. However, the successful management of the aquaculture microbiota is currently hampered by our lack of knowledge of relevant microbial interactions and the overall ecology of these systems. PMID:27452663

  16. Advanced approach to information security management system model for industrial control system.

    PubMed

    Park, Sanghyun; Lee, Kyungho

    2014-01-01

    Organizations make use of important information in day-to-day business. Protecting sensitive information is imperative and must be managed. Companies in many parts of the world protect sensitive information using the international standard known as the information security management system (ISMS). ISO 27000 series is the international standard ISMS used to protect confidentiality, integrity, and availability of sensitive information. While an ISMS based on ISO 27000 series has no particular flaws for general information systems, it is unfit to manage sensitive information for industrial control systems (ICSs) because the first priority of industrial control is safety of the system. Therefore, a new information security management system based on confidentiality, integrity, and availability as well as safety is required for ICSs. This new ISMS must be mutually exclusive of an ICS. This paper provides a new paradigm of ISMS for ICSs, which will be shown to be more suitable than the existing ISMS.

  17. Data collection automation and total quality management: case studies in the health-service industry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan D; Offodile, O Felix

    2008-01-01

    The limitations, immeasurable, and seemly unquantifiable aspects of the healthcare service industry, make it imperative that quality assurance programs include total quality management (TQM) and automatic identification and data capture (AIDC)-related technologies. Most of standards used in TQM and AIDC require data, to measure improvement and achieve standardization. Major difference between managing a service firm and managing a product-manufacturing firm is the difficulty of achieving consistently high quality. Examination of two different healthcare service providers in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area offers different views as to the implementation and practice of total quality management techniques and AIDC integration. Since the healthcare service industry must take into account its high customization needs, there are positive steps to make the hospital structure itself more patient friendly and quality related; hence improving its heath-marketing strategies to the general public.

  18. Advanced Approach to Information Security Management System Model for Industrial Control System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Organizations make use of important information in day-to-day business. Protecting sensitive information is imperative and must be managed. Companies in many parts of the world protect sensitive information using the international standard known as the information security management system (ISMS). ISO 27000 series is the international standard ISMS used to protect confidentiality, integrity, and availability of sensitive information. While an ISMS based on ISO 27000 series has no particular flaws for general information systems, it is unfit to manage sensitive information for industrial control systems (ICSs) because the first priority of industrial control is safety of the system. Therefore, a new information security management system based on confidentiality, integrity, and availability as well as safety is required for ICSs. This new ISMS must be mutually exclusive of an ICS. This paper provides a new paradigm of ISMS for ICSs, which will be shown to be more suitable than the existing ISMS. PMID:25136659

  19. Results of a modeling workshop concerning economic and environmental trends and concomitant resource management issues in the Mobile Bay area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, David B.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.; Ellison, Richard A.; Johnson, Richard A.; Roelle, James E.; Staley, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    During the past decade, the southern regions of the U.S. have experienced rapid change which is expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Growth in population, industry, and resource development has been attributed to a variety of advantages such as an abundant and inexpensive labor force, a mild climate, and the availability of energy, water, land, and other natural resources. While this growth has many benefits for the region, it also creates the potential for increased air, water, and solid waste pollution, and modification of natural habitats. A workshop was convened to consider the Mobile Bay area as a site-specific case of growth and its environmental consequences in the southern region. The objectives of the modeling workshop were to: (1) identify major factors of economic development as they relate to growth in the area over the immediate and longer term; (2) identify major environmental and resource management issues associated with this expected growth; and (3) identify and characterize the complex interrelationships among economic and environmental factors. This report summarizes the activities and results of a modeling workshop concerning economic growth and concomitant resource management issues in the Mobile Bay area. The workshop was organized around construction of a simulation model representing the relationships between a series of actions and indicators identified by participants. The workshop model had five major components. An Industry Submodel generated scenarios of growth in several industrial and transportation sectors. A Human Population/Economy Submodel calculated human population and economic variables in response to employment opportunities. A Land Use/Air Quality Submodel tabulated changes in land use, shoreline use, and air quality. A Water Submodel calculated indicators of water quality and quantity for fresh surface water, ground water, and Mobile Bay based on discharge information provided by the Industry and Human

  20. Understanding Cultural Issues in Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors of Korean Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Yang, Kyeongra; Lee, Jia; Min, Jiwon; Kim, Kevin H.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore potential factors affecting self-management behaviors in Korean immigrants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (KIT2Ds). Methods A qualitative descriptive design guided this study. Semi-structured interviews lasting 45-60 minutes were conducted with 20 KIT2Ds in the participant’s preferred language; in all cases this was Korean. Each interview was audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data analysis was performed in two steps. The data written in Korean were initially analyzed by three bilingual researchers. A qualitative researcher then participated in the analysis to refine the findings for presentation to an English speaking audience while staying true to the data and preserving the nuanced Korean meanings. Results The mean age of the sample was 64. 5 ± 11.6 years (9 men and 11 women). The mean years of staying in the U. S. and age at diabetes mellitus diagnosis were 23.6 ± 9.7 years and 52.5 ± 12.3 years, respectively. Three major ideas were identified: (a) issues on treatment regimen related to both medications and diet, (b) resources that helped or hindered their ability to manage diabetes, and (c) the physician/patient relationship. Conclusions There were important cultural nuances that need to be addressed to better prepare KIT2Ds to manage their diabetes more effectively. A culture specific program should extend beyond a diabetes self-management education delivered in Korean language. Rather, content and education methods need to consider acculturation effects on diabetes management behaviors. PMID:23019236

  1. Mini-review: Assessing the drivers of ship biofouling management--aligning industry and biosecurity goals.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ian; Scianni, Christopher; Hewitt, Chad; Everett, Richard; Holm, Eric; Tamburri, Mario; Ruiz, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling exerts a frictional and cost penalty on ships and is a direct cause of invasion by marine species. These negative consequences provide a unifying purpose for the maritime industry and biosecurity managers to prevent biofouling accumulation and transfer, but important gaps exist between these sectors. This mini-review examines the approach to assessments of ship biofouling among sectors (industry, biosecurity and marine science) and the implications for existing and emerging management of biofouling. The primary distinctions between industry and biosecurity in assessment of vessels biofouling revolve around the resolution of biological information collected and the specific wetted surface areas of primary concern to each sector. The morphological characteristics of biofouling and their effects on propulsion dynamics are of primary concern to industry, with an almost exclusive focus on the vertical sides and flat bottom of hulls and an emphasis on antifouling and operational performance. In contrast, the identity, biogeography, and ecology of translocated organisms is of highest concern to invasion researchers and biosecurity managers and policymakers, especially as it relates to species with known histories of invasion elsewhere. Current management practices often provide adequate, although not complete, provision for hull surfaces, but niche areas are well known to enhance biosecurity risk. As regulations to prevent invasions emerge in this arena, there is a growing opportunity for industry, biosecurity and academic stakeholders to collaborate and harmonize efforts to assess and manage biofouling of ships that should lead to more comprehensive biofouling solutions that promote industry goals while reducing biosecurity risk and greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:26930397

  2. Effect of Occupational Health and Safety Management System on Work-Related Accident Rate and Differences of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Awareness between Managers in South Korea's Construction Industry

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seok J.; Lin, Hsing K.; Chen, Gang; Yi, Shinjea; Choi, Jeawook; Rui, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to investigate the current status of the occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) in the construction industry and the effect of OHSMS on accident rates. Differences of awareness levels on safety issues among site general managers and occupational health and safety (OHS) managers are identified through surveys. Methods The accident rates for the OHSMS-certified construction companies from 2006 to 2011, when the construction OHSMS became widely available, were analyzed to understand the effect of OHSMS on the work-related injury rates in the construction industry. The Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency 18001 is the certification to these companies performing OHSMS in South Korea. The questionnaire was created to analyze the differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers of construction companies. Results The implementation of OHSMS among the top 100 construction companies in South Korea shows that the accident rate decreased by 67% and the fatal accident rate decreased by 10.3% during the period from 2006 to 2011. The survey in this study shows different OHSMS awareness levels between site general managers and OHS managers. The differences were motivation for developing OHSMS, external support needed for implementing OHSMS, problems and effectiveness of implementing OHSMS. Conclusion Both work-related accident and fatal accident rates were found to be significantly reduced by implementing OHSMS in this study. The differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers were identified through a survey. The effect of these differences on safety and other benefits warrants further research with proper data collection. PMID:24422176

  3. A qualitative case study of child protection issues in the Indian construction industry: investigating the security, health, and interrelated rights of migrant families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many of India’s estimated 40 million migrant workers in the construction industry migrate with their children. Though India is undergoing rapid economic growth, numerous child protection issues remain. Migrant workers and their children face serious threats to their health, safety, and well-being. We examined risk and protective factors influencing the basic rights and protections of children and families living and working at a construction site outside Delhi. Methods Using case study methods and a rights-based model of child protection, the SAFE model, we triangulated data from in-depth interviews with stakeholders on and near the site (including employees, middlemen, and managers); 14 participants, interviews with child protection and corporate policy experts in greater Delhi (8 participants), and focus group discussions (FGD) with workers (4 FGDs, 25 members) and their children (2 FGDs, 9 members). Results Analyses illuminated complex and interrelated stressors characterizing the health and well-being of migrant workers and their children in urban settings. These included limited access to healthcare, few educational opportunities, piecemeal wages, and unsafe or unsanitary living and working conditions. Analyses also identified both protective and potentially dangerous survival strategies, such as child labor, undertaken by migrant families in the face of these challenges. Conclusions By exploring the risks faced by migrant workers and their children in the urban construction industry in India, we illustrate the alarming implications for their health, safety, livelihoods, and development. Our findings, illuminated through the SAFE model, call attention to the need for enhanced systems of corporate and government accountability as well as the implementation of holistic child-focused and child-friendly policies and programs in order to ensure the rights and protection of this hyper-mobile, and often invisible, population. PMID:24044788

  4. [Security Management in Clinical Laboratory Departments and Facilities: Current Status and Issues].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Haku; Nakamura, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koike, Masaru; Inoue, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey regarding the current activities for protecting patients' privacy and the security of information systems (IS) related to the clinical laboratory departments of university hospitals, certified training facilities for clinical laboratories, and general hospitals in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The response rate was 47% from 215 medical institutions, including three commercial clinical laboratory centers. The results showed that there were some differences in management activities among facilities with respect to continuing education, the documentation or regulation of operational management for paper records, electronic information, remaining samples, genetic testing, and laboratory information for secondary use. They were suggested to be caused by differences in functions between university and general hospitals, differences in the scale of hospitals, or whether or not hospitals have received accreditation or ISO 15189. Regarding the IS, although the majority of facilities had sufficiently employed the access control to IS, there was some room for improvement in the management of special cases such as VIPs and patients with HIV infection. Furthermore, there were issues regarding the login method for computers shared by multiple staff, the showing of the names of personnel in charge of reports, and the risks associated with direct connections to systems and the Internet and the use of portable media such as USB memory sticks. These results indicated that further efforts are necessary for each facility to continue self-assessment and make improvements. PMID:27509732

  5. [Security Management in Clinical Laboratory Departments and Facilities: Current Status and Issues].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Haku; Nakamura, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koike, Masaru; Inoue, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey regarding the current activities for protecting patients' privacy and the security of information systems (IS) related to the clinical laboratory departments of university hospitals, certified training facilities for clinical laboratories, and general hospitals in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The response rate was 47% from 215 medical institutions, including three commercial clinical laboratory centers. The results showed that there were some differences in management activities among facilities with respect to continuing education, the documentation or regulation of operational management for paper records, electronic information, remaining samples, genetic testing, and laboratory information for secondary use. They were suggested to be caused by differences in functions between university and general hospitals, differences in the scale of hospitals, or whether or not hospitals have received accreditation or ISO 15189. Regarding the IS, although the majority of facilities had sufficiently employed the access control to IS, there was some room for improvement in the management of special cases such as VIPs and patients with HIV infection. Furthermore, there were issues regarding the login method for computers shared by multiple staff, the showing of the names of personnel in charge of reports, and the risks associated with direct connections to systems and the Internet and the use of portable media such as USB memory sticks. These results indicated that further efforts are necessary for each facility to continue self-assessment and make improvements.

  6. Review of Issues Associated with Safe Operation and Management of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, Paul M.; Blomberg, Richard D.; Gleghorn, George J.; Krone, Norris J.; Voltz, Richard A.; Dunn, Robert F.; Donlan, Charles J.; Kauderer, Bernard M.; Brill, Yvonne C.; Englar, Kenneth G.; Himmel, Seymour C.; Fitch, Dennis E.; Parmet, Norman R.; McDonald, John F.McDonald; Stewart, John G.

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the President of the United States through the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the NASA Administrator tasked the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel with the responsibility to identify and review issues associated with the safe operation and management of the Space Shuttle program arising from ongoing efforts to improve and streamline operations. These efforts include the consolidation of operations under a single Space Flight Operations Contract (SFOC), downsizing the Space Shuttle workforce and reducing costs of operations and management. The Panel formed five teams to address the potentially significant safety impacts of the seven specific topic areas listed in the study Terms of Reference. These areas were (in the order in which they are presented in this report): Maintenance of independent safety oversight; implementation plan for the transition of Shuttle program management to the Lead Center; communications among NASA Centers and Headquarters; transition plan for downsizing to anticipated workforce levels; implementation of a phased transition to a prime contractor for operations; Shuttle flight rate for Space Station assembly; and planned safety and performance upgrades for Space Station assembly. The study teams collected information through briefings, interviews, telephone conversations and from reviewing applicable documentation. These inputs were distilled by each team into observations and recommendations which were then reviewed by the entire Panel.

  7. Management of old landfills by utilizing forest and energy industry waste flows.

    PubMed

    Niutanen, Ville; Korhonen, Jouni

    2002-05-01

    The lack of landfill capacity, forthcoming EU waste disposal and landfill management legislation and the use of non-renewable and energy intensive natural resources for the end-treatment of old landfills increase pressures to develop new landfill management methods. This paper considers a method for the end-management of old landfills in Finland, which is based on the utilization of forest and paper industry waste flows, wastes from paper recycling (de-inking) and wastes from forest industry energy production. Fibre clay wastes from paper mills, de-inking sludges from de-inking of recovered waste paper and incineration ash from forest industry power plants serve to substitute the use of natural clay for the building of landfill structures for closed landfills. Arguably, this method is preferable to existing practices of natural clay use for landfill building, because it (1) substitutes non-renewable natural clay, (2) consumes less energy and generates less CO2 emissions than the use of natural clay, and (3) eliminates considerable amounts of wastes from paper production, paper consumption and from forest industry energy production. Some difficulties in the application of the method are considered and the waste flow utilization is incorporated into a local forest industry recycling network. PMID:12173421

  8. Management of old landfills by utilizing forest and energy industry waste flows.

    PubMed

    Niutanen, Ville; Korhonen, Jouni

    2002-05-01

    The lack of landfill capacity, forthcoming EU waste disposal and landfill management legislation and the use of non-renewable and energy intensive natural resources for the end-treatment of old landfills increase pressures to develop new landfill management methods. This paper considers a method for the end-management of old landfills in Finland, which is based on the utilization of forest and paper industry waste flows, wastes from paper recycling (de-inking) and wastes from forest industry energy production. Fibre clay wastes from paper mills, de-inking sludges from de-inking of recovered waste paper and incineration ash from forest industry power plants serve to substitute the use of natural clay for the building of landfill structures for closed landfills. Arguably, this method is preferable to existing practices of natural clay use for landfill building, because it (1) substitutes non-renewable natural clay, (2) consumes less energy and generates less CO2 emissions than the use of natural clay, and (3) eliminates considerable amounts of wastes from paper production, paper consumption and from forest industry energy production. Some difficulties in the application of the method are considered and the waste flow utilization is incorporated into a local forest industry recycling network.

  9. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  10. Improving Educational Objectives of the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process of developing programme educational objectives (PEOs) for the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University, and the process of deployment of these PEOs. Input of the four constituents of the programme, faculty, students, alumni, and employers, is incorporated in the development and…

  11. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  12. Waste Management, Treatment, and Disposal for the Food Processing Industry. Special Circular 113.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooding, N. Henry

    This publication contains information relating to waste prevention, treatment and disposal, and waste product utilization. Its primary purpose is to provide information that will help the food industry executive recognize waste problems and make wise management decisions. The discussion of the methods, techniques, and the state-of-the-art is…

  13. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    EIA Publications

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  14. The Hospital Management of Fatal Self-Poisoning in Industrialized Countries: An Opportunity for Suicide Prevention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Navneet; Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Simkin, Sue; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Gunnell, David

    2006-01-01

    Suicide by self-poisoning is a prevalent cause of death worldwide. A substantial proportion of individuals who poison themselves come into contact with medical services before they die. Our focus in the current study was the medical management of drug self-poisoning in industrialized countries and its possible contribution to suicide prevention.…

  15. Engineering, Support, and Management Services: Construction Industry Series: Preparation Level: Student Manual and Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The guide is an outline of training experiences designed to lead a student to at least entry-level proficiency in engineering, support, and management service jobs within the construction industry. Teaching units cover construction drafting, architectural drawing, engineering drafting, estimating, expediting and scheduling, surveying, testing and…

  16. Business and Industrial Supervisors. Project TEAMS. (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platte Technical Community Coll., Columbus, NE.

    The result of a project to develop short courses to help business and industrial supervisors in developing practical, up-to-date managerial skills, this instructional workbook provides information and exercises applicable to on-the-job situations. Unit I covers the following aspects of management: leadership techniques, problem solving, decision…

  17. A Conceptual Model for Analysing Management Development in the UK Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual, contingent model of management development. It explains the nature of the UK hospitality industry and its potential influence on MD practices, prior to exploring dimensions and relationships in the model. The embryonic model is presented as a model that can enhance our understanding of the complexities of the…

  18. De facto disentitlement in an information economy: enrollment issues in Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    López, Leslie

    2005-03-01

    This article discusses enrollment issues in New Mexico's Medicaid managed care (MMC) system and seeks to illuminate reasons for persistent problems reported by workers and clients. It argues that between 1997 and 2000, the MMC and welfare reforms raised enrollment barriers by complicating and dehumanizing the system, thus "technically disenfranchising" workers and clients. Specifically, the new system increased the need for professional, in-person enrollment assistance precisely when the state decreased its provision of it. Some aspects of the State Child Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) reforms indirectly aggravated those same problems, and though they also significantly lowered barriers in some areas, overall the new system was plagued with preexisting barriers as well as new, unmet needs that produced "de facto disentitlement" to health services.

  19. Municipal solid waste management in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka: Problems, issues and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Vidanaarachchi, Chandana K. . E-mail: c.vidanaarachchi@civenv.unimelb.edu.au; Yuen, Samuel T.S.; Pilapitiya, Sumith

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the problems, issues and challenges faced by Sri Lanka based on the outcome of a recent study conducted in the country's Southern Province. The study consists of a public survey, discussions with local authority staff involved in waste management, discussions with Provincial Council and Government officials, dialogue with local politicians, review of documents and field observations. The study revealed that only 24% of the households have access to waste collection and that in rural areas it was less than 2%. A substantial number of households in areas without waste collection expect local authorities to collect their waste. The study also showed that most sites in the province are under capacity to handle any increased demand. Urgent and immediate improvement of the waste disposal sites is necessary to meet the current demand for improved waste collection. The study also revealed that there is a high willingness of people for home composting.

  20. Telecommunications issues of intelligent database management for ground processing systems in the EOS era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touch, Joseph D.

    1994-01-01

    Future NASA earth science missions, including the Earth Observing System (EOS), will be generating vast amounts of data that must be processed and stored at various locations around the world. Here we present a stepwise-refinement of the intelligent database management (IDM) of the distributed active archive center (DAAC - one of seven regionally-located EOSDIS archive sites) architecture, to showcase the telecommunications issues involved. We develop this architecture into a general overall design. We show that the current evolution of protocols is sufficient to support IDM at Gbps rates over large distances. We also show that network design can accommodate a flexible data ingestion storage pipeline and a user extraction and visualization engine, without interference between the two.