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Sample records for industry q10 pharmaceutical

  1. Coenzyme Q10 analytical determination in biological matrices and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lucangioli, Silvia; Martinefski, Manuela; Tripodi, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the analytical determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has gained importance in clinical diagnosis and in pharmaceutical quality control. CoQ10 is an important cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a potent endogenous antioxidant. CoQ10 deficiency is often associated with numerous diseases and patients with these conditions may benefit from administration of supplements of CoQ10. In this regard, it has been observed that the best benefits are obtained when CoQ10 deficiency is diagnosed and treated early. Therefore, it is of great value to develop analytical methods for the detection and quantification of CoQ10 in this type of disease. The methods above mentioned should be simple enough to be used in routine clinical laboratories as well as in quality control of pharmaceutical formulations containing CoQ10. Here, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of CoQ10 analysis.

  2. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System; availability. Notice.

    PubMed

    2009-04-08

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance describes a model for an effective quality management system for the pharmaceutical industry, referred to as the Pharmaceutical Quality System. The guidance is intended to provide a comprehensive approach to an effective pharmaceutical quality system that is based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) concepts, includes applicable good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations and complements ICH guidances on "Q8 Pharmaceutical Development" and "Q9 Quality Risk Management."

  3. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation... Systems and Processes for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA),...

  4. Densitometric HPTLC method for qualitative, quantitative analysis and stability study of Coenzyme Q10 in pharmaceutical formulations utilizing normal and reversed-phase silica gel plates.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kader, Maged Saad; Alam, Prawez; Alqasoumi, Saleh Ibrahim

    2016-03-01

    Two simple, precise and stability-indicating densitometric HPTLC method were developed and validated for qualitative and quantitative analysis of Coenzyme Q10 in pharmaceutical formulations using normal-phase (Method I) and reversed phase (Method II) silica gel TLC plates. Both methods were developed and validated with 10×20 cm glass-backed plates coated with 0.2 mm layers of either silica gel 60 F254 (E-Merck, Germany) using hexane-ethyl acetate (8.5:1.5 v/v) as developing system (Method I) or RP-18 silica gel 60 F254 (E-Merck, Germany) using methanol-acetone (4:6 v/v) as mobile phase (Method II). Both analyses were scanned with a densitometer at 282 nm. Linearity was found in the ranges 50-800 ng/spot (r(2)=0.9989) and 50-800 ng/spot (r(2)=0.9987) for Method I and Method II respectively. Stability of Coenzyme Q10 was explored by the two methods using acid, base, hydrogen peroxide, temperature and different solvents. Due to the efficiency of the method in separating Coenzyme Q10 from other ingredients including its degradation products, it can be applied for quality control, standardization of different pharmaceutical formulations and stability study.

  5. The production of coenzyme Q10 in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cluis, Corinne P; Pinel, Dominic; Martin, Vincent J

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 has emerged as a valuable molecule for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Therefore, research into producing and optimizing coenzyme Q10 via microbial fermentation is ongoing. There are two major paths being explored for maximizing production of this molecule to commercially advantageous levels. The first entails using microbes that naturally produce coenzyme Q10 as fermentation biocatalysts and optimizing the fermentation parameters in order to reach industrial levels of production. However, the natural coenzyme Q10-producing microbes tend to be intractable for industrial fermentation settings. The second path to coenzyme Q10 production being explored is to engineer Escherichia coli with the ability to biosynthesize this molecule in order to take advantage of its more favourable fermentation characteristics and the well-understood array of genetic tools available for this bacteria. Although many studies have attempted to over-produce coenzyme Q10 in E. coli through genetic engineering, production titres still remain below those of the natural coenzyme Q10-producing microorganisms. Current research is providing the knowledge needed to alleviate the bottlenecks involved in producing coenzyme Q10 from an E. coli strain platform and the fermentation parameters that could dramatically increase production titres from natural microbial producers. Synthesizing the lessons learned from both approaches may be the key towards a more cost-effective coenzyme Q10 industry.

  6. [Pharmaceuticals: a strategic national industry].

    PubMed

    Hollender, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Asked by Mme Nicole Fontaine, Delegate Minister of Industry, to help the government with its ongoing reflections on pharmaceutical industrial strategy, and the necessary autonomy of our country in the face of major commercial threats, a working group of the French National Academy of Medicine consulted representatives of five French and two foreign major drug companies. Their statements can be classified in four categories:--the first concerns new medications, which must be approved successively by three commissions, whose opinions are often delayed and influenced by economic considerations;--second, public and private research are both insufficient and are sometimes hindered by procedural restrictions,--third, the pharmaceutical industry is unable to deal with frequent and unforseeable political upheavals,--France does not adequately recognize the strategic importance of the pharmaceutical industry in the national economy. The Academy makes several recommendations: the French pharmaceutical industry should be considered as a national priority, the strategic importance of national pharmaceutical companies should be recognized, a multi-annual contract should be signed with manufacturers, clinical trials should be facilitated in France, relationships between the national pharmaceutical industry and public research structures should be reinforced, and an inter-ministerial Council on Pharmaceuticals should be created. This study was supplemented by a survey of veterinary medications, the results and conclusions of which are very similar to those outlined above for human medicines.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure , or blood sugar levels, may decrease the effects of CoQ10. CoQ10 may change way the body uses warfarin (a drug that prevents the blood ... using CoQ10 along with conventional therapies has any effect, good or bad, on the ... therapies work in the body. Is CoQ10 approved by the US Food and ...

  8. Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Graham S.; Pendri, Yadagiri; Snyder, Lawrence B.; Yevich, Joseph P.; Deshpande, Milind

    This chapter will discuss the role of chemistry within the pharmaceutical industry. Although the focus will be upon the industry within the United States, much of the discussion is equally relevant to pharmaceutical companies based in other first world nations such as Japan and those in Europe. The major objective of the pharmaceutical industry is the discovery, development, and marketing of efficacious and safe drugs for the treatment of human disease. Of course drug companies do not exist as altruistic, charitable organizations but like other share-holder owned corporations within our capitalistic society must achieve profits in order to remain viable and competitive. Thus, there exists a conundrum between the dual goals of enhancing the quality and duration of human life and that of increasing stock-holder equity. Much has been written and spoken in the lay media about the high prices of prescription drugs and the hardships this places upon the elderly and others of limited income.

  9. Immunotoxicology in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed Central

    Norbury, K C

    1982-01-01

    Development of an immunotoxicology program within the pharmaceutical industry is described. With few guidelines in the area and a multitude of factors to consider, a basic screen for evaluating immune competence in species routinely used in toxicologic studies has been proposed. The future of immunotoxicology depends upon the ability of the selected immune function tests to be predictive of human risk. PMID:7037389

  10. Coenzyme Q10 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Delgado Pavón, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel; Pérez Calero, Carmen; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2014-01-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These 2 functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical use of CoQ10. Also, at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, CoQ10 is recognized as an obligatory cofactor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the mitochondrial transition pore. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects the expression of genes involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport, and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, aging-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, and muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels as well as different ataxias and encephalomyopathies. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral administration of CoQ10 is a frequent antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit. PMID:25126052

  11. Bioremediation of industrial pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hedi Ben; Mosrati, Ridha; Barillier, Daniel; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2012-07-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn toward the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment. In recent years, many reports have been made on the occurrence of the large, differentiated group of pharmaceuticals in wastewater (PW), surface water, ground water, and in soil. The pharmaceutical sector is currently expanding in Tunisia, with more than 34 industries. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 to treat PW. P. putida was very efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand (COD), total dissolved solids (TDS), and turbidity of solution (85.5, 89.1, and 81.5%, respectively). Genotoxicity of effluent, before and after biodegradation, was evaluated in vivo in mouse bone marrow by assessing the percentage of cells bearing different chromosome aberrations. Results indicated that PW showed a significant ability to induce DNA damage. In addition, PW induced a remarkable lipid peroxidation (LPO) effect, however, activities of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were unchanged when treated with PW, compared to nontreated PW. This toxicity was imputed to the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater. However, chromosome aberration, as well as LPO of PW, were significantly reduced after bioremediation. Thus, the use of this strain for testing on the industrial scale seems possible and advantageous.

  12. [Production of coenzyme Q10 by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Dai, Guanping; Miao, Liangtian; Sun, Tao; Li, Qingyan; Xiao, Dongguang; Zhang, Xueli

    2015-02-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipophilic antioxidant that improves human immunity, delays senility and enhances the vitality of the human body and has wide applications in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Microbial fermentation is a sustainable way to produce CoQ10, and attracts increased interest. In this work, the native CoQ8 synthetic pathway of Escherichia coli was replaced by the CoQ10 synthetic pathway through integrating decaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene (dps) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into chromosome of E. coli ATCC 8739, followed by deletion of the native octaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene (ispB). The resulting strain GD-14 produced 0.68 mg/L CoQ10 with a yield of 0.54 mg/g DCW. Modulation of dxs and idi genes of the MEP pathway and ubiCA genes in combination led to 2.46-fold increase of CoQ10 production (from 0.54 to 1.87 mg/g DCW). Recruiting glucose facilitator protein of Zymomonas mobilis to replace the native phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems (PTS) further led to a 16% increase of CoQ10 yield. Finally, fed-batch fermentation of the best strain GD-51 was performed, which produced 433 mg/L CoQ10 with a yield of 11.7 mg/g DCW. To the best of our knowledge, this was the highest CoQ10 titer and yield obtained for engineered E. coli.

  13. Coenzyme Q10-containing composition (Immugen) protects against occupational and environmental stress in workers of the gas and oil industry.

    PubMed

    Korkina, Ludmila; Deeva, Irina; Ibragimova, Galina; Shakula, Alexander; Luci, Antonio; De Luca, Chiara

    2003-01-01

    The manual workers of the gas-and-oil extraction industry are exposed to hostile environmental and occupational conditions, resulting in elevated mortality and disability, due to chronic neurological and cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated the degree of oxidative stress, often associated with these pathological features, in the blood of manual and office employees of Russian Siberian extraction plants, and their psycho-physiological conditions. Results showed increased levels of spontaneous (p < 0.05) and PMA-activated (p < 0.01) luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (LDCL) in the white blood cells (WBC), and decreased peroxynitrite levels (p < 0.05) in the group of manual workers, and less markedly in the clerks and technicians working on spot, vs. a control group of city clerks. Superoxide release by WBC, and plasma/WBC membrane ubiquinol levels did not display major differences in the three groups. A relevant percentage of manual/office workers of extraction platforms presented impaired cardiovascular and neurological functions. The short term administration of a nutraceutical formulation based on coenzyme10, vitamin E, selenium, methionine and phospholipids led to significant improvement of cardiovascular parameters and psycho-emotional status, consistent with the normalization of LDCL and peroxynitrite production by WBC, with a good compliance to treatment confirmed by the increased blood levels of ubiquinol.

  14. Globalization and the pharmaceutical industry revisited.

    PubMed

    Busfield, Joan

    2003-01-01

    This survey of the pharmaceutical industry at the beginning of the 21st century updates some of the information provided in Claudio Tarabusi and Graham Vickery's survey, "Globalization in the Pharmaceutical Industry," published in the International Journal of Health Services in 1998, which was largely based on data up to 1993. However, the purpose of the present article differs from that of Tarabusi and Vickery, which covered a wide range of aspects of the industry relevant to globalization but did not explicitly address the question of the extent to which the industry could be described as globalized. After looking at the industry in some detail, the author directly confronts the question of the appropriateness of the use of the term "globalization" for characterizing the directions in which the pharmaceutical industry has been moving.

  15. Drug Information Residency Rotation with Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Program objectives of a drug information rotation at the Upjohn Company include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of…

  16. Developing Closer Ties with the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gregor; Hoddinott, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The need for research administrators to understand and appreciate the pharmaceutical industry's research and development environment is discussed, using examples from Canada. The research administrator's role in the technology transfer process and implications for faculty are examined. Ways to build closer school-industry ties are discussed. (MSE)

  17. Mergers and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Comanor, William S; Scherer, F M

    2013-01-01

    Conflicting trends confound the pharmaceutical industry. The productivity of pharmaceutical innovation has declined in recent years. At the same time, the cohort of large companies who are the leading engines of pharmaceutical R&D has become increasingly concentrated. The concurrent presence of these trends is not sufficient to determine causation. In response to lagging innovation prospects, some companies have sought refuge in mergers and acquisitions to disguise their dwindling prospects or gain R&D synergies. On the other hand, the increased concentration brought on by recent mergers may have contributed to the declining rate of innovation. In this paper, we consider the second of these causal relationships: the likely impact of the recent merger wave among the largest pharmaceutical companies on the rate of innovation. In other words, have recent mergers, which may have been taken in response to lagging innovation, represented a self-defeating strategy that only made industry outcomes worse?

  18. Pollution prevention in the pharmaceutical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramani, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    A clear understanding of the process, reaction pathways, process equipment, operational requirements, and waste stream characteristics are critical for the evaluation, selection, and implementation of pollution prevention in the pharmaceutical industry. Although pollution prevention opportunities are always preferred over treatment and disposal techniques, consideration of a full range of options--including at-source treatments and disposal--is a practical necessity to ensure protection of the environment using best available technology. General housekeeping can also play a major role in waste minimization. Waste minimization and pollution prevention are not new concepts for the pharmaceutical industry. But the confidential and highly competitive nature of the business stands in the way of disseminating information regarding specific activities in this area. The pharmaceutical industry could probably do much better in this respect. Successful implementation of waste minimization in the pharmaceutical industry requires that a process modification not have a negative impact on product quality. Recovered and recycled materials must meet quality specifications that are similar to those for virgin raw materials.

  19. An overview of the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Stave, G M; Joines, R

    1997-01-01

    The research-based pharmaceutical industry is a large and diverse worldwide employer. Rapid changes in the health care marketplace have resulted in many changes for the industry, including a need to streamline the drug discovery and development process. To address this challenge, new technologies have been rapidly adapted. Another result of the changing marketplace has been a rapid consolidation with many recent mergers and acquisitions as well as internal reorganizations to better support new and varied customers.

  20. Effective executive management in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hoang; Kleiner, Brian H

    2005-01-01

    Along with the boom in information technology and vast development in genomic and proteomic discoveries, the pharmaceutical and biotech industries have been provided the means and tools to create a new page in medicinal history. They are now able to alter the classic ways to cure complex diseases thanks to the completion of the human genome project. To be able to compete in this industry, pharmaceutical management has to be effective not only internally but also externally in socially acceptable conduct. The first department that requires focus is marketing and sales. As the main driving force to increase revenues and profits, marketing and sales employees should be highly motivated by compensation. Also, customer relationships should be maintained for long-term gain. As important as marketing, research and development requires the financial support as well as the critical decision making to further expand the product pipeline. Similarly, finance and technologies should be adequately monitored and invested to provide support as well as prepare for future expansion. On top of that, manufacturing processes and operations are operated per quality systems and FDA guidelines to ensure high quality. Human Resources, on the other hand, should carry the managing and motivation from upper management through systematic recruitment, adequate training, and fair compensation. Moreover, effective management in a pharmaceutical would also require the social welfare and charity to help patients who cannot afford the treatment as well as improving the organization's image. Last but not least, the management should also prepare for the globalization of the industry. Inevitably, large pharmaceutical companies are merging with each other or acquiring smaller companies to enhance the competitive advantages as well as expand their product mix. For effectiveness in a pharmaceutical industry, management should focus more than just the daily routine tasks and short-term goals. Rather, they

  1. Globalization in the pharmaceutical industry, Part I.

    PubMed

    Casadio Tarabusi, C; Vickery, G

    1998-01-01

    This report on the pharmaceutical industry will be published in two parts. Part I begins with a summary of the study and its conclusions. The authors then provide an overview of the characteristics of the industry and current trends in its growth and structure: production and consumption, employment, research and development, capital investment, firm and product concentration and product competition, and pricing. A discussion of international trade follows, covering intra- and inter-regional, intra-firm, and intra-industry trade. The report will continue in the next issue of the Journal (Part II) with a look at foreign direct investment, inter-firm networks, and governmental policies.

  2. Financial risk of the biotech industry versus the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Golec, Joseph; Vernon, John A

    2009-01-01

    The biotech industry now accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total R&D spending on new medicines. However, compared with the pharmaceutical industry, the biotech industry is financially fragile. This article illustrates the financial fragility of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in the US and the implications of this fragility for the effects that government regulation could have on biotech firms. Graphical analysis and statistical tests were used to show how the biotech industry differs from the pharmaceutical industry. The two industries' characteristics were measured and compared, along with various measures of firms' financial risk and sensitivity to government regulation. Data from firms' financial statements provided accounting-based measures and firms' stock returns applied to a multifactor asset pricing model provided financial market measures. The biotech industry was by far the most research-intensive industry in the US, averaging 38% R&D intensity (ratio of R&D spending to total firm assets) over the past 25 years, compared with an average of 25% for the pharmaceutical industry and 3% for all other industries. Biotech firms exhibited lower and more volatile profits and higher market-related and size-related risk, and they suffered more negative stock returns in response to threatened government price regulation. Biotech firms' financial risks increase their costs of capital and make them more sensitive to government regulations that affect their financial prospects. As biotech products grow to represent a larger share of new medicines, general stock market conditions and government regulations could have a greater impact on the level of innovation of new medicines.

  3. Globalization in the pharmaceutical industry, Part II.

    PubMed

    Casadio Tarabusi, C; Vickery, G

    1998-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report on the pharmaceutical industry. Part II begins with a discussion of foreign direct investment and inter-firm networks, which covers international mergers, acquisitions, and minority participation; market shares of foreign-controlled firms; international collaboration agreements (with a special note on agreements in biotechnology); and licensing agreements. The final section of the report covers governmental policies on health and safety regulation, price regulation, industry and technology, trade, foreign investment, protection of intellectual property, and competition.

  4. [Clinical researchers and pharmaceutical industry. Dangerous liaisons].

    PubMed

    Roos, J C

    1999-08-07

    Pharmaceutical industry and physician-investigators are mutually dependent for the development of new drugs and clinical trials of such drugs. Under pressure of increasing market orientation, clinical scientific investigations shift more and more from fundamental to clinical drug trials, the results of which sometimes do not justify the excitement with which they are presented in the scientific and lay press. More room and means should be given to less market oriented studies, addressing more fundamental clinical problems. Financial affiliation with the industry may influence the doctors' mind and the presentation and type of investigation. Apart from this type of intellectual subjection there is a form of financial subjugation of doctors to the industry, by participating in so-called 'postmarketing surveillance studies' which they in fact are not, that have no scientific value whatsoever, but only serve the financial interest of the participating doctor and the industry.

  5. The changing role of quality assurance in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    ICH Q10. Pharmaceutical Quality System emphasizes that senior management is responsible for the quality system. Thus, it is not the quality assurance organization that has the primary responsibility for the quality system. With this shift of responsibilities, what can quality assurance do to help senior management fulfill their responsibility? How can quality assurance be more proactive, add more value? What new skills does quality assurance need to have in order to perform its new role? This article attempts to answer these questions.

  6. TDR collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, W E

    2006-12-01

    TDR's research programme was initiated in 1976 at the same time that the pharmaceutical industry began to withdraw from the discovery and development of new drugs for tropical diseases. TDR collaborated with the industry right from the start, its prime objective initially being to ensure that candidate drugs already in the development pipeline, such as praziquantel, mefloquine, ivermectin, halofantrine and atovaquone/proguanil, were not shelved. It became clear during the 1980s that once candidate drugs in these existing pipelines had been processed, that would be it. TDR therefore developed a number of other ways for collaboration, including testing compounds already in development in companies for other therapeutic areas. One candidate identified in this way was an oral formulation of miltefosine, in development in Asta Medica for an antitumour indication. A joint Asta Medica (later Zentaris)/TDR development project was agreed, and despite its fair share of traumas during the development process, miltefosine is now registered for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in India, Germany and Colombia. This example of a successful TDR/pharmaceutical industry collaboration lives on in the various Public Private Partnerships such as the new Medicines for Malaria Venture that TDR helped to spawn.

  7. Academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Ban, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    In the second half of the 19th century new drugs introduced by the pharmaceutical industry helped lead to the establishment of academic departments in psychiatry. Causal treatment of cerebral pellagra by nicotinic acid and cerebral syphilis by penicillin in the first half of the 20th century led to major changes in the diagnostic distribution of psychiatric patients. In the second half of the 20th century with the introduction of a rapidly growing number of psychotropic drugs, pharmacotherapy became the primary form of treatment in mental illness. Psychiatrists today perceive neuropharmacology as one of the basic sciences of psychiatry and psychopharmacology as the bridge between the mode of action and the clinical indications of psychotropic drugs. Pharmacotherapy with psychotropic drugs focused attention on the differential responsiveness to the same drug within the same diagnostic category. Yet, instead of re-evaluating psychiatric nosology and conducting research in psychopathology, a statistical methodology was adopted for the demonstration of therapeutic effectiveness in pharmacologically heterogeneous populations. Employment of consensus-based classifications and psychiatric rating scales in the clinical development of psychotropic drugs led to semi-finished products, which are prescribed indiscriminately. Replacement of single-center clinical trials by multi-center centrally coordinated clinical investigations led to the control of education in pharmacotherapy by the pharmaceutical industry. To separate education from marketing, the identification of the treatment-responsive forms of illness and the delineation of the therapeutic profile of psychotropic drugs are proposed with the employment of a new methodology, the "Composite Diagnostic Evaluation System." It is postulated that development of a pharmacologically valid psychiatric nosology with the employment of a "nosologic matrix" would provide the pharmaceutical industry with the necessary feedback to

  8. COENZYME Q 10 : A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deependra; Jain, Vandana; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, S

    2002-01-01

    Ubiquinone or Co Q10 is essentially a vitamin like substance and is a cofactor of an enzyme. It is an integral part of the memberanes of mitocondria where it is involved in the energy production. It is a nutrient necessary for the function of every cell of the body especially vital organs of the body like heart, liver, brain etc. Studies have shown that coenzyme Q10 alters the natural history of cardiovascular illness and has the potential of prevention of cardiovascular diseases through the inhibition of LDL cholesterol oxidation by maintenance of optimal cellular and mitochondrial function throughout the ravages of time internal and external stress. PMID:22557086

  9. Pharmaceutical industry exposure in our hospitals: the final frontier.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jessica; Loh, Erwin; Coleman, Justin J

    2016-01-18

    Despite recent changes in attitudes, most hospitals continue to experience pharmaceutical industry presence. Pharmaceutical industry presence may be necessary and beneficial in the context of sponsorship of clinical trials with appropriate governance. Doctors continue to hold positive attitudes towards market-oriented activities of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. Despite evidence to the contrary, doctors believe they are able to effectively manage pharmaceutical sales representative interactions such that their own prescribing is not adversely impacted. Doctors also share a belief that small gifts and benefits are harmless. There may be significant financial burden associated with divestment of such sponsorship by hospitals. Change requires education and effective policies to manage pharmaceutical industry relationships and conflicts of interest. We discuss case studies involving students and public hospital doctors to show that divestment is possible without significant financial detriment. Health services need to be proactive in transitioning financial and cultural reliance on pharmaceutical industry sponsorship to other potentially less harmful sources.

  10. Coenzyme Q10 - A new player in the treatment of heart failure?

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Jerzy; Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Cieślewicz, Artur; Jabłecka, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is the only endogenously synthesized lipid with a redox function which exhibits broad tissue and intracellular distribution in mammals. Beneficial effects of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation were observed in several age-related diseases including heart failure. CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10) level is significantly decreased in patients with this disease, which correlates with severity of clinical symptoms. Supplementation with various pharmaceutical formulations of CoQ10 improves impaired cardiac function and clinical course of heart failure. Current data from clinical trials indicate that CoQ10 can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality of heart failure patients in addition to guideline recommended pharmacotherapy.

  11. A vision of the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Muñio, S

    1998-01-01

    As the financial resources available for looking after the health of an aging population are limited, generic drugs (drugs that are no longer covered by a patent and marketed at a lower price) have come to be used in western countries as a means for meeting growing demand while leaving resources in the health budget for new drugs. In Spain, a law on product patents was introduced in 1992, which is much later than in other countries, and created difficulties in the definition and procedure for gaining approval for generic drugs. Circular 3/97 from the Ministry of Health finally resolved these issues. In this circular, generic pharmaceutical products (GPPs) are clearly defined and identified with a positive commitment towards guaranteeing the ability to interchange original drugs for other cheaper generic products and towards clarifying the Spanish vade mecum. The position of the pharmaceutical industry on generic drugs varies widely and consequently, it is impossible to make a general statement on the view of the industry. However, the commitment of Novartis, given the issues described above and in line with the company's global strategy, is to offer innovation and services to society. This is perfectly compatible with offering health professionals both innovative drugs and generic drugs of a high quality at a lower price, given that registering genetics requires less investment in research and development. In any case, GPPs face an uncertain future in Spain and market forecasts also differ widely, ranging from 15 billion to 80 billion pesetas in the year 2000. It will be necessary to get doctors and pharmacists positively involved, to set up fast structural measures, and to avoid rejection by patients through successful information and marketing.

  12. Global gene mining and the pharmaceutical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2005-09-01

    Worldwide efforts are ongoing in optimizing medical treatment by searching for the right medicine at the right dose for the individual. Metabolism is regulated by polymorphisms, which may be tested by relatively simple SNP analysis, however requiring DNA from the test individuals. Target genes for the efficiency of a given medicine or predisposition of a given disease are also subject to population studies, e.g., in Iceland, Estonia, Sweden, etc. For hypothesis testing and generation, several bio-banks with samples from patients and healthy persons within the pharmaceutical industry have been established during the past 10 years. Thus, more than 100,000 samples are stored in the freezers of either the pharmaceutical companies or their contractual partners at universities and test institutions. Ethical issues related to data protection of the individuals providing samples to bio-banks are several: nature and extent of information prior to consent, coverage of the consent given by the study person, labeling and storage of the sample and data (coded or anonymized). In general, genetic test data, once obtained, are permanent and cannot be changed. The test data may imply information that is not beneficial to the patient and his/her family (e.g., employment opportunities, insurance, etc.). Furthermore, there may be a long latency between the analysis of the genetic test and the clinical expression of the disease and wide differences in the disease patterns. Consequently, information about some genetic test data may stigmatize patients leading to poor quality of life. This has raised the issue of 'genetic exceptionalism' justifying specific regulation of use of genetic information. Discussions on how to handle sampling and data are ongoing within the industry and the regulatory sphere, the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) having issued a position paper, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) having a working

  13. RFID in the pharmaceutical industry: addressing counterfeits with technology.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in the pharmaceutical industry has grown in recent years. The technology has matured from its specialized tracking and retail uses to a systemic part of supply chain management in international pharmaceutical production and distribution. Counterfeit drugs, however, remain a significant challenge for governments, pharmaceutical companies, clinicians, and patients and the use of RFID to track these compounds represents an opportunity for development. This paper discusses the medical, technological, and economic factors that support widespread adoption of RFID technology in the pharmaceutical industry in an effort to prevent counterfeit medicines from harming patients and brand equity.

  14. [Justice challenges of pharmaceutical industry global research].

    PubMed

    Páez Moreno, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    International research projects sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry are a recent modality of biomedical research, which is driven by interests that are not only scientific, but also commercial. This combination of interests is one of the natural consequences of globalization, which has brought unquestionable benefits for the world, but has also created a wider gap between the wealthy and the poor. Given that globalization has been led by the the world's leading economies, the level of injustice in the world has increased, often to the favor of the already wealthy. Globalization has a well-established dynamics, whose main characteristic is domain over the following: technological innovation, the organization of the production of goods and services, human needs, and consumption. International biomedical research fits well in this dynamics, and the result is often a poor distribution of benefits, added to a loss of scientific integrity for the sake of commercial interests. This phenomenon raises many ethical questions and it demands a reflection from different bioethical points of view, particularly an economic ethics and a global justice.

  15. [Relationship between pharmaceutical industry and public health in vaccination].

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Giuseppe; Capanna, Alessandra; Soncini, Renato; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines play the main role in primary prevention in Public Health as they allow the control of many infectious diseases progression, reducing complications, morbidity and mortality. Pharmaceutical industry has spread worldwide the production and distribution of vaccines; moreover, research and new technological approaches inside industry make possible new formulations and preparations with an increasing safety. In spite of these positive aspects, lack of confidence in the utility of vaccination as well as in the real role of the pharmaceutical industry has grown in importance in recent decades. Aim of the study was to analyze these issues, with regards to cost and timing of vaccine production, and complex vaccine planning, related to efficacy, safety and tolerability assessment. Relationship between pharmaceutical industry and Public Health was finally considered; in particular, the role of Public Health as mediator between the pharmaceutical industry and the general population.

  16. The Utilization of Project Management in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krusko, Diane; Cangemi, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 99 pharmaceutical companies concerning their organization and use of project management techniques for research and development found that the industry is using project management increasingly in a variety of ways for better business planning and operations. (MSE)

  17. Scientific misconduct, the pharmaceutical industry, and the tragedy of institutions.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kohler, Jillian Clare; Esmail, Laura C

    2007-09-01

    This paper examines how current legislative and regulatory models do not adequately govern the pharmaceutical industry towards ethical scientific conduct. In the context of a highly profit-driven industry, governments need to ensure ethical and legal standards are not only in place for companies but that they are enforceable. We demonstrate with examples from both industrialized and developing countries how without sufficient controls, there is a risk that corporate behaviour will transgress ethical boundaries. We submit that there is a critical need for urgent drug regulatory reform. There must be robust regulatory structures in place which enforce corporate governance mechanisms to ensure that pharmaceutical companies maintain ethical standards in drug research and development and the marketing of pharmaceuticals. What is also needed is for the pharmaceutical industry to adopt authentic "corporate social responsibility" policies as current policies and practices are insufficient.

  18. A Study of Comparative Advantage and Intra-Industry Trade in the Pharmaceutical Industry of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Rezapour, Aziz; Lotfi, Farhad; Azar, Farbod Ebadifard; Nabilo, Bahram; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Hadian, Mohammad; Shahidisadeghi, Niusha; Karami, Atiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Drug costs in Iran accounts for about 30% of the total health care expenditure. Moreover, pharmaceutical business lies among the world’s greatest businesses. The aim of this study was to analyze Iran’s comparative advantage and intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals so that suitable policies can be developed and implemented in order to boost Iran’s trade in this field. Methods: To identify Iran’s comparative advantage in pharmaceuticals, trade specialization, export propensity, import penetration and Balassa and Vollrath indexes were calculated and the results were compared with other pharmaceutical exporting countries. The extent and growth of Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals were measured and evaluated using the Grubel-Lloyd and Menon-Dixon indexes. The required data was obtained from Iran’s Customs Administration, Iran’s pharmaceutical Statistics, World Bank and International Trade Center. Results: The results showed that among pharmaceutical exporting countries, Iran has a high level of comparative disadvantage in pharmaceutical products because it holds a small share in world’s total pharmaceutical exports. Also, the low extent of bilateral intra-industry trade between Iran and its trading partners in pharmaceuticals shows the trading model of Iran’s pharmaceutical industry is mostly inter-industry trade rather than intra-industry trade. In addition, the growth of Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals is due to its shares of imports from pharmaceutical exporting countries to Iran and exports from Iran to its neighboring countries. Conclusions: The results of the analysis can play a valuable role in helping pharmaceutical companies and policy makers to boost pharmaceutical trade. PMID:26153184

  19. 76 FR 64945 - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Cephalon, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Cephalon, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Orders... Consent Orders (``Consent Agreement'') from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (``Teva'') and Cephalon... Pharmaceutical, Inc. (``Par'') all of Teva's rights and assets relating to its generic transmucosal...

  20. Clinical applications of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Oropesa-Avila, Manuel; Vega, Alejandro Fernandez; de la Mata, Mario; Pavon, Ana Delgado; Alcocer-Gomez, Elisabet; Calero, Carmen Perez; Paz, Marina Villanueva; Alanis, Macarena; de Lavera, Isabel; Cotan, David; Sanchez-Alcazar, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or ubiquinone was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics as electron and proton carrier; later studies demonstrated its presence in other cellular membranes and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These two functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical indication of CoQ10. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects expression of genes involved in human cell signalling, metabolism and transport and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, ageing-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also a secondary effect of statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, fibromyalgia, muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral CoQ10 treatment is a frequent mitochondrial energizer and antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit.

  1. Intellectual Property and the Pharmaceutical Scientist: An Industry Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, William J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Three issues are discussed: (1) conflict between the pharmaceutical industry and academe; (2) how and why some companies contract their research efforts to colleges; and (3) how colleges can increase their percentage of industry monies available for contract research. (Author/MSE)

  2. Uneasy subjects: medical students' conflicts over the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    In this article I report on an investigation of the pharmaceutical industry's influence in medical education. Findings are based on fifty semi-structured interviews with medical students in the United States and Canada conducted between 2010 and 2013. Participant responses support the survey-based literature demonstrating that there is clear and pervasive influence of the pharmaceutical industry in medical education. They also challenge the theory that medical students feel entitled to industry gifts and uncritically accept industry presence. I investigate how medical students who are critical of the pharmaceutical industry negotiate its presence in the course of their medical education. Findings suggest that these participants do not simply absorb industry presence, but interpret it and respond in complex ways. Participants were uncomfortable with industry influence throughout their medical training and found multifaceted ways to resist. They struggled with power relations in medical training and the prevailing notion that industry presence is a normal part of medical education. I argue that this pervasive norm of industry presence is located in neoliberal structural transformations within and outside both education and medicine. The idea that industry presence is normal and inevitable represents a challenge for students who are critical of industry.

  3. Biochemical Assessment of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Aguilera, Juan Carlos; Cortés, Ana Belén; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J. M.; Navas, Plácido

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency syndrome includes clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases that show a variety of severe and debilitating symptoms. A multiprotein complex encoded by nuclear genes carries out CoQ10 biosynthesis. Mutations in any of these genes are responsible for the primary CoQ10 deficiency, but there are also different conditions that induce secondary CoQ10 deficiency including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and mutations in genes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The diagnosis of CoQ10 deficiencies is determined by the decrease of its content in skeletal muscle and/or dermal skin fibroblasts. Dietary CoQ10 supplementation is the only available treatment for these deficiencies that require a rapid and distinct diagnosis. Here we review methods for determining CoQ10 content by HPLC separation and identification using alternative approaches including electrochemical detection and mass spectrometry. Also, we review procedures to determine the CoQ10 biosynthesis rate using labeled precursors. PMID:28273876

  4. Biochemical Assessment of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Aguilera, Juan Carlos; Cortés, Ana Belén; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J M; Navas, Plácido

    2017-03-05

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency syndrome includes clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases that show a variety of severe and debilitating symptoms. A multiprotein complex encoded by nuclear genes carries out CoQ10 biosynthesis. Mutations in any of these genes are responsible for the primary CoQ10 deficiency, but there are also different conditions that induce secondary CoQ10 deficiency including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and mutations in genes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The diagnosis of CoQ10 deficiencies is determined by the decrease of its content in skeletal muscle and/or dermal skin fibroblasts. Dietary CoQ10 supplementation is the only available treatment for these deficiencies that require a rapid and distinct diagnosis. Here we review methods for determining CoQ10 content by HPLC separation and identification using alternative approaches including electrochemical detection and mass spectrometry. Also, we review procedures to determine the CoQ10 biosynthesis rate using labeled precursors.

  5. Drug discovery in pharmaceutical industry: productivity challenges and trends.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ish

    2012-10-01

    Low productivity, rising R&D costs, dissipating proprietary products and dwindling pipelines are driving the pharmaceutical industry to unprecedented challenges and scrutiny. In this article I reflect on the current status of the pharmaceutical industry and reasons for continued low productivity. An emerging 'symbiotic model of innovation', that addresses underlying issues in drug failure and attempts to narrow gaps in current drug discovery processes, is discussed to boost productivity. The model emphasizes partnerships in innovation to deliver quality products in a cost-effective system. I also discuss diverse options to build a balanced research portfolio with higher potential for persistent delivery of drug molecules.

  6. Evolving role of pharmaceutical physicians in the industry: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Patil, Anant; Rajadhyaksha, Viraj

    2012-01-01

    The Indian pharmaceutical industry, like any other industry, has undergone significant change in the last decade. The role of a Medical advisor has always been of paramount importance in the pharmaceutical companies in India. On account of the evolving medical science and the competitive environment, the medical advisor's role is also increasingly becoming critical. In India, with changes in regulatory rules, safety surveillance, and concept of medical liaisons, the role of the medical advisor is evolving continuously and is further likely to evolve in the coming years in important areas like health economics, public private partnerships, and strategic planning.

  7. Models for open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Alexander; Germann, Paul-Georg; Trill, Henning; Gassmann, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    The nature of the pharmaceutical industry is such that the main driver for its growth is innovation. In view of the vast challenges that the industry has been facing for several years and, in particular, how to manage stagnating research and development (R&D) productivity, pharmaceutical companies have opened their R&D organizations to external innovation. Here, we identify and characterize four new types of open innovator, which we call 'knowledge creator', 'knowledge integrator', 'knowledge translator' and 'knowledge leverager', and which describe current open R&D models.

  8. Evolving role of pharmaceutical physicians in the industry: Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anant; Rajadhyaksha, Viraj

    2012-01-01

    The Indian pharmaceutical industry, like any other industry, has undergone significant change in the last decade. The role of a Medical advisor has always been of paramount importance in the pharmaceutical companies in India. On account of the evolving medical science and the competitive environment, the medical advisor's role is also increasingly becoming critical. In India, with changes in regulatory rules, safety surveillance, and concept of medical liaisons, the role of the medical advisor is evolving continuously and is further likely to evolve in the coming years in important areas like health economics, public private partnerships, and strategic planning. PMID:22347701

  9. [The pharmaceutical industry in France: the turning point of 1915].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    For several convergent reasons, 1915 was a key period for the pharmaceutical industry in France. The overall realization that France was dependent on Germany for chemical and pharmaceutical products came from shortages of key drugs but also from massive use of poison gas for which France was not able to face this unexpected event. France's shortage for chemists properly trained to answer the needs of industry, the weak relationship between industry and faculty, the uncomfortable situation of specialty drugs, the regulations on patents and trademarks were many subjects of controversies which will contribute to the analysis of the source of this French dependence to Germany. It will be at the origin of new orientations after the war for the pharmaceutical industry and the French society. The objective was to be independent for drugs and consequently to resolve the identified issues, as well as to have a dynamic industrial research. The creation and development of several pharmaceutical companies after the war was a more or less direct benefit from the considerations starting in 1915.

  10. Qualitative Phenomenological Examination of IT Project Management in Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ly, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what caused IT projects to fail at a high rate in the pharmaceutical industry. IT projects failures delayed development of new drugs that can help save lives. It was imperative to evaluate what caused project failures because the collateral damage was delay in drug development. This qualitative…

  11. Writing Technical Documents for the Global Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    States that technical writers in the global pharmaceutical industry write for two audiences: regulatory agencies and healthcare practitioners. Contends that information products that address these audiences must balance the competing forces of business interests, market penetration, and the cultural variables of products so tied to people's…

  12. Some statistical issues in project prioritization in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Senn, S

    1996-12-30

    Various aspects of portfolio management and project prioritization within the pharmaceutical industry are examined. It is shown that the cost and probability architecture of a project is a crucial aspect of its value. An appropriate simple tool for ranking projects is the Pearson index. Various difficulties are considered.

  13. Pharmaceutical Industry and Trade Liberalization Using Computable General Equilibrium Model

    PubMed Central

    Barouni, M; Ghaderi, H; Banouei, AA

    2012-01-01

    Background Computable general equilibrium models are known as a powerful instrument in economic analyses and widely have been used in order to evaluate trade liberalization effects. The purpose of this study was to provide the impacts of trade openness on pharmaceutical industry using CGE model. Methods: Using a computable general equilibrium model in this study, the effects of decrease in tariffs as a symbol of trade liberalization on key variables of Iranian pharmaceutical products were studied. Simulation was performed via two scenarios in this study. The first scenario was the effect of decrease in tariffs of pharmaceutical products as 10, 30, 50, and 100 on key drug variables, and the second was the effect of decrease in other sectors except pharmaceutical products on vital and economic variables of pharmaceutical products. The required data were obtained and the model parameters were calibrated according to the social accounting matrix of Iran in 2006. Results: The results associated with simulation demonstrated that the first scenario has increased import, export, drug supply to markets and household consumption, while import, export, supply of product to market, and household consumption of pharmaceutical products would averagely decrease in the second scenario. Ultimately, society welfare would improve in all scenarios. Conclusion: We presents and synthesizes the CGE model which could be used to analyze trade liberalization policy issue in developing countries (like Iran), and thus provides information that policymakers can use to improve the pharmacy economics. PMID:23641393

  14. Quality in the pharmaceutical industry – A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Haleem, Reham M.; Salem, Maissa Y.; Fatahallah, Faten A.; Abdelfattah, Laila E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to:a.Highlight the most important guidelines and practices of quality in the pharmaceutical industry.b.Organize such guidelines and practices to create a guide to pave the way for other researchers who would like to dig deeper into these guidelines and practices. Design A review was conducted of 102 publications; 56 publications were concerned with the pharmaceutical quality directly while 46 publications were concerned with the general quality practices. The content of those sources was analyzed and the following themes were identified:a.Research theme 1: Guidelines of the pharmaceutical quality.b.Research theme 2: General practices recently applied in the pharmaceutical industry. Main outcome measures The following guidelines were identified and reviewed: WHO guidelines, FDA guidelines, EU guidelines and ICH guidelines in the research theme I. In research theme II; the following topics were identified and reviewed: quality risk management, quality by design, corrective actions and preventive actions, process capability analysis, Six Sigma, process analytical technology, lean manufacturing, total quality management, ISO series and HACCP. Results Upon reviewing the previously highlighted guidelines and the practices that are widely applied in the pharmaceutical industry, it was noticed that there is an abundant number of papers and articles that explain the general guidelines and practices but the literature lack those describing application; case studies of the pharmaceutical factories applying those guidelines and significance of those guidelines and practices. Conclusions It is recommended that the literature would invest more in the area of application and significance of guidelines and practices. New case studies should be done to prove the feasibility of such practices. PMID:26594110

  15. [The pharmaceutical industry in the industrial chemical group: the National Union of Chemical-Pharmaceutical Laboratories (1919-1936)].

    PubMed

    Nozal, Raúl Rodríquez

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry associations, as it happened with other businesses, had a significant rise during the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera and II Republic. The 'Cámara Nacional de Industrias Químicas', in Barcelona, represented the national chemical industry to its ultimate assimilation by the 'Organización Sindical' in 1939. In this association, matters relating to pharmaceutical products -- which we will especially deal with in this work -- were managed by the 'Unión Nacional de Laboratorios Químico-Farmacéuticos', which defended the interests of pharmaceutical companies in the presence of government authorities, using the resources and mechanisms also managed by business pressure groups. The inclusion of industrial pharmacy in the Chemical lobby separated the pharmaceutical industry from traditional exercise and its corporate environment. this created ups and downs, conflicts of interests and finally, love and hate relationships with their colleagues of the pharmacy work placement and, of course, with the association that represented them: the 'Unión Farmacéutica Nacional'.

  16. Pharmaceutical and industrial protein engineering: where we are?

    PubMed

    Amara, Amro Abd-Al-Fattah

    2013-01-01

    The huge amount of information, the big number of scientists and their efforts, labs, man/hrs, fund, companies all and others factors build the success of the amazing new branch of genetic engineering the 'protein engineering' (PE). It concerns with the modification of protein structure/function(s) or building protein from scratch. The engineered proteins usually have new criteria(s). Engineering proteins can be mediated on the level of genes or proteins. PE fined its way in different important sectors including industrial, pharmaceutical and medicinal ones. Aspects about PE and its applications will be discussed with this review. The concept, tools, and the industrial applications of the protein, engineered proteins and PE will be under focus. In order to get up to date knowledge about the applications of PE in basic protein and molecular biology, several examples are discussed. PE can play a significant role in different industrial and pharmaceutical sectors if used wisely and selectively.

  17. India's pharmaceutical industry: hype or high tech take-off?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Prabodh; Lofgren, Hans

    2004-11-08

    India has built a large pharmaceutical industry through an array of measures in support of domestic firms. The absence of product patents enabled Indian companies to become world leading producers of generic versions of patented drugs. Low costs and a strong engineering tradition continue to sustain competitive strength. The implementation of the World Trade Organization patent regime in 2005 is driving a transformation of the industry. Key elements of the present shake-up include the return of 'big pharma' companies on a large scale and the emergence of several Indian firms that aim to become fully-fledged research-based multinationals. This article provides a description of the development and structure of the Indian pharmaceutical industry and explores questions and challenges arising from its integration into global markets.

  18. Strategic imperatives for globalization of industries in developing countries: an Indian pharmaceutical industry example.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rajesh; Chandra, Ashish; Kumar, Girish

    2004-01-01

    The annual global pharmaceutical sales have grown over 466 billion dollars, almost 50% of which comes from North America. Among developing countries, India, with 16% of the world population, accounts for only a small percentage of the global pharmaceutical industry. Until recently, India has had virtually no pharmaceutical industry worth the name producing drugs from basic raw materials and it used to rely mostly on the imports from countries like the USA and England for all its requirements of drugs. On the other hand, India has seen a plethora of multinational pharmaceutical companies come and do business in India. This paper develops a matrix which provides a broad guidance to the mid- to large-size Indian pharmaceutical domestic companies, which should embark on the path to global expansion to establish their might as well.

  19. Pharmaceutical industry's corporate social responsibility towards HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Arun Kumar

    2006-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has a corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards HIV/AIDS. Measures taken to increase awareness of HIV/AIDS, availability and accessibility of potent and patient-friendly FDCs / Kits for adults and children will go a long way in increasing awareness and acceptance of this disease and its therapy. This will improve adherence, lower resistance and facilitate better disease management. This article discusses some of the CSR initiatives and their scope.

  20. Regulatory constraints as seen from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Galligani, G; David-Andersen, I; Fossum, B

    2005-01-01

    In Chile, Canada, Europe, Japan, and the USA, which are the main geographical areas for fish farming of high value fish such as salmonids, sea bass, sea bream, yellowtail and catfish, vaccination has been established as an important method for the prevention of infectious diseases. To make new vaccines available to the fish farming industry, pharmaceutical companies must comply with the regulatory framework for licensing of fish vaccines, which in recent years has become more regulated. Considerable scientific and regulatory skills are thus required to develop, document and license vaccines in accordance with the requirements in the different geographical areas. International co-operation to harmonise requirements for the licensing documentation is ongoing. Even though there are obvious benefits to the pharmaceutical industry from the harmonisation process, it may sometimes impose unreasonable requirements. The regulatory framework for fish vaccines clearly has an impact on the time for bringing a new fish vaccine to the market. Several hurdles need to be passed to complete the regulatory process, i.e. obtain a licence. Fulfilment of the rather detailed and extensive requirements for documentation of the production and controls, as well as safety and efficacy of the vaccine, represent a challenge to the pharmaceutical industry, as do the different national and regional licensing procedures. This paper describes regulatory constraints related to the documentation, the licensing process, the site of production and the continuing international harmonisation work, with emphasis on inactivated conventional fish vaccines.

  1. [Pharmaceutical industry and "New German Medicine" ("Neue Deutsche Heilkunde")].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    THe so-called "New German Medicine", initially propagated in the health policy of the National Socialist Party, promoted greater use of phytotherapeutic and homeopathic drugs by the medical community. In response, the "Reichsfachschaft der pharmazeutischen Industrie e. V." (Association of Pharmaceutical Industry of the Reich") was obliged to pursue a carefully chosen double strategy, given that the members of the Association were both manufacturers of natural remedies and manufacturers of allopathic drugs.However, the fact that I.G. Farben completely ignored the "New German Medicine" suggests that the large chemical-pharmaceutical manufacturers did not take this policy very seriously. The only documents pertaining to increased research in the area of natural remedies stem from the medium-sized manufacturers Knoll and Schering. In the case of both companies it is noteworthy that they worked towards obtaining a scientific foundation for the developed preparates, and that they employed conventional methods of chemical analysis and proof of activity. THe growth of the classical manufacturers of natural remedies, such as the company Willmar Schwabe was, as far as any growth at all could be observed, significantly smaller than had been theoretically postulated. There is no casual relationship between any commercial success during the period in which the Nazis were in power and today's commercial prosperity.Moreover, from the viewpoint of the pharmaceutical industry, the "New German Medicine" seems to have passed its zenith before 1936, when the 4-year plan for war preparation entered into force.

  2. Measuring the efficiency of large pharmaceutical companies: an industry analysis.

    PubMed

    Gascón, Fernando; Lozano, Jesús; Ponte, Borja; de la Fuente, David

    2016-06-25

    This paper evaluates the relative efficiency of a sample of 37 large pharmaceutical laboratories in the period 2008-2013 using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. We describe in detail the procedure followed to select and construct relevant inputs and outputs that characterize the production and innovation activity of these pharmaceutical firms. Models are estimated with financial information from Datastream, including R&D investment, and the number of new drugs authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considering the time effect. The relative performances of these firms-taking into consideration the strategic importance of R&D-suggest that the pharmaceutical industry is a highly competitive sector given that there are many laboratories at the efficient frontier and many inefficient laboratories close to this border. Additionally, we use data from S&P Capital IQ to analyze 2071 financial transactions announced by our sample of laboratories as an alternative way to gain access to new drugs, and we link these transactions with R&D investment and DEA efficiency. We find that efficient laboratories make on average more financial transactions, and the relative size of each transaction is larger. However, pharmaceutical companies that simultaneously are more efficient and invest more internally in R&D announce smaller transactions relative to total assets.

  3. Generics market in Greece: the pharmaceutical industry's beliefs.

    PubMed

    Geitona, Mary; Zavras, Dimitrios; Hatzikou, Magda; Kyriopoulos, John

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the beliefs and perspectives of the pharmaceutical industry on generic medication in Greece. Questionnaires were mailed to all 58 members of the Hellenic Association of Pharmaceutical Companies from November 2002 to February 2003. The response rate was 52%, namely 30 questionnaires were completed and returned. The questionnaire requested information on companies' involvement in generics, their opinion on generics' characteristics and on public policies affecting the demand and supply of generic medication. A descriptive analysis of the outcomes, that is percentage comparison through binomial tests and Fisher tests, was performed. According to our findings, 43% of the respondents were involved in the production and distribution of generics and the mean period of their involvement was 12 years. The majority of the respondents were in favor of their companies' involvement in generics, despite the relatively small market share of generics in Greece; 9.7% of total pharmaceutical market in 2003. Bearing in mind that in Greece the promotion of generics is not encouraged, pharmaceutical companies believe that the mandatory introduction of bioequivalence studies is an indirect promotional strategy towards generics. Additionally, the majority declared that their main competitive advantages are their safety, efficacy and effectiveness as well as their economic benefit to the society. Finally, the respondents expressed their preference for the introduction of pharmacoeconomic submissions for drugs' reimbursement by social insurance funds.

  4. Preparation and characterization of green bricks using pharmaceutical industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Yamuna Rani, M; Bhagawan, D; Himabindu, V; Venkateswara Reddy, V; Saritha, P

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on recycling of industrial wastes (three pharmaceutical industrial sludges) into environmental friendly value-added materials. Stabilization/Solidification (S/S or bricks) process was applied to make a safer way for the utilization of pharmaceutical waste. The additives in this study include binders (cement, lime and bentonite) and strengthening material (pulverized fuel ash (PFA), silica fume and quarry dust) was used at different compositions. Bricks were cured for 28 days, and the following analysis-like compressive strength, leachability of heavy metals, mineralogical phase identity by X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal behaviour by thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) had done. All the bricks were observed to achieve the standard compressive strength as required for construction according to BIS standards. Metal concentration in the leachate has reached the dischargeable limits according to Brazilian standards. Results of this study demonstrate that production of bricks is a promising and achievable productive use of pharmaceutical sludge.

  5. Pharmaceutical industry sponsorship and research outcome and quality: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lexchin, Joel; Bero, Lisa A; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Clark, Otavio

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether funding of drug studies by the pharmaceutical industry is associated with outcomes that are favourable to the funder and whether the methods of trials funded by pharmaceutical companies differ from the methods in trials with other sources of support. Methods Medline (January 1966 to December 2002) and Embase (January 1980 to December 2002) searches were supplemented with material identified in the references and in the authors' personal files. Data were independently abstracted by three of the authors and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results 30 studies were included. Research funded by drug companies was less likely to be published than research funded by other sources. Studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies were more likely to have outcomes favouring the sponsor than were studies with other sponsors (odds ratio 4.05; 95% confidence interval 2.98 to 5.51; 18 comparisons). None of the 13 studies that analysed methods reported that studies funded by industry was of poorer quality. Conclusion Systematic bias favours products which are made by the company funding the research. Explanations include the selection of an inappropriate comparator to the product being investigated and publication bias. PMID:12775614

  6. Homochiral drugs: a demanding tendency of the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Núñez, María C; García-Rubiño, M Eugenia; Conejo-García, Ana; Cruz-López, Olga; Kimatrai, María; Gallo, Miguel A; Espinosa, Antonio; Campos, Joaquín M

    2009-01-01

    The issue of drug chirality is now a major theme in the design and development of new drugs, underpinned by a new understanding of the role of molecular recognition in many pharmacologically relevant events. In general, three methods are utilized for the production of a chiral drug: the chiral pool, separation of racemates, and asymmetric synthesis. Although the use of chiral drugs predates modern medicine, only since the 1980's has there been a significant increase in the development of chiral pharmaceutical drugs. An important commercial reason is that as patents on racemic drugs expire, pharmaceutical companies have the opportunity to extend patent coverage through development of the chiral switch enantiomers with desired bioactivity. Stimulated by the new policy statements issued by the regulatory agencies, the pharmaceutical industry has systematically begun to develop chiral drugs in enantiometrically enriched pure forms. This new trend has caused a tremendous change in the industrial small- and large-scale production to enantiomerically pure drugs, leading to the revisiting and updating of old technologies, and to the development of new methodologies of their large-scale preparation (as the use of stereoselective syntheses and biocatalyzed reactions). The final decision whether a given chiral drug will be marketed in an enantiomerically pure form, or as a racemic mixture of both enantiomers, will be made weighing all the medical, financial and social proficiencies of one or other form. The kinetic, pharmacological and toxicological properties of individual enantiomers need to be characterized, independently of a final decision.

  7. Healthcare systems, the State, and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ignacio José Godinho

    2016-11-03

    This article discusses the relations between healthcare systems and the pharmaceutical industry, focusing on state support for pharmaceutical innovation. The study highlights the experiences of the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany, developed countries and paradigms of modern health systems (liberal, universal, and corporatist), in addition to Japan, a case of successful catching up. The study also emphasizes the experiences of China, India, and Brazil, large developing countries that have tried different catching up strategies, with diverse histories and profiles in their healthcare systems and pharmaceutical industries. Finally, with a focus on state forms of support for health research, the article addresses the mechanisms for linkage between health systems and the pharmaceutical industry, evaluating the possibilities of Brazil strengthening a virtuous interaction, favoring the expansion and consolidation of the Brazilian health system - universal but segmented ‒ and the affirmation of the innovative national pharmaceutical industry. Resumo: O artigo discute as relações entre os sistemas de saúde e a indústria farmacêutica, concentrando-se no apoio do Estado à inovação farmacêutica. Salienta as trajetórias dos Estados Unidos, Reino Unido e Alemanha, países desenvolvidos, paradigmáticos dos modernos sistemas de saúde (liberais, universais e corporativos), além do Japão, um caso de emparelhamento bem-sucedido. Também enfatiza as trajetórias de China, Índia e Brasil, países em desenvolvimento, extensos, que experimentaram diferentes estratégias de emparelhamento, dispondo de sistemas de saúde e indústrias farmacêuticas com trajetórias e perfis diversos. Finalmente, com foco nas formas estatais de apoio à pesquisa em saúde, considera os mecanismos de conexão entre os sistemas de saúde e a indústria farmacêutica, avaliando as possibilidades, no Brasil, de fortalecer uma interação virtuosa que favoreça a expansão e

  8. [The pharmaceutical industry in scandal: Mercury or Aesculapius?].

    PubMed

    Offerhaus, L

    2004-12-18

    During the last decade public sympathy for the pharmaceutical industry has gradually been eroded because of excessive protectionism and profit margins. Its reputation as a healthy, profitable and prosperous industry has recently been seriously damaged by several errors of judgement. Data from early trials proved to be less positive than expected. The responsible drug manufacturers decided to cover the results up. So far the pharmaceutical industry has managed to weather the criticism, but recently a multitude of damaging data was published by an unexpected outsider. Angell, a former editor in chief of one of the most respected, peer-reviewed medical journals in the world, the New England Journal of Medicine, decided to collect such data and to analyze them critically. She also used this analysis to draw up recommendations for improving of what she regarded as an unhealthy situation. The book gained bestseller status on the American market and received much praise from reviewers. Although quickly denounced by the industry as controversial and excessively negative, it contains a lot of data, opinions and conclusions that also apply directly to the European situation.

  9. [The Korean Pharmaceutical Industry and the Expansion of the General Pharmaceuticals Market in the 1950-1960s].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    After the Liberation, the Korean economy was dependent on relief supplies and aid after the ruin of the colonial regime and war. The pharmaceutical business also searched for their share in the delivery of military supplies and the distribution of relief supplies. The supply-side pharmaceutical policy made the pharmaceutical market a wholesale business. The gravity of the situation led to an increased importation of medical supplies, and wholesalers took the lead in establishing the distribution structure, whereas consumers and pharmaceutical business were relatively intimidated. The aid provided by the International Cooperation Administration (ICA) marked a turning point in the Korean pharmaceutical industry after the middle of the 1950s. ICA supplied raw materials and equipment funds, while the pharmaceutical business imported advanced technology and capital. The government invited the local production of medical substances, whereas pharmaceutical businesses replaced imported medical substances with locally produced antibiotics. After the 1960s, the production of antibiotics reached saturation. Pharmaceutical businesses needed new markets to break through the stalemate, so they turned their attention to vitamins and health tonics as general pharmaceuticals, as these were suitable for mass production and mass consumption. The modernized patent medicine market after the Opening of Korea was transformed into the contemporized general pharmaceuticals market equipped with the up-to-date facilities and technology in 1960s. Pharmaceutical businesses had to advertise these new products extensively and reform the distribution structure to achieve high profits. With the introduction of TV broadcasting, these businesses invested in TV advertising and generated sizable sales figures. They also established retail pharmacy and chain stores to reform the distribution structure. The end result was a dramatic expansion of the general pharmaceuticals market. The market for

  10. Intellectual property rights: An overview and implications in pharmaceutical industry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chandra Nath; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2011-01-01

    Intellectual property rights (IPR) have been defined as ideas, inventions, and creative expressions based on which there is a public willingness to bestow the status of property. IPR provide certain exclusive rights to the inventors or creators of that property, in order to enable them to reap commercial benefits from their creative efforts or reputation. There are several types of intellectual property protection like patent, copyright, trademark, etc. Patent is a recognition for an invention, which satisfies the criteria of global novelty, non-obviousness, and industrial application. IPR is prerequisite for better identification, planning, commercialization, rendering, and thereby protection of invention or creativity. Each industry should evolve its own IPR policies, management style, strategies, and so on depending on its area of specialty. Pharmaceutical industry currently has an evolving IPR strategy requiring a better focus and approach in the coming era. PMID:22171299

  11. Intellectual property rights: An overview and implications in pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Chandra Nath; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2011-04-01

    Intellectual property rights (IPR) have been defined as ideas, inventions, and creative expressions based on which there is a public willingness to bestow the status of property. IPR provide certain exclusive rights to the inventors or creators of that property, in order to enable them to reap commercial benefits from their creative efforts or reputation. There are several types of intellectual property protection like patent, copyright, trademark, etc. Patent is a recognition for an invention, which satisfies the criteria of global novelty, non-obviousness, and industrial application. IPR is prerequisite for better identification, planning, commercialization, rendering, and thereby protection of invention or creativity. Each industry should evolve its own IPR policies, management style, strategies, and so on depending on its area of specialty. Pharmaceutical industry currently has an evolving IPR strategy requiring a better focus and approach in the coming era.

  12. Coenzyme Q10: Can It Prevent Statin Side Effects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Q10: Can it prevent statin side effects? Can coenzyme Q10 reduce the risk of side effects from ... Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. At this time, coenzyme Q10 isn't universally recommended for preventing side ...

  13. [Innovation guidelines and strategies for pharmaceutical engineering of Chinese medicine and their industrial translation].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Yu; Qu, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Bo-Li

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly analyzes the bottlenecks and major technical requirements for pharmaceutical industry of Chinese medicine, providing current status of pharmaceutical engineering of Chinese medicine. The innovation directions and strategies of the pharmaceutical engineering for manufacturing Chinese medicine are proposed along with the framework of their core technology. As a consequence, the development of the third-generation pharmaceutical technology for Chinese medicine, featured as "precision, digital and intelligent", is recommended. The prospects of the pharmaceutical technology are also forecasted.

  14. [Chapter 1. A contemporary history of the Japanese pharmaceutical industry (1980-2010). A contemporary history of the Japanese Pharmaceutical Industry (1980-2010) Task Force].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    This publication, commemorating the sixty years since the founding of Japan Society for the History of Pharmacy (JSHP), provides an overview of the Japanese pharmaceutical industry over a thirty-year span from 1980 to 2010. In the first section, entitled Medical Evolution: The Growth Period for Pharmaceutical Products, and the second section, "Patient-Based Medicine: The Period of Information Prioritization, the following themes are examined. Changes in Drug Pricing Policies, Promotion of Bungyō (separation of prescription from dispensing), Measures to Improve the Safety of Pharmaceutical Products; Appropriate Use of Pharmaceutical Products, Drug Discovery: Changes in Pharmaceutical Product Development and Actual Conditions in the Domestic Launch of New Medicines; Marketing (Medical Representative) Reforms, Pharmaceutical Industry Mergers and Acquisitions, Internationalization of the Pharmaceutical Industry. The following papers are provided as further references to support the conclusions made in the sections above. Changes in Japanese Drug Discovery Technologies and Drug Development. Japan's Pharmaceutical Market and Shifts in Manufacturing and Sales. Changes in Clinical Trials in Japan and Appropriate Use of Pharmaceuticals. Internationalization of the Japanese Pharmaceutical Industry.

  15. Is Industry-University Interaction Promoting Innovation in the Brazilian Pharmaceutical Industry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paranhos, Julia; Hasenclever, Lia

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses industry-university interaction and its characteristics in the Brazilian pharmaceutical system of innovation, taking account of the relevance of company strategies, the approach of the universities and the actions of government. By analysing primary and secondary data the authors show that, for as long as corporate investment…

  16. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of aqueous dispersions of coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, B; Westesen, K

    1995-02-01

    The present study describes a novel pharmaceutical formulation of coenzyme Q10, viz. submicron-sized dispersions of the substance prepared by emulsification of molten coenzyme Q10 in an aqueous phase. Photon correlation spectroscopy reveals mean diameters of 60 to 300 nm depending on process parameters. Coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles remain stable on storage for more than 30 months. Lipophilic drugs can be incorporated into the nanoparticles demonstrating their potential use as a drug carrier system. Transmission electron micrographs of freeze-fractured replica show spherical particles with an amorphous core. Cryo-electron microscopy reveals the coexistence of small unilamellar vesicles in phospholipid stabilized dispersions. Thermoanalysis and X-ray studies indicate that the dispersed and emulsified coenzyme Q10 does not recrystallize even at 4 degrees C over 30 months. These agree with 1H NMR data which demonstrate that coenzyme Q10 molecules have a high mobility when formulated as nanoparticles and that colloidally dispersed coenzyme Q10 remains in the state of a supercooled melt. Despite the high melting point of the bulk material, coenzyme Q10 dispersions represent no suspensions but O/W emulsions according to the IUPAC definition (1).

  17. Current state of coenzyme Q(10) production and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jeya, Marimuthu; Moon, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jeong-Lim; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2010-02-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), an obligatory cofactor in the aerobic respiratory electron transfer for energy generation, is formed from the conjugation of a benzoquinone ring with a hydrophobic isoprenoid chain. CoQ(10) is now used as a nutritional supplement because of its antioxidant properties and is beneficial in the treatment of several human diseases when administered orally. Bioprocesses have been developed for the commercial production of CoQ(10) because of its increased demand, and these bioprocesses depend on microbes that produce high levels of CoQ(10) naturally. However, as knowledge of the biosynthetic enzymes and the regulatory mechanisms modulating CoQ(10) production increases, approaches arise for the genetic engineering of CoQ(10) production in Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This review focused on approaches for CoQ(10) production, strategies used to engineer CoQ(10) production in microbes, and potential applications of CoQ(10).

  18. High Speed Video Applications In The Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapley, David

    1985-02-01

    The pursuit of quality is essential in the development and production of drugs. The pursuit of excellence is relentless, a never ending search. In the pharmaceutical industry, we all know and apply wide-ranging techniques to assure quality production. We all know that in reality none of these techniques are perfect for all situations. We have all experienced, the damaged foil, blister or tube, the missing leaflet, the 'hard to read' batch code. We are all aware of the need to supplement the traditional techniques of fault finding. This paper shows how high speed video systems can be applied to fully automated filling and packaging operations as a tool to aid the company's drive for high quality and productivity. The range of products involved totals some 350 in approximately 3,000 pack variants, encompassing creams, ointments, lotions, capsules, tablets, parenteral and sterile antibiotics. Pharmaceutical production demands diligence at all stages, with optimum use of the techniques offered by the latest technology. Figure 1 shows typical stages of pharmaceutical production in which quality must be assured, and highlights those stages where the use of high speed video systems have proved of value to date. The use of high speed video systems begins with the very first use of machine and materials: commissioning and validation, (the term used for determining that a process is capable of consistently producing the requisite quality) and continues to support inprocess monitoring, throughout the life of the plant. The activity of validation in the packaging environment is particularly in need of a tool to see the nature of high speed faults, no matter how infrequently they occur, so that informed changes can be made precisely and rapidly. The prime use of this tool is to ensure that machines are less sensitive to minor variations in component characteristics.

  19. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry-6 Pharmacia].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2014-01-01

    The article series provides a written and pictorial account of the Danish pharmaceutical industry's products from their introduction until about 1950. Part 6 deals with products from A/S Pharmacia. A/S Pharmacia was established in Copenhagen in 1922 as a Danish limited company by the enterprising pharmacist Edward Jacobsen. Pharmacia was not Jacobsen's first pharmaceutical company as previously he had established a pharmaceutical agency already in 1913 which in 1919 was reorganized to a limited company by the name of A/S Edward Jacobsen. This agency was later extended to include a production of generics. Jacobsen remained the co-owner and manager of Pharmacia until 1934 where he resigned and established another company, A/S Ejco, for the manufacture of generics. It is worth mentioning that already in 1911 a Swedish pharmaceutical company was established named AB Pharmacia. Today we do not know whether Edward Jacobsen knew about this Swedish company. Later on in 1936 AB Pharmacia and A/S Pharmacia made a contract concerning mutual market sharing, and a research cooperation was brought about between the two companies which resulted in an increase of turnover for A/S Pharmacia. In 1955 the cooperation between the two companies was increased as the Swedish company joined as principal shareholder with the purpose of continuing and developing the Danish company as an independent pharmaceutical company with its own research and development as well as manufacture, control and marketing. Therefore Pharmacia in Denmark was able to establish a synthesis factory in Koge and move the domicile to new premises in Hillered. In 1993 Pharmacia was presented in a printed matter as "The largest Nordic pharmaceutical company" as a result of the merger between the Swedish Kabi Pharmacia, formerly established by a merger between Kabi Vitrum and AB Pharmacia, and the Italian Farmitalia Carlo Erba. Only two years later in 1995 Pharmacia merged with the American pharmaceutical company The

  20. Multiblock PLS analysis of an industrial pharmaceutical process.

    PubMed

    Lopes, J A; Menezes, J C; Westerhuis, J A; Smilde, A K

    2002-11-20

    The performance of an industrial pharmaceutical process (production of an active pharmaceutical ingredient by fermentation, API) was modeled by multiblock partial least squares (MBPLS). The most important process stages are inoculum production and API production fermentation. Thirty batches (runs) were produced according to an experimental planning. Rather than merging all these data into a single block of independent variables (as in ordinary PLS), four data blocks were used separately (manipulated and quality variables for each process stage). With the multiblock approach it was possible to calculate weights and scores for each independent block. It was found that the inoculum quality variables were highly correlated with API production for nominal fermentations. For the nonnominal fermentations, the manipulations of the fermentation stage explained the amount of API obtained (especially the pH and biomass concentration). Based on the above process analysis it was possible to select a smaller set of variables with which a new model was built. The amount of variance predicted of the final API concentration (cross-validation) for this model was 82.4%. The advantage of the multiblock model over the standard PLS model is that the contributions of the two main process stages to the API volumetric productivity were determined.

  1. The development of Bio-pharmaceutical industry in China: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Gujun

    2014-07-01

    Known as the "sunrise industry" of the 21st century, bio-pharmaceutical industry has been a fast-growing global industry, and many countries have been developing this industry as the focus of their national economies. In China, there exists a huge market demand for the development of bio-pharmaceutical industry, but at the present stage the industry is faced with some problems, such as low level of R & D for innovative drugs, and inappropriate capital investment in the industrialization. In order to accelerate the development of China's bio-pharmaceutical industry, it is necessary to take strategic initiatives of improving the technology transfer system, developing the bio-pharmaceutical outsourcing, and building a diversified industrial financing system.

  2. How to revive breakthrough innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Munos, Bernard H; Chin, William W

    2011-06-29

    Over the past 20 years, pharmaceutical companies have implemented conservative management practices to improve the predictability of therapeutics discovery and success rates of drug candidates. This approach has often yielded compounds that are only marginally better than existing therapies, yet require larger, longer, and more complex trials. To fund them, companies have shifted resources away from drug discovery to late clinical development; this has hurt innovation and amplified the crisis brought by the expiration of patents on many best-selling drugs. Here, we argue that more breakthrough therapeutics will reach patients only if the industry ceases to pursue "safe" incremental innovation, re-engages in high-risk discovery research, and adopts collaborative innovation models that allow sharing of knowledge and costs among collaborators.

  3. Marketing norm perception among medical representatives in Indian pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed; Ramasamy, Ravindran

    2012-03-01

    Study of marketing norm perception among medical representatives is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the perception of marketing norms among medical representatives. The research design is quantitative and cross sectional study with medical representatives as unit of analysis. Data is collected from medical representatives (n=300) using a simple random and cluster sampling using a structured questionnaire. Results indicate that there is no difference in the perception of marketing norms among male and female medical representatives. But there is a difference in opinion among domestic and multinational company's medical representatives. Educational back ground of medical representatives also shows the difference in opinion among medical representatives. Degree holders and multinational company medical representatives have high perception of marketing norms compare to their counterparts. The researchers strongly believe that mandatory training on marketing norms is beneficial in decision making process during the dilemmas in the sales field.

  4. Computational Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry: From Childhood to Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hillisch, Alexander; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Wild, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Computational chemistry within the pharmaceutical industry has grown into a field that proactively contributes to many aspects of drug design, including target selection and lead identification and optimization. While methodological advancements have been key to this development, organizational developments have been crucial to our success as well. In particular, the interaction between computational and medicinal chemistry and the integration of computational chemistry into the entire drug discovery process have been invaluable. Over the past ten years we have shaped and developed a highly efficient computational chemistry group for small-molecule drug discovery at Bayer HealthCare that has significantly impacted the clinical development pipeline. In this article we describe the setup and tasks of the computational group and discuss external collaborations. We explain what we have found to be the most valuable and productive methods and discuss future directions for computational chemistry method development. We share this information with the hope of igniting interesting discussions around this topic.

  5. Personalized medicine: a paradigm for a sustainable pharmaceutical industry?

    PubMed

    Chackalamannil, Samuel; Desai, Manoj C

    2009-07-01

    Personalized medicine is a custom-tailored approach to patient treatment based on individual genetic traits. In personalized medicine, a patient group is characterized by a clinical biomarker that has been correlated to a differential response to drug treatment. During the past decade, several developments in the understanding of the structure and function of the human genome have occurred that bring personalized medicine closer to becoming a reality. The promise of personalized medicine lies in a clinical biomarker-driven patient stratification, and focused smaller-sized clinical trials that result in a shorter development time and reduced overall development cost. Personalized medicine has the potential to offer a new business model for the pharmaceutical industry by providing a more efficient drug discovery process with reduced cost.

  6. The epiphany of data warehousing technologies in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J S; Koprowski, S P

    2002-03-01

    The highly competitive pharmaceutical industry has seen many external changes to its landscape as companies consume each other increasing their pipelines while removing redundant functions and processes. Internally, companies have sought to streamline the discovery and development phases in an attempt to improve candidate selection and reduce the time to regulatory filing. In conjunction with efforts to screen and develop more compounds faster and more efficiently, database management systems (DBMS) have been developed for numerous groups supporting various R&D efforts. An outgrowth of DBMS evolution has been the birth of data warehousing. Often confused with DBMS, data warehousing provides a conduit for data residing across platforms, networks, and in different data structures. Through the use of metadata, the warehouse establishes connectivity of varied data stores (operational detail data, ODD) and permits identification of data ownership, location and transaction history. This evolution has closely mirrored and in some ways been driven by the electronic submission (formerly CANDA). The integration of the electronic submissions and document management with R&D data warehousing initiatives should provide a platform by which companies can address compliance with 21 CFR Part 11. Now more than ever "corporate memory" is being extended to the data itself. The when, why and how of successes and failures are constantly being probed by R&D management teams. The volume of information being generated by today's pharmaceutical companies requires mining of historical data on a routine basis. Data warehousing represents a core technology to assist in this endeavor. New initiatives in this field address the necessity of data portals through which warehouse data can be web-enabled and exploited by diverse data customers both internal and external to the company. The epiphany of data warehousing technologies within the pharmaceutical industry has begun and promises to change

  7. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry-7].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kirkegaard, Hanne; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2014-01-01

    A/S GEA Farmaceutisk Fabrik was established as a family business in 1927 by the pharmacist Knud L. Gad Andresen who until then had been employed in the pharmaceutical industry. Gad Andresen wanted to run a company focusing on the development of generics, and he wanted this development to take place in a close cooperation with Danish physicians. This has indeed been achieved with success. In 1995 GEA was purchase'd by the American pharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb who in a press release characterized GEA as Denmark's second largest manufacturer of generics. Immediately after this takeover GEA's R&D department ceased the research in innovative products and from now on exclusively focused on the development of generics. Three years later GEA was sold to the German generic company Hexal who later on resold GEA to the Swiss generic company Sandoz. GEA changed ownership another couple of times until the last owner went bankrupt in 2011. GEA is yet again a model example of an early Danish pharmaceutical company which was established as an individual company, and which had a long commercial success with the production and marketing of generics. GEA's earliest products, the organotherapeutics, were not innovations. The innovative products were developed already in the 1890s in Denmark by Alfred Benzon, and later on copies followed a.o. from Medicinalco and from foreign companies before GEA marketed their generics. Therefore GEA had to promote their preparations as especially qualified medicinal products and to intimate that the products of the competitors were less "active'". At the end of the 1920s the Ministry of Health became aware of the fact that there might be health problems related to the none-existing control of both the or- ganotherapeutic preparations and actually also the other medicinal products of the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore the Ministry had requested the National Board of Health for a statement regarding this problem. The National Board

  8. Psychiatric Resident and Faculty Views on and Interactions with the Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Sahana; Ganzini, Linda; Keepers, George

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sales visits, or detailing, by pharmaceutical industry representatives at academic institutions has been increasingly criticized. The authors surveyed psychiatric residents and faculty members on their views and interactions with representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. Methods: In 2007, a 46-item online survey measuring…

  9. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment.

  10. Assessing the Factors Associated With Iran’s Intra-Industry Trade in Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Hadian, Mohammad; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pharmaceutical industry is a sensitive and profitable industry. If this industry wants to survive, it should be able to compete well in international markets. So, study of Iran’s intra-industry trade (IIT) in pharmaceuticals is essential in order to identify competitiveness potential of country and boost export capability in the global arena. Methods: This study assessed the factors associated with Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals with the rest of the world during the 2001–2012 periods using seasonal time series data at the four-digit SITC level. The data was collected from Iran’s pharmaceutical Statistics, World Bank and International Trade Center. Finally, we discussed a number of important policy recommendations to increase Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals. Results: The findings indicated that economies of scale, market structure and degree of economic development had a significantly positive impact on Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals and tariff trade barriers were negatively related to IIT. Product differentiation and technological advancement didn’t have the expected signs. In addition, we found that Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals have shown an increasing trend during the study period. Thus, the composition of Iran trade in pharmaceuticals has changed from inter-industry trade to intra-industry trade. Conclusions: In order to get more prepared for integration into the global economy, the development of Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals should be given priority. Therefore, paying attention to IIT could have an important role in serving pharmaceutical companies in relation to pharmaceutical trade. PMID:26156931

  11. [Brocades and Stheeman: from apothecary-manufacturer to pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Rinsema, T

    1999-01-01

    In the middle of the nineteenth century, vegetable products were the most important raw material for the pharmaceutical industry. That industry was a "pharmacist-industry" and the quality of their products was defined in the official pharmacopoeias. Eisso Post Stheeman was one of these pharmacists and although he was a producer of medicines he stayed a pharmacist between pharmacists. He communicated with them about the quality of medicines in terms of pureness, identity and preparation. His successor, Sypko Stheeman, went into his fathers steps. He too was primarily a pharmacist; only after that a producer of (vegetable) drugs. Still there was a difference between them. Sypko focussed more on commerce and production of medicines. To that end price-lists were published from 1878 onwards. These price-lists became an important medium of communication between manufacturer and pharmacist. The introduction of the steam engine in 1894 represents a turning-point. Steam energy made many new activities possible, and the production of medicines and dispensation forms became possible on a much larger scale. The development that had set in with the introduction of steam energy was completed in the years between 1901 and 1914. Production of medicines grew enormously, but an important renewal was the production of tablets. Millions of them left the factory in Meppel every day. At the same time, the firm strived to give each of the produced medicines its own identity. Brocades and Stheeman not only introduced "specialities", but chemical drugs, produced by others, were being marketed under the label of B S as well. Gradually, the standard of pharmacist-quality had been replaced by Broacades and Stheeman-quality.

  12. Clinical aspects of coenzyme Q10: an update.

    PubMed

    Littarru, Gian Paolo; Tiano, Luca

    2010-03-01

    The fundamental role of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) in mitochondrial bioenergetics and its well-acknowledged antioxidant properties constitute the basis for its clinical applications, although some of its effects may be related to a gene induction mechanism. Cardiovascular disease is still the main field of study and the latest findings confirm a role of CoQ(10) in improving endothelial function. The possible relation between CoQ(10) deficiency and statin side effects is highly debated, particularly the key issue of whether CoQ(10) supplementation counteracts statin myalgias. Furthermore, in cardiac patients, plasma CoQ(10) was found to be an independent predictor of mortality. Studies on CoQ(10) and physical exercise have confirmed its effect in improving subjective fatigue sensation and physical performance and in opposing exercise-related damage. In the field of mitochondrial myopathies, primary CoQ(10) deficiencies have been identified, involving different genes of the CoQ(10) biosynthetic pathway; some of these conditions were found to be highly responsive to CoQ(10) administration. The initial observations of CoQ(10) effects in Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have been extended to Friedreich's ataxia, where CoQ(10) and other quinones have been tested. CoQ(10) is presently being used in a large phase III trial in Parkinson's disease. CoQ(10) has been found to improve sperm count and motility on asthenozoospermia. Moreover, for the first time CoQ(10) was found to decrease the incidence of preeclampsia in pregnancy. The ability of CoQ(10) to mitigate headache symptoms in adults was also verified in pediatric and adolescent populations.

  13. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in drug discovery and development: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, H M; Chen, Y; Gibson, C; Heimbach, T; Parrott, N; Peters, S A; Snoeys, J; Upreti, V V; Zheng, M; Hall, S D

    2015-03-01

    The application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling has developed rapidly within the pharmaceutical industry and is becoming an integral part of drug discovery and development. In this study, we provide a cross pharmaceutical industry position on "how PBPK modeling can be applied in industry" focusing on the strategies for application of PBPK at different stages, an associated perspective on the confidence and challenges, as well as guidance on interacting with regulatory agencies and internal best practices.

  14. The use of atomic spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry for the determination of trace elements in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lewen, Nancy

    2011-06-25

    The subject of the analysis of various elements, including metals and metalloids, in the pharmaceutical industry has seen increasing importance in the last 10-15 years, as modern analytical instrumentation has afforded analysts with the opportunity to provide element-specific, accurate and meaningful information related to pharmaceutical products. Armed with toxicological data, compendial and regulatory agencies have revisited traditional approaches to the testing of pharmaceuticals for metals and metalloids, and analysts have begun to employ the techniques of atomic spectroscopy, such as flame- and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS, Flame AA or FAA and GFAAS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), to meet their analytical needs. Newer techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation ICP-MS (LAICP-MS) are also beginning to see wider applications in the analysis of elements in the pharmaceutical industry.This article will provide a perspective regarding the various applications of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in drug products, active pharmaceutical ingredients (API's), raw materials and intermediates. The application of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in clinical samples, nutraceutical, metabolism and pharmacokinetic samples will not be addressed in this work.

  15. Ways of Learning in the Pharmaceutical Sales Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Carrie Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to document the ways pharmaceutical representatives learn for work and report attributes of (in)formality and other characteristics of ways of learning perceived as effective and frequently used. Design/methodology/approach: A total of agents 20 from 11 pharmaceutical manufacturers across Canada participated…

  16. Psychiatric Training Program Engagement with the Pharmaceutical Industry: An Educational Issue, Not Strictly an Ethical One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the educational and ethical issues involved in interactions between departments of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry. METHODS: The author analyzes the history of attitudes toward pharmaceutical companies, various conflicting ethical principles that apply, and areas of confluence and conflict of interest between…

  17. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry--8. Lundbeck].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kirkegaard, Hanne; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2016-01-01

    The article series provides a written and pictorial account of the Danish pharmaceutical industry's products from their introduction until about 1950. Part 8 deals with products from Lundbeck. Lundbeck which today is known as a considerable international pharmaceutical company could in 2015 celebrate its 100 years' jubilee. Among the early Danish medicinal companies H. Lundbeck & Co. is in many ways an exception as the company was not originally established as a pharmaceutical company. Not until several years after the foundation the company began to import foreign ready-made medicinal products and later-on to manufacture these medicinal products in own factory and even later to do research and development of own innovative products. When Lundbeck was established in 1915 several Danish medicinal companies, not only the well-known such as Alfred Benzon and Løvens kemiske Fabrik (LEO Pharma), but also Skelskør Frugtplantage, Ferrin and Ferraton, had emerged due to the respective enterprising pharmacy owners who had expanded their traditional pharmacy business and even with commercial success. Other medicinal companies, such as C.R. Evers & Co., Leerbeck & Holms kemiske Fabriker, Chr. F. Petri, Erslevs kemiske Laboratorium, Edward Jacobsen, Th. Fallesen-Schmidt, and yet other companies which were named after the founder had all been established by pharmacists with the primary intention to manufacture and sell medicinal products. Also for the limited companies Medicinalco, Ferrosan, Pharmacia, and GEA the primary task was to manufacture and sell medicinal products, and also in these companies pharmacists were involved in the foundation. Not until 1924, fully 9 years after the foundation, Lundbeck started to be interested in medicinal products and initiated import and sale of foreign medicinal products manufactured by a.o. German and French companies which had not established their own sales companies in Denmark. Almost all contemporary Danish manufacturers of

  18. Topical treatment with coenzyme Q10-containing formulas improves skin's Q10 level and provides antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Knott, Anja; Achterberg, Volker; Smuda, Christoph; Mielke, Heiko; Sperling, Gabi; Dunckelmann, Katja; Vogelsang, Alexandra; Krüger, Andrea; Schwengler, Helge; Behtash, Mojgan; Kristof, Sonja; Diekmann, Heike; Eisenberg, Tanya; Berroth, Andreas; Hildebrand, Janosch; Siegner, Ralf; Winnefeld, Marc; Teuber, Frank; Fey, Sven; Möbius, Janne; Retzer, Dana; Burkhardt, Thorsten; Lüttke, Juliane; Blatt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10, Q10) represents an endogenously synthesized lipid-soluble antioxidant which is crucial for cellular energy production but is diminished with age and under the influence of external stress factors in human skin. Here, it is shown that topical Q10 treatment is beneficial with regard to effective Q10 replenishment, augmentation of cellular energy metabolism, and antioxidant effects. Application of Q10-containing formulas significantly increased the levels of this quinone on the skin surface. In the deeper layers of the epidermis the ubiquinone level was significantly augmented indicating effective supplementation. Concurrent elevation of ubiquinol levels suggested metabolic transformation of ubiquinone resulting from increased energy metabolism. Incubation of cultured human keratinocytes with Q10 concentrations equivalent to treated skin showed a significant augmentation of energy metabolism. Moreover, the results demonstrated that stressed skin benefits from the topical Q10 treatment by reduction of free radicals and an increase in antioxidant capacity.

  19. Pharmaceutical industry discursives and the marketization of nursing work: a case example.

    PubMed

    Springer, Rusla Anne

    2011-07-01

    Increasing pharmaceutical industry presence in health care research and practice has evoked critical social, political, economic, and ethical questions and concern among health care providers, ethicists, economists, and the general citizenry. The case example presented of the 'marketization' of nursing practice not only reveals the magnitude of the purview of the pharmaceutical industry, it demonstrates how that industry imparts effect upon the organization of nursing work, an area of health care professional practice where the ethical polemic of pharmaceutical industry involvement and influence has been largely ignored, and the profession of nursing conspicuously silent. Drawing on a Foucauldian dispositive analysis that troubled the complex apparatus responsible for the production of knowledge and action in the neurology subspecialty of multiple sclerosis (MS), the case discloses how the pharmaceutical industry has created compliance and adherence as clinical imperatives in the practice of MS nursing. The case makes explicit the conscious transformative self-action undertaken by MS nurses as a result of their subjectivation (marketization) and demonstrates how MS nurses have become pawns in pharmaceutical industry strategic games of power, truth, identity, and wealth creation by turning their clinical practice settings into heterodiscursive spaces of surveillance and persuasion. MS nurses have become instruments of the pharmaceutical industry, and their clinical practices ordered, organized, limited, constrained, and marketized as a result.

  20. Optimized genotyping method for identification of bacterial contaminants in pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Stamatoski, Borche; Ilievska, Miroslava; Babunovska, Hristina; Sekulovski, Nikola; Panov, Sasho

    2016-06-01

    Microbiological control is of crucial importance in the pharmaceutical industry regarding the possible bacterial contamination of the environment, water, raw materials and finished products. Molecular identification of bacterial contaminants based on DNA sequencing of the hypervariable 16SrRNA gene has been introduced recently. The aim of this study is to investigate the suitability of gene sequencing using our selection of PCR primers and conditions for rapid and accurate bacterial identification in pharmaceutical industry quality control. DNA was extracted from overnight incubated colonies from 10 bacterial ATCC strains, which are common contaminants in the pharmaceutical industry. A region of bacterial 16SrRNA gene was analyzed by bidirectional DNA sequencing. Bacterial identification based on partial sequencing of the 16SrRNA gene is the appropriate method that could be used in the pharmaceutical industry after adequate validations. We have successfully identified all tested bacteria with more than 99 % similarity to the already published sequences.

  1. Analogies Among Current and Future Life Detection Missions and the Pharmaceutical/Biomedical Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, N. R.; Steele, A.; Monaco, L.; Fries, M.

    2017-02-01

    Life detection goals and technologies are remarkably similar between several types of NASA missions and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Needs for sensitivity, specificity, speed have driven techniques and equipment to common ends.

  2. The case for entrepreneurship in R&D in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Frank L; Narayanan, V K; Mitchell, Lesa; Litan, Robert E

    2010-09-01

    A lack of entrepreneurial behaviour has often been highlighted as a contributor to the decline in the research and development (R&D) productivity of the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we present an assessment of entrepreneurship in the industry, based on interviews with 26 former and current leaders of R&D departments at major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Factors are highlighted that could be important in promoting entrepreneurial behaviour, which might serve as a catalyst for revitalizing R&D productivity.

  3. Development of an Integrated Performance Measurement (PM) Model for Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Shabaninejad, Hosein; Mirsalehian, Mohammad Hossein; Mehralian, Gholamhossein

    2014-01-01

    With respect to special characteristics of pharmaceutical industry and lack of reported performance measure, this study tries to design an integrated PM model for pharmaceutical companies. For generating this model; we first identified the key performance indicators (KPIs) and the key result indicators (KRIs) of a typical pharmaceutical company. Then, based on experts᾽ opinions, the identified indicators were ranked with respect to their importance, and the most important of them were selected to be used in the proposed model; In this model, we identified 25 KPIs and 12 KRIs. Although, this model is mostly appropriate to measure the performances of pharmaceutical companies, it can be also used to measure the performances of other industries with some modifications. We strongly recommend pharmaceutical managers to link these indicators with their payment and reward system, which can dramatically affect the performance of employees, and consequently their organization`s success. PMID:24711848

  4. Process simulation in the pharmaceutical industry: a review of some basic physical models.

    PubMed

    Kremer, D M; Hancock, B C

    2006-03-01

    This study reviews process modeling efforts which have been developed to elucidate the fundamental physical process underlying the manufacture and delivery of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Within the pharmaceutical industry, process models have been applied to a diverse array of physical processes at length and time scales that vary by orders of magnitude. As such, both large-scale continuum and particle-scale discrete approaches will be discussed in this study. Challenges associated with the practical application of process models within the pharmaceutical industry will be discussed, and opportunities for future research will be identified.

  5. Customer relationship management in the contract pharmaceutical industry: an exploratory study for measuring success.

    PubMed

    Kros, John F; Nadler, Scott; Molis, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Managing customer relationships is a very important issue in business-to-business markets. This research investigates the growing number of available resources defining Customer Relationship Management (CRM) efforts, and how they are being applied within the Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing industry. Exploratory study results using face-to-face and telephone questionnaires based on four criteria for rating a company's CRM efforts are presented. Data was collected from large Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing companies in the US market. The results and conclusions are discussed relating how the Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing industry is implementing CRM including some potential steps to take when considering a CRM initiative.

  6. Concentration evolution of pharmaceutically active compounds in raw urban and industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2014-09-01

    The distribution of pharmaceutically active compounds in the environment has been reported in several works in which wastewater treatment plants have been identified as the main source of these compounds to the environment. The concentrations of these compounds in influent wastewater can vary widely not only during the day but also along the year, because of the seasonal-consumption patterns of some pharmaceuticals. However, only few studies have attempted to assess the hourly variability of the concentrations of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater. In this work, the distribution and seasonal and hourly variability of twenty-one pharmaceuticals, belonging to seven therapeutic groups, have been investigated in urban and industrial wastewater. The highest concentrations of pharmaceutically active compounds, except salicylic acid, were found in urban wastewater, especially in the case of anti-inflammatory drugs and caffeine. The highest concentrations of salicylic acid were measured in industrial wastewater, reaching concentration levels up to 3295μgL(-)(1). The studied pharmaceutically active compounds showed different distribution patterns during winter and summer periods. Temporal variability of pharmaceutically active compounds during a 24-h period showed a distribution in concordance with their consumption and excretion patterns, in the case of urban wastewater, and with the schedule of industrial activities, in the case of industrial wastewater.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  8. Legal considerations for social media marketing by pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Chen, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Social media marketing is the next frontier for direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceutical products, but represents an unchartered territory for regulatory action. With explosive growth in the use of social media, along with pharmaceutical companies' increasing adeptness at taking advantage of opportunities for social media marketing, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) faces an urgent need to develop its own capacities to monitor and engage with social media marketing. In response to potential FDA action, pharmaceutical companies' marketing, regulatory compliance and legal staffs must work closely to design initiatives that are sensitive to FDA concerns. This article will address the current status of FDA regulations on social media advertising, their historical origins, challenges to implementation, and their likely future direction.

  9. Development paths of China's agricultural Pharmaceutical industry under Eco-agriculture background.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinkai; Gong, Liutang; Ji, Xi; Zhang, Jin; Miao, Pei

    2014-07-01

    Using pesticides has double effects. On one hand, it contributes to pests control and regulates the growth of crops; On the other hand, it does harm to the environment. To develop ecological agriculture should not only emphasize the output level of agriculture to pursuit of economic efficiency, but also need to keep the ecological environment protected and focus on the social benefits during the development of the industry. As a large agricultural country in the world, China is vigorously promoting the development of ecological agriculture, which is bound to put forward to developing the pesticide industry and green ecological development requirements to promote the transformation and upgrading of agricultural pharmaceutical industry. This paper discusses the mechanism of pesticide pollution on the ecological environment and analyzes China's agricultural problems in the pharmaceutical industry. Then study on the development of Chinese green pesticides and try to find the proper paths of agricultural pharmaceutical to achieve industrial upgrading.

  10. Discovery of innovative therapeutics: today's realities and tomorrow's vision. 1. Criticisms faced by the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne E

    2013-07-25

    The pharmaceutical industry is facing enormous challenges, including reduced efficiency, declining innovation, key patent expirations, fierce price competition from generics, high regulatory hurdles, and a tarnished image. There is a clear need for change in the paradigms designed to address these challenges. Pharma has responded by embarking on a range of initiatives. However, along the way the industry has accrued critics whose accusations have tainted its reputation. The first part of this two-part series will discuss the criticisms that have been leveled at the pharmaceutical industry and summarize the supporting data for and against these criticisms. The second installment will focus on the current challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry and Pharma's responses to address these challenges. It will describe the industry's changing perspective and new business models for coping with the recent loss of talent and declining clinical pipelines as well as present some examples of recent drug discovery successes.

  11. Inherent Anticipation in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Michael; Evans, Georgia; Zappia, Andrew

    2015-04-15

    Pharmaceutical and biotech research often involves discovering new properties of, or new methods to use, existing compositions. The doctrine of inherent anticipation, however, prevents the issuance and/or validity of a patent for discoveries deemed to have been implicitly disclosed in the prior art. This can be a barrier to patent rights in these technologies. Inherent anticipation therefore creates uncertainty for patent protection in the pharmaceutical and biotech sciences. Despite this uncertainty, Federal Circuit jurisprudence provides guidance on the boundaries of the inherent anticipation doctrine. In view of the case law, certain strategies may be employed to protect inventions that may potentially be viewed as inherent in the prior art.

  12. Partial progress: governing the pharmaceutical industry and the NHS, 1948-2008.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John

    2009-12-01

    Coinciding with sixty years of the U.K. National Health Service (NHS), this article reviews the neglected area of the governance of the pharmaceutical industry and the NHS. It traces the relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, the state, and the NHS from the creation of the health service to the present, as they have grappled with the overlapping challenges of pharmaceutical safety, efficacy, cost-effectiveness, pricing, promotion, and advertising. The article draws on the concepts of "corporate bias" and "regulatory capture" from political theory, and "counter-vailing powers" and "clinical autonomy" in medical sociology, while also introducing the new concepts of "assimilated allies" and "pharmaceuticalization" in order to synthesize a theoretical framework capable of longitudinal empirical analysis of pharmaceutical governance. The analysis identifies areas in which the governance of pharmaceuticals and the NHS has contributed to progress in health care since 1948. However, it is argued that that progress has been slow, restricted, and vulnerable to misdirection due to the enormous and unrivaled influence afforded to the pharmaceutical industry in policy developments. Countervailing influences against such corporate bias have often been limited and subject to destabilization by the industry's assimilated allies either within the state or in the embrace of pharmaceuticalization and consumerism.

  13. Globalization of the pharmaceutical industry and the growing dependency of developing countries: the case of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Semin, Semih; Güldal, Dilek

    2008-01-01

    In developing countries, the effect of globalization on the pharmaceutical sector has resulted in a decrease in exportation and domestic production, accompanied by an increase in importation of pharmaceuticals and a rise in prices and expenditures. As an example of a developing country, Turkey has been facing the long-standing and increasing pressure of global regulations placed on its pharmaceutical sector. This has led to an increasing dependency on multinational companies and a gradual deterioration of an already weakened domestic pharmaceutical sector. This case study of Turkey offers points to consider in the world of increasing globalization, as it offers lessons on ways of examining the effects of globalization on the pharmaceutical industry of developing countries.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 and statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Statins inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which is involved in the production of mevalonic acid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. This pathway also results in the production of other bioactive molecules including coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone). Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring coenzyme with antioxidant effects that is involved in electron transport in mitochondria and is thought to play a role in energy transfer in skeletal muscle. Muscle-related problems are a frequently reported adverse effect of statins, and it has been hypothesised that a reduced endogenous coenzyme Q10 concentration is a cause of statin-induced myopathy. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has therefore been proposed to reduce the adverse muscular effects sometimes seen with statins. Here, we consider whether coenzyme Q10 has a place in the management of statin-induced myopathy.

  15. [Innovation in pharmaceutical and health biotechnology industries: challenges for a virtuous agenda].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Marco; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira; Maldonado, José

    2012-12-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries comprise a major production subsystem of the health industrial complex in Brazil. It stands out for both its economic importance and its prominent role in developing new technologies in strategic areas. Strengthening the local production of generic drugs in the last decade has significantly increased the number of Brazilian companies in the local pharmaceutical market and has been an important turning point for this industry's growth. However, there remain major structural bottlenecks both in terms of production and continuous innovation. These bottlenecks reveal the high vulnerability of the Brazilian National Health System and point to the need of public policies that promote strengthening the production base and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry and that at the same time meet health-related social demands in health in Brazil.

  16. Kairos as Indeterminate Risk Management: The Pharmaceutical Industry's Response to Bioterrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. Blake

    2006-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry's response to the threat of bioterrorism following 9-11 invoked the rhetorical notion of kairos as an urgent and ongoing opportunity not only to protect the nation but also to improve the industry's reputation and fortify its political power. Yet the notion of kairos as seizing an advantage--grounded in modernist…

  17. Haploinsufficiency of COQ4 causes coenzyme Q10 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Leonardo; Trevisson, Eva; Hernandez, Maria Angeles Rodriguez; Casarin, Alberto; Pertegato, Vanessa; Doimo, Mara; Cassina, Matteo; Agosto, Caterina; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Sartori, Geppo; Sacconi, Sabrina; Memo, Luigi; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Artuch, Rafael; Quinzii, Catarina; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Navas, Plácido

    2013-01-01

    Background COQ4 encodes a protein that organises the multienzyme complex for the synthesis of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). A 3.9 Mb deletion of chromosome 9q34.13 was identified in a 3-year-old boy with mental retardation, encephalomyopathy and dysmorphic features. Because the deletion encompassed COQ4, the patient was screened for CoQ10 deficiency. Methods A complete molecular and biochemical characterisation of the patient’s fibroblasts and of a yeast model were performed. Results The study found reduced COQ4 expression (48% of controls), CoQ10 content and biosynthetic rate (44% and 43% of controls), and activities of respiratory chain complex II+III. Cells displayed a growth defect that was corrected by the addition of CoQ10 to the culture medium. Knockdown of COQ4 in HeLa cells also resulted in a reduction of CoQ10. Diploid yeast haploinsufficient for COQ4 displayed similar CoQ deficiency. Haploinsufficency of other genes involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis does not cause CoQ deficiency, underscoring the critical role of COQ4. Oral CoQ10 supplementation resulted in a significant improvement of neuromuscular symptoms, which reappeared after supplementation was temporarily discontinued. Conclusion Mutations of COQ4 should be searched for in patients with CoQ10 deficiency and encephalomyopathy; patients with genomic rearrangements involving COQ4 should be screened for CoQ10 deficiency, as they could benefit from supplementation. PMID:22368301

  18. CoQ10 in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stephanie A.; Hamill, Robert W.; Simon, David K.; Pathak, Subash; Ruthazer, Robin; Standaert, David G.; Yacoubian, Talene A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An investigator-initiated, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to determine whether coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is safe, well tolerated, and effective in slowing functional decline in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Methods: Sixty-one participants received CoQ10 (2,400 mg/d) or placebo for up to 12 months. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Rating Scale (PSPRS), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, activities of daily living, Mini-Mental State Examination, the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, and 36-item Short Form Health Survey were monitored at baseline and months 3, 6, 9, and 12. The safety profile of CoQ10 was determined by adverse events, vital signs, and clinical laboratory values. Primary outcome measures were changes in PSPRS and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores from baseline to month 12. Results: CoQ10 was well tolerated. No statistically significant differences were noted between CoQ10 and placebo groups in primary or secondary outcome measures. A nonsignificant difference toward slower clinical decline in the CoQ10 group was observed in total PSPRS among those participants who completed the trial. Before the final study visit at 12 months, 41% of participants withdrew because of travel distance, lack of perceived benefit, comorbidities, or caregiver issues. Conclusions: High doses of CoQ10 did not significantly improve PSP symptoms or disease progression. The high withdrawal rate emphasizes the difficulty of conducting clinical trials in patients with PSP. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00382824. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that CoQ10 does not significantly slow functional decline in PSP. The study lacks the precision to exclude a moderate benefit of CoQ10. PMID:27583276

  19. Characterizing dense suspensions: two case studies from the pharmaceutical industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, David J.; Khawaja, Nazia; Kazakevich, Irina; Bhattacharjee, Himanshu; Heslinga, Michael; Dalton, Chad

    2015-11-01

    Liquid suspensions of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient powders are present as pharmaceutical dosage forms in the form of oral suspensions and injectables. We present two case studies, both dense (~ 30-40%) suspensions, in which the physical characterization of the product, specifically, particle size & shape and rheology were key to understanding the key product attributes as pertaining to the manufacturing process and to patient administration. For the one case study, an oral suspension, identifying variations in particle morphology during the wet milling of the product was key to the product understanding necessary to modify the milling process. Rheological measurements were applied as well. For the second case study, an injectable, results from different particle size measurement techniques and rheological measurements indicated the possibility of flocculation in a formulation. Additionally, measurements were obtained to assess the ``injectability'' of the product via rheometer and texture analyzer measurements and Poiseuille flow modeling. As a result, the relevant shear rate regime for this drug product administration was identified.

  20. Investigating inspection practices of pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities in selected Arab countries: views of inspectors and pharmaceutical industry employees.

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Hasan, R; Scahill, S; Babar, Z Ud-Din

    2013-11-01

    There are few studies that explore inspection practices of pharmaceutical facilities from the viewpoint of inspectors and industry employees. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, inspectors and quality assurance staff from 4 Arab countries--the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Jordan--were surveyed about their inspection practices and views. There was considerable variation in inspection practices across countries and between the inspectorate and quality assurance staff within countries. Divergence was found in views associated with payment mechanisms. There was mutual agreement by both groups that inspectors were in short supply and that they needed to be better trained. Inspectors appeared to have less authority than expected in order to control pharmaceutical manufacturing and marketing activities. Compounding this was a dearth of policy which would support a more uniform and systematic approach to the inspection process within and across countries.

  1. Marketing to the consumer: perspectives from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    David, C

    2001-01-01

    Individualized health management is one of the most exciting challenges facing health care marketing today. Greater access to health information has empowered consumers to take more control of their health needs, creating a whole new landscape for marketers, manufacturers, and service providers. Customization is the key to creating marketing campaigns that successfully target today's health-conscious consumers. Drawing on individualized market intelligence and available genetic information, pharmaceutical companies are learning to tailor products to meet the needs of this growing market.

  2. Challenges for pharmaceutical industry: new partnerships for sustainable human health.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jackie

    2011-05-13

    The healthcare burden is increasing in both the developed and the developing world and there is widespread acceptance that the historical pharmaceutical business model is not sustainable. In order to meet the healthcare challenge, companies and academia need to develop new business models to increase the probability of success and decrease the cost of failure. New partnerships have already emerged in the area of neglected diseases and other models for diseases of the developed world are emerging.

  3. Characteristics of physicians targeted by the pharmaceutical industry to participate in e-detailing.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Khanfar, Nile M; Doucette, William R; Loudon, David

    2009-01-01

    Electronic detailing (e-detailing) has been introduced in the last few years by the pharmaceutical industry as a new communication channel through which to promote pharmaceutical products to physicians. E-detailing involves using digital technology, such as Internet, video conferencing, and interactive voice response, by which drug companies target their marketing efforts toward specific physicians with pinpoint accuracy. A mail survey of 671 Iowa physicians was used to gather information about the physician characteristics and practice setting characteristics of those who are usually targeted by pharmaceutical companies to participate in e-detailing. A model is developed and tested to explain firms' targeting strategy for targeting physicians for e-detailing.

  4. Breeding of Coenzyme Q10 Produced Strain by Low-Energy Ion Implantation and Optimization of Coenzyme Q10 Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dejun; Zheng, Zhiming; Wang, Peng; Wang, Li; Yuan, Hang; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-12-01

    In order to increase the production efficiency of coenzyme Q10, the original strain Agrobacterium tumefaciens ATCC 4452 was mutated by means of Nitrogen ions implantation. A mutant strain, ATX 12, with high contents of coenzyme Q10 was selected. Subsequently, the conditions such as carbohydrate concentration, nitrogen source concentration, inoculum's size, seed age, aeration and temperature which might affect the production of CoQ10 were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the maximum concentration of the intracellular CoQ10 reached 200.3 mg/L after 80 h fed-batch fermentation, about 245% increasing in CoQ10 production after ion implantation, compared to the original strain.

  5. Medical Students' Exposure to and Attitudes about the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Austad, Kirsten E.; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between health professionals and the pharmaceutical industry has become a source of controversy. Physicians' attitudes towards the industry can form early in their careers, but little is known about this key stage of development. Methods and Findings We performed a systematic review reported according to PRISMA guidelines to determine the frequency and nature of medical students' exposure to the drug industry, as well as students' attitudes concerning pharmaceutical policy issues. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and ERIC from the earliest available dates through May 2010, as well as bibliographies of selected studies. We sought original studies that reported quantitative or qualitative data about medical students' exposure to pharmaceutical marketing, their attitudes about marketing practices, relationships with industry, and related pharmaceutical policy issues. Studies were separated, where possible, into those that addressed preclinical versus clinical training, and were quality rated using a standard methodology. Thirty-two studies met inclusion criteria. We found that 40%–100% of medical students reported interacting with the pharmaceutical industry. A substantial proportion of students (13%–69%) were reported as believing that gifts from industry influence prescribing. Eight studies reported a correlation between frequency of contact and favorable attitudes toward industry interactions. Students were more approving of gifts to physicians or medical students than to government officials. Certain attitudes appeared to change during medical school, though a time trend was not performed; for example, clinical students (53%–71%) were more likely than preclinical students (29%–62%) to report that promotional information helps educate about new drugs. Conclusions Undergraduate medical education provides substantial contact with pharmaceutical marketing, and the extent of such contact is associated with positive

  6. Coenzyme Q-10 in Human Health: Supporting Evidence?

    PubMed

    Saha, Sibu P; Whayne, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10) is a widely used alternative medication or dietary supplement and one of its roles is as an antioxidant. It naturally functions as a coenzyme and component of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Decreased levels have been demonstrated in diseased myocardium and in Parkinson disease. Farnesyl pyrophosphate is a critical intermediate for CoQ10 synthesis and blockage of this step may be important in statin myopathy. Deficiency of CoQ10 also has been associated with encephalomyopathy, severe infantile multisystemic disease, cerebellar ataxia, nephrotic syndrome, and isolated myopathy. Although supplementation with CoQ10 has been reported to be beneficial in treating hypertension, congestive heart failure, statin myopathy, and problems associated with chemotherapy for cancer treatement, this use of CoQ10 as a supplement has not been confirmed in randomized controlled clinical trials. Nevertheless, it appears to be a safe supplementary medication where usage in selected clinical situations may not be inappropriate. This review is an attempt to actualize the available information on CoQ10 and define its potential benefit and appropriate usage.

  7. Reduction of ascites mortality in broilers by coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Geng, A L; Guo, Y M; Yang, Y

    2004-09-01

    Effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites were studied in broilers. One hundred eighty 1-d-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 3 groups with 6 replicates each. From d 8, the diets were supplemented with CoQ10 at levels of 0, 20, and 40 mg/kg, respectively. From d 15 to 21, all the chicks were exposed to low ambient temperature (15 to 18 degrees C) to induce ascites. Average feed intake, BW gain, and feed conversion ratio of the broilers during 0 to 3 wk, 3 to 6 wk, and 0 to 6 wk were measured. The results showed that there were no influences observed on broilers' growth performance, but the mortality due to ascites was reduced by CoQ10 supplementation (P < or = 0.05). Erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF) was significantly decreased by 40 mg/kg CoQ10 compared with the control, but no significant changes were observed on blood packed cell volume (PCV) among the treatments. Pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure was significantly decreased on d 36, but no significant changes were observed on right ventricular pressure (RVP), pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, and the maximum change ratio of right intraventricular pressure (+/- dp/ dtmax). Ascites heart index (AHI) was significantly decreased by 40 mg/kg CoQ10 supplementation (P < or = 0.05). The results of this study suggested that CoQ10 has a beneficial effect in reducing ascites mortality in broilers, and 40 mg/kg CoQ10 seems to be more effective than 20 mg/ kg CoQ10.

  8. Bioinformatics, target discovery and the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry.

    PubMed

    Fagan, R; Swindells, M

    2000-12-01

    With the first draft of the human genome now available a directed genome-wide mining strategy is being implemented by many pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies in order to identify novel members of the most therapeutically relevant target families. At the same time there is an increasing amount of annotation relevant to the human genome sequence entering into the public domain. The ability to identify protein families on a genome-wide scale can only be done at speed by using high-throughput computational approaches. This review describes many of the latest algorithmic developments in this field and shows how they can be best put to use for target identification and prioritization.

  9. Antibiotics: the changing regulatory and pharmaceutical industry paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bax, Richard; Green, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    Drug licensing is changing. Previously, regulators prioritized the licensing of innovative drugs that fulfilled a high unmet medical need for a small number of patients, including orphan, cancer and HIV medicines. Alternatives to large and costly prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trials have led to a more bespoke development, such as adaptive design studies. Regulators have recently agreed to include much-needed narrow-spectrum antibiotics, active against certain MDR bacteria, in this paradigm. The background to why big pharmaceutical companies have largely deserted the antibacterial research arena, and the proposals that are hoped to reinvigorate their interest, are presented.

  10. Environmental management practices in the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries: implementation strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Massoud, May A; Makarem, N; Ramadan, W; Nakkash, R

    2015-03-01

    This research attempts to provide an understanding of the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries' environmental management strategies, priorities, and perceptions as well as drivers, barriers, and incentives regarding the implementation of the voluntary ISO 14001 Environmental Management System. Accordingly, a semistructured in-depth interview was conducted with the pharmaceutical industries. The findings revealed a significant lack of knowledge about the standard among the industries. The main perceived drivers for adopting the ISO 14001 are improving the companies' image and overcoming international trade. The main perceived barriers for acquiring the standard are the lack of government support and the fact that ISO 14001 is not being legally required or enforced by the government. Moreover, results revealed that adopting the ISO 14001 standard is not perceived as a priority for the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries. Although the cost of certification was not considered as a barrier for the implementation of ISO 14001, the majority of the pharmaceutical industries are neither interested nor willing to adopt the Standard if they are not exposed to any regulatory pressure or external demand. They are more concerned with quality and safety issues with the most adopted international standard among the industries being the ISO 9001 quality management system. This study highlights the aspect that financial barriers are not always the hurdles for implementing environmental management strategies in developing countries and underscores the need for regulatory frameworks and enforcement.

  11. [PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRUGS].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The cost of pharmacotherapy is increasing in the health care budget. The pharmaceutical industry is facing the exhaustion of medications that are largely prescribed and have a high profitability (blockbusters). Because of patient heterogeneity, there is a great interindividual variability of the responses to drug therapy. Thus, it is essential to better detect potential to avoid waste of resources resulting from the prescription of expensive drugs to poor responders. The development of personalized medicine, or precision medicine, certainly offers opportunities to the pharmaceutical industry, but also exposes it to new big challenges.

  12. Health Canada and the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Preliminary Analysis of the Historical Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Lexchin, Joel

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, Health Canada has been accused of favouring the pharmaceutical industry over the public in areas of pharmaceutical policy. This orientation has been tied to the introduction of user fees by the industry in 1994 that help finance key aspects of drug regulation. This paper provides a preliminary examination of the history of the relationship starting in 1939 until the mid-1980s in an attempt to discern whether 1994 really represented a key turning point. Clientele pluralism, a theory that explains the relationship between the state and interest groups, is used to explain the nature of the events described. PMID:24359714

  13. Topical treatment with coenzyme Q10‐containing formulas improves skin's Q10 level and provides antioxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, Volker; Smuda, Christoph; Mielke, Heiko; Sperling, Gabi; Dunckelmann, Katja; Vogelsang, Alexandra; Krüger, Andrea; Schwengler, Helge; Behtash, Mojgan; Kristof, Sonja; Diekmann, Heike; Eisenberg, Tanya; Berroth, Andreas; Hildebrand, Janosch; Siegner, Ralf; Winnefeld, Marc; Teuber, Frank; Fey, Sven; Möbius, Janne; Retzer, Dana; Burkhardt, Thorsten; Lüttke, Juliane; Blatt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10, Q10) represents an endogenously synthesized lipid‐soluble antioxidant which is crucial for cellular energy production but is diminished with age and under the influence of external stress factors in human skin. Here, it is shown that topical Q10 treatment is beneficial with regard to effective Q10 replenishment, augmentation of cellular energy metabolism, and antioxidant effects. Application of Q10‐containing formulas significantly increased the levels of this quinone on the skin surface. In the deeper layers of the epidermis the ubiquinone level was significantly augmented indicating effective supplementation. Concurrent elevation of ubiquinol levels suggested metabolic transformation of ubiquinone resulting from increased energy metabolism. Incubation of cultured human keratinocytes with Q10 concentrations equivalent to treated skin showed a significant augmentation of energy metabolism. Moreover, the results demonstrated that stressed skin benefits from the topical Q10 treatment by reduction of free radicals and an increase in antioxidant capacity. © 2015 BioFactors, 41(6):383–390, 2015 PMID:26648450

  14. [Chapter 5. The internationalization of the Japanese pharmaceutical industry (1980-2010)].

    PubMed

    Yongue, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese pharmaceutical industry experienced a period of rapid and economic growth following the introduction of the national healthcare system in 1961. Triggered by a major revision in Japanese legislation from process to substance patents, leading Japanese pharmaceutical companies began to invest in research and development (R&D). By the mid-1980s, some had managed to develop their first internationally marketable drugs, many of which were antibiotics. The emergence of novel drugs gave companies the impetus to engage in progressively more appreciable investments in Asia, Europe and the United States. In the 1980s, internationalization was mainly inwardly focused so as to limit firms' exposure to risk. However, as profits increased in the 1990s from the sale of new drugs, Japanese pharmaceutical companies were able to engage in even more sizeable, outwardly focused investments. By 2010, Japan's leading pharmaceutical enterprises had succeeded in putting place three types of global operations: manufacturing, marketing and R&D.

  15. Modelling and simulation in the pharmaceutical industry--some reflections.

    PubMed

    Burman, Carl-Fredrik; Wiklund, Stig Johan

    2011-01-01

    Modelling and simulation (M&S) is increasingly being applied in (clinical) drug development. It provides an opportune area for the community of pharmaceutical statisticians to pursue. In this article, we highlight useful principles behind the application of M&S. We claim that M&S should be focussed on decisions, tailored to its purpose and based in applied sciences, not relying entirely on data-driven statistical analysis. Further, M&S should be a continuous process making use of diverse information sources and applying Bayesian and frequentist methodology, as appropriate. In addition to forming a basis for analysing decision options, M&S provides a framework that can facilitate communication between stakeholders. Besides the discussion on modelling philosophy, we also describe how standard simulation practice can be ineffective and how simulation efficiency can often be greatly improved.

  16. Applications of terahertz-pulsed technology in the pharmaceutical industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taday, Philip F.

    2010-02-01

    Coatings are applied to pharmaceutical tablets (or pills) to for either cosmetic or release control reasons. Cosmetic coatings control the colour or to mask the taste of an active ingredient; the thickness of these coating is not critical to the performance of the product. On the other hand the thickness and uniformity of a controlled release coating has been found affect the release of the active ingredient. In this work we have obtained from a pharmacy single brand of pantoprazole tablet and mapped them using terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) prior to additional dissolution testing. Three terahertz parameters were derived for univariate analysis for each layer: coating thickness, terahertz electric field peak strength and terahertz interface index. These parameters were then correlated dissolution tested. The best fit was found to be with combined coating layer thickness of the inert layer and enteric coating. The commercial tablets showed a large variation in coating thickness.

  17. Anti-counterfeit technologies: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipika; Malla, Swathi; Gudala, Kapil; Tiwari, Pramil

    2013-01-01

    Growth of international free trade and inadequate drug regulation have led to the expansion of trade in counterfeit drugs worldwide. Technological protection is seen to be the best way to avoid this problem. Different technologies came into existence like overt, covert, and track and trace technologies. This review emphasises ideal technological characteristics, existing anti-counterfeit technologies, and their adoption in different countries. Developed countries like the USA have implemented RFID while the European trend is towards 2D barcodes. The Indian government is getting sensitised about the extent of the problem and has formulated rules mandating barcodes. Even the pharmaceutical companies have been employing these technologies in order to detain illegitimate drugs in their supply chain.

  18. Process analytical technology in the pharmaceutical industry: a toolkit for continuous improvement.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bradley; Wilcock, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Process analytical technology (PAT) refers to a series of tools used to ensure that quality is built into products while at the same time improving the understanding of processes, increasing efficiency, and decreasing costs. It has not been widely adopted by the pharmaceutical industry. As the setting for this paper, the current pharmaceutical manufacturing paradigm and PAT guidance to date are discussed prior to the review of PAT principles and tools, benefits, and challenges. The PAT toolkit contains process analyzers, multivariate analysis tools, process control tools, and continuous improvement/knowledge management/information technology systems. The integration and implementation of these tools is complex, and has resulted in uncertainty with respect to both regulation and validation. The paucity of staff knowledgeable in this area may complicate adoption. Studies to quantitate the benefits resulting from the adoption of PAT within the pharmaceutical industry would be a valuable addition to the qualitative studies that are currently available.

  19. Risk Communication and the Pharmaceutical Industry: what is the reality?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian; Chakraborty, Sweta

    2012-11-01

    Risk communication is central to the risk management strategy of a pharmaceutical company. Pharmaceutical companies primarily communicate risk through labelling tools such as the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC), package insert, patient information leaflet (PIL) and the carton, which are currently regulated based on templates such as those of the EU. Recent research raises concern about how effective the SmPC is alone in communicating risk. There is some evidence that carton design can influence risk comprehension. Processes to check new trade names cannot be confused with existing names is a simple measure to mitigate one form of risk. Given the central role and the vast amount of resource that is consumed, it is surprising there has not been extensive original research to see whether product information such as the SmPC is a good tool for communicating risk. Recently, EU agencies have assessed the communication value of the PIL and revised the template and guidelines. However, no evaluation of user testing has been conducted at European level since the introduction of these new requirements. As regards 'Dear Healthcare Professional Communications', there is inconsistent evidence about their ability to change patient and physician behaviour. There is a dearth of evidence about what sort of communications materials are the most effective under which circumstances. The use of templates restricts the flexibility of companies to adapt their risk messages to their targets. Effective communication requires understanding how different audiences perceive the message and what the fundamental drivers are for altering patient and prescriber behaviour to be safer. This requires careful consideration of the relationship between risk communication, perception and management. However, the focus of a company's risk communication plan is normally on the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) regions and their regulations. Although the same regulatory tools are

  20. How to improve R&D productivity: the pharmaceutical industry's grand challenge.

    PubMed

    Paul, Steven M; Mytelka, Daniel S; Dunwiddie, Christopher T; Persinger, Charles C; Munos, Bernard H; Lindborg, Stacy R; Schacht, Aaron L

    2010-03-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under growing pressure from a range of environmental issues, including major losses of revenue owing to patent expirations, increasingly cost-constrained healthcare systems and more demanding regulatory requirements. In our view, the key to tackling the challenges such issues pose to both the future viability of the pharmaceutical industry and advances in healthcare is to substantially increase the number and quality of innovative, cost-effective new medicines, without incurring unsustainable R&D costs. However, it is widely acknowledged that trends in industry R&D productivity have been moving in the opposite direction for a number of years. Here, we present a detailed analysis based on comprehensive, recent, industry-wide data to identify the relative contributions of each of the steps in the drug discovery and development process to overall R&D productivity. We then propose specific strategies that could have the most substantial impact in improving R&D productivity.

  1. Medical Education and the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Review of Ethical Guidelines and Their Implications for Psychiatric Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geppert, Cynthia M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews and summarizes eight ethical guidelines of major professional organizations regarding the pharmaceutical industry's role in the psychiatric education of trainees. Method: The author conducted a literature review of research and guidelines pertaining to the pharmaceutical industry's relationship to trainees, with…

  2. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry--a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Alexandru; Kuokkanen, Katja; Heier, Annabelle

    2011-10-09

    This commentary offers an overview of some current trends of the pharmaceutical industry drawing on examples taken from the analysis of four companies (Pfizer, Merck, Novo Nordisk, Crucell). The very brief analysis looks at diversification paths, pipeline management strategies, generic competition as well as corporate social responsibility policies.

  3. [The rational basis for the short-, medium-, and long-term evolution of the pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Amédée-Manesme, O

    In the last few years, a worldwide reorganization affecting the entire pharmaceutical industry has begun and is now accelerating. This intense trend of mergers, acquisitions, market entires++ and exits, reorientation and diversification reflects a new environment. This article sets out to explain the reasons behind this inescapable and rapid evolution.

  4. A review on characterization and bioremediation of pharmaceutical industries' wastewater: an Indian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Rajender Singh; Singh, Prashant; Kandari, Vikash; Singh, Rakesh; Dobhal, Rajendra; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-08-01

    During the past few decades, pharmaceutical industries have registered a quantum jump contributing to high economic growth, but simultaneously it has also given rise to severe environmental pollution. Untreated or allegedly treated pharmaceutical industrial wastewater (PIWW) creates a need for time to time assessment and characterization of discharged wastewater as per the standards provided by the regulatory authorities. To control environmental pollution, pharmaceutical industries use different treatment plans to treat and reuse wastewater. The characterization of PIWW using advanced and coupled techniques has progressed to a much advanced level, but in view of new developments in drug manufacture for emerging diseases and the complexities associated with them, better sophisticated instrumentation and methods of treatment are warranted. The bioremediation process to treat PIWW has undergone more intense investigation in recent decade. This results in the complete mineralization of pharmaceutical industries' wastewater and no waste product is obtained. Moreover, high efficiency and low operation cost prove it to be an effective tool for the treatment of PIWW. The present review focuses on the characterization as well as bioremediation aspects of PIWW.

  5. An assessment of R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Dimitri, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical industry can be strengthened by reducing costs both in the early phase and, mostly, in the clinical phase of drug discovery. However, a cost-benefit probabilistic analysis reveals that despite high costs, the clinical phase shows healthy productivity, whereas the early phase, particularly lead optimization, exhibits very low productivity.

  6. Towards novel processes for the fine-chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Gjalt W; Gray, David

    2002-08-01

    In response to the need in the pharmaceutical industry for more complex, chiral molecules, fine-chemical companies are embracing new manufacturing technologies to produce compounds of these specifications. In particular, recent developments in biocatalysis combined with novel process engineering are providing improved methods for the production of valuable chemical intermediates.

  7. The Role of the Pharmaceutical Industry in Teaching Psychopharmacology: A Growing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkey, Amy C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and examine the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the teaching of psychopharmacology to residents and medical students and to make recommendations for changes in curriculum and policy based on these findings. METHODS: Literature reviews and discussions with experts, educators, and trainees. RESULTS: The pharmaceutical…

  8. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  9. Pharmaceutical Industry Viewpoint of Wordage Problems--Amount, Languages, and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starker, L. N.

    1972-01-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry more emphasis will be required on tertiary sources which maintain multiple computer-based files. These files are now being made available for SDI purposes, while their usefulness for retrospective searches still needs to be evaluated. (7 references) (Author/NH)

  10. [Patents in pharmaceutical industry: between ethics and property rights].

    PubMed

    Martínez Cárdenas, Edgar E

    2003-01-01

    The article presents a reflection on one of the greater challenges which the contemporary State is confronted with, related to guaranteeing the effective application of the fundamental rights, besides having to solve the conflicts that arise due to the rivalry between either fundamental rights or between some of these and others known as second or third generation rights. The conflict between the protection to the intellectual property rights, as in the case of the patents of the pharmaceutical multinationals, and the fundamental right to life is considered. It is observed that the interests of these companies have prevailed, as if the fundamental value to protect was the profit of these multinationals, or their efficiency, and not the right to health of the individuals which bears a direct relation with the right to the life. This situation is aggravated still more when the State, instead of being on the side of the weaker and offering him protection, safeguards the stronger who abuse of their dominant position, exerting the monopoly on the production of many essential medicines.

  11. Co-opting psychiatry: the alliance between academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Moncrieff, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    The editorial presents the arguments that an alliance between academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry is harmful through a critical review of the academic literature and media coverage of activities of the pharmaceutical industry. The industry and the psychiatric profession both gain advantages from promoting biomedical models of psychiatric disturbance and pharmacological treatment. This confluence of interests has lead to the exaggeration of the efficacy of psychiatric drugs and neglect of their adverse effects and has distorted psychiatric knowledge and practice. Academic psychiatry has helped the industry to colonise more and more areas of modern life in order to expand the market for psychotropic drugs. Persuading people to understand their problems as biological deficiencies obscures the social origin and context of distress and prevents people from seeking social or political solutions. Psychiatry has the power to challenge the dominance of the pharmaceutical industry and should put its efforts into developing alternatives to routine drug treatment. Psychiatry needs to disengage from the industry if it wants to make genuine advances in understanding psychiatric disorder and help reverse the harmful social consequences of the widening med-icalisation of human experience.

  12. How pharmaceutical industry employees manage competing commitments in the face of public criticism.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Wendy; Montgomery, Kathleen; Little, Miles

    2013-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the "medical affairs" departments of pharmaceutical companies, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with professionals working in medical departments of companies in Sydney, Australia. We show that this group of pharmaceutical professionals are committed to their responsibilities both to patients, research participants, and the public and to their companies. Despite the discrepancies between these commitments, our participants did not express much cognitive dissonance, and this appeared to stem from their use of two dialectically related strategies, one of which embraces commerce and the other of which resists the commercial imperative. We interpret these findings through the lens of institutional theory and consider their implications for pharmaceutical ethics and governance.

  13. A randomized trial of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Glover, Elisa I; Martin, Joan; Maher, Amy; Thornhill, Rebecca E; Moran, Gerald R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    Case reports and open-label studies suggest that coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) treatment may have beneficial effects in mitochondrial disease patients; however, controlled trials are warranted to clinically prove its effectiveness. Thirty patients with mitochondrial cytopathy received 1200 mg/day CoQ(10) for 60 days in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. Blood lactate, urinary markers of oxidative stress, body composition, activities of daily living, quality of life, forearm handgrip strength and oxygen desaturation, cycle exercise cardiorespiratory variables, and brain metabolites were measured. CoQ(10) treatment attenuated the rise in lactate after cycle ergometry, increased (∽1.93 ml) VO(2)/kg lean mass after 5 minutes of cycling (P < 0.005), and decreased gray matter choline-containing compounds (P < 0.05). Sixty days of moderate- to high-dose CoQ(10) treatment had minor effects on cycle exercise aerobic capacity and post-exercise lactate but did not affect other clinically relevant variables such as strength or resting lactate.

  14. Managing the interface with marketing to improve delivery of pharmacovigilance within the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under pressure to improve the scientific quality of its decisions concerning the benefit and risks of its products while ensuring compliance with acceptable standards of marketing. All those in a pharmaceutical company who currently work within pharmacovigilance should be encouraged to lead from the front to examine ongoing marketing activities to see how they can be adapted more towards pharmacovigilance and risk management. The current irony is that the personnel who have the greatest influence on benefit-risk decisions of a product are not necessarily those who acknowledge that they are performing pharmacovigilance. Indeed, for all concerned, whether their orientation is scientific and commercial, effective communication with prescribers and consumers usually underpins product success. Also, a substantial 'marketing' budget is culturally acceptable for the pharmaceutical industry so it is logical to assume that resource for postmarketing activity is often made available. Given these realities, I suggest we should strive for an integrated marketing and risk-management plan based on the best available evidence and that being fully aware and in control of the safety issues for your products is the best way to commercialise them successfully. This approach can still be consistent with other corporate responsibilities such as trying to reduce the financial burden of product development. If this article stimulates further debate about how the pharmaceutical industry can more effectively organise resources and operations to support pharmacovigilance, risk management, and marketing, then it will have achieved its purpose.

  15. Chemical ecology: a view from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed Central

    Caporale, L H

    1995-01-01

    Biological diversity reflects an underlying molecular diversity. The molecules found in nature may be regarded as solutions to challenges that have been confronted and overcome during molecular evolution. As our understanding of these solutions deepens, the efficiency with which we can discover and/or design new treatments for human disease grows. Nature assists our drug discovery efforts in a variety of ways. Some compounds synthesized by microorganisms and plants are used directly as drugs. Human genetic variations that predispose to (or protect against) certain diseases may point to important drug targets. Organisms that manipulate molecules within us to their benefit also may help us to recognize key biochemical control points. Drug design efforts are expedited by knowledge of the biochemistry of a target. To supplement this knowledge, we screen compounds from sources selected to maximize molecular diversity. Organisms known to manipulate biochemical pathways of other organisms can be sources of particular interest. By using high throughput assays, pharmaceutical companies can rapidly scan the contents of tens of thousands of extracts of microorganisms, plants, and insects. A screen may be designed to search for compounds that affect the activity of an individual targeted human receptor, enzyme, or ion channel, or the screen might be designed to capture compounds that affect any step in a targeted metabolic or biochemical signaling pathway. While a natural product discovered by such a screen will itself only rarely become a drug (its potency, selectivity, bioavailability, and/or stability may be inadequate), it may suggest a type of structure that would interact with the target, serving as a point of departure for a medicinal chemistry effort--i.e., it may be a "lead." It is still beyond our capability to design, routinely, such lead structures, based simply upon knowledge of the structure of our target. However, if a drug discovery target contains regions of

  16. Was Part D a giveaway to the pharmaceutical industry?

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Joseph P; Seiguer, Erica; Frank, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) prohibited the government from negotiating drug prices, a feature that the act's critics characterize as a giveaway to the drug industry. Instead of the government negotiating to keep prices down, the act relies on competition among drug companies to obtain business from private insurers; yet, competition cannot be effective when there are no close clinical substitutes. In the past few years, the rate of introduction of first-in-class drugs has been low; if this continues, the prohibition on negotiation may be only a minor problem. However, if the prior rate of introduction resumes, the government may find itself with unacceptable expenditure levels.

  17. Bioenergetic and antioxidant properties of coenzyme Q10: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Littarru, Gian Paolo; Tiano, Luca

    2007-09-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q (CoQ10 in humans) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These two functions constitute the basis on which research supporting the clinical use of CoQ10 is founded. Also at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, coenzyme Q is recognized as an obligatory co-factor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the transition pore. Furthermore, recent data reveal that CoQ10 affects expression of genes involved in human cell signalling, metabolism, and transport and some of the effects of exogenously administered CoQ10 may be due to this property. Coenzyme Q is the only lipid soluble antioxidant synthesized endogenously. In its reduced form, CoQH2, ubiquinol, inhibits protein and DNA oxidation but it is the effect on lipid peroxidation that has been most deeply studied. Ubiquinol inhibits the peroxidation of cell membrane lipids and also that of lipoprotein lipids present in the circulation. Dietary supplementation with CoQ10 results in increased levels of ubiquinol-10 within circulating lipoproteins and increased resistance of human low-density lipoproteins to the initiation of lipid peroxidation. Moreover, CoQ10 has a direct anti-atherogenic effect, which has been demonstrated in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed with a high-fat diet. In this model, supplementation with CoQ10 at pharmacological doses was capable of decreasing the absolute concentration of lipid hydroperoxides in atherosclerotic lesions and of minimizing the size of atherosclerotic lesions in the whole aorta. Whether these protective effects are only due to the antioxidant properties of coenzyme Q remains to be established; recent data point out that CoQ10 could have a direct effect on endothelial function. In patients with stable moderate CHF, oral CoQ10 supplementation was shown to ameliorate

  18. A measure of productivity and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R

    2016-11-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has faced enormous pressures over the last few decades. Declining revenues, increasing payer pressures, and a constantly changing regulatory landscape have forced all companies to identify processes to increase productivity and innovation. However, to date, no one agrees on precisely how to measure these attributes or how to interpret these results to understand the state of the industry. We propose new quantitative measures of productivity and innovation and use these to illustrate an industry that has in recent years become more innovative and productive after years of decline.

  19. The pharmaceutical industry's responsibility for protecting human subjects of clinical trials in developing nations.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Finnuala

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies increasingly perform clinical trials in developing nations. Governments of host nations see the trials as a way to provide otherwise unaffordable medical care, while trial sponsors are drawn to those countries by lower costs, the prevalence of diseases rare in developed nations, and large numbers of impoverished patients. Local governments, however, fail to police trials, and the FDA does not monitor trials in foreign countries, resulting in the routine violation of international standards for the protection of human subjects. This Note proposes independent accreditation of those institutions involved in clinical trials--the institutional review boards which oversee trial protocol; the organizations, such as pharmaceutical companies, which sponsor the trials; and the research organizations that conduct the trials. Accreditation, similar to that used in the footwear and apparel industries, would increase the transparency of pharmaceutical trials and would enable the United States government and consumers to hold trial sponsors accountable for their actions.

  20. [Approval of drugs by national and European agencies--sequelae for the pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Zierenberg, O

    1997-11-01

    The research-based pharmaceutical industry supports the European harmonization process for the granting of pharmaceutical registrations. In order to improve consumer protection and the therapeutic options available to physicians in comparison to nationally registered products, the harmonization must be carried out on schedule and transparently a high scientific standard. It must not lead to the adoption of all national restrictions regarding data sheets and patient leaflets. Pharmaceutical products with the same ingredients can be registered either through the national or through the European procedure. This situation can only be remedied by the harmonization of core SPCs. This process must be agreed in consultation between pharmaceutical companies and regulatory authorities. With regard to measures to avert drug risks, professional associations and the pharmaceutical companies affected should be heard by the national authorities and their arguments given due consideration. In addition, national authorities and the CPMP must coordinate their decisions before they are published. In particular, the basis of these decisions should be made clear and therapeutic alternatives should be known.

  1. Identifying and prioritizing industry-level competitiveness factors: evidence from pharmaceutical market

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical industry is knowledge-intensive and highly globalized, in both developed and developing countries. On the other hand, if companies want to survive, they should be able to compete well in both domestic and international markets. The main purpose of this paper is therefore to develop and prioritize key factors affecting companies’ competitiveness in pharmaceutical industry. Based on an extensive literature review, a valid and reliable questionnaire was designed, which was later filled up by participants from the industry. To prioritize the key factors, we used the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS). Results The results revealed that human capital and macro-level policies were two key factors placed at the highest rank in respect of their effects on the competitiveness considering the industry-level in pharmaceutical area. Conclusion This study provides fundamental evidence for policymakers and managers in pharma context to enable them formulating better polices to be proactively competitive and responsive to the markets’ needs. PMID:24708770

  2. High rate composting of herbal pharmaceutical industry solid waste.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Duba, K S; Kalamdhad, A S; Bhatia, A; Khursheed, A; Kazmi, A A; Ahmed, N

    2012-01-01

    High rate composting studies of hard to degrade herbal wastes were conducted in a 3.5 m(3) capacity rotary drum composter. Studies were spread out in four trials: In trial 1 and 2, one and two turns per day rotation was observed, respectively, by mixing of herbal industry waste with cattle (buffalo) manure at a ratio of 3:1 on wet weight basis. In trial 3 inocula was added in raw waste to enhance the degradation and in trial 4 composting of a mixture of vegetable market waste and herbal waste was conducted at one turn per day. Results demonstrated that the operation of the rotary drum at one turn a day (trial 1) could provide the most conducive composting conditions and co-composting (trial 4) gave better quality compost in terms of temperature, moisture, nitrogen, and Solvita maturity index. In addition a FT-IR study also revealed that trial 1 and trial 4 gave quality compost in terms of stability and maturity due to the presence of more intense peaks in the aromatic region and less intense peaks were found in the aliphatic region compared with trial 2 and trial 3.

  3. Automatic plaque assay for the pharmaceutical industry using machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Joseph; Tsai, Augustine; Festa, J. M.

    1995-10-01

    A crucial step in the manufacture of vaccines is the verification of their potency. An assay of the potency must be carried out on every batch produced to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine. Currently, human inspectors count the number of plaques (holes) in a cell layer in a petri dish to estimate the potency.They must determine whether nearby plaques that have overgrown each other's borders are single or multiple plaques and distinguish between plaques and small tears in the cell layer resulting from the processing operations (the edges of tears differ in appearance from the edges of plaques). Because of the judgments required to make these subtle distinctions, human inspectors are inconsistent. In cooperation with Merck & Co., Inc., the Rutgers University Center for Computer Aids for Industrial Productivity has demonstrated the feasibility of achieving consistent automatic counting of plaques by a prototype intelligent machine vision system. The David Sarnoff Research Center developed materials handling equipment and factory information system interfaces to enable this prototype system to be installed in a quality control facility at Merck. This paper describes the overall operation of the machine vision aspects of the system, including optics, illumination, sensing, preprocessing, feature extraction and shape recognition. Results of initial tests of the system are also reported.

  4. The future of risk communication and the role of the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sweta; Bouder, Frederic

    2013-02-01

    Risk communication is an interactive two-way process that various stakeholders (e.g., patients, regulators, industry) utilize to address prescription drug safety. This paper will specifically examine the pharmaceutical industry's engagement with risk communication as a tool for information exchange with patients and other stakeholders about the associated risks related to its medicines. Risk communications are not solely meant to inform; and rather effective two-way risk communications have the potential to change behavioral outcomes for the purpose of individual and societal benefit. Despite this indispensable role of risk communication for the pharmaceutical industry, more research is needed for the appropriate development and dissemination of risk communications. A crucial missing component for the crafting of pharmaceutical risk communications is the understanding of risk perceptions from the patient/consumer's perspective. This is necessary to see where any divergences in views may lie between the industry and its final consumer, which is crucial in tailoring communications to target a specific erroneous belief or to address what might be deemed as a needed behavioral shift. It is also necessary to develop communications in consideration of the levels of public trust in the industry as well as other perceived actors in the healthcare system. Even the most meticulously crafted and tested risk communications will fail to fulfill their purpose if the role of trust is not taken into consideration. These considerations can lead to the establishment of a "social contract" that effectively addresses what is required from both parties for continued and mutually beneficial interactions. Conducting risk perception research, addressing the role of trust, establishing a social contract, and having a realistic outlook on the impact of risk communications are necessary considerations as pharmaceutical risk communication evolves for the future.

  5. Peering into the pharmaceutical "pipeline": investigational drugs, clinical trials, and industry priorities.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jill A; Cottingham, Marci D; Kalbaugh, Corey A

    2015-04-01

    In spite of a growing literature on pharmaceuticalization, little is known about the pharmaceutical industry's investments in research and development (R&D). Information about the drugs being developed can provide important context for existing case studies detailing the expanding--and often problematic--role of pharmaceuticals in society. To access the pharmaceutical industry's pipeline, we constructed a database of drugs for which pharmaceutical companies reported initiating clinical trials over a five-year period (July 2006-June 2011), capturing 2477 different drugs in 4182 clinical trials. Comparing drugs in the pipeline that target diseases in high-income and low-income countries, we found that the number of drugs for diseases prevalent in high-income countries was 3.46 times higher than drugs for diseases prevalent in low-income countries. We also found that the plurality of drugs in the pipeline was being developed to treat cancers (26.2%). Interpreting our findings through the lens of pharmaceuticalization, we illustrate how investigating the entire drug development pipeline provides important information about patterns of pharmaceuticalization that are invisible when only marketed drugs are considered.

  6. Price-cost margin in the pharmaceutical industry. Empirical evidence from Finland.

    PubMed

    Linnosmaa, Ismo; Hermans, Raine; Hallinen, Taru

    2004-06-01

    This contribution estimates the price-cost margin in the Finnish pharmaceutical industry. The estimation is based on the method developed by Hall who shows that under constant returns to scale total factor productivity growth depends on the growth of output-capital ratio if the market is imperfectly competitive. Measurement of the price-cost margin is based on this theoretical result. We utilize data on the Finnish pharmaceutical industry. The data cover the years 1975-1999 and include information on output, labor hours, and capital stock. The results show that the estimated price-cost margin is in the range 0.59-0.67, which is close to the estimates obtained in the United States market.

  7. Growth of the Asian health-care market: global implications for the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard J

    2007-10-01

    The global economy is being transformed by an explosion of information unleashed by the internet, the digital revolution, communications and increased international mobility. This transformation is manifesting in many ways, including rapid development of countries such as China, commoditization of public services, mobilization of workforces, shifting of market control from suppliers to consumers, interlinked rises in product demand and customer expectations, and problems regulating international business competition. As Asia is home to half of the world's population, and offers both a large relatively low-cost workforce in some countries and a potentially huge retail market, this region could be central to the future of the global economy. Like other industries, the pharmaceutical industry faces a new array of Asia-specific opportunities and challenges. Success in meeting these challenges will go to those pharmaceutical companies that best understand the unique strengths and constraints of Asia's diverse cultures, talents and markets.

  8. Prerequisites for the pharmaceutical industry to develop and commercialise helminths and helminth-derived product therapy.

    PubMed

    Tilp, Cornelia; Kapur, Vishal; Loging, Will; Erb, Klaus J

    2013-03-01

    During the past 10 years, immunologists, epidemiologists and parasitologists have made many new exciting discoveries in the field of helminth-mediated immune regulation. In addition, many animal experiments have shown that certain helminths or products derived from helminths can protect mice from developing allergic or autoimmune disease. Some clinical trials utilising Trichuris suis or Necator americanus for the treatment of allergic disorders and inflammatory bowel disease have been conducted. The outcomes of these trials suggest that they may be used to treat these disorders. However, to date no helminth therapy is routinely being applied to patients and no helminth-derived product therapy has been developed. In order to bring new drugs to the market and shoulder the enormous costs involved in developing such therapies, pharmaceutical companies need to be involved. However, currently the resources from the pharmaceutical industry devoted to this concept are relatively small and there are good reasons why the industry may have been reluctant to invest in developing these types of therapies. In this review article, the hurdles that must be overcome before the pharmaceutical industry might invest in these novel therapies are outlined.

  9. Economic analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This economic analysis (EA) examines compliance costs and economic impacts resulting from the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Final Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Industry Point Source Category. It also investigates the costs and impacts associated with an air rule requiring Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) to control air emissions, both separately and together with the Final Pharmaceutical Industry Effluent Guidelines. The EA estimates the economic effects of compliance with both final rules in terms of total aggregate annualized costs of compliance, facility closures, impacts on firms (likelihood of bankruptcy and effects on profit margins), and impacts on new sources. The EA also investigates secondary impacts on employment and communities, foreign trade, specific demographic groups, and environmental justice. This report includes a Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (FRFA) detailing the impacts on small businesses within the pharmaceutical industry to meet the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), as amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA). Finally, the EA presents a cost-benefit analysis to meet the requirements of Executive Order 12866 and the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.

  10. Building the world's supply of quinine: Dutch colonialism and the origins of a global pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Goss, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Quinine, a naturally occurring alkaloid from the Cinchona tree, was one of the first drugs produced and sold by a global pharmaceutical industry during the nineteenth century. Factories in Europe and North America dominated the manufacturing industry, and between 1890 and 1940, Cinchona plantations on Java supplied most of the bark for the quinine pharmaceutical business. At the end of the nineteenth century, the Dutch colonial state kept a hands-off approach to the Cinchona enterprises, in keeping with its liberal orientation. But the persistent low-price for bark, which led to the near ruin of the Cinchona planters, eventually pushed the colonial state to actively protect the Cinchona plantations. Colonial officials sought to stabilize the colonial Cinchona export-business by encouraging the integration of the quinine industry on a global scale. Most important was the colonial state's sponsorship in 1913 of the Quinine Agreement, establishing a set price for Cinchona bark, which created the world's first pharmaceutical cartel. In the interwar period, an alliance of Dutch government officials, planters, scientists, doctors and drug-makers, working in both the motherland and the colony, actively promoted the expansion of quinine consumption, as well as the merit of the Quinine Agreement, which they argued supplied guaranteed a steady supply of quinine, all for the wellbeing of global humanity.

  11. Role of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in cardiac disease, hypertension and Meniere-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adarsh; Kaur, Harharpreet; Devi, Pushpa; Mohan, Varun

    2009-12-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) is a mitochondrial coenzyme which is essential for the production of ATP. Being at the core of cellular energy processes it assumes importance in cells with high energy requirements like the cardiac cells which are extremely sensitive to CoQ10 deficiency produced by cardiac diseases. CoQ10 has thus a potential role for prevention and treatment of heart ailments by improving cellular bioenergetics. In addition it has an antioxidant, a free radical scavenging and a vasodilator effect which may be helpful in these conditions. It inhibits LDL oxidation and thus the progression of atherosclerosis. It decreases proinflammatory cytokines and decreases blood viscosity which is helpful in patients of heart failure and coronary artery disease. It also improves ischemia and reperfusion injury of coronary revascularisation. Significant improvement has been observed in clinical and hemodynamic parameters and in exercise tolerance in patients given adjunctive CoQ10 in doses from 60 to 200 mg daily in the various trials conducted in patients of heart failure, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and other cardiac illnesses. Recently it has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality in congestive heart failure. It has also been found to be helpful in vertigo and Meniere-like syndrome by improving the immune system. Further research is going on to establish firmly its role in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. A quality by design study applied to an industrial pharmaceutical fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Vera; Lochmann, Dirk; Reich, Gabriele; Menezes, José C; Herdling, Thorsten; Schewitz, Jens

    2012-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is encouraged within Quality by Design (QbD) to apply science-based manufacturing principles to assure quality not only of new but also of existing processes. This paper presents how QbD principles can be applied to an existing industrial pharmaceutical fluid bed granulation (FBG) process. A three-step approach is presented as follows: (1) implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) monitoring tools at the industrial scale process, combined with multivariate data analysis (MVDA) of process and PAT data to increase the process knowledge; (2) execution of scaled-down designed experiments at a pilot scale, with adequate PAT monitoring tools, to investigate the process response to intended changes in Critical Process Parameters (CPPs); and finally (3) the definition of a process Design Space (DS) linking CPPs to Critical to Quality Attributes (CQAs), within which product quality is ensured by design, and after scale-up enabling its use at the industrial process scale. The proposed approach was developed for an existing industrial process. Through enhanced process knowledge established a significant reduction in product CQAs, variability already within quality specifications ranges was achieved by a better choice of CPPs values. The results of such step-wise development and implementation are described.

  13. Pharmaceutical contamination in residential, industrial, and agricultural waste streams: risk to aqueous environments in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Yu, Tsung-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2008-12-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the occurrence of antibiotics, hormones and other pharmaceuticals in water sites that have major potential for downstream environmental contamination. These include residential (hospitals, sewage treatment plants, and regional discharges), industrial (pharmaceutical production facilities), and agricultural (animal husbandries and aquacultures) waste streams. We assayed 23 Taiwanese water sites for 97 targeted compounds, of which a significant number were detected and quantified. The most frequently detected compounds were sulfamethoxazole, caffeine, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen, followed closely by cephalexin, ofloxacin, and diclofenac, which were detected in >91% of samples and found to have median (maximum) concentrations of 0.2 (5.8), 0.39 (24.0), 0.02 (100.4), 0.41 (14.5), 0.15 (31.4), 0.14 (13.6) and 0.083 (29.8) microg/L, respectively. Lincomycin and acetaminophen had high measured concentrations (>100 microg/L), and 35 other pharmaceuticals occurred at the microg/L level. These incidence and concentration results correlate well with published data for other worldwide locations, as well as with Taiwanese medication usage data, suggesting a human contamination source. Many pharmaceuticals also occurred at levels exceeding predicted no-effect concentrations (PNEC), warranting further investigation of their occurrence and fate in receiving waters, as well as the overall risks they pose for local ecosystems and human residents. The information provided here will also be useful for development of strategies for regulation and remediation.

  14. Creating knowledge structures in the pharmaceutical industry: the increasing significance of virtual organisation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, A; Howells, J

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the specific trend and challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry regarding the exploitation of Internet e-commerce technology and virtual organisation to develop and maintain competitive advantage. There are two important facets of the current trend. One is the rapid development of a complex network of alliances between the established pharmaceutical companies and the specialised biotechnology company start-ups. The other is the rapid growth of internet e-commerce companies dedicated to developing specialised technological platforms for acquiring and selling genetic and biochemical knowledge. The underlying challenge is how big pharmaceutical companies can emulate some of the innovation processes of smaller biotechnology company start-ups, and how they can appropriate and applied new technological knowledge on the development of new drugs. Pharmaceutical companies in order to retain competitive advantage need to continuously monitor all aspects of knowledge management with regard to the R&D and manufacturing process (as well as customer management and marketing). Technological change and organisational restructuring should be aimed at boosting the capacity of large firms to innovate rapidly.

  15. The teaching of drug development to medical students: collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and medical school

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, A G; Jackson, D; Barnett, D B

    2005-01-01

    Collaboration between the medical school at Leicester and a local pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca, led to the design and implementation of an optional third year special science skills module teaching medical students about drug discovery and development. The module includes didactic teaching about the complexities of the drug discovery process leading to development of candidate drugs for clinical investigation as well as practical experience of the processes involved in drug evaluation preclinically and clinically. It highlights the major ethical and regulatory issues concerned with the production and testing of novel therapies in industry and the NHS. In addition it helps to reinforce other areas of the medical school curriculum, particularly the understanding of clinical study design and critical appraisal. The module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and the critical appraisal of a drug advertisement. This paper describes the objectives of the module and its content. In addition we outline the results of an initial student evaluation of the module and an assessment of its impact on student knowledge and the opinion of the pharmaceutical industry partner. This module has proven to be popular with medical students, who acquire a greater understanding of the work required for drug development and therefore reflect more favourably on the role of pharmaceutical companies in the UK. PMID:15801942

  16. "Does organizational culture influence the ethical behavior in the pharmaceutical industry?".

    PubMed

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed

    2011-12-01

    Study of ethical behavior among medical representatives in the profession is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior of medical representatives. Medical representatives working for both domestic and multinational companies constitutes the sample (n=300). Data is collected using a simple random and cluster sampling through a structured questionnaire. The research design is hypothesis testing. It is a cross-sectional and correlational study, conducted under non-contrived settings. Chi-square tests were shows that there is an association between the organizational culture and ethical behavior of medical representatives. In addition, the strength of the association is measured which report to Cramer's V of 63.1% and Phi Value of 2.749. Results indicate that multinational company medical reps are more ethical compared to domestic company medical representatives vast difference in both variance and in t test results. Through better organizational culture, pharmaceutical companies can create the most desirable behavior among their employees. Authors conclude that apart from organizational culture, the study of additional organizational, individual and external factors are imperative for better understanding of ethical behavior of medical representatives in the pharmaceutical industry in India.

  17. Financial Aspects and the Future of the Pharmaceutical Industry in the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Karamehic, Jasenko; Ridic, Ognjen; Ridic, Goran; Jukic, Tomislav; Coric, Jozo; Subasic, Djemo; Panjeta, Mirsad; Saban, Aida; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The U.S. pharmaceutical industry is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as “companies engaged in researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing of medicines and biological for human or veterinary use”. Besides its main role in improving human health, the US pharmaceutical industry represents one of the most critical, key decision makers’ lobbying prone and competitive sectors in the economy. The cost in the environment of very limited government price regulation remains one of the major problems fuelling aggregate health care cost inflation. Pharmaceuticals have created huge benefits for public health and economic productivity by the means of saving lives, increasing life expectancy, reducing illness related suffering, preventing surgeries and decreasing hospital stays. Purpose: The goal of this review paper is to show the present conditions and future trends of the pharmaceutical industry in the U.S. Methodology: This paper represents a thorough literature review of the multifaceted sources including: studies, books, peer reviewed journals, U.S. government sources (i.e. U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, etc.). Discussion: In the thirty years pharmaceutical companies have consistently developed and launched new medicines, bringing hope to sick or – at risk patients. They also usually provide above the average financial returns for its shareholders. U.S. pharmaceutical companies had as their goal to discover blockbuster drugs. Blockbuster drugs are generally defined as drugs that solve medical problems common to hundreds of millions of people and, at the same time generate large sales increases and profits for the pharmaceutical companies. The main approach of these companies includes huge investments in research and development (R&D), innovation, marketing and sales. The trend analysis shows that for the most part the era of blockbuster drugs is nearing an end. Conclusion: Numerous blockbuster drugs will be coming off

  18. Pursuit of personalized anticancer therapy: leveraging collaboration between academia and the biotech/pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Buck, Elizabeth; Mulvihill, Mark; Iwata, Kenneth K

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, our increased understanding of tumor biology has resulted in the delivery of a new generation of molecularly targeted cancer drugs with greater efficacy and less toxicity. This understanding has also provided pharmaceutical and academic institutions with a greater appreciation for the complexities and challenges associated with discovering and developing molecularly targeted drugs. To deal with the complexities of tumor biology and the associated technologies needed to develop molecularly targeted drugs, there has been increased cooperation and collaboration between academic and pharmaceutical-industry researchers in a broader number of aspects of the drug discovery and development continuum, including structural biology and translational research. This collaborative effort has played a role in molecularly targeted drugs such as cetuximab, trastuzumab, imatinib, and new promising drug candidates such as OSI-906. Cooperative efforts by industry and academia have also provided important insights to optimize the use of such agents in the clinic. This review aims to emphasize the need for academic/industrial collaborations for success and efficiency through the drug discovery and development continuum, and will highlight several examples of collaborations between academic and industrial scientists that facilitated the development of molecularly targeted antitumor agents into the clinic.

  19. Microbial Tyrosinases: Promising Enzymes for Pharmaceutical, Food Bioprocessing, and Environmental Industry

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Kamal Uddin; Ali, Ayesha S.; Ali, Sharique A.; Naaz, Ishrat

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a natural enzyme and is often purified to only a low degree and it is involved in a variety of functions which mainly catalyse the o-hydroxylation of monophenols into their corresponding o-diphenols and the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones using molecular oxygen, which then polymerizes to form brown or black pigments. The synthesis of o-diphenols is a potentially valuable catalytic ability and thus tyrosinase has attracted a lot of attention with respect to industrial applications. In environmental technology it is used for the detoxification of phenol-containing wastewaters and contaminated soils, as biosensors for phenol monitoring, and for the production of L-DOPA in pharmaceutical industries, and is also used in cosmetic and food industries as important catalytic enzyme. Melanin pigment synthesized by tyrosinase has found applications for protection against radiation cation exchangers, drug carriers, antioxidants, antiviral agents, or immunogen. The recombinant V. spinosum tryosinase protein can be used to produce tailor-made melanin and other polyphenolic materials using various phenols and catechols as starting materials. This review compiles the recent data on biochemical and molecular properties of microbial tyrosinases, underlining their importance in the industrial use of these enzymes. After that, their most promising applications in pharmaceutical, food processing, and environmental fields are presented. PMID:24895537

  20. Microbial tyrosinases: promising enzymes for pharmaceutical, food bioprocessing, and environmental industry.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Kamal Uddin; Ali, Ayesha S; Ali, Sharique A; Naaz, Ishrat

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a natural enzyme and is often purified to only a low degree and it is involved in a variety of functions which mainly catalyse the o-hydroxylation of monophenols into their corresponding o-diphenols and the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones using molecular oxygen, which then polymerizes to form brown or black pigments. The synthesis of o-diphenols is a potentially valuable catalytic ability and thus tyrosinase has attracted a lot of attention with respect to industrial applications. In environmental technology it is used for the detoxification of phenol-containing wastewaters and contaminated soils, as biosensors for phenol monitoring, and for the production of L-DOPA in pharmaceutical industries, and is also used in cosmetic and food industries as important catalytic enzyme. Melanin pigment synthesized by tyrosinase has found applications for protection against radiation cation exchangers, drug carriers, antioxidants, antiviral agents, or immunogen. The recombinant V. spinosum tryosinase protein can be used to produce tailor-made melanin and other polyphenolic materials using various phenols and catechols as starting materials. This review compiles the recent data on biochemical and molecular properties of microbial tyrosinases, underlining their importance in the industrial use of these enzymes. After that, their most promising applications in pharmaceutical, food processing, and environmental fields are presented.

  1. Process modeling in the pharmaceutical industry using the discrete element method.

    PubMed

    Ketterhagen, William R; am Ende, Mary T; Hancock, Bruno C

    2009-02-01

    The discrete element method (DEM) is widely used to model a range of processes across many industries. This paper reviews current DEM models for several common pharmaceutical processes including material transport and storage, blending, granulation, milling, compression, and film coating. The studies described in this review yielded interesting results that provided insight into the effects of various material properties and operating conditions on pharmaceutical processes. Additionally, some basic elements common to most DEM models are overviewed. A discussion of some common model extensions such as nonspherical particle shapes, noncontact forces, and interstitial fluids is also presented. While these more complex systems have been the focus of many recent studies, considerable work must still be completed to gain a better understanding of how they can affect the processing behavior of bulk solids.

  2. [Medical research and the pharmaceutical industry. Uneasy bedfellows or a prenuptial agreement?].

    PubMed

    Cohen, A F

    2001-07-28

    Recent publications in medical journals and the media seem to indicate that there are a number of major problems in the relationship between researchers and the pharmaceutical sector. Results of research allegedly are influenced or manipulated, the right to publish the results are taken away from the researchers, and all this for money. The underlying data do not seem to indicate that this is a very common problem, but rather a generalisation of incidents. To efficiently develop medicines in future requires an ever-growing amount of academic know-how that these companies simply lack; in modern pharmaceutical development there are many opportunities to connect academic and industrial research programmes, resulting in synergy rather than an academic sell-out. All parties concerned should make transparent and clear agreements.

  3. Biotechnological applications of functional metagenomics in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Laura M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are found throughout nature, thriving in a vast range of environmental conditions. The majority of them are unculturable or difficult to culture by traditional methods. Metagenomics enables the study of all microorganisms, regardless of whether they can be cultured or not, through the analysis of genomic data obtained directly from an environmental sample, providing knowledge of the species present, and allowing the extraction of information regarding the functionality of microbial communities in their natural habitat. Function-based screenings, following the cloning and expression of metagenomic DNA in a heterologous host, can be applied to the discovery of novel proteins of industrial interest encoded by the genes of previously inaccessible microorganisms. Functional metagenomics has considerable potential in the food and pharmaceutical industries, where it can, for instance, aid (i) the identification of enzymes with desirable technological properties, capable of catalyzing novel reactions or replacing existing chemically synthesized catalysts which may be difficult or expensive to produce, and able to work under a wide range of environmental conditions encountered in food and pharmaceutical processing cycles including extreme conditions of temperature, pH, osmolarity, etc; (ii) the discovery of novel bioactives including antimicrobials active against microorganisms of concern both in food and medical settings; (iii) the investigation of industrial and societal issues such as antibiotic resistance development. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art functional metagenomic methods available and discusses the potential of functional metagenomic approaches to mine as yet unexplored environments to discover novel genes with biotechnological application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  4. Biotechnological applications of functional metagenomics in the food and pharmaceutical industries

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Laura M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are found throughout nature, thriving in a vast range of environmental conditions. The majority of them are unculturable or difficult to culture by traditional methods. Metagenomics enables the study of all microorganisms, regardless of whether they can be cultured or not, through the analysis of genomic data obtained directly from an environmental sample, providing knowledge of the species present, and allowing the extraction of information regarding the functionality of microbial communities in their natural habitat. Function-based screenings, following the cloning and expression of metagenomic DNA in a heterologous host, can be applied to the discovery of novel proteins of industrial interest encoded by the genes of previously inaccessible microorganisms. Functional metagenomics has considerable potential in the food and pharmaceutical industries, where it can, for instance, aid (i) the identification of enzymes with desirable technological properties, capable of catalyzing novel reactions or replacing existing chemically synthesized catalysts which may be difficult or expensive to produce, and able to work under a wide range of environmental conditions encountered in food and pharmaceutical processing cycles including extreme conditions of temperature, pH, osmolarity, etc; (ii) the discovery of novel bioactives including antimicrobials active against microorganisms of concern both in food and medical settings; (iii) the investigation of industrial and societal issues such as antibiotic resistance development. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art functional metagenomic methods available and discusses the potential of functional metagenomic approaches to mine as yet unexplored environments to discover novel genes with biotechnological application in the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26175729

  5. Attitudes and Relationship between Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry in a Public General Hospital in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    De Ferrari, Aldo; Gentille, Cesar; Davalos, Long; Huayanay, Leandro; Malaga, German

    2014-01-01

    Background The interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry influences physicians' attitudes and prescribing behavior. Although largely studied in the US, this topic has not been well studied in resource-poor settings, where a close relationship between physicians and industry still exists. Objective To describe physician interactions with and attitudes towards the pharmaceutical industry in a public general hospital in Lima, Peru. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional study through an anonymous, self-filled questionnaire distributed among faculty and trainee physicians of five different clinical departments working in a Peruvian public general hospital. A transcultural validation of an existing Spanish questionnaire was performed. Exposure to marketing activities, motivations to contact pharmaceutical representatives and attitudes towards industry were studied. Collected data was analyzed by degree of training, clinical department, gender and teaching status. Attitudes were measured on a four-point LIKERT scale. Results 155 physicians completed the survey, of which 148 were included in the study sample. 94.5% of attending physicians reported ongoing encounters with pharmaceutical representatives. The most common industry-related activities were receiving medical samples (91.2%), promotional material (87.8%) and attending meetings in restaurants (81.8%). Respondents considered medical samples and continuing medical education the most ethically acceptable benefits. We found significant differences between attendings and residents, and teaching and non-teaching attendings. An association between the amount of encounters with pharmaceutical representatives, and attitudes towards industry and acceptance of medical samples was found. Conclusions A close physician-industry relationship exists in the population under study. The contact is established mainly through pharmaceutical representatives. Medical samples are the most received and ethically accepted

  6. Widening the debate about conflict of interest: addressing relationships between journalists and the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Wendy; Kerridge, Ian; Sweet, Melissa; Jordens, Christopher; Bonfiglioli, Catriona; Forsyth, Rowena

    2012-08-01

    The phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of the News of the World newspaper in Britain has prompted international debate about media practices and regulation. It is timely to broaden the discussion about journalistic ethics and conduct to include consideration of the impact of media practices upon the population's health. Many commercial organisations cultivate relationships with journalists and news organisations with the aim of influencing the content of health-related news and information communicated through the media. Given the significant influence of the media on the health of individuals and populations, we should be alert to the potential impact of industry-journalist relationships on health care, health policy and public health. The approach taken by the medical profession to its interactions with the pharmaceutical industry provides a useful model for management of industry influence.

  7. The Impact of Chemical Probes in Drug Discovery: A Pharmaceutical Industry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Garbaccio, Robert M; Parmee, Emma R

    2016-01-21

    Chemical probes represent an important component of both academic and pharmaceutical drug discovery research. As a complement to prior reviews that have defined this scientific field, we aim to provide an industry perspective on the value of having high-quality chemical probes throughout the course of preclinical research. By studying examples from the internal Merck pipeline, we recognize that these probes require significant collaborative investment to realize their potential impact in clarifying the tractability and translation of a given therapeutic target. This perspective concludes with recommendations for chemical probe discovery aimed toward maximizing their potential to identify targets that result in the successful delivery of novel therapeutics.

  8. Monitoring versus interim analysis of clinical trials: a perspective from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Enas, G G; Dornseif, B E; Sampson, C B; Rockhold, F W; Wuu, J

    1989-03-01

    The definitions of "interim analysis" and "monitoring" of clinical trials are often ambiguous in the current literature. The resulting confusion can lead to erroneous conclusions and misguided decisions, especially when activities that are operational or observational are evaluated in a probabilistic sense as inferential. The authors seek to define "interim analysis" and "monitoring" in a mutually exclusive fashion. These definitions will then provide the opportunity to review and categorize existing clinical trial practices and procedures. This will clarify such issues as "when to look" and "when to pay a price" (e.g., test size and power) and characterize such issues in the context of pharmaceutical industry drug development.

  9. Effects of L-carnitine and coenzyme q10 on impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, S; Garjani, A; Ziaee, M; Khorrami, A

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, cardiovascular diseases and male infertility are two big health problems in industrial countries.The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective role of coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine pretreatment in the impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol (ISO) in male rats.Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated in 4 groups. ISO was injected for 2 consecutive days (100 mg/kg) in ISO treated groups. Before ISO administration, pretreatment with Coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg/day) and L-Carnitine (350 mg/kg/day) were conducted for 20 consecutive days. Sex hormones level, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant concentration as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weight were investigated.Increase in the concentration of MDA and decrease in total antioxidant level was observed following ISO administration. Accordingly, the sperm viability as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weights were decreased. In the case of sex hormones, the testosterone and LH levels were decreased and the concentration of FSH was increased. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the MDA level and increased total antioxidant, LH and testosterone levels. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 also improved semen parameters and organs weight which were impaired by ISO administration.L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 pretreatment could protect spermatogenesis in male rats with ISO administration.

  10. The Rhetorical Helix of the Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries: Strategies of Transformation through Definition, Description and Ingratiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gretton, Linda Burak

    2009-01-01

    The current pharmaceutical industry, whose origins date from the early 20th century, and the biotechnology industry, which emerged in the 1980s both have foundations built on the modern scientific method and share a mission to develop new drugs for humans and animals. At the same time, they are also made distinct by size (small biotechs versus…

  11. 78 FR 24754 - Guidance for Industry on Regulatory Classification of Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... ``Regulatory Classification of Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals.'' This guidance provides applicants of new drug... Research's (CDER's) current thinking on the appropriate regulatory classification of pharmaceutical...

  12. Solar photo-degradation of a pharmaceutical wastewater effluent in a semi-industrial autonomous plant.

    PubMed

    Expósito, Antonio J; Durán, Antonio; Monteagudo, José M; Acevedo, Alba

    2016-05-01

    An industrial wastewater effluent coming from a pharmaceutical laboratory has been treated in a semi-industrial autonomous solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) plant. A photo-Fenton process assisted with ferrioxalate has been used. Up to 79% of TOC can be removed in 2 h depending on initial conditions when treating an aqueous effluent containing up to 400 ppm of initial organic carbon concentration (TOC). An initial ratio of Fe(II)/TOC higher than 0.5 guarantees a high removal. It can be seen that most of TOC removal occurs early in the first hour of reaction. After this time, mineralization was very slow, although H2O2 was still present in solution. Indeed it decomposed to form oxygen in inefficient reactions. It is clear that remaining TOC was mainly due to the presence of acetates which are difficult to degrade.

  13. The politics of access to expensive drugs: INESSS and the innovative pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David

    2012-05-01

    The innovative pharmaceutical industry employs thousands of people in Quebec and so has the ability to exert strong political pressure; the public statements of Sanofi-Aventis concerning the provincial reimbursement of certain expensive drugs are an example. "Maintaining a dynamic biopharmaceutical industry" is one of four main axes of the drug policy of Quebec's ministry of health. However, this role of government should not take precedence over the efficient and equitable management of health resources. We defend the legitimate and responsible choice of the Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux du Québec (INESSS) to require an acceptable cost-effectiveness ratio from expensive new drugs.

  14. An insight into the emerging role of regional medical advisor in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Nayak, Roopa P

    2013-07-01

    The position of regional medical advisor (RMA) is relatively new in the pharmaceutical industry and its roles and responsibility are still evolving. The RMA is a field based position whose main mission is to foster collaborative relationships with the key opinion leaders (KOLs) and to facilitate the exchange of unbiased scientific information between the medical community and the company. Field-based medical liaison teams are expanding world-wide as part of the pharmaceutical industry's increased focus on global operations including emerging markets. Now, the position of the RMA has evolved into comprehensive, complex, highly interactive, targeted, highly strategic, innovative, and independent role since its inception by the Upjohn Company in 1967. The major objective of the RMA is to develop the professional relationships with the health-care community, particularly KOLs, through peer-to-peer contact. The RMA can facilitate investigator-initiated clinical research proposals from approval until completion, presentation, and publication. It is possible for a RMA to have valuable access to KOLs through his expertise in the clinical research. The RMA can assist in the development, review, and follow-up of the clinical studies initiated within the relevant therapeutic area at the regional/local level. The RMA can lead regional/local clinical projects to ensure that all clinical trials are conducted in compliance with the International Conference of Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice (ICH GCP) guidelines.

  15. [Specificities of patent protection in the pharmaceutical industry: modalities and traits of intellectual property].

    PubMed

    Jannuzzi, Anna Haydée Lanzillotti; Vasconcellos, Alexandre Guimarães; de Souza, Cristina Gomes

    2008-06-01

    Different forms of protection for inventions in the pharmaceutical industry point to strategies for the perpetuation of patent protection. Based on a literature review showing the specificities of patenting in the industry, the article provides a brief history of drug patents in Brazil, a discussion of patentable and non-patentable inventions, and the modalities and traits of patent protection that aim to extend the temporary monopoly granted under the patent. Such strategies include patents targeting polimorphs and optical isomers of drugs and drug combinations and specific clinical preparations, increasingly present in the drug patent claims filed by pharmaceutical companies. The study's objective is to discuss the specificities of drug patent claims in order to help develop expertise in the area and discuss the impact of expanding the scope of patent protection. In conclusion, while the tendency to expand towards more a permissive protective scope could produce opportunities for Brazilian national inventors, it could also be harmful to a policy for access to medicines.

  16. An insight into the emerging role of regional medical advisor in the pharmaceutical industry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Nayak, Roopa P.

    2013-01-01

    The position of regional medical advisor (RMA) is relatively new in the pharmaceutical industry and its roles and responsibility are still evolving. The RMA is a field based position whose main mission is to foster collaborative relationships with the key opinion leaders (KOLs) and to facilitate the exchange of unbiased scientific information between the medical community and the company. Field-based medical liaison teams are expanding world-wide as part of the pharmaceutical industry's increased focus on global operations including emerging markets. Now, the position of the RMA has evolved into comprehensive, complex, highly interactive, targeted, highly strategic, innovative, and independent role since its inception by the Upjohn Company in 1967. The major objective of the RMA is to develop the professional relationships with the health-care community, particularly KOLs, through peer-to-peer contact. The RMA can facilitate investigator-initiated clinical research proposals from approval until completion, presentation, and publication. It is possible for a RMA to have valuable access to KOLs through his expertise in the clinical research. The RMA can assist in the development, review, and follow-up of the clinical studies initiated within the relevant therapeutic area at the regional/local level. The RMA can lead regional/local clinical projects to ensure that all clinical trials are conducted in compliance with the International Conference of Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice (ICH GCP) guidelines. PMID:24010061

  17. Regulating drug information in Europe: a pyrrhic victory for pharmaceutical industry critics?

    PubMed

    Mulinari, Shai

    2013-06-01

    Informed by recent sociological debates on pharmaceuticalisation, this article examines the evolution of the current EU legal proposal on prescription drug information to patients, as well as the surrounding controversies. In 2008 the European Commission proposed the relaxation of the existing rules governing drug information provision to patients by the pharmaceutical industry. Critics of the industry's influence over health policy and markets, including consumer organisations, industry-independent patient organisations and health professionals, rejected the Commission's proposal, claiming that the industry cannot be considered a reliable source of patient information due to inherent financial conflicts of interest. Since these critics were at least partially successful in rallying opinion against the Commission proposal, they functioned as countervailing forces to promotion-driven pharmaceuticalisation. Even so, as a watered-down version of the proposal moved through the European Parliament it was further modified to ultimately resemble the Swedish system that was held up as a high-quality example of industry-based information provision. Yet this article contends that the Swedish system displays evidence of corporate bias. Significantly, basing EU policy on a drug information system not resistant to corporate bias risks creating practices that violate the legally mandated mission of EU drug regulation, which is to 'promote and protect public health'.

  18. Scalable Technology for the Extraction of Pharmaceutics (STEP): the transition from academic knowhow to industrial reality.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ian; Ignatova, Svetlana; Hewitson, Peter; Janaway, Lee; Wood, Philip; Edwards, Neil; Harris, Guy; Guzlek, Hacer; Keay, David; Freebairn, Keith; Johns, David; Douillet, Nathalie; Thickitt, Chris; Vilminot, Elsa; Mathews, Ben

    2011-09-09

    This paper addresses the technological readiness of counter-current chromatography (CCC) instruments to become platform technology for the pharmaceutical industry. It charts the development of the prototype technology since its inception in 1966, through conceptual improvements in the 1980s that led to higher speed separations in hours as opposed to days. It then describes the engineering improvements that have led to the development of high performance counter-current chromatography with the potential for scale-up to process scale for manufacturing products in industry with separation times in minutes rather than hours. A new UK Technology Strategy Board high value manufacturing £1.5 m research programme to take CCC through to technology readiness level 8 (i.e. as platform technology for continuous 24 × 7 operation by industry) is introduced. Four case studies are given as examples of successes from its expanding applications portfolio, which is mainly confidential. Finally, the hurdles for the uptake of new technology by industry are highlighted and the following potential solutions given: rapid method development, automation, continuous processing and instrument reliability and robustness. The future challenge for the CCC community will be to address these development needs urgently if CCC is to become the platform technology it deserves to be.

  19. Windows of opportunities and technological innovation in the Brazilian pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Tigre, Paulo Bastos; Nascimento, Caio Victor Machado França do; Costa, Laís Silveira

    2016-11-03

    The Brazilian pharmaceutical industry is heavily dependent on external sources of inputs, capital, and technology. However, the emergence of technological opportunities and the development of biotechnology and the decline of the patent boom and resulting advances by generic drugs have opened windows of opportunities for the local industry. The article examines the Brazilian industry's innovative behavior vis-à-vis these opportunities, showing that although the industry as a whole invests little in innovation, a few large Brazilian companies have expanded their market share and stepped up their investments in research and development, supported by public policies for innovation. Resumo: A indústria farmacêutica brasileira caracteriza-se pela grande dependência de fontes externas de insumos, capital e tecnologia. O surgimento de oportunidades tecnológicas, associadas ao desenvolvimento da biotecnologia e ao fim do boom das patentes com o consequente avanço dos medicamentos genéricos, entretanto, vem abrindo janelas de oportunidades para a indústria local. Este artigo examina o comportamento inovador da indústria brasileira à luz dessas oportunidades, revelando que, embora o conjunto da indústria mantenha baixos níveis de investimentos em inovação, um pequeno grupo de grandes empresas nacionais vem ampliando sua participação no mercado e intensificando seus investimentos em pesquisa e desenvolvimento, apoiados por políticas públicas de inovação.

  20. [From the design of use study to the assessment of the benefit: with or without pharmaceutical industry?].

    PubMed

    Porzsolt, Franz

    2010-12-01

    The financing of clinical studies by the pharmaceutical industry is a controversial topic both internationally and in here in Germany. The well-known unacceptable shortcomings require no further confirmation. It is, however, indisputable that the pharmaceutical industry and medical science are co-dependent. Neither the marketing of industrial products nor the research and education of clinical scientists could function without this cooperation. Therefore, all partners need suggestions concerning goal orientation and consensus. The aim of this discussion is to formulate just such suggestions. To structure this discussion, we have raised the following questions: Must we always be suspicious of the results of studies financed by the pharmaceutical industry? We have to keep in mind that in Germany all clinical trials leading to approval of a drug were supported by the industry. What, exactly, do we want to achieve with our explicit and often justified criticism of these studies? What should be done to achieve a higher validity of the published data if we avoid answering the decisive question of whether we accept the challenge of continuing to let research and teaching be financed by the pharmaceutical industry or reject this kind of cooperation and support altogether.

  1. Performance and data interpretation of the in vivo comet assay in pharmaceutical industry: EFPIA survey results.

    PubMed

    van der Leede, Bas-Jan; Doherty, Ann; Guérard, Melanie; Howe, Jonathan; O'Donovan, Mike; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Thybaud, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by the ICH S2(R1) guideline. This paper summarizes a survey suggested by the Safety Working Party of European Medicines Agency (EMA), and conducted by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) to investigate the experience among European pharmaceutical companies by conducting the in vivo comet assay for regulatory purpose. A special focus was given on the typology of the obtained results and to identify potential difficulties encountered with the interpretation of study data. The participating companies reported a total of 147 studies (conducted in-house or outsourced) and shared the conclusion on the comet assay response for 136 studies. Most of the studies were negative (118/136). Only about 10% (14/136 studies) of the comet assays showed a positive response. None of the positive comet assay results were clearly associated with organ toxicity indicating that the positive responses are not due to cytotoxic effects of the compound in the tissue examined. The number of comet assays with an equivocal or inconclusive response was rare, respectively <1% (1/147 studies) and 2% (3/147 studies). In case additional information (e.g. repeat assay, organ toxicity, metabolism, tissue exposure) would have been available for evaluation, a final conclusion could most probably have been drawn for most or all of these studies. All (46) negative in vivo comet assays submitted alongside with a negative in vivo micronucleus assay were accepted by the regulatory authorities to mitigate a positive in vitro mammalian cell assay following the current ICH S2 guidance. The survey results demonstrate the robustness of the comet assay and the regulatory acceptance of the current ICH S2 guidance.

  2. The devil is in the details: the pharmaceutical industry's use of gifts to physicians as marketing strategy.

    PubMed

    McFadden, David W; Calvario, Elizabeth; Graves, Cynthia

    2007-06-01

    Marketing costs exceed 30% of revenues for the pharmaceutical industry, with over 90% of the effort aimed at physicians. Although there are currently unprecedented numbers of regulatory activities focusing on relationships between the pharmaceutical industry and the medical profession, such legislation is often unrecognized or flouted. The potential influence, although minimized by both parties, must not be ignored. Physicians and drug companies will need to re-evaluate their responsibilities to their patients and their shareholders, and both groups should assume proactive and guidance roles in the transformation.

  3. What do pharmaceutical industry professionals in Europe believe about involving patients and the public in research and development of medicines? A qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Suzanne; Starling, Bella; Mullan-Jensen, Christine; Warner, Kay; Wever, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore European-based pharmaceutical industry professionals’ beliefs about patient and public involvement (PPI) in medicines research and development (R&D). Setting Pharmaceutical companies in the UK, Poland and Spain. Participants 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals, four based in the UK, five with pan-European roles, four based in Spain and eight based in Poland. Method Qualitative interview study (telephone and face-to-face, semistructured interviews). All interviews were audio taped, translated (where appropriate) and transcribed for analysis using the Framework approach. Results 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals participated. Key themes were: beliefs about (1) whether patients and the public should be involved in medicines R&D; (2) the barriers and facilitators to PPI in medicines R&D and (3) how the current relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations and patients influence PPI in medicines R&D. Conclusions Although interviewees appeared positive about PPI, many were uncertain about when, how and which patients to involve. Patients and the public's lack of knowledge and interest in medicines R&D, and the pharmaceutical industry's lack of knowledge, interest and receptivity to PPI were believed to be key challenges to increasing PPI. Interviewees also believed that relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations, patients and the public needed to change to facilitate PPI in medicines R&D. Existing pharmaceutical industry codes of practice and negative media reporting of the pharmaceutical industry were also seen as negative influences on these relationships. PMID:26743701

  4. Coenzyme Q10 in the diet--daily intake and relative bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Weber, C; Bysted, A; Hølmer, G

    1997-01-01

    The coenzyme Q10 content of the average Danish diet was estimated from consumption data and from analysis of food items to be 3-5 mg coenzyme Q10 per day, primarily derived (64% of the total) from meat and poultry. To investigate if coenzyme Q10 was absorbed to any significant degree from a food item, a randomized cross-over study with single doses of coenzyme Q10 (30 mg/person), administered either as a meal or as capsules, was carried out in healthy subjects. The serum coenzyme Q10 concentration increased significantly, and the maximum concentrations did not differ significantly for the two forms of administration. The study indicates that coenzyme Q10 is present in food items and absorbed to a significant degree. Thus, dietary coenzyme Q10 may contribute to the plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration.

  5. Patent cliff and strategic switch: exploring strategic design possibilities in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Song, Chie Hoon; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Extending the period of the market exclusivity and responding properly to the recent agglomeration of patent expiries are pivotal to the success of pharmaceutical companies. Declining R&D productivity, rising costs of commercialization, near-term patent expirations for many top-selling drugs are forcing companies to adopt new systems to introduce innovative products to market and to focus on strategies that increase the returns from the existing product portfolio. This systematic review explores various strategic and tactical management approaches by synthesizing the relevant literature and practical examples on patent expiration strategies. It further discusses how the mix of competition policies and strategic instruments can be used to maintain declining revenue streams from the blockbuster business model of the pharmaceutical industry. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the research on various strategies, offers both theoretical and practical guidelines for strategy transformation that companies can use to prolong the market exclusivity, and identifies knowledge gaps that needed to be addressed in order to improve efficiency in policy design.

  6. Keynote review: Is declining innovation in the pharmaceutical industry a myth?

    PubMed

    Schmid, Esther F; Smith, Dennis A

    2005-08-01

    Increasing the rate of innovation is a requirement to achieve much-needed advances in patient care, as well as to secure the future of the pharmaceutical industry. Currently, there is a perception in the external environment that pharmaceutical R&D is no longer innovative, fails to bring new drugs to market or, at best, produces a rising number of 'me-too' drugs with no advantage over existing treatments. In addition, the cost to discover and develop new medicines (i.e. cost per launch) has risen dramatically in recent years. The quoted development cost per medicine is a reality, and is not disputed here. However, data are provided that demonstrate that with regard to innovation rates, the current perception is wrong - although there have been, and continue to be, fluctuations in drug launches, there has been a steady increase in the number of new chemical entities launched, both in absolute numbers of FDA-approved medicines and in the proportion of priority reviews.

  7. [The pharmaceutical industry and the sustainability of healthcare systems in developed countries and in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Iñesta, Antonio; Oteo, Luis Angel

    2011-06-01

    The global economic crisis and its impact on public finances in most developed countries are giving rise to cost-containment policies in healthcare systems. Prevailing legislation on medication requires the safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. A few countries include efficiency criteria, primarily for new medication that they wish to include in public financing. The appropriate use of generic and "biosimilar medication" is very important for maintaining the financial equilibrium of the Health Services. The problem in Latin America is that not all multisource products are bioequivalent and not all countries have the resources to conduct bioequivalence studies in vivo. The European Medicines Agency in 2005 adopted guidelines on "biosimilar medicines" and thirteen of them were subsequently approved for general release. Benchmarking of this model by other countries would be important. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry on political and administrative areas is enormous and control is necessary. The pharmaceutical companies claim that they act with corporate social responsibility, therefore, they must ensure this responsibility toward society.

  8. Marketed Marine Natural Products in the Pharmaceutical and Cosmeceutical Industries: Tips for Success

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana; Vieira, Helena; Gaspar, Helena; Santos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a number of macro and micro organisms that have developed unique metabolic abilities to ensure their survival in diverse and hostile habitats, resulting in the biosynthesis of an array of secondary metabolites with specific activities. Several of these metabolites are high-value commercial products for the pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical industries. The aim of this review is to outline the paths of marine natural products discovery and development, with a special focus on the compounds that successfully reached the market and particularly looking at the approaches tackled by the pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies that succeeded in marketing those products. The main challenges faced during marine bioactives discovery and development programs were analyzed and grouped in three categories: biodiversity (accessibility to marine resources and efficient screening), supply and technical (sustainable production of the bioactives and knowledge of the mechanism of action) and market (processes, costs, partnerships and marketing). Tips to surpass these challenges are given in order to improve the market entry success rates of highly promising marine bioactives in the current pipelines, highlighting what can be learned from the successful and unsuccessful stories that can be applied to novel and/or ongoing marine natural products discovery and development programs. PMID:24549205

  9. Curbing misconduct in the pharmaceutical industry: insights from behavioral ethics and the behavioral approach to law.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Yuval; Gauthier, Rebecca; Schuler, Troy

    2013-01-01

    Two insights of psychology on which we would like to draw are that people react to law in more complex ways than rational-choice models assume and that good people sometimes do bad things. With that starting point, this article provides a behavioral perspective on some of the factors that policymakers seeking to reduce the level of misconduct in the pharmaceutical industry should consider. Effective regulation and enforcement need to address the following questions: Who are the regulation's targeted actors - researchers or executives? Are the regulations directed toward research or marketing activities? Is the misconduct a product of explicit rational choice or implicit processes of which the actor is unaware? Is it reasonable to address all types of misconduct using the same approach? Certain misconduct - particularly by researchers - is due to automatic, intuitive, and unconscious decisions and needs to be addressed through different means than those used to address misconduct due to controlled, deliberate decisions. This article therefore recommends using different sorts of regulation depending on the context. It suggests more tailored enforcement mechanisms that will be sensitive to the pharmaceutical researchers' unique work motivations and to their awareness or lack of awareness of their own misconduct.

  10. Marketed marine natural products in the pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical industries: tips for success.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana; Vieira, Helena; Gaspar, Helena; Santos, Susana

    2014-02-17

    The marine environment harbors a number of macro and micro organisms that have developed unique metabolic abilities to ensure their survival in diverse and hostile habitats, resulting in the biosynthesis of an array of secondary metabolites with specific activities. Several of these metabolites are high-value commercial products for the pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical industries. The aim of this review is to outline the paths of marine natural products discovery and development, with a special focus on the compounds that successfully reached the market and particularly looking at the approaches tackled by the pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies that succeeded in marketing those products. The main challenges faced during marine bioactives discovery and development programs were analyzed and grouped in three categories: biodiversity (accessibility to marine resources and efficient screening), supply and technical (sustainable production of the bioactives and knowledge of the mechanism of action) and market (processes, costs, partnerships and marketing). Tips to surpass these challenges are given in order to improve the market entry success rates of highly promising marine bioactives in the current pipelines, highlighting what can be learned from the successful and unsuccessful stories that can be applied to novel and/or ongoing marine natural products discovery and development programs.

  11. Smoking habits and coenzyme Q10 status in healthy European adults

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Alexandra; Onur, Simone; Paulussen, Michael; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipophilic endogenously synthesised antioxidant that is present in nearly all human tissues and plays an important role in mitochondrial energy production. It has been postulated that smoking has a consumptive effect on CoQ10. Material and methods To further define the relation between smoking and the serum CoQ10 status, 276 healthy volunteers aged 19 to 62 years were grouped into non-smokers (n = 113; 77 male, 36 female) and smokers (n = 163; 102 male, 61 female). Serum lipid profile was analysed by standard clinical chemistry. Coenzyme Q10 concentration and redox status were analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Results Male smokers showed higher serum CoQ10 levels than female smokers. This sex-related difference was accounted for when CoQ10 was related to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as the main carrier of CoQ10 in the circulation. Neither LDL-adjusted CoQ10 concentration nor redox status significantly differed when smokers and non-smokers were compared. Regarding the smoking history, the number of cigarettes consumed per day did not significantly affect the CoQ10 status. Interestingly, with increasing time of smoking habit we observed increasing levels of LDL-adjusted serum CoQ10 concentration (Spearman's p < 0.002) and of the reduced form of CoQ10 (Spearman's p < 0.0001). Conclusions As an adaptive response to oxidative stress in long-term smokers an increased demand for antioxidant capacity may be covered by increasing levels of LDL-adjusted CoQ10 serum concentrations and by a concomitantly increased availability of the reduced, active form of CoQ10, possibly by induction of enzymes that are involved in converting CoQ10ox to CoQ10red. PMID:27478450

  12. Muscle coenzyme Q10 deficiencies in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, I; Dubourg, O; Benoist, J-F; Jardel, C; Mochel, F; Koenig, M; Brice, A; Lombès, A; Dürr, A

    2007-01-23

    APTX gene mutations responsible for ataxia-oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1) were identified in a family previously reported with ataxia and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency. We measured muscle CoQ10 levels in six patients with AOA1 and found decreased levels in five. Patients homozygous for the W279X mutation had lower values (p = 0.003). A therapeutic trial of CoQ10 may be warranted in patients with AOA1.

  13. Public funding and private investment for R&D: a survey in China’s pharmaceutical industry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, China has experienced tremendous growth in its pharmaceutical industry. Both the Chinese government and private investors are motivated to invest into pharmaceutical research and development (R&D). However, studies regarding the different behaviors of public and private investment in pharmaceutical R&D are scarce. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the current situation of public funding and private investment into Chinese pharmaceutical R&D. Methods The primary data used in the research were obtained from the China High-tech Industry Statistics Yearbook (2002–2012) and China Statistical Yearbook of Science and Technology (2002–2012). We analyzed public funding and private investment in five aspects: total investment in the industry, funding sources of the whole industry, differences between provinces, difference in subsectors, and private equity/venture capital investment. Results The vast majority of R&D investment was from private sources. There is a significantly positive correlation between public funding and private investment in different provinces of China. However, public funding was likely to be invested into less developed provinces with abundant natural herbal resources. Compared with the chemical medicine subsector, traditional Chinese medicine and biopharmaceutical subsectors obtained more public funding. Further, the effect of the government was focused on private equity and venture capital investment although private fund is the mainstream of this type of investment. Conclusions Public funding and private investment play different but complementary roles in pharmaceutical R&D in China. While being less than private investment, public funding shows its significance in R&D investment. With rapid growth of the industry, the pharmaceutical R&D investment in China is expected to increase steadily from both public and private sources. PMID:24925505

  14. In search of sustainability: process R&D in light of current pharmaceutical industry challenges.

    PubMed

    Federsel, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-11-01

    Is there a need for a paradigm shift in the pharmaceutical industry? Many researchers think so and take as examples the eroding corporate reputation, a regulatory environment that is harsher than ever, and the request for cheaper drugs from patient organizations and authorities. Process R&D, which interfaces medicinal chemistry and production, has taken on this challenge by increasing the delivery focus early on to ensure timely availability of desired compounds. The quest for lower costs of goods has forced the design of best synthetic routes that, given the molecular complexity, often lead to catalytic methodologies. Applying these methodologies will enable not only the cost element, but also the increasingly important aspects of environmental friendliness, and atom and stage efficiency, to be addressed.

  15. Impact of the World Trade Organization TRIPS agreement on the pharmaceutical industry in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Supakankunti, S.; Janjaroen, W. S.; Tangphao, O.; Ratanawijitrasin, S.; Kraipornsak, P.; Pradithavanij, P.

    2001-01-01

    The 1994 World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) established minimum universal standards in all areas of intellectual property. It is intended to implement these standards globally through a WTO enforcement mechanism. The present article proposes a strategy for alleviating the potentially negative impact of TRIPS in Thailand in relation to the following: purchasers; prescribers and dispensers; producers; products; price control; patent-to-third-party; parallel imports; power of the customer; patentable new drugs; personnel; and prevention policies. The following TRIPS provisions are pertinent to the pharmaceutical industry in Thailand: the limited term of product and process patents; the conditions of protection; and the broad scope for compulsory licensing and enforcement procedures in the national patent system. PMID:11417042

  16. [Incentives and disincentives for research and development of new drugs by the pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Curcio, Pasqualina Curcio

    2008-10-01

    The authors present a model with factors that influence research and development decisions by the pharmaceutical industry: risk of disease transmission and possibility of control; case-fatality and the presence of cure or treatments; income; number of persons who demand the medicine; and opportunity costs for the company. Companies tend to invest in markets with inelastic demand (highly contagious diseases with no possibility of controlling transmission and/or very lethal diseases without treatment) and/or where there is a large population or high per capita income. Companies tend not to invest in markets where marginal costs exceed marginal income, particularly when costs increase permanently as a consequence of rising opportunity costs generated by foregoing profit in other markets. In such cases, policies to subsidize R&D are not effective, and policies must be orientated towards strengthening basic and applied research by public institutions.

  17. [Emission characteristics and hazard assessment analysis of volatile organic compounds from chemical synthesis pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Song, Shuang; Xu, Zhi-Rong; Xu, Ming-Zhu; Xu, Wei-Li

    2014-10-01

    In this study, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from chemical synthesis pharmaceutical industry in Taizhou, Zhejiang province were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) was in the range of 14.9-308.6 mg · m(-3). Evaluation models of ozone formation potentials (OFP) and health risk assessment were adopted to preliminarily assess the environmental impact and health risk of VOCs. The results showed that the values of OFP of VOCs were in the range of 3.1-315.1 mg · m(-3), based on the maximum incremental reactivity, the main principal contribution was toluene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetic ether etc. The non-carcinogenic risk and the carcinogen risk fell in the ranges of 9.48 x 10(-7)-4.98 x 10(-4) a(-1) and 3.17 x 10(-5)- 6.33 x 10(-3). The principal contribution of VOCs was benzene, formaldehyde and methylene chloride.

  18. Best practices for veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology, with emphasis on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Lindsay; Boone, Laura I; Ramaiah, Lila; Penraat, Kelley A; von Beust, Barbara R; Ameri, Mehrdad; Poitout-Belissent, Florence M; Weingand, Kurt; Workman, Heather C; Aulbach, Adam D; Meyer, Dennis J; Brown, Diane E; MacNeill, Amy L; Bolliger, Anne Provencher; Bounous, Denise I

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this paper by the Regulatory Affairs Committee (RAC) of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) is to review the current regulatory guidances (eg, guidelines) and published recommendations for best practices in veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology, particularly in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, and to utilize the combined experience of ASVCP RAC to provide updated recommendations. Discussion points include (1) instrumentation, validation, and sample collection, (2) routine laboratory variables, (3) cytologic laboratory variables, (4) data interpretation and reporting (including peer review, reference intervals and statistics), and (5) roles and responsibilities of clinical pathologists and laboratory personnel. Revision and improvement of current practices should be in alignment with evolving regulatory guidance documents, new technology, and expanding understanding and utility of clinical pathology. These recommendations provide a contemporary guide for the refinement of veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology best practices.

  19. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  1. The pharmaceutical industry and the German National Socialist Regime: I.G. Farben and pharmacological research.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, F; García-García, P; Alamo, C

    2009-02-01

    Before the National Socialist party came to power, the German pharmaceutical industry constituted an international reference as far as the development of new medicines was concerned, having been responsible for synthetic analgesics (phenacetin, phenazones, acetylsalicylic acid), arsphenamine, barbiturates and sulfonamides. The year 1925 saw the founding of I.G. Farben (Interessen-Gemeinschaft Farbenindustrie AG), a conglomerate of companies that would monopolize the country's chemical production and come to own all its major pharmaceutical industries. During the World War II, I.G. Farben participated in numerous operations associated with the criminal activities of the Nazi executive, including the use of slave labour in plants built close to concentration camps, such as that at Auschwitz. With regard to medical and pharmacological research projects, I.G. Farben became involved in experimental programmes using patients from the Nazi regime's euthanasia programmes and healthy subjects recruited without their consent from concentration camps, on whom various pharmacological substances were tested, including sulfamide and arsenical derivatives and other preparations whose composition is not precisely known (B-1012, B-1034, 3382 or Rutenol, 3582 or Acridine), generally in relation to the treatment of infectious diseases, such as typhus, erysipelas, scarlet fever or paratyphoid diarrhoea. Furthermore, I.G. Farben played a decisive role in the German army's chemical warfare programme, contributing to the development of the first two neurotoxic substances, later known as 'nerve agents', tabun and sarin. Some of these activities came to light as a result of the one the famous Nuremberg Trials in 1947, which saw 24 executives and scientists from I.G. Farben brought to justice for, among other offences, the use of slave labour in the concentration camps and forced experimentation with drugs on prisoners.

  2. The effects of lifelong ubiquinone Q10 supplementation on the Q9 and Q10 tissue concentrations and life span of male rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Lönnrot, K; Holm, P; Lagerstedt, A; Huhtala, H; Alho, H

    1998-04-01

    The effect of lifelong oral supplementation with ubiquinone Q10 (10 mg/kg/day) was examined in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57/B17 mice. There were no significant differences in survival or life-span found in either rats or mice. Histopathologic examination of different rat tissues showed no differences between the groups. In Q10 supplemented rats, plasma and liver Q10 levels were 2.6 to 8.4 times higher at all age points than in control rats. Interestingly, in supplemented rats the Q9 levels also were significantly higher (p<0.05) in plasma and liver at ages 18 and 24 months. Neither Q9 nor Q10 levels were affected by supplementation in kidney, heart, or brain tissues. In spite of the significant changes in plasma and liver ubiquinone concentrations, lifelong Q10 supplementation did not prolong or shorten the lifespan of either rats or mice.

  3. [Reduced synthesis of coenzyme Q10 may cause statin related myopathy].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Pareek, Manan; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2011-11-14

    Statin treatment can cause muscular side effects. It has been suggested that the mechanism is reduced synthesis of coenzyme Q10 (coQ10) and a subsequent dysfunction of the respiratory chain. A literature review resulted in insufficient evidence supporting this theory. It is uncertain whether intramuscular levels of coQ10 and mitochondrial function are affected by statin therapy and whether the symptoms of myopathy can be alleviated with coQ10 supplementation. Nevertheless, due to a favourable safety profile, coQ10 can be tested in patients whose muscular symptoms cannot be managed otherwise.

  4. Multivariate analysis in the pharmaceutical industry: enabling process understanding and improvement in the PAT and QbD era.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana P; Tobyn, Mike

    2015-01-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, chemometrics is rapidly establishing itself as a tool that can be used at every step of product development and beyond: from early development to commercialization. This set of multivariate analysis methods allows the extraction of information contained in large, complex data sets thus contributing to increase product and process understanding which is at the core of the Food and Drug Administration's Process Analytical Tools (PAT) Guidance for Industry and the International Conference on Harmonisation's Pharmaceutical Development guideline (Q8). This review is aimed at providing pharmaceutical industry professionals an introduction to multivariate analysis and how it is being adopted and implemented by companies in the transition from "quality-by-testing" to "quality-by-design". It starts with an introduction to multivariate analysis and the two methods most commonly used: principal component analysis and partial least squares regression, their advantages, common pitfalls and requirements for their effective use. That is followed with an overview of the diverse areas of application of multivariate analysis in the pharmaceutical industry: from the development of real-time analytical methods to definition of the design space and control strategy, from formulation optimization during development to the application of quality-by-design principles to improve manufacture of existing commercial products.

  5. Evaluating the "greenness" of chemical processes and products in the pharmaceutical industry--a green metrics primer.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-González, Concepción; Constable, David J C; Ponder, Celia S

    2012-02-21

    This tutorial review presents an overview of the main metrics that have been used to test and compare the 'greenness' of processes and products, primarily in the pharmaceutical industry. The green metrics cover areas of resources, materials, processing, cleaning, life cycle assessment, renewability, amongst others. Application examples of these metrics are also presented to illustrate key points and concepts.

  6. Civic Engagement as Risk Management and Public Relations: What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Teach Us about Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. Blake

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry's corporate responsibility reports illustrate how the liberal rhetoric of civic engagement can be reappropriated to serve the market-driven aims of risk management and public relations. Tracing the ideologic linkage of corporate responsibility and service-learning versions of civic engagement, and contextualizing…

  7. Misleading Advertising for Antidepressants in Sweden: A Failure of Pharmaceutical Industry Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zetterqvist, Anna V.; Mulinari, Shai

    2013-01-01

    Background The alleged efficacy of pharmaceutical industry self-regulation has been used to repudiate increased government oversight over promotional activity. European politicians and industry have cited Sweden as an excellent example of self-regulation based on an ethical code. This paper considers antidepressant advertising in Sweden to uncover the strengths and weaknesses of self-regulation. Methodology We analyzed all antidepressant advertisements in the Swedish Medical Journal, 1994–2003. The regulation of these advertisements was analyzed using case reports from self-regulatory bodies. The authors independently reviewed this material to investigate: (1) extent of violative advertising; (2) pattern of code breaches; (3) rate at which the system reacted to violative advertising; (4) prevalence of and oversight over claims regarding antidepressant efficacy and disease causality, and (5) costs for manufactures associated with violative advertising. Principal Findings Self-regulatory bodies identified numerous code breaches. Nonetheless, they failed to protect doctors from unreliable information on antidepressants, since as many as 247 of 722 (34%) advertisements breached the industry code. Self-regulatory bodies repeatedly failed to challenge inflated claims of antidepressant efficacy, lending evidence of lax oversight. On average, 15 weeks elapsed between printing and censure of a wrongful claim, and in 25% of cases 47 weeks or more elapsed. Industry paid roughly €108000 in fines for violative advertising, adding an estimated additional average cost of 11% to each purchased violative advertisement, or amounting to as little as 0.009% of total antidepressant sales of around €1.2 billion. Conclusions Lax oversight, combined with lags in the system and low fines for violations, may explain the Swedish system’s failure to pressure companies into providing reliable antidepressants information. If these shortcomings prove to be consistent across self

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Administration Increases Brain Mitochondrial Concentrations and Exerts Neuroprotective Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Russell T.; Yang, Lichuan; Browne, Susan; Baik, Myong; Flint Beal, M.

    1998-07-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor of the electron transport chain as well as a potent free radical scavenger in lipid and mitochondrial membranes. Feeding with coenzyme Q10 increased cerebral cortex concentrations in 12- and 24-month-old rats. In 12-month-old rats administration of coenzyme Q10 resulted in significant increases in cerebral cortex mitochondrial concentrations of coenzyme Q10. Oral administration of coenzyme Q10 markedly attenuated striatal lesions produced by systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid and significantly increased life span in a transgenic mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These results show that oral administration of coenzyme Q10 increases both brain and brain mitochondrial concentrations. They provide further evidence that coenzyme Q10 can exert neuroprotective effects that might be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. [The investment of pharmaceutical industry in hospital clinical research: an estimate for france in 2010].

    PubMed

    Fagnani, Francis

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the investment of pharmaceutical industry in hospital clinical research in France for 2010. The method consisted in combining data extracted from various sources about volumes of patients and unit costs per patient according to phase (I, II and II) and therapeutic domains. The numbers of French patients enrolled were estimated through an extraction of the National Institute of Health (NIH) database. Unit costs per patient were estimated from a sample of 54 clinical studies covering the most frequent combinations of phases and therapeutic domains and documented independently by 5 international companies. We identified 1, 178 clinical studies ongoing in 2010, having included a total of about 73, 000 French patients. Among these studies, 40.3% and 12.8% concerned Onco-Haematology and Rare Diseases respectively. The total annual investment from industry was estimated at 488 million euros, comprising 83.6 M€ of medical honoraria (17%), 73 M€ of hospital extra cost (15%), 99 M€ of drug provision (20%) and 232 M€ of internal cost for french affiliates (48%).

  10. Review of patents and application of spray drying in pharmaceutical, food and flavor industry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavesh B; Patel, Jayvadan K; Chakraborty, Subhashis

    2014-04-01

    Spray drying has always remained an energetic field of innovation in pharmaceutical, food and flavor industry since last couple of decades. The current communication embodies an in-depth application of spray drying in pulmonary drug delivery for production of uniform and respirable size particles suitable for nebulizers, dry powder inhalers (DPI) and pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI). The review also highlights spray drying application in the manufacturing of mucoadhesive formulation suitable for nasal cavities to improve the drug absorption and bioavailability. Recent research works and patents filed by various researchers on spray drying technology for solubility enhancement have also been accentuated. Benefits of spray drying in production of dry flavorings to meet a product with maximum yield and least flavor loss are also discussed. The use of spray drying in production of various food products like milk or soymilk powder, tomato pulp, dry fruit juice etc, and in encapsulation of vegetable oil or fish oil and dry creamer has been discussed. Current review also highlights the application of spray drying in the biotechnology field like production of dry influenza or measles vaccine as well as application in ceramic industry. Spray drying based patents issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in the area of drug delivery have also been included in the current review to emphasize importance of spray drying in the recent research scenario.

  11. Silo Effect a Prominence Factor to Decrease Efficiency of Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Vatanpour, Hossein; Khorramnia, Atoosa; Forutan, Naghmeh

    2013-01-01

    To be sure, all the industries try to be involved in globalization with a constant trend to find out ways to increase productivity across different functions within an organization to maintain competitive advantage world. Pharmaceutical industries are not exceptional and further are based on fragmentation. So these kind of companies need to cope with several barriers such as silo mentality that may affect efficiency of their business activity. Due to eliminate a part of resources such as raw materials, new molecule developed, financial and human resources and so on, companies can gradually loss their competitive potentials in the market and increase their expenses. Furthermore, to avoid any business disturbances in financially connected companies due to silo effect, they should arrange their management to integrated organization form. Otherwise, actions taken by one business member of the chain can influence the profitability of all the other members in the chain. That is why recently supply chain has generated much interest in many business units. In this paper, it has been tried to investigate the different aspects of silo effect which can affect integrate supply chain. Finally, a fluent communication, high level of information exchange, fragmentation management, cross-functional control in a supply chain management format are needed to reduce or control silo effect within entire chain of the holding company by Supply chain management. PMID:24250690

  12. Plasma Coenzyme Q10 Predicts Lipid-lowering Response to High-Dose Atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Pacanowski, Michael A.; Frye, Reginald F.; Enogieru, Osatohanmen; Schofield, Richard S.; Zineh, Issam

    2008-01-01

    Background Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a provitamin synthesized via the HMG-CoA reductase pathway, and thus may serve as a potential marker of intrinsic HMG-CoA reductase activity. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) decrease CoQ10, although it is unclear whether this is due to reductions in lipoproteins, which transport CoQ10. Objectives We evaluated whether baseline plasma CoQ10 concentrations predict the lipid-lowering response to high-dose atorvastatin, and to what extent CoQ10 changes following atorvastatin therapy depend on lipoprotein changes. Methods Individuals without dyslipidemia or known cardiovascular disease (n=84) received atorvastatin 80 mg daily for 16 weeks. Blood samples collected at baseline and after 4, 8, and 16 weeks of treatment were assayed for CoQ10. Results Individuals with higher baseline CoQ10:LDL-C ratios displayed diminished absolute and percent LDL-C reductions at 8 and 16 weeks of atorvastatin treatment (P<0.001 to 0.01). After 16 weeks of atorvastatin, plasma CoQ10 decreased 45% from 762±301 ng/ml to 374±150 ng/ml (P<0.001). CoQ10 changes were correlated with LDL-C and apolipoprotein B changes (r=0.27-0.38, P=0.001-0.02), but remained significant when normalized to all lipoproteins. CoQ10 changes were not associated with adverse drug reactions. Conclusion Baseline CoQ10:LDL-C ratio was associated with the degree of LDL-C response to atorvastatin. Atorvastatin decreased CoQ10 concentrations in a manner that was not completely dependent on lipoprotein changes. The utility of CoQ10 as a predictor of atorvastatin response should be further explored in patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:19649137

  13. Factors affecting the chemical durability of glass used in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Iacocca, Ronald G; Toltl, Nick; Allgeier, M; Bustard, B; Dong, Xia; Foubert, M; Hofer, J; Peoples, S; Shelbourn, T

    2010-09-01

    Delamination, or the generation of glass flakes in vials used to contain parenteral drug products, continues to be a persistent problem in the pharmaceutical industry. To understand all of the factors that might contribute to delamination, a statistical design of experiments was implemented to describe this loss of chemical integrity for glass vials. Phase I of this study focused on the effects of thermal exposure (prior to product filling) on the surface chemistry of glass vials. Even though such temperatures are below the glass transition temperature for the glass, and parenteral compounds are injected directly into the body, data must be collected to show that the glass was not phase separating. Phase II of these studies examined the combined effects of thermal exposure, glass chemistry, and exposure to pharmaceutically relevant molecules on glass delamination. A variety of tools was used to examine the glass and the solution contained in the vial including: scanning electron microscopy and dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy for the glass; and visual examination, pH measurements, laser particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry for the analysis of the solution. The combined results of phase I and II showed depyrogenation does not play a significant role in delamination. Terminal sterilization, glass chemistry, and solution chemistry are the key factors in the generation of glass flakes. Dissolution of silica may be an effective indicator that delamination will occur with a given liquid stored in glass. Finally, delamination should not be defined by the appearance of visible glass particulates. There is a mechanical component in the delamination process whereby the flakes must break away from the interior vial surface. Delamination should be defined by the observation of flakes on the interior surface of the vial, which can be detected by several other analytical techniques.

  14. The impact of TRIPS on innovation and exports: a case study of the pharmaceutical industry in India.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Prabodh

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there is a debate on what impact the implementation of the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) in India would have on its pharmaceutical industry and health care. The debate hinges primarily on two major questions. First, will the new patent regime provide an impetus for innovation in the pharmaceutical industry? Second, how far will India's pharmaceutical exports of copied versions of patented drugs to developing countries be restricted under the new regime? The first question seeks to find out if TRIPS will increase India's innovative capabilities to fill the current vacuum to develop drugs for tropical diseases. The large multinational companies (MNCs) that dominate the global pharmaceutical industry have no interest in commercial ventures that have little potential for great returns on investment. The second question attempts to find a solution to the lack of access to medicine in most developing countries. Indian manufacturers' supply of reverse-engineered drugs, which cost only a fraction of the prices charged by MNCs, may be coming to an end under the new regime. Against this backdrop, this article attempts to analyse the impact of strengthening intellectual property rights in India.

  15. Protective effect of Co-enzyme Q10 On doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy of rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Hou, Chien-Wen; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Pai, Peiying; Liu, Zhao-Rong; Lin, Tze-Yi; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-02-01

    Q10 is a powerful antioxidant often used in medical nutritional supplements for cancer treatment. This study determined whether Q10 could effectively prevent cardio-toxicity caused by doxorubicin treatment. Four week old SD rats were segregated into groups namely control, doxorubicin group (challenged with doxorubicin), Dox + Q10 group (with doxorubicin challenge and oral Q10 treatment), and Q10 group (with oral Q10 treatment). Doxorubicin groups received IP doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) every 3 days and Q10 groups received Q10 (10 mg/kg) every day. Three weeks of doxorubicin challenge caused significant reduction in heart weight, disarray in cardiomyocyte arrangement, elevation of collagen accumulation, enhancement of fibrosis and cell death associated proteins, and inhibition of survival proteins. However, Q10 effectively protected cardiomyocytes and ameliorated fibrosis and cell death induced by doxorubicin. Q10 is, therefore, evidently a potential drug to prevent heart damage caused by doxorubicin. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 679-689, 2017.

  16. The World Health Organization and the Pharmaceutical Industry. Common areas of interest and differing views.

    PubMed

    Hardwicke, Caroline J

    2002-01-01

    No article published in the scientific press in the last 10 years reviews the various areas of interest common to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the pharmaceutical industry. Despite a vast amount of information in the public domain, the policies expound the views only of the bodies they represent rather than comparing differing views. An understanding of the factors which affect the interaction between these organisations as well as the organisational structures and the actual areas of intersecting interest, may help to find ways for the industry to assist the WHO in its endeavours in developing countries. Modern drug development is performed initially in and for western society, leaving the areas of infectious or tropical diseases with relatively less industry investment than cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Aspects of the development of an ethical drug, regardless of its therapeutic class (selection of drug name, intellectual property rights, drug safety, marketing and pricing, quality assurance and counterfeiting, generic use, emerging drug donations) are influenced to varying degrees by the triad of money, politics and medical need and the perspectives (each defensible) placed thereon by the WHO and industry. Instead of simply defending their positions combining the best of these strategies to optimise drug development for the needs of developing countries appears logical. Similarly, via its philanthropic initiatives, industry will have donated over $US1 billion in drug and research aid in the period 1995 to 2005. These charitable projects should yield useful information for planning and organising future aid efforts. Global warming, only recently given serious governmental consideration, is an area not yet addressed in drug development policy although along with geographical effects, it is likely to have an impact on the epidemiology of diseases e.g. malaria returning to the Mediterranean, worldwide. With changing disease patterns (and

  17. Characterisation and Skin Distribution of Lecithin-Based Coenzyme Q10-Loaded Lipid Nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huafeng; Yue, Yang; Liu, Guanlan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Zemin; Duan, Mingxing

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the inner lipid ratio on the physicochemical properties and skin targeting of surfactant-free lecithin-based coenzyme Q10-loaded lipid nanocapsules (CoQ10-LNCs). The smaller particle size of CoQ10-LNCs was achieved by high pressure and a lower ratio of CoQ10/GTCC (Caprylic/capric triglyceride); however, the zeta potential of CoQ10-LNCs was above /- 60 mV/ with no distinct difference among them at different ratios of CoQ10/GTCC. Both the crystallisation point and the index decreased with the decreasing ratio of CoQ10/GTCC and smaller particle size; interestingly, the supercooled state of CoQ10-LNCs was observed at particle size below about 200 nm, as verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in one heating-cooling cycle. The lecithin monolayer sphere structure of CoQ10-LNCs was investigated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The skin penetration results revealed that the distribution of Nile red-loaded CoQ10-LNCs depended on the ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC; moreover, epidermal targeting and superficial dermal targeting were achieved by the CoQ10-LNCs application. The highest fluorescence response was observed at a ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC of 1:1. These observations suggest that lecithin-based LNCs could be used as a promising topical delivery vehicle for lipophilic compounds.

  18. Coenzyme Q10 ameliorates oxidative stress and prevents mitochondrial alteration in ischemic retinal injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Keun-Young; Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Sang Yeop; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species for protecting neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. We tested whether a diet supplemented with CoQ10 ameliorates oxidative stress and mitochondrial alteration, as well as promotes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in ischemic retina induced by intraocular pressure elevation. A CoQ10 significantly promoted RGC survival at 2 weeks after ischemia. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were significantly increased at 12 h after ischemic injury. In contrast, the CoQ10 significantly prevented the upregulation of SOD2 and HO-1 protein expression in ischemic retina. In addition, the CoQ10 significantly blocked activation of astroglial and microglial cells in ischemic retina. Interestingly, the CoQ10 blocked apoptosis by decreasing caspase-3 protein expression in ischemic retina. Bax and phosphorylated Bad (pBad) protein expression were significantly increased in ischemic retina at 12 h. Interestingly, while CoQ10 significantly decreased Bax protein expression in ischemic retina, CoQ10 showed greater increase of pBad protein expression. Of interest, ischemic injury significantly increased mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression in the retina at 12 h, however, CoQ10 significantly preserved Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Interestingly, there were no differences in mitochondrial DNA content among control- or CoQ10-treated groups. Our findings demonstrate that CoQ10 protects RGCs against oxidative stress by modulating the Bax/Bad-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as well as prevents mitochondrial alteration by preserving Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Our results suggest that CoQ10 may provide neuroprotection against oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial alterations in ischemic retinal injury.

  19. The impact of the cox-2 inhibitor issue on perceptions of the pharmaceutical industry: content analysis and communication implications.

    PubMed

    Lofstedt, Ragnar E

    2007-01-01

    The field of risk communication has its roots in the environmental, chemical, space, and nuclear arenas. As a number of these sectors have now vastly improved their communication strategies, attention is being placed on sectors that have been more problematic as of late. Examples of such sectors, include the food industries and the pharmaceutical/health sector. This article focuses on how large, multinational pharmaceutical companies can better communicate risks by analysis of one specific case, namely, that of the Cox-2 controversy.(1) For purposes of this article, risk communication is best described as "the flow of information and risk evaluations back and forth between academic experts, regulatory practitioners, interest groups and the general public," and "big pharma" refers to the more traditional R & D-based, innovative pharmaceutical companies.

  20. Assessment of Food Processing and Pharmaceutical Industrial Wastes as Potential Biosorbents: A Review

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hanan E. M.; El-Sayed, Mayyada M. H.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for the use of low-cost and ecofriendly adsorbents in water/wastewater treatment applications. Conventional adsorbents as well as biosorbents from different natural and agricultural sources have been extensively studied and reviewed. However, there is a lack of reviews on biosorption utilizing industrial wastes, particularly those of food processing and pharmaceuticals. The current review evaluates the potential of these wastes as biosorbents for the removal of some hazardous contaminants. Sources and applications of these biosorbents are presented, while factors affecting biosorption are discussed. Equilibrium, kinetics, and mechanisms of biosorption are also reviewed. In spite of the wide spread application of these biosorbents in the treatment of heavy metals and dyes, more research is required on other classes of pollutants. In addition, further work should be dedicated to studying scaling up of the process and its economic feasibility. More attention should also be given to enhancing mechanical strength, stability, life time, and reproducibility of the biosorbent. Environmental concerns regarding disposal of consumed biosorbents should be addressed by offering feasible biosorbent regeneration or pollutant immobilization options. PMID:25110656

  1. A full-scale biological treatment system application in the treated wastewater of pharmaceutical industrial park.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ge; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Wang, Feifei; Zhang, Xingsong

    2010-08-01

    A full-scale combined biological system is used for the treatment of treated wastewater discharged from a pharmaceutical industrial park. This treated water is rich in NH(4)(+)-N (average in 86.4 mg/L), low in COD/NH(4)(+)-N (average in 3.4) and low in BOD(5)/COD ratio (average in 0.24) with pH varying from 7.16 to 7.78. The final effluent of the combined treatment process was stably below 100mg/L COD and 20mg/L NH(4)(+)-N, separately, with organic loading rate of 4954 kg COD/d and 92.5 kg NH(4)(+)-N/d. It is found that the BOD(5)/COD ratio could be raised from 0.24 to 0.35, and the production of total VFAs account for 9.57% of the total COD via the treatment of hydrolysis/acidification. MBBR and oxidation ditch represent 35.4% and 60.7% of NH(4)(+)-N removal, 30.2% and 61.5% of COD removal, separately, of the total treatment process. PCR-DGGE is used for microbial community analysis of MBBR and oxidation ditch.

  2. Assessment of food processing and pharmaceutical industrial wastes as potential biosorbents: a review.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Hanan E M; El-Sayed, Mayyada M H

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for the use of low-cost and ecofriendly adsorbents in water/wastewater treatment applications. Conventional adsorbents as well as biosorbents from different natural and agricultural sources have been extensively studied and reviewed. However, there is a lack of reviews on biosorption utilizing industrial wastes, particularly those of food processing and pharmaceuticals. The current review evaluates the potential of these wastes as biosorbents for the removal of some hazardous contaminants. Sources and applications of these biosorbents are presented, while factors affecting biosorption are discussed. Equilibrium, kinetics, and mechanisms of biosorption are also reviewed. In spite of the wide spread application of these biosorbents in the treatment of heavy metals and dyes, more research is required on other classes of pollutants. In addition, further work should be dedicated to studying scaling up of the process and its economic feasibility. More attention should also be given to enhancing mechanical strength, stability, life time, and reproducibility of the biosorbent. Environmental concerns regarding disposal of consumed biosorbents should be addressed by offering feasible biosorbent regeneration or pollutant immobilization options.

  3. Animals on drugs: understanding the role of pharmaceutical companies in the animal-industrial complex.

    PubMed

    Twine, Richard

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I revisit previous critiques that I have made of much, though by no means all, bioethical discourse. These pertain to faithfulness to dualistic ontology, a taken-for-granted normative anthropocentrism, and the exclusion of a consideration of how political economy shapes the conditions for bioethical discourse (Twine Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8(3):285-295, 2005; International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food 16(3):1-18, 2007, 2010). Part of my argument around bioethical dualist ontology is to critique the assumption of a division between the "medical" (human) and "agricultural" (nonhuman) and to show various ways in which they are interrelated. I deepen this analysis with a focus on transnational pharmaceutical companies, with specific attention to their role in enhancing agricultural production through animal drug administration. I employ the topical case of antibiotics in order to speak to current debates in not only the interdisciplinary field of bioethics but also that of animal studies. More generally, the animal-industrial complex (Twine Journal for Critical Animal Studies 10(1):12-39, 2012) is underlined as a highly relevant bioethical object that deserves more conceptual and empirical attention.

  4. Impact of Corporate Governance on Research and Development Investment in the Pharmaceutical Industry in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of the corporate governance of pharmaceutical companies on research and development (R&D) investment. Methods The period of the empirical analysis is from 2000 to 2012. Financial statements and comments in general, and internal transactions were extracted from TS-2000 of the Korea Listed Company Association. Sample firms were those that belong to the medical substance and drug manufacturing industries. Ultimately, 786 firm-year data of 81 firms were included in the sample (unbalanced panel data). Results The shareholding ratio of major shareholders and foreigners turned out to have a statistically significant influence on R&D investment (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found in the shareholding ratio of institutional investors and the ratio of outside directors. Conclusion The higher the shareholding ratio of the major shareholders, the greater the R&D investment. There will be a need to establish (or switch to) a holding company structure. Holding companies can directly manage R&D in fields with high initial risks, and they can diversify these risks. The larger the number of foreign investors, the greater the R&D investment, indicating that foreigners directly or indirectly impose pressure on a manager to make R&D investments that bring long-term benefits. PMID:26473092

  5. [Coenzyme Q10--its importance, properties and use in nutrition and cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Hojerová, J

    2000-05-01

    Coenzyme Q10, or ubiquinone, is a nutrient--a vitamin-like substance which plays a crucial role in the generation of cellular energy an in free radical scavenging in the human body. After the age of 35 to 40, the organism begins to lose its ability to synthesize Co Q10 from food and its deficiency develops. Ageing, poor eating habits, stress and infection--they all affect our ability to provide adequate amounts of Co Q10. Therefore Co Q10 supplementation may be very helpful for the organism. The present summarizing study reports the history of the discovery and research, properties, biochemical effects, dosage of Co Q10 deficiency in the human body. A possible use of Co Q10 as a dietary supplement and an ingredient for topical cosmetic products is described.

  6. Coenzyme Q(10): a novel therapeutic approach for Fibromyalgia? case series with 5 patients.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; de Miguel, Manuel; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Luque, Carlos M; Fernández-Riejo, Patricia; Fernández, Ana María Moreno; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio

    2011-07-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant. Low CoQ(10) levels have been detected in patients with Fibromyalgia (FM). The purpose of the present work was to assess the effect of CoQ(10) on symptoms of five patients with FM. Patients were evaluated clinically with Visual Analogical Scale of pain (VAS), and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Patients with CoQ(10) deficiency showed a statistically significant reduction on symptoms after CoQ(10) treatment during 9 months (300 mg/day). Determination of deficiency and consequent supplementation in FM may result in clinical improvement. Further analysis involving more scientifically rigorous methodology will be required to confirm this observation.

  7. Could the Pharmaceutical Industry Benefit from Full-Scale Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Technology with New Regulations?

    PubMed

    Coustasse, Alberto; Kimble, Craig A; Stanton, Robert B; Naylor, Mariah

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare regulators are directing attention to the pharmaceutical supply chain with the passage of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) and the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has the ability to improve compliance, reduce costs, and improve safety in the supply chain but its implementation has been limited; primarily because of hardware and tag costs. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the benefits to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system of the adoption of RFID technology as a result of newly implemented supply chain regulations. The methodology was a review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 96 sources used. With the DSCSA, pharmaceutical companies must track and trace prescription drugs across the supply chain, and RFID can resolve many track-and-trace issues with manufacturer control of data. The practical implication of this study is that pharmaceutical companies must continue to have the potential to increase revenues, decrease associated costs, and increase compliance with new FDA regulations with RFID. Still, challenges related to regulatory statute wording, implementation of two-dimensional barcode technology, and the variety of interfaces within the pharmaceutical supply chain have delayed adoption and its full implementation.

  8. Could the Pharmaceutical Industry Benefit from Full-Scale Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Technology with New Regulations?

    PubMed Central

    Coustasse, Alberto; Kimble, Craig A.; Stanton, Robert B.; Naylor, Mariah

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare regulators are directing attention to the pharmaceutical supply chain with the passage of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) and the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has the ability to improve compliance, reduce costs, and improve safety in the supply chain but its implementation has been limited; primarily because of hardware and tag costs. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the benefits to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system of the adoption of RFID technology as a result of newly implemented supply chain regulations. The methodology was a review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 96 sources used. With the DSCSA, pharmaceutical companies must track and trace prescription drugs across the supply chain, and RFID can resolve many track-and-trace issues with manufacturer control of data. The practical implication of this study is that pharmaceutical companies must continue to have the potential to increase revenues, decrease associated costs, and increase compliance with new FDA regulations with RFID. Still, challenges related to regulatory statute wording, implementation of two-dimensional barcode technology, and the variety of interfaces within the pharmaceutical supply chain have delayed adoption and its full implementation. PMID:27843419

  9. Preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and simulation in the pharmaceutical industry: an IQ consortium survey examining the current landscape.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Edgar; Bohnert, Tonika; Chakravarty, Arijit; Damian-Iordache, Valeriu; Gibson, Christopher; Hsu, Cheng-Pang; Heimbach, Tycho; Krishnatry, Anu Shilpa; Liederer, Bianca M; Lin, Jing; Maurer, Tristan; Mettetal, Jerome T; Mudra, Daniel R; Nijsen, Marjoleen Jma; Raybon, Joseph; Schroeder, Patricia; Schuck, Virna; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Su, Yaming; Trapa, Patrick; Tsai, Alice; Vakilynejad, Majid; Wang, Shining; Wong, Harvey

    2015-03-01

    The application of modeling and simulation techniques is increasingly common in preclinical stages of the drug discovery and development process. A survey focusing on preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) analysis was conducted across pharmaceutical companies that are members of the International Consortium for Quality and Innovation in Pharmaceutical Development. Based on survey responses, ~68% of companies use preclinical PK/PD analysis in all therapeutic areas indicating its broad application. An important goal of preclinical PK/PD analysis in all pharmaceutical companies is for the selection/optimization of doses and/or dose regimens, including prediction of human efficacious doses. Oncology was the therapeutic area with the most PK/PD analysis support and where it showed the most impact. Consistent use of more complex systems pharmacology models and hybrid physiologically based pharmacokinetic models with PK/PD components was less common compared to traditional PK/PD models. Preclinical PK/PD analysis is increasingly being included in regulatory submissions with ~73% of companies including these data to some degree. Most companies (~86%) have seen impact of preclinical PK/PD analyses in drug development. Finally, ~59% of pharmaceutical companies have plans to expand their PK/PD modeling groups over the next 2 years indicating continued growth. The growth of preclinical PK/PD modeling groups in pharmaceutical industry is necessary to establish required resources and skills to further expand use of preclinical PK/PD modeling in a meaningful and impactful manner.

  10. Container Closure Integrity Testing - Practical Aspects and Approaches in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Helen; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Mellman, James; Nieto, Alejandra; Wagner, Daniel; Schaar, Matthias; Mathaes, Roman; Kossinna, Juergen; Schmitting, Franz; Dreher, Sascha; Roehl, Holger; Hemminger, Markus; Wuchner, Klaus

    2016-10-27

    The assurance of sterility of a parenteral drug product, prior to any human use, is a regulatory requirement. Hence, all strategies related to container closure integrity (CCI) must demonstrate absence of microbial contamination through leaks as part of the container closure system (CCS) qualification, during manufacturing, for Quality Control purposes and to ensure microbiological integrity (sterility) during storage and shipment up to the end of product shelf life. Current regulatory guidances, which differ between countries and regions, provide limited detail on how to assess CCI. The new revision of USP <1207> aims to provide extensive and detailed guidance for CCI assessments for sterile products. However, practical questions and considerations are yet to be addressed by the pharmaceutical industry. These may include: (i) choice of method, e.g., whether a deterministic CCI method (e.g., helium leak) is preferable over probabilistic CCI method (e.g., microbial ingress), (ii) the type of primary packaging (e.g., vial, syringe, device) and (iii) dosage form (e.g., liquid vs lyophilisate), (iv) suitable acceptance criteria and (v) appropriate sample size, (vi) the most appropriate way to introduce artificial leaks into the CCS, (vii) ensure suitable assurance of CCI during Drug Product manufacturing, (viii) evaluate CCI under intended shipment and storage conditions (e.g., in the frozen state). A group of European industry peers have met to discuss these and other related questions in order to provide their viewpoint and best-practice on practical approaches to CCI. Their perspective is provided in this white paper. Through these discussions, it became clear that there is currently no gold standard for CCI test methods or for the generation of artificial leaks; therefore flexibility towards CCI approaches is required. Although there should be flexibility, any CCI approach must consider the intended use (e.g., CCS qualification, routine manufacturing, or Quality

  11. Combination therapy with metformin and coenzyme Q10 in murine experimental autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jhun, JooYeon; Lee, SeungHoon; Kim, Se-Young; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Park, Sung Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-01-01

    Metformin (Met) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) are reported to have therapeutic functions in several inflammatory diseases. These drugs have shown anti-inflammatory effects and have been utilized in mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, there is no evidence of the additive effect of Met and CoQ10 in RA. Although Met and CoQ10 may be involved in the improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, limited information is available regarding whether this effect can improve mitochondrial dysfunction in RA in particular. In this study, we sought to determine whether Met and CoQ10 attenuate the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and show an additive effect in a mouse model. The combination of Met and CoQ10 improved CIA, reducing joint inflammation, Th17 differentiation and IgG production. In contrast, the combination of Met and CoQ10 induced Treg differentiation. Osteoclastogenesis was reduced by the combination of Met and CoQ10. The protein expression of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice splenocytes exposed to lipopolysaccharide decreased after drug combination therapy. We also found that the expression of JC-1 and COX IV were enhanced by treatment with the combination of Met and CoQ10. Moreover, the combination of Met and CoQ10 promoted mitochondrial O2 consumption. These findings suggest that the combination of Met and CoQ10 reduced CIA severity, improving mitochondrial dysfunction compared to Met or CoQ10 alone. These results present a novel, significant preventive targets in RA and may enhance our understanding of its pathogenesis.

  12. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

  13. Physical activity affects plasma coenzyme Q10 levels differently in young and old humans.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesús; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabet; Ballesteros-Simarro, Manuel; Navas-Enamorado, Ignacio; Tung, Bui Thanh; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is a key lipidic compound for cell bioenergetics and membrane antioxidant activities. It has been shown that also has a central role in the prevention of oxidation of plasma lipoproteins. Q has been associated with the prevention of cholesterol oxidation and several aging-related diseases. However, to date no clear data on the levels of plasma Q during aging are available. We have measured the levels of plasmatic Q10 and cholesterol in young and old individuals showing different degrees of physical activity. Our results indicate that plasma Q10 levels in old people are higher that the levels found in young people. Our analysis also indicates that there is no a relationship between the degree of physical activity and Q10 levels when the general population is studied. However, very interestingly, we have found a different tendency between Q10 levels and physical activity depending on the age of individuals. In young people, higher activity correlates with lower Q10 levels in plasma whereas in older adults this ratio changes and higher activity is related to higher plasma Q10 levels and higher Q10/Chol ratios. Higher Q10 levels in plasma are related to lower lipoperoxidation and oxidized LDL levels in elderly people. Our results highlight the importance of life habits in the analysis of Q10 in plasma and indicate that the practice of physical activity at old age can improve antioxidant capacity in plasma and help to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  14. CoenzymeQ10 localizations in model membranes. A Langmuir monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Nerdal, Willy; Nilsen, Torill Regine Sandvik; Steinkopf, Signe

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in a monolayer of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glysero-3-phospho-L-choline (DPPC), in a monolayer of 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glysero-3-phospho-L-choline (DEPC), in a monolayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glysero-3-phospho-L-serine (POPS) and in a monolayer of total lipid extract from pig brain (PB) has been investigated by using the Langmuir monolayer technique. Surface pressure (π)-mean molecular area (mma) isotherms have been measured for pure lipid monolayers and lipid monolayers with 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mol% CoQ10 concentrations. At the biological concentration (1.0-3.0 mol%) of CoQ10, intercalation of CoQ10 occurs in the lipid acyl chains of DPPC, POPS and PB monolayers. Above the biological concentration of CoQ10, the CoQ10 molecule induces domain formation in the monolayers of DPPC, POPS and PB lipids. The DEPC monolayer behavior deviates from the other lipids in this study. At 2.0 mol% the CoQ10 promotes very dense lipid packing, and the CoQ10 molecule is located parallel to the DEPC acyl chains at all concentrations.

  15. Investigation of Risk Factors of Work-Related Upper-Limb Musculoskeletal Disorders in a Pharmaceutical Industry or Research Article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmahabadian, Mohammad; Akhavan, Mehdi; Azam, Kamal

    This study was performed among workers of an Iranian pharmaceutical industry with the aiming to determine WRMDs prevalence and exposure assessment of WRMDs risks. In this cross-sectional study, 84 female and male workers randomly selected from five packing operations. Modified Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was applied to study the prevalence of WRMDs and Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) method was used for the evaluation of the exposure to risk factors associated with work-related upper limb disorders. Results showed a significant association exists between neck, lower arm and A scores group with those obtained by self-reported pain (p<0.01). Similar RULA grand scores of 3 and 4 and action level of 2 were found for workers in five packing operations. Also, the results of this study revealed that RULA method is a fairly suitable tool for the evaluation of WRMDs among packing workers in pharmaceutical industry.

  16. Challenges and solutions for clinical development of new antibacterial agents: results of a survey among pharmaceutical industry professionals.

    PubMed

    Bettiol, Esther; Wetherington, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Nicola; Harbarth, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    As the number of antibacterial medicines in the pipeline remains low, we anonymously surveyed pharmaceutical industry professionals on challenges and solutions for clinical development of these agents. Challenges were reported primarily as financial and regulatory. For multidrug-resistant organisms, there are needs for rapid diagnostic tests, new regulatory guidance, and adaptation of endpoints/trial designs. Regulators and public/private initiatives are addressing these challenges to help ensure that proposed solutions have the support of all involved stakeholders.

  17. Impact of a heterogeneous liquid droplet on a dry surface: application to the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Bolleddula, D A; Berchielli, A; Aliseda, A

    2010-09-15

    Droplet impact has been studied for over a hundred years dating back to the pioneering work of Worthington. In fact, much of his ingenuity contributed to modern day high speed photography. Over the past 40 years significant contributions in theoretical, numerical, and experimental work have been made. Droplet impact is a problem of fundamental importance due to the wealth of applications involved, namely, spray coating, spray painting, delivery of agricultural chemicals, spray cooling, inkjet printing, soil erosion due to rain drop impact, and turbine wear. Here we highlight one specific application, spray coating. Although most studies have focused their efforts on low viscosity Newtonian fluids, many industrial applications such as spray coating utilize more viscous and complex rheology liquids. Determining dominant effects and quantifying their behavior for colloidal suspensions and polymer solutions remains a challenge and thus has eluded much effort. In the last decade, it has been shown that introducing polymers to Newtonian solutions inhibits the rebounding of a drop upon impact, Bergeron et al. Furthermore Bartolo et al. concluded that the normal stress component of the elongational viscosity was responsible for the rebounding inhibition of polymer based non-Newtonian solutions. We aim to uncover the drop impact dynamics of highly viscous Newtonian and complex rheology liquids used in pharmaceutical coating processes. The generation and impact of drops of mm and microm size drops of coating liquids and glycerol/water mixtures on tablet surfaces are systematically studied over a range of We approximately O(1-300), Oh approximately O(10(-2)-1), and Re approximately O(1-700). We extend the range of Oh to values above 1, which are not available to previous studies of droplet impacts. Outcomes reveal that splashing and rebounding are completely inhibited and the role of wettability is negligible in the early stages of impact. The maximum spreading diameter of

  18. Peptide Therapeutics and the Pharmaceutical Industry: Barriers Encountered Translating from the Laboratory to Patients.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, John; Nagaraj, Hema; McCloskey, Alice P; Huwaitat, Rawan; Porter, Simon; Albadr, Alyaa; Laverty, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are receiving increasing interest as clinical therapeutics. These highly tunable molecules can be tailored to achieve desirable biocompatibility and biodegradability with simultaneously selective and potent therapeutic effects. Despite challenges regarding up-scaling and licensing of peptide products, their vast clinical potential is reflected in the 60 plus peptide-based therapeutics already on the market, and the further 500 derivatives currently in developmental stages. Peptides are proving effective for a multitude of disease states including: type 2 diabetes (controlled using the licensed glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor liraglutide); irritable bowel syndrome managed with linaclotide (currently at approval stages); acromegaly (treated with octapeptide somatostatin analogues lanreotide and octreotide); selective or broad spectrum microbicidal agents such as the Gram-positive selective PTP-7 and antifungal heliomicin; anticancer agents including goserelin used as either adjuvant or monotherapy for prostate and breast cancer, and the first marketed peptide derived vaccine against prostate cancer, sipuleucel-T. Research is also focusing on improving the biostability of peptides. This is achieved through a number of mechanisms ranging from replacement of naturally occurring L-amino acid enantiomers with D-amino acid forms, lipidation, peptidomimetics, N-methylation, cyclization and exploitation of carrier systems. The development of self-assembling peptides are paving the way for sustained release peptide formulations and already two such licensed examples exist, lanreotide and octreotide. The versatility and tunability of peptide-based products is resulting in increased translation of peptide therapies, however significant challenges remain with regard to their wider implementation. This review highlights some of the notable peptide therapeutics discovered to date and the difficulties encountered by the pharmaceutical industry in translating these

  19. Coenzyme Q10 counteracts testicular injury induced by sodium arsenite in rats.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Al-Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Yacoubi, Mohamed T

    2011-03-25

    The protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against testicular toxicity induced by sodium arsenite (10mg/kg/day, orally for two consecutive days) was investigated in rats. Coenzyme Q10 treatment (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for five consecutive days, starting three days before arsenite administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased serum testosterone level which was reduced by sodium arsenite. Coenzyme Q10 significantly suppressed lipid peroxidation, restored the depleted antioxidant defenses, and attenuated the increases of tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide resulted from arsenic administration. Also, the elevation of arsenic ion, and the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in testicular tissue were mitigated by coenzyme Q10. Histopathological examination showed that testicular injury mediated by arsenic was ameliorated by coenzyme Q10 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the arsenic-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, Fas ligand and caspase-3 in testicular tissue. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 represents a potential therapeutic option to protect the testicular tissue from the detrimental effects of arsenic intoxication.

  20. Coenzyme Q10 prevents high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sekizaki, Naoto; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2007-07-02

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. Although some clinical evidences suggest the use of an antioxidant reagent coenzyme Q10 in diabetes with hypertension, the direct effect of coenzyme Q10 on the endothelial functions has not been examined. In the present study, we therefore investigated the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) exhibited abnormal properties, including the morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, activation of protein kinase Cbeta2, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibited these changes in HUVEC under high glucose condition. In addition, coenzyme Q10 inhibited high glucose-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an endogenous caspase-3 substrate. These results suggest that coenzyme Q10 prevents reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. Moreover, consistent with previous reports, high glucose caused upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and promoted the adhesion of U937 monocytic cells. Coenzyme Q10 displayed potent inhibitory effects against these endothelial abnormalities. Thus, we provide the first evidence that coenzyme Q10 has a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

  1. ADCK4 mutations promote steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome through CoQ10 biosynthesis disruption

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Shazia; Gee, Heon Yung; Woerner, Stephanie; Xie, Letian X.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Lovric, Svjetlana; Fang, Humphrey; Song, Xuewen; Cattran, Daniel C.; Avila-Casado, Carmen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Nitschké, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Cochat, Pierre; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Haberberger, Birgit; Allen, Susan J.; Zhou, Weibin; Airik, Rannar; Otto, Edgar A.; Barua, Moumita; Al-Hamed, Mohamed H.; Kari, Jameela A.; Evans, Jonathan; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Saleem, Moin A.; Böckenhauer, Detlef; Kleta, Robert; El Desoky, Sherif; Hacihamdioglu, Duygu O.; Gok, Faysal; Washburn, Joseph; Wiggins, Roger C.; Choi, Murim; Lifton, Richard P.; Levy, Shawn; Han, Zhe; Salviati, Leonardo; Prokisch, Holger; Williams, David S.; Pollak, Martin; Clarke, Catherine F.; Pei, York; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Identification of single-gene causes of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) has furthered the understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, using a combination of homozygosity mapping and whole human exome resequencing, we identified mutations in the aarF domain containing kinase 4 (ADCK4) gene in 15 individuals with SRNS from 8 unrelated families. ADCK4 was highly similar to ADCK3, which has been shown to participate in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis. Mutations in ADCK4 resulted in reduced CoQ10 levels and reduced mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activity in cells isolated from individuals with SRNS and transformed lymphoblasts. Knockdown of adck4 in zebrafish and Drosophila recapitulated nephrotic syndrome-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, ADCK4 was expressed in glomerular podocytes and partially localized to podocyte mitochondria and foot processes in rat kidneys and cultured human podocytes. In human podocytes, ADCK4 interacted with members of the CoQ10 biosynthesis pathway, including COQ6, which has been linked with SRNS and COQ7. Knockdown of ADCK4 in podocytes resulted in decreased migration, which was reversed by CoQ10 addition. Interestingly, a patient with SRNS with a homozygous ADCK4 frameshift mutation had partial remission following CoQ10 treatment. These data indicate that individuals with SRNS with mutations in ADCK4 or other genes that participate in CoQ10 biosynthesis may be treatable with CoQ10. PMID:24270420

  2. Novel marine actinobacteria from emerald Andaman & Nicobar Islands: a prospective source for industrial and pharmaceutical byproducts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Andaman and Nicobar Islands situated in the eastern part of Bay of Bengal are one of the distinguished biodiversity hotspot. Even though number of studies carried out on the marine flora and fauna, the studies on actinobacteria from Andaman and Nicobar Islands are meager. The aim of the present study was to screen the actinobacteria for their characterization and identify the potential sources for industrial and pharmaceutical byproducts. Results A total of 26 actinobacterial strains were isolated from the marine sediments collected from various sites of Port Blair Bay where no collection has been characterized previously. Isolates were categorized under the genera: Saccharopolyspora, Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Streptoverticillium, Microtetraspora, Actinopolyspora, Actinokineospora and Dactylosporangium. Majority of the isolates were found to produce industrially important enzymes such as amylase, protease, gelatinase, lipase, DNase, cellulase, urease and phosphatase, and also exhibited substantial antibacterial activity against human pathogens. 77% of isolates exhibited significant hemolytic activity. Among 26 isolates, three strains (NIOT-VKKMA02, NIOT-VKKMA22 and NIOT-VKKMA26) were found to generate appreciable extent of surfactant, amylase, cellulase and protease enzyme. NIOT-VKKMA02 produced surfactant using kerosene as carbon source and emulsified upto E24–63.6%. Moreover, NIOT-VKKMA02, NIOT-VKKMA22 and NIOT-VKKMA26 synthesized 13.27 U/ml, 9.85 U/ml and 8.03 U/ml amylase; 7.75 U/ml, 5.01 U/ml and 2.08 U/ml of cellulase and 11.34 U/ml, 6.89 U/ml and 3.51 U/ml of protease enzyme, respectively. Conclusions High diversity of marine actinobacteria was isolated and characterized in this work including undescribed species and species not previously reported from emerald Andaman and Nicobar Islands, including Streptomyces griseus, Streptomyces venezuelae and Saccharopolyspora salina. The enhanced salt, pH and temperature tolerance of the actinobacterial

  3. Ultra-small NLC for improved dermal delivery of coenyzme Q10.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Julia C; Baisaeng, Nuttakorn; Hoppel, Magdalena; Löw, Monika; Keck, Cornelia M; Valenta, Claudia

    2013-04-15

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts as an antioxidant in the skin and is frequently contained in anti-aging products. In previous studies, it could be shown that nano-structured lipid carriers (NLC) with a size of about 230 nm are beneficial for the dermal delivery of CoQ10. They increased Q10 skin penetration when compared to equally sized nanoemulsion. In this study, ultra-small NLC were prepared with even smaller mean particles sizes of around 80 nm. The influence of this decrease of particle size was investigated in terms of skin permeation and penetration as well as physicochemical stability of the NLC. Improved dermal delivery of CoQ10 by ultra-small NLC could be achieved.

  4. 76 FR 75551 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Regulatory Classification of Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with a neutral guest compound co-former, have been the focus of significant... guest compound conformer in the crystal lattice. Similarly, unlike salts, where the components in...

  5. 77 FR 60124 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Drug Master Files Under the Generic Drug User Fee... Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA), holders of certain drug master files, namely, Type II active...

  6. Coenzyme Q10 Status as a Determinant of Muscular Strength in Two Independent Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Alexandra; Onur, Simone; Niklowitz, Petra; Menke, Thomas; Laudes, Matthias; Rimbach, Gerald; Döring, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with sarcopenia, which is a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is involved in several important functions that are related to bioenergetics and protection against oxidative damage; however, the role of CoQ10 as a determinant of muscular strength is not well documented. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the determinants of muscular strength by examining hand grip force in relation to CoQ10 status, gender, age and body mass index (BMI) in two independent cohorts (n = 334, n = 967). Furthermore, peak flow as a function of respiratory muscle force was assessed. Spearman’s correlation revealed a significant positive association between CoQ10/cholesterol level and hand grip in the basic study population (p<0.01) as well as in the validation population (p<0.001). In the latter, we also found a negative correlation with the CoQ10 redox state (p<0.01), which represents a lower percentage of the reduced form of CoQ10 (ubiquinol) in subjects who exhibit a lower muscular strength. Furthermore, the age of the subjects showed a negative correlation with hand grip (p<0.001), whereas BMI was positively correlated with hand grip (p<0.01), although only in the normal weight subgroup (BMI <25 kg/m2). Analysis of the covariance (ANCOVA) with hand grip as the dependent variable revealed CoQ10/cholesterol as a determinant of muscular strength and gender as the strongest effector of hand grip. In conclusion, our data suggest that both a low CoQ10/cholesterol level and a low percentage of the reduced form of CoQ10 could be an indicator of an increased risk of sarcopenia in humans due to their negative associations to upper body muscle strength, peak flow and muscle mass. PMID:27907044

  7. Coenzyme Q10 suppresses Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation and ameliorates experimental autoimmune arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Jhun, JooYeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Byun, Jae-Kyeong; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Jennifer; Jung, Young-Ok; Shin, Dongyun; Park, Sung Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant synthesized in human body. This enzyme promotes immune system function and can be used as a dietary supplement. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease leading to chronic joint inflammation. RA results in severe destruction of cartilage and disability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CoQ10 on inflammation and Th17 cell proliferation on an experimental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) mice model. CoQ10 or cotton seed oil as control was orally administrated once a day for seven weeks to mice with zymosan-induced arthritis (ZIA). Histological analysis of the joints was conducted using immunohistochemistry. Germinal center (GC) B cells, Th17 cells and Treg cells of the spleen tissue were examined by confocal microscopy staining. mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR and protein levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Flow cytometric analysis (FACS) was used to evaluate Th17 cells and Treg cells. CoQ10 mitigated the severity of ZIA and decreased serum immunoglobulin concentrations. CoQ10 also reduced RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, inflammatory mediators and oxidant factors. Th17/Treg axis was reciprocally controlled by CoQ10 treatment. Moreover, CoQ10 treatment on normal mouse and human cells cultured in Th17 conditions decreased the number of Th17 cells and enhanced the number of Treg cells. CoQ10 alleviates arthritis in mice with ZIA declining inflammation, Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that CoQ10 can be a potential therapeutic substance for RA.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 and Heart Failure: A State-of-the-Art Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhinav; Fonarow, Gregg C; Butler, Javed; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Felker, G Michael

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) with either preserved or reduced ejection fraction is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Evidence-based therapies are often limited by tolerability, hypotension, electrolyte disturbances, and renal dysfunction. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) may represent a safe therapeutic option for patients with HF. CoQ10 is a highly lipophilic molecule with a chemical structure similar to vitamin K. Although being a common component of cellular membranes, CoQ10's most prominent role is to facilitate the production of adenosine triphosphate in the mitochondria by participating in redox reactions within the electron transport chain. Numerous trials during the past 30 years examining CoQ10 in patients with HF have been limited by small numbers and lack of contemporary HF therapies. The recent publication of the Q-SYMBIO randomized controlled trial demonstrated a reduction in major adverse cardiovascular events with CoQ10 supplementation in a contemporary HF population. Although having limitations, this study has renewed interest in evaluating CoQ10 supplementation in patients with HF. Current literature suggests that CoQ10 is relatively safe with few drug interactions and side effects. Furthermore, it is already widely available as an over-the-counter supplement. These findings warrant future adequately powered randomized controlled trials of CoQ10 supplementation in patients with HF. This state-of-the-art review summarizes the literature about the mechanisms, clinical data, and safety profile of CoQ10 supplementation in patients with HF.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 attenuated DMH-induced precancerous lesions in SD rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Mi; Park, Eunju

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is known to be a compound with mitochondrial bioenergetic functions and antioxidant activity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CoQ10 on the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), DMH-induced leukocytic DNA damage and gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by real-time PCR in colonic mucosa of male SD rats. The animals were divided into three groups and fed a casein-based high-fat and low fiber diet (100 g lard+20 g cellulose/kg diet) with or without CoQ10 (0.4 mg in soybean oil/kg BW/d, i.p.). One week after beginning the diets, the rats were subjected to 6 wk of treatment with DMH (30 mg/kg/wk, s.c.) and CoQ10 treatments continued over the entirety of the experimental period (59 d). Administration of CoQ10 resulted in reduction of ACF numbers, to 20% of the carcinogen control value. CoQ10 supplementation induced an antigenotoxic effect on DMH-induced DNA damage in the blood cells. Colonic mucosa of DMH-injected rats had significantly greater COX-2 and iNOS gene expression than those of control rats, while treatment with CoQ10 induced an inhibitory effect on over-expression of COX-2 and iNOS in colon tumors. Our results provide evidence that CoQ10 has a protective effect on the process of colon carcinogenesis, suppressing the development of preneoplastic lesions, possibly by modulating COX-2 and iNOS gene expression in colonic mucosa and DNA damage in leukocytes, suggesting that CoQ10 has chemotherapeutic activity.

  10. The politics and strategy of industry self-regulation: the pharmaceutical industry's principles for ethical direct-to-consumer advertising as a deceptive blocking strategy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Denis G; Oakley, James L

    2013-06-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry lobbies European regulators to permit direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs in the European Union, we found that five leading companies violated industry-developed and -promulgated standards for ethical advertising in the United States. Utilizing multiple data sources and methods, we demonstrate a consistent failure by companies that market erectile dysfunction drugs to comply with the industry's guiding principles for ethical DTCA over a four-year period despite pledges of compliance by company leaders. Noncompliance resulted in children being exposed to sexually themed promotional messages more than 100 billion times. We argue that the guidelines are a coordinated effort by the industry to prevent unwanted federal regulation, and we introduce the concept of a blocking strategy to explain company behavior and to advance theoretical understanding of firms' public affairs strategies. We recommend policy responses to prevent deceptive practices, protect children from adult content, and promote genuine health care education.

  11. A lesson from Japan: research and development efficiency is a key element of pharmaceutical industry consolidation process.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Hirohisa; Masuda, Sachiko; Kimura, Hiromichi

    2014-02-01

    Scholarly attention to pharmaceutical companies' ability to sustain research and development (R&D) productivity has increased as they increasingly handle business challenges. Furthermore, the deterioration of R&D productivity has long been considered a major cause of mergers and acquisitions (M&As). This study attempts to investigate quantitatively the possible causes of the deterioration and the relationship between the deterioration and M&As by examining the Japanese pharmaceutical industry. Japan from 1980 to 1997 is an ideal case because of the availability of official data, but more importantly the significant changes in its business environment at the time. Using the Malmquist Index and data envelopment analysis, we measured the deterioration of R&D productivity from 1980 to 1997 based on a sample of 15 Japanese companies. Two lessons can be learned from Japan's case. First, to sustain R&D productivity over the long term, companies should use licensing activities and focus on the dominant therapeutic franchises. Second, if a company fails significantly to catch up with the benchmark, it is likely to pursue an M&A or seek an alternative way to improve R&D productivity. These findings appear similar to the current situation of the global pharmaceutical industry, although Japan pursued more licensing activities than M&A to improve R&D productivity.

  12. Toxicity evaluation of wastewater collected at different treatment stages from a pharmaceutical industrial park wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Qin, Zhe; Zhao, Zhongqing; Zhao, Chunxia; Liang, Shuxuan

    2016-09-01

    The toxicity of water-receiving bodies, the effluent and other treatment stages in wastewater treatment plants has recently been of interest to the public due to the lack of a regulated toxicity-based index for wastewater discharge in China. This study aimed to evaluate the conventional pollution parameters and toxicities of wastewaters collected at different treatment stages from a pharmaceutical industrial park wastewater treatment plant through dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio qinghaiensis) tests. The results of an analysis of conventional parameters indicated that the total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), ammonia nitrogen (NH3N), and total phosphorus (TP) were largely removed after various treatments. However, the TN, NH3N and COD still exceeded the regulated standards. The tested pharmaceutical park effluents were mainly polluted with organic pollutants and nitrogenous. The toxicity test results indicated that the toxicities could be markedly reduced after treatment, with the toxicities of two out of the six effluent samples at different treatment stages being greater than the influent toxicity. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated a significantly positive correlation between the toxicity values obtained using the DHA and Vibrio qinghaiensis tests. Compared with the DHA measurement, the Vibrio qinghaiensis test was faster and more sensitive. Meanwhile, the toxicity indicators were significantly and positively correlated with the TSS, TN, TP and COD concentrations. These results may aid the understanding of the toxicity of pharmaceutical industrial park wastewaters and toxicity removal using the treatment techniques that are currently utilized in China.

  13. A Randomized Trial of Coenzyme Q10 in Patients with Confirmed Statin Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Beth A.; Lorson, Lindsay; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation is the most popular therapy for statin myalgia among both physicians and patients despite limited and conflicting evidence of its efficacy. Objective This study examined the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on simvastatin-associated muscle pain, muscle strength and aerobic performance in patients with confirmed statin myalgia. Methods Statin myalgia was confirmed in 120 patients with prior symptoms of statin myalgia using an 8-week randomized, double-blind crossover trial of simvastatin 20 mg/d and placebo. Forty-one subjects developed muscle pain with simvastatin but not with placebo and were randomized to simvastatin 20 mg/d combined with CoQ10 (600 mg/d ubiquinol) or placebo for 8 weeks. Muscle pain (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), time to pain onset, arm and leg muscle strength, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were measured before and after each treatment. Results Serum CoQ10 increased from 1.3±0.4 to 5.2±2.3 mcg/mL with simvastatin and CoQ10, but did not increase with simvastatin and placebo (1.3±0.3 to 0.8±0.2) (p<0.05). BPI pain severity and interference scores increased with simvastatin therapy (both p<0.01), irrespective of CoQ10 assignment (p=0.53 and 0.56). There were no changes in muscle strength or VO2max with simvastatin with or without CoQ10 (all p>0.10). Marginally more subjects reported pain with CoQ10 (14 of 20 vs 7 of 18; p=0.05). There was no difference in time to pain onset in the CoQ10 (3.0±2.0 weeks) vs. placebo (2.4±2.1 wks) groups (p=0.55). A similar lack of CoQ10 effect was observed in 24 subjects who were then crossed over to the alternative treatment. Conclusions Only 36% of patients complaining of statin myalgia develop symptoms during a randomized, double-blind crossover of statin vs placebo. CoQ10 supplementation does not reduce muscle pain in patients with statin myalgia. Trial Registration NCT01140308; www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:25545331

  14. Validated electrochemical and chromatographic quantifications of some antibiotic residues in pharmaceutical industrial waste water.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Heba K; Abdel-Moety, Mona M; Abdel-Gawad, Sherif A; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Kawy, Mohamed Abdel

    2017-01-14

    Realistic implementation of ion selective electrodes (ISEs) into environmental monitoring programs has always been a challenging task. This could be largely attributed to difficulties in validation of ISE assay results. In this study, the electrochemical response of amoxicillin trihydrate (AMX), ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CPLX), trimethoprim (TMP), and norfloxacin (NFLX) was studied by the fabrication of sensitive membrane electrodes belonging to two types of ISEs, which are polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane electrodes and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Linear response for the membrane electrodes was in the concentration range of 10(-5)-10(-2) mol/L. For the PVC membrane electrodes, Nernstian slopes of 55.1, 56.5, 56.5, and 54.0 mV/decade were achieved over a pH 4-8 for AMX, CPLX, and NFLX, respectively, and pH 3-6 for TMP. On the other hand, for GC electrodes, Nernstian slopes of 59.1, 58.2, 57.0, and 58.2 mV/decade were achieved over pH 4-8 for AMX, CPLX, and NFLX, respectively, and pH 3-6 for TMP. In addition to assay validation to international industry standards, the fabricated electrodes were also cross-validated relative to conventional separation techniques; high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and thin layer chromatography (TLC)-densitometry. The HPLC assay was applied in concentration range of 0.5-10.0 μg/mL, for all target analytes. The TLC-densitometry was adopted over a concentration range of 0.3-1.0 μg/band, for AMX, and 0.1-0.9 μg/band, for CPLX, NFLX, and TMP. The proposed techniques were successfully applied for quantification of the selected drugs either in pure form or waste water samples obtained from pharmaceutical plants. The actual waste water samples were subjected to solid phase extraction (SPE) for pretreatment prior to the application of chromatographic techniques (HPLC and TLC-densitometry). On the other hand, the fabricated electrodes were successfully applied for quantification of the antibiotic residues in actual

  15. Is Coenzyme Q10 Effective in Protection against Ulcerative Colitis? An Experimental Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ewees, Mohamed Gamal; Messiha, Basim Anwar Shehata; Abo-Saif, Ali Ahmed; Abd El-Latif, Hekma Abd El-Tawab

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) is a vitamin-like supplement which appears to be safe, with minimal side effects and low drug interaction potential. Co-Q10 is used in the treatment of a variety of disorders related primarily to suboptimal cellular energy metabolism and oxidative injury. Studies supporting the efficacy of Co-Q10 appear most promising for a variety of diseases, including ulcerative colitis (UC). The present investigation aims to elucidate the possible protective effects of Co-Q10 against UC, as induced by the administration of iodoacetamide to adult male albino rats. In our study, Co-Q10 showed potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities through a significant increase in catalase activity and glutathione content. In addition, it significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde content and nitrate/nitrite production. These results suggest that Co-Q10 protects against UC in rats via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials, and therefore seems promising for use in further clinical trials.

  16. Determination of the coenzyme Q10 status in a large Caucasian study population.

    PubMed

    Onur, Simone; Niklowitz, Petra; Fischer, Alexandra; Jacobs, Gunnar; Lieb, Wolfgang; Laudes, Matthias; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 ) exists in a reduced (ubiquinol) and an oxidized (ubiquinone) form in all human tissues and functions, amongst others, in the respiratory chain, redox-cycles, and gene expression. As the status of CoQ10 is an important risk factor for several diseases, here we determined the CoQ10 status (ubiquinol, ubiquinone) in a large Caucasian study population (n = 1,911). The study population covers a wide age range (age: 18-83 years, 43.4% men), has information available on more than 10 measured clinical phenotypes, more than 30 diseases (presence vs. absence), about 30 biomarkers, and comprehensive genetic information including whole-genome SNP typing (>891,000 SNPs). The major aim of this long-term resource in CoQ10 research is the comprehensive analysis of the CoQ10 status with respect to integrated health parameters (i.e., fat metabolism, inflammation), disease-related biomarkers (i.e., liver enzymes, marker for heart failure), common diseases (i.e., neuropathy, myocardial infarction), and genetic risk in humans. Based on disease status, biomarkers, and genetic variants, our cohort is also useful to perform Mendelian randomisation approaches. In conclusion, the present study population is a promising resource to gain deeper insight into CoQ10 status in human health and disease.

  17. CINRG Pilot trial of Coenzyme Q10 in steroid treated Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher F.; Rocha, Carolina Tesi; Henricson, Erik; Florence, Julaine; Mayhew, Jill; Gorni, Ksenija; Pasquali, Livia; Pestronk, Alan; Martin, Gerard R.; Hu, Fengming; Nie, Lei; Connolly, Anne M.; Escolar, Diana M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid treatment slows disease progression and is the standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a potent antioxidant that may improve function in dystrophin deficient muscle. Methods We performed an open label, “add-on” pilot study of CoQ10 in thirteen 5–10 year old DMD patients on steroids. The primary outcome measure was the total Quantitative Muscle Testing (QMT) score. Results Twelve of 16 children (mean age 8.03±1.64 years) completed the trial. Target serum levels of CoQ10 (≥2.5 μg/ml) were shown to be subject- and administration-dependent. Nine of 12 subjects showed an increase in total QMT score. Overall, CoQ10 treatment resulted in 8.5 % increase in muscle strength (p=0.03). Discussion This pilot study found the addition of CoQ10 to prednisone therapy in DMD patients resulted in an increase in muscle strength. These results warrant a larger, controlled trial of CoQ10 in DMD. PMID:21698649

  18. Beneficial effect of coenzyme Q10 injection on nitric oxide -related dilation of the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Kozaeva, Larisa P; Gorodetskaya, Evgeniya A; Ruuge, Enno K; Kalenikova, Elena I; Medvedev, Oleg S

    2017-01-05

    This study examined whether coenzyme Q10 can improve nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vasodilatation in the rat aorta after pre-incubation or intravenous administration. In initial experiments, intact isolated aortic rings were incubated with coenzyme Q10 or L-arginine. In further experiments, coenzyme Q10 was administered intravenously in anesthetized rats, then in 2h aorta was isolated. In both cases, after preliminary preparation the isolated aortic rings were tested for acetylcholine-induced NO-dependent relaxation. Acetylcholine elicited concentration-dependent relaxation of phenylephine precontracted aortic rings. Relaxant responses to acetylcholine were markedly potentiated after pre-incubation with coenzyme Q10 or L-arginine. The maximum relaxant responses (%) were significantly increased from 64.1±5.3 (control) to 89.8±3.0 and 83.6±3.0 (coenzyme Q10 and L-arginine, respectively). pD2 (-lgEC50) value in control study was 5.81±0.28, after pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 or L-arginine were 7.59±0.16 and 7.26±0.32, respectively. There was no difference between coenzyme Q10 and L-arginine groups. After intravenous administration, the relaxant responses to acetylcholine were significantly increased in coenzyme Q10-treated group (94.2±2.0) compared with controls (68.1±4.4). pD2 values were also different between control and treatment groups (5.79±0.29 vs. 8.14±0.65, respectively). Thus, coenzyme Q10 improved NO-mediated vasodilation in rat aorta in magnitude close to the effects of L-arginine - substrate for eNOS. Our data first show that exogenous coenzyme Q10 through intravenous administration is able to improve rapidly NO-dependent vasodilation in rat aorta, likely due to accumulation of coenzyme Q10 in the vessel wall. Improvement of endothelial function can contribute, at least in part, to beneficial effects of coenzyme Q10 in cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Notable deals in the pharmaceutical industry in the second quarter of 2016.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, P

    2016-08-01

    During the second quarter of 2016, Cortellis Competitive Intelligence had 1,014 new deals added as part of its ongoing coverage of pharmaceutical licensing activity. This was on par with the last quarter (1,011) and a substantial increase on the same quarter for the previous 1 year (659). This article will focus on highlighting a number of the most valuable and notable deals forged during the quarter, as well as a selection of deals from some of the most prolific deal makers. An update on milestone, options and terminated deals of significance will also be presented, along with an early outlook on the next quarter's pharmaceutical licensing activity.

  20. What can be gained from increased early-stage interaction between regulators, payers and the pharmaceutical industry?

    PubMed

    Wonder, Michael

    2014-08-01

    New medicines are the lifeblood of the global innovative pharmaceutical industry. Developments in genomics, proteomics, immunology and cellular biology are set to promise a plethora of novel targets for the industry to create and develop innovative new medicines. For a new medicine to fulfill its therapeutic and commercial potential (i.e., successful market access), it is now simply no longer a matter of its creator/developer generating evidence to demonstrate its quality, safety and efficacy to a standard expected by those responsible for making a decision on its marketing authorization ('regulators'). Nowadays, the successful market access of a new medicine not only requires market authorisation with an acceptable (i.e., competitive) label, but also that those responsible for making a decision on whether or not it is worth paying for (i.e., independent appraisal committees who advise payers as well as payers themselves; the term 'payers' has been used as an umbrella term to capture both groups) have the necessary clinical and other evidence they need to make a timely and favorable reimbursement determination at the proposed price. Typically this means that the clinical evidence for a development compound's that is available at the end of its Phase III clinical trial program to demonstrate its therapeutic value is both strong and relevant to the decisions payers are called upon to make. This poses strategic and operational challenges for the global pharmaceutical industry because the clinical evidence needs of the payers differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those of the regulators.

  1. The draft FDA guideline on non-inferiority clinical trials: a critical review from European pharmaceutical industry statisticians.

    PubMed

    Huitfeldt, Bernhard; Hummel, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The European Federation of Statisticians in the Pharmaceutical Industry (EFSPI) engages more than 2000 statisticians through its ten national organizations. Amongst other things, EFSPI is involved in reviewing regulatory guidelines under development, including the draft FDA guideline on non-inferiority clinical trials. This review resulted in several critical comments relating to as follows: (i) the lack of one single standard for proving efficacy of new drugs implied by the guideline; (ii) the problems with the suggested 'fraction of effect to be preserved'; (iii) the formulation of the primary hypothesis in a non-inferiority trial aiming at indirectly demonstrating a new drug is superior to placebo; and (iv) the preference in the guideline for the fixed-margin method over the synthesis method in the analysis. The presumed implications of this guideline, if implemented as is, are (i) increased confusion of how efficacy could be demonstrated when placebo control is not available, (ii) more complicated communication between pharmaceutical industry and FDA because of the apparent disagreements on fundamental statistical matters, and (iii) illogical consequences in the approval process because of which order drugs are approved rather than how they fulfill the regulatory requirements. We believe that the area is not yet ready for such a prescriptive regulatory guidance and that further research and experience are required until the methodology can be finally agreed. A strategy needs to be developed by regulatory agencies together with drug industry and academia for a long term solution for this topic.

  2. Is poor research the cause of the declining productivity of the pharmaceutical industry? An industry in need of a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Sams-Dodd, Frank

    2013-03-01

    For the past 20 years target-based drug discovery has been the main research paradigm used by the pharmaceutical industry and billions of dollars have been invested into this approach. However, recent industry data strongly indicate that the target-based approach is not an effective drug discovery paradigm and is likely to be the cause of the productivity crisis the industry is experiencing. However, from a theoretical and scientific perspective the target-based approach appears sound, so why is it not more successful? The purpose of this paper is first to analyse the real-life implementation of the target-based approach to identify possible reasons for the high failure rate and second to suggest changes to the drug discovery approach, which can improve productivity.

  3. Statistical thinking and knowledge management for quality-driven design and manufacturing in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Korakianiti, Evdokia; Rekkas, Dimitrios

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the evolution of quality principles and how they have been implemented in the pharmaceutical industry. The article discusses the challenges that the FDA PAT Guidance and the ICH Q8, Q9 and Q10 Guidelines present to industry and provides a comprehensive overview of the basic tools that can be used to effectively build quality into products. The principles of the design of experiments, the main tools for statistical process analysis and control, and the requisite culture change necessary to facilitate statistical, knowledge-based management are also addressed.

  4. Asynchronous Training in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing: A Model for University and Industrial Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Norbert; Haggerty, Blake; Foster, Mary; Spak, Gale

    2008-01-01

    The present study documents the results of a 17-month program to train Cardinal Health Pharmaceutical Technology Services (PTS) employees in an innovative model that combines investigative and writing techniques. Designed to address the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the program is a…

  5. Peering into the Pharmaceutical “Pipeline”: Investigational Drugs, Clinical Trials, and Industry Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Cottingham, Marci D.; Kalbaugh, Corey A.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of a growing literature on pharmaceuticalization, little is known about the pharmaceutical industry’s investments in research and development (R&D). Information about the drugs being developed can provide important context for existing case studies detailing the expanding – and often problematic – role of pharmaceuticals in society. To access the pharmaceutical industry’s pipeline, we constructed a database of drugs for which pharmaceutical companies reported initiating clinical trials over a five-year period (July 2006-June 2011), capturing 2,477 different drugs in 4,182 clinical trials. Comparing drugs in the pipeline that target diseases in high-income and low-income countries, we found that the number of drugs for diseases prevalent in high-income countries was 3.46 times higher than drugs for diseases prevalent in low-income countries. We also found that the plurality of drugs in the pipeline were being developed to treat cancers (26.2%). Interpreting our findings through the lens of pharmaceuticalization, we illustrate how investigating the entire drug development pipeline provides important information about patterns of pharmaceuticalization that are invisible when only marketed drugs are considered. PMID:25159693

  6. Supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Pierce, Janet D

    2015-05-21

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with ever increasing prevalence in the United States and worldwide. There is growing body of evidence suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Coenzyme Q10 is an important micronutrient acting on the electron transport chain of the mitochondria with two major functions: (1) synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); and (2) a potent antioxidant. Deficiency in coenzyme Q10 is often seen in patients with T2DM. Whether restoration of coenzyme Q10 will help alleviate oxidative stress, preserve mitochondrial function, and thus improve glycemic control in T2DM is unclear. This article reviews the relationships among oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and T2DM and examines the evidence for potential use of coenzyme Q10 as a supplement for the treatment of T2DM.

  7. Experimental schistosomal hepatitis: protective effect of coenzyme-Q10 against the state of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmad A; Shoheib, Zeinab S; Abdel-Aleem, Ghada A; Shareef, Mohamed M

    2008-10-01

    Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) eggs trapped in the host liver elicit a chain of oxidative processes that may be, at least in part, responsible for the pathology and progression of fibrosis associated with schistosomal hepatitis. This study was designed to assess the protective effect of the antioxidant coenzyme-Q10 (Co-Q10) against experimental S. mansoni-induced oxidative stress in the liver, and its potential role as an adjuvant to praziquantel (PZQ) therapy. The oxidative stress and overall liver function were improved under Co-Q10 therapy as evidenced by significant reduction in oxidative stress markers and preservation of antioxidant factors. Liver fibrosis was also reduced with a positive impact on liver function. Moreover, addition of Co-Q10 to PZQ therapy caused: significant reduction of liver egg load, significant improvement of the redox status, and lastly decreased liver fibrosis.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Pala, Ragip; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Cinar, Vedat; Atalay, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), inhibitors of kappa B (IκB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) in rats after chronic exercise training for 6 weeks. 8-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of four treatments planned in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of two condition (sedentary vs. exercise training), and two coenzyme Q10 levels (0 and 300 mg/kg per day for 6 weeks). The expression levels of the target proteins were determined in the heart, liver and muscle, and biochemical parameters including creatinine, urea, glucose and lipid profile were investigated in plasma. When compared with sedentary group, significant decreases in heart, liver and muscle NFκB levels by 45%, 26% and 44% were observed in Q10 supplemented rats after exercise training, respectively, while the inhibitory protein IκB increased by 179%, 111% and 127% in heart, liver and muscle tissues. Q10 supplementation caused an increase in Nrf2 (167%, 165% and 90%) and HO-1 (107%, 156% and 114%) after exercise training in heart, liver and muscle tissues (p < 0.05). No significant change was observed in any of the parameters associated with protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, except that exercise caused a decrease in plasma triglyceride, which was further decreased by Q10. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q10 modulates the expression of NFκB, IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 in exercise training, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of Q10 and emphasizes its role in antioxidant defense. Key pointsCoenzyme Q10 is a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria which is linked to the generation of energy in the cell.Coenzyme Q10 may inhibit the peroxidation of lipids, thus acting as an antioxidant and protects tissue against oxidative injury.Using of coenzyme Q

  9. The effects of coenzyme Q10 on seizures in mice: the involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sattarinezhad, Elahe; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Sheikhnouri, Kiandokht; Mousavi, Zahra; Moezi, Leila

    2014-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant in both mitochondria and lipid membranes. It has also been recognized to have an effect on gene expression. This study was designed to investigate whether acute or subchronic treatment with coenzyme Q10 altered the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole or electroshock in mice. We also evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide in the effects of coenzyme Q10 in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. Acute oral treatment with different doses of coenzyme Q10 did not affect the seizure in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole, intravenous pentylenetetrazole, and electroshock models in mice. Subchronic oral administration of coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg or more) increased time latencies to the onset of myoclonic jerks and clonic seizures induced by intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and at the doses of 25 mg/kg or more increased the seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. Subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 (50 mg/kg or more) also decreased the incidence of tonic seizures in the electroshock-induced seizure model. Moreover, acute treatment with the precursor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-arginine (60 mg/kg), led to a significant potentiation of the antiseizure effects of subchronic administration of coenzyme Q10 (400 mg/kg in intraperitoneal and 6.25 mg/kg in intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests). Acute treatment with l-NAME (5 mg/kg), a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the antiseizure effects of subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both seizure models induced by pentylenetetrazole. On the other hand, acute administration of aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg), a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not affect the seizures in mice treated with subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both intraperitoneal and intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests. In conclusion, only subchronic and not acute administration of coenzyme Q10 attenuated seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole

  10. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Ragip; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Cinar, Vedat; Atalay, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), inhibitors of kappa B (IκB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) in rats after chronic exercise training for 6 weeks. 8-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of four treatments planned in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of two condition (sedentary vs. exercise training), and two coenzyme Q10 levels (0 and 300 mg/kg per day for 6 weeks). The expression levels of the target proteins were determined in the heart, liver and muscle, and biochemical parameters including creatinine, urea, glucose and lipid profile were investigated in plasma. When compared with sedentary group, significant decreases in heart, liver and muscle NFκB levels by 45%, 26% and 44% were observed in Q10 supplemented rats after exercise training, respectively, while the inhibitory protein IκB increased by 179%, 111% and 127% in heart, liver and muscle tissues. Q10 supplementation caused an increase in Nrf2 (167%, 165% and 90%) and HO-1 (107%, 156% and 114%) after exercise training in heart, liver and muscle tissues (p < 0.05). No significant change was observed in any of the parameters associated with protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, except that exercise caused a decrease in plasma triglyceride, which was further decreased by Q10. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q10 modulates the expression of NFκB, IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 in exercise training, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of Q10 and emphasizes its role in antioxidant defense. Key points Coenzyme Q10 is a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria which is linked to the generation of energy in the cell. Coenzyme Q10 may inhibit the peroxidation of lipids, thus acting as an antioxidant and protects tissue against oxidative injury. Using of coenzyme

  11. Effect of Metabolic Stress on Coenzyme Q10 Content in Tissues of Active and Passive Rats.

    PubMed

    Kirbaeva, N V; Sharanova, N E; Baturina, V A; Zhminchenko, V M; Pertsov, S S; Vasil'ev, A V

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of coenzyme Q10 concentration in the blood plasma, liver, and brain of passive and active rats was studied on the model of metabolic stress. This parameter was shown to differ in rats with various patterns of behavior. Dietary consumption of coenzyme Q10 in doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight was followed by changes in its content in experimental animals.

  12. Methyl group dynamics in glassy, polycrystalline, and liquid coenzyme Q10 studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smuda, Christoph; Busch, Sebastian; Wagner, Bernd; Unruh, Tobias

    2008-08-01

    The methyl group rotation of coenzyme Q10 confined in nanosized droplets was studied using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Q10 as an oligoisoprene derivative with ten isoprene units can easily be supercooled in nanodroplets. Fixed window scans and QENS spectra at several temperatures of glassy Q10 were recorded to study the methyl group rotation which can be described by a logarithmic Gaussian distribution of hopping rates for temperatures below the glass transition temperature (Tg~200 K). A mean activation energy of 4.8 kJ/mol with a distribution width of 2.1 kJ/mol was obtained from the evaluation of the QENS spectra. A corresponding analysis of a fixed window scan yielded an average activation energy of 5.1 kJ/mol with a distribution width of 1.8 kJ/mol. The results are compared and discussed with those of chain deuterated polyisoprene-d5. For polycrystalline Q10, the QENS spectra could be described by the same model yielding a similar average activation energy as found for glassy Q10. However, no temperature dependence of the distribution width was observed. Based on the performed low-temperature measurements, the correlation times for the methyl group rotation were extrapolated to temperatures of liquid Q10. The complex dynamics of liquid Q10 could be described by a model yielding an apparent diffusion coefficient, the jump rate of the methyl groups, as well as an overall molecular rotational diffusion coefficient. The correlation times of the methyl group rotation in liquid Q10 at a given temperature T0 coincide with values determined in the glassy phase and extrapolated to T0.

  13. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Markers of Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Junya; Bo, Yacong; Lu, Yan; Liu, Chunli; Zhang, Lishi

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective Chronic inflammation contributes to the onset and development of metabolic diseases. Clinical evidence has suggested that coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has some effects on inflammatory markers. However, these results are equivocal. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of CoQ10 on serum levels of inflammatory markers in people with metabolic diseases. Methods Electronic databases were searched up to February 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The outcome parameters were related to inflammatory factors, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and C reactive protein (CRP). RevMan software was used for meta-analysis. Meta-regression analysis, Egger line regression test and Begg rank correlation test were performed by STATA software. Results Nine trials involving 428 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that compared with control group, CoQ10 supplementation has significantly improved the serum level of CoQ10 by 1.17μg/ml [MD = 1.17, 95% CI (0.47 to 1.87) μg/ml, I2 = 94%]. Meanwhile, it has significantly decreased TNF-α by 0.45 pg/ml [MD = -0.45, 95% CI (-0.67 to -0.24) pg/ml, I2 = 0%]. No significant difference was observed between CoQ10 and placebo with regard to CRP [MD = -0.21, 95% CI (-0.60 to 0.17) mg/L, I2 = 21%] and IL-6 [MD = -0.89, 95% CI (-1.95 to 0.16) pg/ml, I2 = 84%]. Conclusions CoQ10 supplementation may partly improve the process of inflammatory state. The effects of CoQ10 on inflammation should be further investigated by conducting larger sample size and well-defined trials of long enough duration. PMID:28125601

  14. Coenzyme Q10 protects against acute consequences of experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Eleawa, Samy M; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Ghosh, Sanjoy; Al-Hashem, Fahaid; Shatoor, Abdullah S; Alhejaily, Abdulmohsen; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Myocardial infarction (MI) due to sudden occlusion of a major coronary artery leads to a complex series of events that result in left ventricle (LV) impairment eventual heart failure. Therapeutic options are limited to reverse such trends post MI. The aim of this study was to compare the acute cardioprotective effects of the antioxidants, resveratrol (RES) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), either individually or in combination, on infracts size, LV hemodynamics, inflammation and oxidative stress markers in rats with experimentally induced MI. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: control without surgery, sham without occlusion, MI without antioxidants, RES pre-treated then MI (20 mg/kg, orally), CoQ10 then MI (20 mg/kg, intramuscular.), and combined RES and CoQ10 then MI with (each group n = 10). Pretreatment commenced 7 days prior to the permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Infarct area, hemodynamics, inflammation and oxidative stress markers were assessed 24 hours post-MI. Results: Compared to RES alone, CoQ10 pre-administration either by itself or in combination with RES, significantly reduced LV infarct area (57%), and normalized LV hemodynamic parameters like LVEDP (100%), LVSP (95.4%), LV +dp/dt and -dp/dt (102 and 73.1%, respectively). CoQ10 also decreased serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (70%), and various circulating inflammatory markers like TNF-α (83.2%) and IL-6 (83.2%). Regarding oxidative stress, TBARS scores were lowered with a concurrent increase in both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities with CoQ10 alone or in combination with RES. Conclusion: Coenzyme Q10 protects against the acute sequelae of myocardial infarction. It profoundly reduced infarct area, inflammation and oxidative stress while normalizing LV hemodynamics post MI. PMID:26069524

  15. A Randomized Trial of Coenzyme Q10 in Patients with Statin Myopathy: Rationale and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Beth A.; Gregory, Sara M.; Lorson, Lindsay; Polk, Donna; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Statins are the most commonly prescribed and effective medications for reducing low-density lipoprotein levels. Some patients experience myopathic symptoms during statin treatment. The etiology is not known, but depletion of mevalonate pathway metabolites, including coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), has been suggested. CoQ10 supplementation has been recommended to patients who experience myalgic symptoms despite a lack of conclusive evidence supporting its utility. Objective The Co-Enzyme Q10 in Statin Myopathy study is designed to examine the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on the extent and intensity of muscle pain during treatment with simvastatin. Methods We will recruit patients with a documented history of myalgia during statin treatment. The presence of statin-related myalgia will be confirmed in a crossover run-in trial during which presence and absence of symptoms will be documented during statin and placebo treatment, respectively. Individuals with myalgic symptoms while on statin but not placebo will be randomized to receive simvastatin 20 mg daily plus either 600 mg daily of CoQ10 or placebo. Muscle pain intensity will be documented during weekly phone calls using the Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form) (BPI-SF). Treatment will continue for 8 weeks or until muscle symptoms are reported continuously for one week or become intolerable, and then subjects will crossover to the alternative treatment (CoQ10 or placebo). Results This study is an ongoing clinical trial. Conclusions This study will determine the utility of CoQ10 for reducing pain intensity in myalgic patients and will provide guidance for clinicians treating patients with hypercholesterolemia who are intolerant to statins. PMID:23725917

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 in rats with acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Jresat, Iyad

    2012-03-01

    The potential protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against acute liver injury induced by a single dose of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg, p.o.) was investigated in rats. Coenzyme Q10 treatment was given as two i.p. injections, 10 mg/kg each, at 1 and 12 h following acetaminophen administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly reduced the levels of serum aminotransferases, suppressed lipid peroxidation, prevented the decreases of reduced glutathione and catalase activity, decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide as well as attenuating the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in liver tissue resulting from acetaminophen administration. Histopathological liver tissue damage mediated by acetaminophen was ameliorated by coenzyme Q10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the acetaminophen-induced overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and p53 in liver tissue. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 protects rat liver against acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, most probably through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects.

  17. Therapeutic effect of coenzyme Q10 against experimentally-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in rats.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Al-Mulhim, Abdulruhman S; Jresat, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of coenzyme Q10 was investigated in rats with hepatocellular carcinoma induced by trichloroacetic acid (0.5g/kg/day, p.o., for five days). Coenzyme Q10 treatment (0.4mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for four weeks following trichloroacetic acid administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly suppressed lipid peroxidation, prevented the depletion of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide in liver tissue of rats with hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, the histopathological dysplastic changes induced by trichloroacetic acid in liver tissue were ameliorated by coenzyme Q10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the expression of hepPar-1, alpha-fetoprotein, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor-κB in liver tissue of rats with hepatocellular carcinoma. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 may represent a potential therapeutic option for liver carcinogenesis.

  18. Behavioral improvement after chronic administration of coenzyme Q10 in P301S transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Stack, Cliona; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Beal, M Flint; Dumont, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a key component of the electron transport chain which plays an essential role in ATP production and also has antioxidant effects. Neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 have been reported in both in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its effects have not been studied in cells or in animals with tau induced pathology. In this report, we administered coenzyme Q10 to transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, which causes fronto-temporal dementia in man. These mice develop tau hyperphosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Coenzyme Q10 improved survival and behavioral deficits in the P301S mice. There was a modest reduction in phosphorylated tau in the cortex of P301S mice. We also examined the effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on the electron transport chain enzymes, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. There was a significant increase in complex I activity and protein levels, and a reduction in lipid peroxidation. Our data show that coenzyme Q10 significantly improved behavioral deficits and survival in transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, upregulated key enzymes of the electron transport chain, and reduced oxidative stress.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 and Oxidative Stress: Inflammation Status in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiao-Tien; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Yin-Tzu; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2017-01-04

    (1) Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and surgical resection is the main treatment for HCC. To date, no published study has examined the status of coenzyme Q10 in patients with HCC after surgery. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between the level of coenzyme Q10, oxidative stress, and inflammation in patients with HCC after surgery; (2) Methods: 71 primary HCC patients were recruited. Levels of coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxidase dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase), and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein; tumor necrosis factor-α; and interleukin-6) were measured; (3) Results: Patients with HCC had a significantly lower levels of coenzyme Q10 (p = 0.01) and oxidative stress (p < 0.01), and significantly higher levels of antioxidant enzymes activities and inflammation after surgery (p < 0.05). The level of coenzyme Q10 was significantly positively correlated with antioxidant capacity (vitamin E and glutathione peroxidase activity) and negatively correlated with inflammation markers after surgery; (4) Conclusion: Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with oxidative stress, and coenzyme Q10 may be considered an antioxidant therapy for patients with HCC, particularly those with higher inflammation after surgery.

  20. Coenzyme Q10 and Oxidative Stress: Inflammation Status in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsiao-Tien; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Yin-Tzu; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2017-01-01

    (1) Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and surgical resection is the main treatment for HCC. To date, no published study has examined the status of coenzyme Q10 in patients with HCC after surgery. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between the level of coenzyme Q10, oxidative stress, and inflammation in patients with HCC after surgery; (2) Methods: 71 primary HCC patients were recruited. Levels of coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxidase dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase), and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein; tumor necrosis factor-α; and interleukin-6) were measured; (3) Results: Patients with HCC had a significantly lower levels of coenzyme Q10 (p = 0.01) and oxidative stress (p < 0.01), and significantly higher levels of antioxidant enzymes activities and inflammation after surgery (p < 0.05). The level of coenzyme Q10 was significantly positively correlated with antioxidant capacity (vitamin E and glutathione peroxidase activity) and negatively correlated with inflammation markers after surgery; (4) Conclusion: Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with oxidative stress, and coenzyme Q10 may be considered an antioxidant therapy for patients with HCC, particularly those with higher inflammation after surgery. PMID:28054958

  1. The relationship between coenzyme Q10, oxidative stress, and antioxidant enzymes activities and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Yi-Chin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Ko, Ya-Wen; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A higher oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coenzyme Q10 concentration and lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities and the risk of CAD. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery were assigned to the case group (n = 51). The control group (n = 102) comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) were measured. Subjects with CAD had significant lower plasma coenzyme Q10, CAT and GPx activities and higher MDA and SOD levels compared to those of the control group. The plasma coenzyme Q10 was positively correlated with CAT and GPx activities and negatively correlated with MDA and SOD. However, the correlations were not significant after adjusting for the potential confounders of CAD with the exception of SOD. A higher level of plasma coenzyme Q10 (≥ 0.52 μmol/L) was significantly associated with reducing the risk of CAD. Our results support the potential cardioprotective impact of coenzyme Q10.

  2. Effect of coenzyme q10 on myopathic symptoms in patients treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Caso, Giuseppe; Kelly, Patricia; McNurlan, Margaret A; Lawson, William E

    2007-05-15

    Treatment of hypercholesterolemia with statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, statin use is often associated with a variety of muscle-related symptoms or myopathies. Myopathy may be related in part to statin inhibition of the endogenous synthesis of coenzyme Q10, an essential cofactor for mitochondrial energy production. The aim of this study is to determine whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation would reduce the degree of muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Patients with myopathic symptoms were randomly assigned in a double-blinded protocol to treatment with coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/day, n = 18) or vitamin E (400 IU/day, n = 14) for 30 days. Muscle pain and pain interference with daily activities were assessed before and after treatment. After a 30-day intervention, pain severity decreased by 40% (p <0.001) and pain interference with daily activities decreased by 38% (p <0.02) in the group treated with coenzyme Q10. In contrast, no changes in pain severity (+9%, p = NS) or pain interference with daily activities (-11%, p = NS) was observed in the group treated with vitamin E. In conclusion, results suggest that coenzyme Q10 supplementation may decrease muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Thus, coenzyme Q10 supplementation may offer an alternative to stopping treatment with these vital drugs.

  3. NLRP3 Inflammasome Is Activated in Fibromyalgia: The Effect of Coenzyme Q10

    PubMed Central

    Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; Culic, Ognjen; Carrión, Angel M.; de Miguel, Manuel; Díaz-Parrado, Eduardo; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Bullón, Pedro; Battino, Maurizio; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a prevalent chronic pain syndrome characterized by generalized hyperalgesia associated with a wide spectrum of symptoms such as fatigue and joint stiffness. Diagnosis of FM is difficult due to the lack of reliable diagnostic biomarkers, while treatment is largely inadequate. We have investigated the role of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammasome activation in blood cells from FM patients, and in vitro and in vivo CoQ10 deficiency models. Results: Mitochondrial dysfunction was accompanied by increased protein expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) and caspase-1 activation, and an increase of serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-18). CoQ10 deficiency induced by p-aminobenzoate treatment in blood mononuclear cells and mice showed NLRP3 inflammasome activation with marked algesia. A placebo-controlled trial of CoQ10 in FM patients has shown a reduced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β and IL-18 serum levels. Innovation: These results show an important role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of FM, and the capacity of CoQ10 in the control of inflammasome. Conclusion: These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of FM and suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition represents a new therapeutic intervention for the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1169–1180. PMID:23886272

  4. Severe encephalopathy associated to pyruvate dehydrogenase mutations and unbalanced coenzyme Q10 content

    PubMed Central

    Asencio, Claudio; Rodríguez-Hernandez, María A; Briones, Paz; Montoya, Julio; Cortés, Ana; Emperador, Sonia; Gavilán, Angela; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Yubero, Dèlia; Montero, Raquel; Pineda, Mercedes; O'Callaghan, María M; Alcázar-Fabra, María; Salviati, Leonardo; Artuch, Rafael; Navas, Plácido

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is associated to a variety of clinical phenotypes including neuromuscular and nephrotic disorders. We report two unrelated boys presenting encephalopathy, ataxia, and lactic acidosis, who died with necrotic lesions in different areas of brain. Levels of CoQ10 and complex II+III activity were increased in both skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, but it was a consequence of higher mitochondria mass measured as citrate synthase. In fibroblasts, oxygen consumption was also increased, whereas steady state ATP levels were decreased. Antioxidant enzymes such as NQO1 and MnSOD and mitochondrial marker VDAC were overexpressed. Mitochondria recycling markers Fis1 and mitofusin, and mtDNA regulatory Tfam were reduced. Exome sequencing showed mutations in PDHA1 in the first patient and in PDHB in the second. These genes encode subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) that could explain the compensatory increase of CoQ10 and a defect of mitochondrial homeostasis. These two cases describe, for the first time, a mitochondrial disease caused by PDH defects associated with unbalanced of both CoQ10 content and mitochondria homeostasis, which severely affects the brain. Both CoQ10 and mitochondria homeostasis appears as new markers for PDH associated mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26014431

  5. Severe encephalopathy associated to pyruvate dehydrogenase mutations and unbalanced coenzyme Q10 content.

    PubMed

    Asencio, Claudio; Rodríguez-Hernandez, María A; Briones, Paz; Montoya, Julio; Cortés, Ana; Emperador, Sonia; Gavilán, Angela; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Yubero, Dèlia; Montero, Raquel; Pineda, Mercedes; O'Callaghan, María M; Alcázar-Fabra, María; Salviati, Leonardo; Artuch, Rafael; Navas, Plácido

    2016-03-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is associated to a variety of clinical phenotypes including neuromuscular and nephrotic disorders. We report two unrelated boys presenting encephalopathy, ataxia, and lactic acidosis, who died with necrotic lesions in different areas of brain. Levels of CoQ10 and complex II+III activity were increased in both skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, but it was a consequence of higher mitochondria mass measured as citrate synthase. In fibroblasts, oxygen consumption was also increased, whereas steady state ATP levels were decreased. Antioxidant enzymes such as NQO1 and MnSOD and mitochondrial marker VDAC were overexpressed. Mitochondria recycling markers Fis1 and mitofusin, and mtDNA regulatory Tfam were reduced. Exome sequencing showed mutations in PDHA1 in the first patient and in PDHB in the second. These genes encode subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) that could explain the compensatory increase of CoQ10 and a defect of mitochondrial homeostasis. These two cases describe, for the first time, a mitochondrial disease caused by PDH defects associated with unbalanced of both CoQ10 content and mitochondria homeostasis, which severely affects the brain. Both CoQ10 and mitochondria homeostasis appears as new markers for PDH associated mitochondrial disorders.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 can prolong C. elegans lifespan by lowering oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Naoaki; Senoo-Matsuda, Nanami; Miyake, Kohichiro; Yasuda, Kayo; Ishii, Takamasa; Hartman, Philip S; Furukawa, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    The mev-1 gene encodes cytochrome b, a large subunit of the Complex II enzyme succinate-CoQ oxidoreductase. The mev-1(kn1) mutants are hypersensitive to oxidative stress and age precociously, probably because of elevated superoxide anion production in mitochondria. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is essential for the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Here, we show that CoQ(10) and Vitamin E extended the life span of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. Conversely, only CoQ(10) recovered the life shortening effects seen in mev-1. We also show that CoQ(10) but not Vitamin E reduced superoxide anion levels in wild type and mev-1. Another previously described phenotype of mev-1 animals is the presence of supernumerary apoptotic cells. We now demonstrate that CoQ(10) (but not Vitamin E) suppressed these supernumerary apoptoses. Collectively these data suggest that exogenously supplied CoQ(10) can play a significant anti-aging function. It may do so either by acting as an antioxidant to dismutate the free radical superoxide anion or by reducing the uncoupling of reactions during election transport that could otherwise result in superoxide anion production. The latter activity has not been ascribed to CoQ(10); however, it is known that conditions that uncouple electron transport reactions can lead to elevated superoxide anion production.

  7. CoQ10 Deficiency Is Not a Common Finding in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barca, Emanuele; Tang, Maoxue; Kleiner, Giulio; Engelstad, Kristin; DiMauro, Salvatore; Quinzii, Catarina M; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2016-01-01

    CoQ10 deficiency has been recently described in tissues of a patient with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome. Here, we investigated patients and mice with GLUT1 deficiency in order to determine whether low CoQ is a recurrent biochemical feature of this disorder, to justify CoQ10 supplementation as therapeutic option.CoQ10 levels were investigated in plasma, white blood cells, and skin fibroblasts of 16 patients and healthy controls and in the brain, cerebellum, liver, kidney, muscle, and plasma of 4-month-old GLUT1 mutant and control mice.CoQ10 levels in plasma did not show any difference compared with controls. Since most of the patients studied were on a ketogenic diet, which can alter CoQ10 content in plasma, we also analyzed white blood cells and cultured skin fibroblasts. Again, we found no differences. In mice, we found slightly reduced CoQ in the cerebellum, likely an epiphenomenon, and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes was normal.Our data from GLUT1 deficiency patients and from GLUT1 model mice fail to support CoQ10 deficiency as a common finding in GLUT1 deficiency, suggesting that CoQ deficiency is not a direct biochemical consequence of defective glucose transport caused by molecular defects in the SLC2A1 gene.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 production in a 150-l reactor by a mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kien, Nguyen Ba; Kong, In-Soo; Lee, Min-Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2010-05-01

    For the commercial production of CoQ(10), batch-type fermentations were attempted in a 150-l fermenter using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides. Optimum temperature and initial aeration rate were found to be 30 degrees C and 2 vvm, respectively. Under optimum fermentation conditions, the maximum value of specific CoQ(10) content was achieved reproducibly as 6.34 mg/g DCW after 24 h, with 3.02 g/l of DCW. During the fermentation, aeration shift (from the adequate aeration at the early growth phase to the limited aeration in active cellular metabolism) was a key factor in CoQ(10) production for scale-up. A higher value of the specific CoQ(10) content (8.12 mg/g DCW) was achieved in fed-batch fermentation and comparable to those produced by the pilot-scale fed-batch fermentations of A. tumefaciens, which indicated that the mutant strain of R. sphaeroides used in this study was a potential high CoQ(10) producer. This is the first detailed study to demonstrate a pilot-scale production of CoQ(10) using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides.

  9. Application of coenzyme Q10 for accelerating soft tissue wound healing after tooth extraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Ekuni, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsuji; Kataoka, Kota; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Morita, Manabu

    2014-12-10

    Accelerating wound healing after tooth extraction is beneficial in dental treatment. Application of antioxidants, such as reduced coenzyme Q10 (rCoQ10), may promote wound healing after tooth extraction. In this study, we examined the effects of topical application of rCoQ10 on wound healing after tooth extraction in rats. After maxillary first molars were extracted, male Fischer 344 rats (8 weeks old) (n = 27) received topical application of ointment containing 5% rCoQ10 (experimental group) or control ointment (control group) to the sockets for 3 or 8 days (n = 6-7/group). At 3 days after extraction, the experimental group showed higher collagen density and lower numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the upper part of socket, as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB were also lower in the experimental group than in the control group (p < 0.05). At 8 days after tooth extraction, there were no significant differences in collagen density, number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and bone fill between the groups. Our results suggest that topical application of rCoQ10 promotes wound healing in the soft tissue of the alveolar socket, but that rCoQ10 has a limited effect on bone remodeling in rats.

  10. Behavioral Improvement after Chronic Administration of Coenzyme Q10 in P301S Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Stack, Cliona; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Beal, M. Flint; Dumont, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a key component of the electron transport chain which plays an essential role in ATP production and also has antioxidant effects. Neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 have been reported in both in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its effects have not been studied in cells or in animals with tau induced pathology. In this report, we administered coenzyme Q10 to transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, which causes fronto-temporal dementia in man. These mice develop tau hyperphosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Coenzyme Q10 improved survival and behavioral deficits in the P301S mice. There was a modest reduction in phosphorylated tau in the cortex of P301S mice. We also examined the effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on the electron transport chain enzymes, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. There was a significant increase in complex I activity and protein levels, and a reduction in lipid peroxidation. Our data show that coenzyme Q10 significantly improved behavioral deficits and survival in transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, upregulated key enzymes of the electron transport chain, and reduced oxidative stress. PMID:21971408

  11. Rapid determination of coenzyme Q10 in food supplements using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Ingrid; Kuballa, Thomas; Lerch, Christiane; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2013-01-01

    A methodology utilizing 1H NMR spectroscopy has been developed to measure the concentration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in dietary supplements. For sample preparation, a very simple dilution with deuterated chloroform and addition of internal standard is sufficient. CoQ10 produces a distinct peak of the CH groups in the isoprene side chain of the molecule in the δ 5.15 - 5.05 ppm range, where it can be distinguished from other matrix compounds. The method was shown to be of adequate sensitivity with a limit of detection (LOD) of 7.8 mg/L, to control the CoQ10 content in the majority of the products. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation was around 5 %; linearity was observed from 14 to 2000 mg/L (R = 0.99). The developed methodology was applied for the analysis of 21 food supplements (capsules, tablets, and liquid products). On the basis of the labeled amounts, only two products contained substantially lower concentrations of CoQ10 (57 % and 51 %). All other concentrations varied between 83 % and 190 % with respect to labeling. The developed NMR method may be used by quality assurance laboratories for routine control of CoQ10 products.

  12. Q10-loaded NLC versus nanoemulsions: stability, rheology and in vitro skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Junyaprasert, Varaporn B; Teeranachaideekul, Veerawat; Souto, Eliana B; Boonme, Prapaporn; Müller, Rainer H

    2009-07-30

    In this study, nanoemulsions (NE) of medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) of cetyl palmiate/MCT were produced to load coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) and characterized for their stability before and after incorporation into xanthan gum hydrogels. After storage at 4, 25 and 40 degrees C, the particles remained in the nanosize range for 12 months, with zeta potential higher than |40 mV|. Similar results were found in xanthan gum-based hydrogels containing NE or NLC. The crystallinity index of Q(10)-loaded NLC increased after being incorporated into hydrogels. The Q(10) entrapped in NLC and NE remained higher than 90% at all temperatures for 12 months but dramatically decreased when exposed to light. From the rheological studies, both NLC and NE dispersions possessed pseudoplastic flow having more liquid characteristics, whereas NLC and NE hydrogels exhibited plastic flow with thixothopy, showing more elastic rather than viscous properties. The occurrence of a spatial arrangement of lipid molecules was observed in the matrix of NLC when entrapped into hydrogels. From in vitro permeation studies, it could be stated that the amount of Q(10) released and occlusiveness were major keys to promote the deep penetration of Q(10) into the skin.

  13. [Clinical researchers and the pharmaceutic industry. The research contract is not an addendum].

    PubMed

    Cohen, A F

    1999-06-26

    The relation between a pharmaceutical company and a clinical investigator combines a certain form of entrepreneurship with scientific endeavour. Both parties are concerned with the content of the clinical study as well as with its business aspects. A good contract is essential for the project to succeed. In three cases based on actual experience the contract failed. In the first case, dosage miscalculation in the hospital pharmacy led to side effects in patients as a consequence of which the study was stopped. The pharmaceutical company sued the investigator. In the second case the investigator published data in a congress abstract, which prevented a patent by the company. In the third case scientific information was published by the company with the principal investigator featuring in the acknowledgement section of the article only. Investigators should have their own standard contract ready, and they should invest time and energy in understanding the contracts of the research they are carrying out.

  14. The simple economics of risk-sharing agreements between the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Barros, Pedro Pita

    2011-04-01

    The introduction of new (and expensive) pharmaceutical products is one of the major challenges for health systems. The search for new institutional arrangements is natural. The use of the so-called risk-sharing agreements is one example. Recent discussions have somewhat neglected the economic fundamentals underlying risk-sharing agreements. We argue here that risk-sharing agreements, although attractive due to the principle of paying by results, also entail risks. Too many patients may be put under treatment. Prices are likely to be adjusted upward, in anticipation of future risk-sharing agreements between the pharmaceutical company and the third-party payer. An available instrument is a verification cost per patient treated, which allows obtaining the first-best allocation of patients to the new treatment, under the agreement. Overall, the welfare effects of risk-sharing agreements are ambiguous, and caution is urged regarding their use.

  15. Notable deals in the pharmaceutical industry in the first quarter of 2016.

    PubMed

    Cruces, E

    2016-08-01

    During the first quarter of 2016, Cortellis Competitive Intelligence had 1,011 new deals added as part of its ongoing coverage of pharmaceutical licensing activity. This was a slight decrease on the last quarter (Q4 2015: 1,075) but a significant increase on the same quarter for the previous year (Q1 2015: 826). This article will focus on highlighting a number of the most valuable and notable deals forged during the quarter, as well as a selection of deals from some of the most prolific deal makers. An update on milestone, options and terminated deals of significance will also be presented, along with an early outlook on the next quarter's pharmaceutical licensing activity.

  16. Notable deals in the pharmaceutical industry in the third quarter of 2016.

    PubMed

    Cruces, E

    2016-10-01

    During the third quarter of 2016, Cortellis Competitive Intelligence had 865 new deals added as part of its ongoing coverage of pharmaceutical licensing activity. This figure shows similar deal activity compared with the same quarter of 2015 (934), and 21% less than the previous quarter, although they had similar disclosed financial sizes in comparison with the first half of 2016. This article will focus on a number of the most valuable and notable deals forged during the quarter, as well as a selection of deals from some of the most prolific deal makers. An update on milestones, options and terminated deals of significance will also be presented, along with an early outlook on the last quarter of 2016's pharmaceutical licensing activity.

  17. Strategic of Applying Free Chemical Usage In Purified Water System For Pharmaceutical Industry Toward CPOB (Cara Pembuatan Obat yang Baik) Indonesia To Reducing Environmental Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartono, R.; Basuki, Y. T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the sets of model and literature review to prove that strategy of applying free chemical usage in purified water system for pharmaceutical industry would be help the existing and new pharmaceutical companies to comply with part of Natioanal Agency of Drug and Food Control / Badan Pengawas Obat dan Makanan (NADFC/BPOM) regulation in order to achieve "Cara Pembuatan Obat yang Baik" (CPOB) of Indonesia pharmaceutical industry. One of the main reasons is when we figured out the number of Indonesian pharmaceutical industries in 2012 are kept reducing compare to the increasing numbers of Indonesian population growth. This strategy concept also might help the industries to reducing environmental pollution, and operational cost in pharmaceutical industries, by reducing of the chemical usage for water treatment process in floculation and cougulation and chlorination for sterillization. This new model is free usage of chemicals for purified water generation system process and sterilization. The concept offering of using membrane technology- Reverse Osmosis (RO) membrane base treatment to replace traditional chemical base treatment, following enhance Electrodeionization (EDI) as final polisher for controlling conductivity, and finally Ultra Violet (UV) disinfectant technology as final guard for bacteria controls instead of chemical base system in purified water generation system.

  18. Occurrence of antibiotics in pharmaceutical industrial wastewater, wastewater treatment plant and sea waters in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Tahrani, Leyla; Van Loco, Joris; Ben Mansour, Hedi; Reyns, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly used group of pharmaceuticals in human medicine. They can therefore reach surface and groundwater bodies through different routes, such as wastewater treatment plant effluents, surface runoff, or infiltration of water used for agricultural purposes. It is well known that antibiotics pose a significant risk to environmental and human health, even at low concentrations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of aminoglycosides and phenicol antibiotics in municipal wastewaters, sea water and pharmaceutical effluents in Tunisia. All analysed water samples contained detectable levels of aminoglycoside and phenicol antibiotics. The highest concentrations in wastewater influents were observed for neomycin and kanamycin B (16.4 ng mL(-1) and 7.5 ng mL(-1), respectively). Chloramphenicol was found in wastewater influents up to 3 ng mL(-1). It was observed that the waste water treatment plants were not efficient in completely removing these antibiotics. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were found in sea water samples near aquaculture sites at levels up to, respectively, 15.6 ng mL(-1) and 18.4 ng mL(-1). Also aminoglycoside antibiotics were found near aquaculture sites with the highest concentration of 3.4 ng mL(-1) for streptomycin. In pharmaceutical effluents, only gentamycin was found at concentrations up to 19 ng mL(-1) over a sampling period of four months.

  19. Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency presenting as fatal neonatal multiorgan failure.

    PubMed

    Desbats, Maria Andrea; Vetro, Annalisa; Limongelli, Ivan; Lunardi, Giada; Casarin, Alberto; Doimo, Mara; Spinazzi, Marco; Angelini, Corrado; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Burlina, Alberto; Rodriguez Hernandez, Maria Angeles; Chiandetti, Lino; Clementi, Maurizio; Trevisson, Eva; Navas, Placido; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Salviati, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Coenzyme Q10 deficiency is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, with manifestations that may range from fatal neonatal multisystem failure, to adult-onset encephalopathy. We report a patient who presented at birth with severe lactic acidosis, proteinuria, dicarboxylic aciduria, and hepatic insufficiency. She also had dilation of left ventricle on echocardiography. Her neurological condition rapidly worsened and despite aggressive care she died at 23 h of life. Muscle histology displayed lipid accumulation. Electron microscopy showed markedly swollen mitochondria with fragmented cristae. Respiratory-chain enzymatic assays showed a reduction of combined activities of complex I+III and II+III with normal activities of isolated complexes. The defect was confirmed in fibroblasts, where it could be rescued by supplementing the culture medium with 10 μM coenzyme Q10. Coenzyme Q10 levels were reduced (28% of controls) in these cells. We performed exome sequencing and focused the analysis on genes involved in coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis. The patient harbored a homozygous c.545T>G, p.(Met182Arg) alteration in COQ2, which was validated by functional complementation in yeast. In this case the biochemical and morphological features were essential to direct the genetic diagnosis. The parents had another pregnancy after the biochemical diagnosis was established, but before the identification of the genetic defect. Because of the potentially high recurrence risk, and given the importance of early CoQ10 supplementation, we decided to treat with CoQ10 the newborn child pending the results of the biochemical assays. Clinicians should consider a similar management in siblings of patients with CoQ10 deficiency without a genetic diagnosis.

  20. Oxidative Stress Correlates with Headache Symptoms in Fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 Effect on Clinical Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Mario D.; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. Methods We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. Results We found decreased CoQ10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r = −0.59, P<0.05; r = −0.68, P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r = 0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P<0.001). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM. PMID:22532869

  1. 76 FR 42729 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products and... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products...

  2. The antioxidant status and concentrations of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Hua; Yang, Nae-Cherng; Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Jui-Yuan; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E and the antioxidant status in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). Subjects with MS (n = 72) were included according to the criteria for MS. The non-MS group (n = 105) was comprised of healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E concentrations, lipid profiles, and antioxidant enzymes levels (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase) were measured. The subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of plasma coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E than those in the non-MS group, but these differences were not significant after being normalized for triglyceride level. The levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group. The subjects with the higher antioxidant enzymes activities had significant reductions in the risk of MS (P < 0.01) after being adjusted for coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. In conclusion, the subjects with MS might be under higher oxidative stress resulting in low levels of antioxidant enzyme activities. A higher level of antioxidant enzymes activities was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of MS independent of the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E.

  3. Automatic determination of coenzyme Q10 in food using cresyl violet encapsulated into magnetoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Román-Pizarro, Vanessa; Fernández-Romero, Juan Manuel; Gómez-Hens, Agustina

    2017-04-15

    A new type of magnetoliposomes (MLs), containing hydrophobic magnetic-gold nanoparticles and the long wavelength fluorophore cresyl violet, has been used for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). MLs were concentrated just before the detector, using a flow system and an external electromagnet device. The subsequent introduction of Triton X-100 and CoQ10 causes the MLs lysis and the cresyl violet oxidation, obtaining a decrease in the fluorescence signal. The dynamic range of the calibration graph was 0.03-0.50μmolL(-1) CoQ10, and the detection limit was 0.008μmolL(-1). The precision (relative standard deviation) was in the range of 1.3-4.5%. The method showed a sampling frequency of 12h(-1) and was applied to the determination of CoQ10 in several food samples. The results were compared with those obtained using a previously described chromatographic method. Also, recovery values were in the range of 83.5-101.3%.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol-10) supplementation improves oxidative imbalance in children with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Miles, Michael V; Patterson, Bonnie J; Chalfonte-Evans, Melinda L; Horn, Paul S; Hickey, Francis J; Schapiro, Mark B; Steele, Paul E; Tang, Peter H; Hotze, Stephanie L

    2007-12-01

    Endogenous coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, a potent antioxidant, and a potential biomarker for systemic oxidative status. Evidence of oxidative stress was reported in individuals with trisomy 21. In this study, 14 children with trisomy 21 had significantly increased (P < 0.0001) plasma ubiquinone-10 (the oxidized component of coenzyme Q10) compared with 12 age- and sex-matched healthy children (historical controls). Also, the mean ratio of ubiquinol-10 (the biochemically reduced component):total coenzyme Q10 was significantly decreased (P < 0.0001). After 3 months of ubiquinol-10 supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) to 10 patients with trisomy 21, the mean ubiquinol-10:total coenzyme Q10 ratio increased significantly (P < 0.0001) above baseline values, and 80% of individual ratios were within normal range. No significant or unexpected adverse effects were reported by participants. To our knowledge, this is the first study to indicate that the pro-oxidant state in plasma of children with trisomy 21, as assessed by ubiquinol-10:total coenzyme Q10 ratio, may be normalized with ubiquinol-10 supplementation. Further studies are needed to determine whether correction of this oxidant imbalance improves clinical outcomes of children with trisomy 21.

  5. Improved high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of coenzyme Q10 in plasma.

    PubMed

    Grossi, G; Bargossi, A M; Fiorella, P L; Piazzi, S; Battino, M; Bianchi, G P

    1992-02-28

    Coenzyme (Co) Q10 was dissociated from lipoproteins in plasma by treatment with methanol and extraction with n-hexane. Subsequent clean-up on silica gel and C18 solid-phase extraction cartridges with complete recovery (99 +/- 1.2%) produced a clean extract. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation was performed on a C18 reversed-phase column. Three simple, rapid procedures are presented: HPLC with final UV (275 nm) detection, a microanalysis utilizing a three-electrode electrochemical detector and a microanalysis with column-switching HPLC and electrochemical detection. The methods correlate very well with classical ethanol-n-hexane extraction with UV detection. The identity and purity of the Co Q10 peak were investigated and the resulting methods were concluded to be suitable for total plasma Co Q10 determination. The average level in healthy subjects was 0.80 +/- 0.20 mg/l; the minimum detectable Co Q10 plasma level was 0.05 and 0.005 mg/l for UV and electrochemical detection, respectively. The methods were applied to many samples and the plasma Co Q10 reference values for healthy subjects, athletes, hyperthyroid, hypothyroid and hypercholesterolaemic patients are given.

  6. Effect of coenzyme Q10 on superoxide production in rats with reperfusion injuries.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, K; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K; Kimura, M; Nomoto, K; Itoman, M

    1999-03-01

    We examined the effect of coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10) on superoxide radical (O2-) production in a model of rat reperfusion injury. The chemiluminescence method using a derivative of luciferin was used to quantify O2- production by erythrocytes in the reperfused limb after a period of ischaemia. A total of 20 limbs from Lewis rats were preserved at 4 degrees C in Euro-Collins solution for 72 hours, and were grafted orthotopically to syngeneic rats by a microsurgical technique. In the treated group (n = 10), Co Q10 (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into the recipients one hour before reperfusion. In the control group (n = 10), the same dose of solvent was given. To measure the extent of oxidative stress, heparinised blood from the treated and control recipients was collected before, and at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after reperfusion for the measurement of chemiluminescence. O2- production in the Co Q10-treated group was significantly lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). Although these findings suggest that Co Q10 scavenged O2- that was produced in the replanted limbs as a result of ischaemia-reperfusion injury, we should consider other possible mechanisms by which this agent may protect against ischaemia-induced reperfusion injury.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 Abrogated the 28 Days Aluminium Chloride Induced Oxidative Changes in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anuradha S.; Nirwane, Abhijit; Kamble, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to elucidate the impact of oral administration of aluminium chloride for 28 days with respect to oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex of female rats. Further, to investigate the potentials of Coenzyme (Co) Q10 (4, 8, and 12 mg/kg, i.p.) in mitigating the detrimental changes. Materials and Methods: Biochemical estimations of cerebral lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were carried out after 28 days of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) and Co Q10 exposures along with histopathological examination of cerebral cortex of the rats. Results: Subacute exposure to AlCl3(5 mg/kg) led to significant decrease in levels of GSH, vitamin E and activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and an increase in LPO of cerebral cortex. These aberrations were restored by Co Q10 (12 mg/kg, i.p.). This protection offered was comparable to that of L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, i.p.) which served as a reference standard. Histopathological evaluations confirmed that the normal cerebral morphology was maintained by Co Q10. Conclusion: Thus, AlCl3 exposure hampers the activities of various antioxidant enzymes and induces oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of female Wistar rats. Supplementation with intraperitoneal Co Q10 abrogated these deleterious effects of AlCl3. PMID:25253934

  8. Analysis on Time-Lag Effect of Research and Development Investment in the Pharmaceutical Industry in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae; Choi, Mankyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of the research and development (R&D) investment of pharmaceutical companies on enterprise value. Methods The period of the empirical analysis is from 2000 to 2012, considering the period after the influence of the financial crisis. Financial statements and comments in general and internal transactions were extracted from TS-2000 of the Korea Listed Company Association, and data related to stock price were extracted from KISVALUE-III of National Information and Credit Evaluation Information Service Co., Ltd. STATA 12.0 was used as the statistical package for panel analysis. Results In the pharmaceutical firms, the influence of the R&D intensity with regard to Tobin's q was found to be positive. However, only the R&D expenditure intensities of previous years 2 and 5 (t–2 and t–5, respectively) were statistically significant (p < 0.1), whereas those of previous years 1, 3, and 4 years (t–1, t–3, and t–4, respectively) were not statistically significant. Conclusion R&D investment not only affects the enterprise value but is also evaluated as an investment activity that raises the long-term enterprise value. The research findings will serve as valuable data to understand the enterprise value of the Korea pharmaceutical industry and to strengthen reform measures. Not only should new drug development be made, but also investment and support should be provided according to the specific factors suitable to improve the competitiveness of each company, such as generic, incrementally modified drugs, and biosimilar products. PMID:26473091

  9. Acquiring Pharmaceutical Industry Assets in the UK: 1 + 1 = 1?

    PubMed

    Kanavos, Panos; Angelis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    The recent AstraZeneca takeover bid from Pfizer puts pharmaceutical R&D once again on the public agenda. Three pertinent questions are (a) what can be expected from this acquisition, (b) what are the implications for the UK economy and science base, and (c) whether such a deal should go ahead. Although the key driver behind this acquisition would be an improvement in company performance and shareholder value, past evidence suggests that mergers and acquisitions (M&A) of large pharmaceutical companies imply a neutral net effect on productivity, if not a decline, with employment decreasing and R&D spend following a similar trend. Similarities between the two companies include dropping sales; however, relative to its size, AstraZeneca has a more promising R&D pipeline, especially in therapeutic areas where Pfizer's strength is currently limited (e.g. oncology). Ensuring a portfolio diversification would make Pfizer's takeover proposal a knight's one, but history points towards a knave-like behavior.

  10. The Determinants of Research and Development Investment in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Focus on Financial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae; Choi, Mankyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study analyzes the influence of the financial structure of pharmaceutical companies on R&D investment to create a next-generation profit source or develop relatively cost-effective drugs to maximize enterprise value. Methods The period of the empirical analysis is from 2000 to 2012. Financial statements and comments in general and internal transactions were extracted from TS-2000 of the Korea Listed Company Association (KLCA), and data related to stock price is extracted from KISVALUE-Ⅲ of NICE Information Service Co., Ltd. Stata 12.0 was used as the statistical package for panel analysis. Results The current ratio had a positive influence on R&D investment, the debt ratio had a negative influence on R&D investment, and return on investment and net sales growth rate did not have a significant influence on R&D investment. Conclusion It was found in this study that the higher liquidity ratio, the greater the R&D investment. The stability of pharmaceutical companies has a negative influence on R&D investment. This finding is consistent with the prediction that if a company faces a financial risk, it will be passive in R&D investment due to its financial difficulties. PMID:26730355

  11. Efficient Lewis acid ionic liquid-catalyzed synthesis of the key intermediate of coenzyme Q10 under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Zhang, Xuan; Yu, Ping; Sun, Guoyong; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-12-22

    An efficient synthesis of a valuable intermediate of coenzyme Q(10) by microwave-assisted Lewis acidic ionic liquid (IL)-catalyzed Friedel-Crafts alkylation is reported. The acidity of six [Etpy]BF(4)-based ionic liquids was characterized by means of the FT-IR technique using acetonitrile as a molecular probe. The catalytic activities of these ionic liquids were correlated with their Lewis acidity. With increasing Lewis acid strength of the ionic liquids, their catalytic activity in the Friedel-Crafts reaction increased, except for [Etpy]BF(4)-AlCl(3). The effects of the reaction system, the molar fraction of Lewis acid in the Lewis acid ILs and heating techniques were also investigated. Among the six Lewis acid ionic liquids tested [Etpy]BF(4)-ZnCl(2) showed the best catalytic activity, with a yield of 89% after a very short reaction time (150 seconds). This procedure has the advantages of higher efficiency, better reusability of ILs, energy conservation and eco-friendliness. The method has practical value for preparation of CoQ(10) on an industrial scale.

  12. A comparative evaluation of coenzyme Q10-loaded liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles as dermal antioxidant carriers

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Evren H; Korkmaz, Emrah; Tuncay-Tanrıverdi, Sakine; Dellera, Eleonora; Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, M Cristina; Ozer, Ozgen

    2012-01-01

    Background The effective delivery of coenzyme Q10 (Q10) to the skin has several benefits in therapy for different skin pathologies. However, the delivery of Q10 to deeper layers of skin is challenging due to low aqueous solubility of Q10. Liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have many advantages to accomplish the requirements in topical drug delivery. This study aims to evaluate the influence of these nanosystems on the effective delivery of Q10 into the skin. Methods Q10-loaded liposomes (LIPO-Q10) and SLNs (SLN-Q10) were prepared by thin film hydration and high shear homogenization methods, respectively. Particle size (PS), polydispersity index (PI), zeta potential (ZP), and drug entrapment efficiency were determined. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis and morphological transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination were conducted. Biocompatibility/cytotoxicity studies of Q10-loaded nanosystems were performed by means of cell culture (human fibroblasts) under oxidative conditions. The protective effect of formulations against production of reactive oxygen species were comparatively evaluated by cytofluorometry studies. Results PS of uniform SLN-Q10 and LIPO-Q10 were determined as 152.4 ± 7.9 nm and 301.1 ± 8.2 nm, respectively. ZPs were −13.67 ± 1.32 mV and −36.6 ± 0.85 mV in the same order. The drug entrapment efficiency was 15% higher in SLN systems. TEM studies confirmed the colloidal size. SLN-Q10 and LIPO-Q10 showed biocompatibility towards fibroblasts up to 50 μM of Q10, which was determined as suitable for cell proliferation. The mean fluorescence intensity % depending on ROS production determined in cytofluorometric studies could be listed as Q10 ≥ SLN-Q10 > LIPO-Q10. Conclusion The LIPO-Q10 system was able to enhance cell proliferation. On the contrary, SLN-Q10 did not show protective effects against ROS accumulation. As a conclusion, liposomes seem to have advantages over SLN in terms of effective delivery of Q10 to skin

  13. General procedure to aid the development of continuous pharmaceutical processes using multivariate statistical modeling - an industrial case study.

    PubMed

    Tomba, Emanuele; De Martin, Marialuisa; Facco, Pierantonio; Robertson, John; Zomer, Simeone; Bezzo, Fabrizio; Barolo, Massimiliano

    2013-02-28

    Streamlining the manufacturing process has been recognized as a key issue to reduce production costs and improve safety in pharmaceutical manufacturing. Although data available from earlier developmental stages are often sparse and unstructured, they can be very useful to improve the understanding about the process under development. In this paper, a general procedure is proposed for the application of latent variable statistical methods to support the development of new continuous processes in the presence of limited experimental data. The proposed procedure is tested on an industrial case study concerning the development of a continuous line for the manufacturing of paracetamol tablets. The main driving forces acting on the process are identified and ranked according to their importance in explaining the variability in the available data. This improves the understanding about the process by elucidating how different active pharmaceutical ingredient pretreatments, different formulation modes and different settings on the processing units affect the overall operation as well as the properties of the intermediate and final products. The results can be used as a starting point to perform a comprehensive and science-based quality risk assessment that help to define a robust control strategy, possibly enhanced with the integration of a design space for the continuous process at a later stage.

  14. Effects of fluvastatin and coenzyme Q10 on skeletal muscle in normo- and hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Vincze, J; Jenes, Á; Füzi, M; Almássy, J; Németh, R; Szigeti, G; Dienes, B; Gaál, Z; Szentesi, P; Jóna, I; Kertai, P; Paragh, G; Csernoch, L

    2015-06-01

    Myalgia and muscle weakness may appreciably contribute to the poor adherence to statin therapy. Although the pathomechanism of statin-induced myopathy is not completely understood, changes in calcium homeostasis and reduced coenzyme Q10 levels are hypothesized to play important roles. In our experiments, fluvastatin and/or coenzyme Q10 was administered chronically to normocholesterolaemic or hypercholaestherolaemic rats, and the modifications of the calcium homeostasis and the strength of their muscles were investigated. While hypercholesterolaemia did not change the frequency of sparks, fluvastatin increased it on muscles both from normocholesterolaemic and from hypercholesterolaemic rats. This effect, however, was not mediated by a chronic modification of the ryanodine receptor as shown by the unchanged ryanodine binding in the latter group. While coenzyme Q10 supplementation significantly reduced the frequency of the spontaneous calcium release events, it did not affect their amplitude and spatial spread in muscles from fluvastatin-treated rats. This indicates that coenzyme Q10 supplementation prevented the spark frequency increasing effect of fluvastatin without having a major effect on the amount of calcium released during individual sparks. In conclusion, we have found that fluvastatin, independently of the cholesterol level in the blood, consistently and specifically increased the frequency of calcium sparks in skeletal muscle cells, an effect which could be prevented by the addition of coenzyme Q10 to the diet. These results support theories favouring the role of calcium handling in the pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy and provide a possible pathway for the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 in statin treated patients symptomatic of this condition.

  15. Effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on simvastatin-induced myalgia.

    PubMed

    Young, Joanna M; Florkowski, Christopher M; Molyneux, Sarah L; McEwan, Roberta G; Frampton, Christopher M; George, Peter M; Scott, Russell S

    2007-11-01

    Myalgia is the most frequently reported adverse side effect associated with statin therapy and often necessitates reduction in dose, or the cessation of therapy, compromising cardiovascular risk management. One postulated mechanism for statin-related myalgia is mitochondrial dysfunction through the depletion of coenzyme Q(10), a key component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This pilot study evaluated the effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on statin tolerance and myalgia in patients with previous statin-related myalgia. Forty-four patients were randomized to coenzyme Q(10) (200 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks in combination with upward dose titration of simvastatin from 10 mg/day, doubling every 4 weeks if tolerated to a maximum of 40 mg/day. Patients experiencing significant myalgia reduced their statin dose or discontinued treatment. Myalgia was assessed using a visual analogue scale. There was no difference between combined therapy and statin alone in the myalgia score change (median 6.0 [interquartile range 2.1 to 8.8] vs 2.3 [0 to 12.8], p = 0.63), in the number of patients tolerating simvastatin 40 mg/day (16 of 22 [73%] with coenzyme Q(10) vs 13 of 22 [59%] with placebo, p = 0.34), or in the number of patients remaining on therapy (16 of 22 [73%] with coenzyme Q(10) vs 18 of 22 [82%] with placebo, p = 0.47). In conclusion, coenzyme Q(10) supplementation did not improve statin tolerance or myalgia, although further studies are warranted.

  16. Synergistic cosolubilization of omega-3 fatty acid esters and CoQ10 in dilutable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Deutch-Kolevzon, Rivka; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-10-01

    Water-dilutable microemulsions were prepared and loaded with two types of omega-3 fatty acid esters (omega-3 ethyl esters, OEE; and omega-3 triacylglycerides, OTG), each separately and together with ubiquinone (CoQ(10)). The microemulsions showed high and synergistic loading capabilities. The linear fatty acid ester (OEE) solubilization capacity was greater than that of the bulky and robust OTG. The location of the guest molecules within the microemulsions at any dilution point were determined by electrical conductivity, viscosity, DSC, SAXS, cryo-TEM, SD-NMR, and DLS. We found that OEE molecules pack well within the surfactant tails to form reverse micelles that gradually, upon water dilution, invert into bicontinuous phase and finally into O/W droplets. The CoQ(10) increases the stabilization and solubilization of the omega-3 fatty acid esters because it functions as a kosmotropic agent in the micellar system. The hydrophobic and bulky OTG molecule strongly interferes with the tail packing and spaces them significantly - mainly in the low and medium range water dilutions. When added to the micellar system, CoQ(10) forms some reverse hexagonal mesophases. The inversion into direct micelles is more difficult in comparison to the OEE system and requires additional water dilution. The OTG with or without CoQ(10) destabilizes the structures and decreases the solubilization capacity since it acts as a chaotropic agent to the micellar system and as a kosmotropic agent to hexagonal packing. These results explain the differences in the behavior of these molecules with vehicles that solubilize them in aqueous phases. Temperature disorders the bicontinuous structures and reduces the supersaturation of the system containing OEE with CoQ(10); as a result CoQ(10) crystallization is retarded.

  17. Coenzyme Q10, carotenoid, tocopherol, and retinol levels in cord plasma from multiethnic subjects in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Franke, A A; Lai, J F; Morrison, C M; Pagano, I; Li, X; Halm, B M; Soon, R; Custer, L J

    2013-09-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (Q10), carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol are the major circulating lipid-phase micronutrients (LPM) known to help mitigate oxidative damage and prevent chronic diseases. However, the functions of these compounds in newborns are little understood. This is due, in part, to the paucity of studies reporting their concentrations in this population. We measured Q10, carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol in cord plasma from 100 multiethnic subjects living in Hawaii using HPLC with diode array and electrochemical detection. Appropriate internal standards were used including, for the first time, custom designed oxidized (UN10) and reduced (UL10) Q10 analogues. These compounds reflected the oxidation of UL10 to UN10 that occurred during sample processing and analysis and thus permitted accurate adjustments of natively circulating Q10 levels. All LPM measured were much lower in cord than in peripheral plasma. Cord plasma levels of total carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol were approximately 10-fold, 3- to 5-fold and 1.5- to 3-fold lower than those in children or women. Cord plasma levels of total Q10 (TQ10; median, 113 ng/mL) were approximately 2-fold or 7- to 9-fold lower than peripheral plasma levels of neonates or children and adults, respectively. In contrast, the UN10/TQ10 ratio was substantially higher in cord (24%) than in peripheral plasma of children (3-4%) or adults (9%). Among the 5 ethnic groups in our cohort, no differences were observed in the levels of UN10, UL10, or TQ10. However, significant differences in many of the LPM were observed between ethnicities. More research is needed to explain these phenomena.

  18. Stability and bioequivalence studies of two marketed formulations of coenzyme Q10 in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Kommuru, T R; Ashraf, M; Khan, M A; Reddy, I K

    1999-07-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a highly lipophilic compound present in the inner mitochondrial membrane, is essential for production of cellular energy in the form of ATP. CoQ10 is used as an antioxidant and also in the treatment of various cardiovascular disorders. The relative bioavailabilities of powder filled capsule (I) and oil-based formulation (II) of CoQ10 were compared in beagle dogs in an open, randomized, multiple dose, cross-over design. Poor and slow absorption characteristics were observed for both the formulations. The AUC, Cmax, and Tmax for formulation I and II are comparable (p < 0.05) where the values for formulation I are 22.84 +/- 6.3 micrograms ml-1 h, 0.51 +/- 0.11 microgram/ml, and 6.1 +/- 2.0 h whereas the values for formulation II are 24.32 +/- 5.6 micrograms ml-1 h, 0.55 +/- 0.16 microgram/ml, and 6.6 +/- 2.3 h, respectively. Stability of CoQ10 at various temperature and humidity conditions and its photostability were studied. Various antioxidants were evaluated to determine the type and amount of antioxidant(s) required to improve the stability of CoQ10. Large extent of degradation was observed at 45 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The effect of humidity conditions on degradation was insignificant. Among the various antioxidants studied, mixture of ascorbic acid (5%) and EDTA (0.1%) offered better protection than phenolic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA), butylated hydroxy toluene (BHT), or propyl gallate (PG). Further, increasing concentrations of phenolic antioxidants (from 0.1 to 0.3%) accelerated the degradation.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 Suppresses TNF-α-Induced Inflammatory Reaction In Vitro and Attenuates Severity of Dermatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Wu, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xiangling; Wang, Wenhan; Song, Sijia; Liang, Ke; Yang, Min; Guo, Linlin; Zhao, Yunpeng; Li, Ruifeng

    2016-02-01

    Anti-oxidant coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) is commonly used in clinic. Recently, Co-Q10 was reported to antagonize TNF-α-induced inflammation and play a protective role in various inflammatory conditions. However, its role in dermatitis is unknown. Herein, RAW264.7 macrophage cell line was cultured with stimulation of TNF-α, and administration of Co-Q10 alleviated TNF-α-mediated inflammatory reaction in vitro. Furthermore, oxazolone-induced dermatitis mice model was established, and treatment of Co-Q10 markedly attenuated dermatitis phenotype in this mice model. Moreover, the protective role of Co-Q10 in vitro and in dermatitis was probably due to its repression on NF-κB signaling. Collectively, Co-Q10 may represent a potential molecular target for prevention and treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  20. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, José Martins; Germano Martins, Antonio César

    2010-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 μm was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  1. Innovation in the pharmaceutical industry: New estimates of R&D costs.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, Joseph A; Grabowski, Henry G; Hansen, Ronald W

    2016-05-01

    The research and development costs of 106 randomly selected new drugs were obtained from a survey of 10 pharmaceutical firms. These data were used to estimate the average pre-tax cost of new drug and biologics development. The costs of compounds abandoned during testing were linked to the costs of compounds that obtained marketing approval. The estimated average out-of-pocket cost per approved new compound is $1395 million (2013 dollars). Capitalizing out-of-pocket costs to the point of marketing approval at a real discount rate of 10.5% yields a total pre-approval cost estimate of $2558 million (2013 dollars). When compared to the results of the previous study in this series, total capitalized costs were shown to have increased at an annual rate of 8.5% above general price inflation. Adding an estimate of post-approval R&D costs increases the cost estimate to $2870 million (2013 dollars).

  2. Causal Relationships among Technology Acquisition, Absorptive Capacity, and Innovation Performance: Evidence from the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jieun; Hong, Suckchul; Ohm, Jay; Yang, Taeyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of absorptive capacity in improving a firm’s innovation performance. Specifically, we examine firm interaction with the knowledge and capabilities of outside organizations and the effect on the firm’s bottom line. We use the impulse-response function of the vector auto-regressive model to gain insight into this relationship by estimating the time required for the effect of each activity level to reach outputs, the spillover effects. We apply this methodology to pharmaceutical firms, which we classify into two sub-groups – large firms and medium and small firms – based on sales. Our results show that the impact of an activity on any other activity is delayed by three years for large firms and by one to two years for small and medium firms. PMID:26181440

  3. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  4. A consideration of the patentability of enantiomers in the pharmaceutical industry in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chris P; Ullrich, John W

    2008-06-01

    During the last thirty years, concern over stereoselectivity of drug action has drawn a great deal of interest within the pharmaceutical field due to an improved understanding of the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of enantiomers. Developing single enantiomers versus racemates or introducing a single enantiomer following the development of the racemic mixture appears to be the new trend. The intellectual property status of single enantiomers from racemates may be unclear. Drug discoverers and patent attorneys must examine the examples of the past to establish an appropriate pathway towards the development and intellectual property protection of chiral drugs. The review will focus on the patenting of an enantiomer in view of the prior art disclosure for the racemic mixture.

  5. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose Jr.; Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar

    2010-05-21

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 mum was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  6. Electronic noses and tongues: applications for the food and pharmaceutical industries.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Elizabeth A; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Dea, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (e-nose) is designed to crudely mimic the mammalian nose in that most contain sensors that non-selectively interact with odor molecules to produce some sort of signal that is then sent to a computer that uses multivariate statistics to determine patterns in the data. This pattern recognition is used to determine that one sample is similar or different from another based on headspace volatiles. There are different types of e-nose sensors including organic polymers, metal oxides, quartz crystal microbalance and even gas-chromatography (GC) or combined with mass spectroscopy (MS) can be used in a non-selective manner using chemical mass or patterns from a short GC column as an e-nose or "Z" nose. The electronic tongue reacts similarly to non-volatile compounds in a liquid. This review will concentrate on applications of e-nose and e-tongue technology for edible products and pharmaceutical uses.

  7. Causal Relationships among Technology Acquisition, Absorptive Capacity, and Innovation Performance: Evidence from the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jieun; Hong, Suckchul; Ohm, Jay; Yang, Taeyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of absorptive capacity in improving a firm's innovation performance. Specifically, we examine firm interaction with the knowledge and capabilities of outside organizations and the effect on the firm's bottom line. We use the impulse-response function of the vector auto-regressive model to gain insight into this relationship by estimating the time required for the effect of each activity level to reach outputs, the spillover effects. We apply this methodology to pharmaceutical firms, which we classify into two sub-groups--large firms and medium and small firms--based on sales. Our results show that the impact of an activity on any other activity is delayed by three years for large firms and by one to two years for small and medium firms.

  8. Isolation and characterization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from pharmaceutical industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Tahrani, Leyla; Soufi, Leila; Mehri, Ines; Najjari, Afef; Hassan, Abdenaceur; Van Loco, Joris; Reyns, Tim; Cherif, Ameur; Ben Mansour, Hedi

    2015-12-01

    Contamination of surface waters in underdeveloped countries is a great concern. Treated and untreated wastewaters have been discharged into rivers and streams, leading to possible waterborne infection outbreaks which may represent a significant dissemination mechanism of antibiotic resistance genes among pathogenic bacterial populations. The present study aims to determine the multi-drug resistance patterns among isolated and identified bacterial strains in a pharmaceutical wastewater effluent in north Tunisia. Fourteen isolates were obtained and seven of them were identified. These isolates belong to different genera namely, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Exiguobacterium, Delftia and Morganella. Susceptibility patterns of these isolates were studied toward commonly used antibiotics in Tunisia. All the identified isolates were found to have 100% susceptibility against colistin sulfate and 100% resistance against amoxicillin. Among the 11 antibiotics tested, six patterns of multi-drug resistance were obtained. The potential of the examined wastewater effluent in spreading multi-drug resistance and the associated public health implications are discussed.

  9. Scalable technology for the extraction of pharmaceutics: outcomes from a 3 year collaborative industry/academia research programme.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ian; Thickitt, Chris; Douillet, Nathalie; Freebairn, Keith; Johns, David; Mountain, Clive; Wood, Philip; Edwards, Neil; Rooke, David; Harris, Guy; Keay, David; Mathews, Ben; Brown, Roland; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2013-03-22

    This paper reports on some of the key outcomes of a 3 year £1.5m Technology Strategy Board (TSB) funded research programme to develop a small footprint, versatile, counter-current chromatography purification technology and methodology which can be operated at a range of scales in both batch and continuous modes and that can be inserted into existing process plant and systems. Our consortium, integrates technology providers (Dynamic Extractions) and the scientific development team (Brunel) with end user needs (GSK & Pfizer), addressing major production challenges aimed at providing flexible, low capital platform technology driving substantial cost efficiency in both drug development and drug manufacturing processes. The aims of the Technology Strategy Board's high value manufacturing programme are described and how the academic/industry community were challenged to instigate step changes in the manufacturing of high value pharmaceuticals. This paper focusses on one of the themes of the TSB research programme, "Generate a Comprehensive Applications Portfolio". It outlines 15 applications from this portfolio that can be published in the public domain and gives four detailed case studies illustrating the range of application of the technology on the separation of (1) isomers, (2) polar compounds, (3) crude mixtures and (4) on the removal of impurities. Two of these case studies that were scaled up demonstrate between 10 and 20% lower solvent usage and were projected to have significant cost savings compared to conventional solid phase silica gel chromatography at procss scale demonstrating that the latest high performance countercurrent chromatography technology is a competitive platform technolgy for the pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Coenzyme Q10 serum concentration and redox status in European adults: influence of age, sex, and lipoprotein concentration

    PubMed Central

    Niklowitz, Petra; Onur, Simone; Fischer, Alexandra; Laudes, Matthias; Palussen, Michael; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is synthesized in almost all human tissues and presumably involved in age-related alterations and diseases. Here, we examined the impact of aging and sex on the serum CoQ10 status in 860 European adults ranging in age from 18 to 82 years. We identified an inverse U-shaped relationship between CoQ10 concentration and age. Women showed lower cholesterol-adjusted CoQ10 levels than men, irrespective of age. As observed in both sexes, the decrease in CoQ10 concentration in older subjects was accompanied by a shift in the redox status in favour of the oxidized form. A strong positive correlation was found for total CoQ10 and cholesterol concentrations (Spearman’s, p≤1E-74). We found strong negative correlations between total (Spearman’s, p≤1E-07) and between cholesterol-adjusted CoQ10 concentration (Spearman’s, p≤1E-14) and the proportion of the oxidized form of CoQ10. These correlations were not dependent on age and sex and were attenuated by supplementation with 150 mg/day reduced CoQ10 for 14 days. Overall, our results are useful to define risk groups with critical CoQ10 status in humans. In particular, older subjects were characterized by impaired CoQ10 status due to their lowered serum CoQ10 concentration and concomitant decrease of CoQ10 redox capacity. PMID:27257350

  11. Nanoparticles in the pharmaceutical industry and the use of supercritical fluid technologies for nanoparticle production.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Pratik; Sandhu, Harpreet; Singhal, Dharmendra; Malick, Waseem; Shah, Navnit; Kislalioglu, M Serpil

    2012-05-01

    Poor aqueous solubility of drug candidates is a major challenge for the pharmaceutical scientists involved in drug development. Particle size reduction appears as an effective and versatile option for solubility improvement. Nanonization is an attractive solution to improve the bioavailability of the poorly soluble drugs, improved therapies, in vivo imaging, in vitro diagnostics and for the production of biomaterials and active implants. In drug delivery, application of nanotechnology is commonly referred to as Nano Drug Delivery Systems (NDDS). In this article, commercially available nanosized drugs, their dosage forms and proprietors, as well as the methods used for preparation like milling, high pressure homogenization, vacuum deposition, and high temperature evaporation were listed. Unlike the traditional methods used for the particle size reduction, supercritical fluid-processing techniques offer advantages ranging from superior particle size control to clean processing. The primary focus of this review article is the use of supercritical CO2 based technologies for small particle generation. Particles that have the smooth surfaces, small particle size and distribution and free flowing can be obtained with particular SCF techniques. In almost all techniques, the dominating process variables may be thermodynamic and aerodynamic in nature, and the design of the particle collection environment. Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS), Supercritical Anti Solvent (SAS) and Particles from Gas Saturated Solutions (PGSS) are three groups of processes which lead to the production of fine and monodisperse powders. Few of them may also control crystal polymorphism. Among the aforementioned processes, RESS involves dissolving a drug in a supercritical fluid (SCF) and passing it through an appropriate nozzle. Rapid depressurization of this solution causes an extremely rapid nucleation of the product. This process has been known for a long time but its application

  12. Influence of gel and powdered formulations of coenzyme Q10 on metabolic parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Harry G; Echard, Bobby; Bagchi, Debasis; Clouatre, Dallas; Perricone, Nicholas V

    2010-07-01

    The healthful benefits of two commercially available formulations of coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10), one in gel and the other in a powdered form, on a variety of metabolic parameters in Sprague-Dawley rats (SD) were compared to control. The principal metabolic parameters examined were systolic blood pressure (SBP), DNA fragmentation, and free radical formation in hepatic and renal tissues. Compared to control, the powdered formulation significantly decreased SBP in the normotensive SD, whereas both commercial formulations lowered hepatic and renal DNA fragmentation and free radical formation. The gel-formulation lowered hepatic DNA fragmentation more than the powdered-formulation. In conclusion, both gel- and powdered-formulations of Co Q10 significantly influenced the metabolic parameters assessed in a favorable fashion, with the powdered-formulation more effective on SBP and the gel-formulation more effective on overcoming hepatic DNA fragmentation. From the data, we conclude that the choice of the formulation containing Co Q10 to be used should be based on the desired healthful benefits.

  13. Preparation, characterization and in silico modeling of biodegradable nanoparticles containing cyclosporine A and coenzyme Q10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankola, D. D.; Durbin, E. W.; Buxton, G. A.; Schäfer, J.; Bakowsky, U.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2010-02-01

    Combination therapy will soon become a reality, particularly for those patients requiring poly-therapy to treat co-existing disease states. This becomes all the more important with the increasing cost, time and complexity of the drug discovery process prompting one to look at new delivery systems to increase the efficacy, safety and patient compliance of existing drugs. Along this line, we attempted to design nano-scale systems for simultaneous encapsulation of cyclosporine A (CsA) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and model their encapsulation and release kinetics. The in vitro characterization of the co-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the surfactant nature, concentration, external phase volume, droplet size reduction method and drug loading concentration can all influence the overall performance of the nanoparticles. The semi-quantitative solubility study indicates the strong influence of CoQ10 on CsA entrapment which was thought to be due to an increase in the lipophilicity of the overall system. The in vitro dissolution profile indicates the influence of CoQ10 on CsA release (64%) to that of individual particles of CsA, where the release is faster and higher (86%) on 18th day. The attempts to model the encapsulation and release kinetics were successful, offering a possibility to use such models leading to high throughput screening of drugs and their nature, alone or in combination for a particular polymer, if chi-parameters are understood.

  14. Plasma coenzyme Q10 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Orhan; Bilen, Habip; Keles, Sadullah; Alp, H. Hakan; Keleş, Mevlüt Sait; Yıldırım, Kenan; Öndaş, Osman; Pınar, L. Can; Civelekler, Mustafa; Baykal, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the relationship between proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDRP) and plasma coenzyme Q10(CoQ10) concentration. METHODS Patients with type 2 diabetes and PDRP were determined to be the case group (n=50). The control group was consist of healthy individuals (n=50). Plasma CoQ10 and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in both groups. RESULTS Ubiquinone-10 (Coenzyme Q10) levels in PDRP and control subjects are 3.81±1.19µmol/L and 1.91±0.62µmol/L, respectively. Plasma MDA levels in PDRP and control subjects were 8.16±2µmol/L and 3.44±2.08µmol/L, respectively. Ratio of Ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 in PDRP and control subjects were 0.26±0.16 and 1.41±0.68, respectively. CONCLUSION The ratio of ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 is found lower in patients with PDRP. High levels of plasma ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 ratio indicate the protective effect on diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24195048

  15. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Rotenone-Induced Mitochondrial Fission.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Ning; Zimmerman, Mary; Milledge, Gaolin Z; Hou, Xiao-Lin; Cheng, Jiang; Wang, Zhen-Hai; Li, P Andy

    2017-02-11

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. It is usually accompanied by an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics and changes in mitochondrial morphology that are associated with impaired function. The objectives of this study were to identify the effects of rotenone, a drug known to mimic the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, on mitochondrial dynamics. Additionally, this study explored the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) against rotenone-induced cytotoxicity in murine neuronal HT22 cells. Our results demonstrate that rotenone elevates protein expression of mitochondrial fission markers, Drp1 and Fis1, and causes an increase in mitochondrial fragmentation as evidenced through mitochondrial staining and morphological analysis. Water-soluble CoQ10 prevented mitochondrial dynamic imbalance by reducing Drp1 and Fis1 protein expression to pre-rotenone levels, as well as reducing rotenone treatment-associated mitochondrial fragmentation. Hence, water-soluble CoQ10 may have therapeutic potential in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

  16. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Sherwin Y; Shih, Frederick F; Champagne, Elaine T; Daigle, Kim W; Patindol, James A; Mattison, Christopher P; Boue, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenisation of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 56 cycles. The resulting emulsion had a particle size range of 200-300 nm and the absolute zeta potential varied between 8.4 and 10.6 mV. CoQ10 retention of the emulsion and freeze dried products, determined by a hexane rinse, was 98.2%. Reconstitution of the freeze dried product in Mcllvaine citrate-phosphate buffers with pH values of 3-5 and temperatures at 4 and 25 °C had very little effect on the range and distribution of the nanoparticles' size. The inflection point of the zeta potential and pH plot occurred at the first pKa of succinic acid (pH 4.2), indicating succinate as the main influence over zeta potential.

  17. In vitro effects of zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Giacone, Filippo; Condorelli, Rosita A; Mongioì, Laura M; Bullara, Valentina; La Vignera, Sandro; Calogero, Aldo E

    2016-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species favor reproductive processes at low concentrations, but damage spermatozoa and decrease their fertilizing capacity at high concentrations. During infection and/or inflammation of the accessory sex glands reactive oxygen species overproduction may occur which, in turn, may negatively impact on sperm motility, sperm DNA fragmentation, and lipid peroxidation. A number of nutraceutical formulations containing antioxidant molecules have been developed to counteract the deleterious effects of the oxidative stress. A recent formulation containing zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 is present in the pharmaceutical market. Based on these premises, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of this combination on spermatozoa in vitro. The study was conducted on 24 men (32.2 ± 5.5 years): 12 normozoospermic men and 12 asthenozoospermic patients. Spermatozoa from each sample were divided into two control aliquots (aliquot A and B) and an aliquot incubated with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (aliquot C). After 3 h of incubation, the following parameters were evaluated: progressive motility, number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 maintained sperm motility in normozoospermic men (37.7 ± 1.2 % vs. 35.8 ± 2.3 % at time zero) and improved it significantly in asthenozoospermic patients (26.5 ± 1.9 % vs. 18.8 ± 2.0 % at time zero) (p < 0.01). This resulted in a significantly higher (p < 0.01) number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up in both normozospermic men (4.1 ± 0.9 vs. 3.3 ± 1.0 millions) and asthenozooseprmic patients (3.2 ± 0.8 vs. 1.6 ± 0.5 millions). Finally, a statistically significant lower sperm lipid peroxidation was found after incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (p < 0

  18. HPLC method development for evolving applications in the pharmaceutical industry and nanoscale chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, Steven Louis

    As scientific research trends towards trace levels and smaller architectures, the analytical chemist is often faced with the challenge of quantitating said species in a variety of matricies. The challenge is heightened when the analytes prove to be potentially toxic or possess physical or chemical properties that make traditional analytical methods problematic. In such cases, the successful development of an acceptable quantitative method plays a critical role in the ability to further develop the species under study. This is particularly true for pharmaceutical impurities and nanoparticles (NP). The first portion of the research focuses on the development of a part-per-billion level HPLC method for a substituted phenazine-class pharmaceutical impurity. The development of this method was required due to the need for a rapid methodology to quantitatively determine levels of a potentially toxic phenazine moiety in order to ensure patient safety. As the synthetic pathway for the active ingredient was continuously refined to produce progressively lower amounts of the phenazine impurity, the approach for increasingly sensitive quantitative methods was required. The approaches evolved across four discrete methods, each employing a unique scheme for analyte detection. All developed methods were evaluated with regards to accuracy, precision and linear adherence as well as ancillary benefits and detriments -- e.g., one method in this evolution demonstrated the ability to resolve and detect other species from the phenazine class. The second portion of the research focuses on the development of an HPLC method for the quantitative determination of NP size distributions. The current methodology for the determination of NP sizes employs tunneling electron microscopy (TEM), which requires sample drying without particle size alteration and which, in many cases, may prove infeasible due to cost or availability. The feasibility of an HPLC method for NP size characterizations evolved

  19. In Vitro Screening of 1877 Industrial and Consumer Chemicals, Pesticides and Pharmaceuticals in up to 782 Assays: ToxCast Phase I and II (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Phase II of the ToxCast program, the U.S. EPA and Tox21 partners screened 1,877 chemicals, including pesticides; food, cosmetics and personal care ingredients; pharmaceuticals; and industrial chemicals. Testing used a 782 in vitro assays across 7 technologies and multiple bi...

  20. Gateway to the Future. Skill Standards for the Bioscience Industry for Technical Workers in Pharmaceutical Companies, Biotechnology Companies, and Clinical Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Bioscience Industry Skills Standards Project (BISSP) is developing national, voluntary skill standards for technical jobs in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and clinical laboratories in hospitals, universities, government, and independent settings. Research with employees and educators has pinpointed three issues underscoring the…

  1. Encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 in a simple emulsion-based nutraceutical formulation and application in cheese manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Stratulat, Iulia; Britten, Michel; Salmieri, Stéphane; St-Gelais, Daniel; Champagne, Claude P; Fustier, Patrick; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-12-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was encapsulated successfully in a nutraceutical formulation composed of calcium caseinate, flaxseed oil and lecithin. The effect of CoQ10 on the physico-chemical stability of emulsions was compared to emulsions without CoQ10. According to ATR-FTIR analysis, emulsions were found to be more stable in the presence of CoQ10. The emulsion with CoQ10 was used as a functional cream in the cheese making process. The retention rate of CoQ10, composition and cheese yield were also determined. Quantification of CoQ10 by HPLC showed that the retention of this lipophilic agent into cheese matrix was 93% and equivalent to the total lipid retention. Protein retention and cheese yield were not affected by the addition of the functional cream. For the first time, CoQ10 has been encapsulated in a cheese matrix, hence demonstrating that CoQ10 could be used in the development of functional cheeses.

  2. Improvement of coenzyme Q10 production: mutagenesis induced by high hydrostatic pressure treatment and optimization of fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yahong; Tian, Yuting; Yue, Tianli

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone), a potent antioxidative dietary supplement, was produced by submerged fermentation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens instead of chemical synthesis or solvent extraction. Agrobacterium tumefaciens 1.2554 was subjected to mutagenesis using a series of treatments including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment, UV irradiation, and diethyl sulfate (DES) treatment to obtain mutant strains showing higher CoQ10 production than wild-type strains. A mutant strain PK38 with four genetic markers was isolated: the specific CoQ10 content of the mutant strain increased by 52.83% compared with the original strain. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on CoQ10 production with PK38 were studied. Sucrose at concentration of 30 g/l was tested as the best carbon source, and yeast extract at concentration of 30 g/l supplemented with 10 g/l of ammonium sulfate was identified to be the most favorable for CoQ10 production using PK38. Fed-batch culture strategy was then used for increasing production of CoQ10 in 5-l fermentor. Using the exponential feeding fed-batch culture of sucrose, cell growth and CoQ10 formation were significantly improved. With this strategy, the final cell biomass, CoQ10 production, and specific CoQ10 production increased by 126.11, 173.12, and 22.76%, respectively, compared to those of batch culture.

  3. Controlling the sucrose concentration increases Coenzyme Q10 production in fed-batch culture of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Ha, Suk-Jin; Kim, Sang-Yong; Seo, Jin-Ho; Moon, Hee-Jung; Lee, Kyoung-Mi; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2007-08-01

    The production yield of Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) from the sucrose consumed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens KCCM 10413 decreased, and high levels of exopolysaccharide (EPS) accumulated after switching from batch culture to fed-batch culture. Therefore, we examined the effect of sucrose concentration on the fermentation profile by A. tumefaciens. In the continuous fed-batch culture with the sucrose concentration maintained constantly at 10, 20, 30, and 40 g l(-1), the dry cell weight (DCW), specific CoQ(10) content, CoQ(10) production, and the production yield of CoQ(10) from the sucrose consumed increased, whereas EPS production decreased as maintained sucrose concentration decreased. The pH-stat fed-batch culture system was adapted for CoQ(10) production to minimize the concentration of the carbon source and osmotic stress from sucrose. Using the pH-stat fed-batch culture system, the DCW, specific CoQ(10) content, CoQ(10) production, and the product yield of CoQ(10) from the sucrose consumed increased by 22.6, 13.7, 39.3, and 39.3%, respectively, whereas EPS production decreased by 30.7% compared to those of fed-batch culture in the previous report (Ha SJ, Kim SY, Seo JH, Oh DK, Lee JK, Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 74:974-980, 2007). The pH-stat fed-batch culture system was scaled up to a pilot scale (300 l), and the CoQ(10) production results obtained (626.5 mg l(-1) of CoQ(10) and 9.25 mg g DCW(-1) of specific CoQ(10) content) were similar to those obtained at the laboratory scale. Thus, an efficient and highly competitive process for microbial CoQ(10) production is available.

  4. Coenzyme Q(10) and selenium in statin-associated myopathy treatment.

    PubMed

    Fedacko, Jan; Pella, Daniel; Fedackova, Petra; Hänninen, Osmo; Tuomainen, Petri; Jarcuska, Peter; Lopuchovsky, Tomas; Jedlickova, Lucia; Merkovska, Lucia; Littarru, Gian Paolo

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of coenzyme Q10 and selenium supplementation administered to patients with statin-associated myopathy (SAM). Sixty eligible patients entered the pilot study. Laboratory examination (CoQ10, selenium, creatin kinase) and intensity of SAM (visual scale) were performed at baseline, after 1 month, and at the end of study at month 3. Plasma levels of CoQ10 increased from 0.81 ± 0.39 to 3.31 ± 1.72 μmol/L in the active group of patients treated by CoQ10, compared with the placebo (p = 0.001). Also, the symptoms of SAM significantly improved in the active group (p < 0.001): the intensity of muscle pain decreased from 6.7 ± 1.72 to 3.2 ± 2.1 (p < 0.01, -53.4 ± 28.2%); muscle weakness decreased from 7.0 ± 1.63 to 2.8 ± 2.34 (p < 0.01, -60 ± 24.0%); muscle cramps decreased from 5.33 ± 2.06 to 1.86 ± 2.42, p < 0.01, -65 ± 28%); tiredness decreased from the initial 6.7 ± 1.34 to 1.2 ± 1.32 (p < 0.01, -82 ± 22%). We did not observe any significant changes in the placebo group. In conclusion, supplementation of statin-treated patients with CoQ10 resulted in a decrease in the symptoms of SAM, both in absolute numbers and intensity. Additional selenium supplementation was not associated with any statistically significant decrease of SAM. However, it is not possible to draw any definite conclusions, even though this study was carried out in double-blind fashion, because it involved a small number of patients.

  5. Implementing US-style anti-fraud laws in the Australian pharmaceutical and health care industries.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas A; Urbas, Gregor; Skillen, Lesley

    2011-05-02

    This article critically analyses the prospects for introducing United States anti-fraud (or anti-false claims) laws in the Australian health care setting. Australian governments spend billions of dollars each year on medicines and health care. A recent report estimates that the money lost to corporate fraud in Australia is growing at an annual rate of 7%, but that only a third of the losses are currently being detected. In the US, qui tam provisions - the component of anti-fraud or anti-false claims laws involving payments to whistleblowers - have been particularly successful in providing critical evidence allowing public prosecutors to recover damages for fraud and false claims made by corporations in relation to federal and state health care programs. The US continues to strengthen such anti-fraud measures and to successfully apply them to a widening range of areas involving large public investment. Australia still suffers from the absence of any comprehensive scheme that not only allows treble damages recovery for fraud on the public purse, but crucially supports such actions by providing financial encouragement for whistleblowing corporate insiders to expose evidence of fraud. Potential areas of application could include direct and indirect government expenditure on health care service provision, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, defence, carbon emissions compensation and tobacco-related illness. The creation in Australia of an equivalent to US anti-false claims legislation should be a policy priority, particularly in a period of financial stringency.

  6. Electronic Noses and Tongues: Applications for the Food and Pharmaceutical Industries

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Elizabeth A.; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Dea, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (e-nose) is designed to crudely mimic the mammalian nose in that most contain sensors that non-selectively interact with odor molecules to produce some sort of signal that is then sent to a computer that uses multivariate statistics to determine patterns in the data. This pattern recognition is used to determine that one sample is similar or different from another based on headspace volatiles. There are different types of e-nose sensors including organic polymers, metal oxides, quartz crystal microbalance and even gas-chromatography (GC) or combined with mass spectroscopy (MS) can be used in a non-selective manner using chemical mass or patterns from a short GC column as an e-nose or “Z” nose. The electronic tongue reacts similarly to non-volatile compounds in a liquid. This review will concentrate on applications of e-nose and e-tongue technology for edible products and pharmaceutical uses. PMID:22163873

  7. Vermicomposting of herbal pharmaceutical industry waste: earthworm growth, plant-available nutrient and microbial quality of end materials.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepika; Suthar, Surindra

    2012-05-01

    Efforts were made to decompose herbal pharmaceutical industrial waste (HPIW) spiked with cow dung (CD) using Eisenia fetida. A total of five vermibeds: T(1) - HPIW (0%+CD 100%, control), T(2) - HPIW (25%), T(3) - HPIW (50%), T(4) - HPIW (75%) and T(5) - HPIW (100%) were used for vermicomposting. The changes in biology and chemistry of vermibeds were measured after ten days interval. E. fetida showed high growth and cocoon production rate in all vermibeds. The vermicomposted material contained great population of fungi 6.0-40.6 (CFU × 10(5)g(-1)), bacteria 220-1276.0 (CFU × 10(8)g(-1)) and actinomycetes 410.0-2962.0 (CFU × 10(5)g(-1)) than initial material. Vermicomposted material was rich in plant-available forms of nutrients (N-NO(3)(-),PO(4)(3-),available K and SO(4)(-2)). Results suggested that noxious industrial waste can be converted into valuable product for sustainable soil fertility programme.

  8. Nanomicellar formulation of coenzyme Q10 (Ubisol-Q10) effectively blocks ongoing neurodegeneration in the mouse 1-methyl-4- phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model: potential use as an adjuvant treatment in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sikorska, Marianna; Lanthier, Patricia; Miller, Harvey; Beyers, Melissa; Sodja, Caroline; Zurakowski, Bogdan; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Pandey, Siyaram; Sandhu, Jagdeep K.

    2016-01-01

    Although the support for the use of antioxidants, such as coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD) comes from the extensive scientific evidence, the results of conducted thus far clinical trials are inconclusive. It is assumed that the efficacy of CoQ10 is hindered by insolubility, poor bioavailability, and lack of brain penetration. We have developed a nanomicellar formulation of CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10) with improved properties, including the brain penetration, and tested its effectiveness in mouse MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl- 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine) model with the objectives to assess its potential use as an adjuvant therapy for PD. We used a subchronic MPTP model (5-daily MPTP injections), characterized by 50% loss of dopamine neurons over a period of 28 days. Ubisol-Q10 was delivered in drinking water. Prophylactic application of Ubisol-Q10, started 2 weeks before the MPTP exposure, significantly offset the neurotoxicity (approximately 50% neurons died in MPTP group vs. 17% in MPTP+ Ubisol-Q10 group by day 28). Therapeutic application of Ubisol-Q10, given after the last MPTP injection, was equally effective. At the time of intervention on day 5 nearly 25% of dopamine neurons were already lost, but the treatment saved the remaining 25% of cells, which otherwise would have died by day 28. This was confirmed by cell counts, analyses of striatal dopamine levels, and improved animals’ motor skill on a beam walk test. Similar levels of neuroprotection were obtained with 3 different Ubisol-Q10 concentrations tested, that is, 30 mg, 6 mg, or 3 mg CoQ10/kg body weight/day, showing clearly that high doses of CoQ10 were not required to deliver these effects. Furthermore, the Ubisol-Q10 treatments brought about a robust astrocytic activation in the brain parenchyma, indicating that astroglia played an active role in this neuroprotection. Thus, we have shown for the first time that Ubisol-Q10 was capable of halting the neurodegeneration already in progress

  9. Heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation systems for the treatment of an industrial pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Molina, R; Pariente, M I

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the treatment of wastewater coming from a pharmaceutical plant through a continuous heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process using an Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15 nanocomposite catalyst. This catalyst was preliminary tested in a batch stirred tank reactor (STR), to elucidate the influence of significant parameters on the oxidation system, such as temperature, initial oxidant concentration and initial pH of the reaction medium. In that case, a temperature of 80 degrees C using an initial oxidant concentration corresponding to twice the theoretical stoichiometric amount for complete carbon depletion and initial pH of ca. 3 allow TOC degradation of around 50% after 200 min of contact time. Thereafter, the powder catalyst was extruded with bentonite to prepare pellets that could be used in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Results in the up-flow FBR indicate that the catalyst shows high activity in terms of TOC mineralization (ca. 60% under steady-state conditions), with an excellent use of the oxidant and high stability of the supported iron species. The activity of the catalyst is kept constant, at least, for 55h of reaction. Furthermore, the BOD(5)/COD ratio is increased from 0.20 to 0.30, whereas the average oxidation stage (AOS) changed from 0.70 to 2.35. These two parameters show a high oxidation degree of organic compounds in the outlet effluent, which enhances its biodegradability, and favours the possibility of a subsequent coupling with a conventional biological treatment.

  10. The FDA guidance for industry on PROs: the point of view of a pharmaceutical company.

    PubMed

    Arpinelli, Fabio; Bamfi, Francesco

    2006-10-31

    The importance of the patients point of view on their health status is widely recognised. Patient-reported outcomes is a broad term encompassing a large variety of different health data reported by patients, as symptoms, functional status, Quality of Life and Health-Related Quality of Life. Measurements of Health-Related Quality of Life have been developed during many years of researches, and a lot of validated questionnaires exist. However, few attempts have been made to standardise the evaluation of instruments characteristics, no recommendations are made about interpretation on Health-Related Quality of Life results, especially regarding the clinical significance of a change leading a therapeutic approach. Moreover, the true value of Health-Related Quality of Life evaluations in clinical trials has not yet been completely defined. An important step towards a more structured and frequent use of Patient-Reported Outcomes in drug development is represented by the FDA Guidance, issued on February 2006. In our paper we aim to report some considerations on this Guidance. Our comments focus especially on the characteristics of instruments to use, the Minimal Important Difference, and the methods to calculate it. Furthermore, we present the advantages and opportunities of using the Patient-Reported Outcomes in drug development, as seen by a pharmaceutical company. The Patient-Reported Outcomes can provide additional data to make a drug more competitive than others of the same pharmacological class, and a well demonstrated positive impact on the patient' health status and daily life might allow a higher price and/or the inclusion in a reimbursement list. Applying extensively the FDA Guidance in the next trials could lead to a wider culture of subjective measurement, and to a greater consideration for the patient's opinions on his/her care. Moreover, prescribing doctors and payers could benefit from subjective information to better define the value of drugs.

  11. Drug reformulations and repositioning in pharmaceutical industry and its impact on market access: reassessment of nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Murteira, Susana; Ghezaiel, Zied; Karray, Slim; Lamure, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Medicinal products that have been developed and approved for one disease may be the object of additional clinical development in other disease areas or of additional pharmaceutical development for new and different formulations. The newly developed products can be named as repositioned or reformulated products, respectively. Market access of repositioned or reformulated products in Europe and the United States is an interesting object of study as it may provide clarity about which parameters are assessed and considered to bring added value, other than the molecule itself. As such, we aim to evaluate if the added value of repositioned or reformulated medicinal products can be systematically described, quantified, and predicted. As a first step toward investigating the impact of market access on drug research and development trends for repositioned and reformulated products, it is necessary to have consistency in the designations for the case studies evaluated in this project. In an attempt to achieve that consistency, the current study aims to propose harmonized definitions for the repositioning and reformulation strategies and to propose a taxonomy for the medicinal products derived thereof. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to collect information on existing cases of repositioning or reformulation. A search strategy was developed by defining the search objectives, targeted data sources, search keywords, and inclusion/exclusion criteria for the retrieved documents. Results A total of 505 publications were retrieved through a search of the main data sources. The screenings and the ad hoc search led to a total of 56 publications to be used for the case study data extraction. In total, 87 repositioning and/or reformulation cases were found described in the literature, 23 of which presented different definitions and/or classifications by different authors. Conclusion Given the disparity and inconsistency of terminologies and

  12. Atorvastatin reduces the myocardial content of coenzyme Q10 in isoproterenol-induced heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Andalib, S; Shayanfar, A; Khorrami, A; Maleki-Dijazi, N; Garjani, A

    2014-05-01

    The present study was aimed to study the effects of different doses of atorvastatin on Co Q10 content in the myocardium tissue in rats. A subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day) for 10 days was used for the induction of heart failure. Rats were randomly assigned to control, treatment with atorvastatin (5, 10, 20 mg/kg/day) and treatment with atorvastatin plus coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg/day). Coenzyme Q10 content of myocardium was measured using HPLC method with UV detector after hemodynamic parameters measurements. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the myocardium was evaluated in order to determine coenzyme Q10 antioxidative effect. A high dose of atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) was significantly reduced the myocardium content of coenzyme Q10 as compared with isoproterenol treated group (p<0.001). Compared with atorvastatin alone treated animals, co-administration of coenzyme Q10 with atorvastatin was improved the level of coenzyme Q10 in the myocardium (p<0.05, p<0.001). Increasing the dose of atorvastatin also led to increase in MDA content of the myocardium (p<0.01). Serum lipid profile showed no changes in atorvastatin treated groups. The results of this study demonstrate that high doses of atorvastatin reduce coenzyme Q10 content of the myocardium and increase lipid peroxidation in myocardium which is reversed by coenzyme Q10 co-administration.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity: potential benefit and mechanism of Co-enzyme Q10 supplementation in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Co-enzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) is an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Most cells are sensitive to co-enzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) deficiency. This deficiency has been implicated in several clinical disorders such as heart failure, hypertension, Parkinson’s disease and obesity. The lipid lowering drug statin inhibits conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and lowers plasma Co-Q10 concentrations. However, supplementation with Co-Q10 improves the pathophysiological condition of statin therapy. Recent evidence suggests that Co-Q10 supplementation may be useful for the treatment of obesity, oxidative stress and the inflammatory process in metabolic syndrome. The anti-inflammatory response and lipid metabolizing effect of Co-Q10 is probably mediated by transcriptional regulation of inflammation and lipid metabolism. This paper reviews the evidence showing beneficial role of Co-Q10 supplementation and its potential mechanism of action on contributing factors of metabolic and cardiovascular complications. PMID:24932457

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity: potential benefit and mechanism of Co-enzyme Q10 supplementation in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Ashraful; Rahman, Md Mahbubur

    2014-01-01

    Co-enzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) is an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Most cells are sensitive to co-enzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) deficiency. This deficiency has been implicated in several clinical disorders such as heart failure, hypertension, Parkinson's disease and obesity. The lipid lowering drug statin inhibits conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and lowers plasma Co-Q10 concentrations. However, supplementation with Co-Q10 improves the pathophysiological condition of statin therapy. Recent evidence suggests that Co-Q10 supplementation may be useful for the treatment of obesity, oxidative stress and the inflammatory process in metabolic syndrome. The anti-inflammatory response and lipid metabolizing effect of Co-Q10 is probably mediated by transcriptional regulation of inflammation and lipid metabolism. This paper reviews the evidence showing beneficial role of Co-Q10 supplementation and its potential mechanism of action on contributing factors of metabolic and cardiovascular complications.

  15. Ubisol-Q10 Prevents Glutamate-Induced Cell Death by Blocking Mitochondrial Fragmentation and Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Santosh; Mehta, Suresh L; Milledge, Gaolin Z.; Huang, Xinyu; Li, Haining; Li, P. Andy

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major events that lead to the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) during glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has widely been used for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Comparing to traditional lipid-soluble CoQ10, water soluble CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10) has high intracellular and intra-mitochondrial distribution. The aims of the present study are to determine the neuroprotective effects of Ubisol-Q10 on glutamate-induced cell death and to explore its functional mechanisms. HT22 neuronal cells were exposed to glutamate. Cell viability was measured and mitochondrial fragmentation was assessed by mitochondrial imaging. The mPTP opening was determined by mitochondrial membrane potential and calcium retention capacity. The results revealed that the anti-glutamate toxicity effects of Ubisol-Q10 was associated with its ability to block mitochondrial fragmentation, to maintain calcium retention capacity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and to prevent mPTP formation, AIF release, and DNA fragmentation. We concluded that Ubisol-Q10 protects cells from glutamate toxicity by preserving the integrity of mitochondrial structure and function. Therefore, adequate CoQ10 supplementation may be beneficial in preventing cerebral stroke and other disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27194946

  16. Coenzyme Q10 treatments influence the lifespan and key biochemical resistance systems in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Strachecka, Aneta; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Paleolog, Jerzy; Borsuk, Grzegorz; Bajda, Milena; Krauze, Magdalena; Merska, Malwina; Chobotow, Jacek

    2014-07-01

    Natural bioactive preparations that will boost apian resistance, aid body detoxification, or fight crucial bee diseases are in demand. Therefore, we examined the influence of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 2,3-dimethoxy, 5-methyl, 6-decaprenyl benzoquinone) treatment on honeybee lifespan, Nosema resistance, the activity/concentration of antioxidants, proteases and protease inhibitors, and biomarkers. CoQ10 slows age-related metabolic processes. Workers that consumed CoQ10 lived longer than untreated controls and were less infested with Nosema spp. Relative to controls, the CoQ10-treated workers had higher protein concentrations that increased with age but then they decreased in older bees. CoQ10 treatments increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, GPx, catalase, glutathione S-transferase), protease inhibitors, biomarkers (aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase), the total antioxidant potential level, and concentrations of uric acid and creatinine. The activities of acidic, neutral, and alkaline proteases, and concentrations of albumin and urea were lower in the bees that were administered CoQ10. CoQ10 could be taken into consideration as a natural diet supplement in early spring before pollen sources become available in the temperate Central European climate. A response to CoQ10 administration that is similar to mammals supports our view that Apis mellifera is a model organism for biochemical gerontology.

  17. Shining the light on physician-pharmaceutical and medical device industry financial relationships.

    PubMed

    Conn, Lawrence; Vernaglia, Lawrence

    2011-09-01

    Long subject to legal scrutiny under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, financial ties between physicians and drug manufacturers have recently come under additional pressure as a result of recently enacted state and federal disclosure laws and state gift restrictions, the latest coming in connection with the Federal Health Reform Law. These "sunshine" laws have been motivated by the concern that gifts and payments by manufacturers to physicians may lead to conflicts of interest and improperly influence physicians in their drug- or device-prescribing decisions. As a backdrop to these new laws, it is helpful to review prior guidance regarding manufacturer-physician financial relationships, both from the federal government and the industry itself. These laws do not prohibit physician involvement with industry in research and education, but they impose various new compliance requirements on these relationships, and also in many cases, require public disclosure of arrangements that previously were treated as confidential. It is still too early to tell if these laws will stifle innovation, but they do require a heightened degree of diligence to avoid, at a minimum, adverse publicity and embarrassment and, at worst, criminal and civil liability.

  18. Health technology assessment and comparative effectiveness research: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanni; Thomas, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    We briefly review the characteristics of several established health technology assessment (HTA) programs in industrialized societies including Germany, the UK and France. Special attention is paid on two issues: the position of HTA in coverage decision making and the role of economic assessment in evaluation processes. Although law makers in the USA have barred the use of NICE's cost/quality-adjusted life year or similar health economics approaches by public payers for coverage decision making, there are suggestions of prioritizing relative efficacy evaluation over economic assessment under a comparative effectiveness research (CER) framework to inform payment rates of public payers (an approach similar to German and French HTA processes). However, such an approach is unlikely to prove viable. It should also be noted that, if cost considerations are made explicit in US CER policy decisions, CER may become an unsustainable approach undermined by a conflicting emphasis on both cost containment and a demand for costly comparative evidence. On the other hand, properly designed CER initiatives can serve as a facilitator of more efficient research activities and drug development models. With these points in mind, the likely pathway of US CER is explored and the plausible impact on industry innovation is discussed.

  19. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Patients and the General Public towards the Interactions of Physicians with the Pharmaceutical and the Device Industry: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fadlallah, Racha; Nas, Hala; Naamani, Dana; El-Jardali, Fadi; Hammoura, Ihsan; Al-Khaled, Lina; Brax, Hneine; Kahale, Lara; Akl, Elie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the evidence on the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of patients and the general public towards the interactions of physicians with the pharmaceutical and the device industry. Methods We included quantitative and qualitative studies addressing any type of interactions between physicians and the industry. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE in August 2015. Two reviewers independently completed data selection, data extraction and assessment of methodological features. We summarized the findings narratively stratified by type of interaction, outcome and country. Results Of the 11,902 identified citations, 20 studies met the eligibility criteria. Many studies failed to meet safeguards for protecting from bias. In studies focusing on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry, the percentages of participants reporting awareness was higher for office-use gifts relative to personal gifts. Also, participants were more accepting of educational and office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. The findings were heterogeneous for the perceived effects of physician-industry interactions on prescribing behavior, quality and cost of care. Generally, participants supported physicians’ disclosure of interactions through easy-to-read printed documents and verbally. In studies focusing on surgeons and device manufacturers, the majority of patients felt their care would improve or not be affected if surgeons interacted with the device industry. Also, they felt surgeons would make the best choices for their health, regardless of financial relationship with the industry. Participants generally supported regulation of surgeon-industry interactions, preferably through professional rather than governmental bodies. Conclusion The awareness of participants was low for physicians’ receipt of personal gifts. Participants also reported greater acceptability and fewer perceived influence for office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. Overall, there appears to

  20. Thermodynamic implications of high Q10 of thermo-TRP channels in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Etsuro; Ikemoto, Yusuke; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    The activity of thermo-transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is highly dependent on temperature, and thus thermo-TRP reactions have a high temperature coefficient Q10. In thermodynamics, a high value of Q10 indicates the existence of a large activation energy (i.e., a large enthalpy) over a short period during the transition process between the closed and open states of the channels. The Gibbs free energy equation shows that a large entropy is required to compensate for this large enthalpy and permit activation of the channels, suggesting a large conformational change of the channels. These large values of enthalpy and entropy seem to be a match for the values of the unfolding process of globular proteins. We outline these thermodynamic issues in thermo-TRPs. PMID:27493512

  1. Nontarget analysis of polar contaminants in freshwater sediments influenced by pharmaceutical industry using ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terzic, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure for a reliable identification of nontarget polar contaminants in aquatic sediments was developed, based on the application of ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). The procedure was applied for the analysis of freshwater sediment that was highly impacted by wastewater discharges from the pharmaceutical industry. A number of different contaminants were successfully identified owing to the high mass accuracy of the QTOFMS system, used in combination with high chromatographic resolution of UHPLC. The major compounds, identified in investigated sediment, included a series of polypropylene glycols (n=3-16), alkylbenzene sulfonate and benzalkonium surfactants as well as a number of various pharmaceuticals (chlorthalidone, warfarin, terbinafine, torsemide, zolpidem and macrolide antibiotics). The particular advantage of the applied technique is its capability to detect less known pharmaceutical intermediates and/or transformation products, which have not been previously reported in freshwater sediments.

  2. Antibacterial Effects of Cinnamon: From Farm to Food, Cosmetic and Pharmaceutical Industries

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Izadi, Morteza; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times, because of their antimicrobial properties increasing the safety and shelf life of food products by acting against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria. Plants have historically been used in traditional medicine as sources of natural antimicrobial substances for the treatment of infectious disease. Therefore, much attention has been paid to medicinal plants as a source of alternative antimicrobial strategies. Moreover, due to the growing demand for preservative-free cosmetics, herbal extracts with antimicrobial activity have recently been used in the cosmetic industry to reduce the risk of allergies connected to the presence of methylparabens. Some species belonging to the genus Cinnamomum, commonly used as spices, contain many antibacterial compounds. This paper reviews the literature published over the last five years regarding the antibacterial effects of cinnamon. In addition, a brief summary of the history, traditional uses, phytochemical constituents, and clinical impact of cinnamon is provided. PMID:26378575

  3. Antibacterial Effects of Cinnamon: From Farm to Food, Cosmetic and Pharmaceutical Industries.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Izadi, Morteza; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-09-11

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times, because of their antimicrobial properties increasing the safety and shelf life of food products by acting against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria. Plants have historically been used in traditional medicine as sources of natural antimicrobial substances for the treatment of infectious disease. Therefore, much attention has been paid to medicinal plants as a source of alternative antimicrobial strategies. Moreover, due to the growing demand for preservative-free cosmetics, herbal extracts with antimicrobial activity have recently been used in the cosmetic industry to reduce the risk of allergies connected to the presence of methylparabens. Some species belonging to the genus Cinnamomum, commonly used as spices, contain many antibacterial compounds. This paper reviews the literature published over the last five years regarding the antibacterial effects of cinnamon. In addition, a brief summary of the history, traditional uses, phytochemical constituents, and clinical impact of cinnamon is provided.

  4. [Effects of culture conditions on coenzyme Q10 production by Rhizobium radiobacter by metabolic flux analysis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zu-fang; Du, Guo-cheng; Chen, Jian

    2005-04-01

    Metabolic pathway network of CoQ10 synthesis by R. radiobacter WSH2601 were instructed. The metabolic flux and its changes were determined under the conditions of changing DO concentration and addition of 1% CSL in the medium. The results illustrated that the Ru5P flux (r7) increased by 26.6 when increasing the DO concentration, r7 increased by 17.2 when addition of 1% CSL. The ratio of EMP and HMP flux as well as TCA flux decreased at these two conditions. DPP flux had a little change at these two conditions. Therefore, the CoQ10 accumulation is greatly determined by two key enzymes activities of condensation reaction between p-hydroxybenzoate acid (PHB) and decaprenyl diphosphate (DPP). The nodes of G6P, pyruvate and PEP are principal nodes in primary metabolism of CoQ10 fermentation. The flexibility of principal nodes was evaluated that the G6P node is elastic, while pyruvate node is weakly flexibility, at the condition of changing culture conditions. The increase of DCW is associated with the improvement of HMP pathway flux.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 restores oocyte mitochondrial function and fertility during reproductive aging

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Meir, Assaf; Burstein, Eliezer; Borrego-Alvarez, Aluet; Chong, Jasmine; Wong, Ellen; Yavorska, Tetyana; Naranian, Taline; Chi, Maggie; Wang, Ying; Bentov, Yaakov; Alexis, Jennifer; Meriano, James; Sung, Hoon-Ki; Gasser, David L; Moley, Kelle H; Hekimi, Siegfried; Casper, Robert F; Jurisicova, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Female reproductive capacity declines dramatically in the fourth decade of life as a result of an age-related decrease in oocyte quality and quantity. The primary causes of reproductive aging and the molecular factors responsible for decreased oocyte quality remain elusive. Here, we show that aging of the female germ line is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction associated with decreased oxidative phosphorylation and reduced Adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) level. Diminished expression of the enzymes responsible for CoQ production, Pdss2 and Coq6, was observed in oocytes of older females in both mouse and human. The age-related decline in oocyte quality and quantity could be reversed by the administration of CoQ10. Oocyte-specific disruption of Pdss2 recapitulated many of the mitochondrial and reproductive phenotypes observed in the old females including reduced ATP production and increased meiotic spindle abnormalities, resulting in infertility. Ovarian reserve in the oocyte-specific Pdss2-deficient animals was diminished, leading to premature ovarian failure which could be prevented by maternal dietary administration of CoQ10. We conclude that impaired mitochondrial performance created by suboptimal CoQ10 availability can drive age-associated oocyte deficits causing infertility. PMID:26111777

  6. Pharmaceutical virtue.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily

    2006-06-01

    In the early history of psychopharmacology, the prospect of developing technologically sophisticated drugs to alleviate human ills was surrounded with a fervor that could be described as religious. This paper explores the subsequent history of the development of psychopharmacological agents, focusing on the ambivalent position of both the industry and its employees. Based on interviews with retired pharmaceutical employees who were active in the industry in the 1950s and 1960s when the major breakthroughs were made in the development of MAOIs and SSRIs, the paper explores the initial development of educational materials for use in sales campaigns. In addition, based on interviews with current employees in pharmaceutical sales and marketing, the paper describes the complex perspective of contemporary pharmaceutical employees who must live surrounded by the growing public vilification of the industry as rapacious and profit hungry and yet find ways to make their jobs meaningful and dignified. The paper will contribute to the understudied problem of how individuals function in positions that require them to be part of processes that on one description constitute a social evil, but on another, constitute a social good.

  7. [Evolution of the international intellectual property rights system: patent protection for the pharmaceutical industry and access to medicines].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela Costa; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Hasenclever, Lia; de Melo, Luiz Martins

    2007-02-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the international intellectual property rights system in three phases and the implications for public health, especially for the implementation of policies for access to medicines. During the first phase, characterized by the Paris and Berne Convention, signatory countries defined which technological fields should be protected (or not). Under the second phase, with the enforcement of the WTO TRIPS Agreement, countries are obliged to grant patent protection for all technological fields, including for the pharmaceutical industry. Within their national legislations, countries also have the opportunity to implement access to TRIPS flexibilities for medicines. With the third phase, characterized by the negotiation and signing of bilateral and regional free trade agreements, countries will have to implement TRIPS-plus provisions which may have negative implications for the TRIPS flexibilities as well as for policies for access to medicines. The authors conclude that the currently proposed international intellectual property rights system favors patent-holder rights and that a balance is needed between patent holders' and health rights.

  8. Federalism, the economic-industrial health care complex and high-cost pharmaceutical assistance in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Elize Massard; Costa, Nilson do Rosario

    2015-04-01

    Brazil has a relevant, although relatively unknown, special medicines programme that distributes high-cost products, such as drugs needed for cancer treatments. In 2009, the purchase of these medicines became the responsibility of the Brazilian Federal Government. Until then, there were no clear norms regarding the responsibilities, in terms of the management/financing of these medicines, of the Brazilian Federal Government and of the states themselves. This qualitative study analyses the policy process needed to transfer this programme to the central government. The study examines the reports of the Tripartite Commission between 2000 and 2012, and in-depth interviews with eleven key informants were conducted. The study demonstrates that throughout the last decade, institutional changes have been made in regard to the federal management of these programmes (such as recentralisation of the purchasing of medicines). It concludes that these changes can be explained because of the efficiency of the coordinating mechanisms of the Federal Government. These findings reinforce the idea that the Ministry of Health is the main driver of public health policies, and it has opted for the recentralisation of activities as a result of the development project implicit in the agenda of the Industrial and Economic Heal.

  9. Quality by design: scale-up of freeze-drying cycles in pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Roberto; Fissore, Davide; Barresi, Antonello A; Rastelli, Massimo

    2013-09-01

    This paper shows the application of mathematical modeling to scale-up a cycle developed with lab-scale equipment on two different production units. The above method is based on a simplified model of the process parameterized with experimentally determined heat and mass transfer coefficients. In this study, the overall heat transfer coefficient between product and shelf was determined by using the gravimetric procedure, while the dried product resistance to vapor flow was determined through the pressure rise test technique. Once model parameters were determined, the freeze-drying cycle of a parenteral product was developed via dynamic design space for a lab-scale unit. Then, mathematical modeling was used to scale-up the above cycle in the production equipment. In this way, appropriate values were determined for processing conditions, which allow the replication, in the industrial unit, of the product dynamics observed in the small scale freeze-dryer. This study also showed how inter-vial variability, as well as model parameter uncertainty, can be taken into account during scale-up calculations.

  10. Respecting the right to access to medicines: Implications of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights for the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suerie

    2013-06-14

    What are the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies with regard to access to medicines? The state-based international human rights framework has long struggled with the issue of the human rights obligations of non-state actors, a question sharpened by economic globalization and the concomitant growing power of private for-profit actors ("business"). In 2011, after a six-year development process, the UN Human Rights Council unanimously endorsed the Guiding Principles advanced by the UN Secretary General's Special Representative on Business and Human Rights, John Ruggie. The Ruggie Principles sought to clarify and differentiate the responsibilities of states and non-state actors-in this case, "business" -with respect to human rights. The framework centered on "three core principles: the state duty to protect against human rights abuses by third parties, including business; the corporate responsibility to respect human rights; and the need for more effective access to remedies." The "Protect, Respect, and Remedy" Framework emerged from a review of many industrial sectors operating from local to global scales, in many regions of the world, and involving multiple stakeholder consultations. However, their implications for the pharmaceutical industry regarding access to medicines remain unclear. This article analyzes the 2008 Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in relation to Access to Medicines advanced by then-UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health, Paul Hunt, in light of the Ruggie Principles. It concludes that some guidelines relate directly to the industry's responsibility to respect the right to access to medicines, and form a normative baseline to which firms should be held accountable. It also finds that responsibility for other guidelines may better be ascribed to states than to private actors, based on conceptual and practical considerations. While not discouraging the pharmaceutical industry from making additional

  11. Valorization of solid wastes from chestnut industry processing: Extraction and optimization of polyphenols, tannins and ellagitannins and its potential for adhesives, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Aires, Alfredo; Carvalho, Rosa; Saavedra, Maria José

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential of chestnut peels to produce pomaces enhanced with tannins to be used in the formulations of wood adhesives, leather tanning or as natural antioxidants in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry. An analytical procedure was planned as 2 factorial design to analyze the influence of solvent (water, Na2SO3 and NaOH at different concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% in water) and extraction time (30, 60, and 120, 240, 480 and 960min) on extraction yield, pH, Stiasny index, and tannins. HPLC-diode array detector equipped with an ionization mass spectrophotometer was used to assess the polyphenol composition. Our results showed that both extraction properties and phytochemicals were significantly affected (P<0.001) by all independent factors. The main tannins identified were the hydrolyzable gallic acid, vescalagin castalagin and ellagic acid, and the condensed epigallocatechin, catechin and epicatechin. The solvent 1% Na2SO3 was more effective to extract the condensed tannins whilst hydrolyzable tannins were extracted efficiently by 1% NaOH. The multivariable analysis and the Pearson's correlation coefficients showed a direct association between Stiasny number and the average levels of condensed tannins.

  12. 77 FR 72385 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Commission Determination (1) To Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Commission Determination (1) To Review... into the United States of certain coenzyme Q10 products by reason of infringement of certain claims...

  13. Emerging Genetic Counselor Roles within the Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries: as Industry Interest Grows in Rare Genetic Disorders, How are Genetic Counselors Joining the Discussion?

    PubMed

    Field, Tessa; Brewster, Stephanie Jo; Towne, Meghan; Campion, MaryAnn W

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry (BPI) has focused drug development at the mass-market level targeting common medical issues. However, a recent trend is the development of therapies for orphan or rare disorders, including many genetic disorders. Developing treatments for genetic disorders requires an understanding of the needs of the community and translating genomic information to clinical and non-clinical audiences. The core skills of genetic counselors (GCs) include a deep knowledge of genetics and ability to communicate complex information to a broad audience, making GCs a choice fit for this shift in drug development. To date there is limited data defining the roles GCs hold within this industry. This exploratory study aimed to define the roles and motivation of GCs working in BPI, assess job satisfaction, and identify translatable skills and current gaps in GC training programs. The authors surveyed 26 GCs working in BPI in the United States; 79 % work for companies focused on rare disorders. GC positions in BPI are growing, with 57 % of respondents being the first GC in their role. GCs in BPI continue to utilize core genetic counseling competencies, though 72 % felt their training did not fully prepare them for BPI. These data suggest opportunities for exposure to BPI in GC training to better prepare future generations of GCs for these career opportunities. GC satisfaction was high in BPI, notably in areas traditionally reported as less satisfying on the National Society for Genetic Counselors Professional Status Survey: salary and advancement opportunities. BPI's growing interest in rare disorders represents a career opportunity for GCs, addressing both historic areas of dissatisfaction for GCs and BPI's genomic communication needs.

  14. Stabilizing effects of coenzyme Q10 on potassium ion release, membrane potential and fluidity of rabbit red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Shinozawa, S; Araki, Y; Oda, T

    1980-09-01

    The effects of coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10) on potassium ion release, membrane potential and fluidity of rabbit red blood cells were studied. Co Q10 inhibited the increased potassium ion release induced by cetylamine or lysolecithin from the cells. Co Q10 slightly decreased the membrane potential monitored by changes in fluorescence intensity of cyanine dye, 3,3'-dipropyl-2,2'-thiodicarbocyanine iodide [diS-C3-(5)], and also slightly decreased the membrane fluidity measured by using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). These effects of Co Q10 on the membrane are considered to be due to its membrane stabilizing activity by interaction with lipid bilayers of the membrane.

  15. The efficacy and safety of coenzyme Q10 in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Guo; Sun, Miao-Xuan; Zhang, Wan-Li; Wang, Wen-Wen; Jin, Yi-Mei; Xie, Cheng-Long

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in order to arrive at qualitative and quantitative conclusions about the efficacy of CoQ10. Databases searched included PubMed, Google scholar, CNKI, Wan-Fang, and the Cochrane Library from inception to March 2016. We only included sham-controlled, randomized clinical trials of CoQ10 intervention for motor dysfunction in patients with PD. Relevant measures were extracted independently by two investigators. Weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated with random-effects models. Eight studies with a total of 899 patients were included. Random-effects analysis revealed a pooled WMD of 1.02, indicating no significant difference when CoQ10 treatment compared with placebo in terms of UPDRS part 3 (p = 0.54). Meanwhile, the effect size of UPDRS part 1, UPDRS part 2, and total UPDRS scores were similar in CoQ10 group with in placebo group (p > 0.05). Moreover, we found CoQ10 was well tolerated compared with placebo group. Subgroup analysis showed that the effect size of CoQ10 in monocentric studies was larger than in multicenter studies. Using the GRADE criteria, we characterized the quality of evidence presented in this meta-analysis as moderate to high level. The current meta-analysis provided evidence that CoQ10 was safe and well tolerated in participants with PD and no superior to placebo in terms of motor symptoms. According to these results, we cannot recommend CoQ10 for the routine treatment of PD right now.

  16. Dietary coenzyme Q10 does not protect against cigarette smoke-augmented atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gairola, C Gary; Howatt, Deborah A; Daugherty, Alan

    2010-06-01

    Dietary coenzyme Q10 reduces spontaneous atherosclerosis in the apoE-deficient mouse model of experimental atherosclerosis. We have shown previously that exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS) enhances atherosclerotic lesion formation in apoE-deficient mice. The aim of the present study was to determine if CoQ10 protected against SSCS-mediated atherosclerosis. Female apoE-deficient mice were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet (SFD) alone, or supplemented with 1% wt/wt coenzyme Q10 (SFD-Q10). Mice in each diet group were exposed to SSCS for 4hrs/day, 5days/week in a whole-body exposure chamber maintained at 35+/-4mg smoke particulates/m(3). Mice kept in filtered ambient air served as controls. Mice were euthanized after either 6 or 15weeks of SSCS exposure and following measurements were performed: i) lung 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity; ii) plasma cholesterol and CoQ10 concentrations; iii) aortic intimal area covered by atherosclerotic lesions; and, iv) pathological characterization of lesions. Lung EROD activity increased in SSCS mice of both diet groups, confirming SSCS exposure. Plasma concentrations of CoQ10 in SFD-Q10-fed mice were increased markedly in comparison to SFD-fed mice. Plasma cholesterol concentrations and distributions of cholesterol in lipoprotein fractions were unaffected by SSCS exposure. Dietary supplementation with CoQ10 significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions in control mice. As reported previously, exposure to SSCS increased the size of lesions in apoE-/- mice at both time points. However, dietary supplementation with CoQ10 had no effect on atherosclerotic lesions augmented by SSCS exposure. The results suggest a role of oxidative processes in smoke-augmented atherosclerosis that are different than those mitigated by CoQ10.

  17. Treatment effect of coenzyme Q(10) and an antioxidant cocktail in fibroblasts of patients with Sanfilippo disease.

    PubMed

    Matalonga, Leslie; Arias, Angela; Coll, María Josep; Garcia-Villoria, Judit; Gort, Laura; Ribes, Antonia

    2014-05-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) plays a key role in the exchange of electrons in lysosomal membrane, which contributes to protons' translocation into the lumen and to the acidification of intra-lysosomal medium, which is essential for the proteolytic function of hydrolases responsible -when deficient- of a wide range of inherited lysosomal diseases such as Sanfilippo syndromes. Our aim was to evaluate whether treatment with CoQ10 or with an antioxidant cocktail (α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine and α-lipoic acid) were able to ameliorate the biochemical phenotype in cultured fibroblasts of Sanfilippo patients. Basal CoQ10 was analyzed in fibroblasts and Sanfilippo A patients showed decreased basal levels. However, no dysfunction in the CoQ10 biosynthesis pathways was found, revealing for the first time a secondary CoQ10 deficiency in Sanfilippo A fibroblasts. Cultured fibroblasts from five patients affected by Sanfilippo A and B diseases were treated with CoQ10 and an antioxidant cocktail. Upon CoQ10 treatment, none of the Sanfilippo A fibroblasts increased their residual enzymatic activity, but the two Sanfilippo B cell lines showed a statistically significant increase of their residual activity. The antioxidant treatment had no effect on the residual activity in all tested cell lines. Moreover, one Sanfilippo A and two Sanfilippo B fibroblasts showed a statistically significant reduction of glycosaminoglycans accumulation both, after 50 μmol/L CoQ10 and antioxidant treatment. Fibroblasts responsive to treatment enhanced their exocytosis levels. Our results are encouraging as some cellular alterations observed in Sanfilippo syndrome can be partially restored by CoQ10 or other antioxidant treatment in some patients.

  18. Effects of acute and 14-day coenzyme Q10 supplementation on exercise performance in both trained and untrained individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Matthew; Iosia, Mike; Buford, Thomas; Shelmadine, Brian; Hudson, Geoffrey; Kerksick, Chad; Rasmussen, Christopher; Greenwood, Mike; Leutholtz, Brian; Willoughby, Darryn; Kreider, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background To determine whether acute (single dose) and/or chronic (14-days) supplementation of CoQ10 will improve anaerobic and/or aerobic exercise performance by increasing plasma and muscle CoQ10 concentrations within trained and untrained individuals. Methods Twenty-two aerobically trained and nineteen untrained male and female subjects (26.1 ± 7.6 yrs, 172 ± 8.7 cm, 73.5 ± 17 kg, and 21.2 ± 7.0%) were randomized to ingest in a double-blind manner either 100 mg of a dextrose placebo (CON) or a fast-melt CoQ10 supplement (CoQ10) twice a day for 14-days. On the first day of supplementation, subjects donated fasting blood samples and a muscle biopsy. Subjects were then given 200 mg of the placebo or the CoQ10 supplement. Sixty minutes following supplement ingestion, subjects completed an isokinetic knee extension endurance test, a 30-second wingate anaerobic capacity test, and a maximal cardiopulmonary graded exercise test interspersed with 30-minutes of recovery. Additional blood samples were taken immediately following each exercise test and a second muscle biopsy sample was taken following the final exercise test. Subjects consumed twice daily (morning and night), 100 mg of either supplement for a period of 14-days, and then returned to the lab to complete the same battery of tests. Data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05. Results Plasma CoQ10 levels were significantly increased following 2 weeks of CoQ10 supplementation (p < 0.001); while a trend for higher muscle CoQ10 levels was observed after acute CoQ10 ingestion (p = 0.098). A trend for lower serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed following acute supplementation with CoQ10 (p = 0.06), whereas serum malondialdehyde (MDA) tended to be significantly higher (p < 0.05). Following acute ingestion of CoQ10, plasma CoQ10 levels were significantly correlated to muscle CoQ10 levels; maximal oxygen consumption; and treadmill time to exhaustion. A trend for increased time to

  19. The influence of ubiquinone (Co Q10) on the metabolic response to work.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, U; Bonetti, A; Campana, M; Cerioli, G; Solito, F; Novarini, A

    1989-03-01

    Ubiquinone (Co Q10) is a natural substance suitable for therapeutic use in cardiology and in the treatment of some muscular diseases. It might therefore be used during strenuous exercise (as in athletic competitions), especially in the presence of metabolic modifications which may justify its use. For this purpose, we have evaluated the effect of prolonged treatment with Co Q10 (100 mg/day per os for one month) on the biological changes induced by prolonged work on an ergometer bicycle (equal to about 50% of the single VO2max per 60 m'), immediately followed by exhaustive work (25 watts increase every 2 m'). From the venous blood of 12 healthy untrained subjects (students, volunteers, mean age 25.7 and body mass index 23.3) we examined some biological parameters [free fatty acids (FFA), free glycerol, lactate, glucose, insulin, CK] before, at the end of aerobic work, at the end of exhaustive work, and after 30 and 60 m' of the recovery phase. The same indexes, measured after identical times and work, were evaluated after one month of treatment with Co Q10. The only relevant modifications observed were those concerning FFA: at the end of aerobic work and after the administration of the drug, lower levels were reached (before, 1011 +/- 329 microEq/l; after 790 +/- 392; p less than 0.05); the same trend was observed at the end of the exhaustive work (1031 +/- 320 microEq/l vs 826 +/- 387; p less than 0.05). At the subsequent times, as well as for the other biological parameters examined, we did not observe any variation before or after the period of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 supplementation on performance and ascites mortality of broilers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ailian; Guo, Yuming; Yuan, Jianmin

    2004-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites mortality of broilers. A 3 x 3 factorial arrangement was employed with three levels (0, 75 and 150 mg/kg) of L-carnitine and three levels of CoQ10 (0, 20 and 40 mg/kg) supplementation during the experiment. Five hundred and forty one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into nine groups with six replicates each. All birds were fed with the basal diets from day 1 to 7 and changed to the experimental diets from day 8. During day 15 to 21 all the birds were exposed to low ambient temperature (15-18 degrees C) to induce ascites. The results showed that under this condition, growth performance of broilers were not significantly affected by CoQ10 or L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation during week 0-3 and 0-6, but body weight gain (BWG) of broilers was significantly reduced by 150 mg/ kg L-carnitine during week 0-6. Packed cell volume (PCV) of broilers was significantly decreased by L-carnitine and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P < 0.05). Erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF), ascites heart index (AHI) and ascites mortality of broilers were significantly decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. Though no significant changes were observed in total antioxidative capability (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) was increased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P < 0.05). Malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased by CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. The results indicate that dietary L-carnitine and CoQ10 supplementation reduce ascites mortality of broilers; the reason may be partially associated with their antioxidative effects.

  1. Impact of coenzyme Q-10 on parameters of cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle performance in older athletes taking statins.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Richard E; Lavie, Carl J; Dornelles, Adriana C

    2012-11-01

    Many older athletes take statins, which are known to have potential for muscle toxicity. The adverse effects of statins on muscles and the influence thereof on athletic performance remain uncertain. Coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10) may improve performance and reduce muscle toxicity in older athletes taking statins. This trial was designed to evaluate the benefits of CoQ10 administration for mitochondrial function in this population. Twenty athletes aged ≥ 50 years who were taking stable doses of statins were randomized to receive either CoQ10 (200 mg daily) or placebo for 6 weeks in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to evaluate the impact of CoQ10 on the anaerobic threshold (AT). Several secondary endpoints, including muscle function, cardiopulmonary exercise function, and subjective feelings of fitness, were also assessed. The mean (SD) change in AT from baseline was -0.59 (1.2) mL/kg/min during placebo treatment and 2.34 (0.8) mL/kg/min during CoQ10 treatment (P = 0.116). The mean change in time to AT from baseline was significantly greater during CoQ10 treatment than during placebo treatment (40.26 s vs 0.58 s, P = 0.038). Furthermore, muscle strength as measured by leg extension repetitions (reps) increased significantly during CoQ10 treatment, with a mean (SD) increase from baseline of 1.73 (2.9) reps during placebo treatment versus 3.78 (5.0) reps during CoQ10 treatment (P = 0.031). Many other parameters also tended to improve in response to CoQ10 treatment. Treatment with CoQ10 improved AT in comparison with baseline values in 11 of 19 (58%) subjects and in comparison with placebo treatment values in 10 of 19 (53%) subjects. Treatment with CoQ10 (200 mg daily) did not significantly improve AT in older athletes taking statins. However, it did improve muscle performance as measured by time to AT and leg strength (quadriceps muscle reps). Many other measures of mitochondrial function also tended to improve during CoQ10 treatment.

  2. A case of the rare variant of Klinefelter syndrome 47,XY,i(X)(q10).

    PubMed

    Song, Seung-Hun; Won, Hyung Jae; Yoon, Tae Ki; Cha, Dong Hyun; Shim, Jeong Yun; Shim, Sung Han

    2013-12-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common genetic form of male hypogonadism, but the phenotype becomes evident only after puberty. It is characterized by infertility, small testes, sparse body and facial hair, increased body weight, gynecomastia, increased LH and FSH, and a low level of testosterone. Early recognition and treatment of Klinefelter syndrome can significantly improve the patient's quality of life and prevent serious consequences. Here, we report an infertile man with a rare variant of Klinefelter syndrome with a 47, XY, i(X)(q10) karyotype.

  3. Pharmaceutical cocrystals: an overview.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Ning; Li, Mingzhong; Schlindwein, Walkiria; Malek, Nazneen; Davies, Angela; Trappitt, Gary

    2011-10-31

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are emerging as a new class of solid drugs with improved physicochemical properties, which has attracted increased interests from both industrial and academic researchers. In this paper a brief and systematic overview of pharmaceutical cocrystals is provided, with particular focus on cocrystal design strategies, formation methods, physicochemical property studies, characterisation techniques, and recent theoretical developments in cocrystal screening and mechanisms of cocrystal formations. Examples of pharmaceutical cocrystals are also summarised in this paper.

  4. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rat.

    PubMed

    Mirmalek, Seyed Abbas; Gholamrezaei Boushehrinejad, Ala; Yavari, Hassan; Kardeh, Bahareh; Parsa, Yekta; Salimi-Tabatabaee, Seyed Alireza; Yadollah-Damavandi, Soheila; Parsa, Tina; Shahverdi, Ehsan; Jangholi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats regarding biomarkers and morphologic changes. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Control group received intraperitoneal normal saline, while in sham and experimental groups 1 and 2 pancreatitis was induced with L-arginine. E1 and E2 groups were treated with a single dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg Q10, respectively. Serum lipase and amylase, along with pancreas IL-10, IL-1β, and TNF-α, were measured. For evaluation of oxidative stress, pancreatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were assessed. Histopathological examination for morphologic investigation was conducted. Serum amylase and lipase, as well as TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines, reverted with administration of Q10 in consistence with dosage. In contrast, Q10 assisted in boosting of IL-10 with higher dosage (200 mg/kg). A similar pattern for oxidative stress markers was noticed. Both MDA and MPO levels declined with increased dosage, contrary to elevation of SOD and GSH. Histopathology was in favor of protective effects of Q10. Our findings proved the amelioration of pancreatic injury by Q10, which suggest the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property of Q10 and its potential therapeutic role.

  5. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  6. Modifications of plasma proteome in long-lived rats fed on a coenzyme Q10-supplemented diet.

    PubMed

    Santos-González, Mónica; Gómez Díaz, Consuelo; Navas, Plácido; Villalba, José Manuel

    2007-08-01

    Dietary coenzyme Q(10) prolongs life span of rats fed on a PUFAn-6-enriched diet. Our aim was to analyze changes in the levels of plasma proteins of rats fed on a PUFAn-6 plus coenzyme Q(10)-based diet. This approach could give novel insights into the mechanisms of life span extension by dietary coenzyme Q(10) in the rat. Serum albumin, which decreases with aging in the rat, was significantly increased by coenzyme Q(10) supplementation both at 6 and 24 months. After depletion of the most abundant proteins by affinity chromatography, levels of less abundant plasma proteins were also studied by using 2D-electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass fingerprinting analysis. Our results have shown that lifelong dietary supplementation with coenzyme Q(10) induced significant decreases of plasma hemopexin, apolipoprotein H and inter-alpha-inhibitor H4P heavy chain (at both 6 and 24 months), preprohaptoglobin, fibrinogen gamma-chain precursor, and fetuin-like protein (at 6 months), and alpha-1-antitrypsin precursor and type II peroxiredoxin (at 24 months). On the other hand, coenzyme Q(10) supplementation resulted in significant increases of serine protease inhibitor 3, vitamin D-binding protein (at 6 months), and Apo A-I (at 24 months). Our results support a beneficial role of dietary coenzyme Q(10) decreasing oxidative stress and cardiovascular risk, and modulating inflammation during aging.

  7. Evaluation of Co-Q10 anti-gingivitis effect on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Kandwal, Abhishek; Singh, Nidhi; Singh, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deficiency of Co-Q10 has been found to be responsible for periodontal destruction; therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-gingivitis effect of Co-Q10 on plaque induced gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects with plaque induced gingivitis were enrolled in a split mouth randomized controlled trial. For each subject, scaling was randomly performed for any two quadrants, followed by the topical application of Co-Q10 randomly in a previously scaled and as an unscaled quadrant for a period of 28 days. Four treatment options were planned: option A: scaling only; option B: Co-Q10 along with scaling; option C: Co-Q10. Results: Marked reduction in gingival, bleeding, and plaque scores were recorded at the sites where C0-Q10 was applied. Mean±S.D of aforementioned periodontal parameters at 28th day showed significant reduction for option A, B, and C when compared with baseline. Conclusion: Promising results were obtained after the solitary application of Co-Q10 as well as when it was used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for treatment of plaque induced gingivitis. PMID:23493408

  8. Red yeast rice and coenzyme Q10 as safe alternatives to surmount atorvastatin-induced myopathy in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaset, Marwan; Safar, Marwa M; Mahmoud, Sawsan S; Negm, Seham A; Agha, Azza M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are the first line treatment for the management of hyperlipidemia. However, the primary adverse effect limiting their use is myopathy. This study examines the efficacy and safety of red yeast rice (RYR), a source of natural statins, as compared with atorvastatin, which is the most widely used synthetic statin. Statin interference with the endogenous synthesis of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) prompted the hypothesis that its deficiency may be implicated in the pathogenesis of statin-associated myopathy. Hence, the effects of combination of CoQ10 with either statin have been evaluated. Rats were rendered hyperlipidemic through feeding them a high-fat diet for 90 days, during the last 30 days of the diet they were treated daily with either atorvastatin, RYR, CoQ10, or combined regimens. Lipid profile, liver function tests, and creatine kinase were monitored after 15 and 30 days of drug treatments. Heart contents of CoQ9 and CoQ10 were assessed and histopathological examination of the liver and aortic wall was performed. RYR and CoQ10 had the advantage over atorvastatin in that they lower cholesterol without elevating creatine kinase, a hallmark of myopathy. RYR maintained normal levels of heart ubiquinones, which are essential components for energy production in muscles. In conclusion, RYR and CoQ10 may offer alternatives to overcome atorvastatin-associated myopathy.

  9. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study. PMID:26830658

  10. Monitoring of trace metals and pharmaceuticals as anthropogenic and socio-economic indicators of urban and industrial impact on surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vystavna, Yuliya

    2014-05-01

    The research focuses on the monitoring of trace metals and pharmaceuticals as potential anthropogenic indicators of industrial and urban influences on surface water in poorly gauged transboundary Ukraine/Russia region. This study includes analysis of tracers use for the indication of water pollution events, including controlled and emerging discharges, and discussion of the detection method of these chemicals. The following criteria were proposed for the evaluation of indicators: specificity (physical chemical properties), variability (spatial and temporal) and practicality (capacity of the sampling and analytical techniques). The combination of grab and passive water sampling (i.e. DGT and POCIS) procedure was applied for the determination of dissolved and labile trace metals (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) and pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, diazepam, paracetamol, caffeine, diclofenac and ketoprofen). Samples were analysed using ICP - MS (trace metals) and LC-MS/MS ESI +/- (pharmaceuticals). Our results demonstrate the distinctive spatial and temporal patterns of trace elements distribution along an urban watercourse. Accordingly, two general groups of trace metals have been discriminated: 'stable' (Cd and Cr) and 'time-varying' (Cu, Zn, Ni and Pb). The relationship Cd >> Cu > Ag > Cr ≥ Zn was proposed as an anthropogenic signature of the industrial and urban activities pressuring the environment from point sources (municipal wastewaters) and the group Pb - Ni was discussed as a relevant fingerprint of the economic activity (industry and transport) mainly from non-point sources (run-off, atmospheric depositions, etc.). Pharmaceuticals with contrasting hydro-chemical properties of molecules (water solubility, bioaccumulation, persistence during wastewater treatment processes) were discriminated on conservative, labile and with combined properties in order to provide information on wastewater treatment plant efficiency, punctual events (e.g. accidents on sewage

  11. Monitoring of trace metals and pharmaceuticals as anthropogenic and socio-economic indicators of urban and industrial impact on surface waters.

    PubMed

    Vystavna, Y; Le Coustumer, P; Huneau, F

    2013-04-01

    The research focuses on the monitoring of trace metals and pharmaceuticals as potential anthropogenic indicators of industrial and urban influences on surface water. This study includes analysis of tracers use for the indication of water pollution events and discussion of the detection method of these chemicals. The following criteria were proposed for the evaluation of indicators: specificity (physical chemical properties), variability (spatial and temporal), and practicality (capacity of the sampling and analytical techniques). The combination of grab and passive water sampling (i.e., diffusive gradient in the thin film and polar organic chemical integrated samplers) procedure was applied for the determination of dissolved and labile trace metals (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, diazepam, paracetamol, caffeine, diclofenac, and ketoprofen). Samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MS; trace metals) and liquid chromatography-tandem MS electrospray ionization+/- (pharmaceuticals). Our results demonstrate the distinctive spatial and temporal patterns of trace elements distribution along an urban watercourse. Accordingly, two general groups of trace metals have been discriminated: "stable" (Cd and Cr) and "time varying" (Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb). The relationship Cd > Cu > Ag > Cr ≥ Zn was proposed as an anthropogenic signature of the industrial and urban activities pressuring the environment from point sources (municipal wastewaters) and the group Pb-Ni was discussed as a relevant fingerprint of the economic activity (industry and transport) mainly from non-point sources (runoff, atmospheric depositions, etc.). Pharmaceuticals with contrasting hydro-chemical properties of molecules (water solubility, bioaccumulation, persistence during wastewater treatment processes) were discriminated on conservative, labile, and with combined properties in order to provide information on wastewater treatment plant

  12. Effectiveness of coenzyme Q10 in prophylactic treatment of migraine headache: an open-label, add-on, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shoeibi, Ali; Olfati, Nahid; Soltani Sabi, Mohsen; Salehi, Maryam; Mali, Sara; Akbari Oryani, Mahsa

    2017-03-01

    Despite the huge health and economic burden of migraine headache, few medications have been approved for its prophylactic treatment, most of which can potentially induce serious adverse effects. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a supplement and has shown preliminary benefits in migraine prophylaxis. We aimed to assess this effect in an adult population. This is an open-label, parallel, add-on, match-controlled trial. Eighty patients diagnosed with migraine headache based on International Headache Society criteria were allocated to receiving only their current preventive drugs or their current preventive drugs plus 100 mg CoQ10 daily, matching for their baseline characteristics, and were assessed for frequency and severity of attacks, and ≥50 % reduction in attack frequency per month. Thirty-six and 37 patients were analyzed in CoQ10 and control groups, respectively. Number of attacks per month dropped significantly in the CoQ10 group (mean decrease: 1.6 vs. 0.5 among CoQ10 and control groups, respectively, p < 0.001). A significant reduction was also evident in the severity of headaches (mean decrease: 2.3 vs. 0.6 among CoQ10 and control groups, respectively, p < 0.001). For ≥50 % reduction in the frequency of attacks per month, the number needed to treat was calculated as 1.6. No side effects for CoQ10 were observed. This study suggests that CoQ10 might reduce the frequency of headaches, and may also make them shorter in duration, and less severe, with a favorable safety profile.

  13. Design and Evaluation of Multi-functional Nanocarriers for Selective Delivery of Coenzyme Q10 to Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anjali; Soliman, Ghareb M.; Al-Hajaj, Noura; Sharma, Rishi; Maysinger, Dusica; Kakkar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Impairments of mitochondrial functions have been associated with failure of cellular functions in different tissues leading to various pathologies. We report here a mitochondria–targeted nanodelivery system for coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) which can reach mitochondria, and deliver CoQ10 in adequate quantities. Multifunctional nanocarriers based on ABC miktoarm polymers (A= PEG, B = polycaprolactone (PCL) and C = triphenylphosphonium bromide (TPPBr)) were synthesized using a combination of click chemistry with ring opening polymerization, self-assembled into nano-sized micelles, and were employed for CoQ10-loading. Drug loading capacity (60 weight%), micelle size (25–60 nm) and stability were determined using a variety of techniques. The micelles had a small critical association concentration, and were colloidally stable in solution for more than 3 months. The extraordinarily high CoQ10 loading capacity in the micelles is attributed to good compatibility between CoQ10 and PCL, as indicated by low Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. Confocal microscopy studies of fluorescently labeled polymer analog together with the mitochondria-specific vital dye label, indicated that the carrier did indeed reach mitochondria. The high CoQ10 loading efficiency allowed testing of micelles within a broad concentration range, and provided evidence for CoQ10 effectiveness in two different experimental paradigms: oxidative stress and inflammation. Combined results from chemical, analytical and biological experiments suggest that the new miktoarm-based carrier provides a suitable means of CoQ10 delivery to mitochondria without loss of drug effectiveness. The versatility of the click chemistry used to prepare this new mitochondria-targeting nanocarrier offers a widely applicable, simple and easily reproducible procedure to deliver drugs to mitochondria or other intracellular organelles. PMID:22148549

  14. Secretion of a soluble class I molecule encoded by the Q10 gene of the C57BL/10 mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, J J; Lew, A M; Flavell, R A; Coligan, J E

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the Q10 genes appears to be highly conserved amongst strains of mice and has only been found to be transcribed in the liver. An examination of the nucleotide sequence of the exon that normally encodes the transmembrane domain of class I molecules suggested that the Q10 gene encodes a secreted protein. We have established this by showing that L cells transformed with an expression vector containing the Q10 gene secrete a class I molecule which was identified with an antiserum raised against a peptide predicted by the Q10 transmembrane exon. Both the L cell-derived Q10 molecule and a class I protein immunoprecipitated from serum with this anti-peptide antiserum have mol. wts. of approximately 38 000; the Q10 molecule secreted by L cells is heterogeneous in mol. wt. This heterogeneity was drastically reduced after endoglycosidase F treatment, suggesting that Q10 molecules secreted into the serum by the liver may be glycosylated differently from those secreted by L cells. Endoglycosidase F treatment of both the L cell and serum forms of the soluble molecule yielded two products with mol. wts. of approximately 32 000 and 35 000; this is consistent with the observation that the predicted Q10 protein sequence has two potential glycosylation sites. In contrast to previous published results, the Q10 molecule reacted with rabbit anti-H-2 antisera which is consistent with its greater than 80% homology to the classical transplantation antigens. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:4018029

  15. Ultra-small lipid nanoparticles promote the penetration of coenzyme Q10 in skin cells and counteract oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Silke B; Bauersachs, Sonja; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Baisaeng, Nuttakorn; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H; Witte, Ellen; Wolk, Kerstin; Hackbarth, Steffen; Röder, Beate; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    UV irradiation leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An imbalance between the antioxidant system and ROS can lead to cell damage, premature skin aging or skin cancer. To counteract these processes, antioxidants such as coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) are contained in many cosmetics. To improve and optimize cell/tissue penetration properties of the lipophilic CoQ10, ultra-small lipid nanoparticles (usNLC) were developed. The antioxidant effectiveness of CoQ10-loaded usNLC compared to conventional nanocarriers was investigated in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy investigations of the carriers additionally loaded with nile red showed a clear uptake into cells and their distribution within the cytoplasm. By use of the XTT cell viability test, CoQ10 concentrations of 10-50 μg/ml were shown to be non-toxic, and the antioxidant potential of 10 μg/ml CoQ10 loaded usNLC in the HaCaT cells was analyzed via electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy after cellular exposure to UVA (1J/cm(2)) and UVB (18 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation. In comparison with the CoQ10-loaded conventional carriers, usNLC-CoQ10 demonstrated the strongest reduction of the radical formation; reaching up to 23% compared to control cells without nanocarrier treatment. Therefore, usNLC-CoQ10 are very suitable to increase the antioxidant potential of skin.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 reverses mitochondrial dysfunction in atorvastatin-treated mice and increases exercise endurance.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Ayako; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Mitsuishi, Masanori; Tamaki, Masanori; Tanaka, Kumiko; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs widely used in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases; however, they are associated with various types of myopathies. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and thus decrease biosynthesis of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and may also reduce ubiquinones, essential coenzymes of a mitochondrial electron transport chain, which contain isoprenoid residues, synthesized through an HMG-CoA reductase-dependent pathway. Therefore, we hypothesized that statin treatment might influence physical performance through muscular mitochondrial dysfunction due to ubiquinone deficiency. The effect of two statins, atorvastatin and pravastatin, on ubiquinone content, mitochondrial function, and physical performance was examined by using statin-treated mice. Changes in energy metabolism in association with statin treatment were studied by using cultured myocytes. We found that atorvastatin-treated mice developed muscular mitochondrial dysfunction due to ubiquinone deficiency and a decrease in exercise endurance without affecting muscle mass and strength. Meanwhile, pravastatin at ten times higher dose of atorvastatin had no such effects. In cultured myocytes, atorvastatin-related decrease in mitochondrial activity led to a decrease in oxygen utilization and an increase in lactate production. Conversely, coenzyme Q(10) treatment in atorvastatin-treated mice reversed atorvastatin-related mitochondrial dysfunction and a decrease in oxygen utilization, and thus improved exercise endurance. Atorvastatin decreased exercise endurance in mice through mitochondrial dysfunction due to ubiquinone deficiency. Ubiquinone supplementation with coenzyme Q(10) could reverse atorvastatin-related mitochondrial dysfunction and decrease in exercise tolerance.

  17. Selenium and coenzyme Q10 interrelationship in cardiovascular diseases--A clinician's point of view.

    PubMed

    Alehagen, Urban; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A short review is given of the potential role of selenium deficiency and selenium intervention trials in atherosclerotic heart disease. Selenium is an essential constituent of several proteins, including the glutathione peroxidases and selenoprotein P. The selenium intake in Europe is generally in the lower margin of recommendations from authorities. Segments of populations in Europe may thus have a deficient intake that may be presented by a deficient anti-oxidative capacity in various illnesses, in particular atherosclerotic disease, and this may influence the prognosis of the disease. Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are two conditions where increased oxidative stress has been convincingly demonstrated. Some of the intervention studies of anti-oxidative substances that have focused on selenium are discussed in this review. The interrelationship between selenium and coenzyme Q10, another anti-oxidant, is presented, pointing to a theoretical advantage in using both substances in an intervention if there are deficiencies within the population. Clinical results from an intervention study using both selenium and coenzyme Q10 in an elderly population are discussed, where reduction in cardiovascular mortality, a better cardiac function according to echocardiography, and finally a lower concentration of the biomarker NT-proBNP as a sign of lower myocardial wall tension could be seen in those on active treatment, compared to placebo.

  18. Reversal of statin-induced memory dysfunction by co-enzyme Q10: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Okeahialam, Basil N

    2015-01-01

    Statins are useful in the armamentarium of the clinician dealing with dyslipidemia, which increases cardiovascular morbi-mortality in hypertensive and diabetic patients among others. Dyslipidemia commonly exists as a comorbidity factor in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Use of statins is however associated with side effects which at times are so disabling as to interfere with activities of daily living. There are various ways of dealing with this, including use of more water-soluble varieties, intermittent dosing, or use of statin alternatives. Of late, use of co-enzyme Q10 has become acceptable for the muscle side effects. Only one report of any benefit on the rarely reported memory side effect was encountered by the author in the search of English medical literature. This is a report of a documented case of a Nigerian woman with history of statin intolerance in this case, memory dysfunction despite persisting dyslipidemia comorbidity. Her memory dysfunction side effect which interfered with activities of daily living and background muscle pain cleared when coenzyme Q10 was administered alongside low dose statin. Her lipid profile normalized and has remained normal. It is being recommended for use when statin side effects (muscle- and memory-related) impair quality of life and leave patient at dyslipidemia-induced cardiovascular morbi-mortality. PMID:26604775

  19. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation in infertile men with low-grade varicocele: an open, uncontrolled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Festa, R; Giacchi, E; Raimondo, S; Tiano, L; Zuccarelli, P; Silvestrini, A; Meucci, E; Littarru, G P; Mancini, A

    2014-09-01

    Many conditions associated with male infertility are inducers of oxidative stress, including varicocele. Antioxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, may be useful in this case. To evaluate the antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma of infertile men with varicocele before and after an oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 , 38 patients were recruited from a pilot clinical trial. A standard semen analysis was also performed at baseline and 3 months after an oral supplementation with exogenous coenzyme Q10 100 mg per die. Seminal plasma antioxidant capacity was measured using a spectroscopic method. Coenzyme Q10 therapy improved semen parameters and antioxidant status. This study highlights the importance of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of male infertility, namely in varicocele, and strengthens the possibility of the usefulness of the antioxidant therapy.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for coenzyme Q10 dispersive micro solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Contin, Mario; Bonelli, Pablo; Lucangioli, Silvia; Cukierman, Ana; Tripodi, Valeria

    2016-07-22

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIPNPs) with the ability to recognize coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) were synthesised in order to be employed as sorbent in a dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) for the determination of CoQ10 in a liver extract. CoQ10 is a redox-active, lipophilic substance integrated in the mitochondrial respiratory chain which acts as an electron carrier, shuttling electrons from complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and II (succinate-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) to complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase), for the production of cellular energy. The MIPNPs were synthesised by precipitation polymerization using coenzyme Q0 as the dummy template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, an acetonitrile: water mixture as the porogen, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and potassium persulfate as initiator. The nanoparticles were characterized by microscopy, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, and infrared spectroscopy. The MIPNPs demonstrated the presence of selective cavities complementary to the quinone nucleus of CoQ10, leading to a specific recognition of CoQ10 compared with related compounds. In the liver extract the relative CoQ10 peak area (CoQ10 area/total peak area) increased from 4.6% to 25.4% after the DMSPE procedure. The recovery percentage of CoQ10 from the liver matrix was between 70.5% and 83.7% quantified against CoQ10 standard processed under the same conditions. The DMSPE procedure allows the elution of almost all the CoQ10 retained (99.4%) in a small volume (200μL), allowing the sample to be concentrated 2.5 times (LOD: 1.1μgg(-1) and LOQ: 3.7μgg(-1) of tissue). The resulted clean up of the sample, the improvement in peak shape and baseline and the reduction of interferences, evidence that the MIPNPs could potentially be applied as sorbent in a DMSPE with satisfactory results and with a minimum amount of sorbent (1mg).

  1. Elucidation of molecular mechanism involved in neuroprotective effect of Coenzyme Q10 in alcohol-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kandhare, Amit D; Ghosh, Pinaki; Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of Coenzyme Q10 and its combination with vitamin E in alcohol-induced chronic neuropathic pain. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with alcohol (10 g/kg, 35% v/v, b.i.d.) for 10 weeks. Coenzyme Q10 (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) and vitamin E (100 mg/kg) were coadministered orally for 1 h after ethanol administration for 10 weeks. Various nerve functions, biochemical, and molecular parameters were assessed. Chronic administration of ethanol for 10 weeks resulted significant development of neuropathic pain. Treatment with Coenzyme Q10 (50 and 100 mg/kg) for 10 weeks showed significant and dose dependently increased in level of nociceptive threshold, endogenous antioxidant, and Na,K-ATPase enzyme. Coenzyme Q10 (50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly restored the levels of motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity. It also showed significant decrease in levels of endogenous calcium, oxidative-nitrosative stress, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-4 level. Alteration in protein expression of polymerase gamma (pol γ) was significantly restored the Coenzyme Q10 treatment. The important finding of the study is that, Coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg) and α-tocopherol (100 mg/kg) combination-treated rats showed more significant prevention of behavioral, biochemical, and molecular neurotoxic effect of alcohol administration than Coenzyme Q10 or α-tocopherol alone treated group. It is evident from the finding of present investigation that plethora of mechanism including inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, release of pro-inflammatory cytokine, modulation of endogenous biomarker, and protection of pol γ protein expression simultaneously orchestrate to exhibits neuroprotective effect of Coenzyme Q10, vitamin E and their combination.

  2. Augmenting effect of vitrification on lipid peroxidation in mouse preantral follicle during cultivation: Modulation by coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Kashka, Roya Hedayati; Zavareh, Saeed; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2016-12-01

    Cryopreservation-induced oxidative stress (OS) may lead to lipid peroxidation, which may be responsible for decreased cell survival rate. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) as a potent antioxidant may improve cell viability by neutralizing OS. In this study, oxidative lipid injury following the vitrification of preantral follicles was investigated. The effects of CoQ10 treatment on the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, lipid peroxidation products, and activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants of vitrified preantral follicles were also studied. Preantral follicles were isolated from immature mouse ovaries and were vitrified. After warming, these follicles were cultured with or without CoQ10 for four days. The levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and MDA, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT), were assessed at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours of culture period. The MDA level in the vitrified preantral follicles was higher than that in the fresh groups. By contrast, the MDA level was significantly lower in the groups with CoQ10 treatment than in those without this treatment during cultivation. The TAC level was higher in the fresh preantral follicles than in the vitrified groups. The rates were also higher in the CoQ10-treated groups than in those without this treatment. The activities of SOD, GPX, and CAT were also significantly higher in the fresh groups than in the vitrified groups, especially in the groups with CoQ10 treatment than in those without this treatment. Lowering the vitrification-induced lipid peroxidation of preantral follicles by CoQ10-supplemented maturation medium may be mediated by increasing SOD, GPX, and CAT activities and TAC level during cultivation.

  3. Amelioration of altered antioxidant enzymes activity and glomerulosclerosis by coenzyme Q10 in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmadvand, Hassan; Tavafi, Majid; Khosrowbeygi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a natural antioxidant and scavenging free radicals. In the present study, we examined antioxidative activities of coenzyme Q10 and possible protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on in vivo and in vitro lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activity and glomerulosclerosis in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three groups randomly: group 1 as control, group 2 as diabetic untreatment, and group 3 as treatments with coenzyme Q10 by 15 mg/kg i.p. daily, respectively. Diabetes was induced in the second and third groups by alloxan injection subcutaneously. After 8 weeks, animals were anaesthetized, liver and kidney were then removed immediately and used fresh or kept frozen until their lipid peroxidation analysis. Blood samples were also collected before killing to measure the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity. Kidney paraffin sections were prepared and stained by periodic acid-Schiff method. Glomerular volume and leukocyte infiltration were estimated by stereological rules and glomerular sclerosis was studied semi-quantitatively. Coenzyme Q10 significantly inhibited leukocyte infiltration, glomerulosclerosis and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) serum and kidney content in treated group compared with the diabetic untreated group. Coenzyme Q10 significantly inhibited LDL oxidation in vitro. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased the serum levels of glutathione (GSH) and serum activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in treated group compared with the diabetic untreated group. Coenzyme Q10 alleviates leukocyte infiltration and glomerulosclerosis and exerts beneficial effects on the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats.

  4. Glutaredoxin mediated redox effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment in type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Sergio J.; Grünler, Jacob; Nair, Deepika; Tekle, Michael; Fernandes, Aristi P.; Hua, Xiang; Holmgren, Arne; Brismar, Kerstin; Ungerstedt, Johanna S.

    2015-01-01

    The possible beneficial effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on disease progression and oxidant status in diabetes remains debated. In the present study, patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were treated with oral CoQ10, 100 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. We assessed total antioxidant capacity, intra- and extracellular levels of the redox regulating protein glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1), CoQ10, oxidized LDL-cholesterol, lipid profile and HbA1c. We have previously shown that extracellular Grx1 is increased in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to healthy subjects. In the present study, CoQ10 treatment significantly decreased serum Grx1 activity as well as total antioxidant capacity independent of type of diabetes, indicating an improvement to a less oxidized extracellular environment. The effect on serum Grx1 activity was more prominent in patients not on statin treatment. Conversely, intracellular Grx1 activity as well as mRNA levels increased independent of statin treatment. There was a significant improvement in oxidized LDL-cholesterol and lipid profile, with a tendency to improved metabolic control (HbA1c). Additionally, we describe for the first time that CoQ10 is a direct substrate for glutathione, and that Grx1 catalyzes this reaction, thus presenting a novel mechanism for CoQ10 reduction which could explain our findings of an increased intracellular Grx1. In conclusion, 12 weeks CoQ10 treatment significantly improved the extracellular redox balance and lipid profile, indicating that prolonged treatment may have beneficial effects also on clinical outcome in diabetes. PMID:26966682

  5. Effects of immunostimulation with OK432, coenzyme Q10, or levamisole on dimethylhydrazine-induced colonic carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Yamamoto, J; Iwata, Y; Matsumoto, K; Iriyama, K

    1986-03-01

    Effects of immunostimulation with OK432, Coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10), or levamisole on dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic carcinogenesis were investigated in 45 Donryu-rats. The manipulation with one of these immunopotentiators did not prevent DMH-induced colonic carcinogenesis in these rats. However, the number of tumors was significantly reduced and the incidence of invasive carcinomas decreased by immunostimulation. The treatment also reduced the number of lesions with epithelial dysplasia within the flat colonic mucosa.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Astrocytes from ROS-Induced Damage through Inhibition of Mitochondria-Mediated Cell Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; He, Mao-Tao; Chang, Yue; Mehta, Suresh L.; He, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species to protect neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether CoQ10 was capable of protecting astrocytes from reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage. For this purpose, ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation was used as a tool to induce ROS stress to cultured astrocytes. The cells were treated with 10 and 25 μg/ml of CoQ10 for 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation and maintained for 24 h post UVB exposure. Cell viability was assessed by MTT conversion assay. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by respirometer. While superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes, levels of cytochrome C (cyto-c), cleaved caspase-9, and caspase-8 were detected using Western blotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and this damaging effect was associated with superoxide accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization, mitochondrial respiration suppression, cyto-c release, and the activation of both caspase-9 and -8. Treatment with CoQ10 at two different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, inhibition of cyto-c release, suppression of caspase-9. Furthermore, CoQ10 enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. It is concluded that CoQ10 may protect astrocytes through suppression of oxidative stress, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction, blockade of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway, and enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25552930

  7. Coenzyme Q10 Ameliorates Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induced Cell Death Through Inhibition of Mitochondrial Intrinsic Cell Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Kumari, Santosh; Mendelev, Natalia; Li, P. Andy

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) induces cell death by increasing free radical production, activating apoptotic cell death pathways and depolarizing mitochondrial membrane potential. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, serves as a potent antioxidant in the mitochondria. The aim of the present study is to establish whether CoQ10 is capable of protecting neuronal cells against UVB-induced damage. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were treated with 0.01, 0.1 or 1 μM of CoQ10 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation. The CoQ10 concentrations were maintained during irradiation and 24 h post-UVB. Cell viability was assessed by counting viable cells and MTT conversion assay. Superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes. Levels of cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were detected using immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and such damaging effect was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial depolarization, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Treatment with CoQ10 at three different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide production, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. It is concluded that the neuroprotective effect of CoQ10 results from inhibiting oxidative stress and blocking caspase-3 dependent cell death pathway. PMID:22174665

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Glutamate Excitotoxicity and Oxidative Stress–Mediated Mitochondrial Alteration in a Mouse Model of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwook; Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Kim, Heemin; Kim, Sang Yeop; Weinreb, Robert N.; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To test whether a diet supplemented with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) ameliorates glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress–mediated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration by preventing mitochondrial alterations in the retina of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. Methods. Preglaucomatous DBA/2J and age-matched control DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice were fed with CoQ10 (1%) or a control diet daily for 6 months. The RGC survival and axon preservation were measured by Brn3a and neurofilament immunohistochemistry and by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO1), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NR) 1 and 2A, and Bax and phosphorylated Bad (pBad) protein expression was measured by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by TUNEL staining. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)/oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV protein expression were measured by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results. Coenzyme Q10 promoted RGC survival by approximately 29% and preserved the axons in the optic nerve head (ONH), as well as inhibited astroglial activation by decreasing GFAP expression in the retina and ONH of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. Intriguingly, CoQ10 significantly blocked the upregulation of NR1 and NR2A, as well as of SOD2 and HO1 protein expression in the retina of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. In addition, CoQ10 significantly prevented apoptotic cell death by decreasing Bax protein expression or by increasing pBad protein expression. More importantly, CoQ10 preserved mtDNA content and Tfam/OXPHOS complex IV protein expression in the retina of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that CoQ10 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for ameliorating glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in glaucomatous neurodegeneration. PMID:24458150

  9. COQ4 Mutations Cause a Broad Spectrum of Mitochondrial Disorders Associated with CoQ10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Haack, Tobias B.; Karall, Daniela; Ohtake, Akira; Invernizzi, Federica; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Kremer, Laura; Dusi, Sabrina; Fauth, Christine; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Graf, Elisabeth; Ahting, Uwe; Resta, Nicoletta; Laforgia, Nicola; Verrigni, Daniela; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kohda, Masakazu; Martinelli, Diego; Freisinger, Peter; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Lamperti, Costanza; Lacson, Atilano; Navas, Placido; Mayr, Johannes A.; Bertini, Enrico; Murayama, Kei; Zeviani, Massimo; Prokisch, Holger; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiencies are rare, clinically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in several genes encoding proteins involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis. CoQ10 is an essential component of the electron transport chain (ETC), where it shuttles electrons from complex I or II to complex III. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified five individuals carrying biallelic mutations in COQ4. The precise function of human COQ4 is not known, but it seems to play a structural role in stabilizing a multiheteromeric complex that contains most of the CoQ10 biosynthetic enzymes. The clinical phenotypes of the five subjects varied widely, but four had a prenatal or perinatal onset with early fatal outcome. Two unrelated individuals presented with severe hypotonia, bradycardia, respiratory insufficiency, and heart failure; two sisters showed antenatal cerebellar hypoplasia, neonatal respiratory-distress syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathy. The fifth subject had an early-onset but slowly progressive clinical course dominated by neurological deterioration with hardly any involvement of other organs. All available specimens from affected subjects showed reduced amounts of CoQ10 and often displayed a decrease in CoQ10-dependent ETC complex activities. The pathogenic role of all identified mutations was experimentally validated in a recombinant yeast model; oxidative growth, strongly impaired in strains lacking COQ4, was corrected by expression of human wild-type COQ4 cDNA but failed to be corrected by expression of COQ4 cDNAs with any of the mutations identified in affected subjects. COQ4 mutations are responsible for early-onset mitochondrial diseases with heterogeneous clinical presentations and associated with CoQ10 deficiency. PMID:25658047

  10. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) enviroment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM) for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients. PMID:26682233

  11. TPGS-chitosome as an effective oral delivery system for improving the bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yating; Yang, Liang; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to design the chitosan coated TPGS liposome to enhance the bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Optimization of formulation variables for the preparation of the liposome was performed and then three liposomal formulations (TPGS-liposome, TPGS-chitosome, chitosome) were prepared with narrow size distribution and high encapsulation efficiency. All of three liposomal formulations were stable at pH 1.2 and 7.0 for 24h without any significant drug leakage. Furthermore, chitosan-coated liposomes showed the strong mucoadhesive properties. All the tested liposomal formulations significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of CoQ10 as compared to the untreated drug. Particularly, TPGS-chitosome appeared to be most effective in improving the cellular uptake of CoQ10 in Caco-2 cells (about 30-folds greater than the untreated powder formulation). In oral pharmacokinetic studies, TPGS-chitosome enhanced the systemic exposure of CoQ10 by 3.4 folds as compared to the untreated powder and also displayed the extended drug release profile for up to 24h in rats. Compared to the untreated powder CoQ10, TPGS-chitosome significantly improved the antioxidant effect of CoQ10 and reduced the intracellular ROS level. In conclusion, TPGS-chitosome significantly enhanced the oral bioavailability of CoQ10 and prolonged drug release profile in rats, suggesting that TPGS-chitosome could be an effective oral delivery platform to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly absorbable drugs.

  12. Reduced coenzyme Q10 in female smokers and its association with lipid profile in a young healthy adult population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bazi, Maha M.; Elshal, Mohamed F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cigarette smoking has a negative effect on body reserve of antioxidants and cholesterol metabolism. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a potent antioxidant synthesized as part of the cholesterol pathway, is a potential biomarker for systemic oxidative stress. We aimed to investigate gender variation in plasma lipid profile and CoQ10 concentrations in healthy non-smokers and in smokers. Material and methods The study included 55 cigarette smokers (25 females and 30 males) and 51 non-smokers (25 females and 26 males) with the age range from 21 to 45 years, and who had no history of alcohol abuse or chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus or obesity. Coenzyme Q10 plasma concentrations were measured by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. Fasting plasma glucose and lipid levels were determined by standard colorimetric methods. Results Our results showed that CoQ10 concentrations were significantly decreased in smokers, especially in females, than their non-smoker counterparts. Female smokers also exhibited a significant decrease in plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-C, and atherogenic ratios HDL-C/TC and CoQ10/LDL-C than male counterparts. Plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased in smokers irrespective of gender. Plasma CoQ10 was relatively more associated with TC and LDL-C in female smokers than male smokers. Conclusions The adverse effects of smoking on body reserve of antioxidants and cholesterol metabolism are greater in females than in males, partially as a result of decreased CoQ10 plasma concentrations, HDL-C and total-cholesterol and abnormal atherogenicity indices. PMID:22328876

  13. Effects of coenzyme Q10 on the antioxidant system in SD rats exposed to lipopolysaccharide-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Hae; Kim, Ha-Na; Lim, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The study was performed to see the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on blood biochemical components and hepatic antioxidant system in rats exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced toxicity. A total of 24 rats were allocated to four groups: control (CON), 100 mg/kg BW of LPS (LPS), 100 mg of CoQ10/kg BW with LPS (LCQI) and 300 mg of CoQ10/kg BW with LPS (LCQII). The LPS and LCQI groups showed a significant (P<0.05) increase in the relative spleen weight compared with the CON group without affecting body and liver weights. The blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level in the LPS group was significantly (P<0.05) greater than that in the CON group, while supplementation with 100 or 300 mg CoQ10 to rats injected with LPS normalized the ALT level in the CON group. In antioxidant systems, the LPS group showed a significantly (P<0.05) higher mRNA and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) than the CON group. The supplementation with CoQ10 to the LPS-treated group normalized the level of SOD, which was comparable to the level of the CON group. Both the mRNA expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase in the LCQI and LCQII groups were higher (P<0.05) than that of the LPS group. However, administration of LPS or CoQ10 unaffected the level of catalase and total antioxidant power. The level of lipid peroxidation in the LCQII group was lower (P<0.05) than that in the LPS group. In conclusion, CoQ10 exerted its favorable effect against liver damage by modulation of antioxidant enzymes in LPS treated rats.

  14. Electrochemical Investigation of Coenzyme Q10 on Silver Electrode in Ethanol Aqueous Solution and Its Determination Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Deng, Wei; Xu, Hu; Sun, Yinxing; Wang, Yuhong; Chen, Shouhui; Ding, Xianting

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemistry reduction of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on silver electrodes has been investigated in mixed solvent containing 95 vol. % ethanol and 5 vol. % water. A combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is employed to explore the mechanism of redox processes of CoQ10 in the presence and absence of oxygen, respectively. It has been proved that the redox reaction of CoQ10 is highly dependent on the oxygen in the solution compared with that of CoQ0, which may be attributed to the isoprenoid side chain effect of CoQ10 Moreover, the effects of experimental variables such as electrolyte component, pH, temperature, and sonication time on the amperometric and potentiometric responses of CoQ10 are presented. The differential pulse voltammetry method has been developed for the quantification of the CoQ10 in the complex samples. Under the optimum conditions, the method is linear over the concentration range of 1.00 × 10(-7) to 1.00 × 10(-3) mol/L (8.63 × 10(-2) to 8.63 × 10(2) mg/kg). The limit of detection (3σ/k) is 3.33 × 10(-8) mol/L (2.88 × 10(-2) mg/kg). The recoveries of the spiked samples are between 91% and 108%. The presented method can be applied to the analysis of CoQ10 in real samples without any pretreatment.

  15. Chemical process research and development in the 21st century: challenges, strategies, and solutions from a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Federsel, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-05-19

    In process research and development (PR&D), the generation and manipulation of small-molecule drugs ranges from bench-scale (laboratory) chemistry to pilot plant manufacture to commercial production. A broad range of disciplines, including process chemistry (organic synthesis), analytical chemistry, process engineering (mass and heat transfer, unit operations), process safety (chemical risk assessment), regulatory compliance, and plant operation, must be effectively applied. In the critical handover between medicinal chemistry and PR&D, compound production is typically scaled up from a few hundred grams to several kilograms. Can the methodologies applied to the former also satisfy the technical, safety, and scalability aspects that come into play in the latter? Occasionally, the transition might occur smoothly, but more often the situation is the opposite: much work and resources must be invested to design a process that is feasible for manufacturing on pilot scale and, eventually, for commercial production. Authentic examples provide enlightening illustrations of dos and don'ts for developing syntheses designed for round-flask operation into production-scale processes. Factors that are easily underestimated or even neglected in the laboratory, such as method robustness, chemical hazards, safety concerns, environmental impact, availability of starting materials and building blocks in bulk quantities, intellectual property (IP) issues, and the final cost of the product, will come into play and need to be addressed appropriately. The decision on which route will be the best for further development is a crucial event and should come into focus early on the R&D timeline. In addition to scientific and technical concerns, the parameter of speed has come to the forefront in the pharmaceutical arena. Although historically the drug industry has tolerated a total time investment of far more than 10 years from idea to market, the current worldwide paradigm requires a

  16. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 against angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tokai, Emi; Suzuki, Takashi; Seki, Takayuki; Okubo, Kyosuke; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Koya, Sakuji; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-02-15

    Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 (1-10μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22(phox) and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Effect of coenzyme Q10 on the survival time and lipid peroxidation of adriamycin (doxorubicin) treated mice.

    PubMed

    Shinozawa, S; Etowo, K; Araki, Y; Oda, T

    1984-02-01

    The effect of coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10) was examined on the survival time and lipid peroxidation of adriamycin (ADM)-treated ICR mice. Co Q10 showed a protective effect against a subacute toxicity in mice induced by two intraperitoneal administrations of ADM (15 mg/kg). The group treated orally with 10 mg/kg of Co Q10 showed the longest survival time of all the groups studied (16.81 +/- 10.29 days, mean +/- S.D.) and a significantly longer survival time (p less than 0.001) than the ADM-alone group (7.48 +/- 1.99 days). The inhibitory effect of Co Q10 on the plasma and tissue lipid peroxidation levels did not correlate with the effect of prolonging the survival time of mice. Co Q10 tended to inhibit rises in plasma and liver lipid peroxidation levels induced by ADM administration, but there was no statistically significant difference between treatments. There was a statistically significant different inhibitory effect in the kidney lipid peroxidation levels, but was not in those of the heart.

  18. Correlation between vitamin A, E, coenzyme Q10 and degree of insulin resistance in obese and non-obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mehmetoglu, Idris; Yerlikaya, F. Hümeyra; Kurban, Sevil

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate correlation between plasma vitamin A, vitamin E, serum coenzyme Q10 levels and degree of insulin resistance in obese and normal weight people. The study was performed on 98 (21 Male, 77 Female) obese people and 78 (20 Male, 58 Female) control subjects. Vitamin A, E and coenzyme Q10 levels were adjusted to the lipid levels. Adjusted vitamin A and E and coenzyme Q10 levels of the obese female group were significantly lower than those of the control female group. Adjusted vitamin A and coenzyme Q10 levels of the obese male group were significantly lower than those of the control male group. Insulin resistance level of the obese female and male groups were significantly higher than that of the control female and male groups. There were no significant correlations between serum coenzyme Q10, plasma vitamin A and E levels and insulin resistance in obese and control subjects. Our findings show that it is essential to use the lipid adjusted levels of lipid soluble nutrients in obesity. Also, we have found no association between insulin resistance and vitamin A, vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 levels in obese subjects. PMID:22128213

  19. Effect of cooking and in vitro digestion on the stability of co-enzyme Q10 in processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brian D; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hamill, Ruth; Kerry, Joseph P

    2014-05-01

    The use of CoQ10 fortification in the production of a functional food has been demonstrated in the past but primarily for dairy products. This study aimed to determine the bio-accessibility of CoQ10 in processed meat products, beef patties and pork breakfast sausages, fortified with CoQ10. Both the patties and sausages were fortified with a micellarized form of CoQ10 to enhance solubility to a concentration of 1mg/g of sample (NovaSolQ®). An assay was developed combining in vitro digestion and HPLC analysis to quantify the CoQ10 present in fortified products (100mg/g). The cooking retention level of CoQ10 in the products was found to be 74±1.42% for patties and 79.69±0.75% for sausages. The digestibility for both products ranged between 93% and 95%, sausages did have a higher digestibility level than patties but this was not found to be significant (P<0.01).

  20. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Prevents Iron Overload While Improving Glycaemic Control and Antioxidant Protection in Insulin-Resistant Psammomys obesus.

    PubMed

    Lazourgui, Mohamed Amine; El-Aoufi, Salima; Labsi, Moussa; Maouche, Boubekeur

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the anti-diabetic preventive activity of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in a murine model of diet-induced insulin resistance (IR), Psammomys obesus (Po). IR was induced by feeding a standard laboratory diet (SD). CoQ10 oil suspension was orally administered at 10 mg/kg body weight (BW)/day along with SD for 9 months. Anthropometric parameters, namely, total body weight gain (BWG) and the relative weight of white adipose tissue (WAT) were determined. Blood glucose, insulin, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), total antioxidant status (TAS), iron, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite (NO2 (-)) were evaluated. NO2 (-) level was also assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) culture supernatants. Our results show that CoQ10 supplementation significantly improved blood glucose, insulin, QUICKI, TAS, iron and MDA, but influenced neither NO2 (-) levels nor the anthropometric parameters. These findings support the hypothesis that CoQ10 would exert an anti-diabetic activity by improving both glycaemic control and antioxidant protection. The most marked effect of CoQ10 observed in this study concerns the regulation of iron levels, which may carry significant preventive importance.

  1. Cetyl palmitate-based NLC for topical delivery of Coenzyme Q(10) - development, physicochemical characterization and in vitro release studies.

    PubMed

    Teeranachaideekul, Veerawat; Souto, Eliana B; Junyaprasert, Varaporn B; Müller, Rainer H

    2007-08-01

    In the present study, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) composed of cetyl palmitate with various amounts of caprylic/capric triacylglycerols (as liquid lipid) were prepared and Coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) has been incorporated in such carriers due to its high lipophilic character. A nanoemulsion composed solely of liquid lipid was prepared for comparison studies. By photon correlation spectroscopy a mean particle size in the range of 180-240nm with a narrow polydispersity index (PI) lower than 0.2 was obtained for all developed formulations. The entrapment efficiency was 100% in all cases. The increase of oil loading did not affect the mean particle size of NLC formulations. NLC and nanoemulsion, stabilized by the same emulsifier, showed zeta potential values in the range -40/-50mV providing a good physical stability of the formulations. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed NLC of disc-like shape. With respect to lipid polymorphism, a decrease in the ordered structure of NLC was observed with the increase of both oil and Q(10) loadings, allowing therefore high accommodation for Q(10) within the NLC. Using static Franz diffusion cells, the in vitro release studies demonstrated that Q(10)-loaded NLC possessed a biphasic release pattern, in comparison to Q(10)-loaded nanoemulsions comprising similar composition of which a nearly constant release was observed. The NLC release patterns were defined by an initial fast release in comparison to the release of NE followed by a prolonged release, which was dependent on the oil content.

  2. [Effect of phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10 on sports performance in professional volleyball players].

    PubMed

    García Verazaluce, Juan José; Vargas Corzo, María Del Carmen; Aguilar Cordero, María José; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco; Sarmiento Ramírez, Álvaro; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael

    2014-10-03

    Introducción: Los programas de entrenamiento físico, se basan en provocar estados de fatiga transitoria para inducir supercompensaciones de los sistemas biológicos implicados en la actividad, con el objeto mejorar el rendimiento del deportista a medio-largo plazo. La administración de suplementos nutricionales con propiedades antioxidantes e inmunomoduladoras, como Phlebodium decumanum y Coenzima Q10, constituyen medidas muy ventajosas para la recuperación de la inflamación y el daño tisular originados por el estrés del ejercicio intenso y mantenido. Metodología: Se llevó a cabo un diseño experimental, longitudinal, a doble ciego, con tres grupos randomizados a partir de una muestra de 30 jugadores varones de voleibol (22-32 años) de la Universidad de Granada, con un nivel de entrenamiento alto (17 horas por semana en los 6 meses previos a la investigación). Se evaluaron los efectos de un programa de entrenamiento físico de un mes de duración, común a todos los grupos de estudio, asociado a la administración simultánea de suplementos nutricionales a base de Phlebodium decumanum (4 cápsulas de 400 mg/ cáp. al día) el Grupo Experimental 1, Phlebodium decumanum (la misma dosis y posología que el grupo 1) más Coenzima Q10 (4 cápsulas de 30 mg/cáp al día) el Grupo Experimental 2, y sustancia placebo, el Grupo Control. Las variables dependientes sanguíneas para valorar los efectos de dicha intervención sobre el perfil endocrinometabólico e inmunológico basales fueron: cortisol e interleuquina 6 relacionados ambos con el eje del estrés inducido por el ejercicio, y ácido láctico y amonio, vinculados esencialmente, al metabolismo energético anaeróbio. Resultados: Todos los grupos del estudio manifestaron cambios adaptativos favorables sobre el perfil endocri no- metabólico e inmunológico, que se objetivaron a través de un descenso significativo basal postest de las concentraciones de cortisol, interleuquina 6, ácido láctico y amoniaco

  3. Effect of Simvastatin, Coenzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Acetylcysteine and Acetylcarnitine on Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Kopřivová, A; Macečková, D

    2016-01-01

    Some therapeutic and/or adverse effects of drugs may be related to their effects on mitochondrial function. The effects of simvastatin, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, acetylcysteine, and acetylcarnitine on Complex I-, Complex II-, or Complex IV-linked respiratory rate were determined in isolated brain mitochondria. The protective effects of these biologically active compounds on the calcium-induced decrease of the respiratory rate were also studied. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration (IC50 = 24.0 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 31.3 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 42.9 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration); the inhibitory effect of resveratrol was found at very high concentrations (IC50 = 162 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 564 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 1454 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration). Concentrations required for effective simvastatin- or resveratrol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration were found much higher than concentrations achieved under standard dosing of these drugs. Acetylcysteine and acetylcarnitine did not affect the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria. Coenzyme Q10 induced an increase of Complex I-linked respiration. The increase of free calcium ions induced partial inhibition of the Complex I+II-linked mitochondrial respiration, and all tested drugs counteracted this inhibition. None of the tested drugs showed mitochondrial toxicity (characterized by respiratory rate inhibition) at drug concentrations achieved at therapeutic drug intake. Resveratrol, simvastatin, and acetylcarnitine had the greatest neuroprotective potential (characterized by protective effects against calcium-induced reduction of the respiratory rate).

  4. Impact of pharmaceutical industry treated effluents on the water quality of river Uppanar, South east coast of India: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodhar, Usha; Vikram Reddy, M.

    2013-06-01

    The water quality of a river that received pharmaceutical industrial effluents is evaluated through the analysis of two indices to describe the level of pollution of the river, in this paper. The indices have been computed from December 2009 to June 2011 at four sampling stations—outlet, outfall, upstream, and downstream in the Uppanar River located at Cuddalore (South east coast of India). The results were compared with the guidelines of Bureau of Indian standards for drinking water specifications (BIS 10500).The study also identifies the pollutants of pharmaceutical industrial effluents before and after treatment that affects the river water quality. Data on spatial and temporal changes in dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, pH, temperature, color, electrical conductance, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, calcium, magnesium, hardness, sodium, and chloride were collected. The water quality indices used, Bascarón (1979) adapted Water Quality Index (WQIBA) and the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment-Water Quality Index 1.0 (CCME WQI), which is a well-accepted and universally applicable computer model for evaluating the water quality index. Both the indices presented similar trends, and were considered adequate for evaluating the impacts of industrial effluent on the river water bodies.

  5. Progress report on the guidance for industry for statistical aspects of the design, analysis, and interpretation of chronic rodent carcinogenicity studies of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lin, K K

    2000-11-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in the process of preparing a draft Guidance for Industry document on the statistical aspects of carcinogenicity studies of pharmaceuticals for public comment. The purpose of the document is to provide statistical guidance for the design of carcinogenicity experiments, methods of statistical analysis of study data, interpretation of study results, presentation of data and results in reports, and submission of electronic study data. This article covers the genesis of the guidance document and some statistical methods in study design, data analysis, and interpretation of results included in the draft FDA guidance document.

  6. What determines the spatial variability of soil respiration and its temperature dependence (Q10) at catchment scale (Rur Catchment, Germany)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is suspected to alter temperature, soil moisture, and nutrient inputs to the soil. These factors are supposed to strongly influence soil respiration. The degree by which respiration will respond to these changes is crucial for assessing future CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere. We assume that the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) differs spatially depending on land use, soil unit, and texture owing to their diverse properties of soil organic matter quantity and quality. We further hypothesize that the Q10 value is additionally regulated by soil moisture and nutrient status. On the basis of soil and land use maps we divided the Rur catchment (Western Germany, 2350 km²) into so called environmental soil classes (ESC) that combine each a unique combination of the factors land use, soil unit, and texture. We took nine samples from each of the 12 most common ESC's and incubated them at five temperatures (5-25°C), at four soil moisture levels (30-75% water holding capacity), and with an unfertilized and a fertilized treatment. So far, our results indicate that both soil respiration and the Q10 value are spatially highly variable with Q10 values ranging from 1 to 4. The Q10 value is altered by the level of soil moisture and decreases when soils are as moist as 75% water holding capacity. Fertilization has no effect on the Q10 value. Currently, we are processing the whole data-set to derive the effect of ESC's on the Q10 value. Recent data suggest that forest soils are more sensitive to warming than cropland soils.

  7. Coenzyme Q10, hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR C677T polymorphism in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gorgone, Gaetano; Currò, Monica; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Parisi, Giulia; Parnetti, Lucilla; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Tambasco, Nicola; Rossi, Aroldo; Pisani, Francesco; Calabresi, Paolo; Ientile, Riccardo; Caccamo, Daniela

    2012-03-01

    There is evidence that increased homocysteine (Hcy) levels might accelerate dopaminergic cell death in Parkinson's disease (PD) through neurotoxic effects. Homocysteine neurotoxicity mainly relies on redox state alterations. The present work was aimed at investigating the relationships between plasma Hcy concentrations and percent content of oxidized versus total Coenzyme Q10 (%CoQ10) in 60 PD patients and 82 healthy subjects. Both groups were screened for plasma levels of Hcy, vitamin B12, folate, %CoQ10 and C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism. The MTHFR TT677 mutated genotype was found more frequently in patients than in controls (p = 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, Hcy levels and %CoQ10 were associated with the case/control category (p < 0.0001), MTHFR genotype (p < 0.0001) and their interaction term (p = 0.0015), even after adjusting for age, sex, folate and vitamin B12. Patients carrying the TT677 genotype exhibited the highest values of Hcy and %CoQ10 (p < 0.0001). Structural equation modelling evidenced that the TT677 genotype and levodopa daily dose were independently and directly correlated with Hcy (p < 0.0001, and p = 0.003, respectively), which, in turn, showed a significant correlation (p < 0.0001) with the %CoQ10 in PD patients. Our results suggest that increased Hcy levels act as mediator of the systemic oxidative stress occurring in PD, and %CoQ10 determination might be regarded as a predictor of toxic Hcy effects.

  8. Effect of concomitant administration of coenzyme Q10 with sitagliptin on experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Rajesh; Balaraman, Ramachandran; Sen, Ashim Kumar; Shukla, Disha; Seth, Avinash

    2017-11-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of coenzyme Q10 and its combination with sitagliptin in experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy. The diabetic rats were treated with coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin and their concomitant administration. Various parameters of renal function like serum creatinine, urea, uric acid and markers of oxidative stress such as renal malondialdehyde content (MDA), glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase activities were measured. TNF-α, TGF-β, MPO activity and nitrite content were estimated in renal tissue with histopathological observation. Diabetic rats showed a significant reduction in renal function, which was reflected with an increase in serum creatinine, urea and uric acid levels. Streptozotocin-nicotinamide caused renal tubular damage with a higher MDA level, depletion of SOD and CAT activity and GSH level. In addition, TNF-α, TGF- β, MPO activity and nitrite content were significantly increased in diabetic rats. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin and their co-administration ameliorated STZ-nicotinamide-induced renal damage which was reflected by decreased oxidative stress, TNF-α, TGF-β, MPO activity, nitrite content along with histopathological changes. To conclude, concomitant administration of coenzyme Q10 and sitagliptin showed a better renoprotective effect than coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin when given alone.

  9. Purification of coenzyme Q10 from fermentation extract: high-speed counter-current chromatography versus silica gel column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xue-Li; Xu, Ya-Tao; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Xie, Sheng-Meng; Dong, Ying-Mao; Ito, Yoichiro

    2006-09-15

    High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) is applied to the purification of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) for the first time. CoQ(10) was obtained from a fermentation broth extract. A non-aqueous two-phase solvent system composed of heptane-acetonitrile-dichloromethane (12:7:3.5, v/v/v) was selected by analytical HSCCC and used for purification of CoQ(10) from 500 mg of the crude extract. The separation yielded 130 mg of CoQ(10) at an HPLC purity of over 99%. The overall results of the present studies show the advantages of HSCCC over an alternative of silica gel chromatography followed by recrystallization. These advantages extend to higher purity (97.8% versus 93.3%), recovery (88% versus 74.3%) and yield (26.4% versus 23.4%). An effort to avoid the toxic, expensive solvent CH(2)Cl(2) was unsuccessful, but at least its percentage is low in the solvent system.

  10. Enhanced production of coenzyme Q10 by self-regulating the engineered MEP pathway in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Xu, Haoming; Xie, Wenping; Gu, Jiali; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-04-01

    Fine-tuning the expression level of an engineered pathway is crucial for the metabolic engineering of a host toward a desired phenotype. However, most engineered hosts suffer from nonfunctional protein expression, metabolic imbalance, cellular burden or toxicity from intermediates when an engineered pathway is first introduced, which can decrease production of the desired product. To circumvent these obstacles, we developed a self-regulation system utilizing the trc/tac promoter, LacI(q) protein and ribosomal binding sites (RBS). With the purpose of improving coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 ) production by increasing the decaprenyl diphosphate supplement, enzymes DXS, DXR, IDI, and IspD were constitutively overexpressed under the control of the trc promoter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Then, a self-regulation system combining a set of RBSs for adjusting the expression of the LacI(q) protein was applied to tune the expression of the four genes, resulting in improved CoQ10 production. Finally, another copy of the tac promoter with the UbiG gene (involved in the ubiquinone pathway of CoQ10 biosynthesis) was introduced into the engineered pathway. By optimizing the expression level of both the upstream and downstream pathway, CoQ10 production in the mutants was improved up to 93.34 mg/L (7.16 mg/g DCW), about twofold of the wild-type (48.25 mg/L, 3.24 mg/g DCW).

  11. Folic Acid and Coenzyme Q10 Ameliorate Cognitive Dysfunction in the Rats with Intracerebroventricular Injection of Streptozotocin

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani Dolatabadi, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Azizi Malekabadi, Hamid; Pilehvarian, Ali Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a fat soluble antioxidant, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and folic acid on learning and memory in the rats with intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (ICV-STZ), an animal model of sporadic type of Alzheimer's disease. Materials and Methods The lesion groups were injected bilaterally with ICV-STZ (1.5 mg/kg b.wt., in normal saline). In the treated groups, rats received folic acid (4 mg/kg; i.p.) or CoQ10 (10 mg/kg; i.p.), either alone or together, for 21 days. Passive avoidance learning test was used for evaluation of learning and memory. Results The results showed that learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the rats with ICV-STZ (P< 0.001), however CoQ10 and folic acid, either alone or together, prevented impairments significantly (P< 0.001), as there was not any significant difference between these treated lesion groups and control group. Conclusion The present results suggest that CoQ10 and folic acid have therapeutic and preventive effects on cognitive impairments in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23493655

  12. Coalition Priorité Cancer and the pharmaceutical industry in Quebec: conflicts of interest in the reimbursement of expensive cancer drugs?

    PubMed

    Hughes, David; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2013-08-01

    In the context of scarce public resources, patient interest groups have increasingly turned to private organizations for financing, including the pharmaceutical industry. This practice puts advocacy groups in a situation of potential conflicts between the interests of patients and those of the drug companies. The interests of patients and industry can converge on issues related to the approval and reimbursement of medications. But even on this issue, interests do not always align perfectly. Using the Quebec example of Coalition Priorité Cancer (CPC) as a case study, we examine the ethical issues raised by such financial relationships in the context of drug reimbursement decision-making. We collected, compiled and analyzed publicly available information on the CPC's organization and activities; this approach allowed us to raise and discuss important questions regarding the possible influence exerted on patient groups by donors. We conclude with some recommendations.

  13. Amitriptyline down-regulates coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Tamara; Villanueva-Paz, Marina; Díaz-Parrado, Eduardo; Illanes, Matilde; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-02-15

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been proposed as an antitumoral drug in oxidative therapy. Its pro-apoptotic effects, mediated by high reactive oxygen species generation, have been already described. In this study we analysed the effect of amitriptyline on the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ), an essential component for electron transport and a potent membrane antioxidant involved in redox signaling. We treated H460 cells, a non-small-cell lung cancer cell line, with amitriptyline and we analysed CoQ levels by HPLC and CoQ biosynthesis rate, as well as the enzymes involved in CoQ biosynthesis by real-time PCR and Western blot. Amitriptyline treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in CoQ levels in tumor cells. CoQ decreased levels were associated with down-regulation of the expression of COQ4 gene, as well as decreased Coq4 and Coq6 protein levels. Our findings suggest that the effect of amitriptyline on CoQ biosynthesis highlights the potential of this drug for antitumoral oxidative therapy.

  14. [The measurement of CoQ10 in the acute phase of a myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Puletti, M; Trappolini, M; Di Palma, A; Curione, M; Schiavone, R A; Matteoli, S; Borgia, C

    1991-05-01

    The authors have studied the behaviour of ubidecorenone (Co Q10) in the acute phase of myocardial infarction in 24 patients, 19 male and 5 female, mean age 56.8 +/- 3.3. Ubidecorenone level was determined on admittance, after 48 hours and on the 7th and 30th days. A significant decrease was observed from the first to the 3rd day (mean values 0.90 +/- 0.18 microgram/ml vs 0.72 +/- 0.22, p less than 0.01). Thereafter a progressive rise was observed, but at the 30th day mean values were still below the basal ones. No significant differences were observed between patients treated with fibrinolytic agents and those not so treated, nor between those in whom reperfusion was obtained and the others. Nor was there a proven correlation with changes in creatinkinase. The behaviour of ubidecorenone may be associated with increased consumption for metabolic needs and increased destruction in scavenger action, and also to a lesser extent to decreased production due to lower food intake.

  15. The 7Q10 in South Carolina water-quality regulation: Nearly fifty years later

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Cantrell, Wade M.

    2010-01-01

    The annual minimum 7-day average streamflow with a 10-year recurrence interval, often referred to as the 7Q10, has a long history of being an important low-flow statistic used in water-quality management in South Carolina as evidenced by its adoption into South Carolina law in 1967. State agencies, such as the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, use such lowflow statistics to determine Wasteload Allocations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System discharges, develop Total Maximum Daily Loads for streams, prepare the State Water Plan, and restrict the quantity of water that can be transferred out of basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, working cooperatively with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, is updating low-flow statistics at continuous-record streamflow gages in South Carolina on a basin-by-basin approach. Such statistics are influenced by length of record and hydrologic conditions under which the record was collected. Statewide low-flow statistics in South Carolina were last updated in 1987. Since that time several droughts have occurred with the most severe occurring from 1998-2002 and the most recent occurring from 2006-2009. The low-flow statistics for the Pee Dee River basin were the first to be completed in this ongoing investigation.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 remarkably improves the bio-energetic function of rat liver mitochondria treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Najibi, Asma; Amirzadegan, Najmeh; Gharibi, Raziyeh; Dashti, Ayat; Omidi, Mahmoud; Saeedi, Arastoo; Ghafarian-Bahreman, Ali; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-09-05

    CoQ10 shares a biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol therefore it can be a potential target of the widely available lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Statins are the most widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs with the ability to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. Preclinical and clinical safety data have shown that statins do not cause serious adverse effects in humans. However, their long-term administration is associated with a variety of myopatic complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CoQ10 supplementation of animals under high fat diet (HFD) treated with statins is able to bypass the mitochondrial metabolic defects or not? Animals were divided into 7 groups and fed with either regular (RD) or HFD during experiments. The first group considered as regular control and fed with a RD. Groups 2-7 including HFD control, CoQ10 (10mg/kg), simvastatin (30mg/kg), atorvastatin (30mg/kg), simvastatin+CoQ10 or atorvastatin+CoQ10 treated orally for 30 days and fed with HFD. At the end of treatments, the animals were killed and blood samples were collected for biochemical examinations. The rat liver mitochondria were isolated and several mitochondrial indices including succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPP) were determined. We found that triglyceride (Tg), cholesterol (Chol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were augmented with HFD compared to RD and treatment with statins remarkably lowered the Tg, Chol and LDL levels. Mitochondrial parameters including, SDA, ATP levels, MMP and MPP were reduced with statin treatment and improved by co-administration with CoQ10.

  17. ADCK3, an Ancestral Kinase, Is Mutated in a Form of Recessive Ataxia Associated with Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Tazir, Meriem; López, Luis Carlos; Quinzii, Catarina M.; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Busso, Cleverson; Makri, Samira; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Benhassine, Traki; Anheim, Mathieu; Lynch, David R.; Thibault, Christelle; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Tranchant, Christine; Poch, Olivier; DiMauro, Salvatore; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Barros, Mario H.; Hirano, Michio; Koenig, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Muscle coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone) deficiency has been identified in more than 20 patients with presumed autosomal-recessive ataxia. However, mutations in genes required for CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway have been identified only in patients with infantile-onset multisystemic diseases or isolated nephropathy. Our SNP-based genome-wide scan in a large consanguineous family revealed a locus for autosomal-recessive ataxia at chromosome 1q41. The causative mutation is a homozygous splice-site mutation in the aarF-domain-containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3). Five additional mutations in ADCK3 were found in three patients with sporadic ataxia, including one known to have CoQ10 deficiency in muscle. All of the patients have childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia with slow progression, and three of six have mildly elevated lactate levels. ADCK3 is a mitochondrial protein homologous to the yeast COQ8 and the bacterial UbiB proteins, which are required for CoQ biosynthesis. Three out of four patients tested showed a low endogenous pool of CoQ10 in their fibroblasts or lymphoblasts, and two out of three patients showed impaired ubiquinone synthesis, strongly suggesting that ADCK3 is also involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis. The deleterious nature of the three identified missense changes was confirmed by the introduction of them at the corresponding positions of the yeast COQ8 gene. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis shows that ADCK3 belongs to the family of atypical kinases, which includes phosphoinositide and choline kinases, suggesting that ADCK3 plays an indirect regulatory role in ubiquinone biosynthesis possibly as part of a feedback loop that regulates ATP production. PMID:18319074

  18. Neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 at rostral ventrolateral medulla against fatality during experimental endotoxemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chan, Julie Y H; Chang, Alice Y W; Sikorska, Marianna; Borowy-Borowski, Henryk; Liou, Chai-Wei; Chan, Samuel H H

    2003-05-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone) is a highly mobile electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that also acts as an antioxidant. We evaluated the neuroprotective efficacy of CoQ10 against fatality in an experimental model of endotoxemia that mimics systemic inflammatory response syndrome using a novel water-soluble formulation of this quinone derivative. Experiments were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were maintained under propofol anesthesia. Intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 30 mg/kg) induced progressive hypotension, with death ensuing within 4 h. The sequence of cardiovascular events during this LPS-induced endotoxemia can be divided into a reduction (Phase I), followed by an augmentation (Phase II; "pro-life" phase) and a secondary decrease (Phase III; "pro-death" phase) in the power density of the vasomotor components (0-0.8 Hz) of systemic arterial pressure signals. Pretreatment by microinjection bilaterally of CoQ10 (1 or 2 microg) into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the medullary origin of sympathetic vasomotor tone, significantly diminished mortality, prolonged survival time, and reduced the slope or magnitude of the LPS-induced hypotension. CoQ10 pretreatment also significantly prolonged the duration of and augmented the total power density of the vasomotor components of systemic arterial pressure signals in Phase II endotoxemia. The increase in superoxide anion production induced by LPS at the RVLM during Phases II and III endotoxemia was also significantly blunted. We conclude that CoQ10 provides neuroprotection against fatality during experimental endotoxemia by reducing superoxide anion production at the RVLM, whose neuronal activity is intimately related to the "life-and-death" process.

  19. Association of colony morphology with coenzyme Q(10) production and its enhancement from Rhizobium radiobacter T6102W by addition of isopentenyl alcohol as a precursor.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myung-Ji; Kook, Moo-Chang; Kim, Soon-Ok

    2012-02-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter T6102 was morphologically purified by the aniline blue agar plates to give two distinct colonies; white smooth mucoid colony (T6102W) and blue rough colony (T6102B). The coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) was produced just by T6102W, showing 2.0 mg/g of CoQ(10) content, whereas the T6102B did not produce the CoQ(10). All of the used CoQ(10) biosynthetic precursors enhanced the CoQ(10) production by T6102W. Specifically, the supplementation of 0.75 mM isopentenyl alcohol improved the CoQ(10) concentration (19.9 mg/l) and content (2.4 mg/g) by 42% and 40%, respectively.

  20. Mechanism of the neuroprotective role of coenzyme Q10 with or without L-dopa in rotenone-induced parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Amany A; Hamouda, Hala E

    2008-12-01

    Current treatment options for parkinsonism as a neurodegenerative disease are limited and still mainly symptomatic and lack significant disease-modifying effect. Understanding its molecular pathology and finding the cause of dopaminergic cell loss will lead to exploring therapies that could prevent and cure the disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction was found to stimulate releasing of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with subsequent induction of apoptotic neuronal cell death. The aim of the present study was to throw the light on the role of coenzyme Q10 with or without L-dopa in an experimental model of parkinsonism induced by rotenone in rats. The present work showed that rotenone (2.5 mg/kg/day i.p. for 60 days) induced a model of parkinsonism (group II) resembling the basic findings in human characterized by bradykinesia and rigidity manifested as an increase in catalepsy score (detected after 20 days with bad prognosis after 60 days) with marked decrease in striatal dopamine levels. This model confirmed the implication of mitochondrial-apoptotic pathway in the pathogenesis of parkinsonism as there was a decrease in levels of striatal complex I activity and ATP as well as extreme overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, and also exhibited the role of coenzyme Q10 where its plasma and striatal levels were found to be decreased in comparison to the normal control rats (group I). This proposed pathogenesis was evidenced by the significant correlation between catalepsy score and the neurochemical parameters obtained in the current work. The treated groups started to receive the drug(s) after 20 days from induction of parkinsonism and continued to complete for 60 days. Oral administration of Co Q10 in a low dose 200 mg/kg/day (group III) or a high dose 600 mg/kg/day (group IV), resulted in amelioration of the mitochondrial induced apoptosis by dose-dependent restoration of striatal complex I activity, ATP levels with temperate increase in expression of Bcl-2 as

  1. Coenzyme Q10 plus Multivitamin Treatment Prevents Cisplatin Ototoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, Laura; Simoni, Edi; Valente, Filippo; Ghiselli, Sara; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Chicca, Milvia; Martini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (Cpt) is known to induce a high level of oxidative stress, resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species damaging the inner ear and causing hearing loss at high frequencies. Studies on animal models show that antioxidants may lower Cpt-induced ototoxicity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ototoxic effects of two different protocols of Cpt administration in a Sprague-Dawley rat model, and to test in the same model the synergic protective effects of a solution of coenzyme Q10 terclatrate and Acuval 400®, a multivitamin supplement containing antioxidant agents and minerals (Acu-Qter). The Cpt was administered intraperitoneally in a single dose (14 mg/kg) or in three daily doses (4.6 mg/kg/day) to rats orally treated or untreated with Acu-Qter for 5 days. The auditory function was assessed by measuring auditory brainstem responses from 2 to 32 kHz at day 0 and 5 days after treatment. Similar hearing threshold and body weight alterations were observed in both Cpt administration protocols, but mortality reduced to zero when Cpt was administered in three daily doses. The Acu-Qter treatment was able to prevent and completely neutralize ototoxicity in rats treated with three daily Cpt doses, supporting the synergic protective effects of coenzyme Q terclatrate and Acuval 400® against Cpt-induced oxidative stress. The administration protocol involving three Cpt doses is more similar to common human chemotherapy protocols, therefore it appears more useful for long-term preclinical studies on ototoxicity prevention. PMID:27632426

  2. Allocation of control rights and cooperation efficiency in public-private partnerships: theory and evidence from the Chinese pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Jia, Ming; Wan, Difang

    2009-06-01

    This article uses incomplete contract theory to study the allocation of control rights in public-private partnerships (PPPs) between pharmaceutical enterprises and nonprofit organizations; it also investigates how this allocation influences cooperation efficiency. We first develop a mathematic model for the allocation of control rights and its influence on cooperation efficiency, and then derive some basic hypotheses from the model. The results of an empirical test show that the allocation of control rights influences how enterprises invest in PPPs. A proper allocation provides incentives for firms to make fewer self-interested and more public-interested investments. Such an allocation also improves the cooperation efficiency of PPPs.

  3. Experimental Limiting Oxygen Concentrations for Nine Organic Solvents at Temperatures and Pressures Relevant to Aerobic Oxidations in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Applications of aerobic oxidation methods in pharmaceutical manufacturing are limited in part because mixtures of oxygen gas and organic solvents often create the potential for a flammable atmosphere. To address this issue, limiting oxygen concentration (LOC) values, which define the minimum partial pressure of oxygen that supports a combustible mixture, have been measured for nine commonly used organic solvents at elevated temperatures and pressures. The solvents include acetic acid, N-methylpyrrolidone, dimethyl sulfoxide, tert-amyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, methanol, acetonitrile, and toluene. The data obtained from these studies help define safe operating conditions for the use of oxygen with organic solvents. PMID:26622165

  4. [Drug advertising as communication between the pharmaceutical industry and the physician: advertisements for psychotropic drugs in the Dutch medical journal, Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde, 1900-1940].

    PubMed

    van der Hoogte, Arjo Roersch; Pieters, Toine

    2010-01-01

    In this article we explore the historical development of drug advertisements for psychotropic drugs in the leading Dutch medical journal from 1900 to 1940. The advertisements for hypnotics and sedatives, in The Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (Dutch medical journal) reflected the changes in the vocabulary and image promoted by the pharmaceutical companies. In the first two decades, the advertisements were sober and to the point, and included the trademark, company name, molecular formula and therapeutic properties of the medication. The emphasis was on creating a scientific image of reliable symptom control for the therapeutic drug. In doing so, the ethical drug companies tried (successfully) to distinguish themselves from the producers of patent medicines. Once scientific credibility was established, the form and content of the advertisements changed significantly. In the late 1920s and 1930s drug companies embraced modern advertising techniques, developing a figurative language to address the changing beliefs and practices of Dutch physicians. Instead of promoting therapeutic drugs as safe and scientific, the emphasis was on their effectiveness in comparison to similar drugs. In the process, scientific information was reduced to an indispensable standardized minimum, whereby therapeutic drugs were advertised according to the latest pharmacological taxonomy rather than molecular formulas. The image-making of 'ethical marketing' began during the interwar years when marketers applied modern advertising techniques and infotainment strategies. The scanty black and white informational bulletins transitioned into colourful advertisements. The pharmaceutical companies employed the same medical language as used by physicians, so that one word or image in an advertisement would suffice for the physician to recognize a drug and its therapeutic properties. These developments show the changing relationship between the modern ethical pharmaceutical industry and Dutch

  5. Treatment of real effluents from the pharmaceutical industry: A comparison between Fenton oxidation and conductive-diamond electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J F; Llanos, J; Sáez, C; López, C; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-08-13

    Wastewater produced in pharmaceutical manufacturing plants (PMPs), especially the one coming from organic-synthesis facilities, is characterized by its large variability due to the wide range of solvents and chemical reagents used in the different stages of the production of medicines. Normally, the toxicity of the organic compounds prevent the utilization of biological processes and more powerful treatments are needed becoming advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) a valid alternative. In this work, the efficiency in abatement of pollution by Fenton oxidation (FO) and conductive-diamond electro-oxidation (CDEO) are compared in the treatment of 60 real effluents coming from different processes carried out in a pharmaceutical facility, using standardized tests. In 80% of the samples, CDEO was found to be more efficient than FO and in the remaining 20%, coagulation was found to exhibit a great significance in the COD abatement mechanism during FO, pointing out the effectiveness of the oxidation promoted by the electrochemical technology. Mean oxidation state of carbon was found to be a relevant parameter to understand the behavior of the oxidation technologies. It varied inversely proportional to efficiency in FO and it showed practically no influence in the case of CDEO.

  6. 77 FR 60722 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Request for Statements on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is...

  7. Comparative evaluation of coenzyme Q10-based gel and 0.8% hyaluronic acid gel in treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Varun; Gupta, Rajan; Dahiya, Parveen; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anti-inflammatory and immune enhancing effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and hyaluronic acid are well established in medical literature. The present study was undertaken to evaluate their role in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty sites in 24 patients with clinically confirmed periodontitis were included in the study. A split-mouth design was used for intrasulcular application of CoQ10 as adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP), 0.8% hyaluronic acid as adjunct to SRP and SRP alone. Clinical parameters such as plaque index (PI), gingival color change index (GCCI), Eastman interdental bleeding index (EIBI), pocket depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded. All the clinical parameters PI, EIBI, GCCI, PD, and CAL were recorded at baseline before SRP. Only PI, EIBI, and GCCI were recorded at 1st and 2nd week. Twenty-one days post 2nd week, i.e., 6th week all the clinical parameters were recorded again. Results: Intragroup analysis of all the clinical parameters showed clinical significant results between baseline and 6th week. However, on intergroup analysis, the results were not significant. Conclusion: The local application of CoQ10 and hyaluronic acid gel in conjunction with SRP may have a beneficial effect on periodontal health in patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:28298817

  8. [Effects of nutrient conditions and fed-batch culture on CoQ10 production by Rhizobium radiobacter WSH2601].

    PubMed

    Zu-Fan, Wu; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2003-03-01

    The effects of the variables, including the concentrations of glucose, sucrose, corn steep liquor (CSL) and peptone, and the conditions of fed-batch culture, on CoQ10 fermentation by Rhizobium radiobacter WSH2601 were assessed. The results showed that the optimum concentrations of glucose, sucrose, CSL and peptone were 30 g/L, 40 g/L, 11 g/L and 16 g/L respectively. Addition of CSL and tomato juice stimulate