Science.gov

Sample records for industry profile global

  1. GHGRP Industrial Profiles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses. This page hosts data highlights for all sectors.

  2. GHGRP Refineries Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Refineries industry.

  3. GHGRP Metals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Metals industry.

  4. GHGRP Chemicals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Chemicals industry.

  5. GHGRP Minerals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Minerals industry.

  6. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  7. The global alcohol industry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, David H

    2009-02-01

    To describe the globalized sector of the alcoholic beverage industry, including its size, principal actors and activities. Market research firms and business journalism are the primary sources for information about the global alcohol industry, and are used to profile the size and membership of the three main industry sectors of beer, distilled spirits and wine. Branded alcoholic beverages are approximately 38% of recorded alcohol consumption world-wide. Producers of these beverages tend to be large multi-national corporations reliant on marketing for their survival. Marketing activities include traditional advertising as well as numerous other activities, such as new product development, product placement and the creation and promotion of social responsibility programs, messages and organizations. The global alcohol industry is highly concentrated and innovative. There is relatively little public health research evaluating the impact of its many marketing activities.

  8. Causes for Retail Industry Globalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesha, M.

    2012-12-01

    The heading of this article itself pushing me to think why retail industry is globalizing! Because to increase their presence worldwide and profit on the onside and for the sake of ìname and fameî in industry is other side, but todayís trend and compitetitation force industrial giants to forget the word ìname and fameî globalization is the only strategy to compensate their market share or profit from one country to another country or domestic market. The presence of retail industry in the global level from centuries, but the global recognaization of retail industry came to limelight only two decades ago. As soon as restrictions are removed in this sector, all the retail industry big giants spread across the world to extend their operations especially in emerging markets. Is this a good sign for retailers? Off course it is good sign for some countries and some countries are stick to their own perceptions. Some of the countries welcome this move because the FDI will improve their economic structure. On the other side employment opportunity is also one of the issues in globalization of retail sector. Because retail industry needs huge workforce, so significance of retail has been undoubted.

  9. GHGRP Pulp and Paper Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Pulp and Paper industry.

  10. GHGRP Electronics Manufacturing Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Electronics Manufacturing industry.

  11. GHGRP Power Plants Sector Industrial Profiles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles, available for download below, contain detailed analyses for the Power Plants industry.

  12. GHGRP Miscellaneous Combustion Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Miscellaneous Combustion industry.

  13. The Computer Industry. High Technology Industries: Profiles and Outlooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Trade Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    A series of meetings was held to assess future problems in United States high technology, particularly in the fields of robotics, computers, semiconductors, and telecommunications. This report, which focuses on the computer industry, includes a profile of this industry and the papers presented by industry speakers during the meetings. The profile…

  14. Globalization and the pharmaceutical industry revisited.

    PubMed

    Busfield, Joan

    2003-01-01

    This survey of the pharmaceutical industry at the beginning of the 21st century updates some of the information provided in Claudio Tarabusi and Graham Vickery's survey, "Globalization in the Pharmaceutical Industry," published in the International Journal of Health Services in 1998, which was largely based on data up to 1993. However, the purpose of the present article differs from that of Tarabusi and Vickery, which covered a wide range of aspects of the industry relevant to globalization but did not explicitly address the question of the extent to which the industry could be described as globalized. After looking at the industry in some detail, the author directly confronts the question of the appropriateness of the use of the term "globalization" for characterizing the directions in which the pharmaceutical industry has been moving.

  15. Global Population Profile: 2002. International Population Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Matthew; McDevitt, Thomas; Stanecki, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Global Population Profile: 2002 summarizes the most important trends in global population at the dawn of the 21st century. The presentation is organized around four themes: (1) Global Population; (2) Growth, Global Population; (3) Composition, Contraceptive Prevalence in the Developing World; and (4) the AIDS Pandemic in the 21st Century. This…

  16. Automotive Refinishing Industry: Isocyanates Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The isocyanates profile document is part of the DfE Auto Refinishing Shop Project and is intended to provide information on refinishing, control technologies, and regulatory status regarding isocyanate compounds

  17. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect

    Low, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  18. Industrial Maintenance. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for industrial maintenance occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  19. Forest Industry Worker. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for forest industry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  20. Plant Profiles - Industrial Energy Management in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    This 24-page brochure profiles industrial manufacturing firms who are achieving significant energy savings in their plants. The DOE Office of Industrial Technologies six plant-of-the-year nominees are featured, and an additional 10 projects from other companies are also highlighted. Information on OIT's awards and recognition process, and information on OIT and BestPractices is also included.

  1. High technology industries: Profiles and outlooks. The telecommunications industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This profile is designed to: (1) assess the international competitive position of the U.S. Telecommunication Equipment Industry; pin point the major foreign and domestic challenges to American Telecommunication equipment manufacturers; and present for discussion possible options in terms of U.S. government policies affecting the sector's international standing.

  2. High technology industries: Profiles and outlooks. The semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This profile is designed to assess the international competitive position of the U.S. Semiconductor Industry; pinpoint the major foreign and domestic challenges to American semiconductor manufacturers; and present for discussion possible options in terms of U.S. government policies affecting the sector's international standing.

  3. Trends in the global aluminum fabrication industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh; Yin, Weimin

    2007-02-01

    The aluminum fabrication industry has become more vital to the global economy as international aluminum consumption has grown steadily in the past decades. Using innovation, value, and sustainability, the aluminum industry is strengthening its position not only in traditional packaging and construction applications but also in the automotive and aerospace markets to become more competitive and to face challenges from other industries and higher industrial standards. The aluminum fabrication industry has experienced a significant geographical shift caused by rapid growth in emerging markets in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Market growth and distribution will vary with different patterns of geography and social development; the aluminum industry must be part of the transformation and keep pace with market developments to benefit.

  4. Estimating pre-industrial global temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Ed; Ortega, Pablo; Suckling, Emma; Schurer, Andrew; Hegerl, Gabi; Jones, Phil; Joshi, Manoj; Osborn, Tim; Mignot, Juliette; Thorne, Peter; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan

    2016-04-01

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process has recently agreed to try and limit global temperature rise to `well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels'. But what period is `pre-industrial'? Remarkably, perhaps, this is not defined within the UNFCCC or its many agreements and protocols. Neither was the term used in the IPCC's fifth assessment report (AR5) when discussing when particular temperature levels might be reached, due to the lack of a robust definition. Here, we discuss the important factors to consider when defining a period to call pre-industrial, based on estimates of historical radiative forcings and the availability of climate observations. There is no perfect period to choose, but we suggest that 1720-1800 is the optimal choice. We also attempt to estimate the change in global temperatures since this pre-industrial period using a range of approaches based on observations, radiative forcings, global climate model simulations and proxy evidence. We discuss how such an assessment might be improved in future and conclude that 2015 was likely the first year in which global temperatures were more than 1°C above pre-industrial levels.

  5. Defence electronics industry profile, 1990-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The defense electronics industry profiled in this review comprises an estimated 150 Canadian companies that develop, manufacture, and repair radio and communications equipment, radars for surveillance and navigation, air traffic control systems, acoustic and infrared sensors, computers for navigation and fire control, signal processors and display units, special-purpose electronic components, and systems engineering and associated software. Canadian defense electronics companies generally serve market niches and end users of their products are limited to the military, government agencies, or commercial airlines. Geographically, the industry is concentrated in Ontario and Quebec, where about 91 percent of the industry's production and employment is found. In 1989, the estimated revenue of the industry was $2.36 billion, and exports totalled an estimated $1.4 billion. Strengths and weaknesses of the industry are discussed in terms of such factors as the relatively small size of Canadian companies, the ability of Canadian firms to access research and development opportunities and export markets in the United States, the dependence on foreign-made components, and international competition.

  6. Exporting dams: China's hydropower industry goes global.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kristen; Bosshard, Peter; Brewer, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    In line with China's "going out" strategy, China's dam industry has in recent years significantly expanded its involvement in overseas markets. The Chinese Export-Import Bank and other Chinese financial institutions, state-owned enterprises, and private firms are now involved in at least 93 major dam projects overseas. The Chinese government sees the new global role played by China's dam industry as a "win-win" situation for China and host countries involved. But evidence from project sites such as the Merowe Dam in Sudan demonstrates that these dams have unrecognized social and environmental costs for host communities. Chinese dam builders have yet to adopt internationally accepted social and environmental standards for large infrastructure development that can assure these costs are adequately taken into account. But the Chinese government is becoming increasingly aware of the challenge and the necessity of promoting environmentally and socially sound investments overseas.

  7. Industrial Lead in the Global Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegal, A. R.; Ericson, J. E.

    2004-12-01

    Although the rates of emission, fluxes and recycling of natural and industrial lead in biogeochemical systems are needed to quantify environmental lead pollution, those geochemical processes are rarely incorporated in either Earth Science or Environmental Health Science curriculum. The need for an understanding of the global lead cycle in those diverse fields is due to the omnipresence of industrial lead contamination that was initiated over five millennia ago, which has often exceeded natural emissions of lead by orders of magnitude. That contamination has been repeatedly demonstrated in environmental analyses ranging from the most remote polar regions and oceans of the Earth to urban and industrial regions. The latter include studies of soil lead in Baltimore, New Orleans, St. Paul-Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Tijuana, and Ottawa, which show that lead from past combustion of leaded gasoline remains in those cities and it is bioavailable. With the protracted residence time of that soil lead (102 - 103 years), it is estimated that generations of urban children will continue to be exposed to this toxicant, unless there is abatement. Moreover, many third world countries are still using leaded gasoline and other sources of industrial lead continue to be emitted into the environment, albeit at reduced levels. Consequently, the geochemical cycling of lead is and will continue to be a most appropriate and topical subject of study in the curriculum of earth science and environmental health science.

  8. [Justice challenges of pharmaceutical industry global research].

    PubMed

    Páez Moreno, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    International research projects sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry are a recent modality of biomedical research, which is driven by interests that are not only scientific, but also commercial. This combination of interests is one of the natural consequences of globalization, which has brought unquestionable benefits for the world, but has also created a wider gap between the wealthy and the poor. Given that globalization has been led by the the world's leading economies, the level of injustice in the world has increased, often to the favor of the already wealthy. Globalization has a well-established dynamics, whose main characteristic is domain over the following: technological innovation, the organization of the production of goods and services, human needs, and consumption. International biomedical research fits well in this dynamics, and the result is often a poor distribution of benefits, added to a loss of scientific integrity for the sake of commercial interests. This phenomenon raises many ethical questions and it demands a reflection from different bioethical points of view, particularly an economic ethics and a global justice.

  9. GHGRP Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses for Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems.

  10. Supporting industries energy and environmental profile

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-09-21

    As part of its Industries of the Future strategy, the Industrial Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy works with energy-intensive industries to improve efficiency, reduce waste, and increase productivity. These seven Industries of the Future (IOFs) – aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel – rely on several other so-called “supporting industries” to supply materials and processes necessary to the products that the IOFs create. The supporting industries, in many cases, also provide great opportunities for realizing energy efficiency gains in IOF processes.

  11. Space and biotechnology: An industry profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Richard S.; Norton, David J.; Tom, Baldwin H.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a study conducted by the Center for Space and Advanced Technology (CSAT) for NASA-JSC are presented. The objectives were to determine the interests and attitudes of the U.S. biotechnology industry toward space biotechnology and to prepare a concise review of the current activities of the biotechnology industry. In order to accomplish these objectives, two primary actions were taken. First, a questionnaire was designed, reviewed, and distributed to U.S. biotechnology companies. Second, reviews of the various biotechnology fields were prepared in several aspects of the industry. For each review, leading figures in the field were asked to prepare a brief review pointing out key trends and current industry technical problems. The result is a readable narrative of the biotechnology industry which will provide space scientists and engineers valuable clues as to where the space environment can be explored to advance the U.S. biotechnology industry.

  12. The global position of the U S forest products industry

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; David N. Wear; Michaela O. Foster

    2015-01-01

    The United States’ share of global industrial roundwood production has declined since the 1990s. We reviewed data from 1961-2013 to evaluate the extent of this decline for industrial roundwood and derived secondary forest products compared to other major producing countries. We find that the U.S. global share of industrial roundwood peaked at 28 percent in 1999 but...

  13. New York State industrial energy profile, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, B. B.; Brown, B. L.

    1981-04-01

    A New York State industrial energy data base compatible with the national data base which includes industrial energy use on a national level and energy recovery technologies was studied. The data base is a comprehensive New York industrial energy use profile by county and 4 digit standard industrial classification (SIC) and includes the following process and waste energy fuel type, plant size, and employee distribution. Total energy consumption in the manufacturing sector in New York State.

  14. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  15. Globalisation of tobacco industry influence and new global responses.

    PubMed

    Yach, D; Bettcher, D

    2000-06-01

    The globalisation of tobacco marketing, trade, research, and industry influence represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Drawing upon tobacco industry strategy documents prepared over several decades, this paper will demonstrate how the tobacco industry operates as a global force, regarding the world as its operating market by planning, developing, and marketing its products on a global scale. The industry has used a wide range of methods to buy influence and power, and penetrate markets across the world. It has an annual turnover of almost US$400 billion. In contrast, until recently tobacco control lacked global leadership and strategic direction and had been severely underfunded. As part of moving towards a more sustainable form of globalisation, a global enabling environment linked to local actions should focus on the following strategies: global information management; development of nationally and locally grounded action; global regulation, legal instruments, and foreign policy; and establishment of strong partnerships with purpose. As the vector of the tobacco epidemic, the tobacco industry's actions fall far outside of the boundaries of global corporate responsibility. Therefore, global and local actions should not provide the tobacco industry with the two things that it needs to ensure its long term profitability: respectability and predictability.

  16. Globalisation of tobacco industry influence and new global responses

    PubMed Central

    Yach, D.; Bettcher, D.

    2000-01-01

    The globalisation of tobacco marketing, trade, research, and industry influence represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Drawing upon tobacco industry strategy documents prepared over several decades, this paper will demonstrate how the tobacco industry operates as a global force, regarding the world as its operating market by planning, developing, and marketing its products on a global scale. The industry has used a wide range of methods to buy influence and power, and penetrate markets across the world. It has an annual turnover of almost US$400 billion. In contrast, until recently tobacco control lacked global leadership and strategic direction and had been severely underfunded. As part of moving towards a more sustainable form of globalisation, a global enabling environment linked to local actions should focus on the following strategies: global information management; development of nationally and locally grounded action; global regulation, legal instruments, and foreign policy; and establishment of strong partnerships with purpose. As the vector of the tobacco epidemic, the tobacco industry's actions fall far outside of the boundaries of global corporate responsibility. Therefore, global and local actions should not provide the tobacco industry with the two things that it needs to ensure its long term profitability: respectability and predictability.


Keywords: globalisation of tobacco marketing PMID:10841858

  17. Recommendation for funding the 1992 Global Change Summer Institute: Industrial ecology and global change

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, J.S.

    1992-12-31

    A summer institute on Industrial Ecology and Global Change was held at Snow Mass, Colorado, July 20--31, 1992. Topics of discussion included the following: the patterns and prospects of global industrialization; the vulnerability of the global environment to human activity; how industrial activity might be reconfigured in response to a deeper understanding of the major biogeochemical cycles in which this activity is embedded; how industrial activity might be reconfigured in response to a deeper understanding of associated exotic disturbances of the environment; interactions of human activity with basic environmental cycles; human activity in the form of exotic disturbance of the environment; and the dynamics of industrial development and the environmental implications.

  18. Globalization in the pharmaceutical industry, Part I.

    PubMed

    Casadio Tarabusi, C; Vickery, G

    1998-01-01

    This report on the pharmaceutical industry will be published in two parts. Part I begins with a summary of the study and its conclusions. The authors then provide an overview of the characteristics of the industry and current trends in its growth and structure: production and consumption, employment, research and development, capital investment, firm and product concentration and product competition, and pricing. A discussion of international trade follows, covering intra- and inter-regional, intra-firm, and intra-industry trade. The report will continue in the next issue of the Journal (Part II) with a look at foreign direct investment, inter-firm networks, and governmental policies.

  19. Agricultural/Industrial Mechanical Technician. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for agricultural/industrial mechanical technician occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits),…

  20. Globalization in the pharmaceutical industry, Part II.

    PubMed

    Casadio Tarabusi, C; Vickery, G

    1998-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report on the pharmaceutical industry. Part II begins with a discussion of foreign direct investment and inter-firm networks, which covers international mergers, acquisitions, and minority participation; market shares of foreign-controlled firms; international collaboration agreements (with a special note on agreements in biotechnology); and licensing agreements. The final section of the report covers governmental policies on health and safety regulation, price regulation, industry and technology, trade, foreign investment, protection of intellectual property, and competition.

  1. Industrial application for global quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, A.; Petruccione, F.

    2012-09-01

    In the last decade the quantum communication community has witnessed great advances in photonic quantum cryptography technology with the research, development and commercialization of automated Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) devices. These first generation devices are however bottlenecked by the achievable spatial coverage. This is due to the intrinsic absorption of the quantum particle into the communication medium. As QKD is of paramount importance in the future ICT landscape, various innovative solutions have been developed and tested to expand the spatial coverage of these networks such as the Quantum City initiative in Durban, South Africa. To expand this further into a global QKD-secured network, recent efforts have focussed on high-altitude free-space techniques through the use of satellites. This couples the QKD-secured Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs) with secured ground-tosatellite links as access points to a global network. Such a solution, however, has critical limitations that reduce its commercial feasibility. As parallel step to the development of satellitebased global QKD networks, we investigate the use of the commercial aircrafts' network as secure transport mechanisms in a global QKD network. This QKD-secured global network will provide a robust infrastructure to create, distribute and manage encryption keys between the MANs of the participating cities.

  2. Assessment of global industrial-age anthropogenic arsenic contamination.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengxiang X; Su, Yi; Monts, David L; Plodinec, M John; Banin, Amos; Triplett, Glover E

    2003-09-01

    Arsenic, a carcinogenic trace element, threatens not only the health of millions of humans and other living organisms, but also global sustainability. We present here, for the first time, the global industrial-age cumulative anthropogenic arsenic production and its potential accumulation and risks in the environment. In 2000, the world cumulative industrial-age anthropogenic arsenic production was 4.53 million tonnes. The world-wide coal and petroleum industries accounted for 46% of global annual gross arsenic production, and their overall contribution to industrial-age gross arsenic production was 27% in 2000. Global industrial-age anthropogenic As sources (as As cumulative production) follow the order: As mining production>As generated from coal>As generated from petroleum. The potential industrial-age anthropogenic arsenic input in world arable surface in 2000 was 2.18 mg arsenic kg(-1), which is 1.2 times that in the lithosphere. The development of substitute materials for arsenic applications in the agricultural and forestry industries and controls of arsenic emissions from the coal industry may be possible strategies to significantly decrease arsenic pollution sources and dissipation rates into the environment.

  3. Emerging Patterns in the Global Defense Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    Industry Raymond Franck , Ira Lewis, Bernard Udis, and David Matthews, NPS Published: 30 April 2011 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...Acquisition Research Program Attn: James B. Greene, RADM, USN, (Ret.) Acquisition Chair Graduate School of Business and Public Policy Naval Postgraduate...Postgraduate School Foundation and acknowledge its generous contributions in support of this Symposium. James B. Greene, Jr. Keith F. Snider

  4. Assessing global resource utilization efficiency in the industrial sector.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc A

    2013-09-01

    Designing efficient energy systems, which also meet economic, environmental and other objectives and constraints, is a significant challenge. In a world with finite natural resources and large energy demands, it is important to understand not just actual efficiencies, but also limits to efficiency, as the latter identify margins for efficiency improvement. Energy analysis alone is inadequate, e.g., it yields energy efficiencies that do not provide limits to efficiency. To obtain meaningful and useful efficiencies for energy systems, and to clarify losses, exergy analysis is a beneficial and useful tool. Here, the global industrial sector and industries within it are assessed by using energy and exergy methods. The objective is to improve the understanding of the efficiency of global resource use in the industrial sector and, with this information, to facilitate the development, prioritization and ultimate implementation of rational improvement options. Global energy and exergy flow diagrams for the industrial sector are developed and overall efficiencies for the global industrial sector evaluated as 51% based on energy and 30% based on exergy. Consequently, exergy analysis indicates a less efficient picture of energy use in the global industrial sector than does energy analysis. A larger margin for improvement exists from an exergy perspective, compared to the overly optimistic margin indicated by energy.

  5. Global climate change: A utility industry perspective

    SciTech Connect

    DeMichele, O.M.

    1994-12-31

    Many electric utilities have accepted responsibility to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Many have enthusiastically committed their support. No one industry, government or environmental group can take responsibility for, or stop, climate change. However, for a long time, electric utilities took an unfair share of the blame. Since 1973, US electricity use has increased 61%. But, total energy use went up only 11%. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide emissions per dollar of gross domestic product dropped 29%. In other words, increased electrification actually increases energy efficiency and reduces greenhouse gases.

  6. Global gene mining and the pharmaceutical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2005-09-01

    Worldwide efforts are ongoing in optimizing medical treatment by searching for the right medicine at the right dose for the individual. Metabolism is regulated by polymorphisms, which may be tested by relatively simple SNP analysis, however requiring DNA from the test individuals. Target genes for the efficiency of a given medicine or predisposition of a given disease are also subject to population studies, e.g., in Iceland, Estonia, Sweden, etc. For hypothesis testing and generation, several bio-banks with samples from patients and healthy persons within the pharmaceutical industry have been established during the past 10 years. Thus, more than 100,000 samples are stored in the freezers of either the pharmaceutical companies or their contractual partners at universities and test institutions. Ethical issues related to data protection of the individuals providing samples to bio-banks are several: nature and extent of information prior to consent, coverage of the consent given by the study person, labeling and storage of the sample and data (coded or anonymized). In general, genetic test data, once obtained, are permanent and cannot be changed. The test data may imply information that is not beneficial to the patient and his/her family (e.g., employment opportunities, insurance, etc.). Furthermore, there may be a long latency between the analysis of the genetic test and the clinical expression of the disease and wide differences in the disease patterns. Consequently, information about some genetic test data may stigmatize patients leading to poor quality of life. This has raised the issue of 'genetic exceptionalism' justifying specific regulation of use of genetic information. Discussions on how to handle sampling and data are ongoing within the industry and the regulatory sphere, the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) having issued a position paper, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) having a working

  7. The globalization of the arms industry: The next proliferation challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzinger, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    The globalization of the arms industry entails a significant shift away from traditional, single-country patterns of weapons production toward internationalization of the development, production, and marketing of arms. While wholly indigenous armaments production may be on the decline, multinational arms production - through collaboration on individual weapon systems and increasingly via interfirm linkages across the international arms industry - appears actually to be expanding. In several instances, in fact, multinational armaments production is increasingly supplementing or even supplanting indigenous or autonomous weapons production or arms imports. The emergence of an increasingly transnational defense technology and industrial base is fundamentally affecting the shape and content of much of the global arms trade. This changing defense market, in turn, will have a profound impact on a number of national security issues concerning the Western industrialized nations. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Achieving Carbon Neutrality in the Global Aluminum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh

    2012-02-01

    In the 21st century, sustainability is widely regarded as the new corporate culture, and leading manufacturing companies (Toyota, GE, and Alcoa) and service companies (Google and Federal Express) are striving towards carbon neutrality. The current carbon footprint of the global aluminum industry is estimated at 500 million metric tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2eq), representing about 1.7% of global emissions from all sources. For the global aluminum industry, carbon neutrality is defined as a state where the total "in-use" CO2eq saved from all products in current use, including incremental process efficiency improvements, recycling, and urban mining activities, equals the CO2eq expended to produce the global output of aluminum. This paper outlines an integrated and quantifiable plan for achieving "carbon neutrality" in the global aluminum industry by advocating five actionable steps: (1) increase use of "green" electrical energy grid by 8%, (2) reduce process energy needs by 16%, (3) deploy 35% of products in "in-use" energy saving applications, (4) divert 6.1 million metric tonnes/year from landfills, and (5) mine 4.5 million metric tonnes/year from aluminum-rich "urban mines." Since it takes 20 times more energy to make aluminum from bauxite ore than to recycle it from scrap, the global aluminum industry could set a reasonable, self-imposed energy/carbon neutrality goal to incrementally increase the supply of recycled aluminum by at least 1.05 metric tonnes for every tonne of incremental production via primary aluminum smelter capacity. Furthermore, the aluminum industry can and should take a global leadership position by actively developing internationally accepted and approved carbon footprint credit protocols.

  9. Agricultural/Industrial Mechanical Technician. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This occupational competency analysis profile (OCAP), which is one a series of employer-verified competency lists that were developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives across Ohio, identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  10. Global distribution of seamounts from Seasat profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Claire H.; Sandwell, David T.

    1988-01-01

    A new measurement techique based on a model of a Gaussian seamount loading a thin elastic lithosphere was developed to analyze seamounts that, until then, were not surveyed or seamounts with poor bathymetric coverage. The model predicts that the seamount diameter is equal to the peak-to-trough distance along the vertical deflection profile and that the flexural diameter of a seamount is related to the age of the lithosphere when the seamount formed. This model also suggests that these two measurements are relatively insensitive to the cross-track location from the seamount. These model predictions were confirmed using Seasat altimeter profiles crossing 14 surveyed seamounts in the Pacific. The analysis of the seamount distribution indicated considerable variations in population density and type across the oceans. Most notable among them are the absence of seamounts in the Atlantic, variations in population density across large fracture zones in the Pacific, and the prevalence of small signatures in the Indian Ocean.

  11. Differential Globalization of Industry- and Non-Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Atal, Ignacio; Trinquart, Ludovic; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the international landscape of clinical trials may inform global health research governance, but no large-scale data are available. Industry or non-industry sponsorship may have a major influence in this mapping. We aimed to map the global landscape of industry- and non-industry-sponsored clinical trials and its evolution over time. We analyzed clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2013 and registered in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We mapped single-country and international trials by World Bank's income groups and by sponsorship (industry- vs. non- industry), including its evolution over time from 2006 to 2012. We identified clusters of countries that collaborated significantly more than expected in industry- and non-industry-sponsored international trials. 119,679 clinical trials conducted in 177 countries were analysed. The median number of trials per million inhabitants in high-income countries was 100 times that in low-income countries (116.0 vs. 1.1). Industry sponsors were involved in three times more trials per million inhabitants than non-industry sponsors in high-income countries (75.0 vs. 24.5) and in ten times fewer trials in low- income countries (0.08 vs. 1.08). Among industry- and non-industry-sponsored trials, 30.3% and 3.2% were international, respectively. In the industry-sponsored network of collaboration, Eastern European and South American countries collaborated more than expected; in the non-industry-sponsored network, collaboration among Scandinavian countries was overrepresented. Industry-sponsored international trials became more inter-continental with time between 2006 and 2012 (from 54.8% to 67.3%) as compared with non-industry-sponsored trials (from 42.4% to 37.2%). Based on trials registered in the WHO ICTRP we documented a substantial gap between the globalization of industry- and non-industry-sponsored clinical research. Only 3% of academic trials but 30% of industry trials are

  12. Tobacco industry globalization and global health governance: towards an interdisciplinary research agenda.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelley; Eckhardt, Jappe; Holden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Shifting patterns of tobacco production and consumption, and the resultant disease burden worldwide since the late twentieth century, prompted efforts to strengthen global health governance through adoption of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. While the treaty is rightfully considered an important achievement, to address a neglected public health issue through collective action, evidence suggests that tobacco industry globalization continues apace. In this article, we provide a systematic review of the public health literature and reveal definitional and measurement imprecision, ahistorical timeframes, transnational tobacco companies and the state as the primary units and levels of analysis, and a strong emphasis on agency as opposed to structural power. Drawing on the study of globalization in international political economy and business studies, we identify opportunities to expand analysis along each of these dimensions. We conclude that this expanded and interdisciplinary research agenda provides the potential for fuller understanding of the dual and dynamic relationship between the tobacco industry and globalization. Deeper analysis of how the industry has adapted to globalization over time, as well as how the industry has influenced the nature and trajectory of globalization, is essential for building effective global governance responses. This article is published as part of a thematic collection dedicated to global governance.

  13. Tobacco industry globalization and global health governance: towards an interdisciplinary research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley; Eckhardt, Jappe; Holden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Shifting patterns of tobacco production and consumption, and the resultant disease burden worldwide since the late twentieth century, prompted efforts to strengthen global health governance through adoption of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. While the treaty is rightfully considered an important achievement, to address a neglected public health issue through collective action, evidence suggests that tobacco industry globalization continues apace. In this article, we provide a systematic review of the public health literature and reveal definitional and measurement imprecision, ahistorical timeframes, transnational tobacco companies and the state as the primary units and levels of analysis, and a strong emphasis on agency as opposed to structural power. Drawing on the study of globalization in international political economy and business studies, we identify opportunities to expand analysis along each of these dimensions. We conclude that this expanded and interdisciplinary research agenda provides the potential for fuller understanding of the dual and dynamic relationship between the tobacco industry and globalization. Deeper analysis of how the industry has adapted to globalization over time, as well as how the industry has influenced the nature and trajectory of globalization, is essential for building effective global governance responses. This article is published as part of a thematic collection dedicated to global governance. PMID:28458910

  14. Writing Technical Documents for the Global Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    States that technical writers in the global pharmaceutical industry write for two audiences: regulatory agencies and healthcare practitioners. Contends that information products that address these audiences must balance the competing forces of business interests, market penetration, and the cultural variables of products so tied to people's…

  15. Writing Technical Documents for the Global Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    States that technical writers in the global pharmaceutical industry write for two audiences: regulatory agencies and healthcare practitioners. Contends that information products that address these audiences must balance the competing forces of business interests, market penetration, and the cultural variables of products so tied to people's…

  16. Globalization and Industrialization in 64 Developing Countries, 1980-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Yunus

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the latest wave of economic globalization on manufacturing employment in developing countries. It revisits the classic debate on the effect of internal and external influences on industrialization, and extends this debate to contemporary developing countries. In the process, it assesses the evidence for…

  17. Globalization and Industrialization in 64 Developing Countries, 1980-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Yunus

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the latest wave of economic globalization on manufacturing employment in developing countries. It revisits the classic debate on the effect of internal and external influences on industrialization, and extends this debate to contemporary developing countries. In the process, it assesses the evidence for…

  18. Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.O.

    1991-12-31

    A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

  19. Strategic imperatives for globalization of industries in developing countries: an Indian pharmaceutical industry example.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rajesh; Chandra, Ashish; Kumar, Girish

    2004-01-01

    The annual global pharmaceutical sales have grown over 466 billion dollars, almost 50% of which comes from North America. Among developing countries, India, with 16% of the world population, accounts for only a small percentage of the global pharmaceutical industry. Until recently, India has had virtually no pharmaceutical industry worth the name producing drugs from basic raw materials and it used to rely mostly on the imports from countries like the USA and England for all its requirements of drugs. On the other hand, India has seen a plethora of multinational pharmaceutical companies come and do business in India. This paper develops a matrix which provides a broad guidance to the mid- to large-size Indian pharmaceutical domestic companies, which should embark on the path to global expansion to establish their might as well.

  20. Industrial Water Use - A New Global Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassolo, S.

    The industry together with irrigation are the most important water users. While wa- ter use for irrigation has been intensely investigated and its distribution is available on different scales (for example Döll &Siebert, 2000), industrial water use has only been published as lump values for 26 regions of the world (Shiklomanov, 1997). This paper will present a new global data set of industrial water use for 1995 with values distributed on a 0.5 x 0.5 raster. Water use for production of electricity, chemicals, pulp and paper, pig iron, sugar, beer, cloth, crude steel, and aluminium is included in the computation. Water use for electricity production is obtained based on the geo- graphical location (NIMA Atlas, 1999) of 96,000 fuelled power stations (Utility Data Institute, 2000) and the respective water use. Water use for manufacturing is com- puted based on the country individual branch production (UN Statistical Yearbook, 1997) and the specific water use for the respective branch (European Environmental Agency, 1999). The computed water use is distributed according to the urban pop- ulation of each individual country. The obtained data are compared with individual published data and presented in a global map.

  1. The impact of global warming on the automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannappel, Ralf

    2017-08-01

    One cause of global warming of the earth's atmosphere is the emission of human made gases (methane, CO2, nitrous oxygen, etc.) into the environment. Of the total global CO2 emissions the transportation sector contributes to about 14%. In order to control the emissions of the automotive sector, in all major countries (USA, Europe, China, Japan) of the world, tough emissions targets were being set to reduce the vehicle traffic's contribution of CO2. These are derived from the global climate conference' target to limit the maximum temperature increase of the earth of 2 degrees Celsius until 2100. In order to achieve these stringent targets the automotive industry will face a major change in its drivetrain. It will move from combustion to electrical engines. The technical realization of these engines will most likely be battery and fuel cell driven propulsion systems. In order to achieve that transition a major effort is required in 4 industrial areas, i.e. growing electrical charging infrastructure, lowering battery cost, increasing the battery-electric vehicle ranges and developing new environmental friendly hydrogen production methods.

  2. African women, industrialization and another development. A global perspective.

    PubMed

    Steady, F C

    1982-01-01

    Historically, the women of Africa have been differentially integrated into the world economic system, serving primarily as a labor reserve and a mainstay for the subsistence and reproductive sectors. If and when necessary, female proletarianization can come into effect. African women, by virtue of their strategic role in traditional food systems, have acquired certain skills compatible with labor intensive food processing industries. Consequently, in some countries they have been involved in the handling, processing, and packing of food. In many 3rd world nations regulations protecting minimum wage levels do not exist and collective bargaining activities are not strongly in force. Economic hardship and the desperate need to survive can lead some groups to accept even lower wages. Consequently, although the employment of women at lower wages violates the principle of equal pay for equal work, agroindustries with monopolies can deliberately and with impunity hire women at lower wages than men. In general, when women are hired in industries the nature of their employment is precarious, frequently being of a casual and seasonal nature and in greatest demand during peak periods. In an effort to understand the implications of industrialization for African women a global perspective is necessary, for at present the incorporation of the African women in direct industrialization is minimal. Racism has played an important role in the exploitation of the African continent, and no serious study of class and gender inequality in Africa can overlook that important fact. Numerous studies have shown how industry perpetuates the sexual division of labor. Even in the industrialized nations, women often have held the least paid and most precarious jobs in industry. Women's vulnerability is further worsened by several factors, the most obvious being their reproductive capabilities. In addition to being more vulnerable to industrial hazards, their employment can be truncated by

  3. Nuclear energy position in industrial and economics global

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Permana, Sidik

    2012-06-01

    3E (Energy, Economics and Education) are three concepts of community development, and 3E concepts are interlinked between each other. 3E concept is divided into three levels of regions, remote area or villages, small towns and metropolitan cities, and there are different problems of each region. This paper analyzes the relations between energy, economics and education in the metropolitan and industrial city. Especially the influence of nuclear energy concerning at cost production of the industrial and the contribution of education and research for nuclear energy innovation. This relation can be explained using "S-curve". The results of this study is the comparison between the product involves the use of nuclear energy or not in the production process are explained using "S-curve" and its effect on the global economics.

  4. Global Daily Atmospheric State Profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 (micro)m to 15.4 (micro)m and a 13.5 km footprint. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles, clouds, dust and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4.[1] AIRS data are used for weather forecasting and studies of global climate change. The AIRS is a 'facility' instrument developed by NASA as an experimental demonstration of advanced technology for remote sensing and the benefits of high resolution infrared spectra to science investigations.

  5. Ozone Profiles and Tropospheric Ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sioris, C. E.; Sparr, R. J. D.; Kuregm, T. P.; Martin, R. V.; Newchurch, M. J.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ozone profiles are derived from backscattered radiances in the ultraviolet spectra (290-340 nm) measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment using optimal estimation. Tropospheric O3 is directly retrieved with the tropopause as one of the retrieval levels. To optimize the retrieval and improve the fitting precision needed for tropospheric O3, we perform extensive wavelength and radiometric calibrations and improve forward model inputs. Retrieved O3 profiles and tropospheric O3 agree well with coincident ozonesonde measurements, and the integrated total O3 agrees very well with Earth Probe TOMS and Dobson/Brewer total O3. The global distribution of tropospheric O3 clearly shows the influences of biomass burning, convection, and air pollution, and is generally consistent with our current understanding.

  6. Industrial-era global ocean heat uptake doubles in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, Peter J.; Durack, Paul J.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Forest, Chris E.

    2016-04-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes identified in observational, modelling and data re-analysis studies. Here, we examine OHC changes in the context of the Earth’s global energy budget since early in the industrial era (circa 1865-2015) for a range of depths. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the nineteenth-century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in situ mostly upper-ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2,000 m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. We show that the multi-model mean constructed from the current generation of historically forced climate models is consistent with the OHC changes from this diverse collection of observational systems. Our model-based analysis suggests that nearly half of the industrial-era increases in global OHC have occurred in recent decades, with over a third of the accumulated heat occurring below 700 m and steadily rising.

  7. An overview of fecal sample preparation for global metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Deda, Olga; Gika, Helen G; Wilson, Ian D; Theodoridis, Georgios A

    2015-09-10

    The global metabolic profiling of feces represents a challenge for both analytical chemistry and biochemistry standpoints. As a specimen, feces is complex, not homogenous and rich in macromolecules and particulate, non-digested, matter that can present problems for analytical systems. Further to this, the composition of feces is highly dependent on short-term dietary factors whilst also representing the primary specimen where co-metabolism of the host organism and the gut-microbiota is expressed. Thus the presence and the content of metabolites can be a result of host metabolism, gut microbiota metabolism or co-metabolism. Successful sample preparation and metabolite analysis require that the methodology applied for sample preparation is adequate to compensate for the highly variable nature of the sample in order to generate useful data and provide insight to ongoing biochemical processes, thereby generating hypotheses. The current practices for processing fecal samples for global metabolic profiling are described with emphasis on critical aspects in sample preparation: e.g., homogenization, filtration, centrifugation, solvent extraction and so forth and also conditions/parameter selection are discussed. The different methods applied for feces processing prior to metabolite analysis are summarized and illustrated using selected examples to highlight the effect of sample preparation on the metabolic profile obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing global soil models to soil carbon profile databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Harden, J. W.; He, Y.; Lawrence, D. M.; Nave, L. E.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Treat, C.; Sulman, B. N.; Kane, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    As global soil models begin to consider the dynamics of carbon below the surface layers, it is crucial to assess the realism of these models. We focus on the vertical profiles of soil C predicted across multiple biomes form the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), using different values for a parameter that controls the rate of decomposition at depth versus at the surface, and compare these to observationally-derived diagnostics derived from the International Soil Carbon Database (ISCN) to assess the realism of model predictions of carbon depthattenuation, and the ability of observations to provide a constraint on rates of decomposition at depth.

  9. Global Profiling Strategies for Mapping Dysregulated Metabolic Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel I.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells possess fundamentally altered metabolism that provides a foundation to support tumorigenicity and malignancy. Our understanding of the biochemical underpinnings of cancer has benefited from the integrated utilization of large-scale profiling platforms (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics), which, together, can provide a global assessment of how enzymes and their parent metabolic networks become altered in cancer to fuel tumor growth. This review presents several examples of how these integrated platforms have yielded fundamental insights into dysregulated metabolism in cancer. We will also discuss questions and challenges that must be addressed to more completely describe, and eventually control, the diverse metabolic pathways that support tumorigenesis. PMID:23063552

  10. GHGRP Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids Suppliers Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Natural Gas and Natural Gas Suppliers indust

  11. Profiling contextual factors which influence safety in heavy vehicle industries.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jason R D; Davey, Jeremy; Armstrong, Kerry A

    2014-12-01

    A significant proportion of worker fatalities within Australia result from truck-related incidents. Truck drivers face a number of health and safety concerns. Safety culture, viewed here as the beliefs, attitudes and values shared by an organisation's workers, which interact with their surrounding context to influence behaviour, may provide a valuable lens for exploring safety-related behaviours in heavy vehicle operations. To date no major research has examined safety culture within heavy vehicle industries. As safety culture provides a means to interpret experiences and generate behaviour, safety culture research should be conducted with an awareness of the context surrounding safety. The current research sought to examine previous health and safety research regarding heavy vehicle operations to profile contextual factors which influence health and safety. A review of 104 peer-reviewed papers was conducted. Findings of these papers were then thematically analysed. A number of behaviours and scenarios linked with crashes and non-crash injuries were identified, along with a selection of health outcomes. Contextual factors which were found to influence these outcomes were explored. These factors were found to originate from government departments, transport organisations, customers and the road and work environment. The identified factors may provide points of interaction, whereby culture may influence health and safety outcomes.

  12. Global climate change policy issues related to the movement of industry from developed to rapidly industrializing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Waltemath, L.A.

    1990-10-01

    Global climate change policies adopted by developed countries may encourage industries to move to countries with less restrictive policies. The purpose of this study is to identify policy-driven issues that may result in such a movement. This report (1) summarizes the conclusions of previous studies that have explored the relationship between environmental regulations and industrial movement, (2) identifies and summarizes existing and proposed US global climate change policy options, and (3) discusses issues and topics relating to possible industrial relocation because of the global climate change policy options. It concludes with recommendations for further research. Although federal global climate change policy options are the primary focus of this report, some international and regional efforts addressing this issue are also included. A potential regional industrial migration issue is highlighted. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Global gene expression profile progression in Gaucher disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher disease is caused by defective glucocerebrosidase activity and the consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide. The pathogenic pathways resulting from lipid laden macrophages (Gaucher cells) in visceral organs and their abnormal functions are obscure. Results To elucidate this pathogenic pathway, developmental global gene expression analyses were conducted in distinct Gba1 point-mutated mice (V394L/V394L and D409 V/null). About 0.9 to 3% of genes had altered expression patterns (≥ ± 1.8 fold change), representing several categories, but particularly macrophage activation and immune response genes. Time course analyses (12 to 28 wk) of INFγ-regulated pro-inflammatory (13) and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory (11) cytokine/mediator networks showed tissue differential profiles in the lung and liver of the Gba1 mutant mice, implying that the lipid-storage macrophages were not functionally inert. The time course alterations of the INFγ and IL-4 pathways were similar, but varied in degree in these tissues and with the Gba1 mutation. Conclusions Biochemical and pathological analyses demonstrated direct relationships between the degree of tissue glucosylceramides and the gene expression profile alterations. These analyses implicate IFNγ-regulated pro-inflammatory and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory networks in differential disease progression with implications for understanding the Gaucher disease course and pathophysiology. PMID:21223590

  14. The Target Industries: Profiles of Five Hazardous Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    To contribute to a fuller understanding and awareness of the hazards involved in industries as well as to call attention to steps being taken to solve safety problems, this pamphlet surveys five industries cited among those having the highest rates of job-related injuries in the country. Industries include: (1) Roofing and Sheet Metal, (2)…

  15. Global Aerosol Profiling by Orbital Lidar, GLAS Results and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument was designed for high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of clouds and aerosol. GLAS is approaching six months of on orbit data operation. These data from thousands of orbits illustrate the ability of space lidar to accurately and dramatically measure the height distribution of global aerosol to an unprecedented degree. There were many intended science applications of the GLAS data and significant results have already been realized, profiling is a fundamentally new measurement from space with multiple applications. A most important aerosol application is providing input to global aerosol generation transport models. Another is improved measurement of aerosol optical depth. A main approach to verify the aerosol optical depth retrieval is comparison to surface measurements by Aeronet. A special feature of the GLAS satellite bus is to rapidly point the lidar instrument at off nadir targets with less than 100 m accuracy. About a dozen selected Aeronet sites were pointed at whenever the GLAS lidar came within 5 degrees of zenith. These plus a more general comparison to nearby sites support the GLAS data product values. In addition the GLAS data can be used to add vertical distribution information to Aeronet aerosol measurements. As an EOS project instrument, GLAS data products are openly available to the science community. First year results from GLAS are summarized.

  16. Global Aerosol Profiling by Orbital Lidar, GLAS Results and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument was designed for high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of clouds and aerosol. GLAS is approaching six months of on orbit data operation. These data from thousands of orbits illustrate the ability of space lidar to accurately and dramatically measure the height distribution of global aerosol to an unprecedented degree. There were many intended science applications of the GLAS data and significant results have already been realized. profiling is a fundamentally new measurement from space with multiple applications. A most important aerosol application is providing input to global aerosol generation and transport models. Another is improved measurement of aerosol optical depth. A main approach to verify the aerosol optical depth retrieval is comparison to surface measurements by Aeronet. A special feature of the GLAS satellite bus is to rapidly point the lidar instrument at off nadir targets with less than 100 m accuracy. About a dozen selected Aeronet sites were pointed at whenever the G U S lidar came within 5 degrees of zenith. These plus a more general comparison to nearby sites support the G U S data product values. In addition the GUS data can be used to add vertical distribution information to Aeronet aerosol measurements.. As an EOS project instrument, GLAS data products are openly available to the science community. First year results from G U S are summarized.

  17. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme) families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits. Results This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results re-iterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition. PMID:26544883

  18. A national profile of the U.S. hardwood sawmill industry

    Treesearch

    Scott Bowe; Robert Smith; Philip A. Araman

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide survey of the hardwood sawmill industry was conducted in the fall of 1999. The objectives of the survey were to generate a current demographic profile of the hardwood sawmill industry and identify the preferred information sources for the hardwood sawmill industry. These objectives were chosen because timely information was not available for the hardwood...

  19. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme V: The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact. Teacher Strategies. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Designed to assist teachers and supervisors in the implementation of the global history course, this bulletin presents learning activities which include the rationale, performance objectives, and teaching strategies related to Theme V entitled, "The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact." This theme has seven subthemes: (1)…

  20. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme V: The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact. Teacher Strategies. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Designed to assist teachers and supervisors in the implementation of the global history course, this bulletin presents learning activities which include the rationale, performance objectives, and teaching strategies related to Theme V entitled, "The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact." This theme has seven subthemes: (1)…

  1. The Impact of Globalization and Shifting Defense Priorities on the Defense Industrial Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    The Impact of Globalization and Shifting Defense Priorities on the Defense Industrial Base Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Impact of Globalization and Shifting Defense Priorities on the Defense Industrial Base 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Evolution of the Defense Industrial Base • The defense

  2. Global transcriptome profiles of Camellia sinensis during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Chao; Zhao, Qiong-Yi; Ma, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Zong-Hong; Cao, Hong-Li; Kong, Yi-Meng; Yue, Chuan; Hao, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Liang; Ma, Jian-Qiang; Jin, Ji-Qiang; Li, Xuan; Yang, Ya-Jun

    2013-06-22

    Tea is the most popular non-alcoholic health beverage in the world. The tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) needs to undergo a cold acclimation process to enhance its freezing tolerance in winter. Changes that occur at the molecular level in response to low temperatures are poorly understood in tea plants. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cold acclimation, we employed RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) technologies to the study of genome-wide expression profiles during cold acclimation in tea plants. Using the Illumina sequencing platform, we obtained approximately 57.35 million RNA-Seq reads. These reads were assembled into 216,831 transcripts, with an average length of 356 bp and an N50 of 529 bp. In total, 1,770 differentially expressed transcripts were identified, of which 1,168 were up-regulated and 602 down-regulated. These include a group of cold sensor or signal transduction genes, cold-responsive transcription factor genes, plasma membrane stabilization related genes, osmosensing-responsive genes, and detoxification enzyme genes. DGE and quantitative RT-PCR analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-Seq analysis. Pathway analysis indicated that the "carbohydrate metabolism pathway" and the "calcium signaling pathway" might play a vital role in tea plants' responses to cold stress. Our study presents a global survey of transcriptome profiles of tea plants in response to low, non-freezing temperatures and yields insights into the molecular mechanisms of tea plants during the cold acclimation process. It could also serve as a valuable resource for relevant research on cold-tolerance and help to explore the cold-related genes in improving the understanding of low-temperature tolerance and plant-environment interactions.

  3. Global methylation profiles in DNA from different blood cell types.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Flom, Julie D; Kappil, Maya; Ferris, Jennifer S; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation measured in white blood cell DNA is increasingly being used as in studies of cancer susceptibility. However, little is known about the correlation between different assays to measure global methylation and whether the source of DNA matters when examining methylation profiles in different blood cell types. Using information from 620 women, 217 and 403 women with DNA available from granulocytes (Gran), and total white blood cells (WBC), respectively, and 48 women with DNA available from four different sources (WBC, Gran, mononuclear (MN), and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL)), we compared DNA methylation for three repetitive elements (LINE1, Sat2, Alu) by MethyLight, luminometric methylation assay (LUMA), and [(3)H]-methyl acceptance assay. For four of the five assays, DNA methylation levels measured in Gran were not correlated with methylation in LBC, MN, or WBC; the exception was Sat2. DNA methylation in LCL was correlated with methylation in MN and WBC for the [(3)H]-methyl acceptance, LINE1, and Alu assays. Methylation in MN was correlated with methylation in WBC for the [(3)H]-methyl acceptance and LUMA assays. When we compared the five assays to each other by source of DNA, we observed statistically significant positive correlations ranging from 0.3-0.7 for each cell type with one exception (Sat2 and Alu in MN). Among the 620 women stratified by DNA source, correlations among assays were highest for the three repetitive elements (range 0.39-0.64). Results from the LUMA assay were modestly correlated with LINE1 (0.18-0.20). These results suggest that both assay and source of DNA are critical components in the interpretation of global DNA methylation patterns from WBC.

  4. Local/Global Cognitive Interfaces within Industrial Districts: An Italian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandinetti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With the advance of globalization the competitive chances of industrial districts depends increasingly on their ability to connect to the cognitive circuits of the global economy. This challenge demands the presence of local actors capable of acting as cognitive interfaces between the district context and the global environment. The paper…

  5. Local/Global Cognitive Interfaces within Industrial Districts: An Italian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandinetti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With the advance of globalization the competitive chances of industrial districts depends increasingly on their ability to connect to the cognitive circuits of the global economy. This challenge demands the presence of local actors capable of acting as cognitive interfaces between the district context and the global environment. The paper…

  6. Globally profiling sialylation status of macrophages upon statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Nie, Huan; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Aimin; Li, Yu; Sun, Xue-Long

    2015-09-01

    Sialic acids (SAs) are widely expressed on immune cells and their levels and linkages named as sialylation status vary upon cellular environment changes related to both physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we performed a global profiling of the sialylation status of macrophages and their release of SAs in the cell culture medium by using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy results showed that cell surface α-2,3-linked SAs were predominant in the normal culture condition and changed slightly upon treatment with atorvastatin for 24 h, whereas α-2,6-linked SAs were negligible in the normal culture condition but significantly increased after treatment. Meanwhile, the amount of total cellular SAs increased about three times (from 369 ± 29 to 1080 ± 50 ng/mL) upon treatment as determined by the LC-MS/MS method. On the other hand, there was no significant change for secreted free SAs and conjugated SAs in the medium. These results indicated that the cell surface α-2,6 sialylation status of macrophages changes distinctly upon atorvastatin stimulation, which may reflect on the biological functions of the cells. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Philippine Public Relations: An Industry and Practitioner Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panol, Zenaida Sarabia

    2000-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive look at public relations in the Philippines; traces how public relations evolved in this Southeast Asian country; and discusses the current status of the industry and its practitioners. (NH)

  8. Textile industry: Profile and DSM (demand-side management) options

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Textile Industry Guidebook provides electric utility planning, marketing, and customer service staff with a practical tool to better understand the textile industry and the challenges it faces; its manufacturing processes, technologies, and energy use; and its opportunities for demand-site management (DSM). The Guidebook concludes with guidance and summary data for developing and evaluating DSM plans to realize such opportunities. 5 refs., 37 figs., 52 tabs.

  9. Profile Change When Industry Moves Into an Area. Working Paper RID 73.7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John T., Jr.

    The effects of industrialization on the economic and social profile of a rural community are described in this paper. Some of the major changes when industry moves into a community are in the land use and support systems such as an increase in the demand for water, energy, and waste disposal. Other changes are in the labor force, retail sales and…

  10. Natural Resources. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Forest Industry Worker. Resource Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This competency analysis profile lists 155 competencies that have been identified by employers as core competencies for inclusion in programs to train forest industry and resource conservation workers. The core competencies are organized into 10 units dealing the following: general safety precautions, natural resource industry operations, soil…

  11. Profiles of the National Industry Skills Standards Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn, Mikala L., Comp.

    In an effort to develop a more uniform and comprehensive system of national skill standards, the U.S. Departments of Education and Labor have awarded grants to 22 technical committees, composed of representatives from business, labor, and education, in a variety of industries and occupations. These projects will begin proposing national standards…

  12. Instructional Materials for Industrial Preemployment Laboratory. Competency Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Competency profiles are presented for 17 instructional programs/occupational areas. These forms provide for recording the following information: instructional program, student name and other identifying information (address, telephone number, social security number, emergency contacts), class information (method of instruction, grade, dates of…

  13. Instructional Materials for Industrial Preemployment Laboratory. Competency Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Competency profiles are presented for 17 instructional programs/occupational areas. These forms provide for recording the following information: instructional program, student name and other identifying information (address, telephone number, social security number, emergency contacts), class information (method of instruction, grade, dates of…

  14. Phages in the global fruit and vegetable industry.

    PubMed

    Żaczek, M; Weber-Dąbrowska, B; Górski, A

    2015-03-01

    From recent articles, we have learned that phages can constitute a promising alternative in the food industry to eliminate bacterial pathogens from seedlings in greenhouse and field environments, as well as from fresh-cut food products. The fruit and vegetable industry requires quite a different approach than the meat or dairy industry. Several factors can inhibit efficacy of phage treatment such as plant watering or washing ready-to-eat products (water may dilute therapeutic doses), UV irradiation or extensive spreading of phytopathogens by wind, insects or even humans. Spontaneously occurring anomalous weather conditions in different parts of the world also may have an enormous impact on phage persistence in cultivations and on yields. Despite that, some phage preparations are commercially available and, without doubt, are much safer than chemical treatments. Along with increasing worldwide fruit and vegetable consumption, plant diseases and human foodborne illnesses are becoming a serious economic problem, resulting in a focus on optimization of phage treatment.

  15. Present Global Situation of Amino Acids in Industry.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Naoto; Ito, Hisao

    2016-11-11

    At present, amino acids are widely produced and utilized industrially. Initially, monosodium glutamate (MSG) was produced by extraction from a gluten hydrolysate. The amino acid industry started using the residual of the lysate. The discovery of the functions of amino acids has led to the expansion of their field of use. In addition to seasoning and other food use, amino acids are used in many fields such as animal nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. On the other hand, the invention of the glutamate fermentation process, followed by the development of fermentation methods for many other amino acids, is no less important. The supply of these amino acids at a low price is very essential for their industrial use. Most amino acids are now produced by fermentation. The consumption of many amino acids such as MSG or feed-use amino acids is still rapidly increasing.

  16. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    -specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving the

  17. Energy balance of the global photovoltaic (PV) industry--is the PV industry a net electricity producer?

    PubMed

    Dale, Michael; Benson, Sally M

    2013-04-02

    A combination of declining costs and policy measures motivated by greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction and energy security have driven rapid growth in the global installed capacity of solar photovoltaics (PV). This paper develops a number of unique data sets, namely the following: calculation of distribution of global capacity factor for PV deployment; meta-analysis of energy consumption in PV system manufacture and deployment; and documentation of reduction in energetic costs of PV system production. These data are used as input into a new net energy analysis of the global PV industry, as opposed to device level analysis. In addition, the paper introduces a new concept: a model tracking energetic costs of manufacturing and installing PV systems, including balance of system (BOS) components. The model is used to forecast electrical energy requirements to scale up the PV industry and determine the electricity balance of the global PV industry to 2020. Results suggest that the industry was a net consumer of electricity as recently as 2010. However, there is a >50% that in 2012 the PV industry is a net electricity provider and will "pay back" the electrical energy required for its early growth before 2020. Further reducing energetic costs of PV deployment will enable more rapid growth of the PV industry. There is also great potential to increase the capacity factor of PV deployment. These conclusions have a number of implications for R&D and deployment, including the following: monitoring of the energy embodied within PV systems; designing more efficient and durable systems; and deploying PV systems in locations that will achieve high capacity factors.

  18. Globalized Security: An Allied Industrial Base for the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    During the Cold War, the United States maintained an extensive industrial base in the event of a global war with the Soviet Union. With the Russian...threat diminished, and the downward spiral of allied defense budgets, a new industrial base model may be more effective in managing scarce defense...adopt a broad allied defense industrial base model, and take the next step in leading this society to a more prosperous and safer future.

  19. Economic Development Policymaking Down the Global Commodity Chain: Attracting an Auto Industry to Silao, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    This article applies the global commodity chain approach to analyze the way policymakers encouraged an automotive commodity chain to touch down in Silao, Mexico. The article explains that the changing dynamics of the global auto industry have transformed it into an "assembler-driven" commodity chain. It notes how policymakers in the…

  20. The Triumph of the Industrial-Consumer Paradigm and English as the Global Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Joel

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the role of English as the global language within the industrial-consumer paradigm. In the 21st century, the English language plays a different function in the global economy than it did during the 19th century when it was used as an instrument of cultural imperialism. Today, English serves as a vehicle for participation in…

  1. Economic Development Policymaking Down the Global Commodity Chain: Attracting an Auto Industry to Silao, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    This article applies the global commodity chain approach to analyze the way policymakers encouraged an automotive commodity chain to touch down in Silao, Mexico. The article explains that the changing dynamics of the global auto industry have transformed it into an "assembler-driven" commodity chain. It notes how policymakers in the…

  2. The Triumph of the Industrial-Consumer Paradigm and English as the Global Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Joel

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the role of English as the global language within the industrial-consumer paradigm. In the 21st century, the English language plays a different function in the global economy than it did during the 19th century when it was used as an instrument of cultural imperialism. Today, English serves as a vehicle for participation in…

  3. The Art of Globalism, the Culture of Difference, the Industry of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalder, Glenda

    This paper speaks in terms of "globalism" rather than "globalization," of a "culture of difference" rather than of cultural difference, of an "industry of knowledge" rather than of knowing. The paper first considers the argument that new communications technologies and systems are bringing cultures together…

  4. The global food crisis: an Australian dairy industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to shed further light on the factors contributing to the emerging global food crisis by examining the reasons for an unusual downturn in dairy food production in Australia, from where 11% of the world trade in dairy foods originates.

  5. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme V: The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact. Student Worksheets. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The worksheets contained in this bulletin are designed for use in conjunction with the teaching strategies for Theme V entitled, "The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact." The worksheets correspond to specific strategies with accompanying questions on the appropriate strategy page. Included are activities for the seven subthemes: (1)…

  6. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme V: The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact. Student Worksheets. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The worksheets contained in this bulletin are designed for use in conjunction with the teaching strategies for Theme V entitled, "The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact." The worksheets correspond to specific strategies with accompanying questions on the appropriate strategy page. Included are activities for the seven subthemes: (1)…

  7. The Magnesium Industry Today…The Global Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzer, Greg

    World demand for magnesium will show a decline in 2009. The outlook for 2010, which is guardedly optimistic, will be for a resumption of slow growth. The industry has seen marked changes in the sources of supply for primary and alloyed magnesium in recent years. Technological advances in magnesium continue at a strong pace as does interest in the material as a substitute for other light metals. The automotive segment remains the end-use area with the largest growth potential, if for no other reason than the size and quantity of the potential materials substitution applications. However, the shrinkage of that market, particularly in North America will have a definite impact on expectations for magnesium. The 3C market (computers, communications & consumer electronics) will continue to show above average growth. Other niche markets related to medical and construction industries also offer potential.

  8. Global Cooperation and Competition in the Defense and Aerospace Industries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-26

    popular support. Thereafter, most persons in Nordic states increasingly viewed themselves as citizens of their respective countries. 48 The balance...applied for membership in the EEC. Denmark became a member in 1973, but a popular referendum in Norway rejected the idea in the same year. Norway... seguridad y defensa [Industry and technology in European defense and security policy] (Monografías del CESEDEN, 105). Madrid: Centro Superior de

  9. The global methanol industry -- Is it deja vu all over again?

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    The author reviews the methanol industry in the 1980`s and uses this to forecast the future of the industry, attempting to be as realistic as possible. Data are presented on the global methanol supply and demand, anticipated new methanol production capacity, and the 1995 worldwide methanol capacity. Although the global methanol industry, and most especially the producers, are entering some stormy seas, they are not completely uncharted. Those who were around ten or more years ago can see some similarities between current and anticipated market conditions. The similarities and differences are discussed.

  10. Marli: Mars Lidar for Global Wind Profiles and Aerosol Profiles from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Guzewich, S. D.; Smith, M. D.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Gentry, B. M.; Yu, A.; Allan, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Analysis Group's Next Orbiter Science Analysis Group (NEXSAG) has recently identified atmospheric wind measurements as one of 5 top compelling science objectives for a future Mars orbiter. To date, only isolated lander observations of martian winds exist. Winds are the key variable to understand atmospheric transport and answer fundamental questions about the three primary cycles of the martian climate: CO2, H2O, and dust. However, the direct lack of observations and imprecise and indirect inferences from temperature observations leave many basic questions about the atmospheric circulation unanswered. In addition to addressing high priority science questions, direct wind observations from orbit would help validate 3D general circulation models (GCMs) while also providing key input to atmospheric reanalyses. The dust and CO2 cycles on Mars are partially coupled and their influences on the atmospheric circulation modify the global wind field. Dust absorbs solar infrared radiation and its variable spatial distribution forces changes in the atmospheric temperature and wind fields. Thus it is important to simultaneously measure the height-resolved wind and dust profiles. MARLI provides a unique capability to observe these variables continuously, day and night, from orbit.

  11. Profile of the lumber and wood products industry. EPA Office of Compliance sector notebook project

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The lumber and wood products industry includes establishments engaged in cutting timber and pulpwood; sawmills, lath mills, shingle mills, cooperage stock mills (wooden casks or tubs), planing mills, plywood mills; and establishments engaged in manufacturing finished articles made entirely or mainly of wood or related materials such as reconstituted wood panel products manufacturers. The categorization corresponds to the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 24 established by Department of Commerce`s Bureau of the Census to track the flow of goods and services within the economy. In this profile, the industry`s processes are divided into four general groups: logging timber; producing lumber; panel products and wood preserving.

  12. [Outlook for 1997 in the global oil and gas industries

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This section contains 4 small articles which deal with the global outlook on the following: worldwide drilling (Middle East leads the charge); offshore drilling (US Gulf remains hot); worldwide oil production (Producers meet the challenge); and the Canadian outlook (Canada prepares for another brisk year by Hans Maciej). Tables are provided for the 1997 forecast of drilling outside the US, the 1997 forecast of offshore drilling worldwide, world crude oil/condensate production by country in 1995 and 1996, and Canadian drilling forecasts.

  13. The Arteries of Global Trade: Industrial Restructuring and Technological Change in the Transatlantic Air Cargo Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Air cargo enjoys a special importance: together with maritime transport it is the backbone of global trade and is indispensable for contemporary globalization. Air transport is the only mode that combines worldwide reach with high speed. Nonetheless there is a dearth of geographic research that analyzes the current restructuring affecting the air…

  14. The Arteries of Global Trade: Industrial Restructuring and Technological Change in the Transatlantic Air Cargo Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Air cargo enjoys a special importance: together with maritime transport it is the backbone of global trade and is indispensable for contemporary globalization. Air transport is the only mode that combines worldwide reach with high speed. Nonetheless there is a dearth of geographic research that analyzes the current restructuring affecting the air…

  15. Global warming impact on the cement and aggregates industries

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J. . Geopolymer Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    CO[sub 2] related energy taxes are focusing essentially on fuel consumption, not on actual CO[sub 2] emission measured at the chimneys. Ordinary Portland cement, used in the aggregates and industries, results from the calcination of limestone and silica. The production of 1 ton of cement directly generates 0.55 tons of chemical-CO[sub 2] and requires the combustion of carbon-fuel to yield an additional 0.40 tons of CO[sub 2]. The 1987 1 billion metric tons world production of cement accounted for 1 billion metric tons of CO[sub 2], i.e., 5% of the 1987 world CO[sub 2] emission. A world-wide freeze of CO[sub 2] emission at the 1990 level as recommended by international institutions, is incompatible with the extremely high cement development needs of less industrialized countries. Present cement production growth ranges from 5% to 16% and suggests that in 25 years from now, world cement CO[sub 2] emissions could equal 3,500 million tons. Eco-taxes when applied would have a spectacular impact on traditional Portland cement based aggregates industries. Taxation based only on fuel consumption would lead to a cement price increase of 20%, whereas taxation based on actual CO[sub 2] emission would multiply cement price by 1.5 to 2. A 25--30% minor reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions may be achieved through the blending of Portland cement with replacement materials such as coal-fly ash and iron blast furnace slag.

  16. Optimal Detection of Global Warming using Temperature Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, Stephen S.

    1997-01-01

    Optimal fingerprinting is applied to estimate the amount of time it would take to detect warming by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in monthly averages of temperature profiles over the Indian Ocean.

  17. Optimal Detection of Global Warming using Temperature Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, Stephen S.

    1997-01-01

    Optimal fingerprinting is applied to estimate the amount of time it would take to detect warming by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in monthly averages of temperature profiles over the Indian Ocean.

  18. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (p<0.05). Multiple logistic regressions detected no negative correlation between placement in other countries when compared to Brazil. Trials involving subjects with less than 15 years of age, those with targeted recruitment of at least 1,000 subjects, and seven sponsors were identified as significant predictors of trial placement in Brazil. No clear direct competition between Brazil and other emerging countries was detected. South Korea showed the higher proportion of sites and ranked third in total number of trials, appearing as a major player in attractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  19. Metabolite profiling of Phycomyces blakesleeanus carotene mutants reveals global changes across intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Eugenio; Fraser, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus provides a renewable biosource of industrial high-value compounds such as carotenes, other isoprenoids (ubiquinone and sterols), organic acids and fatty acids. Several Phycomyces mutants involved in the formation of β-carotene are available. For example, the carA mutants have a leaky mutation in the phytoene synthase and produce significantly lower amounts of carotenes, while the carB and carR mutants produce phytoene and lycopene, respectively, due to a null mutation in the genes encoding the phytoene dehydrogenase and lycopene cyclase, respectively. The carS mutants are mutated in the gene encoding the oxygenase responsible for the conversion of β-carotene into apocarotenoids and, as a result, β-carotene accumulates. In order to ascertain further the biochemical changes arising in these potential industrial strains, a metabolite profiling workflow was implemented for Phycomyces. GC-MS and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array platforms enabled the identification of over 100 metabolites in 11 carA, carB, carR and carS mutant strains and their wild-type comparator. All mutant strains possessed decreased TCA cycle intermediates, galactose, alanine and ribitol, while dodecanol and valine showed a general increase. As predicted, other terpenoid levels were affected in the carB, carR and carS mutants but not in the carA mutants. The global changes across intermediary metabolism of the mutants suggest that complex metabolic networks exist between intermediary and secondary metabolism or that other mutations beyond the carotene pathway may exist in these mutants. These data show the utility of the methodology in metabolically phenotyping Phycomyces strains with potential industrial exploitation.

  20. The “Global Settlement” With the Tobacco Industry: 6 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Givel, Michael; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2004-01-01

    On June 20, 1997 a group of attorneys and health advocates proposed a “global settlement” of all public and private litigation against the tobacco industry. This agreement was controversial, and the subsequent implementing legislation was defeated. We sought to determine whether the global settlement represented a “missed opportunity” or a dead end. We compared the global settlement with subsequent laws, regulations, settlements, and judgments against the tobacco industry and found that other than Food and Drug Administration regulation of tobacco, tobacco control advocates have achieved many of the policies included in the global settlement and several beyond it. The policies that have been developed since 1997 have advanced tobacco control substantially, often beyond the provisions of the global settlement. PMID:14759930

  1. MARLI: MARs LIdar for Global Wind Profiles and Aerosol Profiles from Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Guzewich, S. D.; Smith, M. D.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Gentry, B. M.; Yu, A.; Allan, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Winds are the key variable to understand atmospheric transport and to answer fundamental questions about the three primary cycles of the Mars climate. We are developing a new orbital lidar to directly measure both wind profiles and aerosol profiles.

  2. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. As a result of this unique integration, we can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications. Validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level. PMID:25496351

  3. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, H. Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Johnson, Caroline H.; Franco, Lauren; Rinehart, Duane; Valentine, Elizabeth; Gowda, Harsha; Ubhi, Baljit K.; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Gieschen, Andrew; Fields, Matthew W.; Patti, Gary J.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2014-12-12

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. We can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications, as a result of this unique integration. Furthermore, validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level.

  4. [Psycho-emotional profile of personality among teenage girls living in the Volgograd industrial region].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, M V; Sivochalova, O V

    2000-01-01

    Social, economic and other factors appeared to form psychoemotional personal profile of teenager girls living in significant industrial region subjected to pollution with chemicals varying in jeopardy. The studies proved that ecologic factors may play an important role in formation of psychoemotional personal profile. All this could be a pathogenetic basis for endocrine disorders among teenagers and subsequent reproductive disturbances and birth of diseased children.

  5. Trend survey of the global environment adaptation type industry technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    A global CO2 recycling system which combines utilization of natural energy and CO2 recovered from combustion of fossil fuel is studied. In the model, CO2 recovered at the place of energy demand is transported to the place where energy is produced, and from the CO2 fuels are synthesized by use of solar energy and transported to the place of energy demand. Facilities worth a large amount of money are required to transmit electric power generated by the photovoltaic power generation in the desert to the fuel synthesizing plant. Therefore, production of electrolytic hydrogen by the on-site power generation and transport by pipe may be considered. As a synthetic fuel being sent back by ocean transport, methanol is considered, and synthetic methane (LNG) can also be a candidate. CO2 is recovered as liquid carbon dioxide. Possibility of CO2 recycling is dependent on development of the desert solar base, as well as depletion of fossil fuel and price increase, CO2 penalty. It has still been difficult to say which of the fuel synthesis, CO2 tanker or securing of the solar base becomes a bottleneck. Entry of recycling fuels to the market will be possible in proportion to restrictions on fossil fuels, and evaluation of the system depends almost on the rate of energy arriving from the energy-producing region.

  6. The concentration of the global alcohol industry and its penetration in the African region.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, David H; Babor, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    To describe the penetration and expansion of the global alcohol industry into the African region, as a context for exploring the implications for public health. Source materials for this study came primarily from market research and the business press. This was supplemented by industry sources (from websites, company annual reports), World Health Organization reports and the scientific literature. Drinking in Africa is characterized by high rates of abstention and a high prevalence of heavy episodic consumption among those who drink. Much of the region is currently experiencing a rapid rise in consumption. Rising populations and income and the rapid pace of urbanization make Africa very attractive to the global alcohol industry, and industry leaders have identified Africa as a key area for growth. The shift from collaboration to competition in Africa among the global alcohol companies has prompted increasing alcohol production, promotion, new product development, pricing schemes and stakeholder lobbying. Beer consumption has increased across most of the continent, and global brewers view themselves as legitimate players at the alcohol policy table. Weak alcohol policy environments may be compromised further in terms of public health protections by alcohol industry opposition to effective measures such as marketing regulations, availability controls and taxation. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Early Lung Cancer Detection via Global Protein Modification Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    remission at 3 years (low risk) following diagnosis (Figure 2). The top graph shows the mean difference in the observed expression of the first 100...in patients with remission at 3 years. These preliminary results suggest that the PTM profiles of Lung cancer tumors with poor prognosis may be...highly divergent from that of tumors from patients that were in remission at 3 years following diagnosis and these differences can be detected using

  8. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    DOE PAGES

    Benton, H. Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; ...

    2014-12-12

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. We can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications, as a result of this unique integration. Furthermore, validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometrymore » data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level.« less

  9. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-22

    Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

  10. Comprehensive Profiling of Proteome Changes Provide Insights of Industrial Penicillium chrysogenum During Pilot and Industrial Penicillin G Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Qiao, Bin; Lu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-07-01

    197 and 198) and CoA ligase at 80 h during the industrial process were around 2-fold of that during the pilot process, indicating that the industrial process with a higher penicillin production per cell might provide available environments to induce over-expression of IPN acyltransferase and accelerate penicillin formation. These results provide new insights into the globally potential responses of P. chrysogenum to variations of environments in different fermentation scales so as to consequently regulate the penicillin production.

  11. Greenhouse gas and carbon profile of the U.S. forest products industry value chain

    Treesearch

    Linda S. Heath; Van Maltby; Reid Miner; Kenneth E. Skog; James E. Smith; Jay Unwin; Brad Upton

    2010-01-01

    A greenhouse gas and carbon accounting profile was developed for the U.S. forest products industry value chain for 1990 and 2004-2005 by examining net atmospheric fluxes of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) using a variety of methods and data sources. Major GHG emission sources include direct and indirect (from purchased electricity...

  12. Changing Occupational Profiles in the Hotel Industry: Case Studies in France, Italy and Spain. Synthesis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Mario; Grazia Mereu, Maria; Tagliaferro, Claudio

    Changing occupational profiles in the hotel industry in France, Italy, and Spain were examined in case studies that included interviews with hotel managers, human resource managers, and individuals employed in hotel occupations identified as new or entailing new skills. The study focused on the following topics: (1) changes in the hotel industry…

  13. Fatty acid profile of 25 plant oils and implications for industrial applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fatty acid (FA) profiles of plant oils extracted from twenty-five alternative feedstocks were determined. This information was utilized to determine what industrial application(s) each oil is best suited for. The basis for the selection was the premise that FA composition influences properties o...

  14. Evaluation of the Evidence Base for the Alcohol Industry's Actions to Reduce Drink Driving Globally.

    PubMed

    Esser, Marissa B; Bao, James; Jernigan, David H; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence base for the content of initiatives that the alcohol industry implemented to reduce drink driving from 1982 to May 2015. We systematically analyzed the content of 266 global initiatives that the alcohol industry has categorized as actions to reduce drink driving. Social aspects public relations organizations (i.e., organizations funded by the alcohol industry to handle issues that may be damaging to the business) sponsored the greatest proportion of the actions. Only 0.8% (n = 2) of the sampled industry actions were consistent with public health evidence of effectiveness for reducing drink driving. The vast majority of the alcohol industry's actions to reduce drink driving does not reflect public health evidenced-based recommendations, even though effective drink-driving countermeasures exist, such as a maximum blood alcohol concentration limit of 0.05 grams per deciliter for drivers and widespread use of sobriety checkpoints.

  15. Differential Globalization of Industry- and Non-Industry–Sponsored Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Atal, Ignacio; Trinquart, Ludovic; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Mapping the international landscape of clinical trials may inform global health research governance, but no large-scale data are available. Industry or non-industry sponsorship may have a major influence in this mapping. We aimed to map the global landscape of industry- and non-industry–sponsored clinical trials and its evolution over time. Methods We analyzed clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2013 and registered in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We mapped single-country and international trials by World Bank's income groups and by sponsorship (industry- vs. non- industry), including its evolution over time from 2006 to 2012. We identified clusters of countries that collaborated significantly more than expected in industry- and non-industry–sponsored international trials. Results 119,679 clinical trials conducted in 177 countries were analysed. The median number of trials per million inhabitants in high-income countries was 100 times that in low-income countries (116.0 vs. 1.1). Industry sponsors were involved in three times more trials per million inhabitants than non-industry sponsors in high-income countries (75.0 vs. 24.5) and in ten times fewer trials in low- income countries (0.08 vs. 1.08). Among industry- and non-industry–sponsored trials, 30.3% and 3.2% were international, respectively. In the industry-sponsored network of collaboration, Eastern European and South American countries collaborated more than expected; in the non-industry–sponsored network, collaboration among Scandinavian countries was overrepresented. Industry-sponsored international trials became more inter-continental with time between 2006 and 2012 (from 54.8% to 67.3%) as compared with non-industry–sponsored trials (from 42.4% to 37.2%). Conclusions Based on trials registered in the WHO ICTRP we documented a substantial gap between the globalization of industry- and non-industry–sponsored clinical research. Only 3% of

  16. IT Investment Guidelines in Taiwan's IT Industry under a Global Economic Downturn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Un Un

    2011-01-01

    The current qualitative phenomenological study focused on how information technology (IT) leaders managed IT investment during the global economic downturn in the Taiwan IT industry. Organizations around the world spend billions of dollars on IT-related products and services every year. Determining an effective IT investment plan is a complex task…

  17. Linguistic Globalization and the Call Center Industry: Imperialism, Hegemony or Cosmopolitanism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonntag, Selma K.

    2009-01-01

    Linguistic imperialism, linguistic hegemony and linguistic cosmopolitanism are broad and contrasting conceptualizations of linguistic globalization that are frequently, if implicitly, invoked in the literature, both academic and non-academic, on language practices and perceptions in the call center industry. I begin with outlining each of these…

  18. The Emerging Global Education Industry: Analysing Market-Making in Education through Market Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verger, Antoni; Steiner-Khamsi, Gita; Lubienski, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the rise and consequences of an emerging global education industry (GEI), which represents new forms of private, for profit involvement in education across the globe. The paper explores the emergence within the GEI of new and varied, largely transnational, markets in education by focusing on three examples of the GEI at work.…

  19. 78 FR 73915 - Community Alliance, Inc., Defi Global, Inc., Easy Energy, Inc., Industry Concept Holdings, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Community Alliance, Inc., Defi Global, Inc., Easy Energy, Inc., Industry Concept Holdings, Inc... concerning the securities of Community Alliance, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since...

  20. IT Investment Guidelines in Taiwan's IT Industry under a Global Economic Downturn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Un Un

    2011-01-01

    The current qualitative phenomenological study focused on how information technology (IT) leaders managed IT investment during the global economic downturn in the Taiwan IT industry. Organizations around the world spend billions of dollars on IT-related products and services every year. Determining an effective IT investment plan is a complex task…

  1. Ethnography of epidemiologic transition: Avian flu, global health politics and agro-industrial capitalism in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuengsatiansup, Komatra

    2008-04-01

    This paper situates the ethnography of avian flu within the geo-political context of a new epidemiologic transition. Drawing on anthropological experience and insight, this paper examines areas of enquiry in which an ethnographic approach could contribute to a better implementation of prevention and control measures. Within the context of newly emerging diseases and accelerated globalization, the task of ethnography needs to extend far beyond the local. This paper reveals two major global issues that the ethnography of epidemiologic transition must take into consideration: (1) Global agro-industrial capitalism, and (2) global politics in the context of international health organizations and multi-national drug companies. The case of Thailand poses a question of how the strength of ethnographic practice could be deployed to account for the reality of the global-local interface of the new epidemiologic transition.

  2. Global regulatory requirements for mutagenicity assessment in the registration of industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiying; Ball, Nicholas S; LeBaron, Matthew J

    2017-06-01

    Mutagenicity is an important toxicological endpoint that requires thorough evaluation during the industrial chemical registration process. Regulatory requirements for mutagenicity assessment in registration of industrial chemicals vary in geographic regions (and in some cases by intended application). Here we compile the mutagenicity testing requirements for registration of industrial chemicals from representative geographic regions (in alphabetical order), that is Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, European Union (EU), India, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and United States (US). We further discuss the challenges that industry is facing to meet global regulations, for example, different testing requirements among geographic regions, different strategies in follow-up tests to in vitro positive findings, no-observed-adverse-effect-levels in genetic toxicity testing, and human relevance of mutagenicity. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:345-353, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Globalization of the pharmaceutical industry and the growing dependency of developing countries: the case of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Semin, Semih; Güldal, Dilek

    2008-01-01

    In developing countries, the effect of globalization on the pharmaceutical sector has resulted in a decrease in exportation and domestic production, accompanied by an increase in importation of pharmaceuticals and a rise in prices and expenditures. As an example of a developing country, Turkey has been facing the long-standing and increasing pressure of global regulations placed on its pharmaceutical sector. This has led to an increasing dependency on multinational companies and a gradual deterioration of an already weakened domestic pharmaceutical sector. This case study of Turkey offers points to consider in the world of increasing globalization, as it offers lessons on ways of examining the effects of globalization on the pharmaceutical industry of developing countries.

  4. Global optimization of semiconductor quantum well profile for maximal optical rectification by variational calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanovic, Jelena; Milanovic, Vitomir; Ikonic, Zoran; Indjin, Dragan

    2002-07-01

    A procedure is proposed for finding the optimal profile of a semiconductor quantum well to obtain maximal value of the optical rectification coefficient. It relies on the variational calculus, i.e. the optimal control theory, combined with the method of simulated annealing, and should deliver a globally optimized profile, unconstrained to any particular class of functional forms. For the purpose of illustration, the procedure is applied to the optimized design of AlxGa1-xAs based quantum wells, for rectification of ℎω = 116 meV (CO2 laser) radiation. The optimal smooth profile may eventually be discretized to make the structure fabrication easier.

  5. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: creating a global corporate network to undermine public health.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Intinarelli, Gina; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-17

    The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI) was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when threatened by the globalization of public health, sidestep competitive

  6. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: Creating a global corporate network to undermine public health

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Intinarelli, Gina; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-01

    Background The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Methods Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. Results The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI) was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. Conclusion The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when threatened by the globalization of

  7. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile, nondestructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of nondestructive testing procedures by NASA and the transfer of nondestructive testing to technology to civilian industry are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) an overview of the nondestructive testing field, (2) NASA contributions to the field of nondestructive testing, (3) dissemination of NASA contributions, and (4) a transfer profile. Attachments are included which provide a brief description of common nondestructive testing methods and summarize the technology transfer reports involving NASA generated nondestructive testing technology.

  8. Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA): global leadership towards a raised profile.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Shilton, Trevor; Bull, Fiona

    2013-12-01

    Physical inactivity has been recognised by the World Health Organization as one of the leading causes of death due to non-communicable disease (NCD), worldwide. The benefits of action over inactivity can cut across health, environment, transportation, sport, culture and the economy. Despite the evidence, the policies and strategies to increase population-wide participation in physical activity receive insufficient priority from across high, middle and low-income countries; where physical inactivity is a rapidly-emerging issue. There is an increased need for all countries to invest in policies, strategies and supportive environments that inform, motivate and support individuals and communities to be active in ways that are safe, accessible and enjoyable. This commentary presents some recent efforts towards physical activity promotion globally, led by the Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA). It provides an overview of the background and history of GAPA; describes GAPA and the council's key achievements and milestones; places physical activity promotion within the global NCD agenda; presents GAPA flagships; and reflects on the lessons learned, ingredients for success and the major challenges that remain. The commentary documents insights into the effectiveness and challenges faced by a small non-governmental organisation (NGO) in mounting global advocacy. These lessons may be transferrable to other areas of health promotion advocacy.

  9. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    James, T.; Goodrich, A.

    2013-12-01

    This briefing provides an overview of supply chain developments in the global wind industry and a detailed assessment of blade manufacturing considerations for U.S. end-markets. The report discusses the international trade flows of wind power equipment, blade manufacturing and logistical costs, and qualitative issues that often influence factory location decisions. To help guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, this report offers a comprehensive perspective of both quantitative and qualitative factors that affect selected supply chain developments in the growing wind power industry.

  10. KT&G: From Korean monopoly to 'a global name in the tobacco industry'.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelley; Gong, Lucy; Eckhardt, Jappe; Holden, Chris; Lee, Sungkyu

    2017-03-01

    Until the late 1980s, the former South Korean tobacco monopoly KT&G was focused on the protected domestic market. The opening of the market to foreign competition, under pressure from the U.S. Trade Representative, led to a steady erosion of market share over the next 10 years. Drawing on company documents and industry sources, this paper examines the adaptation of KT&G to the globalization of the South Korean tobacco industry since the 1990s. It is argued that KT&G has shifted from a domestic monopoly to an outward-looking, globally oriented business in response to the influx of transnational tobacco companies. Like other high-income countries, South Korea has also seen a decline in smoking prevalence as stronger tobacco control measures have been adopted. Faced with a shrinking domestic market, KT&G initially focused on exporting Korean-manufactured cigarettes. Since the mid-2000s, a broader global business strategy has been adopted including the building of overseas manufacturing facilities, establishing strategic partnerships and acquiring foreign companies. Trends in KT&G sales suggest an aspiring transnational tobacco company poised to become a major player in the global tobacco market. This article is part of the special issue 'The emergence of Asian tobacco companies: Implications for global health governance'.

  11. What do global warming impacts really mean to U.S. industry?

    SciTech Connect

    Bendel, W.B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will explore real-world impacts that global warming could have on US industry. The question of dealing with global warming is, to some extent, an exercise in probability or relative risk management. The difficult part is separating fact from fiction. There is another issue that arises in this intense debate regarding impacts on business and policy. This is the question of whether the impacts are real or only perceived. As the authors have been seen in several environmental situations, the difference between a real or perceived impact can be academic, since a perceived risk often produces real impacts. This paper presents a discussion on what companies can and should do to minimize the perceived risk of global warming on their bottom lines. That is, the basic question is, how can businesses today manage this risk so that objective business decisions can be made? Problems that could be directly or indirectly embedded in the global warming controversy are examined. These include financial, engineering, and international aspects of global climate change. This discussion will include possible impacts on the utility, agricultural, insurance, and financial industries.

  12. Developing global health technology standards: what can other industries teach us?

    PubMed

    Masum, Hassan; Lackman, Rebecca; Bartleson, Karen

    2013-10-17

    There is a lack of effective and affordable technologies to address health needs in the developing world. One way to address problems of innovation and affordability is to design global health technologies to follow agreed-upon standards. This Debate article argues that we can better develop standards for global health technologies if we learn lessons from other industries. The article's Background section begins by explaining why standards are needed in global health. For example, if global health technologies can be modularized into independent interfacing parts, these parts can then interact via well-defined standards in a "plug and play" fashion. This can avoid development of mutually incompatible solutions by different organizations, speed the pace of innovation, unlock health systems from single providers and approaches, and lower barriers to entry. The Background then gives a brief primer on standards and discusses incentives for health standards. The article's Discussion section begins with brief relevant cases of standards development from other industries, including electricity, container shipping, CD standards, Universal Serial Bus (USB), and the Internet. It then explores lessons from these and other industries that suggest how to develop standards for global health technologies. The remainder of the Discussion considers intellectual property and regulatory issues and standards-based global health business models, and ends with a checklist of considerations for health standards development leaders. (The associated Additional file discusses observations from standards development for cell phones and semiconductors, as well as challenges in the standards development process itself.) Throughout the article, point-of-care diagnostics are used as an illustrative example. An initiative is already underway to explore standardized diagnostics platforms. This Debate article aims to convince the reader that standards can benefit global health technologies if we

  13. Developing global health technology standards: what can other industries teach us?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of effective and affordable technologies to address health needs in the developing world. One way to address problems of innovation and affordability is to design global health technologies to follow agreed-upon standards. This Debate article argues that we can better develop standards for global health technologies if we learn lessons from other industries. Discussion The article’s Background section begins by explaining why standards are needed in global health. For example, if global health technologies can be modularized into independent interfacing parts, these parts can then interact via well-defined standards in a “plug and play” fashion. This can avoid development of mutually incompatible solutions by different organizations, speed the pace of innovation, unlock health systems from single providers and approaches, and lower barriers to entry. The Background then gives a brief primer on standards and discusses incentives for health standards. The article’s Discussion section begins with brief relevant cases of standards development from other industries, including electricity, container shipping, CD standards, Universal Serial Bus (USB), and the Internet. It then explores lessons from these and other industries that suggest how to develop standards for global health technologies. The remainder of the Discussion considers intellectual property and regulatory issues and standards-based global health business models, and ends with a checklist of considerations for health standards development leaders. (The associated Additional file discusses observations from standards development for cell phones and semiconductors, as well as challenges in the standards development process itself.) Throughout the article, point-of-care diagnostics are used as an illustrative example. An initiative is already underway to explore standardized diagnostics platforms. Summary This Debate article aims to convince the reader that standards can

  14. Growth of the Asian health-care market: global implications for the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard J

    2007-10-01

    The global economy is being transformed by an explosion of information unleashed by the internet, the digital revolution, communications and increased international mobility. This transformation is manifesting in many ways, including rapid development of countries such as China, commoditization of public services, mobilization of workforces, shifting of market control from suppliers to consumers, interlinked rises in product demand and customer expectations, and problems regulating international business competition. As Asia is home to half of the world's population, and offers both a large relatively low-cost workforce in some countries and a potentially huge retail market, this region could be central to the future of the global economy. Like other industries, the pharmaceutical industry faces a new array of Asia-specific opportunities and challenges. Success in meeting these challenges will go to those pharmaceutical companies that best understand the unique strengths and constraints of Asia's diverse cultures, talents and markets.

  15. Globalization of the International Arms Industry: A Step Towards ABCA and NATO Interoperability?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press , 2008),s.v.”globalization.” 14 Sarah Tulloch,ed.,The Oxford Dictionary and...Thesaurus (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press , 2008),s.v.”interoperable.” 15 American, Britain, Canada and Australia (New Zealand not included in the...Budget Project, 1994),1. 21 Richard Bitzinger, Towards a Brave New Arms Industry ( New York: Oxford University Press , 2003),5. 8

  16. The international space station: An opportunity for industry-sponsored global education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Cathleen E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station provides an excellent opportunity for industry sponsorship of international space education. As a highly visible worldwide asset, the space station already commands our interest. It has captured the imagination of the world's researchers and connected the world's governments. Once operational, it can also be used to capture the dreams of the world's children and connect the world's industry through education. The space station's global heritage and ownership; its complex engineering, construction, and operation; its flexible research and technology demonstration capability; and its long duration make it the perfect educational platform. These things also make a space station education program attractive to industry. Such a program will give private industry the opportunity to sponsor space-related activities even though a particular industry may not have a research or technology-driven need for space utilization. Sponsors will benefit through public relations and goodwill, educational promotions and advertising, and the sale and marketing of related products. There is money to be made by supporting, fostering, and enabling education in space through the International Space Station. This paper will explore various ISS education program and sponsorship options and benefits, will examine early industry response to such an opportunity, and will make the case for moving forward with an ISS education program as a private sector initiative.

  17. Reassessing policy paradigms: A comparison of the global tobacco and alcohol industries.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris; Eckhardt, Jappe; Lee, Kelley

    2016-03-21

    Tobacco is widely considered to be a uniquely harmful product for human health. Since the mid-1990s, the strategies of transnational tobacco corporations to undermine effective tobacco control policy has been extensively documented through internal industry documents. Consequently, the sale, use and marketing of tobacco products are subject to extensive regulation and formal measures to exclude the industry from policy-making have been adopted in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. In contrast to tobacco, alcohol is subject to less stringent forms of regulation, and the alcohol industry continues to play a central role in policy-making in many countries and at the global level. This article examines whether there is a sufficient rationale for such different regulatory approaches, through a comparative analysis of the political economy of the tobacco and alcohol industries including the structure of the industries, and the market and political strategies they pursue. Despite some important differences, the extensive similarities which exist between the tobacco and alcohol industries in terms of market structure and strategy, and political strategy, call into question the rationale for both the relatively weak regulatory approach taken towards alcohol, and the continued participation of alcohol corporations in policy-making processes.

  18. Automatic identification approach for high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring fatty acid global profiling.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-08-18

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a group of lipid molecules that are essential to organisms. As potential biomarkers for different diseases, FAs have attracted increasing attention from both biological researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. A sensitive and accurate method for globally profiling and identifying FAs is required for biomarker discovery. The high selectivity and sensitivity of high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) gives it great potential to fulfill the need to identify FAs from complicated matrices. This paper developed a new approach for global FA profiling and identification for HPLC-MRM FA data mining. Mathematical models for identifying FAs were simulated using the isotope-induced retention time (RT) shift (IRS) and peak area ratios between parallel isotope peaks for a series of FA standards. The FA structures were predicated using another model based on the RT and molecular weight. Fully automated FA identification software was coded using the Qt platform based on these mathematical models. Different samples were used to verify the software. A high identification efficiency (greater than 75%) was observed when 96 FA species were identified in plasma. This FAs identification strategy promises to accelerate FA research and applications.

  19. Building the world's supply of quinine: Dutch colonialism and the origins of a global pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Goss, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Quinine, a naturally occurring alkaloid from the Cinchona tree, was one of the first drugs produced and sold by a global pharmaceutical industry during the nineteenth century. Factories in Europe and North America dominated the manufacturing industry, and between 1890 and 1940, Cinchona plantations on Java supplied most of the bark for the quinine pharmaceutical business. At the end of the nineteenth century, the Dutch colonial state kept a hands-off approach to the Cinchona enterprises, in keeping with its liberal orientation. But the persistent low-price for bark, which led to the near ruin of the Cinchona planters, eventually pushed the colonial state to actively protect the Cinchona plantations. Colonial officials sought to stabilize the colonial Cinchona export-business by encouraging the integration of the quinine industry on a global scale. Most important was the colonial state's sponsorship in 1913 of the Quinine Agreement, establishing a set price for Cinchona bark, which created the world's first pharmaceutical cartel. In the interwar period, an alliance of Dutch government officials, planters, scientists, doctors and drug-makers, working in both the motherland and the colony, actively promoted the expansion of quinine consumption, as well as the merit of the Quinine Agreement, which they argued supplied guaranteed a steady supply of quinine, all for the wellbeing of global humanity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  1. Health profile of workers in a ship building and repair industry

    PubMed Central

    Lokhande, Vaishali R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The modern ship building industry, which encompasses the ship yards and marine equipment manufacturing, is an important and strategic industry. The various activities in modern ship building, maintenance, and repair have to be carried out at heights, or in closed confined spaces along with the added risk of exposure to chemicals and metal fumes. These activities expose the workers to various health hazards. Aims: This study was carried out with an aim to assess the health profile of workers in the ship building industry and to assess the occupational health issues related to ship building. Settings and Design: It was a cross-sectional study carried out on 100 randomly selected workers in a ship building yard in Mumbai, and their health profile was studied. Materials and Methods: The workers were enquired for history of co-morbidities, addictions and personal protective equipment use, health-related complaints, and were examined systemically as well as for bedside tests for hearing and detailed systemic examination as per the history or co-morbidity. Results: The important observations were those of prevalence of addictions (69%), irregular use of personal protective equipments (PPEs) among 50% of paint workers, presence of hypertension (20%), overweight (53%), osteoarthritis (10%), hearing loss (25%), and poor self-care. Conclusions: Health education to the workers regarding occupational hazards and lifestyle diseases along with more emphasis on the use of PPEs with regular health examination needs reinforcement. PMID:25568604

  2. The role of industrial nitrogen in the global nitrogen biogeochemical cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Baojing; Chang, Jie; Min, Yong; Ge, Ying; Zhu, Qiuan; Galloway, James N.; Peng, Changhui

    2013-01-01

    Haber-Bosch nitrogen (N) has been increasingly used in industrial products, e.g., nylon, besides fertilizer. Massive numbers of species of industrial reactive N (Nr) have emerged and produced definite consequences but receive little notice. Based on a comprehensive inventory, we show that (1) the industrial N flux has increased globally from 2.5 to 25.4 Tg N yr−1 from 1960 through 2008, comparable to the NOx emissions from fossil fuel combustion; (2) more than 25% of industrial products (primarily structural forms, e.g., nylon) tend to accumulate in human settlements due to their long service lives; (3) emerging Nr species define new N-assimilation and decomposition pathways and change the way that Nr is released to the environment; and (4) the loss of these Nr species to the environment has significant negative human and ecosystem impacts. Incorporating industrial Nr into urban environmental and biogeochemical models could help to advance urban ecology and environmental sciences. PMID:23999540

  3. Nature-based solutions for urban landscapes under post-industrialization and globalization: Barcelona versus Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peilei; Ouyang, Zutao; Basnou, Corina; Pino, Joan; Park, Hogeun; Chen, Jiquan

    2017-07-01

    Using Barcelona and Shanghai as case studies, we examined the nature-based solutions (NBS) in urban settings-specifically within cities experiencing post-industrialization and globalization. Our specific research questions are: (1) What are the spatiotemporal changes in urban built-up land and green space in Barcelona and Shanghai? (2) What are the relationships between economic development, exemplified by post-industrialization, globalization, and urban green space? Urban land use and green space change were evaluated using data derived from a variety of sources, including satellite images, landscape matrix indicators, and a land conversion matrix. The relationships between economic development, globalization, and environmental quality were analyzed through partial least squares structural equation modeling based on secondary statistical data. Both Barcelona and Shanghai have undergone rapid urbanization, with urban expansion in Barcelona beginning in the 1960s-1970s and in Shanghai in the last decade. While Barcelona's urban green space and green space per capita began declining between the 1950s and 1990s, they increased slightly over the past two decades. Shanghai, however, has consistently and significantly improved urban green space and green space per capita over the past six decades, especially since the economic reform in 1978. Economic development has a direct and significant influence on urban green space for both cities and post-industrialization had served as the main driving force for urban landscape change in Barcelona and Shanghai. Based on secondary statistical and qualitative data from on-site observations and interviews with local experts, we highlighted the institution's role in NBS planning. Furthermore, aspiration to become a global or globalizing city motivated both cities to use NBS planning as a place-making tool to attract global investment, which is reflected in various governing policies and regulations. The cities' effort to achieve a

  4. The global budgets of organic hydroperoxides for present and pre-industrial scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A. H.; Cooke, M. C.; Utembe, S. R.; Xiao, P.; Morris, W. C.; Derwent, R. G.; Archibald, A. T.; Jenkin, M. E.; Percival, C. J.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    The global 3-D chemistry-transport model, STOCHEM-CRI (Utembe et al., 2010), has been used to simulate the global distribution of organic hydroperoxides (ROOH) for both present day and pre-industrial scenarios. Globally, the formation of ROOH is solely from the reaction between RO2 and HO2, being more significant under NOx-limited conditions; here the self and cross reactions of RO2 and HO2 radicals dominate over their reaction with NO. The predominant global loss processes for ROOH are reaction with OH (95%) and by photolysis (4.4%) with a minor loss (<1%) by deposition, in the present day scenario. The associated global burden of ROOH in our model study is found to be 3.8 Tg. The surface distribution of ROOH shows a peak near the equator corresponding with higher photochemical activity and large (biogenic) VOC emissions. The simulated abundances of ROOH are comparable with those recorded in field campaigns, but generally show a tendency towards underestimation, particularly in the boundary layer. ROOH displayed seasonal cycles with higher concentrations during the summer months and lower concentrations during the winter months. The effects of including proposed HOx recycling schemes, including isomerisation of isoprene-derived peroxy radicals on the global budget of ROOH have also been investigated for the present and the pre-industrial environment. The present day simulations showed significant increases in CH3OOH and ROOH (up to 80% and 30%, respectively) over tropical forested regions, due to a general increase in HO2 and RO2 levels in isoprene-rich regions at low NOx levels. In the pre-industrial scenario, the increases in CH3OOH and total ROOH abundances are even larger, reflecting the more efficient operation of HOx recycling mechanisms at lower NOx levels. RCO3H species contribute 40-50% of the global burden of ROOH; inclusion of HOx recycling mechanisms leads to an increase in these RCO3H species but there is no discernible change in the remaining ROOH

  5. Global geodesic acoustic mode in a tokamak with positive magnetic shear and a monotonic temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgisonis, V. I.; Khalzov, I. V.; Lakhin, V. P.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Sorokina, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    The analytical solution for global geodesic acoustic modes (GGAMs) in a tokamak with a positive magnetic shear profile and a monotonic temperature profile is found in the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory. The axisymmetric eigenvalue problem for perturbed pressure and electrostatic potential is formulated as a recurrent set of equations for poloidal Fourier harmonics. The integral condition for the existence of GGAMs is obtained. It is shown that the traditional paradigm of having a off-axis maximum of the local geodesic acoustic frequency is not necessary for the existence of GGAMs; a representative example is designed.

  6. Principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS spectra, images and depth profiles: an industrial perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacholski, Michaeleen L.

    2004-06-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) has been successfully applied to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) spectra, images and depth profiles. Although SIMS spectral data sets can be small (in comparison to datasets typically discussed in literature from other analytical techniques such as gas or liquid chromatography), each spectrum has thousands of ions resulting in what can be a difficult comparison of samples. Analysis of industrially-derived samples means the identity of most surface species are unknown a priori and samples must be analyzed rapidly to satisfy customer demands. PCA enables rapid assessment of spectral differences (or lack there of) between samples and identification of chemically different areas on sample surfaces for images. Depth profile analysis helps define interfaces and identify low-level components in the system.

  7. The global biopharma industry and the rise of Indian drug multinationals: implications for Australian generics policy

    PubMed Central

    Löfgren, Hans

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a synopsis of the new dynamics of the global biopharma industry. The emergence of global generics companies with capabilities approximating those of 'big pharma' has accelerated the blurring of boundaries between the innovator and generics sectors. Biotechnology-based products form a large and growing segment of prescription drug markets and regulatory pathways for biogenerics are imminent. Indian biopharma multinationals with large-scale efficient manufacturing plants and growing R&D capabilities are now major suppliers of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) and generic drugs across both developed and developing countries. In response to generic competition, innovator companies employ a range of life cycle management techniques, including the launch of 'authorised generics'. The generics segment in Australia will see high growth rates in coming years but the prospect for local manufacturing is bleak. The availability of cheap generics in international markets has put pressure on Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) pricing arrangements, and a new policy direction was announced in November 2006. Lower generics prices will have a negative impact on some incumbent suppliers but industrial renewal policies for the medicines industry in Australia are better focused on higher value R&D activities and niche manufacturing of sophisticated products. PMID:17543115

  8. From technology transfer to local manufacturing: China's emergence in the global wind power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Joanna Ingram

    This dissertation examines the development of China's large wind turbine industry, including the players, the status of the technology, and the strategies used to develop turbines for the Chinese market. The primary goals of this research project are to identify the models of international technology transfer that have been used among firms in China's wind power industry; examine to what extent these technology transfers have contributed to China's ability to locally manufacture large wind turbine technology; and evaluate China's ability to become a major player in the global wind industry. China is a particularly important place to study the opportunities for and dynamics of clean energy development due to its role in global energy consumption. China is the largest coal consuming and producing nation in the world, and consequently the second largest national emitter of carbon dioxide after only the United States. Energy consumption and carbon emissions are growing rapidly, and China is expected to surpass the US and become the largest energy consuming nation and carbon dioxide emitter in coming decades. The central finding of this dissertation is that even though each firm involved in the large wind turbine manufacturing industry in China has followed a very different pathway of technology procurement for the Chinese market, all of the firms are increasing the utilization of locally-manufactured components, and many are doing so without transferring turbine technology or the associated intellectual property. Only one fully Chinese-owned firm, Goldwind, has succeeded in developing a commercially available large wind turbine for the Chinese market. No Chinese firms or foreign firms are manufacturing turbines in China for export overseas, though many have stated plans to do so. There already exists a possible niche market for the smaller turbines that are currently being made in China, particularly in less developed countries that are looking for less expensive

  9. Chemical profiles of PM emitted from the iron and steel industry in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyang; Gao, Xiang; Zhu, Tingyu; Luo, Lei; Zheng, Yang

    2017-02-01

    Source-level sampling methods were adopted in this study to sample six iron and steel plants referring four main manufacturing processes, with over 150 samples collected and measured in this study, the latest data for iron and steel industry in China has been demonstrated. The emission factors of CO2, CO, SO2, NOx, TSP, PM2.5 and PM10 were calculated, and the majority of pollutants were emitted from the sintering process. The virtual impactor divided the PM sample into three size fractions for chemical profiles and the profiles indicate that SO42-, NH4+ and OC distribute more into fine particles. The elements in PM from the sintering, pelletizing, puddling and steelmaking processes were measured and compared using the coefficient of divergence. The divergence between PM2.5 and PM10 for the same process is not obvious, with CD values ranging from 0.1697 to 0.2578. PM2.5 profiles of four process were notably different from one another, with CD values ranging from 0.4802 to 0.7500. More efforts are needed to update the PM profiles in China. PAHs in PM were investigated, and most of the PAHs in PM are from the sintering process. The total PAH concentration in PM2.5 from the sintering process is 73.28 ± 1.45 μg/m3 with a BaPE value calculated at 9.92 μg/m3.

  10. Global gene expression profiles reveal significant nuclear reprogramming by the blastocyst stage after cloning.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sadie L; Everts, Robin E; Tian, X Cindy; Du, Fuliang; Sung, Li-Ying; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2005-12-06

    Nuclear transfer (NT) has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but the technology is hindered by low efficiency. Global gene expression analysis of clones is important for the comprehensive study of nuclear reprogramming. Here, we compared global gene expression profiles of individual bovine NT blastocysts with their somatic donor cells and fertilized control embryos using cDNA microarray technology. The NT embryos' gene expression profiles were drastically different from those of their donor cells and closely resembled those of the naturally fertilized embryos. Our findings demonstrate that the NT embryos have undergone significant nuclear reprogramming by the blastocyst stage; however, problems may occur during redifferentiation for tissue genesis and organogenesis, and small reprogramming errors may be magnified downstream in development.

  11. Global analysis of methylation profiles from high resolution CpG data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ni; Bell, Douglas A; Maity, Arnab; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Joubert, Bonnie R; London, Stephanie J; Wu, Michael C

    2015-02-01

    New high throughput technologies are now enabling simultaneous epigenetic profiling of DNA methylation at hundreds of thousands of CpGs across the genome. A problem of considerable practical interest is identification of large scale, global changes in methylation that are associated with environmental variables, clinical outcomes, or other experimental conditions. However, there has been little statistical research on methods for global methylation analysis using technologies with individual CpG resolution. To address this critical gap in the literature, we develop a new strategy for global analysis of methylation profiles using a functional regression approach wherein we approximate either the density or the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the methylation values for each individual using B-spline basis functions. The spline coefficients for each individual are allowed to summarize the individual's overall methylation profile. We then test for association between the overall distribution and a continuous or dichotomous outcome variable using a variance component score test that naturally accommodates the correlation between spline coefficients. Simulations indicate that our proposed approach has desirable power while protecting type I error. The method was applied to detect methylation differences, both genome wide and at LINE1 elements, between the blood samples from rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy controls and to detect the epigenetic changes of human hepatocarcinogenesis in the context of alcohol abuse and hepatitis C virus infection. A free implementation of our methods in the R language is available in the Global Analysis of Methylation Profiles (GAMP) package at http://research.fhcrc.org/wu/en.html. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. Global Analysis of Methylation Profiles From High Resolution CpG Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ni; Bell, Douglas A.; Maity, Arnab; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Joubert, Bonnie R.; London, Stephanie J.; Wu, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    New high throughput technologies are now enabling simultaneous epigenetic profiling of DNA methylation at hundreds of thousands of CpGs across the genome. A problem of considerable practical interest is identification of large scale, global changes in methylation that are associated with environmental variables, clinical outcomes, or other experimental conditions. However, there has been little statistical research on methods for global methylation analysis using technologies with individual CpG resolution. To address this critical gap in the literature, we develop a new strategy for global analysis of methylation profiles using a functional regression approach wherein we approximate either the density or the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the methylation values for each individual using B-spline basis functions. The spline coefficients for each individual are allowed to summarize the individual’s overall methylation profile. We then test for association between the overall distribution and a continuous or dichotomous outcome variable using a variance component score test that naturally accommodates the correlation between spline coefficients. Simulations indicate that our proposed approach has desirable power while protecting type I error. The method was applied to detect methylation differences, both genome wide and at LINE1 elements, between the blood samples from rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy controls and to detect the epigenetic changes of human hepatocarcinogenesis in the context of alcohol abuse and hepatitis C virus infection. A free implementation of our methods in the R language is available in the Global Analysis of Methylation Profiles (GAMP) package at http://research.fhcrc.org/wu/en.html. PMID:25537884

  13. Global Cytokine Profiles and Association With Clinical Characteristics in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Sean M P; Polster, Annikka; Törnblom, Hans; Isaksson, Stefan; Capronnier, Sandrine; Tessier, Aurore; Le Nevé, Boris; Simrén, Magnus; Öhman, Lena

    2016-08-01

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have an altered cytokine profile, although it is unclear whether cytokines are linked with symptom severity. We aimed to determine whether global serum and mucosal cytokine profiles differ between IBS patients and healthy subjects and whether cytokines are associated with IBS symptoms. Serum from 144 IBS patients and 42 healthy subjects was analyzed for cytokine levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17A, interferon (IFN)-γ, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by MSD MULTI-ARRAY. In total, 109 IBS and 36 healthy sigmoid colon biopsies were analyzed for mRNA expression of IL-8, IL-10, TNF, and FOXP3 by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Multivariate discrimination analysis evaluated global cytokine profiles. Rectal sensitivity, oroanal transit time, and psychological and gastrointestinal symptom severity were also assessed. Global cytokine profiles of IBS patients and healthy subjects overlapped, but cytokine levels varied more in IBS patients. Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 tended to be increased and levels of IFN-γ tended to be decreased in IBS patients. Mucosal mRNA expression of IL-10 and FOXP3 tended to be decreased in IBS patients. Within both the full study cohort and IBS patients alone, serum level of TNF was associated with looser stool pattern, while subjects with more widespread somatic symptoms had increased serum levels of IL-6. Although neither IBS bowel habit subgroups nor patients with possible post-infectious IBS were associated with distinct cytokine profiles, a small cluster of IBS patients with comparatively elevated immune markers was identified. Global cytokine profiles did not discriminate IBS patients from healthy subjects, but cytokine profiles were more varied among IBS patients than among healthy subjects, and a small subgroup of patients with enhanced immune activity was identified. Also, association of inflammatory cytokines with some

  14. Nutrition labelling: a review of research on consumer and industry response in the global South

    PubMed Central

    Mandle, Jessie; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Michalow, Julia; Hofman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify peer-reviewed research on consumers’ usage and attitudes towards the nutrition label and the food industry's response to labelling regulations outside Europe, North America, and Australia and to determine knowledge gaps for future research. Design Narrative review. Results This review identified nutrition labelling research from 20 countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Consumers prefer that pre-packaged food include nutrition information, although there is a disparity between rates of use and comprehension. Consumer preference is for front-of-pack labelling and for information that shows per serving or portion as a reference unit, and label formats with graphics or symbols. Research on the food and beverage industry's response is more limited but shows that industry plays an active role in influencing legislation and regulation. Conclusions Consumers around the world share preferences with consumers in higher income countries with respect to labelling. However, this may reflect the research study populations, who are often better educated than the general population. Investigation is required into how nutrition labels are received in emerging economies especially among the urban and rural poor, in order to assess the effectiveness of labelling policies. Further research into the outlook of the food and beverage industry, and also on expanded labelling regulations is a priority. Sharing context-specific research regarding labelling between countries in the global South could be mutually beneficial in evaluating obesity prevention policies and strategies. PMID:25623608

  15. Nutrition labelling: a review of research on consumer and industry response in the global South.

    PubMed

    Mandle, Jessie; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Michalow, Julia; Hofman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    To identify peer-reviewed research on consumers' usage and attitudes towards the nutrition label and the food industry's response to labelling regulations outside Europe, North America, and Australia and to determine knowledge gaps for future research. Narrative review. This review identified nutrition labelling research from 20 countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Consumers prefer that pre-packaged food include nutrition information, although there is a disparity between rates of use and comprehension. Consumer preference is for front-of-pack labelling and for information that shows per serving or portion as a reference unit, and label formats with graphics or symbols. Research on the food and beverage industry's response is more limited but shows that industry plays an active role in influencing legislation and regulation. Consumers around the world share preferences with consumers in higher income countries with respect to labelling. However, this may reflect the research study populations, who are often better educated than the general population. Investigation is required into how nutrition labels are received in emerging economies especially among the urban and rural poor, in order to assess the effectiveness of labelling policies. Further research into the outlook of the food and beverage industry, and also on expanded labelling regulations is a priority. Sharing context-specific research regarding labelling between countries in the global South could be mutually beneficial in evaluating obesity prevention policies and strategies.

  16. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  17. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  18. Global Warming: A Science Overview for the A/C Industry

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1999-12-06

    Fossil fuels (i.e., coal, oil, and natural gas) provide about 85% of the world's energy, sustaining our standard-of-living. They are inexpensive, transportable, safe, and relatively abundant. At the same time, their use contributes to problems such as air quality and acid rain that are being addressed through various control efforts and to the problem of global warming, which is now being considered by governments of the world. This talk will focus on six key aspects of the scientific findings that are leading to proposals for significant limitation of the emissions of fossil-fuel-derived carbon dioxide and limitations on emissions of other greenhouse gases that can influence the global climate, including substances used in the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries.

  19. Creating healthy food environments through global benchmarking of government nutrition policies and food industry practices.

    PubMed

    Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Swinburn, Boyd

    2014-03-05

    Unhealthy processed food products are increasingly dominating over healthy foods, making food and nutrition environments unhealthier. Development and implementation of strong government healthy food policies is currently being circumvented in many countries by powerful food industry lobbying. In order to increase accountability of both governments and the private sector for their actions, and improve the healthiness of food environments, INFORMAS (the International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Research, Monitoring and Action Support) has recently been founded to systematically and comprehensively monitor food environments and policies in countries of varying size and income. This will enable INFORMAS to rank both governments and private sector companies globally according to their actions on food environments. Identification of those countries which have the healthiest food and nutrition policies and using them as international benchmarks against which national progress towards best practice can be assessed, should support reductions in global obesity and diet-related NCDs.

  20. Relative effects on global warming of halogenated methanes and ethanes of social and industrial interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Donald A.; Hales, Charles H.; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, N. Dak

    1990-01-01

    The relative potential global warming effects for several halocarbons (chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's)-11, 12, 113, 114, and 115; hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC's) 22, 123, 124, 141b, and 142b; and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's) 125, 134a, 143a, and 152a; carbon tetrachloride; and methyl chloroform) were calculated by two atmospheric modeling groups. These calculations were based on atmospheric chemistry and radiative convective models to determine the chemical profiles and the radiative processes. The resulting relative greenhouse warming when normalized to the effect of CFC-11 agree reasonably well as long as we account for differences between modeled lifetimes. Differences among results are discussed. Sensitivity of relative warming values is determined with respect to trace gas levels assumed. Transient relative global warming effects are analyzed.

  1. Chemical profile of size-fractionated soils collected in a semiarid industrial area of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Del Mastro, Anabella; Pereyra, Marcelo; Londonio, Agustín; Pereyra, Victoria; Rebagliati, Raúl Jiménez; Dawidowski, Laura; Gómez, Darío; Smichowski, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the chemical profile of soil collected in Bahía Blanca (Argentina). In this industrial city, semiarid soils are affected by different industrial and agricultural activities, the presence of a saltpeter extraction facility, traffic and increasing urbanization. Sixteen soil samples (superficial and sub-superficial) were collected. Samples were sieved in two fractions (A < 37 μm, and 37 < B < 50 μm) before elemental analysis. Major, minor and trace elements namely, Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Ti, V and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Anions (Cl-, F-, SO42-) and cations (K+, Na+ and NH4+) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after an aqueous extraction. As expected, crustal elements namely, Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and Ti exhibited the highest concentrations. Mean elemental concentration ranged from <0.3 μg g-1 (Sb) to 14.6 ± 0.6% (Ca). Ions concentrations in the soluble fraction measured at mg g-1 levels were in the order Cl- > Na+ ≅ SO42- > K+ > NO3-. Three indicators, namely, (i) coefficient of variation, (ii) coefficient of divergence and (iii) ratio of elemental concentration with respect to Ca were used to assess chemical, spatial and inter-profile variability. Chloride > Ca > Na+ > Mo > SO42-, dominated the variability indicating that these are key chemical markers for future assessment of crustal contribution to airborne particles in the area. The ratios Xi/Ca allowed discriminating the soil of the semi-arid region surrounding Bahía Blanca. The chemical profiles obtained in this study, particularly those of topsoil, will be a key input to characterize soil resuspension and its contribution to airborne particulate matter in a forthcoming receptor model analysis.

  2. Improving the New Zealand dairy industry's contribution to local and global wellbeing: the case of infant formula exports.

    PubMed

    Galtry, Judith A

    2013-11-22

    On narrow economic measures of wellbeing, New Zealand's dairy industry is a huge success. Infant formula, in particular, is New Zealand's 'export superstar'. However, using a broader wellbeing lens, there is some public disquiet about environmental, human and animal wellbeing associated with the dairy industry. This article questions whether New Zealand's dairy industry is also undermining global 'best practice' infant feeding. It argues that while there is support for increased trade and exports, there are few voices promoting global infant health and that discussion is needed on this issue by the New Zealand public health community.

  3. Global gene expression profiling of individual human oocytes and embryos demonstrates heterogeneity in early development.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lisa; Sneddon, Sharon F; Zeef, Leo; Kimber, Susan J; Brison, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    Early development in humans is characterised by low and variable embryonic viability, reflected in low fecundity and high rates of miscarriage, relative to other mammals. Data from assisted reproduction programmes provides additional evidence that this is largely mediated at the level of embryonic competence and is highly heterogeneous among embryos. Understanding the basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in a number of areas including: the regulation of early human development, disorders of pregnancy, assisted reproduction programmes, the long term health of children which may be programmed in early development, and the molecular basis of pluripotency in human stem cell populations. We have therefore investigated global gene expression profiles using polyAPCR amplification and microarray technology applied to individual human oocytes and 4-cell and blastocyst stage embryos. In order to explore the basis of any variability in detail, each developmental stage is replicated in triplicate. Our data show that although transcript profiles are highly stage-specific, within each stage they are relatively variable. We describe expression of a number of gene families and pathways including apoptosis, cell cycle and amino acid metabolism, which are variably expressed and may be reflective of embryonic developmental competence. Overall, our data suggest that heterogeneity in human embryo developmental competence is reflected in global transcript profiles, and that the vast majority of existing human embryo gene expression data based on pooled oocytes and embryos need to be reinterpreted.

  4. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Mice Brains following Experimental Infection with the Cyst-Forming Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikha, Hany M.; Liu, Guang-Xue; Suo, Xun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its host has been largely studied. However, molecular changes at the metabolic level in the host central nervous system and pathogenesis-associated metabolites during brain infection are largely unexplored. We used a global metabolomics strategy to identify differentially regulated metabolites and affected metabolic pathways in BALB/c mice during infection with T. gondii Pru strain at 7, 14 and 21 days post-infection (DPI). The non-targeted Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics analysis detected approximately 2,755 retention time-exact mass pairs, of which more than 60 had significantly differential profiles at different stages of infection. These include amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and vitamins. The biological significance of these metabolites is discussed. Principal Component Analysis and Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis showed the metabolites’ profile to change over time with the most significant changes occurring at 14 DPI. Correlated metabolic pathway imbalances were observed in carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, energetic metabolism and fatty acid oxidation. Eight metabolites correlated with the physical recovery from infection-caused illness were identified. These findings indicate that global metabolomics adopted in this study is a sensitive approach for detecting metabolic alterations in T. gondii-infected mice and generated a comparative metabolic profile of brain tissue distinguishing infected from non-infected host. PMID:26431205

  5. Methods for simultaneously identifying coherent local clusters with smooth global patterns in gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yin-Jing; Lee, Yun-Shien; Wu, Han-Ming; Chen, Chun-Houh

    2008-03-20

    The hierarchical clustering tree (HCT) with a dendrogram 1 and the singular value decomposition (SVD) with a dimension-reduced representative map 2 are popular methods for two-way sorting the gene-by-array matrix map employed in gene expression profiling. While HCT dendrograms tend to optimize local coherent clustering patterns, SVD leading eigenvectors usually identify better global grouping and transitional structures. This study proposes a flipping mechanism for a conventional agglomerative HCT using a rank-two ellipse (R2E, an improved SVD algorithm for sorting purpose) seriation by Chen 3 as an external reference. While HCTs always produce permutations with good local behaviour, the rank-two ellipse seriation gives the best global grouping patterns and smooth transitional trends. The resulting algorithm automatically integrates the desirable properties of each method so that users have access to a clustering and visualization environment for gene expression profiles that preserves coherent local clusters and identifies global grouping trends. We demonstrate, through four examples, that the proposed method not only possesses better numerical and statistical properties, it also provides more meaningful biomedical insights than other sorting algorithms. We suggest that sorted proximity matrices for genes and arrays, in addition to the gene-by-array expression matrix, can greatly aid in the search for comprehensive understanding of gene expression structures. Software for the proposed methods can be obtained at http://gap.stat.sinica.edu.tw/Software/GAP.

  6. A global portrait of the manganese industry-A socioeconomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Carl; Upson, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    In 2013/14, Risk & Policy Analysts Ltd undertook the first global study on the socio-economic value of Manganese (Mn). Based on a top-down analysis of the key supply chains for Mn, it outlined the economic importance of Mn ore and alloys in terms of their direct and indirect economic value, as well as their effects on employment (jobs and wages). In 2013, global production of Mn ore was worth an estimated US$ 10.2-11.1 billion. Taking into account multiplier effects in the supply chain, the total economic value of Mn ore production globally in 2013 is estimated at US$ 21-23 billion. Direct employment related to Mn ore production is estimated at 44,000-78,000 people worldwide (with total wages estimated at US$ 2.7-4.6 billion per year), plus 33,000-59,000 jobs are created through indirect and induced employment effects. Meanwhile, the production of Mn alloy contributes around US$ 23 billion per year to the global economy (based on global production of around 19 million mt and 2013 market prices). In total, the value of Mn alloy production worldwide, taking into account downstream multiplier effects in the supply chain, is estimated at around US$ 146 billion per year. Direct employment related to Mn alloy production is estimated at 67,000-86,000 jobs worldwide (with total wages estimated at US$ 613-796 million per year), plus 217,000-278,000 jobs created through indirect & induced employment effects. In addition, numerous industries/sectors, products and/or applications are heavily dependent on Mn production and use. Mn is a critical raw material input and alloying element for the steel industry, for which there are no known alternatives. It can be argued that without Mn the entire steel industry (based on the current physico-chemical properties of steel) would not exist and, as a result, the value of the steel industry - an estimated US$ 964 billion to US$ 1446 billion in 2013 - is reliant on the continued supply and use of Mn. Besides its use in steel, Mn is also a

  7. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  8. Characteristics and Trade-Offs of Doppler Lidar Global Wind Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Emmitt, G David

    2004-01-01

    Accurate, global profiling of wind velocity is highly desired by NASA, NOAA, the DOD/DOC/NASA Integrated Program Office (IPO)/NPOESS, DOD, and others for many applications such as validation and improvement of climate models, and improved weather prediction. The most promising technology to deliver this measurement from space is Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL). The NASA/NOAA Global Tropospheric Wind Sounder (GTWS) program is currently in the process of generating the science requirements for a space-based sensor. In order to optimize the process of defining science requirements, it is important for the scientific and user community to understand the nature of the wind measurements that DWL can make. These measurements are very different from those made by passive imaging sensors or by active radar sensors. The purpose of this paper is to convey the sampling characteristics and data product trade-offs of an orbiting DWL.

  9. Liquefied-petroleum-gas industry profile. Volume 1. An overview of the industry (1944-1980). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gazda, W.; Forman, C.; Zebe, P.

    1985-11-01

    The report provides a broad, factual description of the U.S. liquefied petroleum gas (LP-gas) industry. The basic purpose of the report is to provide analysts and policymakers in government and industry with a comprehensive overview of the LP-gas industry that can be used as a tool in the decision-making process. The report is contained in two volumes: Volume I provides the basic discussion of the LP-gas industry. Volume II supplements the presentation of Volume I with appendices containing additional detail on selected topics.

  10. Global current profile effects on the evolution and saturation of magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect

    Poye, A.; Agullo, O.; Benkadda, S.; Smolyakov, A.; Garbet, X.

    2013-02-15

    The nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The growth and saturation of the island are shown to depend not only on asymptotic tearing mode stability parameter {Delta}{sup Prime} but also on the initial global current profile. Presence of the external current sheets leads to the formation of different island state for the same value of {Delta}{sup Prime }. It is found that the flow vorticity generated by the interacting current sheets is an important feature of nonlocal interactions and nonlocal effects in magnetic islands dynamics.

  11. A Targeted Quantitative Proteomics Strategy for Global Kinome Profiling of Cancer Cells and Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Kinases are among the most intensively pursued enzyme superfamilies as targets for anti-cancer drugs. Large data sets on inhibitor potency and selectivity for more than 400 human kinases became available recently, offering the opportunity to design rationally novel kinase-based anti-cancer therapies. However, the expression levels and activities of kinases are highly heterogeneous among different types of cancer and even among different stages of the same cancer. The lack of effective strategy for profiling the global kinome hampers the development of kinase-targeted cancer chemotherapy. Here, we introduced a novel global kinome profiling method, based on our recently developed isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe and a targeted proteomic method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM), for assessing simultaneously the expression of more than 300 kinases in human cells and tissues. This MRM-based assay displayed much better sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy than the discovery-based shotgun proteomic method. Approximately 250 kinases could be routinely detected in the lysate of a single cell line. Additionally, the incorporation of iRT into MRM kinome library rendered our MRM kinome assay easily transferrable across different instrument platforms and laboratories. We further employed this approach for profiling kinase expression in two melanoma cell lines, which revealed substantial kinome reprogramming during cancer progression and demonstrated an excellent correlation between the anti-proliferative effects of kinase inhibitors and the expression levels of their target kinases. Therefore, this facile and accurate kinome profiling assay, together with the kinome-inhibitor interaction map, could provide invaluable knowledge to predict the effectiveness of kinase inhibitor drugs and offer the opportunity for individualized cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24520089

  12. A targeted quantitative proteomics strategy for global kinome profiling of cancer cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-01

    Kinases are among the most intensively pursued enzyme superfamilies as targets for anti-cancer drugs. Large data sets on inhibitor potency and selectivity for more than 400 human kinases became available recently, offering the opportunity to design rationally novel kinase-based anti-cancer therapies. However, the expression levels and activities of kinases are highly heterogeneous among different types of cancer and even among different stages of the same cancer. The lack of effective strategy for profiling the global kinome hampers the development of kinase-targeted cancer chemotherapy. Here, we introduced a novel global kinome profiling method, based on our recently developed isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe and a targeted proteomic method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM), for assessing simultaneously the expression of more than 300 kinases in human cells and tissues. This MRM-based assay displayed much better sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy than the discovery-based shotgun proteomic method. Approximately 250 kinases could be routinely detected in the lysate of a single cell line. Additionally, the incorporation of iRT into MRM kinome library rendered our MRM kinome assay easily transferrable across different instrument platforms and laboratories. We further employed this approach for profiling kinase expression in two melanoma cell lines, which revealed substantial kinome reprogramming during cancer progression and demonstrated an excellent correlation between the anti-proliferative effects of kinase inhibitors and the expression levels of their target kinases. Therefore, this facile and accurate kinome profiling assay, together with the kinome-inhibitor interaction map, could provide invaluable knowledge to predict the effectiveness of kinase inhibitor drugs and offer the opportunity for individualized cancer chemotherapy.

  13. Greenhouse gas and carbon profile of the u.s. Forest products industry value chain.

    PubMed

    Heath, Linda S; Maltby, Van; Miner, Reid; Skog, Kenneth E; Smith, James E; Unwin, Jay; Upton, Brad

    2010-05-15

    A greenhouse gas and carbon accounting profile was developed for the U.S. forest products industry value chain for 1990 and 2004-2005 by examining net atmospheric fluxes of CO(2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) using a variety of methods and data sources. Major GHG emission sources include direct and indirect (from purchased electricity generation) emissions from manufacturing and methane emissions from landfilled products. Forest carbon stocks in forests supplying wood to the industry were found to be stable or increasing. Increases in the annual amounts of carbon removed from the atmosphere and stored in forest products offset about half of the total value chain emissions. Overall net transfers to the atmosphere totaled 91.8 and 103.5 TgCO(2)-eq. in 1990 and 2005, respectively, although the difference between these net transfers may not be statistically significant. Net transfers were higher in 2005 primarily because additions to carbon stored in forest products were less in 2005. Over this same period, energy-related manufacturing emissions decreased by almost 9% even though forest products output increased by approximately 15%. Several types of avoided emissions were considered separately and were collectively found to be notable relative to net emissions.

  14. Greenhouse Gas and Carbon Profile of the U.S. Forest Products Industry Value Chain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A greenhouse gas and carbon accounting profile was developed for the U.S. forest products industry value chain for 1990 and 2004−2005 by examining net atmospheric fluxes of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) using a variety of methods and data sources. Major GHG emission sources include direct and indirect (from purchased electricity generation) emissions from manufacturing and methane emissions from landfilled products. Forest carbon stocks in forests supplying wood to the industry were found to be stable or increasing. Increases in the annual amounts of carbon removed from the atmosphere and stored in forest products offset about half of the total value chain emissions. Overall net transfers to the atmosphere totaled 91.8 and 103.5 TgCO2-eq. in 1990 and 2005, respectively, although the difference between these net transfers may not be statistically significant. Net transfers were higher in 2005 primarily because additions to carbon stored in forest products were less in 2005. Over this same period, energy-related manufacturing emissions decreased by almost 9% even though forest products output increased by approximately 15%. Several types of avoided emissions were considered separately and were collectively found to be notable relative to net emissions. PMID:20355695

  15. Global Gene Expression Profile of the Hippocampus in a Rat Model of Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Tao; Hu, Yue-Qiang; Tang, Nong; Zhao, Qing-Shan; Li, Tian-Wei; Li, Hai-Yuan; Wang, Qing-Bi; Bi, Xin-Ya; Cai, Xin-Kun

    2015-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VD) has been one of the most serious public health problems worldwide. It is well known that cerebral hypoperfusion is the key pathophysiological basis of VD, but it remains unclear how global genes in hippocampus respond to cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. In this study, we aimed to reveal the global gene expression profile in the hippocampus of VD using a rat model. VD was induced by repeated occlusion of common carotid arteries followed by reperfusion. The rats with VD were characterized by deficit of memory and cognitive function and by the histopathological changes in the hippocampus, such as a reduction in the number and the size of neurons accompanied by an increase in intercellular space. Microarray analysis of global genes displayed up-regulation of 7 probesets with genes with fold change more than 1.5 (P < 0.05) and down-regulation of 13 probesets with genes with fold change less than 0.667 (P < 0.05) in the hippocampus. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis showed that the up-regulated genes are mainly involved in oxygen binding and transport, autoimmune response and inflammation, and that the down-regulated genes are related to glucose metabolism, autoimmune response and inflammation, and other biological process, related to memory and cognitive function. Thus, the abnormally expressed genes are closely related to oxygen transport, glucose metabolism, and autoimmune response. The current findings display global gene expression profile of the hippocampus in a rat model of VD, providing new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of VD.

  16. Discontinuous Registration Of Industrial Radiographs Using Profile Analysis And Piecewise Correlation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, David L.; Smith, Peter H.; Liutermoza, John F.

    1980-06-01

    Profile analysis and piecewise correlation techniques for measuring internal machine part clearances by digital processing of industrial radiographs are described in this paper. These methods were developed at the Image and Pattern Analysis Laboratory of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Group. Profile analysis requires mathematical modeling of the expected optical density of a radiograph as a function of machine part position. Part separations are estimated on the basis of individual image scan lines. A final part separation estimate is produced by fitting a polynominal to the individual estimates and correcting for imaging and processing degradations which are simulated using a mathematical model. Piecewise correlation involves an application of image registration where radiographs are correlated in a piecewise fashion to allow inference of the relative motion of machine parts in a time varying series of images. Each image is divided into segments which are dominated by a small number of features. Segments from one image are cross-correlated with subsequent images to identify machine part motion in image space. Correlation peak magnitude is used in assessing the confidence that a particular motion has occurred between images. The rigid feature motion of machine parts requires image registration by discon-tinuous parts. This method differs from the continuous deformations one encounters in perspective projective transformations characteristic of remote sensing applications.

  17. The meat industry: do we think and behave globally or locally?

    PubMed

    Belk, K E; Woerner, D R; Delmore, R J; Tatum, J D; Yang, H; Sofos, J N

    2014-11-01

    For generations, those that produce livestock and meat generally felt that their country or geographical region (i.e., provenance) reflected a basis for product differentiation. This occurs to the extent that geography of production often is considered a "brand." For example, there exists "U.S. Grain-Fed Beef" or "Kobe Black Wagyu" or "Uruguayan Grass-Fed Lamb" or "Danish Pork." However, for most meat trade, industry has evolved beyond this. With the exception perhaps of farms onto which livestock are born, meat company's profits are not generally tied to geographical considerations. Most major companies (e.g., JBS, Marfrig, Tyson, Cargill, Danish Crown, Nippon Meat Packers, etc.) operate in multiple countries and represent to consumers the production of a number of locations. However, there also now exist entrepreneurial options for meat production and "local" sales, albeit at lesser volumes. This discussion explores "global" and "local" meat marketing options. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Major advances in globalization and consolidation of the artificial insemination industry.

    PubMed

    Funk, D A

    2006-04-01

    The artificial insemination (AI) industry in the United States has gone through many consolidations, mergers, and acquisitions over the past 25 yr. There are 5 major AI companies in the United States today: 3 large cooperatives, 1 private company, and 1 public company. The latter 2 have majority ownership outside of the United States. The AI industry in the United States progeny-tests more than 1,000 Holstein young sires per year. Because healthy, mature dairy bulls are capable of producing well over 100,000 straws of frozen semen per year, only a relatively small number of bulls are needed to breed the world's population of dairy cows. Most AI companies in the United States do not own many, if any, females and tend to utilize the same maternal families in their breeding programs. Little differences exist among the selection programs of the AI companies in the United States. The similarity of breeding programs and the extreme semen-production capabilities of bulls have contributed to difficulties the AI companies have had in developing genetically different product lines. Exports of North American Holstein genetics increased steadily from the 1970s into the 1990s because of the perceived superiority of North American Holsteins for dairy traits compared with European strains, especially for production. The breeding industry moved towards international genetic evaluations of bulls in the 1990s, with the International Bull Evaluation Service (Interbull) in Sweden coordinating the evaluations. The extensive exchange of elite genetics has led to a global dairy genetics industry with bulls that are closely related, and the average inbreeding level for the major dairy breeds continues to increase. Genetic markers have been used extensively and successfully by the industry for qualitative traits, especially for recessive genetic disorders, but markers have had limited impact for quantitative traits. Selection emphasis continues to migrate away from production traits and

  19. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Elucidation of ethanol tolerance mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by global metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Song, Ju Hwan; Jung, Young Hoon; Choi, Il-Sup; Choi, Wonja; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol, the major fermentation product of yeast, is a stress factor in yeast. We previously constructed an ethanol-tolerant mutant yeast iETS3 by using the global transcriptional machinery engineering. However, the ethanol-tolerance mechanism has not been systematically investigated. In this study, global metabolite profiling was carried out, mainly by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF MS), to investigate the mechanisms of ethanol tolerance in iETS3. A total of 108 intracellular metabolites were identified by GC/TOF MS and high performance liquid chromatography, and these metabolites were mostly intermediates of the central carbon metabolism. The metabolite profiles of iETS3 and BY4741, cultured with or without ethanol, were significantly different based on principal component and hierarchical clustering analyses. Our metabolomic analyses identified the compositional changes in cell membranes and the activation of glutamate metabolism and the trehalose synthetic pathway as the possible mechanisms for the ethanol tolerance. These metabolic traits can be considered possible targets for further improvement of ethanol tolerance in the mutant. For example, the KGD1 deletion mutant, with up-regulated glutamate metabolism, showed increased tolerance to ethanol. This study has demonstrated that metabolomics can be a useful tool for strain improvement and phenotypic analysis of microorganisms under stress. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. [Industry, Academia and Government Partnership through the Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT)].

    PubMed

    Hinoshita, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    In developing countries, many people are unable to access basic healthcare services, resulting in many avoidable deaths and/or disabilities. The United Nations adopted the Millennium Development Goals in order to resolve this problem, and Japan has been contributing greatly to the achievement of these goals. In this context, in 2013 the Government of Japan proposed its Strategy on Global Health Diplomacy, and since then has been promoting Universal Health Coverage. Since the beginning of the 21st century, the particular importance of addressing neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) has been stressed by the international community. Nevertheless, of the 1 billion people world-wide who are currently living with NTDs, about three-fourths of these are living in poverty, and of these, nearly 65% are unable to acquire or access drugs for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. Under these circumstances, Japan decided to support the Global Health Innovative Technology (GHIT) Fund in order to support the research and development of drugs for people in developing countries, as well as the manufacture, supply and administration of these drugs. Over the last two years, the GHIT Fund has been supporting the research and development of five new candidate drugs for three NTDs (Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and malaria). Japan also hopes to stimulate domestic pharmaceutical industries in developing countries, as well as to increase international cooperation through various activities such the utilization of our capacity to research and develop new drugs.

  2. Trade brokerage property of industrial sectors on the global value chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lizhi; Xu, Xiaoyu; Guan, Jun; Dong, Xianlei

    2017-08-01

    ICIO data have proven itself to be a reliable source for the analysis of economic globalization, with which sectors all over the world could be constructed into a sophisticated GVC, bringing the advantages of simultaneous study on international and domestic economies in detail as a holistic network. This paper uses OECD-WTO TiVA data to set up GIVCN-TiVA networks as the general analytical framework, depicting the transferring process of intermediate goods among sectors of various countries/regions. Secondly, the conception of brokerage roles in SNA has been adopted to redefine sector’s function while linkage exists between its upstream providers and downstream consumers, referred to as “Trade Brokerage Property”, as well as to quantify the ratio of each types of the roles. Thirdly, a set of simulations have been defined to testify the contribution that different TBPs incur to the robustness of global economic system. Finally, analyses on TBPs and NTBPs have been carried out in the levels of industry and country/region, respectively.

  3. GSSML: An Observations and Measurements profile for GlobalSoilMap.net (Oceania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Alistair; Simons, Bruce; Wilson, Peter; Cox, Simon

    2013-04-01

    The Oceania node of the GlobalSoilMap.net consortium has defined GSMML, a profile of the Observations and Measurements (O&M) Geography Markup Language (GML) application schema, to support the delivery of project data using Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Services (WFS). This paper describes GSMML, and the results of initial testing, and proposes linkages to other OGC service types and soil data exchange standards. GlobalSoilMap.net will create a global soil dataset providing predictions for twelve agreed soil properties within a three-dimensional grid. The grid consists of 'Spatial Entities' spaced at 3 arc second intervals and extending to a depth of 2 meters with ten physical soil property predictions made at six predefined depth intervals. In addition, two properties predicting the depth of the profile are made for each Spatial Entity. Each prediction must include: an estimate of its uncertainty; its age and that of the source data; and a description of the process used to generate the value. The approach taken in GSMML is to map the GlobalSoilMap.net requirements on to classes within the O&M Observation and Sampling Features packages. The GlobalSoilMap.net Spatial Entities represent a sampling regime across the earth's terrestrial surface and are modelled as nested O&M 'SF_SpatialSamplingFeatures'. The property predictions are related 'OM_Observation' instances that carry the result, age properties, estimation process, and uncertainty. GSMML defines two concrete classes ('GSM_PrimarySpatialEntity' and 'GSM_SecondarySpatialEntity') with no properties of their own that specialize the SF_SpatialSamplingFeature. Uncertainty is encoded by adopting the UncertML profile of O&M. The schema is accompanied by a set of conformance classes to constrain content, and Semantic Web vocabularies that define the observed properties. Test GSMML services show that a WFS can only reliably support the provision of comprehensive data for requests returning a few hundred

  4. Validation of the Global Land Data Assimilation System based on measurements of soil temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Yingying; Yang, Kun; Chen, Deliang

    2016-04-01

    Soil temperature is a key parameter in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. It plays an important role in the land surface water and energy cycles, and has a major influence on vegetation growth and other hydrological aspects. We evaluated the accuracy of the soil temperature profiles from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) using nine observational networks across the world and aimed to find a reliable global soil temperature profile dataset for future hydrological and ecological studies. In general, the soil temperature profile data generated by the Noah model driven by the GLDAS forcing data (GLDAS_Noah10 and GLDAS_Noah10_v2) were found to have high skills in terms of daily, monthly, and mean seasonal variations, indicated by smaller bias and root-mean-square-error (RMSE) (both < 3 °C) and correlation coefficients larger than 0.90. Conversely, the Community Land Model (CLM) results (GLDAS_CLM10) generally showed larger bias and RMSE (both > 4°C). Further analysis showed that the overestimation by GLDAS_CLM10 was mainly caused by overestimation of the ground heat flux, determined by the thermal conductivity parameterization scheme, whereas the underestimation by GLDAS_Noah10 was due to underestimation of downward longwave radiation from the forcing data. Thus, more accurate forcing data should be required for the Noah model and an improved thermal parameterization scheme should be developed for the CLM. These approaches will improve the accuracy of simulated soil temperatures. To our knowledge, it is the first study to evaluate the GLDAS soil temperatures with comprehensive in situ observations across the world, and has a potential to facilitate an overall improvement of the GLDAS products (not only soil temperatures but also the related energy and water fluxes) as well as a refinement of the land surface parameterization used in GLDAS.

  5. Serum global metabolomics profiling reveals profound metabolic impairments in patients with MPS IIIA and MPS IIIB.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiyan; Meadows, Aaron S; Pineda, Ricardo J; Mohney, Robert P; Stirdivant, Steve; McCarty, Douglas M

    2017-04-05

    The monogenic defects in specific lysosomal enzymes in mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) III lead to lysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans and complex CNS and somatic pathology, for which the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, serum samples from patients with MPS IIIA (age 2-9 yr) and MPS IIIB (2-13 yr) and healthy controls (age 2-9 yr) were assayed by global metabolomics profiling of 658 metabolites using mass spectrometry. Significant alterations were detected in 423 metabolites in all MPS III patients, of which 366 (86.5%) decreased and 57 (13.5%) increased. Similar profiles were observed when analyzing data from MPS IIIA and MPS IIIB samples separately, with only limited age variations in 36 metabolites. The observed metabolic disturbances in MPS III patients involve virtually all major pathways of amino acid (101/150), peptide (17/21), carbohydrate (19/23), lipid (221/325), nucleotide (15/25), energy (8/9), vitamins and co-factors (8/21), and xenobiotics (34/84) metabolism. Notably, detected serum metabolite decreases involved all key amino acids, all major neurotransmitter pathways, and broad neuroprotective compounds. The elevated metabolites are predominantly lipid derivatives, and also include cysteine metabolites and a fibrinogen peptide fragment, consistent with the status of oxidative stress and inflammation in MPS III. This study demonstrates that the lysosomal glycosaminoglycans storage triggers profound metabolic disturbances in patients with MPS III disorders, leading to severe functional depression of virtually all metabolic pathways, which emerge early during the disease progression. Serum global metabolomics profiling may provide an important and minimally invasive tool for better understanding the disease mechanisms and identification of potential biomarkers for MPS III.

  6. Melanoma brain metastasis globally reconfigures chemokine and cytokine profiles in patient cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lok, Edwin; Chung, Amy S; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    The aggressiveness of melanoma is believed to be correlated with tumor-stroma-associated immune cells. Cytokines and chemokines act to recruit and then modulate the activities of these cells, ultimately affecting disease progression. Because melanoma frequently metastasizes to the brain, we asked whether global differences in immunokine profiles could be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of melanoma patients and reveal aspects of tumor biology that correlate with patient outcomes. We therefore measured the levels of 12 cytokines and 12 chemokines in melanoma patient CSF and the resulting data were analyzed to develop unsupervised hierarchical clustergrams and heat maps. Unexpectedly, the overall profiles of immunokines found in these samples showed a generalized reconfiguration of their expression in melanoma patient CSF, resulting in the segregation of individuals with melanoma brain metastasis from nondisease controls. Chemokine CCL22 and cytokines IL1α, IL4, and IL5 were reduced in most samples, whereas a subset including CXCL10, CCL4, CCL17, and IL8 showed increased expression. Further, analysis of clusters identified within the melanoma patient set comparing patient outcome suggests that suppression of IL1α, IL4, IL5, and CCL22, with concomitant elevation of CXCL10, CCL4, and CCL17, may correlate with more aggressive development of brain metastasis. These results suggest that global immunokine suppression in the host, together with a selective increase in specific chemokines, constitute a predominant immunomodulatory feature of melanoma brain metastasis. These alterations likely drive the course of this disease in the brain and variations in the immune profiles of individual patients may predict outcomes.

  7. Global Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Profiling of Erythrocytes Infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Theodore R.; Gordon, D. Benjamin; Fischer, Steven M.; Tichy, Shane E.; Kitagawa, Norton; Lai, Cindy; Gosnell, William L.; Chang, Sandra P.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a global infectious disease that threatens the lives of millions of people. Transcriptomics, proteomics and functional genomics studies, as well as sequencing of the Plasmodium falciparum and Homo sapiens genomes, have shed new light on this host-parasite relationship. Recent advances in accurate mass measurement mass spectrometry, sophisticated data analysis software, and availability of biological pathway databases, have converged to facilitate our global, untargeted biochemical profiling study of in vitro P. falciparum-infected (IRBC) and uninfected (NRBC) erythrocytes. In order to expand the number of detectable metabolites, several key analytical steps in our workflows were optimized. Untargeted and targeted data mining resulted in detection of over one thousand features or chemical entities. Untargeted features were annotated via matching to the METLIN metabolite database. For targeted data mining, we queried the data using a compound database derived from a metabolic reconstruction of the P. falciparum genome. In total, over one hundred and fifty differential annotated metabolites were observed. To corroborate the representation of known biochemical pathways from our data, an inferential pathway analysis strategy was used to map annotated metabolites onto the BioCyc pathway collection. This hypothesis-generating approach resulted in over-representation of many metabolites onto several IRBC pathways, most prominently glycolysis. In addition, components of the “branched” TCA cycle, partial urea cycle, and nucleotide, amino acid, chorismate, sphingolipid and fatty acid metabolism were found to be altered in IRBCs. Interestingly, we detected and confirmed elevated levels for cyclic ADP ribose and phosphoribosyl AMP in IRBCs, a novel observation. These metabolites may play a role in regulating the release of intracellular Ca2+ during P. falciparum infection. Our results support a strategy of global metabolite profiling by untargeted data

  8. Evaluation of sampling and extraction methodologies for the global metabolic profiling of Saccharophagus degradans.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min Hye; Lee, Do Yup; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Fiehn, Oliver; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2010-08-01

    Metabolomics is based on the unbiased and global analysis of metabolites of organisms at specific time points. Therefore, the nonselective and reproducible recovery of all existing metabolites while preventing their transformation is the ideal criterion for metabolome sample preparation. We evaluated currently used sampling methods and extraction solvents for global metabolic profiling of a gram-negative bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans, using gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) with an emphasis on three steps: the sampling method, which consisted of cold methanol quenching or fast filtration; the subsequent washing step; and the extraction solvents. After cold methanol quenching with 70% (v/v) methanol at -70 degrees C, washing with 2.3% NaCl produced a serious loss of intracellular metabolites. In addition, when cold methanol quenching and fast filtration were compared, severe cell leakage caused by cold methanol quenching resulted in a significant loss of intracellular metabolites, which was confirmed by spectrometric analysis at 260 and 280 nm. Upon evaluation of extraction solvents such as pure methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile/water (50ACN; 1:1, v/v), acetonitrile/methanol/water mixture (AMW; 2:2:1), and water/isopropanol/methanol (WiPM; 2:2:5). AMW and WiPM were found to be superior extraction solvents for S. degradans based on the total peak intensities of the metabolites, the total number of metabolite peaks, and the reproducibility of recovered metabolite quantities; however, the metabolite profiles differed significantly between AMW and WiPM. This is the first evaluation of each step of sample preparation involved in global scale metabolic analysis by GC-TOF MS, which can be used as a model in the preparation of organism-specific samples for metabolome analysis.

  9. Global volatile profile of virgin olive oils flavoured by aromatic/medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Perestrelo, R; Silva, C; Silva, P; Câmara, J S

    2017-07-15

    The global volatile profile of commercial virgin olive oils and flavoured olive oils with aromatic/medicinal plants, was established using liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS). More than 60 volatile organic compounds (VOCs belonging to different groups were identified using both methods. Olive oils volatile profile was slightly influenced by maceration process, which occurred at room temperature (20±2°C) for 15days. The predominant differences were observed in terpenoids group, since some of them were only identified in the flavoured olive oils, while others showed an increase with the maceration process. VOCs mass transfer from plants to olive oils could explain the observed results. Principal components analysis (PCA) applied to LLME/GC-qMS data allowed to distinguish the olive oils. The flavoured oils would increase the use of olive oil among consumers as consequence of the improvement of its aromatic profile and healthy properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Weiss, R. F.; Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Miller, B. R.; Salameh, P. K.; Harth, C. M.; Krummel, P. B.; Golombek, A.; Porter, L. W.; Butler, J. H.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Steele, L. P.; Wang, R. H. J.; Cunnold, D. M.

    2010-11-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CCl4 measurements and a 3-dimensional chemical transport model to estimate the interannual regional industrial emissions and seasonal global oceanic uptake of CCl4 for the period of 1996-2004. The Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH), driven by offline National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis meteorological fields, is used to simulate CCl4 mole fractions and calculate their sensitivities to regional sources and sinks using a finite difference approach. High frequency observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and low frequency flask observations are together used to constrain the source and sink magnitudes, estimated as factors that multiply the a priori fluxes. Although industry data imply that the global industrial emissions were substantially declining with large interannual variations, the optimized results show only small interannual variations and a small decreasing trend. The global surface CCl4 mole fractions were declining in this period because the CCl4 oceanic and stratospheric sinks exceeded the industrial emissions. Compared to the a priori values, the inversion results indicate substantial increases in industrial emissions originating from the South Asian/Indian and Southeast Asian regions, and significant decreases in emissions from the European and North American regions.

  11. Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Weiss, R. F.; Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Miller, B. R.; Salameh, P. K.; Harth, C. M.; Krummel, P. B.; Golombek, A.; Porter, L. W.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Steele, L. P.; Wang, R. H. J.; Cunnold, D. M.

    2010-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CC14 measurements and a 3-dimensional chemical transport model to estimate the interannual regional industrial emissions and seasonal global oceanic uptake of CCl4 for the period of 1996-2004. The Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH), driven by offline National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis meteorological fields, is used to simulate CCl4 mole fractions and calculate their sensitivities to regional sources and sinks using a finite difference approach. High frequency observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) and low frequency flask observations are together used to constrain the source and sink magnitudes, estimated as factors that multiply the a priori fluxes. Although industry data imply that the global industrial emissions were substantially declining with large interannual variations, the optimized results show only small interannual variations and a small decreasing trend. The global surface CCl4 mole fractions were declining in this period because the CCl4 oceanic and stratospheric sinks exceeded the industrial emissions. Compared to the a priori values, the inversion results indicate substantial increases in industrial emissions originating from the South Asian/Indian and Southeast Asian regions, and significant decreases in emissions from the European and North American regions.

  12. Global loudness of rising- and falling-intensity tones: How temporal profile characteristics shape overall judgments.

    PubMed

    Ponsot, Emmanuel; Susini, Patrick; Meunier, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying global loudness judgments of rising- or falling-intensity tones were further investigated in two magnitude estimation experiments. By manipulating the temporal characteristics of such stimuli, it was examined whether judgments could be accounted for by an integration of their loudest portion over a certain temporal window associated to a "decay mechanism" downsizing this integration over time for falling ramps. In experiment 1, 1-kHz intensity-ramps were stretched in time between 1 and 16 s keeping their dynamics (difference between maximum and minimum levels) unchanged. While global loudness of rising tones increased up to 6 s, evaluations of falling tones increased at a weaker rate and slightly decayed between 6 and 16 s, resulting in significant differences between the two patterns. In experiment 2, ramps were stretched in time between 2 and 12 s keeping their slopes (rate of change in dB/s) unchanged. In this context, the main effect of duration became non-significant and the interaction between the two profiles remained, although the decay of falling tones was not significant. These results qualitatively support the view that the global loudness computation of intensity-ramps involves an integration of their loudest portions; the presence of a decay mechanism could, however, not be attested.

  13. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Allwood, J William; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-05-15

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  14. Where Do Ex-Offenders Find Jobs? An Industrial Profile of the Employers of Ex-Offenders in Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Based on an examination of the earnings records of ex-offenders released from Virginia correctional institutions from fiscal year 1999 to 2003, this article provides an industrial profile testing the presumption that most ex-offenders are only able to find employment in low-level occupations, with low rates of job retention, and limited customer…

  15. Where Do Ex-Offenders Find Jobs? An Industrial Profile of the Employers of Ex-Offenders in Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Based on an examination of the earnings records of ex-offenders released from Virginia correctional institutions from fiscal year 1999 to 2003, this article provides an industrial profile testing the presumption that most ex-offenders are only able to find employment in low-level occupations, with low rates of job retention, and limited customer…

  16. Equatorial Kelvin wave signatures in ozone profile measurements from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, R. M. A.; van Oss, R. F.; Kelder, H. M.

    2005-11-01

    This study investigates the ability to derive height-resolved information on equatorial Kelvin wave activity from three different Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone profile data sets. The ozone profiles derived using the Ozone Profile Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) based on optimal estimation and the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) both show Kelvin wave signals in agreement with previously identified signals in the GOME total ozone columns. However, because of the inadequate vertical resolution, these two data sets are not able to resolve the vertical structure of the Kelvin wave activity. The third data set, consisting of assimilated OPERA ozone profiles, does provide height-resolved information on Kelvin wave activity that is consistent with results from the analysis of GOME total ozone columns and ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) temperature data. Largest Kelvin-wave-induced perturbations of up to 0.69 DU/km coincide with the maximum vertical gradient in ozone around 35 hPa and show an in-phase relationship with temperature perturbations in ERA-40 as expected from theoretical considerations. These results indicate that the ozone perturbations in the lower stratosphere and in the total column of ozone are transport related. Between 10 and 1 hPa, large Kelvin-wave-induced fluctuations in ozone mixing ratio are present that, however, because of their small contribution to the total column, do not constitute a large contribution to the total ozone column perturbations. The ozone perturbations between 10 and 1 hPa show an out-of-phase relationship with temperature perturbations in ERA-40, indicating that the perturbations can either be caused by transport effects or photochemical influences.

  17. Forty years of improvements in European air quality: regional policy-industry interactions with global impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Monica; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Dentener, Frank; Guizzardi, Diego; Sindelarova, Katerina; Muntean, Marilena; Van Dingenen, Rita; Granier, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The EDGARv4.3.1 (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research) global anthropogenic emissions inventory of gaseous (SO2, NOx, CO, non-methane volatile organic compounds and NH3) and particulate (PM10, PM2.5, black and organic carbon) air pollutants for the period 1970-2010 is used to develop retrospective air pollution emissions scenarios to quantify the roles and contributions of changes in energy consumption and efficiency, technology progress and end-of-pipe emission reduction measures and their resulting impact on health and crop yields at European and global scale. The reference EDGARv4.3.1 emissions include observed and reported changes in activity data, fuel consumption and air pollution abatement technologies over the past 4 decades, combined with Tier 1 and region-specific Tier 2 emission factors. Two further retrospective scenarios assess the interplay of policy and industry. The highest emission STAG_TECH scenario assesses the impact of the technology and end-of-pipe reduction measures in the European Union, by considering historical fuel consumption, along with a stagnation of technology with constant emission factors since 1970, and assuming no further abatement measures and improvement imposed by European emission standards. The lowest emission STAG_ENERGY scenario evaluates the impact of increased fuel consumption by considering unchanged energy consumption since the year 1970, but assuming the technological development, end-of-pipe reductions, fuel mix and energy efficiency of 2010. Our scenario analysis focuses on the three most important and most regulated sectors (power generation, manufacturing industry and road transport), which are subject to multi-pollutant European Union Air Quality regulations. Stagnation of technology and air pollution reduction measures at 1970 levels would have led to 129 % (or factor 2.3) higher SO2, 71 % higher NOx and 69 % higher PM2.5 emissions in Europe (EU27), demonstrating the large role that technology has

  18. Attributing Rise in Global Average Temperature to Emissions Traceable to Major Industrial Carbon Producer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, R. J.; Allen, M. R.; Dalton, M.; Ekwurzel, B.; Frumhoff, P. C.; Heede, R.

    2013-12-01

    The role of human activity on global climate change has been explored in attribution studies based on the total amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Until now, however, a direct link between emissions traced directly to the major carbon producers has not been addressed. The carbon majors dataset developed by Heede (in review) account for more than 60 percent of the cumulative worldwide emissions of industrial carbon dioxide and methane through 2010. We use a conventional energy balance model coupled to a diffusive ocean, based on Allen et al. 2009, to evaluate the global temperature response to forcing from cumulative emissions traced to these producers. The base case for comparison is the Relative Concentration Pathways 4.5 [RCP4.5 (Moss et al. 2012)] simulation. Sensitivity tests varying climate sensitivity, ocean thermal diffusivity, ocean/atmosphere carbon uptake diffusivity, deep ocean carbon advection, and the carbon cycle temperature-dependent feedback are used to assess whether the fractional attribution for these sources surpasses the uncertainty limits calculated from these parameters The results suggest this dataset can be utilized for an expanded field of climate change impacts. Allen, M. R., D. J. Frame, C. Huntingford, C. D. Jones, J. A. Lowe, M. Meinshausen and N. Meinshausen (2009), Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne, Nature, 458, 1163-1166, doi:10.1038/nature08019. Heede, R. (2013), Tracing anthropogenic carbon dioxide and methane emissions to fossil fuel and cement producers, 1854-2010, in review. Moss, R. H., et al. (2010), The next generation of scenarios for climate change research and assessment, Nature, 463, 747-756.

  19. Global antifungal profile optimization of chlorophenyl derivatives against Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Urra, Liane; Bustillo Pérez, Antonio J; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Pinedo-Rivilla, Cristina; Aleu, Josefina; Hernández-Galán, Rosario; Collado, Isidro G

    2009-06-10

    Twenty-two aromatic derivatives bearing a chlorine atom and a different chain in the para or meta position were prepared and evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. The results showed that maximum inhibition of the growth of these fungi was exhibited for enantiomers S and R of 1-(4'-chlorophenyl)-2-phenylethanol (3 and 4). Furthermore, their antifungal activity showed a clear structure-activity relationship (SAR) trend confirming the importance of the benzyl hydroxyl group in the inhibitory mechanism of the compounds studied. Additionally, a multiobjective optimization study of the global antifungal profile of chlorophenyl derivatives was conducted in order to establish a rational strategy for the filtering of new fungicide candidates from combinatorial libraries. The MOOP-DESIRE methodology was used for this purpose providing reliable ranking models that can be used later.

  20. 76 FR 81965 - Remanufactured Goods: An Overview of the U.S. and Global Industries, Markets, and Trade...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... COMMISSION Remanufactured Goods: An Overview of the U.S. and Global Industries, Markets, and Trade; Submission of Questionnaire for OMB Review AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: In... Office of Management and Budget for review. Purpose of Information Collection: The form is for use by...

  1. Assessment of the Impact of Globalization on the Introduction of Innovative Technology Companies in the Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaitseva, Natalia A.; Larionova, Anna A.; Yumatov, Konstantin V.; Korsunova, Natalia M.; Dmitrieva, Nina V.

    2016-01-01

    The importance and relevance of the study of the globalization effects on the introduction of innovative technologies in the hotel industry is difficult to overestimate, as only those hotels that are able to change with demographic, technological and economic changes, and to adapt to occurring changes, will be able to succeed. The aim of this work…

  2. 77 FR 11157 - Remanufactured Goods: An Overview of the U.S. and Global Industries, Markets, and Trade; Change...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Remanufactured Goods: An Overview of the U.S. and Global Industries, Markets, and Trade; Change in... Trade Commission (Commission) instituted investigation No. 332-525, Remanufactured Goods: An Overview of...

  3. Recent US Activities Toward Development of a Global Tropospheric 3D Wind Profiling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, B. M.; Atlas, R.; Baker, W.; Emmitt, G. D.; Hardesty, R. M.; Kakar, R. K.; Kavaya, M. J.; Mango, S.; Miller, K.; Riishojgaard, L. P.

    2008-12-01

    The wind field plays a unique dynamical role in forcing the mass field to adjust to it at all scales in the tropics, and at small scales in the extra-tropics. Because of this unique role, knowledge of the wind field is required to accurately specify the global initial conditions for numerical weather forecasting. In addition to improving numerical weather prediction, there is also a need for improved accuracy of wind fields to assess long term sensitivity of the general circulation to climate change and to improve horizontal and vertical transport estimates of important atmospheric constituents. In spite of the significance, the 3-D structure of the wind field remains largely unobserved on a global scale. A new satellite mission to accurately measure the global wind field would fill this important gap in the Global Observing System. Space-based Doppler wind lidar has been identified as the key technology necessary to meet the global wind profiling requirement. The 2007 NRC Decadal Survey for Earth Science lists a Global Tropospheric 3-D Wind mission as one of the 15 priority missions recommended for NASA in the next decade. The NRC survey recommended a two phase approach to achieving an operational global wind measurement capability. The first recommended step is for NASA to develop the technology and fly a pre-operational mission to demonstrate the technology and measurement concept and establish the performance standards for an operational wind mission. Phase two would be to develop and fly an operational wind system in the 2025 timeframe. The technology approach recommended is a hybrid Doppler wind lidar (HDWL). The HDWL takes advantage of the complementary capabilities of two Doppler lidar technologies, a coherent Doppler lidar sensing winds from the aerosol backscattered laser signal at a wavelength of 2 microns and a direct detection Doppler lidar sensing winds from the molecular backscattered laser signal at 355 nm. The direct detection Doppler system

  4. Global Renal Gene Expression Profiling Analysis in B2-Kinin Receptor Null Mice: Impact of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaffa, Miran A.; Kobeissy, Firas; Al Hariri, Moustafa; Chalhoub, Hussein; Eid, Assaad; Ziyadeh, Fuad N.; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), the leading cause of end-stage renal failure, is clinically manifested by albuminuria and a progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate. The risk factors and mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of DN are still incompletely defined. To address the involvement of bradykinin B2-receptors (B2R) in DN, we used a genome wide approach to study the effects of diabetes on differential renal gene expression profile in wild type and B2R knockout (B2R−/−) mice. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin and plasma glucose levels and albumin excretion rate (AER) were measured at predetermined times throughout the 23 week study period. Longitudinal analysis of AER indicated that diabetic B2R−/−D null mice had a significantly decreased AER levels compared to wild type B2R+/+D mice (P = 0.0005). Results from the global microarray study comparing gene expression profiles among four groups of mice respectively: (B2R+/+C, B2R+/+D, B2R−/−C and B2R−/−D) highlighted the role of several altered pathological pathways in response to disruption of B2R and to the diabetic state that included: endothelial injury, oxidative stress, insulin and lipid metabolism and inflammatory process with a marked alteration in the pro-apoptotic genes. The findings of the present study provide a global genomics view of biomarkers that highlight the mechanisms and putative pathways involved in DN. PMID:23028588

  5. Global industrial impact coefficient based on random walk process and inter-country input-output table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lizhi; Dong, Xianlei; Guan, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Input-output table is very comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with lots of economic relationships, which contains supply and demand information among industrial sectors. The complex network, a theory and method for measuring the structure of complex system, can describe the structural characteristics of the internal structure of the research object by measuring the structural indicators of the social and economic system, revealing the complex relationship between the inner hierarchy and the external economic function. This paper builds up GIVCN-WIOT models based on World Input-Output Database in order to depict the topological structure of Global Value Chain (GVC), and assumes the competitive advantage of nations is equal to the overall performance of its domestic sectors' impact on the GVC. Under the perspective of econophysics, Global Industrial Impact Coefficient (GIIC) is proposed to measure the national competitiveness in gaining information superiority and intermediate interests. Analysis of GIVCN-WIOT models yields several insights including the following: (1) sectors with higher Random Walk Centrality contribute more to transmitting value streams within the global economic system; (2) Half-Value Ratio can be used to measure robustness of open-economy macroeconomics in the process of globalization; (3) the positive correlation between GIIC and GDP indicates that one country's global industrial impact could reveal its international competitive advantage.

  6. Meteorological profiles comparison from global models and experimental radiosoundings at the Antarctica station of Belgrano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, J. A.; Yela, M.; Parrondo, M. C.; Ochoa, H.; Gil, M.

    2012-04-01

    Ozonesoundings are launched from Antarctic Belgrano station (77.87S, 34.62W) since 1999 in the framework of an extensive stratospheric trace-gas measurement program. In the frame of VIOLIN (Extended Vertical Investigation of the Ozone Layer In ANtarctica) project and as a previous step in the application of meteorological models, a comparison-validation exercise has been carried out using simulations and experimental profiles. The aim is to assess the reliability of the meteorological files obtained from global models which could be used as input data in models of higher spatial resolution. Meteorological profiles (potential temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction) have been obtained from ECMWF and NCEP-GDAS models with a spatial resolution of 1°x1° and 14 vertical levels from 950 to 500 mb. The simulated profiles have been compared with in situ soundings at Belgrano. A total of 83 soundings covering the period from 2009 to 2010 have been used. Data have been grouped in three period's: diurnal, nocturnal and transition diurnal-nocturnal or vice versa. The comparison has been performed with the statistical root mean square deviation (RMSD) and BIAS for the four meteorological variables. Results show that potential temperature using both models and wind speed with NCEP-GDAS are underestimated while the rest of parameters are overestimated. The RMSD of the potential temperature ranges between 1.7 and 3.2 °C with a BIAS of -0.18 to -0.74 °C. No differences were found according to the time of the year. The relative humidity analysis shows a RMSD between 21.4 and 30.2 % while the BIAS was ranging from 9.9 to 14.8 %. Best results have been obtained in the transition period. For the wind speed the RMSD oscillate between 2.9 and 4.9 m/s with a BIAS from -0.35 to 0.31 m/s. The wind direction is the parameter with the highest differences, RMSD between 68 and 104°, with a BIAS from 34 to 62°. The highest differences have been found for the diurnal period

  7. Global target profile of the kinase inhibitor bosutinib in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Remsing Rix, L L; Rix, U; Colinge, J; Hantschel, O; Bennett, K L; Stranzl, T; Müller, A; Baumgartner, C; Valent, P; Augustin, M; Till, J H; Superti-Furga, G

    2009-03-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of action of second-generation BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including perturbed targets and pathways, should contribute to rationalized therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or in other affected diseases. Here, we characterized the target profile of the dual SRC/ABL inhibitor bosutinib employing a two-tiered approach using chemical proteomics to identify natural binders in whole cell lysates of primary CML and K562 cells in parallel to in vitro kinase assays against a large recombinant kinase panel. The combined strategy resulted in a global survey of bosutinib targets comprised of over 45 novel tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. We have found clear differences in the target patterns of bosutinib in primary CML cells versus the K562 cell line. A comparison of bosutinib with dasatinib across the whole kinase panel revealed overlapping, but distinct, inhibition profiles. Common among those were the SRC, ABL and TEC family kinases. Bosutinib did not inhibit KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, but prominently targeted the apoptosis-linked STE20 kinases. Although in vivo bosutinib is inactive against ABL T315I, we found this clinically important mutant to be enzymatically inhibited in the mid-nanomolar range. Finally, bosutinib is the first kinase inhibitor shown to target CAMK2G, recently implicated in myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

  8. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in developing physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Pingzhi; Zhang, Sheng; Song, Chi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jia, Yongxia; Fang, Xiaohua; Chen, Fan; Wu, Guojiang

    2012-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP). The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29-41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production.

  9. Cacao diseases: a global perspective from an industry point of view.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Prakash K

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT Diseases of cacao, Theobroma cacao, account for losses of more than 30% of the potential crop. These losses have caused a steady decline in production and a reduction in bean quality in almost all the cacao-producing areas in the world, especially in small-holder farms in Latin America and West Africa. The most significant diseases are witches' broom, caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa, which occurs mainly in South America; frosty pod rot, caused by M. roreri, which occurs mainly in Central and northern South America; and black pod disease, caused by several species of Phytophthora, which are distributed throughout the tropics. In view of the threat that these diseases pose to the sustainability of the cacao crop, Mars Inc. and their industry partners have funded collaborative research involving cacao research institutes and governmental and nongovernmental agencies. The objective of this global initiative is to develop short- to medium-term, low-cost, environmentally friendly disease-management strategies until disease tolerant varieties are widely available. These include good farming practices, biological control and the rational or minimal use of chemicals that could be used for integrated pest management (IPM). Farmer field schools are used to get these technologies to growers. This paper describes some of the key collaborative partners and projects that are underway in South America and West Africa.

  10. Global expression profiling of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to trace levels of free cadmium.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dana F; Descombes, Patrick; Zerges, William; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2008-08-01

    In the natural environment, cadmium is often found as a trace contaminant. Due to the complexity of Cd speciation and the heterogeneity of natural systems and processes, it is often difficult to determine clear relationships between analytical measurements of Cd and its induced biological response. Measurements of gene induction can be used to identify molecular mechanisms underlying toxicity and to quantify sublethal responses to trace contaminants. In the present paper, genes that could be involved in the tolerance of Cd to green algae were examined using two global transcriptome profiling strategies. Microarray and differential display techniques were used for a global transcriptome analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to micromolar and lower Cd(2+) concentrations for a short period (2 h). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that a small set of 10 genes was differentially expressed in response to trace Cd(2+) exposures ranging from 7.8 nM to 9.0 microM. Since induction was only observed for a few genes, none of which are known to function in a general stress response, it was likely the result of relevant responses to Cd exposure. The identified genes are discussed with respect to their possible involvement in Cd tolerance and to their future use as biomarkers for monitoring Cd bioavailability in natural soils and waters.

  11. [Global expression profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: metabolic remodeling in post-log phase].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanrui; Tang, Yuqian; Chen, Hongyun; Zheng, Suiping; Pan, Li; Lin, Ying

    2008-06-01

    For the purpose of revealing the mechanism of the reduction of yeasts ethanol production rate after entrance of post-log phase, we used microarray to study expression profiles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the transition from mid-log growth phase to post-log growth. The results demonstrate that the global pattern of gene expression is very stable during the mid-log phase. However, a dramatic metabolic remodeling was found when the yeast entries post-log phase, during which many of amino acid synthesis and metabolism related genes are up-regulated, moreover, ion transport, energy generation and storage related genes are also up regulated during this phase, while a large number of genes involved in transposition and DNA recombination are repressed. Central metabolic pathways also engage in metabolic remodeling, within which the genes involved in succinate and a-ketoglutarate synthesis pathways are up regulated, accordance with those of amino acid synthesis and metabolism. These results demonstrate that the increasing demand for amino acids in post-log phase lead to a metabolic transition into TCA cycle and glyoxylate cycle, which subsequently reduce the ethanol production rate. This suggests a global insight into the process of yeast ethanol fermentation.

  12. The global gene expression profile of the secondary transition during pancreatic development.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Stefanie J; Mueller, Nikola S; Engert, Silvia; Sterr, Michael; Burtscher, Ingo; Raducanu, Aurelia; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Sass, Steffen; Theis, Fabian J; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas organogenesis is a highly dynamic process where neighboring tissue interactions lead to dynamic changes in gene regulatory networks that orchestrate endocrine, exocrine, and ductal lineage formation. To understand the spatio-temporal regulatory logic we have used the Forkhead transcription factor Foxa2-Venus fusion (FVF) knock-in reporter mouse to separate the FVF(+) pancreatic epithelium from the FVF(−) surrounding tissue (mesenchyme, neurons, blood, and blood vessels) to perform a genome-wide mRNA expression profiling at embryonic days (E) 12.5-15.5. Annotating genes and molecular processes suggest that FVF marks endoderm-derived multipotent epithelial progenitors at several lineage restriction steps, when the bulk of endocrine, exocrine and ductal cells are formed during the secondary transition. In the pancreatic epithelial compartment, we identified most known endocrine and exocrine lineage determining factors and diabetes-associated genes, but also unknown genes with spatio-temporal regulated pancreatic expression. In the non-endoderm-derived compartment, we identified many well-described regulatory genes that are not yet functionally annotated in pancreas development, emphasizing that neighboring tissue interactions are still ill defined. Pancreatic expression of over 635 genes was analyzed with them RNA in situ hybridization Genepaint public database. This validated the quality of the profiling data set and identified hundreds of genes with spatially restricted expression patterns in the pancreas. Some of these genes are also targeted by pancreatic transcription factors and show active chromatin marks in human islets of Langerhans. Thus, with the highest spatio-temporal resolution of a global gene expression profile during the secondary transition, our study enables to shed light on neighboring tissue interactions, developmental timing and diabetes gene regulation.

  13. Testing a dynamic global vegetation model for pre-industrial and Last Glacial Maximum boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handiani, Dian N.; Rachmayani, Rima; Paul, André; Dupont, Lydie M.

    2010-05-01

    Achieving better comparison between dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) with pollen or plant data is important for the climate-vegetation modeling community. Our study tried to find a scheme that can be applied consistently to compare DGVMs with pollen data sets. We tested two models, the Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics (TRIFFID) and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM), which we both ran for pre-industrial boundary conditions. In addition, we ran the TRIFFID model using boundary conditions for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~19,000- 23,000 years before present). For comparisons, we used the modern vegetation of the BIOME4 model and the reconstruction for the year 18000 after pollen data from the BIOME6000 (Version 4.2) project. Differences in the number of PFTs in each DGVMs lead to different results of the biome distribution even if models and data qualitatively agree. In the CLM-DGVM pre-industrial run, northern South America is covered by savanna or desert biome, which is associated with more growing degree days and lower rates of precipitation. Meanwhile, the TRIFFID model simulated a tropical forest in northern South America and a desert biome in Australia, probably because of higher values of growing degree days and different precipitation rates, which is lower in South America and higher in Australia. The climate parameters from both models show a similar pattern as in the BIOME4 model, but the values are higher in the DGVMs. Biome distributions of the pre-industrial simulation show similarities and differences between dynamic vegetation modeling and data reconstructions. Both models reveal a fair agreement simulating savanna and desert biomes around the Sahel, tropical forest in western Africa, boreal forest in eastern North America and in Siberia, and tundra in northern Canada. Some discrepancies appear in South America and Africa, where pollen data indicate a combination of

  14. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  15. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up

    PubMed Central

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I.; Allwood, J. William; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham

    2015-01-01

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  16. Taxonomic profiling and metagenome analysis of a microbial community from a habitat contaminated with industrial discharges.

    PubMed

    Shah, Varun; Zakrzewski, Martha; Wibberg, Daniel; Eikmeyer, Felix; Schlüter, Andreas; Madamwar, Datta

    2013-10-01

    Industrial units, manufacturing dyes, chemicals,solvents, and xenobiotic compounds, produce liquid and solid wastes, which upon conventional treatment are released in the nearby environment and thus are the major cause of pollution. Soil collected from contaminated Kharicut Canalbank (N 22°57.878′; E 072°38.478′), Ahmeda bad, Gujarat,India was used for metagenomic DNA preparation to study the capabilities of intrinsic microbial community in dealing with xenobiotics. Sequencing of metagenomic DNA on the Genome Sequencer FLX System using titanium chemistry resulted in 409,782 reads accounting for 133,529,997 bases of sequence information. Taxonomic analyses and gene annotations were carried out using the bioinformatics platform Sequence Analysis and Management System for Metagenomic Datasets. Taxonomic profiling was carried out by three different complementary approaches: (a) 16S rDNA, (b) environmental gene tags, and (c) lowest common ancestor. The most abundant phylum and genus were found to be “Proteobacteria”and “Pseudomonas,” respectively. Metagenome reads were mapped on sequenced microbial genomes and the highest numbers of reads were allocated to Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501. Assignment of obtained metagenome reads to Gene Ontology terms, Clusters of Orthologous Groups of protein categories, protein family numbers, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes hits revealed genomic potential of indigenous microbial community. In total, 157,024 reads corresponded to 37,028 different KEGG hits, and amongst them, 11,574 reads corresponded to 131 different enzymes potentially involved in xenobiotic biodegradation. These enzymes were mapped on biodegradation pathways of xenobiotics to elucidate their roles in possible catalytic reactions. Consequently, information obtained from the present study will act as a baseline which, subsequently along with other“-omic” studies, will help in designing future bioremediation strategies in effluent treatment

  17. Estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions from industrial and domestic wastewater treatment. Final report, September 1994-March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, M.R.J.; Strait, R.P.; Barnard, W.R.; Eklund, B.

    1997-09-01

    The report summarizes the findings of field tests and provides emission factors for methane (CH4) and nitorus oxide (N2O) from wastewater treatment (WWT). It also includes country-specific activity data on industrial and domestic WWT which were used to develop country-specific emission estimates for CH4 and N2O. The report concludes that WWT is unlikely to be a significant source of volatile organic carbon and carbon dioxide emissions. The biggest contributor to industrial CH4 emissions from WWT is the pulp and paper industry in developing and Eastern European countries. The second principal contributor to CH4 emissions from WWT is the meat and poultry industry. Russia is believed to be the largest contributor. CH4 emissions from untreated domestic wastewater may be many times higher than those of treated wastewater. The report provides rough estimates for global N2O emissions from WWT.

  18. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  19. Collaboration between the Stanford Rock Fracture Project and the Petroleum Industry: A mutually beneficial enterprise resulting from global necessities

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, A.; Pollard, D.D.

    1995-08-01

    The collaboration between the Stanford Rock Fracture Project (RFP) and industrial affiliates stems from RFP`s need to obtain support for its research activities and access to unpublished data and facilities owned by the affiliates, and from industry`s need to keep up with recent advances in the science and technology of predicting and characterizing fractures and faults in reservoirs and their flow properties with the lowest possible investment. It appears that a concerted effort by the US Government to encourage the application of results from ever decreasing federally-funded research to societal problems is the driving force for the former, and a desire to leverage and outsource research is behind the latter. Indeed, industry support provides a stabile funding to RFP, and in turn, the RFP provides a work force of 2 professors, 4 postdoctoral scientists and 14 graduate students along with state-of-the art educational and research facilities for an investment with a leverage ratio of better than 25 to 1. We present three different interaction schemes with examples that have proved to be workable for university-industry collaboration within the framework of RFP: (1) University personnel using data and facilities from industrial affiliates; (2) industry personnel bringing themselves up to date in university workshops and facilities; and (3) joint team from industry and university working on an actual fractured reservoir characterization problem. Global conditions related to changing government funding patterns and to changing strategy for in-house research in industry have motivated us to build this university-industry collaboration which, in turn, made it possible to assemble a team of scientists of unprecedented size and expertise dedicated to research in rock fracturing and its impact on reservoir performance.

  20. The Energy Industry Profile of ISO/DIS 19115-1: Facilitating Discovery and Evaluation of, and Access to Distributed Information Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, S. J.; Richard, S. M.; Doniger, A.; Danko, D. M.; Derenthal, L.; Energistics Metadata Work Group

    2011-12-01

    A diverse group of organizations representative of the international community involved in disciplines relevant to the upstream petroleum industry, - energy companies, - suppliers and publishers of information to the energy industry, - vendors of software applications used by the industry, - partner government and academic organizations, has engaged in the Energy Industry Metadata Standards Initiative. This Initiative envisions the use of standard metadata within the community to enable significant improvements in the efficiency with which users discover, evaluate, and access distributed information resources. The metadata standard needed to realize this vision is the initiative's primary deliverable. In addition to developing the metadata standard, the initiative is promoting its adoption to accelerate realization of the vision, and publishing metadata exemplars conformant with the standard. Implementation of the standard by community members, in the form of published metadata which document the information resources each organization manages, will allow use of tools requiring consistent metadata for efficient discovery and evaluation of, and access to, information resources. While metadata are expected to be widely accessible, access to associated information resources may be more constrained. The initiative is being conducting by Energistics' Metadata Work Group, in collaboration with the USGIN Project. Energistics is a global standards group in the oil and natural gas industry. The Work Group determined early in the initiative, based on input solicited from 40+ organizations and on an assessment of existing metadata standards, to develop the target metadata standard as a profile of a revised version of ISO 19115, formally the "Energy Industry Profile of ISO/DIS 19115-1 v1.0" (EIP). The Work Group is participating on the ISO/TC 211 project team responsible for the revision of ISO 19115, now ready for "Draft International Standard" (DIS) status. With ISO 19115 an

  1. Impacts of the globalized economy on the environment: the tanning industry in the Vale do Rio dos Sinos.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Sganderla, J A; Prodanov, C C; Daroit, D

    2010-12-01

    This case study analysed the impact of the global economy on the environment of the Vale do Rio do Sinos region in southern Brazil. Interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data from social, cultural, economic and political agents in this region, and documents about the tanning industry were reviewed and analysed. Global perspectives and local conditions were brought together to understand the causes and consequences of social, political and economic structures and to evaluate the intrinsic association of the tanning industry with the social, historical and cultural development of the Vale do Rio dos Sinos. The behaviour of the local community, where individuals believe that progress is primordially based on industrial development and go to any lengths to achieve it, was also studied. The analysis of industries that have a high contamination potential revealed that dirty industries moved from central to peripheral countries up to the 1980s, but movement is currently internal and occurs between states in Brazil due to several types of incentives.

  2. An exploratory study of services marketing in global markets: major areas of inquiry for the health care services industry.

    PubMed

    Young, S; Erdem, S A

    1996-01-01

    It has been stated that one of the major challenges for the international marketer is the design of an efficient strategy for marketing services to international markets. This paper reviews some of the issues associated with services marketing in global markets along with the basic variables of service industries. An exploratory assessment of the health care services industry results in a list composed of several inquiry areas which should be examined by multinational companies. It is hoped that the review of the issues raised in this paper provides a basis for decision making and further research.

  3. Global Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Developing Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Pingzhi; Zhang, Sheng; Song, Chi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jia, Yongxia; Fang, Xiaohua; Chen, Fan; Wu, Guojiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP). The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29–41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. Conclusions/Significance The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production. PMID:22574177

  4. Global Analysis of Transcriptome Responses and Gene Expression Profiles to Cold Stress of Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Zou, Zhurong; Wang, Shasha; Gong, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Jatropha curcas L., also called the Physic nut, is an oil-rich shrub with multiple uses, including biodiesel production, and is currently exploited as a renewable energy resource in many countries. Nevertheless, because of its origin from the tropical MidAmerican zone, J. curcas confers an inherent but undesirable characteristic (low cold resistance) that may seriously restrict its large-scale popularization. This adaptive flaw can be genetically improved by elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to cold temperatures. The newly developed Illumina Hiseq™ 2000 RNA-seq and Digital Gene Expression (DGE) are deep high-throughput approaches for gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level, using which we carefully investigated the gene expression profiles in response to cold stress to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of cold response in J. curcas. Results In total, 45,251 unigenes were obtained by assembly of clean data generated by RNA-seq analysis of the J. curcas transcriptome. A total of 33,363 and 912 complete or partial coding sequences (CDSs) were determined by protein database alignments and ESTScan prediction, respectively. Among these unigenes, more than 41.52% were involved in approximately 128 known metabolic or signaling pathways, and 4,185 were possibly associated with cold resistance. DGE analysis was used to assess the changes in gene expression when exposed to cold condition (12°C) for 12, 24, and 48 h. The results showed that 3,178 genes were significantly upregulated and 1,244 were downregulated under cold stress. These genes were then functionally annotated based on the transcriptome data from RNA-seq analysis. Conclusions This study provides a global view of transcriptome response and gene expression profiling of J. curcas in response to cold stress. The results can help improve our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant cold resistance and favor the screening of crucial genes for

  5. Global metabolomic profiling targeting childhood obesity in the Hispanic population12

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Nancy F; Liu, Yan; Zakeri, Issa F; Mohney, Robert P; Mehta, Nitesh; Voruganti, V Saroja; Göring, Harald; Cole, Shelley A; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolomics may unravel important biological pathways involved in the pathophysiology of childhood obesity. Objectives: We aimed to 1) identify metabolites that differ significantly between nonobese and obese Hispanic children; 2) collapse metabolites into principal components (PCs) associated with obesity and metabolic risk, specifically hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperleptinemia, and hyperuricemia; and 3) identify metabolites associated with energy expenditure and fat oxidation. Design: This trial was a cross-sectional observational study of metabolomics by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analyses performed on fasting plasma samples from 353 nonobese and 450 obese Hispanic children. Results: Branched-chained amino acids (BCAAs) (Leu, Ile, and Val) and their catabolites, propionylcarnitine and butyrylcarnitine, were significantly elevated in obese children. Strikingly lower lysolipids and dicarboxylated fatty acids were seen in obese children. Steroid derivatives were markedly higher in obese children as were markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. PC6 (BCAAs and aromatic AAs) and PC10 (asparagine, glycine, and serine) made the largest contributions to body mass index, and PC10 and PC12 (acylcarnitines) made the largest contributions to adiposity. Metabolic risk factors and total energy expenditure were associated with PC6, PC9 (AA and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites), and PC10. Fat oxidation was inversely related to PC8 (lysolipids) and positively related to PC16 (acylcarnitines). Conclusions: Global metabolomic profiling in nonobese and obese children replicates the increased BCAA and acylcarnitine catabolism and changes in nucleotides, lysolipids, and inflammation markers seen in obese adults; however, a strong signature of reduced fatty acid catabolism and increased steroid derivatives may be unique to obese children. Metabolic

  6. Global gene profiling of aging lungs in Atp8b1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Stearns, Timothy M.; Czachor, Alexander; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Turn, Christina; Westermann-Clark, Emma; Breitzig, Mason; Tan, Lee; Lockey, Richard F.; King, Benjamin L.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies implicate cardiolipin oxidation in several age-related diseases. Atp8b1 encoding Type 4 P-type ATPases is a cardiolipin transporter. Mutation in Atp8b1 gene or inflammation of the lungs impairs the capacity of Atp8b1 to clear cardiolipin from lung fluid. However, the link between Atp8b1 mutation and age-related gene alteration is unknown. Therefore, we investigated how Atp8b1 mutation alters age-related genes. Methods We performed Affymetrix gene profiling of lungs isolated from young (7-9 wks, n=6) and aged (14 months, 14 M, n=6) C57BL/6 and Atp8b1 mutant mice. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed. Differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results Global transcriptome analysis revealed 532 differentially expressed genes in Atp8b1 lungs, 157 differentially expressed genes in C57BL/6 lungs, and 37 overlapping genes. IPA of age-related genes in Atp8b1 lungs showed enrichment of Xenobiotic metabolism and Nrf2-mediated signaling pathways. The increase in Adamts2 and Mmp13 transcripts in aged Atp8b1 lungs was validated by qRT-PCR. Similarly, the decrease in Col1a1 and increase in Cxcr6 transcripts was confirmed in both Atp8b1 mutant and C57BL/6 lungs. Conclusion Based on transcriptome profiling, our study indicates that Atp8b1 mutant mice may be susceptible to age-related lung diseases. PMID:27689529

  7. Global Expression Profiling of Globose Basal Cells and Neurogenic Progression Within the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Krolewski, Richard C.; Packard, Adam; Schwob, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion. PMID:22847514

  8. Global gene expression profiling in infants with acute respiratory syncytial virus broncholitis demonstrates systemic activation of interferon signaling networks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections and has a high impact on pediatric emergency department utilization. Variation in host response may influence the pathogenesis and disease severity. We evaluated global gene expression profiles to be...

  9. PollyNET: a global network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, H.; Kanitz, T.; Engelmann, R.; Althausen, D.; Heese, B.; Komppula, M.; Preißler, J.; Tesche, M.; Ansmann, A.; Wandinger, U.; Lim, J.-H.; Ahn, J. Y.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Seifert, P.; Hofer, J.; Skupin, A.; Schneider, F.; Bohlmann, S.; Foth, A.; Bley, S.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Viisanen, Y.; Hooda, R. K.; Pereira, S.; Bortoli, D.; Wagner, F.; Mattis, I.; Janicka, L.; Markowicz, K. M.; Achtert, P.; Artaxo, P.; Pauliquevis, T.; Souza, R. A. F.; Sharma, V. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Beukes, J. P.; Sun, J. Y.; Rohwer, E. G.; Deng, R.; Mamouri, R. E.; Zamorano, F.

    2015-10-01

    A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly) for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design and apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at http://polly.tropos.de. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash) are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  10. Integrated Left Ventricular Global Transcriptome and Proteome Profiling in Human End-Stage Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Namik; Muiya, Nzioka P.; AlHarazi, Olfat; Shinwari, Zakia; Andres, Editha

    2016-01-01

    Aims The disease pathways leading to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are still elusive. The present study investigated integrated global transcriptional and translational changes in human DCM for disease biomarker discovery. Methods We used identical myocardial tissues from five DCM hearts compared to five non-failing (NF) donor hearts for both transcriptome profiling using the ABI high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and proteome expression with One-Dimensional Nano Acquity liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on the Synapt G2 system. Results We identified 1262 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 269 proteins (DEPs) between DCM cases and healthy controls. Among the most significantly upregulated (>5-fold) proteins were GRK5, APOA2, IGHG3, ANXA6, HSP90AA1, and ATP5C1 (p< 0.01). On the other hand, the most significantly downregulated proteins were GSTM5, COX17, CAV1 and ANXA3. At least ten entities were concomitantly upregulated on the two analysis platforms: GOT1, ALDH4A1, PDHB, BDH1, SLC2A11, HSP90AA1, HSP90AB1, H2AFV, HSPA5 and NDUFV1. Gene ontology analyses of DEGs and DEPs revealed significant overlap with enrichment of genes/proteins related to metabolic process, biosynthetic process, cellular component organization, oxidative phosphorylation, alterations in glycolysis and ATP synthesis, Alzheimer’s disease, chemokine-mediated inflammation and cytokine signalling pathways. Conclusion The concomitant use of transcriptome and proteome expression to evaluate global changes in DCM has led to the identification of sixteen commonly altered entities as well as novel genes, proteins and pathways whose cardiac functions have yet to be deciphered. This data should contribute towards better management of the disease. PMID:27711126

  11. Development of an inventory and temporal allocation profiles of emissions from power plants and industrial facilities in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Bich Thao; Manomaiphiboon, Kasemsan; Vongmahadlek, Chatchawan

    2008-07-01

    An emission inventory (EI) of power plants and industrial (i.e., non-power plant) facilities in Thailand was developed. Emissions considered are those from fuel consumption (i.e., combustion) for power plants and those from both fuel consumption and industrial processes (i.e., non-combustion) for industrial facilities. For power plants, total annual emissions due to fuel consumption are 107.9 x 10(3) ton NOx (as NO2), 146.2 x 10(3) ton SO2, 6.1 x 10(3) ton NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compounds), 47.0 x 10(3) ton CO, 1.8 x 10(3) ton NH3, 1.5 x 10(3) ton OC (organic carbon), and 1.5 x 10(3) ton BC (black carbon). For industrial facilities, total annual emissions due to fuel consumption are 111.4 x 10(3) ton NOx (as NO2), 476.9 x 10(3) ton SO2, 33.4 x 10(3) ton NMVOC, 193.1 x 10(3) ton CO, 1.6 x 10(3) ton NH3, 8.5 x 10(3) ton OC, and 8.0 x 10(3) ton BC. Among various industrial types, Food and Beverage, Chemical, and Non-Metal industries are dominant emitters. Total annual emissions due to industrial processes are 79.2 x 10(3) ton SO2, 76.0 x 10(3) ton NMVOC, and 4.8 x 10(3) ton CO. The Central and Eastern regions combined contribute considerably to total emissions for most emission species. Emission estimates found here show fair agreement with those in some selected past studies. A crude estimation of potential fugitive NMVOC emissions specifically from petroleum industry was also made, and the estimates found could be considered significant (nearly half of NMVOC emissions from industrial processes). Several temporal allocation profiles of emissions were also developed and suggested for power plants and industrial facilities, including monthly, daily, and hourly profiles.

  12. The Impact of Globalization on the U.S. Defense Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Ford and General Motors were assembling cars in 24 countries in 1928 ( Sturgeon & Florida, 2000). The term globalization was first used and identified...design and marketing ( Sturgeon & Florida, 2000). Moreover, the source of competitive pressure is shifting from the globalization of markets to the...governing the spatially dispersed networks of plants, affiliates, and suppliers ( Sturgeon & Florida, 2000). When globalization is viewed through

  13. Assessing the impacts of global competition on the Appalachian hardwood industry

    Treesearch

    Urs Buehlmann; Matthew Bumgardner; Al Schuler; Mark Barford

    2007-01-01

    The membership of the Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers, Inc. was surveyed in 2005 to determine the perceived impacts of globalization on large Appalachian sawmills. While much has been written regarding the impacts of globalization on secondary manufacturing, less is known about primary links in the hardwood supply chain. The results suggested that globalization...

  14. Profile of the rubber and plastics industry. EPA Office of Compliance sector notebook project

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The rubber and miscellaneous plastics products industry, as defined by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 30, includes establishments that manufacture products from plastic resins, natural and synthetic rubber, reclaimed rubber, futta percha, balata, and gutta siak. The second section provides background information on the size, geographic distribution, employment, production, sales, and economic condition of the Rubber and Plastics Products industry. The type of facilities described within the document are also described in terms of their Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes. Additionally, this section contains a list of the largest companies in terms of sales.

  15. Global LINE-1 DNA methylation is associated with blood glycaemic and lipid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Mark S; McConnell, James C; Potter, Catherine; Barrett, Laura M; Parker, Louise; Mathers, John C; Relton, Caroline L

    2012-01-01

    Background Patterns of DNA methylation change with age and these changes are believed to be associated with the development of common complex diseases. The hypothesis that Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element 1 (LINE-1) DNA methylation (an index of global DNA methylation) is associated with biomarkers of metabolic health was investigated in this study. Methods Global LINE-1 DNA methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing in blood-derived DNA samples from 228 individuals, aged 49–51 years, from the Newcastle Thousand Families Study (NTFS). Associations between log-transformed LINE-1 DNA methylation levels and anthropometric and blood biochemical measurements, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, fasting glucose and insulin secretion and resistance were examined. Results Linear regression, after adjustment for sex, demonstrated positive associations between log-transformed LINE-1 DNA methylation and fasting glucose {coefficient 2.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39–5.22]}, total cholesterol [4.76 (95% CI 1.43–8.10)], triglycerides [3.83 (95% CI 1.30–6.37)] and LDL-cholesterol [5.38 (95% CI 2.12–8.64)] concentrations. A negative association was observed between log-transformed LINE-1 methylation and both HDL cholesterol concentration [−1.43 (95% CI −2.38 to −0.48)] and HDL:LDL ratio [−1.06 (95% CI −1.76 to −0.36)]. These coefficients reflect the millimoles per litre change in biochemical measurements per unit increase in log-transformed LINE-1 methylation. Conclusions These novel associations between global LINE-1 DNA methylation and blood glycaemic and lipid profiles highlight a potential role for epigenetic biomarkers as predictors of metabolic disease and may be relevant to future diagnosis, prevention and treatment of this group of disorders. Further work is required to establish the role of confounding and reverse causation in the observed associations

  16. Megha-Tropiques/SAPHIR measurements of humidity profiles: validation with AIRS and global radiosonde network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Kumar, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical profiles of humidity measured by SAPHIR (Sondeur Atmospherique du Profil d' Humidité Intropicale par Radiométrie) on-board Megha-Tropiques satellite are validated using Atmosphere Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and ground based radiosonde observations during July-September 2012. SAPHIR provides humidity profiles at six pressure layers viz., 1000-850 (level 1), 850-700 (level 2), 700-550 (level 3), 550-400 (level 4) 400-250 (level 5) and 250-100(level 6) hPa. Segregated AIRS observations over land and oceanic regions are used to assess the performance of SAPHIR quantitatively. The regression analysis over oceanic region (125° W-180° W; 30° S-30° N) reveal that the SAPHIR measurements agrees very well with the AIRS measurements at levels 3, 4, 5 and 6 with correlation coefficients 0.79, 0.88, 0.87 and 0.78 respectively. However, at level 6 SAPHIR seems to be systematically underestimating the AIRS measurements. At level 2, the agreement is reasonably good with correlation coefficient of 0.52 and at level 1 the agreement is very poor with correlation coefficient 0.17. The regression analysis over land region (10° W-30° E; 8° N-30° N) revealed an excellent correlation between AIRS and SAPHIR at all the six levels with 0.80, 0.78, 0.84, 0.84, 0.86 and 0.65 respectively. However, again at levels 5 and 6, SAPHIR seems to be underestimating the AIRS measurements. After carrying out the quantitative comparison between SAPHIR and AIRS separately over land and ocean, the ground based global radiosonde network observations of humidity profiles over three distinct geographical locations (East Asia, tropical belt of South and North America and South Pacific) are then used to further validate the SAPHIR observations as AIRS has its own limitations. The SAPHIR observations within a radius of 50 km around the radiosonde stations are averaged and then the regression analysis is carried out at the first five levels of SAPHIR. The comparison is not carried out at sixth

  17. [Improvement of natamycin production in an industrial strain by heterologous expression of the afsRS(cla) global regulatory genes].

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhengsheng; Wang, Yemin; Zheng, Hualiang; Tao, Meifeng

    2015-05-01

    The afsRS(cla) global regulatory genes from Streptomyces clavuligerus activate the production of two antibiotics in Streptomyces lividans. In this study, we gained an increase of 38% in the production of natamycin (3.56 g/L) in an industrial strain Streptomyces gilvosporeus TZ1401 through the integration of pHL851 that bears the afsRS(cla) global regulatory genes into its genome. We discovered by quantitive real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that the expression of 6 genes of the natamycin biosynthetic gene cluster were improved from 1.9 to 2.7 times. This suggests that afsRS(cla) improve the production of natamycin through increased transcription. This study provides a good example for applying afsRS(cla) in high yield breeding of industrial antibiotic producers.

  18. Virtual karyotyping of pluripotent stem cells on the basis of their global gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri; Mayshar, Yoav; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-05-01

    The genomic instability of stem cells in culture, caused by their routine in vitro propagation or by their genetic manipulation, is deleterious both for their clinical application and for their use in basic research. Frequent evaluation of the genomic integrity of stem cells is thus required, and it is usually performed using cytogenetic or DNA-based methods at variable sensitivities, resolutions and costs. Here we present a detailed protocol for determining the genomic integrity of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) using their global gene expression profiles. This expression-based karyotyping (e-karyotyping) protocol uses gene expression microarray data (either originally generated or derived from the literature) and describes how to organize it properly, subject it to two complementary bioinformatic analyses and conservatively interpret the results in order to generate an accurate estimation of the chromosomal aberrations in the autosomal genome of examined stem cell lines. The experimental steps of e-karyotyping can be carried out in ∼20-30 h.

  19. Understanding system dynamics of an adaptive enzyme network from globally profiled kinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A major challenge in mathematical modeling of biological systems is to determine how model parameters contribute to systems dynamics. As biological processes are often complex in nature, it is desirable to address this issue using a systematic approach. Here, we propose a simple methodology that first performs an enrichment test to find patterns in the values of globally profiled kinetic parameters with which a model can produce the required system dynamics; this is then followed by a statistical test to elucidate the association between individual parameters and different parts of the system’s dynamics. Results We demonstrate our methodology on a prototype biological system of perfect adaptation dynamics, namely the chemotaxis model for Escherichia coli. Our results agreed well with those derived from experimental data and theoretical studies in the literature. Using this model system, we showed that there are motifs in kinetic parameters and that these motifs are governed by constraints of the specified system dynamics. Conclusions A systematic approach based on enrichment statistical tests has been developed to elucidate the relationships between model parameters and the roles they play in affecting system dynamics of a prototype biological network. The proposed approach is generally applicable and therefore can find wide use in systems biology modeling research. PMID:24428922

  20. Application of LC-MS-Based Global Metabolomic Profiling Methods to Human Mental Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenling; Xu, Xianfa; Zhang, Jianping; Liu, Yongsuo; Xu, Xianggang; Li, Lili; Wang, Wei; Xu, Haishan; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan

    2016-12-06

    Mental fatigue is characterized by a reduced capacity for work and a loss of capacity to respond to stimulation and is usually accompanied by a feeling of tiredness and drowsiness. Mental fatigue at work is a serious problem and can raise safety concerns especially in the transportation system. It is believed that mental fatigue is a direct or contributing cause of road and air related accidents and incidents. Psychological studies indicate that fatigue results in reduced work efficiency, alertness, and impaired mental performance. However, its underlying biochemical mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the human body is an integrated system, and mental fatigue results in changes not only in psychology but also in biochemistry of the human body. These biochemical changes are detectable in metabolites. We employed global metabolomic profiling methods to screen biochemical changes that occur with mental fatigue in air traffic controllers (ATCs) in civil aviation. A total of 45, all male, ATCs (two batches) were recruited as two mental fatigue groups and 23 executive staff acted as a control group for this study. The volunteers' urine samples were collected before and after their work. The samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry equipped with a polar, a weak polar, and a nonpolar column, respectively. Three candidate biomarkers were selected on the basis of statistical significance, coefficient of variance, and compared with data of the three groups. The results suggest that urine metabolites may provide a complete new clue from biochemistry to understand, monitor, and manage human mental fatigue.

  1. Global gene expression profiles induced by phytoestrogens in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro; Lenz, Sarah; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Gmuender, Hans; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2008-03-01

    The nutritional intake of phytoestrogens seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer or other neoplastic diseases. However, these epidemiological findings remain controversial because low doses of phytoestrogens, achievable through soy-rich diets, stimulate the proliferation of estrogen-sensitive tumor cells. The question of whether such phytochemicals prevent cancer or rather pose additional health hazards prompted us to examine global gene expression programs induced by a typical soy product. After extraction from soymilk, phytoestrogens were deconjugated and processed through reverse- and normal-phase cartridges. The resulting mixture was used to treat human target cells that represent a common model system for mammary tumorigenesis. Analysis of mRNA on high-density microarrays revealed that soy phytoestrogens induce a genomic fingerprint that is indistinguishable from the transcriptional effects of the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol. Highly congruent responses were also observed by comparing the physiologic estradiol with daidzein, coumestrol, enterolactone, or resveratrol, each representing distinct phytoestrogen structures. More diverging transcriptional profiles were generated when an inducible promoter was used to reconstitute the expression of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Therefore, phytoestrogens appear to mitigate estrogenic signaling in the presence of both ER subtypes but, in late-stage cancer cells lacking ERbeta, these phytochemicals contribute to a tumor-promoting transcriptional signature.

  2. Global chromatin profiling reveals NSD2 mutations in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Jacob D; Wang, Yan; Chan, Ho Man; Zhang, Jinghui; Huether, Robert; Kryukov, Gregory V; Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Taylor, Jordan E; Hu, Min; Englund, Nathan P; Yan, Feng; Wang, Zhaofu; McDonald, E Robert; Wei, Lei; Ma, Jing; Easton, John; Yu, Zhengtian; deBeaumount, Rosalie; Gibaja, Veronica; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Schlegel, Robert; Sellers, William R; Keen, Nicholas; Liu, Jun; Caponigro, Giordano; Barretina, Jordi; Cooke, Vesselina G; Mullighan, Charles; Carr, Steven A; Downing, James R; Garraway, Levi A; Stegmeier, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation is an emerging hallmark of cancers. We developed a high-information-content mass spectrometry approach to profile global histone modifications in human cancers. When applied to 115 lines from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia1, this approach identified distinct molecular chromatin signatures. One signature was characterized by increased histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36) dimethylation, exhibited by several lines harboring translocations in NSD2, which encodes a methyltransferase. A previously unknown NSD2 p.Glu1099Lys (p.E1099K) variant was identified in nontranslocated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines sharing this signature. Ectopic expression of the variant induced a chromatin signature characteristic of NSD2 hyperactivation and promoted transformation. NSD2 knockdown selectively inhibited the proliferation of NSD2-mutant lines and impaired the in vivo growth of an NSD2-mutant ALL xenograft. Sequencing analysis of >1,000 pediatric cancer genomes identified the NSD2 p.E1099K alteration in 14% of t(12;21) ETV6-RUNX1–containing ALLs. These findings identify NSD2 as a potential therapeutic target for pediatric ALL and provide a general framework for the functional annotation of cancer epigenomes. PMID:24076604

  3. Recent geographic convergence in diurnal and annual temperature cycling flattens global thermal profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, George; Dillon, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    Warming mean temperatures over the past century have probably shifted distributions, altered phenologies, increased extinction risks, and impacted agriculture and human health. However, knowledge of mean temperatures alone does not provide a complete understanding either of changes in the climate itself or of how changing climate will affect organisms. Temporal temperature variation, primarily driven by daily and annual temperature cycles, has profound effects on organism physiology and ecology, yet changes in temperature cycling over the past 40 years are still poorly understood. Here we estimate global changes in the magnitudes of diurnal and annual temperature cycles from 1975 to 2013 from an analysis of over 1.4 billion hourly temperature measurements from 7,906 weather stations. Increases in daily temperature variation since 1975 in polar (1.4 °C), temperate (1.0 °C) and tropical (0.3 °C) regions parallel increases in mean temperature. Concurrently, magnitudes of annual temperature cycles decreased by 0.6 °C in polar regions, increased by 0.4 °C in temperate regions, and remained largely unchanged in tropical regions. Stronger increases in daily temperature cycling relative to changes in annual temperature cycling in temperate and polar regions mean that, with respect to diurnal and annual cycling, the world is flattening as temperate and polar regions converge on tropical temperature cycling profiles.

  4. Attomole quantification and global profile of RNA modifications: Epitranscriptome of human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Temple, Sally; Ansari, Suraiya A; D'Amico, Anna; Agris, Paul F

    2016-02-18

    Exploration of the epitranscriptome requires the development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies in order to elucidate the contributions of the more than 100 RNA modifications to cell processes. A highly sensitive and accurate ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to simultaneously detect and quantify 28 modified and four major nucleosides in less than 20 min. Absolute concentrations were calculated using extinction coefficients of each of the RNA modifications studied. A comprehensive RNA modifications database of UV profiles and extinction coefficient is reported within a 2.3-5.2 % relative standard deviation. Excellent linearity was observed 0.99227-0.99999 and limit of detection values ranged from 63.75 attomoles to 1.21 femtomoles. The analytical performance was evaluated by analyzing RNA modifications from 100 ng of RNA from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. Modifications were detected at concentrations four orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding parental nucleosides, and as low as 23.01 femtograms, 64.09 attomoles. Direct and global quantitative analysis of RNA modifications are among the advantages of this new approach. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Global Transcriptional Profiling of Diapause and Climatic Adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaqing; Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; Gregory, Brian D.; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Schmidt, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Wild populations of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster experience highly heterogeneous environments over broad geographical ranges as well as over seasonal and annual timescales. Diapause is a primary adaptation to environmental heterogeneity, and in D. melanogaster the propensity to enter diapause varies predictably with latitude and season. Here we performed global transcriptomic profiling of naturally occurring variation in diapause expression elicited by short day photoperiod and moderately low temperature in two tissue types associated with neuroendocrine and endocrine signaling, heads, and ovaries. We show that diapause in D. melanogaster is an actively regulated phenotype at the transcriptional level, suggesting that diapause is not a simple physiological or reproductive quiescence. Differentially expressed genes and pathways are highly distinct in heads and ovaries, demonstrating that the diapause response is not uniform throughout the soma and suggesting that it may be comprised of functional modules associated with specific tissues. Genes downregulated in heads of diapausing flies are significantly enriched for clinally varying single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and seasonally oscillating SNPs, consistent with the hypothesis that diapause is a driving phenotype of climatic adaptation. We also show that chromosome location-based coregulation of gene expression is present in the transcriptional regulation of diapause. Taken together, these results demonstrate that diapause is a complex phenotype actively regulated in multiple tissues, and support the hypothesis that natural variation in diapause propensity underlies adaptation to spatially and temporally varying selective pressures. PMID:26568616

  6. Expected Characteristics of Global Wind Profile Measurements with a Scanning, Hybrid, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 20 years of investigation by NASA and NOAA scientists and Doppler lidar technologists into a global wind profiling mission from earth orbit have led to the current favored concept of an instrument with both coherent- and direct-detection pulsed Doppler lidars (i.e., a hybrid Doppler lidar) and a stepstare beam scanning approach covering several azimuth angles with a fixed nadir angle. The nominal lidar wavelengths are 2 microns for coherent detection, and 0.355 microns for direct detection. The two agencies have also generated two sets of sophisticated wind measurement requirements for a space mission: science demonstration requirements and operational requirements. The requirements contain the necessary details to permit mission design and optimization by lidar technologists. Simulations have been developed that connect the science requirements to the wind measurement requirements, and that connect the wind measurement requirements to the Doppler lidar parameters. The simulations also permit trade studies within the multi-parameter space. These tools, combined with knowledge of the state of the Doppler lidar technology, have been used to conduct space instrument and mission design activities to validate the feasibility of the chosen mission and lidar parameters. Recently, the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey recommended the wind mission to NASA as one of 15 recommended missions. A full description of the wind measurement product from these notional missions and the possible trades available are presented in this paper.

  7. Global Deletion of TSPO Does Not Affect the Viability and Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaishan; Yang, Jia; Yang, Qi; Fu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Weiqing; Cui, Lianxian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Translocator Protein (18kDa, TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane transmembrane protein. Its expression is elevated during inflammation and injury. However, the function of TSPO in vivo is still controversial. Here, we constructed a TSPO global knockout (KO) mouse with a Cre-LoxP system that abolished TSPO protein expression in all tissues and showed normal phenotypes in the physiological condition. The birth rates of TSPO heterozygote (Het) x Het or KO x KO breeding were consistent with Mendel’s Law, suggesting a normal viability of TSPO KO mice at birth. RNA-seq analysis showed no significant difference in the gene expression profile of lung tissues from TSPO KO mice compared with wild type mice, including the genes associated with bronchial alveoli immune homeostasis. The alveolar macrophage population was not affected by TSPO deletion in the physiological condition. Our findings contradict the results of Papadopoulos, but confirmed Selvaraj’s findings. This study confirms TSPO deficiency does not affect viability and bronchial alveolar immune homeostasis. PMID:27907096

  8. Attomole quantification and global profile of RNA modifications: Epitranscriptome of human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Temple, Sally; Ansari, Suraiya A.; D'Amico, Anna; Agris, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of the epitranscriptome requires the development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies in order to elucidate the contributions of the more than 100 RNA modifications to cell processes. A highly sensitive and accurate ultra-high performance liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to simultaneously detect and quantify 28 modified and four major nucleosides in less than 20 min. Absolute concentrations were calculated using extinction coefficients of each of the RNA modifications studied. A comprehensive RNA modifications database of UV profiles and extinction coefficient is reported within a 2.3–5.2 % relative standard deviation. Excellent linearity was observed 0.99227–0.99999 and limit of detection values ranged from 63.75 attomoles to 1.21 femtomoles. The analytical performance was evaluated by analyzing RNA modifications from 100 ng of RNA from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. Modifications were detected at concentrations four orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding parental nucleosides, and as low as 23.01 femtograms, 64.09 attomoles. Direct and global quantitative analysis of RNA modifications are among the advantages of this new approach. PMID:26438536

  9. The Influence of Microdeletions and Microduplications of 16p11.2 on Global Transcription Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kusenda, Mary; Vacic, Vladimir; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Rodgers, Linda; Pavon, Kevin; Meth, Jennifer; Kumar, Ravinesh A.; Christian, Susan L.; Peeters, Hilde; Cho, Shawn S.; Addington, Anjene; Rapoport, Judith L.; Sebat, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) of a 600 kb region on 16p11.2 are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders and changes in brain volume. The authors hypothesize that abnormal brain development associated with this CNV can be attributed to changes in transcriptional regulation. The authors determined the effects of 16p11.2 dosage on gene expression by transcription profiling of lymphoblast cell lines derived from 6 microdeletion carriers, 15 microduplication carriers and 15 controls. Gene dosage had a significant influence on the transcript abundance of a majority (20/34) of genes within the CNV region. In addition, a limited number of genes were dysregulated in trans. Genes most strongly correlated with patient head circumference included SULT1A, KCTD13, and TMEM242. Given the modest effect of 16p11.2 copy number on global transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, larger studies utilizing neuronal cell types may be needed in order to elucidate the signaling pathways that influence brain development in this genetic disorder. PMID:26391891

  10. Assimilating Electron Density Profiles Measured by the Real Time Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory - GIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Galkin, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    Operational applications of ionospheric models, whether they are first principles or data-driven models, rely on the accuracy of the models during quiet and disturbed conditions. Of course models can correctly describe ionospheric weather only if they assimilate measured ionospheric characteristics and electron density profiles (EDPs). For the "assimilating model" to make correct predictions, the measurements in turn must be accurate and reliable. Ionosondes provide the most accurate vertical EDPs at the site locations but do not cover all parts of the globe. Ionogram-derived EDPs have become the ground truth reference for ionospheric specification, presenting the unrivaled accuracy of the data on continuous demand for validation of alternative ionospheric techniques, including radio occultation, ultraviolet, and tomography. In recent years the digisonde network of ionosondes has grown to eighty stations and is expected to expand to more than 100 stations in the next couple of years. The new Digisonde-4D is running the Automatic Real Time Ionogram Scaler with True height inversion, ARTIST-5. The ARTIST-5 autoscaling program now calculates the EDPs together with density uncertainty limits at each height, making the data products suitable for ingestion in assimilative ionospheric models. In order to specify uncertainty at each height, two boundary profiles, inner and outer, are determined. The inner and outer boundaries reflect the uncertainties of the critical frequencies of each layer, the internal uncertainty of the starting height of the profile, and the uncertainties of the E valley model representation. The actual uncertainties are calculated from a cumulative difference characteristic representing a mismatch between automatically and manually scaled parameters (i.e., foF2, foF1) for the same ionogram. The cumulative differences are determined from statistical analysis of a large amount of ionograms for a specific station. The characteristics of interest are

  11. Academia vs Industry: vanishing boundaries between global earthquake seismology and exploration seismics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hilst, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Global seismology and exploration seismics have long lived in parallel universes, with little cross-fertilization of methodologies and with interaction between the associated communities often limited to company recruitment of students. Fortunately, this traditional separation of technology and people has begun to disappear. This is driven not only by continuing demands for human and financial resources (for companies and academia, respectively) but increasingly also by overlapping intellectual interest. First, 'waves are waves' (that is, the fundamental physics - and math to describe/handle it - is scale invariant) and many artificial boundaries are being removed by use of better wave theory, faster computers, and new data acquisition paradigms. For example, the development of dense sensor arrays (in USA, Europe, Asia - mostly China and Japan) is increasing the attraction (and need) of industry-style interrogation of massive data sets. Examples include large scale seismic exploration of Earth's deep interior with inverse scattering of teleseismic wavefields (e.g., Van der Hilst et al., Science, 2007). On the other hand, reservoir exploration and production benefits from expertise in earthquake seismology, both for better characterization of reservoirs and their overburden and for (induced) micro-earthquake analysis. Passive source methods (including but not restricted to ambient noise tomography) are providing new, economic opportunities for velocity analysis and monitoring, and studies of (micro)seismicity (e.g., source location, parameters, and moment tensor) allow in situ stress determination, tomographic velocity analysis with natural sources in the reservoir, and 4D monitoring (e.g., for hydrocarbon production, carbon sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, and unconventional gas production). Second, the gap between the frequency ranges traditionally considered by both communities is being bridged by better theory, new sensor technology, and through

  12. Global nuclear industry views: challenges arising from the evolution of the optimisation principle in radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, S

    2012-01-01

    further improvements in the international RP system, it should be clearly borne in mind that the system is generally based on protection against the risk of cancer and hereditary diseases. The system also protects against deterministic non-cancer effects on tissues and organs. In seeking refinements of such protective notions, ICRP is invited to pay increased attention to the fact that a continued balance must be struck between beneficial activities that cause exposures and protection. The global nuclear industry is committed to help overcome these key RP issues as part of the RP community's upcoming international deliberations towards a more efficient international RP system.

  13. The Impact of Globalization on the U.S. Defense Industrial Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    of globalization is not a new one. In fact, the ancient Greek rhetorician Libanius believed globalization was both necessary and inevitable (see...proportional to the square of the number of its units. In theory , then, a force of 15 pieces of artillery will have, not a threefold, but a nine-fold...Augustine’s laws. Reston, VA: American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics . Austin, John S., Maj. (2008). Globalization of the

  14. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  15. Global expression profile of tumor stem-like cells isolated from MMQ rat prolactinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhipeng; Cai, Lin; Lu, Jianglong; Li, Chuzhong; Gui, Songbai; Liu, Chunhui; Wang, Chengde; Li, Qun; Zhuge, Qichuan; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have been isolated from various malignancies, were closely correlated with the occurrence, progression, metastasis and recurrence of the malignant cancer. Little is known about the tumor stem-like cells (TSLCs) isolated from benign tumors. Here we want to explore the global expression profile of RNA of tumor stem-like cells isolated from MMQ rat prolactinoma cells. In this study, total RNA was extracted from MMQ cells and MMQ tumor stem-like cells. RNA expression profiles were determined by Agilent Rat 8 × 60 K Microarray. Then we used the qRT-PCR to test the result of Microarray, and found VEGFA had a distinct pattern of expression in MMQ tumor stem-like cells. Then WB and ELISA were used to confirm the VEGFA protein level of tumor sphere cultured from both MMQ cell and human prolactinoma cell. Finally, CCK-8 was used to evaluate the reaction of MMQ tumor stem-like cells to small interfering RNAs intervention and bevacizumab treatment. The results of Microarray showed that 566 known RNA were over-expressed and 532 known RNA were low-expressed in the MMQ tumor stem-like cells. These genes were mainly involved in 15 different signaling pathways. In pathway in cancer and cell cycle, Bcl2, VEGFA, PTEN, Jun, Fos, APC2 were up-regulated and Ccna2, Cdc25a, Mcm3, Mcm6, Ccnb2, Mcm5, Cdk1, Gadd45a, Myc were down-regulated in the MMQ tumor stem-like cells. The expression of VEGFA were high in tumor spheres cultured from both MMQ cell and human prolactinomas. Down-regulation of VEGFA by small interfering RNAs partially decreased cell viability of MMQ tumor stem-like cells in vitro. Bevacizumab partially suppressed the proliferation of MMQ tumor stem-like cells. Our findings characterize the pattern of RNA expression of tumor stem-like cells isolated from MMQ cells. VEGFA may act as a potential therapeutic target for tumor stem-like cells of prolactinomas.

  16. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Food technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Food processing and preservation technologies are reviewed, expected technological advances are considered including processing and market factors. NASA contributions to food technology and nutrition are presented with examples of transfer from NASA to industry.

  17. Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, Joan; Brueske, Sabine; Carole, Tracy; Andres, Howard

    2007-11-01

    This 2007 report provides an overview of the U.S. petroleum refining industry, including new data on market trends and energy and material consumption, as well as information on environmental performance.

  18. Executive Perceptions on International Education in a Globalized Environment: The Travel Industry's Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, J. Mark; Katsioloudes, Marios I.

    2004-01-01

    Research on globalization has determined travel executives' perceptions of the psychological implications brought about by an interconnected global environment and the implications on international education. With the concepts of Clyne and Rizvi (1998) and Pittaway, Ferguson, and Breen (1998) on the value of cross-cultural interaction as a…

  19. Global Market Access in the Internet Era: South Africa's Wood Furniture Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodley, Sagren

    2002-01-01

    Explores the link between Internet connectivity and access to global markets, and uses the South African wood furniture producers as they are integrated into global value chains and exposed to the demands of more sophisticated markets. Articulates policy recommendations to promote greater diffusion of e-commerce technologies in the wood furniture…

  20. Global Market Access in the Internet Era: South Africa's Wood Furniture Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodley, Sagren

    2002-01-01

    Explores the link between Internet connectivity and access to global markets, and uses the South African wood furniture producers as they are integrated into global value chains and exposed to the demands of more sophisticated markets. Articulates policy recommendations to promote greater diffusion of e-commerce technologies in the wood furniture…

  1. 78 FR 58545 - Global Unique Device Identification Database; Draft Guidance for Industry; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Global Unique Device Identification Database; Draft Guidance... ``Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID).'' FDA is issuing this draft guidance to communicate... information on the database elements that must be submitted to the GUDID and their definitions. We intend...

  2. Preeclampsia: novel insights from global RNA profiling of trophoblast subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Matthew; Ona, Katherine; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Garrido-Gomez, Tamara; Zdravkovic, Tamara; Fisher, Susan J

    2017-08-01

    The maternal signs of preeclampsia, which include the new onset of high blood pressure, can occur because of faulty placentation. We theorized that transcriptomic analyses of trophoblast subpopulations in situ would lend new insights into the role of these cells in preeclampsia pathogenesis. Our goal was to enrich syncytiotrophoblasts, invasive cytotrophoblasts, or endovascular cytotrophoblasts from the placentas of severe preeclampsia cases. Total RNA was subjected to global transcriptional profiling to identify RNAs that were misexpressed compared with controls. This was a cross-sectional analysis of placentas from women who had been diagnosed with severe preeclampsia. Gestational age-matched controls were placentas from women who had a preterm birth with no signs of infection. Laser microdissection enabled enrichment of syncytiotrophoblasts, invasive cytotrophoblasts, or endovascular cytotrophoblasts. After RNA isolation, a microarray approach was used for global transcriptional profiling. Immunolocalization identified changes in messenger RNA expression that carried over to the protein level. Differential expression of non-protein-coding RNAs was confirmed by in situ hybridization. A 2-way analysis of variance of non-coding RNA expression identified particular classes that distinguished trophoblasts in cases vs controls. Cajal body foci were visualized by coilin immunolocalization. Comparison of the trophoblast subtype data within each group (severe preeclampsia or noninfected preterm birth) identified many highly differentially expressed genes. They included molecules that are known to be expressed by each subpopulation, which is evidence that the method worked. Genes that were expressed differentially between the 2 groups, in a cell-type-specific manner, encoded a combination of molecules that previous studies associated with severe preeclampsia and those that were not known to be dysregulated in this pregnancy complication. Gene ontology analysis of the

  3. Global Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Unanticipated Networks Responsive to Cisplatin Treatment of Embryonic Stem Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pines, Alex; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Puigvert, Jordi C.; Typas, Dimitris; Misovic, Branislav; de Groot, Anton; von Stechow, Louise; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.; Vrieling, Harry; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA-damaging agents involve the activation of various DNA damage signaling and transduction pathways. Using quantitative and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, we determined global changes in protein level and phosphorylation site profiles following treatment of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-labeled murine embryonic stem cells with the anticancer drug cisplatin. Network and pathway analyses indicated that processes related to the DNA damage response and cytoskeleton organization were significantly affected. Although the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) consensus sequence (S/T-Q motif) was significantly overrepresented among hyperphosphorylated peptides, about half of the >2-fold-upregulated phosphorylation sites based on the consensus sequence were not direct substrates of ATM and ATR. Eleven protein kinases mainly belonging to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family were identified as being regulated in their kinase domain activation loop. The biological importance of three of these kinases (cyclin-dependent kinase 7 [CDK7], Plk1, and KPCD1) in the protection against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Our results indicate that the cellular response to cisplatin involves a variety of kinases and phosphatases not only acting in the nucleus but also regulating cytoplasmic targets, resulting in extensive cytoskeletal rearrangements. Integration of transcriptomic and proteomic data revealed a poor correlation between changes in the relative levels of transcripts and their corresponding proteins, but a large overlap in affected pathways at the levels of mRNA, protein, and phosphoprotein. This study provides an integrated view of pathways activated by genotoxic stress and deciphers kinases that play a pivotal role in regulating cellular processes other than the DNA damage response. PMID:22006019

  4. Global Fitness Profiling Identifies Arsenic and Cadmium Tolerance Mechanisms in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Ganguly, Abantika; Sun, Lingling; Suo, Fang; Du, Li-Lin; Russell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals and metalloids such as cadmium [Cd(II)] and arsenic [As(III)] are widespread environmental toxicants responsible for multiple adverse health effects in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying metal-induced cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis, as well as the detoxification and tolerance pathways, are incompletely understood. Here, we use global fitness profiling by barcode sequencing to quantitatively survey the Schizosaccharomyces pombe haploid deletome for genes that confer tolerance of cadmium or arsenic. We identified 106 genes required for cadmium resistance and 110 genes required for arsenic resistance, with a highly significant overlap of 36 genes. A subset of these 36 genes account for almost all proteins required for incorporating sulfur into the cysteine-rich glutathione and phytochelatin peptides that chelate cadmium and arsenic. A requirement for Mms19 is explained by its role in directing iron–sulfur cluster assembly into sulfite reductase as opposed to promoting DNA repair, as DNA damage response genes were not enriched among those required for cadmium or arsenic tolerance. Ubiquinone, siroheme, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate biosynthesis were also identified as critical for Cd/As tolerance. Arsenic-specific pathways included prefoldin-mediated assembly of unfolded proteins and protein targeting to the peroxisome, whereas cadmium-specific pathways included plasma membrane and vacuolar transporters, as well as Spt–Ada–Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) transcriptional coactivator that controls expression of key genes required for cadmium tolerance. Notable differences are apparent with corresponding screens in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, underscoring the utility of analyzing toxic metal defense mechanisms in both organisms. PMID:27558664

  5. Global LC/MS Metabolomics Profiling of Calcium Stressed and Immunosuppressant Drug Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stefan; Fischer, Steven M; Chen, Lily; Sana, Theodore R

    2013-12-06

    Previous studies have shown that calcium stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, challenged with immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and Cyclosporin A, responds with comprehensive gene expression changes and attenuation of the generalized calcium stress response. Here, we describe a global metabolomics workflow for investigating the utility of tracking corresponding phenotypic changes. This was achieved by efficiently analyzing relative abundance differences between intracellular metabolite pools from wild-type and calcium stressed cultures, with and without prior immunosuppressant drugs exposure. We used pathway database content from WikiPathways and YeastCyc to facilitate the projection of our metabolomics profiling results onto biological pathways. A key challenge was to increase the coverage of the detected metabolites. This was achieved by applying both reverse phase (RP) and aqueous normal phase (ANP) chromatographic separations, as well as electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) sources for detection in both ion polarities. Unsupervised principle component analysis (PCA) and ANOVA results revealed differentiation between wild-type controls, calcium stressed and immunosuppressant/calcium challenged cells. Untargeted data mining resulted in 247 differentially expressed, annotated metabolites, across at least one pair of conditions. A separate, targeted data mining strategy identified 187 differential, annotated metabolites. All annotated metabolites were subsequently mapped onto curated pathways from YeastCyc and WikiPathways for interactive pathway analysis and visualization. Dozens of pathways showed differential responses to stress conditions based on one or more matches to the list of annotated metabolites or to metabolites that had been identified further by MS/MS. The purine salvage, pantothenate and sulfur amino acid pathways were flagged as being enriched, which is consistent with previously published literature for

  6. Modeling dark matter subhalos in a constrained galaxy: Global mass and boosted annihilation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stref, Martin; Lavalle, Julien

    2017-03-01

    The interaction properties of cold dark matter (CDM) particle candidates, such as those of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), generically lead to the structuring of dark matter on scales much smaller than typical galaxies, potentially down to ˜10-10 M⊙ . This clustering translates into a very large population of subhalos in galaxies and affects the predictions for direct and indirect dark matter searches (gamma rays and antimatter cosmic rays). In this paper, we elaborate on previous analytic works to model the Galactic subhalo population, while keeping consistent with current observational dynamical constraints on the Milky Way. In particular, we propose a self-consistent method to account for tidal effects induced by both dark matter and baryons. Our model does not strongly rely on cosmological simulations, as they can hardly be fully matched to the real Milky Way, apart from setting the initial subhalo mass fraction. Still, it allows us to recover the main qualitative features of simulated systems. It can further be easily adapted to any change in the dynamical constraints, and can be used to make predictions or derive constraints on dark matter candidates from indirect or direct searches. We compute the annihilation boost factor, including the subhalo-halo cross product. We confirm that tidal effects induced by the baryonic components of the Galaxy play a very important role, resulting in a local average subhalo mass density ≲1 % of the total local dark matter mass density, while selecting the most concentrated objects and leading to interesting features in the overall annihilation profile in the case of a sharp subhalo mass function. Values of global annihilation boost factors range from ˜2 to ˜20 , while the local annihilation rate is about boosted half as much.

  7. Resolution of Novel Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Subtypes by Global Phosphotyrosine Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Emily S.; Su, Shih-Ping; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Hochgräfe, Falko; Pajic, Marina; Lehrbach, Gillian M.; Parton, Robert G.; Yap, Alpha S.; Horvath, Lisa G.; Chang, David K.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Wu, Jianmin; Daly, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) promises to enhance our understanding of the molecular aberrations driving this devastating disease, and may identify novel therapeutic targets as well as biomarkers that enable stratification of patients for optimal therapy. Here, we use immunoaffinity-coupled high-resolution mass spectrometry to characterize global tyrosine phosphorylation patterns across two large panels of human PDAC cell lines: the ATCC series (19 cell lines) and TKCC series (17 cell lines). This resulted in the identification and quantification of over 1800 class 1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites and the consistent segregation of both PDAC cell line series into three subtypes with distinct tyrosine phosphorylation profiles. Subtype-selective signaling networks were characterized by identification of subtype-enriched phosphosites together with pathway and network analyses. This revealed that the three subtypes characteristic of the ATCC series were associated with perturbations in signaling networks associated with cell-cell adhesion and epithelial-mesenchyme transition, mRNA metabolism, and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, respectively. Specifically, the third subtype exhibited enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple RTKs including the EGFR, ERBB3 and MET. Interestingly, a similar RTK-enriched subtype was identified in the TKCC series, and 'classifier' sites for each series identified using Random Forest models were able to predict the subtypes of the alternate series with high accuracy, highlighting the conservation of the three subtypes across the two series. Finally, RTK-enriched cell lines from both series exhibited enhanced sensitivity to the small molecule EGFR inhibitor erlotinib, indicating that their phosphosignature may provide a predictive biomarker for response to this targeted therapy. These studies highlight how resolution of subtype-selective signaling networks can provide a

  8. First Marine International Findings for the Global Shipbuilding Industrial Base Benchmarking Study Part 1: Major Shipyards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    industrial base benchmarking study (GSIBBS) undertaken by the U.S. Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Industrial Policy) (ODUSD(IP)) in 2004/2005. The objectives of the study were to: " Compare the practices of U.S. and selected leading international commercial and naval shipbuilders in Europe and Asia. " Identify specific changes to U.S. shipbuilding industry processes and to U.S. naval design and acquisition practices that will improve the performance of the shipbuilding enterprise. The FMI shipyard benchmarking system, which is briefly described in

  9. The local impact of globalization: worker health and safety in Mexico's sugar industry.

    PubMed

    Lemus-Ruiz, B E

    1999-01-01

    With the opening of its economy to international trade, the government of Mexico privatized many of its productive holdings, including the state-owned sugar industry. Sugar cane and mill workers had played an important role in the armed struggles of the revolutionary period (1910-1917). Organized into a militant labor union, they had become staunch supporters of the new government in the following decades. Furthermore, in the early years of industrialization, the sugar industry was very important for the Mexican economy, and the union played an active role in the political arena. Since the privatization of the sugar mills, the sugar workers have experienced a dramatic reorganization of the work process, and industry-union relationships are being reshaped. This paper offers an analysis of the impact of the privatization on workers' health and safety. Since the economic and social changes in the work process have a direct impact on the community as a whole, the study also explores these effects.

  10. A risk microbiological profile of the Australian red meat industry: risk ratings of hazard-product pairings.

    PubMed

    Sumner, John; Ross, Tom; Jenson, Ian; Pointon, Andrew

    2005-11-25

    A risk profile of microbial hazards across the supply continuum for the beef, sheep and goat meat industries was developed using both a qualitative tool and a semi-quantitative, spreadsheet tool, Risk Ranger. The latter is useful for highlighting factors contributing to food safety risk and for ranking the risk of various product/pathogen combinations. In the present profile the qualitative tool was used as a preliminary screen for a wide range of hazard-product pairings while Risk Ranger was used to rank in order of population health risk pairings for which quantitative data were available and for assessing the effect of hypothetical scenarios. 'High' risk hazard-product pairings identified were meals contaminated with Clostridium perfringens provided by caterers which have not implemented HACCP; kebabs cross-contaminated by Salmonella present in drip trays or served undercooked; meals served in the home cross-contaminated with Salmonella. 'Medium' risk hazard-product pairings identified were ready-to-eat meats contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes and which have extended shelf life; Uncooked Comminuted Fermented Meat (UCFM)/Salami contaminated with Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and Salmonella; undercooked hamburgers contaminated with EHEC; kebabs contaminated by Salmonella under normal production or following final "flash" heating. Identified 'low' risk hazard-product pairings included cooked, ready-to-eat sausages contaminated with Salmonella; UCFM/Salami contaminated with L. monocytogenes; well-cooked hamburgers contaminated with EHEC. The risk profile provides information of value to Australia's risk managers in the regulatory, processing and R&D sectors of the meat and meat processing industry for the purposes of identifying food safety risks in the industry and for prioritising risk management actions.

  11. Target Salt 2025: A Global Overview of National Programs to Encourage the Food Industry to Reduce Salt in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Jacqui; Trieu, Kathy; Dunford, Elizabeth; Hawkes, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce salt. A systematic review of the literature was supplemented by key informant questionnaires to inform categorization of the initiatives. Fifty nine food industry salt reduction programs were identified. Thirty eight countries had targets for salt levels in foods and nine countries had introduced legislation for some products. South Africa and Argentina have both introduced legislation limiting salt levels across a broad range of foods. Seventeen countries reported reductions in salt levels in foods—the majority in bread. While these trends represent progress, many countries have yet to initiate work in this area, others are at early stages of implementation and further monitoring is required to assess progress towards achieving the global target. PMID:25195640

  12. Target salt 2025: a global overview of national programs to encourage the food industry to reduce salt in foods.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jacqui; Trieu, Kathy; Dunford, Elizabeth; Hawkes, Corinna

    2014-08-21

    Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce salt. A systematic review of the literature was supplemented by key informant questionnaires to inform categorization of the initiatives. Fifty nine food industry salt reduction programs were identified. Thirty eight countries had targets for salt levels in foods and nine countries had introduced legislation for some products. South Africa and Argentina have both introduced legislation limiting salt levels across a broad range of foods. Seventeen countries reported reductions in salt levels in foods-the majority in bread. While these trends represent progress, many countries have yet to initiate work in this area, others are at early stages of implementation and further monitoring is required to assess progress towards achieving the global target.

  13. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  14. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  15. A quantitative profile of the patent medicine industry in Baltimore from 1863 to 1930.

    PubMed

    Torbenson, Michael; Erlen, Jonathon

    2007-01-01

    At least 661 unique patent medicine manufacturers promoted their nostrums in Baltimore from 1863 to 1930. The industry saw its greatest growth from 1880 to 1900 and peaked in 1907. Overall, about 7% of these companies were owned by women and 4% by African-Americans. Based on the short life span of most companies, the business environment appears to have been very competitive. The patent medicine industry began a steady decline after 1907 and by 1930 had lost nearly 40% of the companies. The temporal correlation of this decline with the passage of the Food and Drugs Act of 1906 argues strongly that this legislation was an important contributor to the decline of the industry.

  16. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  17. First Comparison of Remote Vertical Profiles of Refractory Black Carbon between the Atlantic and Pacific Basins on Global Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katich, J. M.; Schwarz, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) provides a first opportunity to obtain vertical profiles of refractory black carbon (rBC) mass mixing ratios over global scale ( 65S - 85 N latitude) in the remote atmosphere over both the Pacific and Atlantic basins. A NOAA single-particle soot photometer (SP2) will fly on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft over July/August of 2016, obtaining near- continuous vertical profiling ( 0.3 to 12 km) over most of the Earth's latitude range, akin to the NSF HIPPO campaign that occurred only over the Pacific basin during 2009-2011. HIPPO analysis suggested both that high altitude rBC mass mixing ratios (MMRs) were likely zonally well mixed, and that global model estimates of remote rBC MMR throughout the upper troposphere globally, and not just over the Pacific, were likely biased high. Here we will present an initial analysis of the new, more complete data set in which Atlantic rBC profiles will be used to assess these prior suppositions.

  18. Industrial food animal production and global health risks: exploring the ecosystems and economics of avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Leibler, Jessica H; Otte, Joachim; Roland-Holst, David; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo; Rushton, Jonathan; Graham, Jay P; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2009-03-01

    Many emerging infectious diseases in human populations are associated with zoonotic origins. Attention has often focused on wild animal reservoirs, but most zoonotic pathogens of recent concern to human health either originate in, or are transferred to, human populations from domesticated animals raised for human consumption. Thus, the ecological context of emerging infectious disease comprises two overlapping ecosystems: the natural habitats and populations of wild animals, and the anthropogenically controlled habitats and populations of domesticated species. Intensive food animal production systems and their associated value chains dominate in developed countries and are increasingly important in developing countries. These systems are characterized by large numbers of animals being raised in confinement with high throughput and rapid turnover. Although not typically recognized as such, industrial food animal production generates unique ecosystems -- environments that may facilitate the evolution of zoonotic pathogens and their transmission to human populations. It is often assumed that confined food animal production reduces risks of emerging zoonotic diseases. This article provides evidence suggesting that these industrial systems may increase animal and public health risks unless there is recognition of the specific biosecurity and biocontainment challenges of the industrial model. Moreover, the economic drivers and constraints faced by the industry and its participants must be fully understood in order to inform preventative policy. In order to more effectively reduce zoonotic disease risk from industrial food animal production, private incentives for the implementation of biosecurity must align with public health interests.

  19. Computer Aided Drafting and Design, Industrial Manufacturing Technician, and Mechanical Engineering Technician and Machine Tool, Die and Moldmaking Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-East Ohio Tech Prep Consortium, Zanesville.

    This document contains competency profiles in four areas: computer-aided drafting and design; industrial manufacturing technician; mechanical engineering technician; and machine tool, die, and moldmaking technology occupations. The profiles are intended for use in articulating tech prep programs from high school through associate degrees in Ohio.…

  20. 1987 Electric Utility Instructor Survey. Summary of Task Verification Data [and] Competency Profile of Industry Instructor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Robert E.

    An initial listing of the tasks performed by electric power industry instructors was prepared by organizing and convening a DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis committee of 11 persons who were considered to be expert instructors in the field. The committee members, relying on their own knowledge and experience, and with the guidance of a…

  1. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Heins, C. R.; Hildred, W. M.; Johnson, F. D.; Staskin, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Technology transfer in the lubrication field is discussed in terms of the movement of NASA-generated lubrication technology into the private sector as affected by evolving industrial requirements. An overview of the field is presented, and NASA technical contributions to lubrication technology are described. Specific examples in which these technologies have been used in the private sector are summarized.

  2. Field Heat Treatment Technician: Competency Profile. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 20908.1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The graduate of the Field Heat Treatment Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able: (1) use heat treatment equipment to apply heat to materials in order to change a material's properties; (2) Use their knowledge of the properties of heat, industry codes and specifications to determine how heat treatment will…

  3. New frontiers in oilseed biotechnology: meeting the global demand for vegetable oils for food, feed, biofuel, and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaofu; Napier, Johnathan A; Clemente, Thomas E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2011-04-01

    Vegetable oils have historically been a valued commodity for food use and to a lesser extent for non-edible applications such as detergents and lubricants. The increasing reliance on biodiesel as a transportation fuel has contributed to rising demand and higher prices for vegetable oils. Biotechnology offers a number of solutions to meet the growing need for affordable vegetable oils and vegetable oils with improved fatty acid compositions for food and industrial uses. New insights into oilseed metabolism and its transcriptional control are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and quality. Alternative crop platforms and emerging technologies for metabolic engineering also hold promise for meeting global demand for vegetable oils and for enhancing nutritional, industrial, and biofuel properties of vegetable oils.

  4. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    SciTech Connect

    McKane, Aimee; Desai, Deann; Matteini, Marco; Meffert, William; Williams, Robert; Risser, Roland

    2009-08-01

    Industry utilizes very complex systems, consisting of equipment and their human interface, which are organized to meet the production needs of the business. Effective and sustainable energy efficiency programs in an industrial setting require a systems approach to optimize the integrated whole while meeting primary business requirements. Companies that treat energy as a manageable resource and integrate their energy program into their management practices have an organizational context to continually seek opportunities for optimizing their energy use. The purpose of an energy management system standard is to provide guidance for industrial and commercial facilities to integrate energy efficiency into their management practices, including fine-tuning production processes and improving the energy efficiency of industrial systems. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy management as one of its top five priorities for standards development. The new ISO 50001 will establish an international framework for industrial, commercial, or institutional facilities, or entire companies, to manage their energy, including procurement and use. This standard is expected to achieve major, long-term increases in energy efficiency (20percent or more) in industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide.This paper describes the impetus for the international standard, its purpose, scope and significance, and development progress to date. A comparative overview of existing energy management standards is provided, as well as a discussion of capacity-building needs for skilled individuals to assist organizations in adopting the standard. Finally, opportunities and challenges are presented for implementing ISO 50001 in emerging economies and developing countries.

  6. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of the industrial garnet industry is provided. About 20 percent of global industrial garnet production takes place in the U.S. During 2000, an estimated 300 kt of industrial garnets were produced worldwide. The U.S. is the world's largest consumer of industrial garnet, consuming 56.9 kt in 2000.

  7. In vivo Host-Pathogen Interaction as Revealed by Global Proteomic Profiling of Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Pascual, Francisco; Ortíz-Severín, Javiera; Varas, Macarena A.; Allende, Miguel L.; Chávez, Francisco P.

    2017-01-01

    demonstrated the suitability of zebrafish embryos as a model for in vivo host-pathogen based proteomic studies in P. aeruginosa. Our global proteomic profiling identifies novel molecular signatures that give systematic insight into zebrafish-Pseudomonas interaction. PMID:28791256

  8. Systematic review of the global epidemiology, clinical and laboratory profile of enteric fever

    PubMed Central

    Azmatullah, Asma; Qamar, Farah Naz; Thaver, Durrane; Zaidi, Anita KM; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-01-01

    Background Children suffer the highest burden of enteric fever among populations in South Asian countries. The clinical features are non–specific, vary in populations, and are often difficult to distinguish clinically from other febrile illnesses, leading to delayed or inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. We undertook a systematic review to assess the clinical profile and laboratory features of enteric fever across age groups, economic regions, level of care and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Methods We searched PubMed (January 1964–December 2013) for studies describing clinical features in defined cohorts of patients over varying time periods. Studies with all culture–confirmed cases or those with at least 50% culture–confirmed cases were included. 242 reports were screened out of 4398 relevant articles and 180 reports were included for final review. Results 96% of studies were from an urban location, 96% were hospital–based studies, with 41% of studies were from South Asia. Common clinical features in hospitalized children include high–grade fever, coated tongue, anaemia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly neutrophilia, abdominal distension and GI bleeding. In adults’ nausea/vomiting, thrombocytopenia and GI perforation predominate. The case–fatality rate in children under 5 years is higher than school aged children and adolescents, and is highest in Sub Saharan Africa and North Africa/Middle East regions. Multi–drug resistant enteric fever has higher rates of complications than drug sensitive enteric fever, but case fatality rates were comparable in both. Conclusions Our findings indicate variability in disease presentation in adults compared to children, in different regions and in resistant vs sensitive cases. Majority of studies are from hospitalized cases, and are not disaggregated by age. Despite higher complications in MDR enteric fever, case fatality rate is comparable to sensitive cases, with an

  9. The global cell therapy industry continues to rise during the second and third quarters of 2012.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chris; McCall, Mark J; Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Suthasan, Shalini; Edwards-Parton, Simon; Bonfiglio, Gregory A; Reeve, Brock C

    2012-12-07

    During Q2-Q3 2012, the cell therapy industry benefited from a number of positive external influences including advantageous changes to future FDA regulation, but stock market activity was highly mixed. The FDA approved two more products and an appreciable number of public-company-sponsored clinical trials are progressing through phases 1-3.

  10. Global marine pollution bibliography: Ocean dumping of municipal and industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Champ, M.A.; Park, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography contains papers from the following categories: marine pollution/ocean dumping, municipal wastes, industrial wastes, legislation/regulations, international conventions, ocean dumping criteria/site selection studies, waste management strategies, biological processes, chemical processes, geological processes, physical processes, engineering studies, and dumping by countries and by regions.

  11. ESTIMATES OF GLOBAL GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL AND DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the findings of field tests and provides emission factors for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from wastewater treatment (WWT). It also includes country-specific activity data on industrial and domestic WWT which were used to develop country-specific em...

  12. Petrochemical industry in the Middle East: current status, uncertainties, global impact

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The situation and perspective of the petrochemical industry in Saudi Arabia, Qatar, IR Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, the UAE, SP Libyan AJ, Algeria, and Egypt are reviewed. Special attention is given to the budgetary constraints, foreign partners, the costs, the markets, and the impact of falling oil prices.

  13. ESTIMATES OF GLOBAL GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL AND DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the findings of field tests and provides emission factors for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from wastewater treatment (WWT). It also includes country-specific activity data on industrial and domestic WWT which were used to develop country-specific em...

  14. Risk profile of cumulative trauma disorders of the arm and hand in the US mining industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hudock, S.D.; Keran, C.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A review of all upper extremity cumulative trauma disorder (UECTD) injuries was conducted by the US Bureau of Mines for 1985 through 1989. This review was performed by analyzing each injury, as reported by law and maintained on the US Mine Safety and Health Administration's accident data base. This analysis found that incidence rates in mining were lower than in private sector industry, although the number of reported UECTD injuries increased sevenfold and their percentage of all mining injuries increased fivefold from 1985 and 1989. Metal-nonmetal mines accounted for 80 pct of UECTD injuries, while coal mines accounted for 20 pct. Nearly 63 pct of UECTD injuries were accounted for by only four occupations -- mechanics, laborers, boney (crusher) operators, and miners not elsewhere classified (NEC) -- with an incidence rate well above the private sector industry rate.

  15. Environmental profile of latent energy storage materials applied to industrial systems.

    PubMed

    López-Sabirón, Ana M; Aranda-Usón, Alfonso; Mainar-Toledo, M D; Ferreira, Victor J; Ferreira, Germán

    2014-03-01

    Industry sector is an intensive-energy consumer and approximately 20-50% of industrial energy consumption is lost as waste heat. Therefore, there is a great potential for reducing energy consumption and, subsequently, decreasing the fossil fuels used if this lost energy can be recovered. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) based on Latent Heat Storage systems (LHS) using Phase Change Materials (PCMs) has become one of the most feasible solutions in achieving energy savings through waste heat recovery, especially when there is a mismatch between the supply and consumption of energy processes. In this paper, a shell and tube heat exchanger incorporating PCMs has been considered to store the excess energy available in an industrial process. Several attempts have been made to design the most appropriate system considering many cost-benefit and technical criteria to maximise the heat recovery. However, the environmental criterion also is an important factor when determining whether this technology is not only energy and cost-efficient but also environmentally friendly, considering the whole life of the system from its manufacture to its disposal. To this end, this research includes a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to determine whether the energy savings of conventional fuels during the operation stage are large enough to balance the environmental impact originated in an industrial TES system including the manufacture, use and disposal phases. Inputs and outputs of each management stage have been defined, and the inventory emissions calculated by SIMAPRO v7.3.2. A midpoint and endpoint approaches have been carried out using two methods, CML 2001 and Eco-indicator 99, respectively. As a preliminary result, a promising reduction in the overall impacts was obtained by the use of this technology. From the environmental impact results, a matrix of possible technical solutions is displayed, to improve the environmental performance.

  16. Sawmill profile : new Forest Products Lab report defines the makeup of North America's softwood sawmill industry

    Treesearch

    Henry Spelter; Matthew Alderman

    2005-01-01

    As of July 2005, the main stream of the softwood lumber industry in the U.S. and Canada consisted of about 1,067sawmills. These sawmills had a combined capacity of 189 million m3 (80 billion BF), employed about 99,000, produced about 172 million m3 (nominal, 73 billion BF) of lumber, and in the process consumed about 280 million m3 of wood.

  17. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  18. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  19. A University-Industry Collaborative Response to the Growing Global Demand for Student Talent: Using Interpretive Phenomenology to Discover Life-World Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vauterin, Johanna Julia; Linnanen, Lassi; Michelsen, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The supply of student talent is now taking on an increasingly global dimension and this has extended the breadth of university-industry interaction. Set in the context of a rapidly growing international student market, knowledge transfer between academia and business through global student talent supply is an emerging practice. This paper…

  20. A University-Industry Collaborative Response to the Growing Global Demand for Student Talent: Using Interpretive Phenomenology to Discover Life-World Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vauterin, Johanna Julia; Linnanen, Lassi; Michelsen, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The supply of student talent is now taking on an increasingly global dimension and this has extended the breadth of university-industry interaction. Set in the context of a rapidly growing international student market, knowledge transfer between academia and business through global student talent supply is an emerging practice. This paper…

  1. GATS and the Education Service Industry: The Politics of Scale and Global Reterritorialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Susan L.; Bonal, Xavier; Dale, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes potential effects of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) on the orientation and control of national education systems. Explains concepts of space, scale, and territorialization in relation to critical shifts in GATS's activity in education. Suggests that rescaling aspects of educational governance to the global level will…

  2. Global carbon benefits of material substitution in passenger cars until 2050 and the impact on the steel and aluminum industries.

    PubMed

    Modaresi, Roja; Pauliuk, Stefan; Løvik, Amund N; Müller, Daniel B

    2014-09-16

    Light-weighting of passenger cars using high-strength steel or aluminum is a common emissions mitigation strategy. We provide a first estimate of the global impact of light-weighting by material substitution on GHG emissions from passenger cars and the steel and aluminum industries until 2050. We develop a dynamic stock model of the global car fleet and combine it with a dynamic MFA of the associated steel, aluminum, and energy supply industries. We propose four scenarios for substitution of conventional steel with high-strength steel and aluminum at different rates over the period 2010-2050. We show that light-weighting of passenger cars can become a "gigaton solution": Between 2010 and 2050, persistent light-weighting of passenger cars can, under optimal conditions, lead to cumulative GHG emissions savings of 9-18 gigatons CO2-eq compared to development business-as-usual. Annual savings can be up to 1 gigaton per year. After 2030, enhanced material recycling can lead to further reductions: closed-loop metal recycling in the automotive sector may reduce cumulative emissions by another 4-6 gigatons CO2-eq. The effectiveness of emissions mitigation by material substitution significantly depends on how the recycling system evolves. At present, policies focusing on tailpipe emissions and life cycle assessments of individual cars do not consider this important effect.

  3. The Local Structure of Globalization. The Network Dynamics of Foreign Direct Investments in the International Electricity Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Johan; Lomi, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    We study the evolution of the network of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the international electricity industry during the period 1994-2003. We assume that the ties in the network of investment relations between countries are created and deleted in continuous time, according to a conditional Gibbs distribution. This assumption allows us to take simultaneously into account the aggregate predictions of the well-established gravity model of international trade as well as local dependencies between network ties connecting the countries in our sample. According to the modified version of the gravity model that we specify, the probability of observing an investment tie between two countries depends on the mass of the economies involved, their physical distance, and the tendency of the network to self-organize into local configurations of network ties. While the limiting distribution of the data generating process is an exponential random graph model, we do not assume the system to be in equilibrium. We find evidence of the effects of the standard gravity model of international trade on evolution of the global FDI network. However, we also provide evidence of significant dyadic and extra-dyadic dependencies between investment ties that are typically ignored in available research. We show that local dependencies between national electricity industries are sufficient for explaining global properties of the network of foreign direct investments. We also show, however, that network dependencies vary significantly over time giving rise to a time-heterogeneous localized process of network evolution.

  4. Flexible parameter-sparse global temperature time profiles that stabilise at 1.5 and 2.0 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntingford, Chris; Yang, Hui; Harper, Anna; Cox, Peter M.; Gedney, Nicola; Burke, Eleanor J.; Lowe, Jason A.; Hayman, Garry; Collins, William J.; Smith, Stephen M.; Comyn-Platt, Edward

    2017-07-01

    The meeting of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December 2015 committed parties at the convention to hold the rise in global average temperature to well below 2.0 °C above pre-industrial levels. It also committed the parties to pursue efforts to limit warming to 1.5 °C. This leads to two key questions. First, what extent of emissions reduction will achieve either target? Second, what is the benefit of the reduced climate impacts from keeping warming at or below 1.5 °C? To provide answers, climate model simulations need to follow trajectories consistent with these global temperature limits. It is useful to operate models in an inverse mode to make model-specific estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration pathways consistent with the prescribed temperature profiles. Further inversion derives related emissions pathways for these concentrations. For this to happen, and to enable climate research centres to compare GHG concentrations and emissions estimates, common temperature trajectory scenarios are required. Here we define algebraic curves that asymptote to a stabilised limit, while also matching the magnitude and gradient of recent warming levels. The curves are deliberately parameter-sparse, needing the prescription of just two parameters plus the final temperature. Yet despite this simplicity, they can allow for temperature overshoot and for generational changes, for which more effort to decelerate warming change needs to be made by future generations. The curves capture temperature profiles from the existing Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP2.6) scenario projections by a range of different Earth system models (ESMs), which have warming amounts towards the lower levels of those that society is discussing.

  5. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  6. Globalization of the Amazon soy and beef industries: opportunities for conservation.

    PubMed

    Nepstad, Daniel C; Stickler, Claudia M; Almeida, Oriana T

    2006-12-01

    Amazon beef and soybean industries, the primary drivers of Amazon deforestation, are increasingly responsive to economic signals emanating from around the world, such as those associated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, "mad cow disease") outbreaks and China's economic growth. The expanding role of these economic "teleconnections" (coupled phenomena that take place in distant places on the planet) led to a 3-year period (2002-2004) of historically high deforestation rates. But it also increases the potential for large-scale conservation in the region as markets and finance institutions demand better environmental and social performance of beef and soy producers. Cattle ranchers and soy farmers who have generally opposed ambitious government regulations that require forest reserves on private property are realizing that good land stewardship-including compliance with legislation-may increase their access to expanding domestic and international markets and to credit and lower the risk of "losing" their land to agrarian reform. The realization of this potential depends on the successful negotiation of social and environmental performance criteria and an associated system of certification that are acceptable to both the industries and civil society. The foot-and-mouth eradication system, in which geographic zones win permission to export beef, may provide an important model for the design of a low-cost, peer-enforced, socioenvironmental certification system that becomes the mechanism by which beef and soy industries gain access to markets outside the Amazon.

  7. Tracking occupational hearing loss across global industries: a comparative analysis of metrics.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Galusha, Deron; McTague, Michael F; Slade, Martin D; Wesdock, James C; Dixon-Ernst, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Occupational hearing loss is one of the most prevalent occupational conditions; yet, there is no acknowledged international metric to allow comparisons of risk between different industries and regions. In order to make recommendations for an international standard of occupational hearing loss, members of an international industry group (the International Aluminium Association) submitted details of different hearing loss metrics currently in use by members. We compared the performance of these metrics using an audiometric data set for over 6000 individuals working in 10 locations of one member company. We calculated rates for each metric at each location from 2002 to 2006. For comparison, we calculated the difference of observed-expected (for age) binaural high-frequency hearing loss (in dB/year) for each location over the same time period. We performed linear regression to determine the correlation between each metric and the observed-expected rate of hearing loss. The different metrics produced discrepant results, with annual rates ranging from 0.0% for a less-sensitive metric to more than 10% for a highly sensitive metric. At least two metrics, a 10dB age-corrected threshold shift from baseline and a 15dB nonage-corrected shift metric, correlated well with the difference of observed-expected high-frequency hearing loss. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop an international standard for tracking occupational hearing loss in industrial working populations.

  8. Tracking occupational hearing loss across global industries: A comparative analysis of metrics

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Galusha, Deron; McTague, Michael F.; Slade, Martin D.; Wesdock, James C.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Occupational hearing loss is one of the most prevalent occupational conditions; yet, there is no acknowledged international metric to allow comparisons of risk between different industries and regions. In order to make recommendations for an international standard of occupational hearing loss, members of an international industry group (the International Aluminium Association) submitted details of different hearing loss metrics currently in use by members. We compared the performance of these metrics using an audiometric data set for over 6000 individuals working in 10 locations of one member company. We calculated rates for each metric at each location from 2002 to 2006. For comparison, we calculated the difference of observed–expected (for age) binaural high frequency hearing loss (in dB/year) for each location over the same time period. We performed linear regression to determine the correlation between each metric and the observed–expected rate of hearing loss. The different metrics produced discrepant results, with annual rates ranging from 0.0% for a less-sensitive metric to more than 10% for a highly sensitive metric. At least two metrics, a 10 dB age-corrected threshold shift from baseline and a 15 dB nonage-corrected shift metric, correlated well with the difference of observed–expected high-frequency hearing loss. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop an international standard for tracking occupational hearing loss in industrial working populations. PMID:22387709

  9. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Contamination control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The strong influence NASA-sponsored research has had on the development of solutions to difficult contamination problems is considered. The contamination control field is comprised of an industrial base, supplying the tools of control; a user base, adopting control techniques; and a technical base, expanding the concepts of control. Both formal and informal mechanisms used by NASA to communicate a variety of technical advances are reviewed and certain examples of the expansion of the user base through technology transfer are given. Issues related to transfer of NASA-generated contamination control technology are emphasized.

  10. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Heins, C. R.; Hildred, W. M.; Johnson, F. D.; Staskin, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    The fire safety field is considered as being composed of three parts: an industry, a technology base, and a user base. An overview of the field is presented, including a perspective on the magnitude of the national fire safety problem. Selected NASA contributions to the technology of fire safety are considered. Communication mechanisms, particularly conferences and publications, used by NASA to alert the community to new developments in the fire safety field, are reviewed. Several examples of nonaerospace applications of NASA-generated fire safety technology are also presented. Issues associated with attempts to transfer this technology from the space program to other sectors of the American economy are outlined.

  11. A profile of the substance abuse treatment industry: organization, costs, and treatment completion.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Albert M; Raskin, Ira E; Blacklow, Beatrice

    2008-01-01

    Nationally representative data from the Alcohol and Drug Services Study, conducted between 1996 and 1999, are used to explore the structure and operation of the substance user treatment industry in the United States. The empirical relationship among client (N=4945) retention and completion, types and use of counseling and medical personnel, diagnostic mix, client demographics, the level of services used, and the cost of treatment in different treatment settings is discussed using tabular presentation and tests of significance. Limitations of the analysis are outlined. This information and analysis are expected to help the research community understand the potential of the ADSS data in addressing many important questions about substance user treatment.

  12. Recent Improvements to CALIOP Level 3 Aerosol Profile Product for Global 3-D Aerosol Extinction Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, J. L.; Getzewich, B. J.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    With nine years of retrievals, the CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product provides an unprecedented synopsis of aerosol extinction in three dimensions and the potential to quantify changes in aerosol distributions over time. The CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product, initially released as a beta product in 2011, reports monthly averages of quality-screened aerosol extinction profiles on a uniform latitude/longitude grid for different cloud-cover scenarios, called "sky conditions". This presentation demonstrates improvements to the second version of the product which will be released in September 2015. The largest improvements are the new sky condition definitions which parse the atmosphere into "cloud-free" views accessible to passive remote sensors, "all-sky" views accessible to active remote sensors and "cloudy-sky" views for opaque and transparent clouds which were previously inaccessible to passive remote sensors. Taken together, the new sky conditions comprehensively summarize CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for a broad range of scientific queries. In addition to dust-only extinction profiles, the new version will include polluted-dust and smoke-only extinction averages. A new method is adopted for averaging dust-only extinction profiles to reduce high biases which exist in the beta version of the level 3 aerosol profile product. This presentation justifies the new averaging methodology and demonstrates vertical profiles of dust and smoke extinction over Africa during the biomass burning season. Another crucial advancement demonstrated in this presentation is a new approach for computing monthly mean aerosol optical depth which removes low biases reported in the beta version - a scenario unique to lidar datasets.

  13. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  14. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  15. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  17. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  19. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  1. Analysis of inter-country input-output table based on citation network: How to measure the competition and collaboration between industrial sectors on the global value chain.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    The input-output table is comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with complex economic relationships, which embodies information of supply and demand among industrial sectors. This paper aims to scale the degree of competition/collaboration on the global value chain from the perspective of econophysics. Global Industrial Strongest Relevant Network models were established by extracting the strongest and most immediate industrial relevance in the global economic system with inter-country input-output tables and then transformed into Global Industrial Resource Competition Network/Global Industrial Production Collaboration Network models embodying the competitive/collaborative relationships based on bibliographic coupling/co-citation approach. Three indicators well suited for these two kinds of weighted and non-directed networks with self-loops were introduced, including unit weight for competitive/collaborative power, disparity in the weight for competitive/collaborative amplitude and weighted clustering coefficient for competitive/collaborative intensity. Finally, these models and indicators were further applied to empirically analyze the function of sectors in the latest World Input-Output Database, to reveal inter-sector competitive/collaborative status during the economic globalization.

  2. Analysis of inter-country input-output table based on citation network: How to measure the competition and collaboration between industrial sectors on the global value chain

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The input-output table is comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with complex economic relationships, which embodies information of supply and demand among industrial sectors. This paper aims to scale the degree of competition/collaboration on the global value chain from the perspective of econophysics. Global Industrial Strongest Relevant Network models were established by extracting the strongest and most immediate industrial relevance in the global economic system with inter-country input-output tables and then transformed into Global Industrial Resource Competition Network/Global Industrial Production Collaboration Network models embodying the competitive/collaborative relationships based on bibliographic coupling/co-citation approach. Three indicators well suited for these two kinds of weighted and non-directed networks with self-loops were introduced, including unit weight for competitive/collaborative power, disparity in the weight for competitive/collaborative amplitude and weighted clustering coefficient for competitive/collaborative intensity. Finally, these models and indicators were further applied to empirically analyze the function of sectors in the latest World Input-Output Database, to reveal inter-sector competitive/collaborative status during the economic globalization. PMID:28873432

  3. CCRM: cultivating a culture of cooperation to advance the global regenerative medicine industry.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alanna; Johnson, Stacey

    2016-12-01

    Launched in June 2011, CCRM is a unique, Canadian, not-for-profit group that is solely focused on developing and commercializing regenerative medicine, cell and gene therapy technologies. Its mission is to generate sustainable health and economic benefits through global collaborations, and its vision is to be the preferred destination for the best people and companies, technologies, clinical trials and investments in cell and gene therapies, and regenerative medicine.

  4. Relationship between urban eco-environment and competitiveness with the background of globalization: statistical explanation based on industry type newly classified with environment demand and environment pressure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiao-guang; Ma, Qing-Bin

    2005-01-01

    Within the global urban system, the statistical relationship between urban eco-environment (UE) and urban competitiveness (UC) (RUEC) is researched. Data showed that there is a statistically inverted-U relationship between UE and UC. Eco-environmental factor is put into the classification of industries, and gets six industrial types by two indexes viz. industries' eco-environmental demand and pressure. The statistical results showed that there is a strong relationship, for new industrial classification, between the changes of industrial structure and evolvement of UE. The drive mechanism of the evolvement of urban eco-environment, with human demand and global work division was analyzed. The conclusion is that the development stratege, industrial policies of cities, and environmental policies fo cities must be fit with their ranks among the global urban system. At the era of globalization, so far as the environmental policies, their rationality could not be assessed with the level of strictness, but it can enhance cities' competitiveness when they are fit with cities' capabilities to attract and control some sections of the industry's value-chain. None but these kinds of environmental policies can probably enhance the UC.

  5. Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Development and Global Competitiveness of US Space Transportation Industry: Critical Success Factors Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enyinda, Chris I.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the unrelenting call in both public and private sectors fora to reduce the high cost associated with space transportation, many innovative partially or fully RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicles) designs (X-34-37) were initiated. This call is directed at all levels of space missions including scientific, military, and commercial and all aspects of the missions such as nonrecurring development, manufacture, launch, and operations. According to Wertz, tbr over thirty years, the cost of space access has remained exceedingly high. The consensus in the popular press is that to decrease the current astronomical cost of access to space, more safer, reliable, and economically viable second generation RLVs (SGRLV) must be developed. Countries such as Brazil, India, Japan, and Israel are now gearing up to enter the global launch market with their own commercial space launch vehicles. NASA and the US space launch industry cannot afford to lag behind. Developing SGRLVs will immeasurably improve the US's space transportation capabilities by helping the US to regain the global commercial space markets while supporting the transportation capabilities of NASA's space missions, Developing the SGRLVs will provide affordable commercial space transportation that will assure the competitiveness of the US commercial space transportation industry in the 21st century. Commercial space launch systems are having difficulty obtaining financing because of the high cost and risk involved. Access to key financial markets is necessary for commercial space ventures. However, public sector programs in the form of tax incentives and credits, as well as loan guarantees are not yet available. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion and assess the critical success factors germane for RLVs development and US global competitiveness.

  6. Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Development and Global Competitiveness of US Space Transportation Industry: Critical Success Factors Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enyinda, Chris I.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the unrelenting call in both public and private sectors fora to reduce the high cost associated with space transportation, many innovative partially or fully RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicles) designs (X-34-37) were initiated. This call is directed at all levels of space missions including scientific, military, and commercial and all aspects of the missions such as nonrecurring development, manufacture, launch, and operations. According to Wertz, tbr over thirty years, the cost of space access has remained exceedingly high. The consensus in the popular press is that to decrease the current astronomical cost of access to space, more safer, reliable, and economically viable second generation RLVs (SGRLV) must be developed. Countries such as Brazil, India, Japan, and Israel are now gearing up to enter the global launch market with their own commercial space launch vehicles. NASA and the US space launch industry cannot afford to lag behind. Developing SGRLVs will immeasurably improve the US's space transportation capabilities by helping the US to regain the global commercial space markets while supporting the transportation capabilities of NASA's space missions, Developing the SGRLVs will provide affordable commercial space transportation that will assure the competitiveness of the US commercial space transportation industry in the 21st century. Commercial space launch systems are having difficulty obtaining financing because of the high cost and risk involved. Access to key financial markets is necessary for commercial space ventures. However, public sector programs in the form of tax incentives and credits, as well as loan guarantees are not yet available. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion and assess the critical success factors germane for RLVs development and US global competitiveness.

  7. Implementation of a protein profiling platform developed as an academic-pharmaceutical industry collaborative effort.

    PubMed

    Végvári, Akos; Magnusson, Mattias; Wallman, Lars; Ekström, Simon; Bolmsjö, Gunnar; Nilsson, Johan; Miliotis, Tasso; Ostling, Jörgen; Kjellström, Sven; Ottervald, Jan; Franzén, Bo; Hultberg, Hans; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    As much attention has devoted to the proteome research during the last few years, biomarker discovery has become an increasingly hot area, potentially enabling the development of new assays for diagnosis and prognosis of severe diseases. This is the field of research interest where efforts originating from both academic and industrial groups should jointly work on solutions. In this paper, we would like to demonstrate the fruitful combination of both research domains where the scientific crossroads sprout fresh ideas from the basic research domain and how these are refined and tethered to industrial standards. We will present an approach that is based on novel microfluidic devices, utilizing their benefits in processing small-volume samples. Our biomarker discovery strategy, built around this platform, involves optimized samples processing (based on SPE and sample enrichment) and fast MALDI-MS readout. The identification of novel biomarkers at low-abundance level has been achieved by the utilization of a miniaturized sample handling platform, which offers clean-up and enrichment of proteins in one step. Complete automation has been realized in the form of a unique robotic instrumentation that is able to extract and transfer 96 samples onto standard MALDI target plates with high throughput. The developed platform was operated with a 60 sample turnaround per hour allowing sensitivities in femtomol regions of medium- and low-abundant target proteins from clinical studies on samples of multiple sclerosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Several proteins have been identified as new biomarkers from cerebrospinal fluid and esophagus epithelial cells.

  8. Profiling oil sands mixtures from industrial developments and natural groundwaters for source identification.

    PubMed

    Frank, Richard A; Roy, James W; Bickerton, Greg; Rowland, Steve J; Headley, John V; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Peru, Kerry M; Parrott, Joanne L; Conly, F Malcolm; Hewitt, L Mark

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify chemical components that could distinguish chemical mixtures in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) that had potentially migrated to groundwater in the oil sands development area of northern Alberta, Canada. In the first part of the study, OSPW samples from two different tailings ponds and a broad range of natural groundwater samples were assessed with historically employed techniques as Level-1 analyses, including geochemistry, total concentrations of naphthenic acids (NAs) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS). While these analyses did not allow for reliable source differentiation, they did identify samples containing significant concentrations of oil sands acid-extractable organics (AEOs). In applying Level-2 profiling analyses using electrospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) and comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF/MS) to samples containing appreciable AEO concentrations, differentiation of natural from OSPW sources was apparent through measurements of O2:O4 ion class ratios (ESI-HRMS) and diagnostic ions for two families of suspected monoaromatic acids (GC × GC-TOF/MS). The resemblance between the AEO profiles from OSPW and from 6 groundwater samples adjacent to two tailings ponds implies a common source, supporting the use of these complimentary analyses for source identification. These samples included two of upward flowing groundwater collected <1 m beneath the Athabasca River, suggesting OSPW-affected groundwater is reaching the river system.

  9. Association between GSTO2 polymorphism and the urinary arsenic profile in copper industry workers.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Leiliane; Hernández, Alba; Martínez, Valeria; Creus, Amadeu; Quinteros, Domingo; Marcos, Ricardo

    2010-07-01

    Two members of the recently identified Omega class glutathione S-transferase enzymes (GSTO1 and GSTO2) have been proposed to play a role in the response to arsenic exposure. Therefore, polymorphisms in these genes could be related with variations in the arsenic excretion profile and, consequently, with the individual response to chronic exposure. Exons and flanking regions of GSTO2 gene have been screened in two different ethnic groups (20 Europeans and 20 Chilean Indians), and the urinary arsenic patterns and the GSTO2 Asn142Asp polymorphism have been investigated in 207 copper mine workers occupationally exposed to arsenic. Three polymorphisms of GSTO2 already described were detected in Europeans and Chilean Indians, although with significant different allele frequencies. The genotyping for the Asn142Asp polymorphism revealed that almost no significant association exists between this change and the arsenic excretion profile. However, 142Asp change seems to be correlated with an increase in DMA excretion after age and total urinary arsenic adjustment (OR=3.61; P=0.05). Altogether, our findings indicate that ethnical differences should be taken into account for correlation studies between GST Omega polymorphisms and arsenic susceptibility, and that the 142Asp allozyme could modulate arsenic biotransformation and thereby arsenic toxicity.

  10. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  11. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenics is especially interesting when viewed from the perspective of technology transfer. Its recent rapid growth has been due to demands of both industry and aerospace. This environment provides an unusual opportunity to identify some of the forces active during a period of broad technological change and at the same time further the understanding of the technology transfer process. That process is specifically defined here as the ways in which technology, generated in NASA programs, contributes to technological change. In addition to presenting a brief overview of the cryogenics field and describing certain representative examples of the transfer of NASA-generated technology to the private sector, this presentation explores a singular relationship between NASA and another federal agency, the National Bureau of Standards. The relationship has operated both to generate and disseminate information fundamental to the broad growth of the cryogenics field.

  12. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  13. Global gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS)-based metabonomic profiling of lyophilized human feces.

    PubMed

    Phua, Lee Cheng; Koh, Poh Koon; Cheah, Peh Yean; Ho, Han Kiat; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2013-10-15

    Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based fecal metabonomics represents a powerful systems biology approach for elucidating metabolic biomarkers of lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) diseases. Unlike metabolic profiling of fecal water, the profiling of complete fecal material remains under-explored. Here, a gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS) method was developed and validated for the global metabonomic profiling of human feces. Fecal and fecal water metabotypes were also profiled and compared. Additionally, the unclear influence of blood in stool on the fecal metabotype was investigated unprecedentedly. Eighty milligram of lyophilized feces was ultrasonicated with 1mL of methanol:water (8:2) for 30min, followed by centrifugation, drying of supernatant, oximation and trimethylsilylation for 45min. Lyophilized feces demonstrated a more comprehensive metabolic coverage than fecal water, based on the number of chromatographic peaks. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated occult blood (1mgHb/g feces) exerted a negligible effect on the fecal metabotype. Conversely, a unique metabotype related to feces spiked with gross blood (100mgHb/g feces) was revealed (PCA, R(2)X=0.837, Q(2)=0.794), confirming the potential confounding effect of gross GIT bleeding on the fecal metabotype. This pertinent finding highlights the importance of prudent interpretation of fecal metabonomic data, particularly in GIT diseases where bleeding is prevalent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Global tropospheric NO2 profiles obtained from a cloud-slicing technique applied to the Aura OMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Joiner, J.; Lamsal, L. N.; Marchenko, S. V.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an important trace species in the troposphere; it has adverse human health effects and also contributes to the formation of tropospheric ozone, a criteria pollutant and climate agent. We derive tropospheric NO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles by applying a cloud slicing technique to data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. In the cloud-slicing approach, the slope of the above-cloud NO2 column versus the cloud scene pressure is proportional to the NO2 VMR. We apply this technique to OMI O2-O2 cloud scene pressures and above-cloud NO2 vertical column densities from a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm. We derived a global seasonal climatology of tropospheric NO2 VMR profiles in cloudy conditions and compare the results with aircraft profiles measured during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign in 2006. An analysis of our cloud slicing NO2 profiles indicates signatures of uplifted and transported anthropogenic NOx in the middle troposphere as well as lightning-generated NOx in the upper troposphere. We expect that this technique can be applied to future geostationary missions including the NASA Earth Ventures Instrument (EVI) 1 selected mission Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) over North America, the Korean Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) over the Asia-Pacific region, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Sentinel-4 over Europe.

  15. Government/industry partnership: A revolutionary approach in global leadership of advanced gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.A.; Zeh, C.M.

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established a government/industry partnership program to greatly improve the capabilities of U.S. gas turbine technology. A new and challenging program named the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) has been initiated by DOE. The technical and business objectives of this initiative are to challenge the bounds of high performance capabilities of gas turbines, meet stringent environmental requirements, and produce lower cost electric power and cogeneration steam. This program will also yield greater societal benefits through continued expansion of high skilled U.S. jobs and export of U.S. products world wide. A progress report on the ATS program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. A preliminary design of an industrial advanced turbine system configuration will also be outlined in the paper. The technical challenges; advanced critical technologies incorporation, analytical and experimental solutions, and test results of an advanced gas turbine meeting the DOE goals will be described and discussed.

  16. Global Impact Estimation of ISO 50001 Energy Management System for Industrial and Service Sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Therkelsen, Peter L.; Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee T.

    2016-08-01

    A methodology has been developed to determine the impacts of ISO 50001 Energy Management System (EnMS) at a region or country level. The impacts of ISO 50001 EnMS include energy, CO2 emissions, and cost savings. This internationally recognized and transparent methodology has been embodied in a user friendly Microsoft Excel® based tool called ISO 50001 Impact Estimator Tool (IET 50001). However, the tool inputs are critical in order to get accurate and defensible results. This report is intended to document the data sources used and assumptions made to calculate the global impact of ISO 50001 EnMS.

  17. Global urinary metabolic profiling procedures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2011-09-08

    The role of urinary metabolic profiling in systems biology research is expanding. This is because of the use of this technology for clinical diagnostic and mechanistic studies and for the development of new personalized health care and molecular epidemiology (population) studies. The methodologies commonly used for metabolic profiling are NMR spectroscopy, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In this protocol, we describe urine collection and storage, GC/MS and data preprocessing methods, chemometric data analysis and urinary marker metabolite identification. Results obtained using GC/MS are complementary to NMR and LC/MS. Sample preparation for GC/MS analysis involves the depletion of urea via treatment with urease, protein precipitation with methanol, and trimethylsilyl derivatization. The protocol described here facilitates the metabolic profiling of ∼400-600 metabolites in 120 urine samples per week.

  18. Global EDGAR v4.1 emissions of air pollutants: analysis of impacts of emissions abatement in industry and road transport on regional and global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Olivier, J. G.; Doering, U. M.; van Aardenne, J.; Monni, S.; Pagliari, V.; Peters, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The new version v4.1 of the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) compiled by JRC and PBL provides independent estimates of the global anthropogenic emissions and emission trends of precursors of tropospheric ozone (CO, NMVOC, NOx) and acidifying substances (NOx, NH3, SO2) for the period 1970-2005. All emissions are detailed at country level consistently using the same technology-based methodology, combining activity data (international statistics) from publicly available sources and to the extent possible emission factors as recommended by the EMEP/EEA air pollutant emission inventory guidebook. By using high resolution global grid maps per source category of area sources and point sources, we also compiled datasets with annual emissions on a 0.1x0.1 degree grid, as input for atmospheric models. We provide full and up-to-date inventories per country, also for developing countries. Moreover, the time series back in time to 1970 provides for the trends in official national inventories a historic perspective. As part of our objective to contribute to more reliable inventories by providing a reference emissions database for emission scenarios, inventory comparisons and for atmospheric modellers, we strive to transparently document all data sources used and assumptions made where data was missing, in particular for assumptions made on the shares of technologies where relevant. Technology mixes per country or region were taken from other data sources (such as the Platts database) or estimated using other sources or countries as proxy. The evolution in the adoption of technologies world-wide over the 35 years covered by EDGAR v4.1 will be illustrated for the power industry and the road transport sectors, in particular for Europe and the US. Similarly the regional and global impacts of implemented control measures and end-of pipe abatements will be illustrated by the examples of - NOx and SO2 end-of pipe abatements being implemented since the late

  19. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry

    SciTech Connect

    James, Ted; Goodrich, Alan

    2013-12-12

    Over the past decade, significant wind manufacturing capacity has been built in the United States in response to an increasingly large domestic market. Recent U.S. manufacturing production levels exceed anticipated near-term domestic demand for select parts of the supply chain, in part due to policy uncertainty, and this is resulting in some restructuring in the industry. Factor location decisions are influenced by a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors; proximity to end-markets is often a key consideration, especially for manufacturers of large wind turbine components. Technology advancements in the wind sector are continuing, and larger blade designs are being pursued in the market, which may increase U.S.-based manufacturing opportunities.

  20. IBM Industry Practice: Challenges in Offshore Software Development from a Global Delivery Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Ilario

    Offshore software development has greatly influenced competitiveness among IT companies in the last decade. Despite the fact that there are matured and developed offshoring methodologies, there is an ongoing tendency to look for new ways of improving them. Major IT corporations successfully rely on their offshore delivery centers for bridging the gap between communication and infrastructure boundaries. However, projects tend to fail, so problems have to be considered that arise between on- and offshore parts within the same corporation. Based on seven case studies from the industry, this paper describes experiences and challenges faced during the execution of offshore application development between IBM Switzerland and IBM India. Additionally, approaches on how they can be solved are proposed.

  1. A dynamical reconstruction of the pre-industrial and the LGM ocean state constrained by global δ18O data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkreuz, Charlotte; Paul, André; Kurahashi-Nakamura, Takasumi; Losch, Martin; Schulz, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Combining ocean general circulation models with observational data via inverse modeling is a powerful means to obtain more reliable estimates of the ocean's state. The Last Glacial Maximum (19-23 ka BP, LGM) was a climatic state substantially different from today and the large-scale ocean circulation patterns during this time remain uncertain. It is furthermore unclear if the sparse data coverage of the LGM is actually sufficient to constrain the ocean circulation by an inverse modeling technique. We used the adjoint method to estimate the state of the global ocean. For the pre-industrial, this estimate is consistent with the dynamics of the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm) and global temperature, salinity and δ18O data within their respective error bounds. The model uses a cubed-sphere grid with 192 x 32 horizontal grid cells and 15 vertical levels. A water-isotopes module was used to simulate stable water isotopes such that, to our knowledge for the first time, global δ18O data from the whole water-column could be assimilated using the adjoint method. The state estimate based on our 200-year long optimized run shows significant improvements in comparison to the original forward run without data constraint ("first guess"). For example, surface δ18O values in the subtropical gyres in the Atlantic, across the North Atlantic, the Mediterranean Sea and in the Arctic Oceans show a much better agreement with the observations. The same holds true for deep-ocean δ18O values, for example in the Atlantic and the Arctic Oceans. Two additional state estimates are presented. Firstly, to test the constraint given by the limited data coverage of the LGM an estimate for the pre-industrial ocean is obtained constrained only by data equivalent to available LGM data in terms of data types and data density. Secondly, we reconstruct the state of the LGM ocean using global sea-surface temperature and δ18O data from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from various sources.

  2. Global Gene Expression Profiles of Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of Glycine tomentella During Phakopsora pachyrhizi Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a destructive foliar disease that occurs in many soybean-producing countries. Towards the goal of identifying genes controlling resistance to soybean rust, transcriptome profiling was conducted in resistant and susceptible Glycine tomentella genotype...

  3. [A psychological profile of subjects from industrial sectors with cardiovascular diseases interviewed via the H. J. Eysenck questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Murăraşu, D; Bălăceanu, G; Mocanu, D; Toma, V; Iliescu, F; Dănulescu, E

    1990-01-01

    Authors in the literature are unanimous in considering type A personality as an individual characteristic susceptible to cardiovascular risk. The latter, in its turn, is regarded, after H. J. Eysenck [4], as an association of the scores of extroversion and neurosis. Starting from this assumption, we set out to outline a profile of the cardiovascular patient using the "Eysenck" questionnaire. The study population included 126 industrial workers compared to a matching control set. The resulting profile displayed neurotic components within an ego perpetually frustrated in its needs of well-being, emotional satisfaction and rewarding social relations (-1,dark blue, Lüscher colour test in its shortened variant). Stress and introversion foster neuroticism and encourage the ego in its compulsive quest for autonomy, "eccentric" behaviour in actual situations and egocentric attitudes in reserve. Findings suggest that the "H. J. Eysenck" test for introversion-extroversion and neuroticism, as well as the Lüscher colour test (the shortened variant) are likely to be useful predictive tools in cardiovascular disease.

  4. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bullock, James; Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2012-11-20

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 {+-} 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least {approx}175 kpc ({approx}2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

  5. Innovation in Photovoltaic Science, Engineering, and Policy: A Potential Trillion-Dollar Global Industry for Sustainable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Cheng

    The solar photovoltaic (PV) technology was an expensive niche energy source only for satellite applications, hallmarked by the Bell Lab's launch of the Telstar satellite with PV cells in 1962. Over the past decades, the accumulation of vast amount of effort across various disciplines in science, engineering, and policy has enabled the phenomenal growth of the solar PV industry into a global enterprise with about 140 gigawatt (GW) of cumulative installations by the end of 2013. Further cost reduction through innovation holds the promise in deploying terawatt (TW)-scale solar PV systems globally in both developed and developing countries, meeting growing energy demand and mitigating climate change. Chapter 1 presents a big picture view of the unsustainable path, heavily relying on fossil fuels, in the current global energy landscape. The main body of the dissertation examines the solar PV technology from a holistic and interdisciplinary perspective: from the basic research, to innovations in manufacturing and installing PV modules, to the driving energy policies. Chapter 2 offers a fundamental understanding of the PV technology and a review on recent scientific advances in improving PV efficiency (W/m 2). Chapter 3 reviews the state-of-the-art process flow in manufacturing commercial PV modules. In the context of pursuing further reduction in manufacturing cost (/m2), the thin Si film concept and its recent research effort are reviewed. Aiming to explore novel ways to produce high-quality seed crystals for thin Si film deposition, the key findings of the laser crystallization experiment is presented in Chapter 4. The fundamental thermophysics of nucleation and crystal growth is first reviewed, which highlights the importance of temperature evolution and heat transport in modelling the ultrafast laser crystallization process. Laser crystallization of a range of Si nanostructures are then carried out to study the nucleation and crystal growth behavior under some novel

  6. A global strategy based on experiments and simulations for squeal prediction on industrial railway brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinou, J.-J.; Loyer, A.; Chiello, O.; Mogenier, G.; Lorang, X.; Cocheteux, F.; Bellaj, S.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent experimental and numerical investigations on industrial railway brakes. The goal of the present study is to discuss the relevance of the mechanical modeling strategy for squeal prediction. Specific experimental set-ups based on transient and controlled braking tests are designed for this purpose. Measurements are performed on it to investigate the dynamic behavior of TGV squeal noise and its squeal characterization through experiments. It will be demonstrated that it is possible to build consistent and efficient finite element models to simulate squeal events in TGV brake systems. The numerical strategy will be presented, including not only the modeling of the TGV brake system and the stability analysis, but also the transient nonlinear dynamic and computational process based on efficient reduced basis. This complete numerical strategy allows us to perform relevance squeal prediction on industrial railway brakes. This study comes within the scope of a research program AcouFren that is supported by ADEME (Agence De l'Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l'Energie) concerning the reduction of the squeal noise generated by high power railway disc brakes. experiments with an evolution of the rotational speed of the disc: these tests are called "transient braking tests" and correspond to real braking tests, experiments with a controlled steady rotational speed (i.e. dynamic fluctuations in rotational speed are not significant): these tests are called "controlled braking tests". In the present study, the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) [20] is used to study the time-history responses of the TGV brake system. So, a brief basic theory of the wavelet analysis that transforms a signal into wavelets that are well localized both in frequency and time is presented in this part of the paper. Considering a function f(t), the associated Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) corresponds to a wavelet transform given by W(a,b

  7. Translating global climate model projections into usable information for water managers and industry: A case study from Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J.; Ling, F.; Graham, B.; Grose, M.; Corney, S.; Holz, G.; White, C.; Gaynor, S.; Bindoff, N.

    2010-09-01

    Translating meteorological projections from global climate models (GCMs) into useful information for water managers and industry involves addressing a combination of technical and communication challenges. The Climate Futures for Tasmania project has projected water yield in Tasmania, Australia to 2100. This paper describes how the Climate Futures for Tasmania project successfully translated climate projections into useable information for water managers and industry. From its inception, the Climate Futures for Tasmania project has maintained a dialogue with the two major water managers in the Tasmania: the Department of Primary Industry, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE), the government body with statutory responsibility for water management in Tasmania, and Hydro Tasmania, Australia's largest hydropower generator. Frequent discussions with these two organisations directed the technical research into future water yields. Tasmania is a difficult region for climate change-hydrology studies. Tasmania's complex rainfall patterns are not replicated by GCMs, and hence GCMs produce information that is too general to be useful to Tasmanian water managers. To overcome this problem, GCM projections were downscaled to a finer spatial resolution. Downscaling greatly improved the spatial correlation of modelled rainfall with observations, and accordingly the usefulness of the projections to water managers. The downscaled climate projections were fed into hydrological models to produce projections of streamflow. The hydrological modelling involved two steps: 1. Runoff modelling - calculating statewide, gridded natural runoff at a resolution of 0.05 degrees 2. River system modelling - aggregating the gridded natural runoff to 65 Tasmanian river basins and then accounting for human activities in rivers including dams, irrigation and hydropower generation. Splitting the hydrological modelling into these two steps allows the effects of climate and human activity to be

  8. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  9. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  10. Globalization and the transfer of hazardous industry: asbestos in Mexico, 1979-2000.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc A; Markowitz, Steven; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Sanchez Roman, Francisco Raúl; Vázquez Grameix, Juan Humberto

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified asbestos use in Mexico in the past decade and evaluated available data on mortality due to malignant mesothelioma in Mexico between 1979 and 2000. Mortality data were analyzed from secondary databases of the Mexican Social Security System and the Ministry of Health. Data on the import and export of asbestos in Mexico were obtained from the Ministry of Trade and Industrial Development of Mexico. Deaths due to pleural mesothelioma significantly increased in this period. Although the import of asbestos declined, the number of Mexican products that contain asbestos tripled. Export of Mexican asbestos-containing products to Central America grew rapidly in the last ten years of the study. Mexico continues the appreciable use of asbestos and has experienced a significant increase in the occurrence of the sentinel asbestos-related disease, malignant mesothelioma. Given the many limitations to the control of hazardous work exposures in Mexico, a ban on asbestos is advocated as the most feasible means of limiting an epidemic of asbestos-related disease.

  11. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models, as determined by using global transcriptomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Ewald, David A; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux; Litman, Thomas; Nakajima, Saeko; Li, Xuan; Xu, Hui; Workman, Christopher T; Scheipers, Peter; Svitacheva, Naila; Labuda, Tord; Krueger, James G; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Kabashima, Kenji; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2017-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. Although many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood, and a comparison of these models with the human AD transcriptomic fingerprint is lacking. We sought to evaluate the transcriptomic profiles of 6 common murine models and determine how they relate to human AD skin. Transcriptomic profiling was performed by using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR on biopsy specimens from NC/Nga, flaky tail, Flg-mutated, ovalbumin-challenged, oxazolone-challenged, and IL-23-injected mice. Gene expression data of patients with AD, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis were obtained from previous patient cohorts. Criteria of a fold change of 2 or greater and a false discovery rate of 0.05 or less were used for gene arrays. IL-23-injected, NC/Nga, and oxazolone-challenged mice show the largest homology with our human meta-analysis-derived AD transcriptome (37%, 18%, 17%, respectively). Similar to human AD, robust TH1, TH2, and also TH17 activation are seen in IL-23-injected and NC/Nga mice, with similar but weaker inflammation in ovalbumin-challenged mice. Oxazolone-challenged mice show a TH1-centered reaction, and flaky tail mice demonstrate a strong TH17 polarization. Flg-mutated mice display filaggrin downregulation without significant inflammation. No single murine model fully captures all aspects of the AD profile; instead, each model reflects different immune or barrier disease aspects. Overall, among the 6 murine models, IL-23-injected mice best simulate human AD; still, the translational focus of the investigation should determine which model is most applicable. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  13. Core Microbial Functional Activities in Ocean Environments Revealed by Global Metagenomic Profiling Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ari J. S.; Siam, Rania; Setubal, João C.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Sayed, Ahmed; Chambergo, Felipe S.; Dawe, Adam S.; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Sharaf, Hazem; Ouf, Amged; Alam, Intikhab; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Lehvaslaiho, Heikki; Ramadan, Eman; Antunes, André; Stingl, Ulrich; Archer, John A. C.; Jankovic, Boris R.; Sogin, Mitchell; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light. PMID:24921648

  14. Global Changes in Lipid Profiles of Mouse Cortex, Hippocampus, and Hypothalamus Upon p53 Knockout

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Tak; Lee, Jong Cheol; Kim, Jong Whi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive lipidomic profiling in three different brain tissues (cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of mouse with p53 deficiency was performed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) and the profile was compared with that of the wild type. p53 gene is a well-known tumour suppressor that prevents genome mutations that can cause cancers. More than 300 lipids (among 455 identified species), including phospholipids (PLs), sphingolipids, ceramides (Cers), and triacylglycerols (TAGs) were quantitatively analysed by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) of nanoflow ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Among the three different neural tissues, hypothalamus demonstrated the most evident lipid profile changes upon p53 knockout. Alterations of PLs containing acyl chains of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid (highly enriched polyunsaturated fatty acids in the nervous system) were examined in relation to cell apoptosis upon p53 knockout. Comparison between sphingomyelins (SMs) and Cers showed that the conversion of SM to Cer did not effectively progress in the hypothalamus, resulting in the accumulation of SMs, possibly due to the inhibition of apoptosis caused by the lack of p53. Furthermore, TAGs were considerably decreased only in the hypothalamus, indicative of lipolysis that led to substantial weight loss of adipose tissue and muscles. PMID:27819311

  15. Occupational asthma prevention and management in industry--an example of a global programme.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Paul F G; Berg, A S; Gayosso, R; Henderson, B; Sax, S E; Willems, H M J

    2005-12-01

    Isocyanates are widely used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams, plastics, coatings and adhesives, and are known to cause occupational asthma in a proportion of exposed workers. Substitution as a prevention strategy is not currently a feasible option. For this reason, health and safety professionals working together in an automotive coatings business created a proactive global programme to address the known potential effects of isocyanates on its workers. The goals of the programme are prevention, early detection and mitigation of effect of key endpoints, especially asthma and to a lesser degree dermatitis, in people who are occupationally exposed, or potentially exposed, to isocyanates and products containing isocyanates. The surveillance programme for isocyanates has several important components, which include assessment of exposure, pre-placement questionnaire and spirometry, training and education of employees, regularly administered periodic questionnaires, medical assessment for abnormal questionnaire responses, process for early reporting and investigation of symptomatic employees and incidents, group data review and management reporting. Although regional differences exist regarding availability of specialized services, we have successfully implemented this programme in parts of North America, Europe and Latin America, and are currently implementing elsewhere. These simple control measures are relatively inexpensive and can be applied in even small business settings. It is recommended that all employers who manufacture, handle or use isocyanate-containing products consider such a strategy.

  16. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through global profiling, network analysis and independent validation of key candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Arvind, Prathima; Jayashree, Shanker; Jambunathan, Srikarthika; Nair, Jiny; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2015-12-01

    Molecular mechanism underlying the patho-physiology of coronary artery disease (CAD) is complex. We used global expression profiling combined with analysis of biological network to dissect out potential genes and pathways associated with CAD in a representative case-control Asian Indian cohort. We initially performed blood transcriptomics profiling in 20 subjects, including 10 CAD patients and 10 healthy controls on the Agilent microarray platform. Data was analysed with Gene Spring Gx12.5, followed by network analysis using David v 6.7 and Reactome databases. The most significant differentially expressed genes from microarray were independently validated by real time PCR in 97 cases and 97 controls. A total of 190 gene transcripts showed significant differential expression (fold change>2,P<0.05) between the cases and the controls of which 142 genes were upregulated and 48 genes were downregulated. Genes associated with inflammation, immune response, cell regulation, proliferation and apoptotic pathways were enriched, while inflammatory and immune response genes were displayed as hubs in the network, having greater number of interactions with the neighbouring genes. Expression of EGR1/2/3, IL8, CXCL1, PTGS2, CD69, IFNG, FASLG, CCL4, CDC42, DDX58, NFKBID and NR4A2 genes were independently validated; EGR1/2/3 and IL8 showed >8-fold higher expression in cases relative to the controls implying their important role in CAD. In conclusion, global gene expression profiling combined with network analysis can help in identifying key genes and pathways for CAD.

  17. Global Gene Expression Profiling in PAI-1 Knockout Murine Heart and Kidney: Molecular Basis of Cardiac-Selective Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Asish K.; Murphy, Sheila B.; Kishore, Raj; Vaughan, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined as an abnormal matrix remodeling due to excessive synthesis and accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in tissues during wound healing or in response to chemical, mechanical and immunological stresses. At present, there is no effective therapy for organ fibrosis. Previous studies demonstrated that aged plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) knockout mice develop spontaneously cardiac-selective fibrosis without affecting any other organs. We hypothesized that differential expressions of profibrotic and antifibrotic genes in PAI-1 knockout hearts and unaffected organs lead to cardiac selective fibrosis. In order to address this prediction, we have used a genome-wide gene expression profiling of transcripts derived from aged PAI-1 knockout hearts and kidneys. The variations of global gene expression profiling were compared within four groups: wildtype heart vs. knockout heart; wildtype kidney vs. knockout kidney; knockout heart vs. knockout kidney and wildtype heart vs. wildtype kidney. Analysis of illumina-based microarray data revealed that several genes involved in different biological processes such as immune system processing, response to stress, cytokine signaling, cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, matrix organization and transcriptional regulation were affected in hearts and kidneys by the absence of PAI-1, a potent inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator. Importantly, the expressions of a number of genes, involved in profibrotic pathways including Ankrd1, Pi16, Egr1, Scx, Timp1, Timp2, Klf6, Loxl1 and Klotho, were deregulated in PAI-1 knockout hearts compared to wildtype hearts and PAI-1 knockout kidneys. While the levels of Ankrd1, Pi16 and Timp1 proteins were elevated during EndMT, the level of Timp4 protein was decreased. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on the influence of PAI-1 on global gene expression profiling in the heart and kidney and its implication in fibrogenesis and

  18. Effects of chronic restraint stress on the global DNA methylation profile of rat lung cells: Modulation by physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Toffoli, L V; Volpini, V L; Nascimento, L M; Silva, W R; Verissimo, L F; Estrada, V B; Pelosi, G G; Gomes, M V

    2017-07-28

    The potential of behavioral stress to affect epigenetic mechanisms of non-encephalic tissues is still underestimated. In the present study we evaluated the effects of chronic behavioral stress on the DNA methylation profile of rat lung cells. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential of physical exercise to modulate the changes evoked by behavioral stress in lung cells. Male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) animals submitted to chronic restraint stress (CRS) (ST group) during the period of the 67th-80th postnatal day (PND); (2) animals submitted to physical exercise (EX group) during the 53rd-79th PND; (3) animals submitted to swimming during the 53rd-79th PND and to CRS during the 67th-80th PND (EX-ST group); and (4) animals not submitted to stress or swimming protocols (CTL). Global DNA methylation was quantified using an ELISA-based approach and gene expression was evaluated by real time PCR. A decreased global DNA methylation profile was observed in the ST group, however physical exercise demonstrated protection of lung cells from this stress-related hypomethylation. Increased expression of the Dnmt1 gene was evidenced in the ST group, whereas physical exercise was shown to protect lung cells from this stress-related effect in the EX-ST group. Comparative analysis of the ST and EX groups revealed opposite effects on the expression of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b; however, a stress-related increase in expression of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b was not seen in the EX-ST group. Our data showed that behavioral stress induced significant changes in the DNA methylation profile of rat lung cells and that this could be modulated by physical exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Observing Magnetic and Current Profiles of the Night side and Terminator of Mars through the Mars Global Surveyor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, N.; Fillingim, M. O.; Fogle, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mars has no global magnetic field. Changes in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field can impact the upper atmosphere and induce currents in the ionosphere of Mars. During aerobraking maneuvers, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) made over 1000 passes through Mars's ionosphere. During these passes, MGS measured the local magnetic field. From these measurements, we can determine the ionospheric currents. We restrict our analysis to passes where the radial component of the magnetic field is nearly zero. This restriction, along with some assumptions about the gradients in the magnetic field, allows us to estimate the horizontal ionospheric currents. Additionally, we focus on the magnetic field data acquired over regions above negligible crustal magnetic fields in order to simplify the analysis. At a maximum altitude of 250 km, the Mars map was segmented to 30 by 30 degrees east longitude and latitude for analysis. We find that on the night side, where the solar zenith angle (SZA) lies between 130 to 180 degrees, only 4% of the data (out of a total of 52 profiles) is usable for computing currents, that is the radial component of the magnetic field is nearly zero. We also find that near the terminator, where the SZA lies between 50 to 130 degrees, an average of 2% of the magnetic field profiles (out of 1905) are usable to compute currents. This implies that currents are rarely horizontal (as required by our assumptions) in these regions. The currents computed from these profiles can give us insights into how the changing solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field can affect the upper atmosphere of Mars. For example, induced currents can lead to Joule heating of the atmosphere potentially modifying the neutral dynamics.

  20. Global Properties of M31's Stellar Halo from the SPLASH Survey. I. Surface Brightness Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Beaton, Rachael L.; Bullock, James; Geha, Marla C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2012-11-01

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 ± 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least ~175 kpc (~2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California

  1. Quantification of Global Primary Emissions of PM2.5, PM10, and TSP from Combustion and Industrial Process Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ye; Tao, Shu

    2015-04-01

    Emission quantification of primary particulate matter (PM) is essential for assessment of its related climate and health impacts. To reduce uncertainty associated with global emissions of TSP, PM10 and PM2.5, we compiled data with high spatial (0.1° ×0.1° ) and sectorial (77 primary sources) resolutions for 2007 based on a newly released global fuel data product (PKU-FUEL-2007), and an emission factor database including emission factors measured recently in developing countries. Total emissions for TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 were estimated to be 162 (123-224), 99 (80-130), and 78 (64-101) Tg, respectively. Our estimates for developing countries are higher than those previously reported. Spatial bias associated with large countries could be reduced by using sub-national fuel consumption data. Despite the fact that most industrial and transport sources locate in urban areas, residential fuel consumptions are quite different between rural and urban areas, especially in developing countries. As a result, per person annual primary PM emission in rural areas are much higher than those in urban areas. Further, this difference in developed countries (12 and 2.8 kg PM2.5 for rural and urban areas) is larger than that in developing countries (8.4 and 4.6 kg PM2.5 for rural and urban areas). Additionally, we looked at temporal trends from 1960 to 2009 at country-scale resolution. Although total emissions are still increasing in developing countries, their intensities in terms of gross domestic production or energy consumption have decreased. PM emitted in developed countries is finer owing to a larger contribution from non-industrial sources, and use of abatement technologies. In contrast, countries like China, with strong industry emissions and limited abatement facilities, emit coarser PM. The health impacts of PM are intensified in hotspots and cities owing to covariance of sources and receptors. Although urbanization reduces the per person emission, overall health impacts

  2. Global profiling and rapid matching of natural products using diagnostic product ion network and in silico analogue database: Gastrodia elata as a case study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang-Jiang-Sheng; Zha, Liangping; Liu, Da-Hui; Kang, Liping; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Nan, Tie-Gui; Yang, Jian; Li, Fajie; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2016-07-22

    Rapid discovery of novel compounds of a traditional herbal medicine is of vital significance for pharmaceutical industry and plant metabolic pathway analysis. However, discovery of unknown or trace natural products is an ongoing challenge. This study presents a universal targeted data-independent acquisition and mining strategy to globally profile and effectively match novel natural product analogues from an herbal extract. The famous medical plant Gastrodia elata was selected as an example. This strategy consists of three steps: (i) acquisition of accurate parent and adduct ions (PAIs) and the product ions data of all eluting compounds by untargeted full-scan MS(E) mode; (ii) rapid compound screening using diagnostic product ions (DPIs) network and in silico analogue database with SUMPRODUCT function to find novel candidates; and (iii) identification and isomerism discrimination of multiple types of compounds using ClogP and ions fragment behavior analyses. Using above data mining methods, a total of 152 compounds were characterized, and 70 were discovered for the first time, including series of phospholipids and novel gastroxyl derivatives. Furthermore, a number of gastronucleosides and phase II metabolites of gastrodin and parishins were discovered, including glutathionylated, cysteinylglycinated and cysteinated compounds, and phosphatidylserine analogues. This study extended the application of classical DPIs filter strategy and developed a structure-based screening approach with the potential for significant increase of efficiency for discovery and identification of trace novel natural products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Global epigenetic profiling identifies methylation subgroups associated with recurrence-free survival in meningioma.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Wilson, Charmaine D; Zadeh, Gelareh; DeMonte, Franco; Jones, David T W; Pfister, Stefan M; Sulman, Erik P; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2017-03-01

    Meningioma is the most common primary brain tumor and carries a substantial risk of local recurrence. Methylation profiles of meningioma and their clinical implications are not well understood. We hypothesized that aggressive meningiomas have unique DNA methylation patterns that could be used to better stratify patient management. Samples (n = 140) were profiled using the Illumina HumanMethylation450BeadChip. Unsupervised modeling on a training set (n = 89) identified 2 molecular methylation subgroups of meningioma (MM) with significantly different recurrence-free survival (RFS) times between the groups: a prognostically unfavorable subgroup (MM-UNFAV) and a prognostically favorable subgroup (MM-FAV). This finding was validated in the remaining 51 samples and led to a baseline meningioma methylation classifier (bMMC) defined by 283 CpG loci (283-bMMC). To further optimize a recurrence predictor, probes subsumed within the baseline classifier were subject to additional modeling using a similar training/validation approach, leading to a 64-CpG loci meningioma methylation predictor (64-MMP). After adjustment for relevant clinical variables [WHO grade, mitotic index, Simpson grade, sex, location, and copy number aberrations (CNAs)] multivariable analyses for RFS showed that the baseline methylation classifier was not significant (p = 0.0793). The methylation predictor, however, was significantly associated with tumor recurrence (p < 0.0001). CNAs were extracted from the 450k intensity profiles. Tumor samples in the MM-UNFAV subgroup showed an overall higher proportion of CNAs compared to the MM-FAV subgroup tumors and the CNAs were complex in nature. CNAs in the MM-UNFAV subgroup included recurrent losses of 1p, 6q, 14q and 18q, and gain of 1q, all of which were previously identified as indicators of poor outcome. In conclusion, our analyses demonstrate robust DNA methylation signatures in meningioma that correlate with CNAs and stratify patients by recurrence

  4. Global properties of M31's stellar halo from the splash survey. II. Metallicity profile

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Geha, Marla C.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2014-12-01

    We present the metallicity distribution of red giant branch (RGB) stars in M31's stellar halo, derived from photometric metallicity estimates for over 1500 spectroscopically confirmed RGB halo stars. The stellar sample comes from 38 halo fields observed with the Keck/DEIMOS spectrograph, ranging from 9 to 175 kpc in projected distance from M31's center, and includes 52 confirmed M31 halo stars beyond 100 kpc. While a wide range of metallicities is seen throughout the halo, the metal-rich peak of the metallicity distribution function becomes significantly less prominent with increasing radius. The metallicity profile of M31's stellar halo shows a continuous gradient from 9 to ∼100 kpc, with a magnitude of ∼ – 0.01 dex kpc{sup –1}. The stellar velocity distributions in each field are used to identify stars that are likely associated with tidal debris features. The removal of tidal debris features does not significantly alter the metallicity gradient in M31's halo: a gradient is maintained in fields spanning 10-90 kpc. We analyze the halo metallicity profile, as well as the relative metallicities of stars associated with tidal debris features and the underlying halo population, in the context of current simulations of stellar halo formation. We argue that the large-scale gradient in M31's halo implies M31 accreted at least one relatively massive progenitor in the past, while the field to field variation seen in the metallicity profile indicates that multiple smaller progenitors are likely to have contributed substantially to M31's outer halo.

  5. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M.; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis. PMID:23154584

  6. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis.

  7. Global copy number profiling of cancer genomes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In this article, we introduce a robust and efficient strategy for deriving global and allele-specific copy number alternations (CNA) from cancer whole exome sequencing data based on Log R ratios and B-allele frequencies. Applying the approach to the analysis of over 200 skin cancer samples, we demonstrate its utility for discovering distinct CNA events and for deriving ancillary information such as tumor purity. Availability and implementation: https://github.com/xfwang/CLOSE CONTACT: xuefeng.wang@stonybrook.edu or michael.krauthammer@yale.edu. (Publication Abstract)

  8. Global profiling of histone modifications in the polyomavirus BK virion minichromosome.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chiung-Yao; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chan, Michael W Y; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chang, Deching

    2015-09-01

    During polyomavirus infection, the viral DNA adopts histones from host cells and forms minichromosomes as an important part of the viral life cycle. However, the detailed mechanisms of this histone incorporation remain unclear. Here, we profiled the histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in BKPyV minichromosomes and in the chromatin of BKPyV host cells. Through Triton-acetic acid-urea (TAU)-PAGE separation followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, we identified different kinds of PTMs on histones from BKPyV minichromosomes and from host cells. We observed not only the common PTMs on histones such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and formylation but also several novel PTM sites. Our results also confirmed that the BKPyV minichromosome is hyperacetylated. Our detailed histone PTM profiles for the BKPyV minichromosome provide insights for future exploration of the underlying mechanisms and biological relevance of these histone PTMs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global nutritional profiling for mutant and chemical mode-of-action analysis in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, Matthew M; Arst, Herbert N; Skalchunes, Amy R; Coffin, Marie; Darveaux, Blaise A; Heiniger, Ryan W; Shuster, Jeffrey R

    2003-12-01

    We describe a method for gene function discovery and chemical mode-of-action analysis via nutrient utilization using a high throughput Nutritional Profiling platform suitable for filamentous microorganisms. We have optimized the growth conditions for each fungal species to produce reproducible optical density growth measurements in microtiter plates. We validated the Nutritional Profiling platform using a nitrogen source utilization assay to analyze 21 Aspergillus nidulans strains with mutations in the master nitrogen regulatory gene, areA. Analysis of these data accurately reproduced expected results and provided new data to demonstrate that this platform is suitable for fine level phenotyping of filamentous fungi. Next, we analyzed the differential responses of two fungal species to a glutamine synthetase inhibitor, illustrating chemical mode-of-action analysis. Finally, a comparative phenotypic study was performed to characterize carbon catabolite repression in four fungal species using a carbon source utilization assay. The results demonstrate differentiation between two Aspergillus species and two diverse plant pathogens and provide a wealth of new data on fungal nutrient utilization. Thus, these assays can be used for gene function and chemical mode-of-action analysis at the whole organism level as well as interspecies comparisons in a variety of filamentous fungi. Additionally, because uniform distribution of growth within wells is maintained, comparisons between yeast and filamentous forms of a single organism can be performed.

  10. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-07

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology.

  11. Global Profiling and Molecular Characterization of Alternative Splicing Events Misregulated in Lung Cancer ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Misquitta-Ali, Christine M.; Cheng, Edith; O'Hanlon, Dave; Liu, Ni; McGlade, C. Jane; Tsao, Ming Sound; Blencowe, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a widespread mechanism underlying the generation of proteomic and regulatory complexity. However, which of the myriad of human AS events play important roles in disease is largely unknown. To identify frequently occurring AS events in lung cancer, we used AS microarray profiling and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays to survey patient-matched normal and adenocarcinoma tumor tissues from the lungs of 29 individuals diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Of 5,183 profiled alternative exons, four displayed tumor-associated changes in the majority of the patients. These events affected transcripts from the VEGFA, MACF1, APP, and NUMB genes. Similar AS changes were detected in NUMB and APP transcripts in primary breast and colon tumors. Tumor-associated increases in NUMB exon 9 inclusion correlated with reduced levels of NUMB protein expression and activation of the Notch signaling pathway, an event that has been linked to tumorigenesis. Moreover, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of NUMB followed by isoform-specific rescue revealed that expression of the exon 9-skipped (nontumor) isoform represses Notch target gene activation whereas expression of the exon 9-included (tumor) isoform lacks this activity and is capable of promoting cell proliferation. The results thus reveal widespread AS changes in NSCLC that impact cell signaling in a manner that likely contributes to tumorigenesis. PMID:21041478

  12. Global phosphoproteomic profiling reveals perturbed signaling in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanov, Uros; Guo, Hongbo; Buchsbaum, Diana; Cosme, Jake; Abbasi, Cynthia; Isserlin, Ruth; Sharma, Parveen; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Emili, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) plays a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac myocytes through regulation of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2A (SERCA2A) Ca2+ pump. An inherited mutation converting arginine residue 9 in PLN to cysteine (R9C) results in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans and transgenic mice, but the downstream signaling defects leading to decompensation and heart failure are poorly understood. Here we used precision mass spectrometry to study the global phosphorylation dynamics of 1,887 cardiac phosphoproteins in early affected heart tissue in a transgenic R9C mouse model of DCM compared with wild-type littermates. Dysregulated phosphorylation sites were quantified after affinity capture and identification of 3,908 phosphopeptides from fractionated whole-heart homogenates. Global statistical enrichment analysis of the differential phosphoprotein patterns revealed selective perturbation of signaling pathways regulating cardiovascular activity in early stages of DCM. Strikingly, dysregulated signaling through the Notch-1 receptor, recently linked to cardiomyogenesis and embryonic cardiac stem cell development and differentiation but never directly implicated in DCM before, was a prominently perturbed pathway. We verified alterations in Notch-1 downstream components in early symptomatic R9C transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes compared with wild type by immunoblot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. These data reveal unexpected connections between stress-regulated cell signaling networks, specific protein kinases, and downstream effectors essential for proper cardiac function. PMID:27742792

  13. Data resource profile: the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE).

    PubMed

    Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath; Naidoo, Nirmala; Biritwum, Richard; Fan, Wu; Lopez Ridaura, Ruy; Maximova, Tamara; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Williams, Sharon; Snodgrass, J Josh; Minicuci, Nadia; D'Este, Catherine; Peltzer, Karl; Boerma, J Ties

    2012-12-01

    Population ageing is rapidly becoming a global issue and will have a major impact on health policies and programmes. The World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) aims to address the gap in reliable data and scientific knowledge on ageing and health in low- and middle-income countries. SAGE is a longitudinal study with nationally representative samples of persons aged 50+ years in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, with a smaller sample of adults aged 18-49 years in each country for comparisons. Instruments are compatible with other large high-income country longitudinal ageing studies. Wave 1 was conducted during 2007-2010 and included a total of 34 124 respondents aged 50+ and 8340 aged 18-49. In four countries, a subsample consisting of 8160 respondents participated in Wave 1 and the 2002/04 World Health Survey (referred to as SAGE Wave 0). Wave 2 data collection will start in 2012/13, following up all Wave 1 respondents. Wave 3 is planned for 2014/15. SAGE is committed to the public release of study instruments, protocols and meta- and micro-data: access is provided upon completion of a Users Agreement available through WHO's SAGE website (www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/sage) and WHO's archive using the National Data Archive application (http://apps.who.int/healthinfo/systems/surveydata).

  14. Global profiling of co- and post-translationally N-myristoylated proteomes in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Brannigan, James A.; Brassat, Ute; Wright, Megan H.; Heal, William P.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Mann, David J.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is a ubiquitous co- and post-translational modification that has been implicated in the development and progression of a range of human diseases. Here, we report the global N-myristoylated proteome in human cells determined using quantitative chemical proteomics combined with potent and specific human N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) inhibition. Global quantification of N-myristoylation during normal growth or apoptosis allowed the identification of >100 N-myristoylated proteins, >95% of which are identified for the first time at endogenous levels. Furthermore, quantitative dose response for inhibition of N-myristoylation is determined for >70 substrates simultaneously across the proteome. Small-molecule inhibition through a conserved substrate-binding pocket is also demonstrated by solving the crystal structures of inhibitor-bound NMT1 and NMT2. The presented data substantially expand the known repertoire of co- and post-translational N-myristoylation in addition to validating tools for the pharmacological inhibition of NMT in living cells. PMID:25255805

  15. Data Resource Profile: The World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath; Naidoo, Nirmala; Biritwum, Richard; Fan, Wu; Lopez Ridaura, Ruy; Maximova, Tamara; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Williams, Sharon; Snodgrass, J Josh; Minicuci, Nadia; D'Este, Catherine; Peltzer, Karl; Boerma, J Ties; Yawson, A.; Mensah, G.; Yong, J.; Guo, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Parasuraman, P.; Lhungdim, H.; Sekher, TV.; Rosa, R.; Belov, VB.; Lushkina, NP; Peltzer, K.; Makiwane, M.; Zuma, K.; Ramlagan, S.; Davids, A.; Mbelle, N.; Matseke, G.; Schneider, M.; Tabane, C.; Tollman, S.; Kahn, K.; Ng, N.; Juvekar, S.; Sankoh, O.; Debpuur, CY.; Nguyen, TK Chuc; Gomez-Olive, FX.; Hakimi, M.; Hirve, S.; Abdullah, S.; Hodgson, A.; Kyobutungi, C.; Egondi, T.; Mayombana, C.; Minh, HV.; Mwanyangala, MA.; Razzaque, A.; Wilopo, S.; Streatfield, PK.; Byass, P.; Wall, S.; Scholten, F.; Mugisha, J.; Seeley, J.; Kinyanda, E.; Nyirenda, M.; Mutevedzi, P.; Newell, M-L.

    2012-01-01

    Population ageing is rapidly becoming a global issue and will have a major impact on health policies and programmes. The World Health Organization’s Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) aims to address the gap in reliable data and scientific knowledge on ageing and health in low- and middle-income countries. SAGE is a longitudinal study with nationally representative samples of persons aged 50+ years in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, with a smaller sample of adults aged 18–49 years in each country for comparisons. Instruments are compatible with other large high-income country longitudinal ageing studies. Wave 1 was conducted during 2007–2010 and included a total of 34 124 respondents aged 50+ and 8340 aged 18–49. In four countries, a subsample consisting of 8160 respondents participated in Wave 1 and the 2002/04 World Health Survey (referred to as SAGE Wave 0). Wave 2 data collection will start in 2012/13, following up all Wave 1 respondents. Wave 3 is planned for 2014/15. SAGE is committed to the public release of study instruments, protocols and meta- and micro-data: access is provided upon completion of a Users Agreement available through WHO’s SAGE website (www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/sage) and WHO’s archive using the National Data Archive application (http://apps.who.int/healthinfo/systems/surveydata). PMID:23283715

  16. Gene expression profiling--Opening the black box of plant ecosystem responses to global change

    SciTech Connect

    Leakey, A.D.B.; Ainsworth, E.A.; Bernard, S.M.; Markelz, R.J.C.; Ort, D.R.; Placella, S.A.P.; Rogers, A.; Smith, M.D.; Sudderth, E.A.; Weston, D.J.; Wullschleger, S.D.; Yuan, S.

    2009-11-01

    The use of genomic techniques to address ecological questions is emerging as the field of genomic ecology. Experimentation under environmentally realistic conditions to investigate the molecular response of plants to meaningful changes in growth conditions and ecological interactions is the defining feature of genomic ecology. Since the impact of global change factors on plant performance are mediated by direct effects at the molecular, biochemical and physiological scales, gene expression analysis promises important advances in understanding factors that have previously been consigned to the 'black box' of unknown mechanism. Various tools and approaches are available for assessing gene expression in model and non-model species as part of global change biology studies. Each approach has its own unique advantages and constraints. A first generation of genomic ecology studies in managed ecosystems and mesocosms have provided a testbed for the approach and have begun to reveal how the experimental design and data analysis of gene expression studies can be tailored for use in an ecological context.

  17. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-08-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and ‑0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration.

  18. Global Profiling of the Cellular Alternative RNA Splicing Landscape during Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Simon; Martenon-Brodeur, Camille; Caron, Marie; Garant, Jean-Michel; Tremblay, Marie-Pier; Armero, Victoria E. S.; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Thibault, Philippe; Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Scott, Michelle S.; Lemay, Guy; Bisaillon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism of genetic regulation which modifies the sequence of RNA transcripts in higher eukaryotes. AS has been shown to increase both the variability and diversity of the cellular proteome by changing the composition of resulting proteins through differential choice of exons to be included in mature mRNAs. In the present study, alterations to the global RNA splicing landscape of cellular genes upon viral infection were investigated using mammalian reovirus as a model. Our study provides the first comprehensive portrait of global changes in the RNA splicing signatures that occur in eukaryotic cells following infection with a human virus. We identify 240 modified alternative splicing events upon infection which belong to transcripts frequently involved in the regulation of gene expression and RNA metabolism. Using mass spectrometry, we also confirm modifications to transcript-specific peptides resulting from AS in virus-infected cells. These findings provide additional insights into the complexity of virus-host interactions as these splice variants expand proteome diversity and function during viral infection. PMID:27598998

  19. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and −0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  20. Global phosphoproteomic profiling reveals perturbed signaling in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanov, Uros; Guo, Hongbo; Buchsbaum, Diana; Cosme, Jake; Abbasi, Cynthia; Isserlin, Ruth; Sharma, Parveen; Gramolini, Anthony O; Emili, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) plays a central role in Ca(2+) homeostasis in cardiac myocytes through regulation of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2A (SERCA2A) Ca(2+) pump. An inherited mutation converting arginine residue 9 in PLN to cysteine (R9C) results in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans and transgenic mice, but the downstream signaling defects leading to decompensation and heart failure are poorly understood. Here we used precision mass spectrometry to study the global phosphorylation dynamics of 1,887 cardiac phosphoproteins in early affected heart tissue in a transgenic R9C mouse model of DCM compared with wild-type littermates. Dysregulated phosphorylation sites were quantified after affinity capture and identification of 3,908 phosphopeptides from fractionated whole-heart homogenates. Global statistical enrichment analysis of the differential phosphoprotein patterns revealed selective perturbation of signaling pathways regulating cardiovascular activity in early stages of DCM. Strikingly, dysregulated signaling through the Notch-1 receptor, recently linked to cardiomyogenesis and embryonic cardiac stem cell development and differentiation but never directly implicated in DCM before, was a prominently perturbed pathway. We verified alterations in Notch-1 downstream components in early symptomatic R9C transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes compared with wild type by immunoblot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. These data reveal unexpected connections between stress-regulated cell signaling networks, specific protein kinases, and downstream effectors essential for proper cardiac function.

  1. Global Profiling of the Cellular Alternative RNA Splicing Landscape during Virus-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, Simon; Martenon-Brodeur, Camille; Caron, Marie; Garant, Jean-Michel; Tremblay, Marie-Pier; Armero, Victoria E S; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Thibault, Philippe; Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Scott, Michelle S; Lemay, Guy; Bisaillon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism of genetic regulation which modifies the sequence of RNA transcripts in higher eukaryotes. AS has been shown to increase both the variability and diversity of the cellular proteome by changing the composition of resulting proteins through differential choice of exons to be included in mature mRNAs. In the present study, alterations to the global RNA splicing landscape of cellular genes upon viral infection were investigated using mammalian reovirus as a model. Our study provides the first comprehensive portrait of global changes in the RNA splicing signatures that occur in eukaryotic cells following infection with a human virus. We identify 240 modified alternative splicing events upon infection which belong to transcripts frequently involved in the regulation of gene expression and RNA metabolism. Using mass spectrometry, we also confirm modifications to transcript-specific peptides resulting from AS in virus-infected cells. These findings provide additional insights into the complexity of virus-host interactions as these splice variants expand proteome diversity and function during viral infection.

  2. Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Heftberger, Peter; Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Pabst, georg

    2014-01-01

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  3. Global microRNA profiling of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Essaghir, Ahmed; Martijn, Cécile; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors are rare malignancies. They arise from enterochromaffin cells and very little is known about differential microRNA (miRNA) expression. The aim of this study was to identify the miRNA profile of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors, which may have a critical role in tumor development, progression and potentially develop miRNAs as novel clinical biomarkers. Specimens from two test groups, 24 small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor specimens at different stages of malignancy, are included in this study. Total RNA from the first test group, five primary tumors, five mesentery metastases and five liver metastases was hybridized onto the Affymetrix Genechip miRNA arrays to perform a genome-wide profile. The results were validated by using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) and northern blot analyses. We then expanded the investigation to laser capture microdissected small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor cells and immuno-laser capture microdissected normal enterochromaffin cells of the first test group. Furthermore, a second test group, three primary tumors, three mesentery metastases and three liver metastases, was included in the study. Thus, two independent test groups validated the data by QRT-PCR. Moreover, we characterized nine miRNAs, five (miR-96, -182, -183, -196a and -200a), which are upregulated during tumor progression, whereas four (miR-31, -129-5p, -133a and -215) are downregulated. Several online software programs were used to predict potential miRNA target genes to map a number of putative target genes for the aberrantly regulated miRNAs, through an advanced and novel bioinformatics analysis. Our findings provide information about pivotal miRNAs, which may lead to further insights into tumorigenesis, progression mechanisms and novel therapeutic targets recognition. PMID:23328977

  4. A nutrient profiling system for the (re)formulation of a global food and beverage portfolio.

    PubMed

    Vlassopoulos, Antonis; Masset, Gabriel; Charles, Veronique Rheiner; Hoover, Cassandra; Chesneau-Guillemont, Caroline; Leroy, Fabienne; Lehmann, Undine; Spieldenner, Jörg; Tee, E-Siong; Gibney, Mike; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-04-01

    To describe the Nestlé Nutritional Profiling System (NNPS) developed to guide the reformulation of Nestlé products, and the results of its application in the USA and France. The NNPS is a category-specific system that calculates nutrient targets per serving as consumed, based on age-adjusted dietary guidelines. Products are aggregated into 32 food categories. The NNPS ensures that excessive amounts of nutrients to limit cannot be compensated for by adding nutrients to encourage. A study was conducted to measure changes in nutrient profiles of the most widely purchased Nestlé products from eight food categories (n = 99) in the USA and France. A comparison was made between the 2009-2010 and 2014-2015 products. The application of the NNPS between 2009-2010 and 2014-2015 was associated with an overall downwards trend for all nutrients to limit. Sodium and total sugars contents were reduced by up to 22 and 31 %, respectively. Saturated Fatty Acids and total fat reductions were less homogeneous across categories, with children products having larger reductions. Energy per serving was reduced by <10 % in most categories, while serving sizes remained unchanged. The NNPS sets feasible and yet challenging targets for public health-oriented reformulation of a varied product portfolio; its application was associated with improved nutrient density in eight major food categories in the USA and France. Confirmatory analyses are needed in other countries and food categories; the impact of such a large-scale reformulation on dietary intake and health remains to be investigated.

  5. Global expression profiling of theophylline response genes in macrophages: evidence of airway anti-inflammatory regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Pei-Li; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Lin, Yi-Chen; Wang, Chien-Hsun; Liao, Wei-Yu; Chen, Jeremy JW; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2005-01-01

    Background Theophylline has been used widely as a bronchodilator for the treatment of bronchial asthma and has been suggested to modulate immune response. While the importance of macrophages in asthma has been reappraised and emphasized, their significance has not been well investigated. We conducted a genome-wide profiling of the gene expressions of macrophages in response to theophylline. Methods Microarray technology was used to profile the gene expression patterns of macrophages modulated by theophylline. Northern blot and real-time quantitative RT-PCR were also used to validate the microarray data, while Western blot and ELISA were used to measure the levels of IL-13 and LTC4. Results We identified dozens of genes in macrophages that were dose-dependently down- or up-regulated by theophylline. These included genes related to inflammation, cytokines, signaling transduction, cell adhesion and motility, cell cycle regulators, and metabolism. We observed that IL-13, a central mediator of airway inflammation, was dramatically suppressed by theophylline. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA analyses also confirmed these results, without respect to PMA-treated THP-1 cells or isolated human alveolar macrophages. Theophylline, rolipram, etazolate, db-cAMP and forskolin suppressed both IL-13 mRNA expression (~25%, 2.73%, 8.12%, 5.28%, and 18.41%, respectively) and protein secretion (<10% production) in macrophages. These agents also effectively suppressed LTC4 expression. Conclusion Our results suggest that the suppression of IL-13 by theophylline may be through cAMP mediation and may decrease LTC4 production. This study supports the role of theophylline as a signal regulator of inflammation, and that down regulation of IL-13 by theophylline may have beneficial effects in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:16083514

  6. A Chemical Proteomics Approach for Global Analysis of Lysine Monomethylome Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhixiang; Cheng, Zhongyi; Sun, Mingwei; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Ping; He, Tieming; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of lysine residues on histone proteins is known to play an important role in chromatin structure and function. However, non-histone protein substrates of this modification remain largely unknown. An effective approach for system-wide analysis of protein lysine methylation, particularly lysine monomethylation, is lacking. Here we describe a chemical proteomics approach for global screening for monomethyllysine substrates, involving chemical propionylation of monomethylated lysine, affinity enrichment of the modified monomethylated peptides, and HPLC/MS/MS analysis. Using this approach, we identified with high confidence 446 lysine monomethylation sites in 398 proteins, including three previously unknown histone monomethylation marks, representing the largest data set of protein lysine monomethylation described to date. Our data not only confirms previously discovered lysine methylation substrates in the nucleus and spliceosome, but also reveals new substrates associated with diverse biological processes. This method hence offers a powerful approach for dynamic study of protein lysine monomethylation under diverse cellular conditions and in human diseases. PMID:25505155

  7. Evaluation of Upper-Tropospheric and Lower-Stratospheric Ozone Profiles from a Global Ozone Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.; Stajner, Ivanka; Phelps, Carrie; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Data Assimilation Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center provides global 3D ozone fields at six-hour time intervals. Data from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument are used in the assimilation. TOMS provides total column information and SBUV provides profile information, primarily above the ozone peak. Information below the ozone peak comes from the model. This paper will explore the realism of the assimilated ozone in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere through validation with ozonesondes, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) observations. This work is in preparation of using the assimilated ozone in the radiative calculation for the meteorological assimilation as well as in the derivation of tropospheric ozone.

  8. Machine learning of global phosphoproteomic profiles enables discrimination of direct versus indirect kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Giguere, Sebastien; Cheng, Jing; Tyers, Michael D; Thibault, Pierre

    2017-03-06

    Mass spectrometry allows quantification of tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites from minute amounts of cellular material. Despite this wealth of information, our understanding of phosphorylation-based signaling is limited, in part because it is not possible to deconvolute substrate phosphorylation that is directly mediated by a particular kinase versus phosphorylation that is mediated by downstream kinases. Here, we describe a framework for assignment of direct in-vivo kinase substrates using a combination of selective chemical inhibition, quantitative phosphoproteomics, and machine learning techniques. Our workflow allows classification of phosphorylation events following inhibition of an analog-sensitive kinase into kinase-independent effects of the inhibitor, direct effects on cognate substrates and indirect effects mediated by downstream kinases or phosphatases. We applied this method to identify many direct targets of Cdc28 and Snf1 kinases in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Global phosphoproteome analysis of acute time-series demonstrated that dephosphorylation of direct kinase substrates occurs more rapidly compared to indirect substrates, both after inhibitor treatment and under a physiological nutrient shift in wild-type cells. Mutagenesis experiments revealed a high proportion of functionally relevant phosphorylation sites on Snf1 targets. For example, Snf1 itself was inhibited through autophosphorylation on S391 and new phosphosites were discovered that modulate the activity of the Reg1 regulatory subunit of the Glc7 phosphatase and the Gal83 β-subunit of SNF1 complex. This methodology applies to any kinase for which a functional analog sensitive version can be constructed to facilitate the dissection of the global phosphorylation network.

  9. Performance comparison of differential evolution techniques on optimization of feeding profile for an industrial scale baker's yeast fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Yüzgeç, Uğur

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is one of the novel evolutionary optimization methods used for solving the problems that consist of nondifferentiable, nonlinear and multi-objective functions. In this presented work, the classical DE technique and its various versions, such as opposition based on differential evolution (ODE), adaptive differential evolution (ADE), adaptive opposition based on differential evolution (AODE) which is an advanced version of ODE, are presented to determine the optimal feeding flow profile of an industrial scale fed-batch baker's yeast fermentation process. The main objective in any fed-batch fermentation process optimization is both to maximize the amount of the biomass at the end of the process and to minimize the ethanol formation during the process. Four different cases regarding the initial condition of the fermentation process were considered so as to evaluate the performances of proposed algorithms. Besides, two strategies of mutation and crossover operators, which are the most popular in DE's applications, were utilized for performance comparison tests. The influence of initial seed value, initial condition of the process, and both of the mutation and crossover strategies have been investigated for all the different classic, opposition-based, self-adaptive and adaptive opposition-based mechanisms. To demonstrate the performance comparison of the of DE's techniques, the experimental data collected from the fermentor with volume of 100 m(3) are presented with the optimization results obtained by using all the interested DE techniques for the same initial conditions. 2009 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Global changes in the transcript and metabolic profiles during symbiotic nitrogen fixation in phosphorus-stressed common bean plants.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Georgina; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Ramírez, Mario; Goffard, Nicolas; Weiller, Georg; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Fuentes, Sara Isabel; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Udvardi, Michael K; Vance, Carroll P

    2009-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) deficiency is widespread in regions where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), the most important legume for human consumption, is produced, and it is perhaps the factor that most limits nitrogen fixation. Global gene expression and metabolome approaches were used to investigate the responses of nodules from common bean plants inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 grown under P-deficient and P-sufficient conditions. P-deficient inoculated plants showed drastic reduction in nodulation and nitrogenase activity as determined by acetylene reduction assay. Nodule transcript profiling was performed through hybridization of nylon filter arrays spotted with cDNAs, approximately 4,000 unigene set, from the nodule and P-deficient root library. A total of 459 genes, representing different biological processes according to updated annotation using the UniProt Knowledgebase database, showed significant differential expression in response to P: 59% of these were induced in P-deficient nodules. The expression platform for transcription factor genes based in quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that 37 transcription factor genes were differentially expressed in P-deficient nodules and only one gene was repressed. Data from nontargeted metabolic profiles indicated that amino acids and other nitrogen metabolites were decreased, while organic and polyhydroxy acids were accumulated, in P-deficient nodules. Bioinformatics analyses using MapMan and PathExpress software tools, customized to common bean, were utilized for the analysis of global changes in gene expression that affected overall metabolism. Glycolysis and glycerolipid metabolism, and starch and Suc metabolism, were identified among the pathways significantly induced or repressed in P-deficient nodules, respectively.

  11. Transcript and Metabolite Profiling for the Evaluation of Tobacco Tree and Poplar as Feedstock for the Bio-based Industry

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Colin; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair; Mortimer, Cara L.; Kozlo, Amanda; Fraser, Paul D.; Funke, Norma; Cesarino, Igor; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Morreel, Kris; Burgert, Ingo; Gierlinger, Notburga; Bulone, Vincent; Schneider, Vera; Stockero, Andrea; Navarro, Juan Pedro; Pudel, Frank; Tambuyser, Bart; Hygate, James; Bumstead, Jon; Notley, Louis; Persson, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    The global demand for food, feed, energy, and water poses extraordinary challenges for future generations. It is evident that robust platforms for the exploration of renewable resources are necessary to overcome these challenges. Within the multinational framework MultiBioPro we are developing biorefinery pipelines to maximize the use of plant biomass. More specifically, we use poplar and tobacco tree (Nicotiana glauca) as target crop species for improving saccharification, isoprenoid, long chain hydrocarbon contents, fiber quality, and suberin and lignin contents. The methods used to obtain these outputs include GC-MS, LC-MS and RNA sequencing platforms. The metabolite pipelines are well established tools to generate these types of data, but also have the limitations in that only well characterized metabolites can be used. The deep sequencing will allow us to include all transcripts present during the developmental stages of the tobacco tree leaf, but has to be mapped back to the sequence of Nicotiana tabacum. With these set-ups, we aim at a basic understanding for underlying processes and at establishing an industrial framework to exploit the outcomes. In a more long term perspective, we believe that data generated here will provide means for a sustainable biorefinery process using poplar and tobacco tree as raw material. To date the basal level of metabolites in the samples have been analyzed and the protocols utilized are provided in this article. PMID:24894952

  12. Transcript and metabolite profiling for the evaluation of tobacco tree and poplar as feedstock for the bio-based industry.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Colin; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair; Mortimer, Cara L; Kozlo, Amanda; Fraser, Paul D; Funke, Norma; Cesarino, Igor; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Morreel, Kris; Burgert, Ingo; Gierlinger, Notburga; Bulone, Vincent; Schneider, Vera; Stockero, Andrea; Navarro, Juan Pedro; Pudel, Frank; Tambuyser, Bart; Hygate, James; Bumstead, Jon; Notley, Louis; Persson, Staffan

    2014-05-16

    The global demand for food, feed, energy and water poses extraordinary challenges for future generations. It is evident that robust platforms for the exploration of renewable resources are necessary to overcome these challenges. Within the multinational framework MultiBioPro we are developing biorefinery pipelines to maximize the use of plant biomass. More specifically, we use poplar and tobacco tree (Nicotiana glauca) as target crop species for improving saccharification, isoprenoid, long chain hydrocarbon contents, fiber quality, and suberin and lignin contents. The methods used to obtain these outputs include GC-MS, LC-MS and RNA sequencing platforms. The metabolite pipelines are well established tools to generate these types of data, but also have the limitations in that only well characterized metabolites can be used. The deep sequencing will allow us to include all transcripts present during the developmental stages of the tobacco tree leaf, but has to be mapped back to the sequence of Nicotiana tabacum. With these set-ups, we aim at a basic understanding for underlying processes and at establishing an industrial framework to exploit the outcomes. In a more long term perspective, we believe that data generated here will provide means for a sustainable biorefinery process using poplar and tobacco tree as raw material. To date the basal level of metabolites in the samples have been analyzed and the protocols utilized are provided in this article.

  13. Institutional profile. The International Society for Cellular Therapy: evolving to meet the demands of the regenerative medicine industry.

    PubMed

    Maziarz, Richard T; Arthurs, Jane; Horwitz, Edwin

    2011-03-01

    The International Society for Cellular Therapy is a global association driving the translation of scientific research to deliver innovative cellular therapies to patients. Established in 1992, its membership and leadership comprises world-class scientists, clinicians, technologists, biotech/pharma and regulatory professionals from 40 countries focused on preclinical and translational aspects of developing cell therapy products. The International Society for Cellular Therapy has evolved in alignment with the maturation of the field of cell therapy and regenerative medicine to create forums for discussion of shared concerns for commercialization of cell therapies and of development of consensus standards, recognizing that true commercialization depends upon the translational scientific community, the regional regulatory and policy institutions, and the technology support and capital investment from industry. It exists to facilitate the international work of many, to spawn new initiatives, and to synergize with other stakeholders to create the best outcome for the many patients across the world depending on the answers and improved health that cellular therapeutics will provide them.

  14. Global nutrient profiling by Phenotype MicroArrays: a tool complementing genomic and proteomic studies in conidial fungi*

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Lea; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2010-01-01

    Conidial fungi or molds and mildews are widely used in modern biotechnology as producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites, industrially important enzymes, chemicals and food. They are also important pathogens of animals including humans and agricultural crops. These various applications and extremely versatile natural phenotypes have led to the constantly growing list of complete genomes which are now available. Functional genomics and proteomics widely exploit the genomic information to study the cell-wide impact of altered genes on the phenotype of an organism and its function. This allows for global analysis of the information flow from DNA to RNA to protein, but it is usually not sufficient for the description of the global phenotype of an organism. More recently, Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology has been introduced as a tool to characterize the metabolism of a (wild) fungal strain or a mutant. In this article, we review the background of PM applications for fungi and the methodic requirements to obtain reliable results. We also report examples of the versatility of this tool. PMID:20205302

  15. Profiling Global Kinome Signatures of the Radioresistant MCF-7/C6 Breast Cancer Cells Using MRM-based Targeted Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is widely used in cancer therapy; however, cancer cells often develop radioresistance, which compromises the efficacy of cancer radiation therapy. Quantitative assessment of the alteration of the entire kinome in radioresistant cancer cells relative to their radiosensitive counterparts may provide important knowledge to define the mechanism(s) underlying tumor adaptive radioresistance and uncover novel target(s) for effective prevention and treatment of tumor radioresistance. By employing a scheduled multiple-reaction monitoring analysis in conjunction with isotope-coded ATP affinity probes, we assessed the global kinome of radioresistant MCF-7/C6 cells and their parental MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We rigorously quantified 120 kinases, of which 1/3 exhibited significant differences in expression levels or ATP binding affinities. Several kinases involved in cell cycle progression and DNA damage response were found to be overexpressed or hyperactivated, including checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (CDK1 and CDK2), and the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase. The elevated expression of CHK1, CDK1, and CDK2 in MCF-7/C6 cells was further validated by Western blot analysis. Thus, the altered kinome profile of radioresistant MCF-7/C6 cells suggests the involvement of kinases on cell cycle progression and DNA repair in tumor adaptive radioresistance. The unique kinome profiling results also afforded potential effective targets for resensitizing radioresistant cancer cells and counteracting deleterious effects of ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:25341124

  16. Global protein expression profile response of planktonic Aeromonas hydrophila exposed to chlortetracycline.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxin; Yao, Zujie; Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Fang; Lin, Wenxiong; Lin, Xiangmin

    2017-04-01

    The antibiotics resistance phenomena of Aeromonas hydrophila has become serious economic and public health problems for the world aquaculture industry and human health care. In this study, to investigate the instinct antibiotics adaptive mechanism of this pathogen, iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation) based quantitative proteomics technologies were performed to compare the differential expression of A. hydrophila in planktonic status in response to chlortetracycline (CTC) stress and then identified total 1552 proteins including 285 altered proteins with 90 increasing and 195 decreasing abundance proteins. The following bioinformatics analysis showed that many metabolic metabolism pathways such as carbon metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis were trend to down-regulated whereas β-Lactam resistance, RNA degradation, and amino acids biosynthesis processes were more likely to increase in CTC stress. The related pyruvate metabolism and β-Lactam resistance processes in mRNA level were further measured using the q-PCR method. Thus, an understanding of the behaviors of A. hydrophila in response to CTC would be helpful to reveal the antibiotics adaptive mechanism and for the development of novel antibiotics therapy.

  17. International incidence and mortality trends of liver cancer: a global profile

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C. S.; Jiang, Johnny Y.; Goggins, William B; Liang, Miaoyin; Fang, Yuan; Fung, Franklin D. H.; Leung, Colette; Wang, Harry H. X.; Wong, Grace L. H.; Wong, Vincent W.S.; Chan, Henry L. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the global incidence and mortality rates of liver cancer, and evaluated the association between incidence/mortality and socioeconomic development (Human Development Index [HDI] and Gross Domestic Product [GDP]) using linear regression analysis. The average annual percent change (AAPC) of the trends was evaluated from join-point regression analysis. The global incidence of liver cancer varied widely by nine-fold, and was negatively correlated with HDI (men: r = −0.232, p = 0.003; women: r = −0.369, p < 0.001) and GDP per capita (men: r = −0.164, p = 0.036; women: r = −0.212, p = 0.007). Its mortality showed a similarly negative correlation with both indices. The greatest incidence rise in men was observed in Poland (AAPC = 17.5, 95% C.I. = 5.6, 30.9) and Brazil (AAPC = 13.2, 95% C.I. = 5.9, 21.0), whereas Germany (AAPC = 6.6, 95% C.I = 2.0, 11.5) and Norway (AAPC = 6.5, 95% C.I. = 3.2, 10.0) had the greatest increase in women. The mortality rates paralleled the incidence rates in most countries. For mortality, Malta (AAPC = 11.5, 95% C.I. = 3.9, 19.8), Australia (AAPC = 6.8, 95% C.I. = 2.2, 11.5) and Norway (APCC = 5.6, 95% C.I. = 2.8, 8.5) reported the biggest increase among men; whilst Australia (AAPC = 13.4, 95% C.I. = 7.8, 19.4) and Singapore (AAPC = 7.7, 95% C.I. = 4.1, 11.5) showed the most prominent rise among women. These epidemiological data identified countries with potentially increasing trends of liver cancer for preventive actions. PMID:28361988

  18. GAPP: A Proteogenomic Software for Genome Annotation and Global Profiling of Post-translational Modifications in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Yang, Ming-Kun; Zeng, Honghui; Ge, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Although the number of sequenced prokaryotic genomes is growing rapidly, experimentally verified annotation of prokaryotic genome remains patchy and challenging. To facilitate genome annotation efforts for prokaryotes, we developed an open source software called GAPP for genome annotation and global profiling of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in prokaryotes. With a single command, it provides a standard workflow to validate and refine predicted genetic models and discover diverse PTM events. We demonstrated the utility of GAPP using proteomic data from Helicobacter pylori, one of the major human pathogens that is responsible for many gastric diseases. Our results confirmed 84.9% of the existing predicted H. pylori proteins, identified 20 novel protein coding genes, and corrected four existing gene models with regard to translation initiation sites. In particular, GAPP revealed a large repertoire of PTMs using the same proteomic data and provided a rich resource that can be used to examine the functions of reversible modifications in this human pathogen. This software is a powerful tool for genome annotation and global discovery of PTMs and is applicable to any sequenced prokaryotic organism; we expect that it will become an integral part of ongoing genome annotation efforts for prokaryotes. GAPP is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gappproteogenomic/.

  19. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) seedlings exposed to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress interferes with plant growth and production. Plants have evolved a series of molecular and morphological adaptations to cope with this abiotic stress, and overexpression of salt response genes reportedly enhances the productivity of various crops. However, little is known about the salt responsive genes in the energy plant physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). Thus, excavate salt responsive genes in this plant are informative in uncovering the molecular mechanisms for the salt response in physic nut. We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of physic nut plants (roots and leaves) 2 hours, 2 days and 7 days after the onset of salt stress. A total of 1,504 and 1,115 genes were significantly up and down-regulated in roots and leaves, respectively, under salt stress condition. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of physiological process revealed that, in the physic nut, many "biological processes" were affected by salt stress, particular those categories belong to "metabolic process", such as "primary metabolism process", "cellular metabolism process" and "macromolecule metabolism process". The gene expression profiles indicated that the associated genes were responsible for ABA and ethylene signaling, osmotic regulation, the reactive oxygen species scavenging system and the cell structure in physic nut. The major regulated genes detected in this transcriptomic data were related to trehalose synthesis and cell wall structure modification in roots, while related to raffinose synthesis and reactive oxygen scavenger in leaves. The current study shows a comprehensive gene expression profile of physic nut under salt stress. The differential expression genes detected in this study allows the underling the salt responsive mechanism in physic nut with the aim of improving its salt resistance in the future.

  20. Global Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) Seedlings Exposed to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Salt stress interferes with plant growth and production. Plants have evolved a series of molecular and morphological adaptations to cope with this abiotic stress, and overexpression of salt response genes reportedly enhances the productivity of various crops. However, little is known about the salt responsive genes in the energy plant physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). Thus, excavate salt responsive genes in this plant are informative in uncovering the molecular mechanisms for the salt response in physic nut. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of physic nut plants (roots and leaves) 2 hours, 2 days and 7 days after the onset of salt stress. A total of 1,504 and 1,115 genes were significantly up and down-regulated in roots and leaves, respectively, under salt stress condition. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of physiological process revealed that, in the physic nut, many “biological processes” were affected by salt stress, particular those categories belong to “metabolic process”, such as “primary metabolism process”, “cellular metabolism process” and “macromolecule metabolism process”. The gene expression profiles indicated that the associated genes were responsible for ABA and ethylene signaling, osmotic regulation, the reactive oxygen species scavenging system and the cell structure in physic nut. Conclusions/Significance The major regulated genes detected in this transcriptomic data were related to trehalose synthesis and cell wall structure modification in roots, while related to raffinose synthesis and reactive oxygen scavenger in leaves. The current study shows a comprehensive gene expression profile of physic nut under salt stress. The differential expression genes detected in this study allows the underling the salt responsive mechanism in physic nut with the aim of improving its salt resistance in the future. PMID:24837971

  1. Global transcription profiling reveals comprehensive insights into hypoxic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglong; Vantoai, Tara; Moy, Linda P; Bock, Geoffrey; Linford, Lara D; Quackenbush, John

    2005-03-01

    Plants have evolved adaptation mechanisms to sense oxygen deficiency in their environments and make coordinated physiological and structural adjustments to enhance their hypoxic tolerance. To gain insight into how plants respond to low-oxygen stress, gene expression profiling using whole-genome DNA amplicon microarrays was carried out at seven time points over 24 h, in wild-type and transgenic P(SAG12):ipt Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Transcript levels of genes involved in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, ethylene synthesis and perception, calcium signaling, nitrogen utilization, trehalose metabolism, and alkaloid synthesis were significantly altered in response to oxygen limitation. Analysis based on gene ontology assignments suggested a significant down-regulation of genes whose functions are associated with cell walls, nucleosome structures, water channels, and ion transporters and a significant up-regulation of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity, and auxin responses under conditions of oxygen shortage. Promoter analysis on a cluster of up-regulated genes revealed a significant overrepresentation of the AtMYB2-binding motif (GT motif), a sugar response element-like motif, and a G-box-related sequence, and also identified several putative anaerobic response elements. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions using 29 selected genes independently verified the microarray results. This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses conducted to date investigating hypoxia-responsive transcriptional networks in plants.

  2. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  3. LC/MS lipid profiling from human serum: a new method for global lipid extraction.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Roberto Maria; Di Veroli, Alessandra; Valeri, Aurora; Goracci, Laura; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have improved the sensitivity and selectivity of LC/MS analyzers, providing very efficient tools for lipidomics research. In particular, the nine lipid classes that constitute 99 % of the human serum lipidome (sterols, cholesteryl esters, phosphocholines, phosphoethanolamines, sphingomyelins, triacylglycerols, fatty acids, lysophosphocholines, and diacylglycerols) can be easily detected. However, until today there has not been a unique technique for sample preparation that provides a satisfactory recovery for all of these nine classes together. In this work, we have developed and validated a new one-phase extraction (OPE) method that overcomes this limitation. This method was also compared with the gold standard lipid extraction methods such as Folch, Bligh & Dyer, and recently developed methods with methanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether. Results demonstrate that the mixture of methanol/chloroform/MTBE (MMC) provides a recovery very close to 100 % for all nine lipid classes of the human serum investigated. For this extraction method, 100 μL of human serum is incubated with 2 mL of the solvents mixture, then vortexed and centrifuged. For its simplicity of execution, rapidity, reproducibility, and the reduced volume of sample required, this method opens the door to the use of human serum lipid profiling for large-scale applications in scientific research and clinical trials.

  4. Global gene expression profiling of oral cavity cancers suggests molecular heterogeneity within anatomic subsites

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Patricia; Alvares, Adriana M; Michaluart, Pedro; Okamoto, Oswaldo K; Nunes, Fabio D; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A; Tajara, Eloiza H

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a frequent neoplasm, which is usually aggressive and has unpredictable biological behavior and unfavorable prognosis. The comprehension of the molecular basis of this variability should lead to the development of targeted therapies as well as to improvements in specificity and sensitivity of diagnosis. Results Samples of primary OSCCs and their corresponding surgical margins were obtained from male patients during surgery and their gene expression profiles were screened using whole-genome microarray technology. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis were used for data visualization and One-way Analysis of Variance was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Samples clustered mostly according to disease subsite, suggesting molecular heterogeneity within tumor stages. In order to corroborate our results, two publicly available datasets of microarray experiments were assessed. We found significant molecular differences between OSCC anatomic subsites concerning groups of genes presently or potentially important for drug development, including mRNA processing, cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis, metabolic process, cell cycle and apoptosis. Conclusion Our results corroborate literature data on molecular heterogeneity of OSCCs. Differences between disease subsites and among samples belonging to the same TNM class highlight the importance of gene expression-based classification and challenge the development of targeted therapies. PMID:19014556

  5. Global Expression Profiling of Low Temperature Induced Genes in the Chilling Tolerant Japonica Rice Jumli Marshi

    PubMed Central

    Chawade, Aakash; Lindlöf, Angelica; Olsson, Björn; Olsson, Olof

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature is a key factor that limits growth and productivity of many important agronomical crops worldwide. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is negatively affected already at temperatures below +10°C and is therefore denoted as chilling sensitive. However, chilling tolerant rice cultivars exist and can be commercially cultivated at altitudes up to 3,050 meters with temperatures reaching as low as +4°C. In this work, the global transcriptional response to cold stress (+4°C) was studied in the Nepalese highland variety Jumli Marshi (spp. japonica) and 4,636 genes were identified as significantly differentially expressed within 24 hours of cold stress. Comparison with previously published microarray data from one chilling tolerant and two sensitive rice cultivars identified 182 genes differentially expressed (DE) upon cold stress in all four rice cultivars and 511 genes DE only in the chilling tolerant rice. Promoter analysis of the 182 genes suggests a complex cross-talk between ABRE and CBF regulons. Promoter analysis of the 511 genes identified over-represented ABRE motifs but not DRE motifs, suggesting a role for ABA signaling in cold tolerance. Moreover, 2,101 genes were DE in Jumli Marshi alone. By chromosomal localization analysis, 473 of these cold responsive genes were located within 13 different QTLs previously identified as cold associated. PMID:24349120

  6. Global gene expression profiles for life stages of the deadly amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Stajich, Jason E.; Maddox, Nicole; Eisen, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Amphibians around the world are being threatened by an emerging pathogen, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Despite intensive ecological study in the decade since Bd was discovered, little is known about the mechanism by which Bd kills frogs. Here, we compare patterns of global gene expression in controlled laboratory conditions for the two phases of the life cycle of Bd: the free-living zoospore and the substrate-embedded sporangia. We find zoospores to be transcriptionally less complex than sporangia. Several transcripts more abundant in zoospores provide clues about how this motile life stage interacts with its environment. Genes with higher levels of expression in sporangia provide new hypotheses about the molecular pathways involved in metabolic activity, flagellar function, and pathogenicity in Bd. We highlight expression patterns for a group of fungalysin metallopeptidase genes, a gene family thought to be involved in pathogenicity in another group of fungal pathogens that similarly cause cutaneous infection of vertebrates. Finally we discuss the challenges inherent in developing a molecular toolkit for chytrids, a basal fungal lineage separated by vast phylogenetic distance from other well characterized fungi. PMID:18852473

  7. Global gene expression profiles for life stages of the deadly amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Stajich, Jason E; Maddox, Nicole; Eisen, Michael B

    2008-11-04

    Amphibians around the world are being threatened by an emerging pathogen, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Despite intensive ecological study in the decade since Bd was discovered, little is known about the mechanism by which Bd kills frogs. Here, we compare patterns of global gene expression in controlled laboratory conditions for the two phases of the life cycle of Bd: the free-living zoospore and the substrate-embedded sporangia. We find zoospores to be transcriptionally less complex than sporangia. Several transcripts more abundant in zoospores provide clues about how this motile life stage interacts with its environment. Genes with higher levels of expression in sporangia provide new hypotheses about the molecular pathways involved in metabolic activity, flagellar function, and pathogenicity in Bd. We highlight expression patterns for a group of fungalysin metallopeptidase genes, a gene family thought to be involved in pathogenicity in another group of fungal pathogens that similarly cause cutaneous infection of vertebrates. Finally we discuss the challenges inherent in developing a molecular toolkit for chytrids, a basal fungal lineage separated by vast phylogenetic distance from other well characterized fungi.

  8. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-03

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria.

  9. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  10. Time course gene expression profiling of yeast spore germination reveals a network of transcription factors orchestrating the global response.

    PubMed

    Geijer, Cecilia; Pirkov, Ivan; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Ericsson, Abraham; Nielsen, Jens; Krantz, Marcus; Hohmann, Stefan

    2012-10-15

    Spore germination of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a multi-step developmental path on which dormant spores re-enter the mitotic cell cycle and resume vegetative growth. Upon addition of a fermentable carbon source and nutrients, the outer layers of the protective spore wall are locally degraded, the tightly packed spore gains volume and an elongated shape, and eventually the germinating spore re-enters the cell cycle. The regulatory pathways driving this process are still largely unknown. Here we characterize the global gene expression profiles of germinating spores and identify potential transcriptional regulators of this process with the aim to increase our understanding of the mechanisms that control the transition from cellular dormancy to proliferation. Employing detailed gene expression time course data we have analysed the reprogramming of dormant spores during the transition to proliferation stimulated by a rich growth medium or pure glucose. Exit from dormancy results in rapid and global changes consisting of different sequential gene expression subprograms. The regulated genes reflect the transition towards glucose metabolism, the resumption of growth and the release of stress, similar to cells exiting a stationary growth phase. High resolution time course analysis during the onset of germination allowed us to identify a transient up-regulation of genes involved in protein folding and transport. We also identified a network of transcription factors that may be regulating the global response. While the expression outputs following stimulation by rich glucose medium or by glucose alone are qualitatively similar, the response to rich medium is stronger. Moreover, spores sense and react to amino acid starvation within the first 30 min after germination initiation, and this response can be linked to specific transcription factors. Resumption of growth in germinating spores is characterized by a highly synchronized temporal organisation of up- and down

  11. Impact of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay on the global expression profile of budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiaoning; Zheng, Wei; Tang, Shijie; Liu, Xiaosong; Zinkel, Robert A; Tsui, Kam-Wah; Yandell, Brian S; Culbertson, Michael R

    2006-11-24

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a eukaryotic mechanism of RNA surveillance that selectively eliminates aberrant transcripts coding for potentially deleterious proteins. NMD also functions in the normal repertoire of gene expression. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, hundreds of endogenous RNA Polymerase II transcripts achieve steady-state levels that depend on NMD. For some, the decay rate is directly influenced by NMD (direct targets). For others, abundance is NMD-sensitive but without any effect on the decay rate (indirect targets). To distinguish between direct and indirect targets, total RNA from wild-type (Nmd(+)) and mutant (Nmd(-)) strains was probed with high-density arrays across a 1-h time window following transcription inhibition. Statistical models were developed to describe the kinetics of RNA decay. 45% +/- 5% of RNAs targeted by NMD were predicted to be direct targets with altered decay rates in Nmd(-) strains. Parallel experiments using conventional methods were conducted to empirically test predictions from the global experiment. The results show that the global assay reliably distinguished direct versus indirect targets. Different types of targets were investigated, including transcripts containing adjacent, disabled open reading frames, upstream open reading frames, and those prone to out-of-frame initiation of translation. Known targeting mechanisms fail to account for all of the direct targets of NMD, suggesting that additional targeting mechanisms remain to be elucidated. 30% of the protein-coding targets of NMD fell into two broadly defined functional themes: those affecting chromosome structure and behavior and those affecting cell surface dynamics. Overall, the results provide a preview for how expression profiles in multi-cellular eukaryotes might be impacted by NMD. Furthermore, the methods for analyzing decay rates on a global scale offer a blueprint for new ways to study mRNA decay pathways in any organism where cultured cell lines are

  12. Inferring ice formation processes from global-scale black carbon profiles observed in the remote atmosphere and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, S.-M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Liu, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Ginoux, P.; Horowitz, L. W.; Levy, H., II; Ming, Y.; Spackman, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol absorbs solar radiation and can act as cloud condensation nucleus and ice formation nucleus. The current generation of climate models have difficulty in accurately predicting global-scale BC concentrations. Previously, an ensemble of such models was compared to measurements, revealing model biases in the tropical troposphere and in the polar troposphere. Here global aerosol distributions are simulated using different parameterizations of wet removal, and model results are compared to BC profiles observed in the remote atmosphere to explore the possible sources of these biases. The model-data comparison suggests a slow removal of BC aerosol during transport to the Arctic in winter and spring, because ice crystal growth causes evaporation of liquid cloud via the Bergeron process and, hence, release of BC aerosol back to ambient air. By contrast, more efficient model wet removal is needed in the cold upper troposphere over the tropical Pacific. Parcel model simulations with detailed droplet and ice nucleation and growth processes suggest that ice formation in this region may be suppressed due to a lack of ice nuclei (mainly insoluble dust particles) in the remote atmosphere, allowing liquid and mixed-phase clouds to persist under freezing temperatures, and forming liquid precipitation capable of removing aerosol incorporated in cloud water. Falling ice crystals can scavenge droplets in lower clouds, which also results in efficient removal of cloud condensation nuclei. The combination of models with global-scale BC measurements in this study has provided new, latitude-dependent information on ice formation processes in the atmosphere, and highlights the importance of a consistent treatment of aerosol and moist physics in climate models.

  13. Time course gene expression profiling of yeast spore germination reveals a network of transcription factors orchestrating the global response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spore germination of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a multi-step developmental path on which dormant spores re-enter the mitotic cell cycle and resume vegetative growth. Upon addition of a fermentable carbon source and nutrients, the outer layers of the protective spore wall are locally degraded, the tightly packed spore gains volume and an elongated shape, and eventually the germinating spore re-enters the cell cycle. The regulatory pathways driving this process are still largely unknown. Here we characterize the global gene expression profiles of germinating spores and identify potential transcriptional regulators of this process with the aim to increase our understanding of the mechanisms that control the transition from cellular dormancy to proliferation. Results Employing detailed gene expression time course data we have analysed the reprogramming of dormant spores during the transition to proliferation stimulated by a rich growth medium or pure glucose. Exit from dormancy results in rapid and global changes consisting of different sequential gene expression subprograms. The regulated genes reflect the transition towards glucose metabolism, the resumption of growth and the release of stress, similar to cells exiting a stationary growth phase. High resolution time course analysis during the onset of germination allowed us to identify a transient up-regulation of genes involved in protein folding and transport. We also identified a network of transcription factors that may be regulating the global response. While the expression outputs following stimulation by rich glucose medium or by glucose alone are qualitatively similar, the response to rich medium is stronger. Moreover, spores sense and react to amino acid starvation within the first 30 min after germination initiation, and this response can be linked to specific transcription factors. Conclusions Resumption of growth in germinating spores is characterized by a highly synchronized

  14. Global Mass Spectrometry and Transcriptomics Array Based Drug Profiling Provides Novel Insight into Glucosamine Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Ribeiro, Helena; Voabil, Paula; Penque, Deborah; Jensen, Ole N.; Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the molecular effects of glucosamine supplements, a popular and safe alternative to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for decreasing pain, inflammation, and maintaining healthy joints. Numerous studies have reported an array of molecular effects after glucosamine treatment. We questioned whether the differences in the effects observed in previous studies were associated with the focus on a specific subproteome or with the use of specific cell lines or tissues. To address this question, global mass spectrometry- and transcription array-based glucosamine drug profiling was performed on malignant cell lines from different stages of lymphocyte development. We combined global label-free MS-based protein quantitation with an open search for modifications to obtain the best possible proteome coverage. Our data were largely consistent with previous studies in a variety of cellular models. We mainly observed glucosamine induced O-GlcNAcylation/O-GalNAcylation (O-HexNAcylation); however, we also observed global and local changes in acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. For example, our data provides two additional examples of “yin-yang” between phosphorylation and O-HexNAcylation. Furthermore, we mapped novel O-HexNAc sites on GLU2B and calnexin. GLU2B and calnexin are known to be located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and involved in protein folding and quality control. The O-HexNAc sites were regulated by glucosamine treatment and correlated with the up-regulation of the ER stress marker GRP78. The occupancy of O-HexNAc on GLU2B and calnexin sites differed between the cytosolic and nuclear fractions with a higher occupancy in the cytosolic fraction. Based on our data we propose the hypothesis that O-HexNAc either inactivates calnexin and/or targets it to the cytosolic fraction. Further, we hypothesize that O-HexNAcylation induced by glucosamine treatment enhances protein trafficking. PMID:25128556

  15. Mid-ATR-FTIR Spectroscopic Profiling of HIV/AIDS Sera for Novel Systems Diagnostics in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Sitole, Lungile; Steffens, Francois; Krüger, Tjaart P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Global health, whether in developed or developing countries, is in need of robust systems diagnostics for major diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, impacting the world populations. Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of serum is a quick and reagent-free methodology with which to analyze metabolic alterations such as those caused by disease or treatment. In this study, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier-Transform (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy was investigated as a means of distinguishing HIV-infected treatment-experienced (HIVpos ARTpos, n=39) and HIV-infected-treatment-naïve (HIVpos ARTneg, n=16) subjects from uninfected control subjects (n=30). Multivariate pattern recognition techniques, including partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), successfully distinguished sample classes, while univariate approaches identified significant differences (p<0.05) after Benjamini-Hochberg corrections. OPLS-DA discriminated between all groups with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of >90%. Compared to uninfected controls, HIVpos ARTpos and HIVpos ARTneg subjects displayed significant differences in spectral regions linked to lipids/fatty acids (3010 cm−1), carbohydrates (1299 cm−1; 1498 cm−1), glucose (1035 cm−1), and proteins (1600 cm−1; 1652 cm−1). These are all molecules shown by conventional biochemical analysis to be affected by HIV/ART interference. The biofluid metabolomics approach applied here successfully differentiated global metabolic profiles of HIV-infected patients and uninfected controls and detected potential biomarkers for development into indicators of host response to treatment and/or disease progression. Our findings therefore contribute to ongoing efforts for capacity-building in global health for robust omics science and systems diagnostics towards major diseases impacting population health. PMID:24937213

  16. Mid-ATR-FTIR spectroscopic profiling of HIV/AIDS sera for novel systems diagnostics in global health.

    PubMed

    Sitole, Lungile; Steffens, Francois; Krüger, Tjaart P J; Meyer, Debra

    2014-08-01

    Global health, whether in developed or developing countries, is in need of robust systems diagnostics for major diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, impacting the world populations. Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of serum is a quick and reagent-free methodology with which to analyze metabolic alterations such as those caused by disease or treatment. In this study, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier-Transform (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy was investigated as a means of distinguishing HIV-infected treatment-experienced (HIV(pos) ART(pos), n=39) and HIV-infected-treatment-naïve (HIV(pos) ART(neg), n=16) subjects from uninfected control subjects (n=30). Multivariate pattern recognition techniques, including partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), successfully distinguished sample classes, while univariate approaches identified significant differences (p<0.05) after Benjamini-Hochberg corrections. OPLS-DA discriminated between all groups with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of >90%. Compared to uninfected controls, HIV(pos) ART(pos) and HIV(pos) ART(neg) subjects displayed significant differences in spectral regions linked to lipids/fatty acids (3010 cm(-1)), carbohydrates (1299 cm(-1); 1498 cm(-1)), glucose (1035 cm(-1)), and proteins (1600 cm(-1); 1652 cm(-1)). These are all molecules shown by conventional biochemical analysis to be affected by HIV/ART interference. The biofluid metabolomics approach applied here successfully differentiated global metabolic profiles of HIV-infected patients and uninfected controls and detected potential biomarkers for development into indicators of host response to treatment and/or disease progression. Our findings therefore contribute to ongoing efforts for capacity-building in global health for robust omics science and systems diagnostics towards major diseases impacting population health.

  17. Identifying the Preferred Subset of Enzymatic Profiles in Nonlinear Kinetic Metabolic Models via Multiobjective Global Optimization and Pareto Filters

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Carlos; Guillén-Gosálbez, Gonzalo; Sorribas, Albert; Jiménez, Laureano

    2012-01-01

    Optimization models in metabolic engineering and systems biology focus typically on optimizing a unique criterion, usually the synthesis rate of a metabolite of interest or the rate of growth. Connectivity and non-linear regulatory effects, however, make it necessary to consider multiple objectives in order to identify useful strategies that balance out different metabolic issues. This is a fundamental aspect, as optimization of maximum yield in a given condition may involve unrealistic values in other key processes. Due to the difficulties associated with detailed non-linear models, analysis using stoichiometric descriptions and linear optimization methods have become rather popular in systems biology. However, despite being useful, these approaches fail in capturing the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the underlying metabolic systems and the regulatory signals involved. Targeting more complex biological systems requires the application of global optimization methods to non-linear representations. In this work we address the multi-objective global optimization of metabolic networks that are described by a special class of models based on the power-law formalism: the generalized mass action (GMA) representation. Our goal is to develop global optimization methods capable of efficiently dealing with several biological criteria simultaneously. In order to overcome the numerical difficulties of dealing with multiple criteria in the optimization, we propose a heuristic approach based on the epsilon constraint method that reduces the computational burden of generating a set of Pareto optimal alternatives, each achieving a unique combination of objectives values. To facilitate the post-optimal analysis of these solutions and narrow down their number prior to being tested in the laboratory, we explore the use of Pareto filters that identify the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by means of a case study that optimizes the

  18. Identifying the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles in nonlinear kinetic metabolic models via multiobjective global optimization and Pareto filters.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Carlos; Guillén-Gosálbez, Gonzalo; Sorribas, Albert; Jiménez, Laureano

    2012-01-01

    Optimization models in metabolic engineering and systems biology focus typically on optimizing a unique criterion, usually the synthesis rate of a metabolite of interest or the rate of growth. Connectivity and non-linear regulatory effects, however, make it necessary to consider multiple objectives in order to identify useful strategies that balance out different metabolic issues. This is a fundamental aspect, as optimization of maximum yield in a given condition may involve unrealistic values in other key processes. Due to the difficulties associated with detailed non-linear models, analysis using stoichiometric descriptions and linear optimization methods have become rather popular in systems biology. However, despite being useful, these approaches fail in capturing the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the underlying metabolic systems and the regulatory signals involved. Targeting more complex biological systems requires the application of global optimization methods to non-linear representations. In this work we address the multi-objective global optimization of metabolic networks that are described by a special class of models based on the power-law formalism: the generalized mass action (GMA) representation. Our goal is to develop global optimization methods capable of efficiently dealing with several biological criteria simultaneously. In order to overcome the numerical difficulties of dealing with multiple criteria in the optimization, we propose a heuristic approach based on the epsilon constraint method that reduces the computational burden of generating a set of Pareto optimal alternatives, each achieving a unique combination of objectives values. To facilitate the post-optimal analysis of these solutions and narrow down their number prior to being tested in the laboratory, we explore the use of Pareto filters that identify the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by means of a case study that optimizes the

  19. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  20. Global Transcript Profiles of Fat in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for BMI: Pathways behind Acquired Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Aila; Saharinen, Juha; Ellonen, Pekka; Keränen, Heli; Suomalainen, Anu; Götz, Alexandra; Suortti, Tapani; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Orešič, Matej; Kaprio, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Background The acquired component of complex traits is difficult to dissect in humans. Obesity represents such a trait, in which the metabolic and molecular consequences emerge from complex interactions of genes and environment. With the substantial morbidity associated with obesity, a deeper understanding of the concurrent metabolic changes is of considerable importance. The goal of this study was to investigate this important acquired component and expose obesity-induced changes in biological pathways in an identical genetic background. Methods and Findings We used a special study design of “clonal controls,” rare monozygotic twins discordant for obesity identified through a national registry of 2,453 young, healthy twin pairs. A total of 14 pairs were studied (eight male, six female; white), with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 25.8 ± 1.4 y and a body mass index (BMI) difference 5.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2. Sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in subcutaneous fat and peripheral leukocytes revealed no aberrant heteroplasmy between the co-twins. However, mtDNA copy number was reduced by 47% in the obese co-twin's fat. In addition, novel pathway analyses of the adipose tissue transcription profiles exposed significant down-regulation of mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism (p < 0.0001). In line with this finding, serum levels of insulin secretion-enhancing BCAAs were increased in obese male co-twins (9% increase, p = 0.025). Lending clinical relevance to the findings, in both sexes the observed aberrations in mitochondrial amino acid metabolism pathways in fat correlated closely with liver fat accumulation, insulin resistance, and hyperinsulinemia, early aberrations of acquired obesity in these healthy young adults. Conclusions Our findings emphasize a substantial role of mitochondrial energy- and amino acid metabolism in obesity and development of insulin resistance. PMID:18336063

  1. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Malard, Veronique; Berenguer, Frederic; Prat, Odette; Ruat, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Gerard; Quemeneur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to 59 Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxicogenomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and biomarker research. Results A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BNIP3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for biomarker research. Of those, TIMP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative biomarker of cobalt toxicity was identified. PMID:17553155

  2. Global correlation analysis for microRNA and gene expression profiles in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayu; Zhou, Changyu; Li, Jiarui; Su, Ziyuan; Sang, Haiyan; Jia, Erna; Si, Daoyuan

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is an increasing health problem associated with major adverse consequences for human health. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small endogenous non-coding RNAs, regulate the expression of genes that play roles in human body via posttranscriptional inhibition. To identify the miRNAs and their target genes involved in obesity, we downloaded the miRNA and gene expression profiles from gene expression omnibus (GEO) database and analyzed the differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in adipose tissues from obese subjects compared to those from non-obese subjects. Then, we constructed the miRNA-target interaction network and conducted functional enrichment analysis of DEGs, and the targets negatively correlated with DEMs. We identified a total of 16 miRNAs and 192 genes that showed a significantly different expression and 3002 miRNA-target interaction pairs, including 182 regulatory pairs in obesity. Target genes of DEMs were found mainly enriched in several functions, such as collagen fibril organization, extracellular matrix part, and extracellular matrix structural constituent. Moreover, hsa-miR-425 and hsa-miR-126 had a significant number of target genes and hsa-miR-16/COL12A1 and hsa-miR-634/SLC4A4 interaction pairs are significantly co-expressed, suggesting that they might play important roles in the pathogenesis of obesity. Our study provides a bioinformatic basis for further research of molecular mechanism in obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Global gene profiling in human endometrium during the window of implantation.

    PubMed

    Kao, L C; Tulac, S; Lobo, S; Imani, B; Yang, J P; Germeyer, A; Osteen, K; Taylor, R N; Lessey, B A; Giudice, L C

    2002-06-01

    Implantation in humans is a complex process that is temporally and spatially restricted. Over the past decade, using a one-by-one approach, several genes and gene products that may participate in this process have been identified in secretory phase endometrium. Herein, we have investigated global gene expression during the window of implantation (peak E2 and progesterone levels) in well characterized human endometrial biopsies timed to the LH surge, compared with the late proliferative phase (peak E2 level) of the menstrual cycle. Tissues were processed for poly(A(+)) RNA and hybridization of chemically fragmented, biotinylated cRNAs on high density oligonucleotide microarrays, screening for 12,686 genes and expressed sequence tags. After data normalization, mean values were obtained for gene readouts and fold ratios were derived comparing genes up- and down-regulated in the window of implantation vs. the late proliferative phase. Nonparametric testing revealed 156 significantly (P < 0.05) up-regulated genes and 377 significantly down-regulated genes in the implantation window. Up-regulated genes included those for cholesterol trafficking and transport [apolipoprotein (Apo)E being the most induced gene, 100-fold], prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis (PLA2) and action (PGE2 receptor), proteoglycan synthesis (glucuronyltransferase), secretory proteins [glycodelin, mammaglobin, Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1, a Wnt inhibitor)], IGF binding protein (IGFBP), and TGF-beta superfamilies, signal transduction, extracellular matrix components (osteopontin, laminin), neurotransmitter synthesis (monoamine oxidase) and receptors (gamma aminobutyric acid A receptor pi subunit), numerous immune modulators, detoxification genes (metallothioneins), and genes involved in water and ion transport [e.g. Clostridia Perfringens Enterotoxin (CPE) 1 receptor (CPE1-R) and K(+) ion channel], among others. Down-regulated genes included intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) [the most repressed gene (50-fold

  4. Global transcriptional profiles of the copper responses in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM) and toxic concentrations (3 µM) in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper.

  5. Profile and predictors of global distress: can the DT guide nursing practice in prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Lotfi-Jam, Kerryann; Gough, Karla; Schofield, Penelope; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-02-01

    This study examines the ability of the distress thermometer to accurately identify patients with higher symptoms, unmet needs and psychological morbidity. Baseline data collected as part of a randomized controlled trial evaluating a nurse-led supportive care intervention for men with prostate cancer commencing radiotherapy at a specialist cancer hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Measures assessed global distress (DT), anxious and depressive symptomatology (HADS), prostate-cancer specific quality of life (EPIC-26), unmet supportive care needs (SCNS-SF34R) and cancer treatment-related concerns (CATS). Following descriptive and correlational analysis, hierarchical multiple regression was employed to examine the contribution of variable sets to explaining variance in DT scores. Less than 20% of men reported DT scores of 4 or higher, indicating overall low distress. The DT accurately identified almost all men reporting HADS score indicative of anxious or depressive symptomatology, suggesting it accurately identifies psychological morbidity. Importantly, the DT identified a further group of distressed men, not identified by HADS, whose distress related to unmet needs and prostate cancer-specific issues, indicating the DT is superior in identifying other forms of distress. While the hierarchical multiple regression confirmed anxious and depressive symptomatology as the best predictor of distress score, many other scales are also good predictors of DT scores, supporting the argument that distress is multi-determined. Nurses can be confident that the DT accurately identifies patients with psychological morbidity and importantly identifies other patients with distress who may require intervention. A distress score of 4 or higher identified participants with higher physical symptomatology, higher unmet needs, more concerns about treatment and poorer quality of life. The low prevalence of distress reaching cut off scores suggests nurses would not be overwhelmed by the outcomes

  6. Global Gene Expression Profiling through the Complete Life Cycle of Trypanosoma vivax.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew P; Goyard, Sophie; Xia, Dong; Foth, Bernardo J; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M; Minoprio, Paola; Berriman, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The parasitic flagellate Trypanosoma vivax is a cause of animal trypanosomiasis across Africa and South America. The parasite has a digenetic life cycle, passing between mammalian hosts and insect vectors, and a series of developmental forms adapted to each life cycle stage. Each point in the life cycle presents radically different challenges to parasite metabolism and physiology and distinct host interactions requiring remodeling of the parasite cell surface. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies of the related parasites T. brucei and T. congolense have shown how gene expression is regulated during their development. New methods for in vitro culture of the T. vivax insect stages have allowed us to describe global gene expression throughout the complete T. vivax life cycle for the first time. We combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of each life stage using RNA-seq and mass spectrometry respectively, to identify genes with patterns of preferential transcription or expression. While T. vivax conforms to a pattern of highly conserved gene expression found in other African trypanosomes, (e.g. developmental regulation of energy metabolism, restricted expression of a dominant variant antigen, and expression of 'Fam50' proteins in the insect mouthparts), we identified significant differences in gene expression affecting metabolism in the fly and a suite of T. vivax-specific genes with predicted cell-surface expression that are preferentially expressed in the mammal ('Fam29, 30, 42') or the vector ('Fam34, 35, 43'). T. vivax differs significantly from other African trypanosomes in the developmentally-regulated proteins likely to be expressed on its cell surface and thus, in the structure of the host-parasite interface. These unique features may yet explain the species differences in life cycle and could, in the form of bloodstream-stage proteins that do not undergo antigenic variation, provide targets for therapy.

  7. Global Transcriptional Profiles of the Copper Responses in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM) and toxic concentrations (3 µM) in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper. PMID:25268225

  8. Global Gene Expression Profiling through the Complete Life Cycle of Trypanosoma vivax

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Goyard, Sophie; Xia, Dong; Foth, Bernardo J.; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Minoprio, Paola; Berriman, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The parasitic flagellate Trypanosoma vivax is a cause of animal trypanosomiasis across Africa and South America. The parasite has a digenetic life cycle, passing between mammalian hosts and insect vectors, and a series of developmental forms adapted to each life cycle stage. Each point in the life cycle presents radically different challenges to parasite metabolism and physiology and distinct host interactions requiring remodeling of the parasite cell surface. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies of the related parasites T. brucei and T. congolense have shown how gene expression is regulated during their development. New methods for in vitro culture of the T. vivax insect stages have allowed us to describe global gene expression throughout the complete T. vivax life cycle for the first time. We combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of each life stage using RNA-seq and mass spectrometry respectively, to identify genes with patterns of preferential transcription or expression. While T. vivax conforms to a pattern of highly conserved gene expression found in other African trypanosomes, (e.g. developmental regulation of energy metabolism, restricted expression of a dominant variant antigen, and expression of ‘Fam50’ proteins in the insect mouthparts), we identified significant differences in gene expression affecting metabolism in the fly and a suite of T. vivax-specific genes with predicted cell-surface expression that are preferentially expressed in the mammal (‘Fam29, 30, 42’) or the vector (‘Fam34, 35, 43’). T. vivax differs significantly from other African trypanosomes in the developmentally-regulated proteins likely to be expressed on its cell surface and thus, in the structure of the host-parasite interface. These unique features may yet explain the species differences in life cycle and could, in the form of bloodstream-stage proteins that do not undergo antigenic variation, provide targets for therapy. PMID:26266535

  9. Global Gene Expression Profiling of a Population Exposed to a Range of Benzene Levels

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Vermeulen, Roel; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Porter, Kristin E.; Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J.; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Benzene, an established cause of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), may also cause one or more lymphoid malignancies in humans. Previously, we identified genes and pathways associated with exposure to high (> 10 ppm) levels of benzene through transcriptomic analyses of blood cells from a small number of occupationally exposed workers. Objectives The goals of this study were to identify potential biomarkers of benzene exposure and/or early effects and to elucidate mechanisms relevant to risk of hematotoxicity, leukemia, and lymphoid malignancy in occupationally exposed individuals, many of whom were exposed to benzene levels < 1 ppm, the current U.S. occupational standard. Methods We analyzed global gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 125 workers exposed to benzene levels ranging from < 1 ppm to > 10 ppm. Study design and analysis with a mixed-effects model minimized potential confounding and experimental variability. Results We observed highly significant widespread perturbation of gene expression at all exposure levels. The AML pathway was among the pathways most significantly associated with benzene exposure. Immune response pathways were associated with most exposure levels, potentially providing biological plausibility for an association between lymphoma and benzene exposure. We identified a 16-gene expression signature associated with all levels of benzene exposure. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic benzene exposure, even at levels below the current U.S. occupational standard, perturbs many genes, biological processes, and pathways. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which benzene may induce hematotoxicity, leukemia, and lymphoma and reveal relevant potential biomarkers associated with a range of exposures. PMID:21147609

  10. Global Effect of Interleukin-10 on the Transcriptional Profile Induced by Neisseria meningitidis in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Øvstebø, Reidun; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Brusletto, Berit; Dalsbotten Aass, Hans Christian; Kierulf, Peter; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Berg, Jens Petter

    2012-01-01

    In meningococcal septic shock, the dominant inducer of inflammation is lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis, while interleukin-10 (IL-10) is the principal anti-inflammatory cytokine. We have used microarrays and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to study the global effects of IL-10 on gene expression induced by N. meningitidis, after exposure of human monocytes (n = 5) for 3 h to N. meningitidis (106 cells/ml), recombinant human IL-10 (rhIL-10) (25 ng/ml), and N. meningitidis combined with rhIL-10. N. meningitidis and IL-10 differentially expressed 3,579 and 648 genes, respectively. IL-10 downregulated 125 genes which were upregulated by N. meningitidis, including NLRP3, the key molecule of the NLRP3 inflammasome. IL-10 also upregulated 270 genes which were downregulated by N. meningitidis, including members of the leukocyte immunuglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family. Fifty-three genes revealed a synergistically increased expression when N. meningitidis and IL-10 were combined. AIM2 (the principal molecule of the AIM2 inflammasome) was among these genes (fold change [FC], 18.3 versus 7.4 and 9.4 after stimulation by N. meningitidis and IL-10, respectively). We detected reduced concentrations (92% to 40%) of six cytokines (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], macrophage inflammatory protein alpha [MIP-α], MIP-β) in the presence of IL-10, compared with concentrations with stimulation by N. meningitidis alone. Our data analysis of the effects of IL-10 on gene expression induced by N. meningitidis suggests that high plasma levels of IL-10 in meningococcal septic shock plasma may have a profound effect on a variety of functions and cellular processes in human monocytes, including cell-to-cell signaling, cellular movement, cellular development, antigen presentation, and cell death. PMID:22966040

  11. Hypercoagulability in adolescent girls on oral contraceptives-global coagulation profile and estrogen receptor polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zia, Ayesha; Callaghan, Michael U; Callaghan, Joseph H; Sawni, Anju; Bartlett, Heather; Backos, Alcesa; Marshall, Sharon; Chitlur, Meera; Rajpurkar, Madhvi

    2015-08-01

    Oral contraceptive (OCP) induced changes on coagulation are complex with high inter-individual variability. The precise reason for differences in this variability is unknown. We hypothesized that global coagulation assays better delineate these changes and variability in hypercoagulability may be the result of differences in estrogen metabolism and thrombophilia. Fifty-two adolescents initiating OCPs were prospectively enrolled; 33 subjects completed the study. Samples were analyzed prior to and after OCPs for procoagulant and anticoagulant factor activities and thrombin generation (TG) +/-thrombomodulin. Participants were genotyped for common thrombophilia and estrogen receptor-α (ESR-α) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNP genotypes were compared to coagulation parameters; TG parameters and differences pre and post OCPs were examined. At baseline, a striking finding was elevated FVIII levels. FVL was absent in all and F2 G20210A was present in one participant. The ESR-α polymorphism was present in heterozygous state in 59% and homozygous state in 21% participants. There were no differences in VWF levels and C after being on OCPs. Protein S levels decreased with OCPs. Sixty percent of participants showed evidence of hypercoagulability on TG testing on OCPs. Higher thrombin peak and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were seen on TG after OCPs. With thrombomodulin, ETP and thrombin peak did not decrease after OCPs, signifying 'thrombomodulin resistance'. We demonstrated that OCPs induce a state of "variable" hypercoagulability in adolescents, predominantly through the protein S pathway. Genetic and nongenetic factors may account for the variable increase in hypercoagulability. Further research is needed to understand this. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Vertical profiles of Mars 1.27 μm O2 dayglow from MRO CRISM limb spectra: Seasonal/global behaviors, comparisons to LMDGCM simulations, and a global definition for Mars water vapor profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd Clancy, R.; Smith, Michael D.; Lefèvre, Franck; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Sandor, Brad J.; Wolff, Michael J.; Lee, Steven W.; Murchie, Scott L.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Nair, Hari; Navarro, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Since July of 2009, The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectral Mapper (CRISM) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has periodically obtained pole-to-pole observations (i.e., full MRO orbits) of limb scanned visible/near IR spectra (λ = 0.4 - 4.0 μ m, △λ ∼ 10 nm- Murchie et al., 2007). These CRISM limb observations support the first seasonally and spatially extensive set of Mars 1.27 μm O2(1△g) dayglow profile retrievals (∼ 1100) over ≥ 8-80 km altitudes. Their comparison to Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) global climate model (GCM) simulated O2(1△g) volume emission rate (VER) profiles, as a function of altitude, latitude, and season (solar longitude, Ls), supports several key conclusions regarding Mars atmospheric water vapor (which is derived from O2(1△g) emission rates), Mars O3, and the collisional de-excitation of O2(1△g) in the Mars CO2 atmosphere. Current (Navarro et al., 2014) LMDGCM simulations of Mars atmospheric water vapor fall 2-3 times below CRISM derived water vapor abundances at 20-40 km altitudes over low-to-mid latitudes in northern spring (Ls = 30-60°), and northern mid-to-high latitudes over northern summer (Ls = 60-140°). In contrast, LMDGCM simulated water vapor is 2-5 times greater than CRISM derived values at all latitudes and seasons above 40 km, within the aphelion cloud belt (ACB), and over high-southern to mid-southern latitudes in southern summer (Ls = 190-340°) at 15-35 km altitudes. Overall, the solstitial summer-to-winter hemisphere gradients in water vapor are reversed between the LMDGCM modeled versus the CRISM derived water vapor abundances above 10-30 km altitudes. LMDGCM-CRISM differences in water vapor profiles correlate with LMDGCM-CRISM differences in cloud mixing profiles; and likely reflect limitations in simulating cloud microphysics and radiative forcing, both of which restrict meridional transport of water from summer-to-winter hemispheres on Mars (Clancy et al., 1996

  13. Time-Course Global Expression Profiles of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Photo-Biological H2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh Vu; Toepel, Joerg; Burgess, Steven; Uhmeyer, Andreas; Blifernez, Olga; Doebbe, Anja; Hankamer, Ben; Nixon, Peter; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    We used a microarray study in order to compare the time course expression profiles of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains, namely the high H2 producing mutant stm6glc4 and its parental WT strain during H2 production induced by sulfur starvation. Major cellular reorganizations in photosynthetic apparatus, sulfur and carbon metabolism upon H2 production were confirmed as common to both strains. More importantly, our results pointed out factors which lead to the higher H2 production in the mutant including a higher starch accumulation in the aerobic phase and a lower competition between the H2ase pathway and alternative electron sinks within the H2 production phase. Key candidate genes of interest with differential expression pattern include LHCSR3, essential for efficient energy quenching (qE). The reduced LHCSR3 protein expression in mutant stm6glc4 could be closely related to the high-light sensitive phenotype. H2 measurements carried out with the LHCSR3 knock-out mutant npq4 however clearly demonstrated that a complete loss of this protein has almost no impact on H2 yields under moderate light conditions. The nuclear gene disrupted in the high H2 producing mutant stm6glc4 encodes for the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) MOC1, whose expression strongly increases during –S-induced H2 production in WT strains. Studies under phototrophic high-light conditions demonstrated that the presence of functional MOC1 is a prerequisite for proper LHCSR3 expression. Furthermore knock-down of MOC1 in a WT strain was shown to improve the total H2 yield significantly suggesting that this strategy could be applied to further enhance H2 production in other strains already displaying a high H2 production capacity. By combining our array data with previously published metabolomics data we can now explain some of the phenotypic characteristics which lead to an elevated H2 production in stm6glc4. PMID:22242116

  14. Global proteome profiling of dental cementum under experimentally-induced apposition.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Cristiane R; Giorgetti, Ana Paula O; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Domingues, Romênia R; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Alves, Marcelo C; Kolli, Tamara N; Foster, Brian L; Nociti, Francisco H

    2016-06-01

    Dental cementum (DC) covers the tooth root and has important functions in tooth attachment and position. DC can be lost to disease, and regeneration is currently unpredictable due to limited understanding of DC formation. This study used a model of experimentally-induced apposition (EIA) in mice to identify proteins associated with new DC formation. Mandibular first molars were induced to super-erupt for 6 and 21days after extracting opposing maxillary molars. Decalcified and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded mandible sections were prepared for laser capture microdissection. Microdissected protein extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the data submitted to repeated measure ANOVA test (RM-ANOVA, alpha=5%). A total of 519 proteins were identified, with 97 (18.6%) proteins found exclusively in EIA sites and 50 (9.6%) proteins exclusively expressed in control sites. Fifty six (10.7%) proteins were differentially regulated by RM-ANOVA (p<0.05), with 24 regulated by the exclusive effect of EIA (12 proteins) or the interaction between EIA and time (12 proteins), including serpin 1a, procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer, tenascin X (TNX), and asporin (ASPN). In conclusion, proteomic analysis demonstrated significantly altered protein profile in DC under EIA, providing new insights on DC biology and potential candidates for tissue engineering applications. Dental cementum (DC) is a mineralized tissue that covers the tooth root surface and has important functions in tooth attachment and position. DC and other periodontal tissues can be lost to disease, and regeneration is currently unpredictable due to lack of understanding of DC formation. This study used a model of experimentally-induced apposition (EIA) in mice to promote new cementum formation, followed by laser capture microdissection (LCM) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. This approach identified

  15. Global endometrial transcriptomic profiling: transient immune activation precedes tissue proliferation and repair in healthy beef cows

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background All cows experience bacterial contamination and tissue injury in the uterus postpartum, instigating a local inflammatory immune response. However mechanisms that control inflammation and achieve a physiologically functioning endometrium, while avoiding disease in the postpartum cow are not succinctly defined. This study aimed to identify novel candidate genes indicative of inflammation resolution during involution in healthy beef cows. Previous histological analysis of the endometrium revealed elevated inflammation 15 days postpartum (DPP) which was significantly decreased by 30 DPP. The current study generated a genome-wide transcriptomic profile of endometrial biopsies from these cows at both time points using mRNA-Seq. The pathway analysis tool GoSeq identified KEGG pathways enriched by significantly differentially expressed genes at both time points. Novel candidate genes associated with inflammatory resolution were subsequently validated in additional postpartum animals using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results mRNA-Seq revealed 1,107 significantly differentially expressed genes, 73 of which were increased 15 DPP and 1,034 were increased 30 DPP. Early postpartum, enriched immune pathways (adjusted P < 0.1) included the T cell receptor signalling pathway, graft-versus-host disease and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways. However 30 DPP, where the majority of genes were differentially expressed, the enrichment (adjusted P < 0.1) of tissue repair and proliferative activity pathways was observed. Nineteen candidate genes selected from mRNA-Seq results, were independently assessed by qRT-PCR in additional postpartum cows (5 animals) at both time points. SAA1/2, GATA2, IGF1, SHC2, and SERPINA14 genes were significantly elevated 30 DPP and are functionally associated with tissue repair and the restoration of uterine homeostasis postpartum. Conclusions The results of this study reveal an early activation of the immune

  16. Global transcriptional profiling of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Erdner, Deana L; Anderson, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    Background Dinoflagellates are one of the most important classes of marine and freshwater algae, notable both for their functional diversity and ecological significance. They occur naturally as free-living cells, as endosymbionts of marine invertebrates and are well known for their involvement in "red tides". Dinoflagellates are also notable for their unusual genome content and structure, which suggests that the organization and regulation of dinoflagellate genes may be very different from that of most eukaryotes. To investigate the content and regulation of the dinoflagellate genome, we performed a global analysis of the transcriptome of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense under nitrate- and phosphate-limited conditions using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS). Results Data from the two MPSS libraries showed that the number of unique signatures found in A. fundyense cells is similar to that of humans and Arabidopsis thaliana, two eukaryotes that have been extensively analyzed using this method. The general distribution, abundance and expression patterns of the A. fundyense signatures were also quite similar to other eukaryotes, and at least 10% of the A. fundyense signatures were differentially expressed between the two conditions. RACE amplification and sequencing of a subset of signatures showed that multiple signatures arose from sequence variants of a single gene. Single signatures also mapped to different sequence variants of the same gene. Conclusion The MPSS data presented here provide a quantitative view of the transcriptome and its regulation in these unusual single-celled eukaryotes. The observed signature abundance and distribution in Alexandrium is similar to that of other eukaryotes that have been analyzed using MPSS. Results of signature mapping via RACE indicate that many signatures result from sequence variants of individual genes. These data add to the growing body of evidence for widespread gene duplication in

  17. Profiles of lead in urban dust and the effect of the distance to multi-industry in an old heavy industry city in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Li, Yingxia; Li, Ben; Shen, Zhenyao; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2017-03-01

    Lead (Pb) concentration in urban dust is often higher than background concentrations and can result in a wide range of health risks to local communities. To understand Pb distribution in urban dust and how multi-industrial activity affects Pb concentration, 21 sampling sites within the heavy industry city of Jilin, China, were analyzed for Pb concentration. Pb concentrations of all 21 urban dust samples from the Jilin City Center were higher than the background concentration for soil in Jilin Province. The analyses show that distance to industry is an important parameter determining health risks associated with Pb in urban dust. The Pb concentration showed an exponential decrease, with increasing distance from industry. Both maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian analysis were used to estimate the exponential relationship between Pb concentration and distance to multi-industry areas. We found that Bayesian analysis was a better method with less uncertainty for estimating Pb dust concentrations based on their distance to multi-industry, and this approach is recommended for further study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. MMPI-2 Profiles in Civilian PTSD: An Examination of Differential Responses between Victims of Crime and Industrial Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shercliffe, Regan Jeffery; Colotla, Victor

    2009-01-01

    The authors studied MMPI-2 profiles of workers (N = 83) diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a control group comprising workers with chronic pain (N = 40). Significant differences were seen in profiles between the PTSD groups and the control group, and the authors compared the PTSD profiles according to exposure to two different…

  19. MMPI-2 Profiles in Civilian PTSD: An Examination of Differential Responses between Victims of Crime and Industrial Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shercliffe, Regan Jeffery; Colotla, Victor

    2009-01-01

    The authors studied MMPI-2 profiles of workers (N = 83) diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a control group comprising workers with chronic pain (N = 40). Significant differences were seen in profiles between the PTSD groups and the control group, and the authors compared the PTSD profiles according to exposure to two different…

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  1. Distinct differences in global gene expression profiles in non-implanted blastocysts and blastocysts resulting in live birth.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Villesen, Palle; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Kølvraa, Steen; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2015-10-25

    Results from animal models points towards the existence of a gene expression profile that is distinguishably different in viable embryos compared with non-viable embryos. Knowledge of human embryo transcripts is however limited, in particular with regard to how gene expression is related to clinical outcome. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the global gene expression profiles of human blastocysts. Next Generation Sequencing was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed in non-implanted embryos and embryos resulting in live birth. Three trophectoderm biopsies were obtained from morphologically high quality blastocysts resulting in live birth and three biopsies were obtained from non-implanting blastocysts of a comparable morphology. Total RNA was extracted from all samples followed by complete transcriptome sequencing. Using a set of filtering criteria, we obtained a list of 181 genes that were differentially expressed between trophectoderm biopsies from embryos resulting in either live birth or no implantation (negative hCG), respectively. We found that 37 of the 181 genes displayed significantly differential expression (p<0.05), e.g. EFNB1, CYTL1 and TEX26 and TESK1, MSL1 and EVI5 in trophectoderm biopsies associated with live birth and non-implanting, respectively. Out of the 181 genes, almost 80% (145 genes) were up-regulated in biopsies from un-implanted embryos, whereas only 20% (36 genes) showed an up-regulation in the samples from embryos resulting in live birth. Our findings suggest the presence of molecular differences visually undetectable between implanted and non-implanted embryos, and represent a proof of principle study.

  2. Characterization of arecoline-induced effects on cytotoxicity in normal human gingival fibroblasts by global gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shang-Lun; Jiang, Shih-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Jou; Chiang, Horn-Che; Chen, Ping-Ho; Tu, Hung-Pin; Ho, Kun-Yen; Tsai, Yu-Shan; Chang, I-Shou; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2007-11-01

    Areca nut is the most widely used psychoactive substance and an important environmental risk factor for development of oral premalignant lesions and cancer. Arecoline, the major alkaloid of areca nut, has been known to cause cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in mammalian cells in vivo and in vitro and even contributes to carcinogenicity. However, the susceptible genes accounting for arecoline-induced damage in normal human oral cells are still lacking, which possibly involves in initial molecular damage via alternation of gene expression level on biological pathways. The present study was undertaken to characterize the toxic effects of arecoline in gene expression profiling on normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) using cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The cytotoxicity of arecoline on HGF-1 cell line was elevated in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05) accompanied with distinct morphological change and formation of intracellular vacuoles were observed. At optimum concentration of arecoline determined from dose-response curve of the cytotoxicity, a large number of genes were significantly repressed than induced by arecoline in global gene expression profiling. Five induced- and seven repressed genes including glutathione synthetase were further validated, and their gene expression changes were increased in a dose-dependent manner in a concentration range of 50-150 microg/ml. In conclusion, we proposed a tentative model to explain arecoline-induced effects on contribution of oral pathogenesis. The findings identified that 12 susceptible genes can potentially serve as biomarkers of arecoline-induced damage in betel chewers.

  3. Global gene expression profiling reveals genes expressed differentially in cattle with high and low residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Gondro, C; Quinn, K; Herd, R M; Parnell, P F; Vanselow, B

    2011-10-01

    Feed efficiency is an economically important trait in beef production. It can be measured as residual feed intake. This is the difference between actual feed intake recorded over a test period and the expected feed intake of an animal based on its size and growth rate. DNA-based marker-assisted selection would help beef breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for feed efficiency by reducing the generation interval and would obviate the high cost of measuring residual feed intake. Although numbers of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes have been identified with the advance of molecular genetics, our understanding of the physiological mechanisms and the nature of genes underlying residual feed intake is limited. The aim of the study was to use global gene expression profiling by microarray to identify genes that are differentially expressed in cattle, using lines genetically selected for low and high residual feed intake, and to uncover candidate genes for residual feed intake. A long-oligo microarray with 24 000 probes was used to profile the liver transcriptome of 44 cattle selected for high or low residual feed intake. One hundred and sixty-one unique genes were identified as being differentially expressed between animals with high and low residual feed intake. These genes were involved in seven gene networks affecting cellular growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell signalling, drug metabolism, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism. Analysis of functional data using a transcriptional approach allows a better understanding of the underlying biological processes involved in residual feed intake and also allows the identification of candidate genes for marker-assisted selection. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  4. Profile of Circulatory Metabolites in a Relapsing-remitting Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis using Global Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Mangalam, AK; Poisson, LM; Nemutlu, E; Datta, I; Denic, A; Dzeja, P; Rodriguez, M; Rattan, R; Giri, S

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the CNS. Although, MS is well characterized in terms of the role played by immune cells, cytokines and CNS pathology, nothing is known about the metabolic alterations that occur during the disease process in circulation. Recently, metabolic aberrations have been defined in various disease processes either as contributing to the disease, as potential biomarkers, or as therapeutic targets. Thus in an attempt to define the metabolic alterations that may be associated with MS disease progression, we profiled the plasma metabolites at the chronic phase of disease utilizing relapsing remitting-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE) model in SJL mice. At the chronic phase of the disease (day 45), untargeted global metabolomic profiling of plasma collected from EAE diseased SJL and healthy mice was performed, using a combination of high-throughput liquid-and-gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. A total of 282 metabolites were identified, with significant changes observed in 44 metabolites (32 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated), that mapped to lipid, amino acid, nucleotide and xenobiotic metabolism and distinguished EAE from healthy group (p<0.05, false discovery rate (FDR)<0.23). Mapping the differential metabolite signature to their respective biochemical pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomics (KEGG) database, we found six major pathways that were significantly altered (containing concerted alterations) or impacted (containing alteration in key junctions). These included bile acid biosynthesis, taurine metabolism, tryptophan and histidine metabolism, linoleic acid and D-arginine metabolism pathways. Overall, this study identified a 44 metabolite signature drawn from various metabolic pathways which correlated well with severity of the EAE disease, suggesting that these metabolic changes could be exploited as (1) biomarkers for EAE/MS progression and (2

  5. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nancy L.; Lin, Chi-Iou; Du, Jinyan; Whang, Edward E.; Ito, Hiromichi; Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation

  6. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M.; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C.; Vose, Julie M.; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M.; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Armitage, James O.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Staudt, Louis M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Chan, Wing C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)–DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)–DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the “gold standard” GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  7. Measuring the Relationship between Academic Self-Perceptions and Global Self-Worth: The Self-Perception Profile for Learning Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renick, Mari Jo

    The study examined the relationship between perceptions of intellectual ability, competence at specific academic subjects, and feelings of global self-worth in 166 learning disabled (LD) adolescents (ages 12-18) attending a private school for LD students. It used the Self-Perception Profile for Learning Disabled Students developed by M. J. Renick…

  8. A Space-Based Point Design for Global Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Profiling Matched to the Recent NASA/NOAA Draft Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Emmitt, G. David; Frehlich, Rod G.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.

    2002-01-01

    An end-to-end point design, including lidar, orbit, scanning, atmospheric, and data processing parameters, for space-based global profiling of atmospheric wind will be presented. The point design attempts to match the recent NASA/NOAA draft science requirements for wind measurement.

  9. First Global Observations of HCHO from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Joiner, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dunlap, L.

    2014-12-01

    Global retrievals of formaldehyde (HCHO) from satellite UV instruments such as the Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and MetOp/Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) have provided important constraints on the emissions of biogenic isoprene. Here we present the first results of HCHO retrievals from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS). We apply an innovative principal component analysis (PCA) retrieval algorithm to extract a set of principal components (PCs) from OMPS-measured radiances between 325.0 and 356.5 nm over presumably clean oceanic regions. Since the background loading of HCHO due to methane oxidation is very small over these areas, the leading PCs (that explain the most variation in radiances) represent spectral features associated with various physical processes (e.g., ozone absorption, rotational Raman scattering) and measurement details (e.g., wavelength shift) other than those related to HCHO absorption. The vertical column density of HCHO is then derived by fitting the PCs and HCHO Jacobians calculated with a radiative transfer model to OMPS-measured radiance spectra. Our retrievals highlight the diverse nature of HCHO sources. Summertime maxima in HCHO detected over the eastern U.S. are likely due to biogenic emissions, while seasonal hot spots observed over West and Central Africa and Russia are mainly attributed to biomass burning emissions. Efforts have also been made to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors of HCHO. Finally, the OMPS PCA HCHO retrievals are compared to OMI HCHO data produced with different Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithms, in an effort to understand and reconcile the differences between various satellite HCHO datasets.

  10. Global profiling of alternative RNA splicing events provides insights into molecular differences between various types of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Pier; Armero, Victoria E S; Allaire, Andréa; Boudreault, Simon; Martenon-Brodeur, Camille; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Thibault, Philippe; Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Scott, Michelle S; Bisaillon, Martin

    2016-08-26

    Dysregulations in alternative splicing (AS) patterns have been associated with many human diseases including cancer. In the present study, alterations to the global RNA splicing landscape of cellular genes were investigated in a large-scale screen from 377 liver tissue samples using high-throughput RNA sequencing data. Our study identifies modifications in the AS patterns of transcripts encoded by more than 2500 genes such as tumor suppressor genes, transcription factors, and kinases. These findings provide insights into the molecular differences between various types of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our analysis allowed the identification of 761 unique transcripts for which AS is misregulated in HBV-associated HCC, while 68 are unique to HCV-associated HCC, 54 to HBV&HCV-associated HCC, and 299 to virus-free HCC. Moreover, we demonstrate that the expression pattern of the RNA splicing factor hnRNPC in HCC tissues significantly correlates with patient survival. We also show that the expression of the HBx protein from HBV leads to modifications in the AS profiles of cellular genes. Finally, using RNA interference and a reverse transcription-PCR screening platform, we examined the implications of cellular proteins involved in the splicing of transcripts involved in apoptosis and demonstrate the potential contribution of these proteins in AS control. This study provides the first comprehensive portrait of global changes in the RNA splicing signatures that occur in hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, these data allowed us to identify unique signatures of genes for which AS is misregulated in the different types of HCC.

  11. The use of a global index of acoustic assessment for predicting noise in industrial rooms and optimizing the location of machinery and workstations.

    PubMed

    Pleban, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study aimed at developing a tool for optimizing the location of machinery and workstations. A global index of acoustic assessment of machines was developed for this purpose. This index and a genetic algorithm were used in a computer tool for predicting noise emission of machines as well as optimizing the location of machines and workstations in industrial rooms. The results of laboratory and simulation tests demonstrate that the developed global index and the genetic algorithm support measures aimed at noise reduction at workstations.

  12. The Global Turnover Time Distribution of Soil Carbon Derived from a Meta-analysis of Radiocarbon Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Allison, S. D.; Torn, M. S.; Harden, J. W.; Smith, L. J.; van der Voort, T.; Trumbore, S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle feedbacks under climate change. Soil carbon turnover times provide information about the sensitivity of carbon pools to changes in inputs and warming. The spatial and vertical distribution of soil carbon turnover times emerges from the interplay between climate, vegetation, and soil properties. Radiocarbon levels of soil organic matter can be used to estimate soil carbon turnover using models that take into account radioactive decay over centuries to millennia and inputs of 14C from atmospheric weapons testing ("bomb carbon") during the second half of the 20th century. By synthesizing more than 200 soil radiocarbon profiles from all major biomes and soil orders, we 1) explored the major controlling factors for soil carbon turnover times of surface and deeper soil layers; 2) developed predictive models (tree-based regression, support vector regression and linear regression models) of ∆14C that depends on depth, climate, vegetation, and soil types; and 3) extrapolated the predictive model to produce the first global distribution of soil carbon turnover times to the depth of 1m. Preliminary results indicated that climate and depth were primary controls of the vertical distribution of ∆14C, contributing to about 70% of the variability in our model. Vegetation and soil order exerted similar level of controls (about 15% each). The predictive model performed reasonably well with an R2 of 0.81 and RMSE (root-mean-squared error) of about 50‰ for topsoil and 100‰ for subsoil, as estimated using cross-validation. Extrapolation of the predictive model to the globe in combination with existing soil carbon information (e.g., Harmonized World Soil Database) indicated that more than half of the global total soil carbon in the top 1m had a turnover time of less than 500 years. Subsoils (30-100cm) had millennium-scale turnover times, with the majority (70%) turning over

  13. Modeling notch signaling in normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis: global gene expression profiling in response to activated notch expression.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, Uma; Tan, Hongying Tina; Lynch, Maureen; Dolezal, Milana; de Vos, Sven; Gasson, Judith C

    2007-08-01

    In normal hematopoiesis, proliferation is tightly linked to differentiation in ways that involve cell-cell interaction with stromal elements in the bone marrow stem cell niche. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies strongly support a role for Notch signaling in the regulation of stem cell renewal and hematopoiesis. Not surprisingly, mutations in the Notch gene have been linked to a number of types of malignancies. To better define the function of Notch in both normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis, a tetracycline-inducible system regulating expression of a ligand-independent, constitutively active form of Notch1 was introduced into murine E14Tg2a embryonic stem cells. During coculture, OP9 stromal cells induce the embryonic stem cells to differentiate first to hemangioblasts and subsequently to hematopoietic stem cells. Our studies indicate that activation of Notch signaling in flk+ hemangioblasts dramatically reduces their survival and proliferative capacity and lowers the levels of hematopoietic stem cell markers CD34 and c-Kit and the myeloid marker CD11b. Global gene expression profiling of day 8 hematopoietic progenitors in the absence and presence of activated Notch yield candidate genes required for normal hematopoietic differentiation, as well as putative downstream targets of oncogenic forms of Notch including the noncanonical Wnts Wnt4 and 5A. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  14. Transcriptome profiling of peanut gynophores revealed global reprogramming of gene expression during early pod development in darkness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background After the zygote divides few times, the development of peanut pre-globular embryo and fruit is arrested under white or red light. Embryo development could be resumed in dark condition after gynophore is buried in soil. It is interesting to study the mechanisms of gynophore development and pod formation in peanut. Results In this study, transcriptome analysis of peanut gynophore was performed using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 to understand the mechanisms of geocarpy. More than 13 million short sequences were assembled into 72527 unigenes with average size of 394 bp. A large number of genes that were not identified previously in peanut EST projects were identified in this study, including most genes involved in plant circadian rhythm, intra-cellular transportation, plant spliceosome, eukaryotes basal transcription factors, genes encoding ribosomal proteins, brassinosteriod biosynthesis, light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and TCA cycle. RNA-seq based gene expression profiling results showed that before and after gynophore soil penetration, the transcriptional level of a large number of genes changed significantly. Genes encoding key enzymes for hormone metabolism, signaling, photosynthesis, light signaling, cell division and growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism as well as genes involved in stress responses were high lighted. Conclusions Transcriptome analysis of peanut gynophore generated a large number of unigenes which provide useful information for gene cloning and expression study. Digital gene expression study suggested that gynophores experience global changes and reprogram from light to dark grown condition to resume embryo and fruit development. PMID:23895441

  15. Transcriptome profiling of peanut gynophores revealed global reprogramming of gene expression during early pod development in darkness.

    PubMed

    Xia, Han; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Hou, Lei; Li, Aiqin; Zhao, Shuzhen; Bi, Yuping; An, Jing; Zhao, Yanxiu; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2013-07-29

    After the zygote divides few times, the development of peanut pre-globular embryo and fruit is arrested under white or red light. Embryo development could be resumed in dark condition after gynophore is buried in soil. It is interesting to study the mechanisms of gynophore development and pod formation in peanut. In this study, transcriptome analysis of peanut gynophore was performed using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 to understand the mechanisms of geocarpy. More than 13 million short sequences were assembled into 72527 unigenes with average size of 394 bp. A large number of genes that were not identified previously in peanut EST projects were identified in this study, including most genes involved in plant circadian rhythm, intra-cellular transportation, plant spliceosome, eukaryotes basal transcription factors, genes encoding ribosomal proteins, brassinosteriod biosynthesis, light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and TCA cycle. RNA-seq based gene expression profiling results showed that before and after gynophore soil penetration, the transcriptional level of a large number of genes changed significantly. Genes encoding key enzymes for hormone metabolism, signaling, photosynthesis, light signaling, cell division and growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism as well as genes involved in stress responses were high lighted. Transcriptome analysis of peanut gynophore generated a large number of unigenes which provide useful information for gene cloning and expression study. Digital gene expression study suggested that gynophores experience global changes and reprogram from light to dark grown condition to resume embryo and fruit development.

  16. Exploring global meaning in Greek breast cancer patients: validation of the Life Attitude Profile--Revised (LAP-R).

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Slater, Julie; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Kolokotroni, Philippa

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure and the psychometric properties of the Life Attitude Profile-Revised (LAP-R) among a sample of Greek breast cancer patients, and to test the fit of a structural equation model with one latent factor underlying the measured LAP-R dimensions. A total of 153 patients with breast cancer completed the LAP-R. Convergent validity was assessed by examining the correlations between the LAP-R subscales and measures of perceived stress, intrusiveness, mental health, and coping styles. Known-groups validity was also assessed. Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation yielded four factors: purpose-coherence-vacuum, choice, death acceptance, and goal seeking. Internal consistency reliability of the subscales and convergent validity of LAP-R were satisfactory. LAP-R was able to detect differences in meaning between different age groups. Confirmatory factor analysis provided support for a single-factor model including a latent meaning-variable indicated by the observed subscales. The LAP-R is a reliable and valid measure of global meaning in life, when administered to breast cancer patients. The use of LAP-R in evaluating meaning-centered psychotherapy interventions for patients with cancer is emphasized. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Global and comparative proteomic profiling of overwintering and developing mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), larvae.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Tiffany R; Robert, Jeanne A; Pitt, Caitlin; Fraser, Jordie D; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P W

    2012-12-01

    Mountain pine beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), are native to western North America, but have recently begun to expand their range across the Canadian Rocky Mountains. The requirement for larvae to withstand extremely cold winter temperatures and potentially toxic host secondary metabolites in the midst of their ongoing development makes this a critical period of their lives. We have uncovered global protein profiles for overwintering mountain pine beetle larvae. We have also quantitatively compared the proteomes for overwintering larvae sampled during autumn cooling and spring warming using iTRAQ methods. We identified 1507 unique proteins across all samples. In total, 33 proteins exhibited differential expression (FDR < 0.05) when compared between larvae before and after a cold snap in the autumn; and 473 proteins exhibited differential expression in the spring when measured before and after a steady incline in mean daily temperature. Eighteen proteins showed significant changes in both autumn and spring samples. These first proteomic data for mountain pine beetle larvae show evidence of the involvement of trehalose, 2-deoxyglucose, and antioxidant enzymes in overwintering physiology; confirm and expand upon previous work implicating glycerol in cold tolerance in this insect; and provide new, detailed information on developmental processes in beetles. These results and associated data will be an invaluable resource for future targeted research on cold tolerance mechanisms in the mountain pine beetle and developmental biology in coleopterans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert; Bilitza, Dieter; Chu, Philip; Richards, Phil G.; Wang, Yongli

    The upper transition height (Ht) (the altitude of the transition from heavy atomic ions to light ions or in the simplest form the transition from O+ to H+) is an important parameter, representing the boundary between the ionosphere and the plasmasphere. Ht is very sensitive to various geophysical parameters, like solar and magnetic activity and strongly depends on latitude and local time. There were numerous studies of this parameter in past decades. In spite of these efforts, no model satisfactorily represents this parameter so far. Moreover, surprising evidence of very low transition heights during the last prolonged solar minimum, of a level never obtained before, have been reported. We investigate the upper transition height on the global scale. We made progress in processing large data sets of Ht deduced from the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder and from the Formosat-3/COSMIC vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h) using the theoretical Global Plasma Ionosphere Density (GPID) model (Webb and Essex, 2004) and a revised non-linear function describing the scale height vs. altitude (Titheridge, 1976) to fit the vertical density profiles to the observed profiles and to determine the upper transition height. Since both methods require the plasma temperatures and their gradients as input, these are calculated using the IRI2012 model. Both methods are verified using a large amount of electron and ion density profiles simulated by the FLIP theoretical model and their accuracy is discussed. We compare the results from Alouette/ISIS and Formosat-3/COSMIC and present a global distribution of the calculated Ht and its dependence on geophysical parameters. Finally we compare it with Ht calculated using the IRI ion composition model. Titheridge, J.E., 1976. Ion Transition Heights from Topside Electron-Density Profiles. Planetary and Space Science 24 (3), 229-245. Webb, P.A., Essex, E.A., 2004. A dynamic global model of the plasmasphere. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar

  19. Sector-based VOCs emission factors and source profiles for the surface coating industry in the Pearl River Delta region of China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhuangmin; Sha, Qing'e; Zheng, Junyu; Yuan, Zibing; Gao, Zongjiang; Ou, Jiamin; Zheng, Zhuoyun; Li, Cheng; Huang, Zhijiong

    2017-04-01

    Accurate depiction of VOCs emission characteristics is essential for the formulation of VOCs control strategies. As one of the continuous efforts in improving VOCs emission characterization in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, this study targeted on surface coating industry, the most important VOCs emission sources in the PRD. Sectors in analysis included shipbuilding coating, wood furniture coating, metal surface coating, plastic surface coating, automobile coating and fabric surface coating. Sector-based field measurement was conducted to characterize VOCs emission factors and source profiles in the PRD. It was found that the raw material-based VOCs emission factors for these six sectors ranged from 0.34 to 0.58kg VOCs per kg of raw materials (kg·kg(-1)) while the emission factors based on the production yield varied from 0.59kg to 13.72t VOCs for each production manufactured. VOCs emission factors of surface coating industry were therefore preferably calculated based on raw materials with low uncertainties. Source profiles differed greatly among different sectors. Aromatic was the largest group for shipbuilding coating, wood furniture coating, metal surface coating and automobile coating while the oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) were the most abundant in the plastic and fabric surface coating sectors. The major species of aromatic VOCs in each of these six sectors were similar, mainly toluene and m/p-xylene, while the OVOCs varied among the different sectors. VOCs profiles in the three processes of auto industry, i.e., auto coating, auto drying and auto repairing, also showed large variations. The major species in these sectors in the PRD were similar with other places but the proportions of individual compounds were different. Some special components were also detected in the PRD region. This study highlighted the importance of updating local source profiles in a comprehensive and timely manner.

  20. Bridging Innovation and Outreach to Overcome Global Gaps in Radiation Oncology Through Information and Communication Tools, Trainee Advancement, Engaging Industry, Attention to Ethical Challenges, and Political Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Dad, Luqman; Royce, Trevor J; Morris, Zachary; Moran, Meena; Pawlicki, Todd; Khuntia, Deepak; Hardenbergh, Patricia; Cummings, Bernard; Mayr, Nina; Hu, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    An evolving paradigm in global outreach in radiation oncology has been the implementation of a more region-specific, needs-based approach to help close the gap in radiation services to low- and middle-income countries through the use of innovative tools in information and communication technology. This report highlights 4 information and communication technology tools in action today: (1) the NCCN Framework for Resource Stratification of NCCN guidelines, (2) ASTRO e-Contouring, (3) i.treatsafely.org, and (4) ChartRounds.com. We also render special consideration to matters related to global outreach that we believe require distinct attention to help us meet the goals established by the 2011 United Nations׳ Declaration on noncommunicable diseases: (1) trainee advancement toward careers in global health, (2) ethical challenges of international outreach, (3) critical importance of political advocacy, and (4) collaboration with Industry.

  1. Seasonal Transport in Mars' Mesosphere revealed by Nitric Oxide Nightglow vertical profiles and global images from IUVS/MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiepen, Arnaud; Stewart, Ian; Jain, Sonal; Schneider, Nicholas; Deighan, Justin; Gonzàlez-Galindo, Francisco; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Stevens, Michael; Bougher, Stephen; Milby, Zachariah; Evans, Scott; Chaffin, Michael; McClintock, William; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefèvre, Franck; Lo, Daniel; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the ultraviolet nightglow in the atmosphere of Mars through Nitric Oxide (NO) δ and γ bands emissions. On the dayside thermosphere of Mars, solar extreme ultraviolet radiation partly dissociates CO2 and N2 molecules. O(3P) and N(4S) atoms are carried by the day-to-night hemispheric transport. They preferentially descend in the nightside mesosphere in the winter hemisphere, where they can radiatively recombine to form NO(C2Π). The excited molecules promptly relax by emitting photons in the UV δ bands and in the γ bands through cascades via the A2Σ, v' = 0 state. These emissions are thus indicators of the N and O atom fluxes transported from the dayside to Mars' nightside and the winter descending circulation pattern from the nightside thermosphere to the mesosphere (e.g. Bertaux et al., 2005 ; Bougher et al., 1990 ; Cox et al., 2008 ; Gagné et al., 2013 ; Gérard et al., 2008 ; Stiepen et al., 2015). Observations of these emissions have been accumulated on a large dataset of nightside disk images and vertical profiles obtained at the limb by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS, McClintock et al., 2015) instrument when the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is at its apoapsis and its periapsis phases along its orbit, respectively. We present discussion on the variability in the brightness, altitude and topside scale height of the emission with season, geographical position and local time and possible interpretation for local and global changes in the mesosphere dynamics. IUVS images and limb scans reveal unexpected complex structure of the emission. The brightest emission is observed close to the winter pole. The emission is also surprisingly more intense in some sectors located close to the equator : at 120˚ and 150˚ longitude. Observations also reveal spots and streaks, indicating irregularities in the wind circulation pattern and possible impact of waves and tides. The disk images and limb profiles are compared to

  2. Evaluation of Hindcast Global and Regional Simulations of Aerosol Property Profiles during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Fast, J. D.; Berg, L. K.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Wang, H.; Ma, P. L.; Chand, D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Flynn, C. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Shilling, J. E.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2014-12-01

    observed and simulated vertical profiles of black carbon (BC), coating of BC, and the impact of BC on vertical variability in radiative forcing. Similarities and differences between the global and regional model simulations will also be discussed.

  3. Global Epitranscriptomics Profiling of RNA Post-Transcriptional Modifications as an Effective Tool for Investigating the Epitranscriptomics of Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Rebecca E.; Pazos, Manuel A.; Curcio, M. Joan; Fabris, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of all the post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) that decorate cellular RNA can provide comprehensive information on the effects of changing environmental conditions on the entire epitranscriptome. To capture this type of information, we performed the analysis of ribonucleotide mixtures produced by hydrolysis of total RNA extracts from S. cerevisiae that was grown under hyperosmotic and heat shock conditions. Their global PTM profiles clearly indicated that the cellular responses to these types of stresses involved profound changes in the production of specific PTMs. The observed changes involved not only up-/down-regulation of typical PTMs, but also the outright induction of new ones that were absent under normal conditions, or the elimination of others that were normally present. Pointing toward the broad involvement of different classes of RNAs, many of the newly observed PTMs differed from those engaged in the known tRNA-based mechanism of translational recoding, which is induced by oxidative stress. Some of the expression effects were stress-specific, whereas others were not, thus suggesting that RNA PTMs may perform multifaceted activities in stress response, which are subjected to distinctive regulatory pathways. To explore their signaling networks, we implemented a strategy based on the systematic deletion of genes that connect established response genes with PTM biogenetic enzymes in a putative interactomic map. The results clearly identified PTMs that were under direct HOG control, a well-known protein kinase pathway involved in stress response in eukaryotes. Activation of this signaling pathway has been shown to result in the stabilization of numerous mRNAs and the induction of selected lncRNAs involved in chromatin remodeling. The fact that PTMs are capable of altering the activity of the parent RNAs suggest their possible participation in feedback mechanisms aimed at modulating the regulatory functions of such RNAs. This

  4. Variational quality control of hydrographic profile data with non-Gaussian errors for global ocean variational data assimilation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Quality control procedures aiming at identifying observations suspected of gross errors are an important component of modern ocean data assimilation systems. On the one hand, assimilating observations whose departures from the background state are large may result in detrimental analyses and compromise the stability of the ocean analysis system. On the other hand, the rejection of these observations may prevent the analysis from ingesting useful information, especially in areas of large variability. In this work, we investigate the quality control of in-situ hydrographic profiles through modifying the probability density function (PDF) of the observational errors and relaxing the assumption of Gaussian PDF. The new PDF is heavier-tailed than Gaussian, thus accommodating the assimilation of observations with large misfits, albeit with smaller weight given to them in the analysis. This implies a different observational term in the analysis equation, and an adaptive quality control procedure based on the innovation statistics themselves. Implemented in a global ocean variational data assimilation system at moderate horizontal resolution, the scheme proves robust and successful in assimilating more observations with respect to the simpler background quality check scheme. This leads to better skill scores against both conventional and satellite observing systems. This approach proves superior also to the case where no quality control is considered. Furthermore, the implementation considers switching on the modified cost function at the 10th iteration of the minimization so that innovation statistics are based on a good approximation of the analysis. Neglecting this strategy and turning on the variational quality control since the beginning of the minimization exhibits worse scores, qualitatively similar to those of the experiment without quality control, suggesting that in this case quality control procedures are too gentle. A specific study investigating the upper

  5. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis found in human plasma using global quantitative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Crispin, David A.; May, Damon; Stevens, Tyler; McIntosh, Martin; Bronner, Mary P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose at early stages when curable treatments are effective. Biomarkers that can improve current pancreatic cancer detection would have great value in improving patient management and survival rate. A large scale quantitative proteomics study was performed to search for the plasma protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer. The enormous complexity of the plasma proteome and the vast dynamic range of protein concentration therein present major challenges for quantitative global profiling of plasma. To address these challenges, multi-dimensional fractionation at both protein and peptide levels was applied to enhance the depth of proteomics analysis. Employing stringent criteria, more than thirteen hundred proteins total were identified in plasma across 8-orders of magnitude in protein concentration. Differential proteins associated with pancreatic cancer were identified, and their relationship with the proteome of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic juice from our previous studies was discussed. A subgroup of differentially expressed proteins was selected for biomarker testing using an independent cohort of plasma and serum samples from well-diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease controls. Using ELISA methodology, the performance of each of these protein candidates was benchmarked against CA19-9, the current gold standard for a pancreatic cancer blood test. A composite marker of TIMP1 and ICAM1 demonstrate significantly better performance than CA19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from the non-pancreatic disease controls and chronic pancreatitis controls. In addition, protein AZGP1 was identified as a biomarker candidate for chronic pancreatitis. The discovery and technical challenges associated with plasma-based quantitative proteomics are discussed and may benefit the development of plasma proteomics technology in general. The protein

  7. Escherichia coli O157:H7 survives within human macrophages: global gene expression profile and involvement of the Shiga toxins.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Katherine; Faucher, Sébastien P; Béland, Maxime; Brousseau, Roland; Gannon, Victor; Martin, Christine; Harel, Josée; Daigle, France

    2008-11-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important food-borne pathogen that specifically binds to the follicle-associated epithelium in the intestine, which rapidly brings this bacterial pathogen in contact with underlying human macrophages. Very little information is available about the interaction between E. coli O157:H7 and human macrophages. We evaluated the uptake and survival of strain EDL933 during infection of human macrophages. Surprisingly, EDL933 survived and multiplied in human macrophages at 24 h postinfection. The global gene expression profile of this pathogen during macrophage infection was determined. Inside human macrophages, upregulation of E. coli O157:H7 genes carried on O islands (such as pagC, the genes for both of the Shiga toxins, and the two iron transport system operons fit and chu) was observed. Genes involved in acid resistance and in the SOS response were upregulated. However, genes of the locus of enterocyte effacement or genes involved in peroxide resistance were not differentially expressed. Many genes with putative or unknown functions were upregulated inside human macrophages and may be newly discovered virulence factors. As the Shiga toxin genes were upregulated in macrophages, survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed with isogenic Shiga toxin mutants. The initial uptake of Shiga toxins mutants was higher than that of the wild type; however, the survival rates were significantly lower at 24 h postinfection. Thus, Shiga toxins are implicated in the interaction between E. coli O157:H7 and human macrophages. Understanding the molecular mechanisms used by E. coli to survive within macrophages may help in the identification of targets for new therapeutic agents.

  8. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Mueller, David S.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryA negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks.

  9. Suppressing Sorbitol Synthesis Substantially Alters the Global Expression Profile of Stress Response Genes in Apple (Malus domestica) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Xu, Kenong; Han, Zhenhai; Cheng, Lailiang

    2015-09-01

    Sorbitol is a major product of photosynthesis in apple (Malus domestica) that is involved in carbohydrate metabolism and stress tolerance. However, little is known about how the global transcript levels in apple leaves respond to decreased sorbitol synthesis. In this study we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) profiling to characterize the transcriptome of leaves from transgenic lines of the apple cultivar 'Greensleeves' exhibiting suppressed expression of aldose-6-phosphate reductase (A6PR) to gain insights into sorbitol function and the consequences of decreased sorbitol synthesis on gene expression. We observed that, although the leaves of the low sorbitol transgenic lines accumulate higher levels of various primary metabolites, only very limited changes were found in the levels of transcripts associated with primary metabolism. We suggest that this is indicative of post-transcriptional and/or post-translational regulation of primary metabolite accumulation and central carbon metabolism. However, we identified significantly enriched gene ontology terms belonging to the 'stress related process' category in the antisense lines (P-value < 0.05). These include genes involved in the synthesis/degradation of abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) disease resistance genes and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes. This suggests that sorbitol plays a role in the responses of apple trees to abiotic and biotic stresses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Awareness and enforcement of guidelines for publishing industry-sponsored medical research among publication professionals: the Global Publication Survey.

    PubMed

    Wager, Elizabeth; Woolley, Karen; Adshead, Viv; Cairns, Angela; Fullam, Josh; Gonzalez, John; Grant, Tom; Tortell, Stephanie

    2014-04-19

    To gather information about current practices and implementation of publication guidelines among publication professionals working in or for the pharmaceutical industry. Web-based survey publicised via email and social media to members of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) and other organisations from November 2012 to February 2013. 469 individuals involved in publishing industry-sponsored research in peer-reviewed journals, mainly working in pharmaceutical or device companies ('industry', n