Science.gov

Sample records for inelastic spheres quarterly

  1. Collision statistics in sheared inelastic hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Marcus N; Green, Thomas E; Grassia, Paul; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-01

    The dynamics of sheared inelastic-hard-sphere systems is studied using nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations and direct simulation Monte Carlo. In the molecular-dynamics simulations Lees-Edwards boundary conditions are used to impose the shear. The dimensions of the simulation box are chosen to ensure that the systems are homogeneous and that the shear is applied uniformly. Various system properties are monitored, including the one-particle velocity distribution, granular temperature, stress tensor, collision rates, and time between collisions. The one-particle velocity distribution is found to agree reasonably well with an anisotropic Gaussian distribution, with only a slight overpopulation of the high-velocity tails. The velocity distribution is strongly anisotropic, especially at lower densities and lower values of the coefficient of restitution, with the largest variance in the direction of shear. The density dependence of the compressibility factor of the sheared inelastic-hard-sphere system is quite similar to that of elastic-hard-sphere fluids. As the systems become more inelastic, the glancing collisions begin to dominate over more direct, head-on collisions. Examination of the distribution of the times between collisions indicates that the collisions experienced by the particles are strongly correlated in the highly inelastic systems. A comparison of the simulation data is made with direct Monte Carlo simulation of the Enskog equation. Results of the kinetic model of Montanero [J. Fluid Mech. 389, 391 (1999)] based on the Enskog equation are also included. In general, good agreement is found for high-density, weakly inelastic systems.

  2. Inhomogeneous quasistationary state of dense fluids of inelastic hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study closed dense collections of freely cooling hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (ISs) where the density profile is spatially nonuniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature valid when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modeling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state) using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. Thus the IS is the exact state of this dense many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving nonuniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction that generalizes previous results. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like a gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: The inelastic decay of energy is a power law [1+t/t(c)](-2), where t(c) diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This is reinforced by observing that for supercritical systems the IS coincide in most of the space with the steady states of granular systems heated at one of the walls. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries.

  3. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of highly inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines]. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-12-01

    In this quarter, we extended our study of the effects of isotropic boundary vibrations to steady, gravity driven, inclined granular flows. These flows are more complex than those considered last quarter because of the presence of slip and mean velocity gradients at the boundary. Consequently, it was first necessary to modify the boundary conditions derived by Richman (1992) to account for corrections to the flow particle velocity distribution function from velocity gradients. In what follows we only summarize the results obtained.

  4. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of high inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines]. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-12-01

    In this paper, we employ formal methods of statistical averaging to calculate the rates at which momentum and energy are transferred from anisotropically fluctuating bumpy boundaries to dense granular assemblies. The assemblies consist of identical, smooth, nearly elastic spheres that are thermalized by repeated collisions with the boundaries, but experience no mean motion as a consequence of these collisions. The boundaries vibrate with velocities that are governed by a tri-axial Gaussian distribution function that depends on both the normal and tangential mean square fluctuation speeds of the boundaries. Using the transfer rates calculated, we write down conditions that ensure that momentum and energy are balanced at such boundaries, and employ these conditions with a corresponding kinetic constitutive theory to analyze steady, gravity-free, thermalized states of granular assemblies between parallel, vibrating, bumpy boundaries. We find that, as the boundaries become bumpier, vibrations that are tangent the boundaries become more effective and vibrations that are normal to the boundaries become less effective at transferring energy to the assemblies.

  5. Brownian relaxation of an inelastic sphere in air

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2016-06-15

    The procedures that are used to calculate the forces and moments on an aerodynamic body in the rarefied gas of the upper atmosphere are applied to a small sphere of the size of an aerosol particle at sea level. While the gas-surface interaction model that provides accurate results for macroscopic bodies may not be appropriate for bodies that are comprised of only about a thousand atoms, it provides a limiting case that is more realistic than the elastic model. The paper concentrates on the transfer of energy from the air to an initially stationary sphere as it acquires Brownian motion. Individual particle trajectories vary wildly, but a clear relaxation process emerges from an ensemble average over tens of thousands of trajectories. The translational and rotational energies in equilibrium Brownian motion are determined. Empirical relationships are obtained for the mean translational and rotational relaxation times, the mean initial power input to the particle, the mean rates of energy transfer between the particle and air, and the diffusivity. These relationships are functions of the ratio of the particle mass to an average air molecule mass and the Knudsen number, which is the ratio of the mean free path in the air to the particle diameter. The ratio of the molecular radius to the particle radius also enters as a correction factor. The implications of Brownian relaxation for the second law of thermodynamics are discussed.

  6. Transport coefficients of a granular gas of inelastic rough hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Gilberto M; Santos, Andrés; Garzó, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    The Boltzmann equation for inelastic and rough hard spheres is considered as a model of a dilute granular gas. In this model, the collisions are characterized by constant coefficients of normal and tangential restitution, and hence the translational and rotational degrees of freedom are coupled. A normal solution to the Boltzmann equation is obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method for states near the homogeneous cooling state. The analysis is carried out to first order in the spatial gradients of the number density, the flow velocity, and the granular temperature. The constitutive equations for the momentum and heat fluxes and for the cooling rate are derived, and the associated transport coefficients are expressed in terms of the solutions of linear integral equations. For practical purposes, a first Sonine approximation is used to obtain explicit expressions of the transport coefficients as nonlinear functions of both coefficients of restitution and the moment of inertia. Known results for purely smooth inelastic spheres and perfectly elastic and rough spheres are recovered in the appropriate limits.

  7. Fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations for inelastic hard spheres or disks.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Maynar, P; de Soria, M I García

    2011-04-01

    Starting from the fluctuating Boltzmann equation for smooth inelastic hard spheres or disks, closed equations for the fluctuating hydrodynamic fields to Navier-Stokes order are derived. This requires deriving constitutive relations for both the fluctuating fluxes and the correlations of the random forces. The former are identified as having the same form as the macroscopic average fluxes and involving the same transport coefficients. On the other hand, the random force terms exhibit two peculiarities as compared with their elastic limit for molecular systems. First, they are not white but have some finite relaxation time. Second, their amplitude is not determined by the macroscopic transport coefficients but involves new coefficients. ©2011 American Physical Society

  8. Steady state in a gas of inelastic rough spheres heated by a uniform stochastic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Reyes, Francisco; Santos, Andrés

    2015-11-01

    We study here the steady state attained in a granular gas of inelastic rough spheres that is subject to a spatially uniform random volume force. The stochastic force has the form of the so-called white noise and acts by adding impulse to the particle translational velocities. We work out an analytical solution of the corresponding velocity distribution function from a Sonine polynomial expansion that displays energy non-equipartition between the translational and rotational modes, translational and rotational kurtoses, and translational-rotational velocity correlations. By comparison with a numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation (by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method), we show that our analytical solution provides a good description that is quantitatively very accurate in certain ranges of inelasticity and roughness. We also find three important features that make the forced granular gas steady state very different from the homogeneous cooling state (attained by an unforced granular gas). First, the marginal velocity distributions are always close to a Maxwellian. Second, there is a continuous transition to the purely smooth limit (where the effects of particle rotations are ignored). And third, the angular translational-rotational velocity correlations show a preference for a quasiperpendicular mutual orientation (which is called "lifted-tennis-ball" behavior).

  9. Steady state in a gas of inelastic rough spheres heated by a uniform stochastic force

    SciTech Connect

    Vega Reyes, Francisco Santos, Andrés

    2015-11-15

    We study here the steady state attained in a granular gas of inelastic rough spheres that is subject to a spatially uniform random volume force. The stochastic force has the form of the so-called white noise and acts by adding impulse to the particle translational velocities. We work out an analytical solution of the corresponding velocity distribution function from a Sonine polynomial expansion that displays energy non-equipartition between the translational and rotational modes, translational and rotational kurtoses, and translational-rotational velocity correlations. By comparison with a numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation (by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method), we show that our analytical solution provides a good description that is quantitatively very accurate in certain ranges of inelasticity and roughness. We also find three important features that make the forced granular gas steady state very different from the homogeneous cooling state (attained by an unforced granular gas). First, the marginal velocity distributions are always close to a Maxwellian. Second, there is a continuous transition to the purely smooth limit (where the effects of particle rotations are ignored). And third, the angular translational-rotational velocity correlations show a preference for a quasiperpendicular mutual orientation (which is called “lifted-tennis-ball” behavior)

  10. Particle-dynamics calculations of gravity flow of inelastic, frictional spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.; Mallon, R.G.; Cervelli, D.M.

    1987-11-17

    Three-dimensional discrete-particle computer models that calculate the motion of each individual grain in assemblies of hundreds of particles in steady shearing flows with either periodic or real boundaries have been modified to simulate gravity flow of particles through arrays of cylindrical horizontal rods and down inclined chutes. The particle interaction models reproduce experimentally measured recoil trajectories for colliding frictional particles, including rotation effects. Laboratory measurements of the flow of glass beads cascading down through an array of horizontal cylindrical rods correlate well with gravity flow calculations of inelastic, frictional spheres falling through a similar rod array. Less elastic particles are found to cascade through the array faster than nearly elastic particles. Likewise, smaller particles are found to flow faster than large ones. Model simulations of nearly two-dimensional inclined chute flow tests of 6mm diameter cellulose-acetate spheres flowing over a rough surface between parallel vertical glass plates, result in particle velocities that are considerably higher than values measured in similar laboratory tests at UCLA; however, inclusion of approximate air drag effects in the calculational model eliminates most of the discrepancy producing both density and velocity profiles that are close to the measured values. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Acoustic radiation due to the inelastic impact of a sphere on a rectangular plate

    PubMed

    Troccaz; Woodcock; Laville

    2000-11-01

    Impact between two structures is an important source of noise in industry. However, it is not a well-known phenomenon from a theoretical point of view. The models available in the literature for impact noise often address only part of the phenomenon. In this paper, a more comprehensive model is developed. The acoustic radiation due to the inelastic impact of a sphere with a rectangular simply supported thin plate is formulated and validated experimentally. The impact force is calculated from Hertz's law, which has been extended to the case of plastic deformations, and the acoustic radiation in the time domain is obtained using Rayleigh's integral, the plate being discretized in rectangular elements. The model is used to show that the sound-radiation mechanism includes two separate sources: the initial deformation of the plate and the propagation of the bending waves. The model is also used to determine the contribution to impact noise of parameters that characterize the two impacting structures or the impact configuration such as plasticity, damping, materials, and impact velocity.

  12. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-09

    ISS040-E-139549 (9 Sept. 2014) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 crew member, works with the bowling ball-sized satellites known as SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage Reorient Experimental Satellites) to study how liquids behave inside containers in microgravity. The experiment, named SPHERES-Slosh, maneuvers the tiny satellites similar to an actual spacecraft with an externally mounted tank and observes the interaction between the sloshing fluid and the tank/vehicle dynamics.

  13. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-08

    Astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with the bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellite known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES in the International Space Stations Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Kibo laboratory. Also sent as Twitter message.

  14. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-11

    ISS020-E-019064 (11 July 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, both Expedition 20 flight engineers, perform a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  15. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-13

    ISS020-E-018319 (11 July 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, both Expedition 20 flight engineers, perform a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  16. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-11

    ISS020-E-019069 (11 July 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 20 flight engineer, is pictured near three Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) floating freely in the Harmony node of the International Space Station.

  17. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-13

    ISS020-E-018324 (11 July 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, both Expedition 20 flight engineers, perform a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  18. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-26

    ISS020-E-014670 (26 June 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 20 flight engineer, is pictured near two Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) floating freely in the Harmony node of the International Space Station.

  19. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-13

    ISS020-E-018325 (11 July 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, both Expedition 20 flight engineers, perform a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  20. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-11

    ISS020-E-019059 (11 July 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt, Expedition 20 flight engineer, writes notes while performing a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  1. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-08

    ISS036-E-029545 (7 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Nyberg and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (not pictured) put the miniature satellites through their paces for a dry run of the SPHERES Zero Robotics tournament scheduled for Aug. 13. Teams of middle school students from Florida, Georgia, Idaho and Massachusetts will gather at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge to see which teams’ algorithms do the best job of commanding the free-flying robots through a series of maneuvers and objectives.

  2. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-08

    ISS036-E-029521 (7 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Nyberg and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (not pictured) put the miniature satellites through their paces for a dry run of the SPHERES Zero Robotics tournament scheduled for Aug. 13. Teams of middle school students from Florida, Georgia, Idaho and Massachusetts will gather at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge to see which teams’ algorithms do the best job of commanding the free-flying robots through a series of maneuvers and objectives.

  3. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-08

    ISS036-E-029539 (7 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Nyberg and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (not pictured) put the miniature satellites through their paces for a dry run of the SPHERES Zero Robotics tournament scheduled for Aug. 13. Teams of middle school students from Florida, Georgia, Idaho and Massachusetts will gather at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge to see which teams’ algorithms do the best job of commanding the free-flying robots through a series of maneuvers and objectives.

  4. SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-08

    ISS036-E-029522 (7 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Nyberg and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (not pictured) put the miniature satellites through their paces for a dry run of the SPHERES Zero Robotics tournament scheduled for Aug. 13. Teams of middle school students from Florida, Georgia, Idaho and Massachusetts will gather at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge to see which teams’ algorithms do the best job of commanding the free-flying robots through a series of maneuvers and objectives.

  5. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of highly inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this quarter, we extended our study of the effects of isotropic boundary vibrations to steady, gravity driven, inclined granular flows. These flows are more complex than those considered last quarter because of the presence of slip and mean velocity gradients at the boundary. Consequently, it was first necessary to modify the boundary conditions derived by Richman (1992) to account for corrections to the flow particle velocity distribution function from velocity gradients. In what follows we only summarize the results obtained.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of the Dynamics of Dissipative, Inelastic Spheres with Applications to Planetary Rovers and Gravitational Billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Alexandre E.

    travel over Martian rock fields. Finally, a mathematical model that captures the essential dynamics required for describing the motion of a real world billiard for arbitrary boundaries is presented. The model considers the more realistic situation of an inelastic, rotating, gravitational billiard in which there are retarding forces due to air resistance and friction. The simulations demonstrate that the parabola has stable, periodic motion, while the wedge and hyperbola, at high driving frequencies, appear chaotic. The hyperbola, at low driving frequencies, behaves similarly to the parabola, and has regular motion. Direct comparisons are made between the model's predictions and previously published experimental data. The representation of the coefficient of restitution employed in the model resulted in good agreement with the experimental data for all boundary shapes investigated. It is shown that the data can be successfully modeled with a simple set of parameters without an assumption of exotic energy dependence.

  7. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of high inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we employ formal methods of statistical averaging to calculate the rates at which momentum and energy are transferred from anisotropically fluctuating bumpy boundaries to dense granular assemblies. The assemblies consist of identical, smooth, nearly elastic spheres that are thermalized by repeated collisions with the boundaries, but experience no mean motion as a consequence of these collisions. The boundaries vibrate with velocities that are governed by a tri-axial Gaussian distribution function that depends on both the normal and tangential mean square fluctuation speeds of the boundaries. Using the transfer rates calculated, we write down conditions that ensure that momentum and energy are balanced at such boundaries, and employ these conditions with a corresponding kinetic constitutive theory to analyze steady, gravity-free, thermalized states of granular assemblies between parallel, vibrating, bumpy boundaries. We find that, as the boundaries become bumpier, vibrations that are tangent the boundaries become more effective and vibrations that are normal to the boundaries become less effective at transferring energy to the assemblies.

  8. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Quarterly project status report, 1 January--31 March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

    1991-12-31

    The hollow sphere materials were alumina, mullite, and mullite- ZrO{sub 2} (the Zr reduced the high-temperature thermal conductivity). During this phase, three major tasks were emphasized: Use of opacifiers (Zr oxide) to reduce the high-temperature thermal conductivity of the sphere, convert the slurries from organic-based to aqueous-based, and technology transfer to industry.

  9. Frontal Impact of Rolling Spheres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domenech, A.; Casasus, E.

    1991-01-01

    A model of the inelastic collision between two spheres rolling along a horizontal track is presented, taking into account the effects of frictional forces at impact. This experiment makes possible direct estimates of the coefficients of restitution and friction. (Author)

  10. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-014147 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson (foreground), Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman, flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  11. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-014536 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman, flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  12. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-014615 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson (top), Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman, flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  13. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-014444 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman, flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  14. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-013914 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman, flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  15. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-015415 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman (partially obscured), flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  16. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-013952 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, enters data in a computer during test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES (out of frame). The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity.

  17. SPHERES Slosh

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-18

    ISS040-E-014468 (18 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and Reid Wiseman, flight engineer, conduct test runs of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation uses small robotic satellites on the space station to examine how liquids move around inside containers in microgravity. Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev (bottom right), flight engineer, looks on.

  18. Interatomic inelastic current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Tim; Solomon, Gemma C.; Hansen, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    In order to identify the location of an inelastic event and to distinguish between situations that are before or after this event, we derive equations for the interatomic inelastic transmission as a perturbation series in the electron-phonon interaction. This series contains both even and odd ordered corrections, and while the even ordered corrections can be thought as a Dyson's expansion of the interatomic elastic transmission in the electron-phonon self-energy, the odd ordered corrections represent something new. We explicitly derive expressions for the interatomic inelastic transmission up to second order and the 1st order correction represents the lowest order term of this new family of terms. We apply this to three model systems and are able to distinguish between situations before and after the inelastic event as steps in the 2nd order transmission. We also see that when the transmission is evaluated between atoms that are coupled by the electron-phonon interaction, the 1st and 2nd order terms must be added together to form a meaningful transmission. Within the limited scope of the models considered here, the 1st order term appears to be the signature of the inelastic event.

  19. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079355 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (foreground), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  20. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079332 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (foreground), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  1. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079129 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  2. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079083 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, enters data in a computer in preparation for a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  3. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079910 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  4. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  5. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  6. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  7. Aerial View of StenniSphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-25

    StenniSphere, the John C. Stennis Space Center's visitor center in Hancock County, Miss., features a 14,000-square-foot museum and outdoor exhibits about Stennis Space Center. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA, the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, and other resident agencies. Recently named Mississippi's Travel Attraction of the Year, StenniSphere hosted a quarter of a million visitors in its first year and is a major school field trip destination.

  8. Aerial View of StenniSphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    StenniSphere, the John C. Stennis Space Center's visitor center in Hancock County, Miss., features a 14,000-square-foot museum and outdoor exhibits about Stennis Space Center. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA, the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, and other resident agencies. Recently named Mississippi's Travel Attraction of the Year, StenniSphere hosted a quarter of a million visitors in its first year and is a major school field trip destination.

  9. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  10. SPHERES test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-05

    ISS036-E-015549 (5 July 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, watches as he devotes some time with the long-running SPHERES experiment, also known as Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites. The experiment is run in conjunction with students who program bowling ball-sized satellites using algorithms. The free-floating satellites are programmed to perform maneuvers potentially influencing the design of future missions.

  11. Rep. Bill Nelson inside a personal rescue sphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-09-25

    U.S. Representative Bill Nelson (D.,Florida) gives a thumbs up signal from inside a small ball called a personal rescue sphere (PRS). The PRS is not part of STS 61-C hardware, but serves to evaluate a subject's reaction to close quarters. The photo was taken through a visor on the 39-inch diameter fabric rescue sphere.

  12. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  13. SPHERES Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Benavides, Jose Victor; Ormsby, Steve L.; GuarnerosLuna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms, and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the International Space Station (ISS), performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principal Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

  14. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  15. NEW APPROACHES: Deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, J.

    1998-01-01

    Feynman diagrams can be used to explain deep inelastic scattering, but it must be remembered that the emission and absorption of a photon are not independent events - the underlying field is important.

  16. Empty Quarter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Empty Quarter - February 1st, 20003 Description: White pinpricks of cloud cast ebony shadows on the Rub' al Khali, or Empty Quarter, near the border between Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The lines of wind-sculpted sand are characteristic of immense sand deserts, or sand seas, and the Rub' al Khali is the largest desert of this type in the world. A highland ridge is just high enough to disturb the flow of the lines. In the center of that interruption lies the Saudi Arabian town of Sharurah. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  17. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  18. Exponential trend to equilibrium for the inelastic Boltzmann equation driven by a particle bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañizo, José A.; Lods, Bertrand

    2016-05-01

    We consider the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres (with constant restitution coefficient α \\in (0,1) ) under the thermalization induced by a host medium with a fixed Maxwellian distribution. We prove that the solution to the associated initial-value problem converges exponentially fast towards the unique equilibrium solution. The proof combines a careful spectral analysis of the linearised semigroup as well as entropy estimates. The trend towards equilibrium holds in the weakly inelastic regime in which α is close to 1, and the rate of convergence is explicit and depends solely on the spectral gap of the elastic linear collision operator.

  19. Inelastic wedge billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Martin; Olafsen, Jeffrey S.

    2017-06-01

    Billiards are simple systems used to investigate Hamiltonian dynamics in physics. When real billiards are examined experimentally, the energy dissipated in each collision must be replaced by an external stimulus to maintain the dynamics. We focus on a specific system of a driven billiard using a wedge shaped boundary to examine nonlinear and chaotic behavior. Mathematical models such as the logistic map are simple low dimensional systems that exhibit nonlinear and chaotic behavior as a single parameter is varied. This logistic map can then be used to identify a very specific mathematical parameter known as the Lyapunov exponent, which helps in identifying chaos more clearly. In the current experiment, the dynamics of a particle free to move near a horizontally shaken vertical boundary will be examined for the presence of chaos. The goal of the research is to extract a Lyapunov exponent between any two trajectories in the system. In addition, the manner in which the dynamics evolve freely through dissipative collisions provides a testbed for measurements of the velocity dependent coefficients of restitution for the billiard. A better description of hard sphere coefficients of restitution would be beneficial to a host of experiments and numerical simulations in granular physics.

  20. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  1. Simulation of rotary-drum and repose tests for frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The effects of rotation rate and interparticle friction on the bulk flow behavior in rotating horizontal cylinders are studied via particle-dynamic simulations. Assemblies of inelastic, frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters are utilized, and rotation rates from quasistatic to centrifuging are examined. Flow phenomena explored include size segregation, avalanching, slumping and centrifuging. Simulated drum flows with two sizes of frictional spheres showed very rapid segregation of species perpendicular to the drum axis; however, simulations of up to 10 revolutions, utilizing periodic-boundary ends, did not exhibit the experimentally observed axial segregation into stripes. Angles of repose for uniform-sized spheres in slowly rotating cylinders varied from 13 to 31 degrees as the friction coefficient varied from 0.02 to 1.0. For simulated rotation rates higher than the threshold to obtain uniform flow conditions, the apparent angle of repose increases as the rotation rats increases, consistent with experiments. Also, simulations with rigid clusters of 4 spheres in a tetrahedral shape or 8 spheres in a cubical arrangement, demonstrate that particle shape strongly influences the repose angle. Simulations of cubical 8-sphere clusters, with a surface coefficient of friction of 0.1, produced apparent angles of repose exceeding 35 degrees, compared to 23 degrees for assemblies of single spheres interacting with the same force model parameters. Centrifuging flows at very high rotation rates exist as stationary beds moving exactly as the outer rotating wall. At somewhat slower speeds the granular bed remains in contact with the wall but exhibits surface sliding down the rising inner bed surface, moving a short distance on each revolution. At still slower speeds particles rain from the surface of the upper half of the rotating bed.

  2. Inelastic diffraction at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-03-01

    The relativistic scattering was one of the scientific fields where Academician V.G. Kadyshevsky has made an important and highly cited contribution [1]. In this paper we discuss the high-energy dependencies of diffractive and non-diffractive inelastic cross-sections in view of the recent LHC data which reveal a presence of the reflective scattering mode.

  3. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin forms perfect sphere with water droplet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-01

    SL2-X9-730 (1 June 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, forms a perfect sphere by blowing water droplets from a straw in zero-gravity. He is in the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Inelastic behavior of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N.; Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A more accurate procedure was developed for the determination of the inelastic behavior of structural components. The actual stress-strain curve for the mathematical of the structure was utilized to generate the force-deformation relationships for the structural elements, rather than using simplified models such as elastic-plastic, bilinear and trilinear approximations. relationships were generated for beam elements with various types of cross sections. In the generational of these curves, stress or load reversals, kinematic hardening and hysteretic behavior were taken into account. Intersections between loading and unloading branches were determined through an iterative process. Using the inelastic properties obtained, the plastic static response of some simple structural systems composed of beam elements was computed. Results were compared with known solutions, indicating a considerable improvement over response predictions obtained by means of simplified approximations used in previous investigations.

  5. SPHERES Slosh Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-22

    ISS038-E-033888 (22 Jan. 2014) --- A new experiment using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, already on the station, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 38 crew member in the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory. For the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, two SPHERES robots are attached to opposite ends of a metal frame holding a plastic tank with green-colored water. The new hardware for the SPHERES-Slosh study was delivered to the station aboard Orbital Sciences' Cygnus cargo craft on Jan. 12.

  6. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  7. DISE: directed sphere exclusion.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The Sphere Exclusion algorithm is a well-known algorithm used to select diverse subsets from chemical-compound libraries or collections. It can be applied with any given distance measure between two structures. It is popular because of the intuitive geometrical interpretation of the method and its good performance on large data sets. This paper describes Directed Sphere Exclusion (DISE), a modification of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm, which retains all positive properties of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm but generates a more even distribution of the selected compounds in the chemical space. In addition, the computational requirement is significantly reduced, thus it can be applied to very large data sets.

  8. SPHERES Slosh Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-22

    ISS038-E-033890 (22 Jan. 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with a new experiment using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, which are already on the station. For the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, two SPHERES robots are attached to opposite ends of a metal frame holding the plastic tank with the green-colored water. The new hardware for the SPHERES-Slosh study was delivered to the station aboard Orbital Sciences' Cygnus cargo craft on Jan. 12.

  9. Bond-orientational analysis of hard-disk and hard-sphere structures.

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, V; Kumaran, V

    2006-05-28

    We report the bond-orientational analysis results for the thermodynamic, random, and homogeneously sheared inelastic structures of hard-disks and hard-spheres. The thermodynamic structures show a sharp rise in the order across the freezing transition. The random structures show the absence of crystallization. The homogeneously sheared structures get ordered at a packing fraction higher than the thermodynamic freezing packing fraction, due to the suppression of crystal nucleation. On shear ordering, strings of close-packed hard-disks in two dimensions and close-packed layers of hard-spheres in three dimensions, oriented along the velocity direction, slide past each other. Such a flow creates a considerable amount of fourfold order in two dimensions and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure in three dimensions. These transitions are the flow analogs of the martensitic transformations occurring in metals due to the stresses induced by a rapid quench. In hard-disk structures, using the bond-orientational analysis we show the presence of fourfold order. In sheared inelastic hard-sphere structures, even though the global bond-orientational analysis shows that the system is highly ordered, a third-order rotational invariant analysis shows that only about 40% of the spheres have face-centered-cubic (fcc) order, even in the dense and near-elastic limits, clearly indicating the coexistence of multiple crystalline orders. When layers of close-packed spheres slide past each other, in addition to the bct structure, the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure is formed due to the random stacking faults. Using the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis and an analysis based on the 14-faceted polyhedra having six quadrilateral and eight hexagonal faces, we show the presence of bct and hcp signatures in shear ordered inelastic hard-spheres. Thus, our analysis shows that the dense sheared inelastic hard-spheres have a mixture of fcc, bct, and hcp structures.

  10. MINIMAL IMMERSIONS OF SPHERES INTO SPHERES

    PubMed Central

    Do Carmo, Manfredo P.; Wallach, Nolan R.

    1969-01-01

    In this paper we announce a qualitative description of an important class of closed n-dimensional submanifolds of the m-dimensional sphere, namely, those which locally minimize the n-area in the same way that geodesics minimize the arc length and are themselves locally n-spheres of constant radius r; those r that may appear are called admissible. It is known that for n = 2 each admissible r determines a unique element of the above class. The main result here is that for each n ≥ 3 and each admissible r ≥ [unk]8 there exists a continuum of distinct such submanifolds. PMID:16591771

  11. A renewal theory of creep and inelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, R.L.; Jones, D.I.G.; Freed, A.D.

    1995-12-31

    A summary of the development of the renewal theory of creep and inelasticity is presented. The creep theory development is outlined to motivate the mathematical form of the uniaxial creep equation. The concept of intrinsic or internal time is then introduced and used to transform the creep theory into the more general inelasticity theory. Measured creep data is then used to construct an inelasticity model for a steel. The model is used to predict a stress-strain curve for the steel.

  12. Improved constraints on inelastic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: mwinkler@ph.tum.de

    2009-09-01

    We perform an extensive study of the DAMA annual modulation data in the context of inelastic dark matter. We find that inelastic dark matter with mass m{sub χ}∼>15 GeV is excluded at the 95% confidence level by the combination of DAMA spectral information and results from other direct detection experiments. However, at smaller m{sub χ}, inelastic dark matter constitutes a possible solution to the DAMA puzzle.

  13. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  14. Liquid hydrogen sphere project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-22

    A 107,000-gallon liquid hydrogen sphere no longer needed at Stennis Space Center is barged through the facility locks June 21. The rocket engine test facility has teamed with the Mississippi Department of Marine Resource to place the sphere in offshore waters as an artificial reef.

  15. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  16. Use of inelastic analysis in cask design

    SciTech Connect

    AMMERMAN,DOUGLAS J.; BREIVIK,NICOLE L.

    2000-05-15

    In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of inelastic analysis are discussed. Example calculations and designs showing the implications and significance of factors affecting inelastic analysis are given. From the results described in this paper it can be seen that inelastic analysis provides an improved method for the design of casks. It can also be seen that additional code and standards work is needed to give designers guidance in the use of inelastic analysis. Development of these codes and standards is an area where there is a definite need for additional work. The authors hope that this paper will help to define the areas where that need is most acute.

  17. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  18. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  19. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  20. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025870 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  1. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025872 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  2. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025866 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  3. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025868 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  4. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025879 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  5. Inelastic behavior in polycarbonate blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Polycarbonate offers a challenging opportunity because of its industrial importance from carbon nano-tubes, ceramics and to Electrophotography. Anti-plasticization shows anomalous inelastic behavior in brittle ductile transition and in stress strain, stress strain rate response. Poly (methylmethacrylate), polystyrene, and polycarbonate are strongly rate dependent, Nano-indentation is a way of determining surface deformation and effect of strain and strain rate behavior of complex surfaces. Hardness and modulus depend on the indentation depth or load, exhibiting the well-known Indentation Size Effect (ISE). A decrease in the hardness with increasing indentation depth or load has been observed in numerous micro or nano-indentation tests on various materials such as metals, diamond-like carbon, polymers, ceramics, etc. which may be called the normal ISE. The inverse ISE has also been reported, in which the hardness increases with increasing indentation depth or load. There are unique properties such as indentation affects resulting in strain softening and strain hardening. There is differentiation in structure with the depth exhibited in variation of Tg. Hertzian and non-linear deformation models including usage of Finite Element Method offer opportunity in analyzing nano-indentation. Presence of diamine in polycarbonate results in making the surface and bulk brittle and acts as an anti-plasticizer by increasing its modulus, yield stress and reducing strain to break. Data on modulus and hardness of polycarbonate and blends of diamine as function of depth (strain) and strain rate are presented and compared to inelastic models.

  6. Generalized upper bound for inelastic diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-01-01

    For inelastic diffraction, we obtain an upper bound valid for the whole range of the elastic scattering amplitude variation allowed by unitarity. We discuss the energy dependence of the inelastic diffractive cross-section on the base of this bound and recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data.

  7. Hamilton's principle as inequality for inelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lv, Q. C.; Liu, Y. R.

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies with conservative external forces. Inelasticity is described by internal variable theory by Rice (J Mech Phys Solids 19:433-455, 1971), and the influence of strain change on the temperature field is ignored. Unlike Hamilton's principle for elastic bodies which has an explicit Lagrangian, Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies generally has no an explicit Lagrangian. Based on the entropy inequality, a quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies is established in the form of inequality and with an explicit Lagrangian, which is just the Lagrangian for elastic bodies by replacing the strain energy with free energy. The quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies states that the actual motion is distinguished by making the action an maximum. The evolution equations of internal variables can not be recovered from the quasi Hamilton's principle.

  8. Microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1982-03-01

    An exact microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering is formulated which contains the physical picture usually associated with distorted wave approximations without the usual redundancy. This formulation encompasses the inelastic scattering of two fragments, elementary or composite (both with or without the full complexity of interfragment Pauli symmetries). The fact that these considerations need not be based upon elementary potential interactions is an indication of the generality of the approach and supports its applicability to inelastic meson scattering. The theory also maintains a description of inelastic scattering which is a natural extension of the description of elastic scattering and it provides a general basis for obtaining truncation models with an explicit distorted wave structure. The distorted wave impulse approximation is presented as an example of a particular truncation/approximation encompassed by this theory and the nature of the distorted waves is explicated. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Distorted wave theory, inelastic scattering, multiple scattering, spectator expansion, Pauli exclusion principle, composite particles, unitarity structure.

  9. Hamilton's principle as inequality for inelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lv, Q. C.; Liu, Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies with conservative external forces. Inelasticity is described by internal variable theory by Rice (J Mech Phys Solids 19:433-455, 1971), and the influence of strain change on the temperature field is ignored. Unlike Hamilton's principle for elastic bodies which has an explicit Lagrangian, Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies generally has no an explicit Lagrangian. Based on the entropy inequality, a quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies is established in the form of inequality and with an explicit Lagrangian, which is just the Lagrangian for elastic bodies by replacing the strain energy with free energy. The quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies states that the actual motion is distinguished by making the action an maximum. The evolution equations of internal variables can not be recovered from the quasi Hamilton's principle.

  10. ISS Update: Smart SPHERES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries conducts a phone interview with Mark Micire, SPHERES Engineering Manager at Ames Research Center. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include ...

  11. Electromagnetically revolving sphere viscometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Maiko; Sakai, Keiji

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of low viscosity measurement, in which the rolling of a probe sphere on the flat solid bottom of a sample cell is driven remotely and the revolution speed of the probe in a sample liquid gives the viscosity measurements. The principle of this method is based on the electromagnetically spinning technique that we developed, and the method is effective especially for viscosity measurements at levels below 100 mPa·s with an accuracy higher than 1%. The probe motion is similar to that in the well-known rolling sphere (ball) method. However, our system enables a steady and continuous measurement of viscosity, which is problematic using the conventional method. We also discuss the limits of the measurable viscosity range common to rolling-sphere-type viscometers by considering the accelerating motion of a probe sphere due to gravity, and we demonstrate the performance of our methods.

  12. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  13. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  14. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  15. SPHERES Maintenance Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    iss048e017435 (6/30/2016) --- Commander Jeff Williams monitors bowling ball-sized internal satellites known as SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) during a maintenance run in the Japanese Kibo Laboratory Module.

  16. StenniSphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-25

    The John C. Stennis Space Center's visitor center, StenniSphere, is one of Mississippi's leading tourist attractions and features a 14,000-square-foot interactive review of Stennis Space Center's role in America's space program. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA, the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, and other resident agencies located at Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss.

  17. StenniSphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center's visitor center, StenniSphere, is one of Mississippi's leading tourist attractions and features a 14,000-square-foot interactive review of Stennis Space Center's role in America's space program. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA, the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, and other resident agencies located at Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss.

  18. SPHERES experiment session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-24

    ISS014-E-17880 (24 March 2007) --- This medium close-up view shows three bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites called Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. SPHERES were designed to test control algorithms for spacecraft by performing autonomous rendezvous and docking maneuvers inside the station. The results are important for multi-body control and in designing constellation and array spacecraft configurations.

  19. Chinese Armillary Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The armillary sphere was perhaps the most important type of astronomical instrument in ancient China. It was first invented by Luoxia Hong in the first century BC. After Han times, the structure of the armillary sphere became increasingly sophisticated by including more and more rings representing various celestial movements as recognized by the Chinese astronomers. By the eighth century, the Chinese armillary sphere consisted of three concentric sets of rings revolving on the south-north polar axis. The relative position of the rings could be adjusted to reflect the precession of the equinoxes and the regression of the Moon's nodes along the ecliptic. To counterbalance the defect caused by too many rings, Guo Shoujing from the late thirteenth century constructed the Simplified Instruments which reorganized the rings of the armillary sphere into separate instruments for measuring equatorial coordinates and horizontal coordinates. The armillary sphere was still preserved because it was a good illustration of celestial movements. A fifteenth-century replica of Guo Shoujing's armillary sphere still exists today.

  20. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  1. Granular mixtures modeled as elastic hard spheres subject to a drag force.

    PubMed

    Vega Reyes, Francisco; Garzó, Vicente; Santos, Andrés

    2007-06-01

    Granular gaseous mixtures under rapid flow conditions are usually modeled as a multicomponent system of smooth inelastic hard disks (two dimensions) or spheres (three dimensions) with constant coefficients of normal restitution alpha{ij}. In the low density regime an adequate framework is provided by the set of coupled inelastic Boltzmann equations. Due to the intricacy of the inelastic Boltzmann collision operator, in this paper we propose a simpler model of elastic hard disks or spheres subject to the action of an effective drag force, which mimics the effect of dissipation present in the original granular gas. For each collision term ij, the model has two parameters: a dimensionless factor beta{ij} modifying the collision rate of the elastic hard spheres, and the drag coefficient zeta{ij}. Both parameters are determined by requiring that the model reproduces the collisional transfers of momentum and energy of the true inelastic Boltzmann operator, yielding beta{ij}=(1+alpha{ij})2 and zeta{ij} proportional, variant1-alpha{ij}/{2}, where the proportionality constant is a function of the partial densities, velocities, and temperatures of species i and j. The Navier-Stokes transport coefficients for a binary mixture are obtained from the model by application of the Chapman-Enskog method. The three coefficients associated with the mass flux are the same as those obtained from the inelastic Boltzmann equation, while the remaining four transport coefficients show a general good agreement, especially in the case of the thermal conductivity. The discrepancies between both descriptions are seen to be similar to those found for monocomponent gases. Finally, the approximate decomposition of the inelastic Boltzmann collision operator is exploited to construct a model kinetic equation for granular mixtures as a direct extension of a known kinetic model for elastic collisions.

  2. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  3. Quarterly coal report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.

    1996-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the third quarter of 1995. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  4. 6. Interior of quarters (executive officer's quarters), living room, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Interior of quarters (executive officer's quarters), living room, looking west - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters S, Essex Street, .45 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  5. 1. North side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. North side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking southeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters S, Essex Street, .45 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  6. 5. East side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking west - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters S, Essex Street, .45 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  7. 4. South side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. South side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking north - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters S, Essex Street, .45 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  8. 2. West side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking east - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters S, Essex Street, .45 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  9. 3. Southwest side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Southwest side of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters S, Essex Street, .45 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  10. 2. Southeast side of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Southeast side of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking northwest - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters R, Essex Street, .43 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  11. 5. Interior of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), living room, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Interior of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), living room, looking northwest - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters R, Essex Street, .43 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  12. 4. Northwest side of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Northwest side of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking southeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters R, Essex Street, .43 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  13. 3. Southwest side of quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Southwest side of quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking east - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters R, Essex Street, .43 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  14. 1. Northeast side of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Northeast side of Quarters R (commanding officer's quarters), looking west - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Quarters R, Essex Street, .43 mile South-Southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  15. Contextual view of quarters no. 2 quarters no. 1, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of quarters no. 2 quarters no. 1, and water tower, looking southwest. - Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, Headquarters Complex, Quarters No. 2, 752 County Road 99W, Willows, Glenn County, CA

  16. Solution of a Simple Inelastic Scattering Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Stephen K.

    1975-01-01

    Provides an analytical solution of a model representing the collision of an atom with a harmonic oscillator, interacting via a repulsive square well potential. Presents results for various energies and strengths of inelastic scattering. (Author/CP)

  17. A sphere packing slideshow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda; Gortler, Steven; Brenner, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have enumerated all the ways to arrange n <= 13+ spheres as a cluster that is nonlinearly rigid. We have discovered many packings that are hypostatic, namely they have fewer than the 3n-6 contacts required to be linearly rigid. Simple scaling arguments explain why these are thermodynamically important when the spheres are colloids interacting with a short-range potential. We discuss these clusters, as well as other surprises that came up along the way. (''+'' means we have enumerated only a particular kind of cluster for n=14, 15, and beyond.)

  18. SPHERES-Vertigo experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-080130 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  19. CSSEDC Quarterly. 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    These four issues of the CSSEDC Quarterly (Conference for Secondary School English Department Chairpersons) represent the quarterly for 1989. Articles in number 1 deal with professional development, and include: "Sharing Expertise within a Department" (Martha R. Dolly); "Empowerment Develops a Computer Writing Center" (Norman…

  20. English Leadership Quarterly. 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    These four issues of the English Leadership Quarterly represent the quarterly for 1991. Articles in number 1 deal with whole language and include: "CEL: Shorter and Better" (Myles D. Eley); "Toward a New Philosophy of Language Learning" (Kathleen Strickland); "Whole Language: Implications for Secondary Classrooms"…

  1. CSSEDC Quarterly. 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirinsky, Driek, Ed.; Strickland, James, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    These four issues of the CSSEDC Quarterly (Conference for Secondary School English Department Chairpersons) represent the quarterly for 1988. Articles in number 1 include: "Relearning Leadership" (Tom Jones); "The English Coalition Conference" (Robert Denham); "The Reluctant Writer and Word Processing" (James…

  2. CSSEDC Quarterly. 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    These four issues of the CSSEDC Quarterly (Conference for Secondary School English Department Chairpersons) represent the quarterly for 1990. Articles in number 1 deal with student teachers and include: "Student Teaching: Smoothing Out the Rough Spots" (Susan B. Argyle and Fred C. Feitler); "A Partnership for Urban Student…

  3. Compression in leg ulcer treatment: inelastic compression.

    PubMed

    Mosti, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Compression therapy is extremely effective in promoting ulcer healing. Which material to use, if elastic or inelastic, is still a matter of debate. This paper will provide an overview on the recent findings in compression therapy mainly for venous or mixed ulcers which are the great majority of leg ulcers. In this paper it will be demonstrated that inelastic compression has been proved to be significantly more effective than elastic compression in reducing venous reflux, increasing venous pumping function and decreasing ambulatory venous hypertension. In addition it is comfortable, well accepted by patients and achieved an extremely high healing rate in venous ulcers. With reduced pressure inelastic compression is able to improve venous pumping function in patients with mixed ulcers without affecting but improving the arterial inflow. It will be also clearly shown that studies claiming a better effect of elastic compression compared to inelastic in favouring healing rate have significant methodological flaws making their conclusions at least doubtful. In conclusion inelastic- is significantly more effective than elastic compression in reducing ambulatory venous hypertension which is the main pathophysiological determinant of venous ulcers and demonstrated to be very effective in getting ulcer healing. New multicentric, randomized and controlled studies, without methodological flaws, will be necessary to prove that elastic- is at least as effective as inelastic compression or, maybe, more effective. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Elastic/Inelastic Measurement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, Steven; Hicks, Sally; Vanhoy, Jeffrey; McEllistrem, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    The work scope involves the measurement of neutron scattering from natural sodium (23Na) and two isotopes of iron, 56Fe and 54Fe. Angular distributions, i.e., differential cross sections, of the scattered neutrons will be measured for 5 to 10 incident neutron energies per year. The work of the first year concentrates on 23Na, while the enriched iron samples are procured. Differential neutron scattering cross sections provide information to guide nuclear reaction model calculations in the low-­energy (few MeV) fast-­neutron region. This region lies just above the isolated resonance region, which in general is well studied; however, model calculations are difficult in this region because overlapping resonance structure is evident and direct nuclear reactions are becoming important. The standard optical model treatment exhibits good predictive ability for the wide-­region average cross sections but cannot treat the overlapping resonance features. In addition, models that do predict the direct reaction component must be guided by measurements to describe correctly the strength of the direct component, e.g., β2 must be known to describe the direct component of the scattering to the first excited state. Measurements of the elastic scattering differential cross sections guide the optical model calculations, while inelastic differential cross sections provide the crucial information for correctly describing the direct component. Activities occurring during the performance period are described.

  6. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  7. Inelastic final-state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like “Watson’s theorem” holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B→Kπ fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  8. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  9. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  10. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-04

    ISS036-E-039685 (4 Sept. 2013) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  11. SPHERES competiton day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-031684 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  12. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-04

    ISS036-E-039743 (4 Sept. 2013) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  13. SPHERES competiton day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-031668 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  14. SPHERES competiton day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-031698 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, poses for a photo while conducting a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  15. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-04

    ISS036-E-039697 (4 Sept. 2013) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  16. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-032134 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  17. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-032138 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  18. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-032180 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  19. Wakata during SPHERES session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-10

    ISS038-E-000078 (10 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, poses for a photo while conducting a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  20. Numerical simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by inelastic bodies using hypersingular boundary integral equation

    SciTech Connect

    Daeva, S.G.; Setukha, A.V.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical method for solving a problem of diffraction of acoustic waves by system of solid and thin objects based on the reduction the problem to a boundary integral equation in which the integral is understood in the sense of finite Hadamard value is proposed. To solve this equation we applied piecewise constant approximations and collocation methods numerical scheme. The difference between the constructed scheme and earlier known is in obtaining approximate analytical expressions to appearing system of linear equations coefficients by separating the main part of the kernel integral operator. The proposed numerical scheme is tested on the solution of the model problem of diffraction of an acoustic wave by inelastic sphere.

  1. 4. Northeast corner of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking onto ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Northeast corner of quarters (executive officer's quarters), looking onto Quarter R (commanding officer's quarters), looking southeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Texas State Highway 202, 4.8 miles east of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & U.S. State Highway 181, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  2. Storing Chemicals in Packed Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reactants released by crushing or puncturing. Agglomerated gas-filled spheres hexagonally close packed and sintered or glued together into rods strung together at ends. Rods fed into crushing machine to release material in spheres as needed.

  3. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions fr(0 ) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a , the coefficients of restitution αr s, and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions fr(0 ) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and αr s. The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  4. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  5. Inelastic effects of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Samir

    We have investigated the effects of the inelastic interaction of electrons with phonons in the barrier region of S-I-S and S-N-S Josephson junctions. We find that under suitable conditions this mechanism can cause substantial modifications of the temperature dependence of the critical current jsb{c} as the inevitable loss of coherence can be more than compensated by the enhancement of the tunneling probability resulting from the phonon absorption. The effect depends strongly on the ratio qsb{TF}a of the junction width a to the screening length in the barrier region. For a S-I-S junction, a monotonic decrease in the critical current with temperature is found for qsb{TF}a ≫ 1 whereas for qsb{TF}a ≪ 1, the appearance of a peak in jsb{c}(T) near Tsb{c} is predicted. This new interesting effect is the consequence of the competition between the decrease of the superconducting gap function and the increase in the number of phonons with temperature. A wide range of parameter values has been explored and contact with relevant experimental results has been made. For an S-N-S junction, there is a large increase in the coherence length in the non-superconducting region leading to a substantial enhancement of the critical current over a wide range of temperature. It turns out that the entire temperature range can be divided broadly into two regimes. At low temperatures, the electron predominantly exchanges energy with just one phonon and it is this process that mainly determines the critical current. At higher temperatures the critical current is determined by processes in which the electrons exchange energy with many phonons during their under barrier motion.

  6. Electromechanical polishing of metal spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.E.; Engelhaupt, D.E.

    1980-04-01

    Equipment has been developed to electromechanically polish metal spheres. Mechanical polishing is accomplished by the action of three cup-shaped laps which rotate against the sphere. An abrasive slurry containing an electrolyte is continuously applied to the sphere and laps. Electrochemical etching is accomplished by applying a positive potential to two of the laps and a negative potential to the third.

  7. Sticky surface: sphere-sphere adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Younger, John G.; Bortz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-scale model to study the attachment of spherical particles with a rigid core, coated with binding ligands and suspended in the surrounding, quiescent fluid medium. This class of fluid-immersed adhesion is widespread in many natural and engineering settings, particularly in microbial surface adhesion. Our theory highlights how the micro-scale binding kinetics of these ligands, as well as the attractive / repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium affects the eventual macro-scale size distribution of the particle aggregates (flocs). The bridge between the micro-macro model is made via an aggregation kernel. Results suggest that the presence of elastic ligands on the particle surface lead to the formation of larger floc aggregates via efficient inter-floc collisions (i.e., non-zero sticking probability, g). Strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favors large floc formation as well. The kernel for the Brownian diffusion for hard spheres is recovered in the limit of perfect binding effectiveness (g → 1) and in a neutral solution with no dissolved salts. PMID:25159830

  8. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m-1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  9. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  10. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  11. Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Redner, S

    2006-01-01

    We study the dynamics of three particles in a finite interval, in which two light particles are separated by a heavy "piston," with elastic collisions between particles but inelastic collisions between the light particles and the interval ends. A symmetry breaking occurs in which the piston migrates near one end of the interval and performs small-amplitude periodic oscillations on a logarithmic time scale. The properties of this dissipative limit cycle can be understood simply in terms of a effective restitution coefficient picture. Many dynamical features of the three-particle system closely resemble those of the many-body inelastic piston problem.

  12. An integral test of the inelastic cross sections of Pb and Mo using measured neutron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.; Ford, C. H.; Wrights, G. N.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of measurements and calculations of fast neutron spectra from a radioactive neutron source inside spheres of Mo or Pb and from a cylindrical reactor containing a thick Pb or Mo reflector are used as a test of ENDF cross sections. The sphere leakage spectra were measured at a sphere-to-spectrometer distance of 2 meters using a 54 Ci spherical Am-Be neutron source. Reactor leakage spectrum measurements were made at the surface of the ZP-1 reactor when bare, with a Pb radial reflector 21 cm thick, and with a metallic Mo radial reflector 10 cm thick. In the case of the thin Mo sphere there is agreement between the calculation and measurement. The Pb calculation is much lower than the measurement except at the highest neutron energy. Two-dimensional calculations of reactor spectra result indicate that the reactor source is reasonably well known. Significant differences in leakage spectrum shape for both Mo and Pb reflectors suggest that there are large uncertainties in the inelastic cross sections for Pb and some for Mo.

  13. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-23

    ISS036-E-003308(23 May 2013) --- Onboard the International Space Station, Expedition 36 Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy, NASA astronaut, watches from just out of frame as he devotes some time with the long-running SPHERES experiment, also known as Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites. The experiment is run in conjunction with students who program bowling ball-sized satellites using algorithms. The free-floating satellites are programmed to perform maneuvers potentially influencing the design of future missions.

  14. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  15. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  16. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Lorentz violation and deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Lunghi, E.; Vieira, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of quark-sector Lorentz violation on deep inelastic electron-proton scattering are studied. We show that existing data can be used to establish first constraints on numerous coefficients for Lorentz violation in the quark sector at an estimated sensitivity of parts in a million.

  18. A Simple Model for Inelastic Scattering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeser, J. G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a model for inelastic scattering obtained by suitably generalizing scattering from a square well. The generalization introduces matrices into the quantum-mechanical scattering equations, which may be solved exactly to give an explicit expression for the scattering matrix. Discusses the results it predicts for a simple example. (Author/SK)

  19. Lorentz violation and deep inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Lunghi, E.; Vieira, A. R.

    2017-03-28

    We study the effects of quark-sector Lorentz violation on deep inelastic electron–proton scattering. Here, we show that existing data can be used to establish first constraints on numerous coefficients for Lorentz violation in the quark sector at an estimated sensitivity of parts in a million.

  20. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  1. The dynamic inelastic response of delaminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.

    1996-12-01

    A generalized theory for laminated plates with delaminations is used to consider the influence of inelastic deformations on the dynamic behavior of composite plates with delaminations. The laminate model is based on a generalized displacement formulation implemented at the layer level. The delamination behavior can be modeled using any general interfacial fracture law: however, for the current work a linear model is employed. The interfacial displacement jumps are expressed in an internally consistent fashion in terms of the fundamental unknown interfacial tractions. The current theory imposes no restrictions on the size, location, distribution, or direction of growth of the delaminations. The proposed theory is used to consider the inelastic, dynamic response of delaminated plates in cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading. The individual layers in the current study are assumed to be either titanium or aluminum. The inelastic response of both materials is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. It is shown that the presence of both inelastic behavior and delamination can have a significant influence on the plate response. In particular it is shown that these mechanisms are strongly interactive. This result emphasizes the need to consider both mechanisms simultaneously.

  2. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  3. Interactions between uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Riffe, D. M.; Ji, Jeong-Young; Booth, William A.

    2017-02-01

    We use simple symmetry arguments suitable for undergraduate students to demonstrate that the magnetic energy, forces, and torques between two uniformly magnetized spheres are identical to those between two point magnetic dipoles. These arguments exploit the equivalence of the field outside of a uniformly magnetized sphere with that of a point magnetic dipole, and pertain to spheres of arbitrary sizes, positions, and magnetizations. The point dipole/sphere equivalence for magnetic interactions may be useful in teaching and research, where dipolar approximations for uniformly magnetized spheres can now be considered to be exact. The work was originally motivated by interest in the interactions between collections of small neodymium magnetic spheres used as desk toys.

  4. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  5. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  6. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  7. Coherent states on spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Brian C.; Mitchell, Jeffrey J.

    2002-03-01

    We describe a family of coherent states and an associated resolution of the identity for a quantum particle whose classical configuration space is the d-dimensional sphere Sd. The coherent states are labeled by points in the associated phase space T*(Sd). These coherent states are not of Perelomov type but rather are constructed as the eigenvectors of suitably defined annihilation operators. We describe as well the Segal-Bargmann representation for the system, the associated unitary Segal-Bargmann transform, and a natural inversion formula. Although many of these results are in principle special cases of the results of Hall and Stenzel, we give here a substantially different description based on ideas of Thiemann and of Kowalski and Rembieliński. All of these results can be generalized to a system whose configuration space is an arbitrary compact symmetric space. We focus on the sphere case in order to carry out the calculations in a self-contained and explicit way.

  8. Science on a Sphere exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Students from Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans view the newest exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center - Science on a Sphere, a 68-inch global presentation of planetary data. StenniSphere is only the third NASA visitor center to offer the computer system, which uses four projectors to display data on a globe and present a dynamic, revolving, animated view of Earth and other planets.

  9. Science on a Sphere exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-31

    Students from Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans view the newest exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center - Science on a Sphere, a 68-inch global presentation of planetary data. StenniSphere is only the third NASA visitor center to offer the computer system, which uses four projectors to display data on a globe and present a dynamic, revolving, animated view of Earth and other planets.

  10. Magnetic spheres in microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2015-06-01

    We apply Mie scattering theory to study the interaction of magnetic spheres with microwaves in cavities beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that both strong and ultrastrong coupling can be realized for stand alone magnetic spheres made from yttrium iron garnet (YIG), acting as an efficient microwave antenna. The eigenmodes of YIG spheres with radii of the order mm display distinct higher angular momentum character that has been observed in experiments.

  11. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, second quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The forecasts in this issue cover the second quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Changes to macroeconomic measures by the Bureau of Economic Analysis have been incorporated into the STIFS model used.

  12. Microgravity Segregation in Binary Mixtures of Inelastic Spheres Driven by Velocity Fluctuation Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, James T.; Louge, Michel Y.

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in collisional granular flows of dry materials in reduced gravity. Because the particles interact through collisions, the energy of the particle velocity fluctuations plays an important role in the physics. Here we focus on the separation of grains by properties - size, for example - that is driven by spatial gradients in the fluctuation energy of the grains. The segregation of grains by size is commonly observed in geophysical flows and industrial processes. Segregation of flowing grains can also take place based on other properties, e.g. shape, mass, friction, and coefficient of restitution. Many mechanisms may be responsible for segregation; most of these are strongly influenced by gravity. Here, we outline a mechanism that is independent of gravity. This mechanism may be important but is often obscured in terrestrial grain flows. It is driven by gradients in fluctuation energy. In microgravity, the separation of grains by property will proceed slowly enough to permit flight observations to provide an unambiguous measurement of the transport coefficients associated with the segregation. In this context, we are planning a microgravity shear cell experiment that contains a mixture of two types of spherical grains. The grains will be driven to interact with two different types of boundaries on either sides of the cell. The resulting separation will be observed visually.

  13. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  14. Plane shear flows of frictionless spheres: Kinetic theory and 3D soft-sphere discrete element method simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; Richard, P.

    2014-05-15

    We use existing 3D Discrete Element simulations of simple shear flows of spheres to evaluate the radial distribution function at contact that enables kinetic theory to correctly predict the pressure and the shear stress, for different values of the collisional coefficient of restitution. Then, we perform 3D Discrete Element simulations of plane flows of frictionless, inelastic spheres, sheared between walls made bumpy by gluing particles in a regular array, at fixed average volume fraction and distance between the walls. The results of the numerical simulations are used to derive boundary conditions appropriated in the cases of large and small bumpiness. Those boundary conditions are, then, employed to numerically integrate the differential equations of Extended Kinetic Theory, where the breaking of the molecular chaos assumption at volume fraction larger than 0.49 is taken into account in the expression of the dissipation rate. We show that the Extended Kinetic Theory is in very good agreement with the numerical simulations, even for coefficients of restitution as low as 0.50. When the bumpiness is increased, we observe that some of the flowing particles are stuck in the gaps between the wall spheres. As a consequence, the walls are more dissipative than expected, and the flows resemble simple shear flows, i.e., flows of rather constant volume fraction and granular temperature.

  15. Cristoforetti in Crew quarters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-06

    iss042e023422 (12/6/14) --- Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) on 6 December 2014 is seen inside of a sleeping bag in her personal crew quarters on the International Space Station. Astronauts will strap the bag to the wall to prevent from free floating and potentially bumping into equipment while sleeping.

  16. Coleman in sleeping quarters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-25

    ISS026-E-012158 (25 Dec. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman, Expedition 26 flight engineer, and one of six crew members currently aboard the International Space Station, peeks out of her sleeping quarters on Christmas morning to view the station’s decorations and gifts.

  17. Gifted Education Quarterly, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    These four issues of "Gifted Education Quarterly" include the following articles: (1) "Using Test Results To Support Clinical Judgment" (Linda Kreger Silverman), which discusses some of the difficulties in obtaining accurate indications of a child's level of giftedness and the importance of using professional judgment in…

  18. English Leadership Quarterly, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, Henry, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    These 4 issues of the English Leadership Quarterly comprise volume 17, published during 1995. Articles in number 1 deal with multicultural and multiethnic literature, and are, as follows: "Guidelines for Selecting European Ethnic Literature for Interdisciplinary Courses" (Sandra Stotsky); "Striving for Kinship within Diverse Communities" (Peter…

  19. Trustee Quarterly, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Sally, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These four issues of "Trustee Quarterly" focus on current topics affecting community college trustees. Issue 1 focuses on the learning revolution and serves as a guide for community college trustees. It offers the following feature articles by Terry O'Banion: "Education Reform: Two Waves,""The Second Wave and the Community…

  20. English Leadership Quarterly, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.; Kiernan, Henry, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These 4 issues of the English Leadership Quarterly comprise volume 16, published during 1994. Articles in number 1 deal with practical advice, and include: "The Law of Privacy and the Writing Teacher" (Ben T. Allen); Beware of Teachers Who Laminate Their Lesson Plans and Other Useful Suggestions about Teaching" (Robert Perrin);…

  1. English Leadership Quarterly, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    These four issues of the English Leadership Quarterly represent those published during 1993. Articles in number 1 deal with parent involvement and participation, and include: "Opening the Doors to Open House" (Jolene A. Borgese); "Parent/Teacher Conferences: Avoiding the Collision Course" (Robert Perrin); "Expanding Human…

  2. Trustee Quarterly, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The four issues of "Trustee Quarterly" combined here focus on topics of current concern to community college trustees. The winter 1994 issues offers these feature articles: "Honoring Retiring Presidents," by Terry O'Banion; "Trustees as Reluctant Leaders: The Board/CEO Relationship," Norma Jean Germond, John Keyser, and Vaughn A. Sherman; and…

  3. Trustee Quarterly, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The four issues of "Trustee Quarterly" combined here focus on topics of current concern to community college trustees. The winter 1994 issues offers these feature articles: "Honoring Retiring Presidents," by Terry O'Banion; "Trustees as Reluctant Leaders: The Board/CEO Relationship," Norma Jean Germond, John Keyser, and Vaughn A. Sherman; and…

  4. English Leadership Quarterly, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    These four issues of the English Leadership Quarterly represent those published during 1992. Articles in number 1 deal with testing assessing, and measuring student performance, and include: "Real Evaluation: Portfolios as an Effective Alternative to Standardized Testing" (Kate Kiefer); "No More Objective Tests, Ever" (Carol…

  5. Trustee Quarterly, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The four issues of "Trustee Quarterly" contained in this document focus on topics of current concern to community college trustees. The winter 1992 issue offers articles on the trustee's role in politics, community colleges as community catalysts, Lewis and Clark Community College's (Illinois) strategic planning process, staff development…

  6. Trustee Quarterly, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The four issues of "Trustee Quarterly" contained in this document focus on topics of current concern to community college trustees. The winter 1993 issue offers articles on the prospects for educational reform under the Clinton administration and the current Congress, strategies for obtaining needed resources from the state legislature, and the…

  7. Constitutive modeling of inelastic anisotropic material response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A constitutive equation was developed to predict the inelastic thermomechanical response of single crystal turbine blades. These equations are essential for developing accurate finite element models of hot section components and contribute significantly to the understanding and prediction of crack initiation and propagation. The method used was limited to unified state variable constitutive equations. Two approaches to developing an anisotropic constitutive equation were reviewed. One approach was to apply the Stouffer-Bodner representation for deformation induced anisotropy to materials with an initial anisotropy such as single crystals. The second approach was to determine the global inelastic strain rate from the contribution of the slip in each of the possible crystallographic slip systems. A three dimensional finite element is being developed with a variable constitutive equation link that can be used for constitutive equation development and to predict the response of an experiment using the actual specimen geometry and loading conditions.

  8. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.E.; Griffioen, K.

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  9. Static inelastic analysis of RC shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Qian, Jiaru

    2002-06-01

    A macro-model of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall is developed for static inelastic analysis. The model is composed of RC column elements and RC membrane elements. The column elements are used to model the boundary zone and the membrane elements are used to model the wall panel. Various types of constitutive relationships of concrete could be adopted for the two kinds of elements. To perform analysis, the wall is divided into layers along its height. Two adjacent layers are connected with a rigid beam. There are only three unknown displacement components for each layer. A method called single degree of freedom compensation is adopted to solve the peak value of the capacity curve. The post-peak stage analysis is performed using a forced iteration approach. The macro-model developed in the study and the complete process analysis methodology are verified by the experimental and static inelastic analytical results of four RC shear wall specimens.

  10. Diffuse inelastic scattering of atoms from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J.R.; Celli, V.

    1989-02-15

    We consider the large-angle diffuse scattering of thermal-energy atoms by defects or adsorbates on a surface. We obtain the Debye-Waller factor for the thermal attenuation of the incoherent elastic peak. When the Debye exponent is small, the diffuse inelastic contribution is dominated by the single-phonon exchange, and is proportional to the frequency distribution function of the defect or adsorbate. We discuss its magnitude compared to the multiphonon background.

  11. High precision neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, Ph.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A.

    2017-06-01

    High precision neutron inelastic scattering cross section data are very important for the development of the new generation of nuclear reactors (Gen IV). Our experiments, performed using the GELINA neutron source and the GAINS spectrometer of the European Commission Joint Research Center, Geel, produce highly reliable and precise cross section data. We will present the details of the setup and the data analysis technique allowing production of such unique results, and we will show examples of two experimental results.

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-15

    This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the second quarter of calendar year 1993, including: inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve, under contract and in transit at the end of the calendar quarter; fill rate for the current quarter and projected fill rate for the next calendar quarter; average price of the petroleum products acquired during the calendar quarter; current and projected storage capacity and plans to accelerate the acquisition or construction of such capacity; analysis of existing or anticipated problems with the acquisition and storage of petroleum products, and future expansion of storage capacity; funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  13. Inelasticity of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Maher, Eoghan; Creane, Arthur; Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Lally, Caitríona; Kelly, Daniel J

    2011-09-01

    Little mechanical test data exists regarding the inelastic behavior of atherosclerotic plaques. As a result finite element (FE) models of stenting procedures commonly use hyperelastic material models to describe the soft tissue response thus limiting the accuracy of the model to the expansion stage of stent implantation and leave them unable to predict the lumen gain. In this study, cyclic mechanical tests were performed to characterize the inelastic behavior of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaque tissue due to radial compressive loading. Plaques were classified clinically as either mixed (M), calcified (Ca), or echolucent (E). An approximately linear increase in the plastic deformation was observed with increases in the peak applied strain for all plaque types. While calcified plaques generally appeared stiffest, it was observed that the clinical classification of plaques had no significant effect on the magnitude of permanent deformation on unloading. The test data was characterized using a constitutive model that accounts for both permanent deformation and stress softening to describe the compressive plaque behavior on unloading. Material constants are reported for individual plaques as well as mean values for each plaque classification. This data can be considered as a first step in characterizing the inelastic behavior of atherosclerotic plaques and could be used in combination with future mechanical data to improve the predictive capabilities of FE models of angioplasty and stenting procedures particularly in relation to lumen gain.

  14. System of elastic hard spheres which mimics the transport properties of a granular gas.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; Astillero, Antonio

    2005-09-01

    The prototype model of a fluidized granular system is a gas of inelastic hard spheres (IHS) with a constant coefficient of normal restitution alpha. Using a kinetic theory description we investigate the two basic ingredients that a model of elastic hard spheres (EHS) must have in order to mimic the most relevant transport properties of the underlying IHS gas. First, the EHS gas is assumed to be subject to the action of an effective drag force with a friction constant equal to half the cooling rate of the IHS gas, the latter being evaluated in the local equilibrium approximation for simplicity. Second, the collision rate of the EHS gas is reduced by a factor (1/2)(1+alpha), relative to that of the IHS gas. Comparison between the respective Navier-Stokes transport coefficients shows that the EHS model reproduces almost perfectly the self-diffusion coefficient and reasonably well the two transport coefficients defining the heat flux, the shear viscosity being reproduced within a deviation less than 14% (for alpha > or = 0.5). Moreover, the EHS model is seen to agree with the fundamental collision integrals of inelastic mixtures and dense gases. The approximate equivalence between IHS and EHS is used to propose kinetic models for inelastic collisions as simple extensions of known kinetic models for elastic collisions.

  15. Deep Inelastic Scattering and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Nigro, A.

    1997-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Organization * Foreword * Welcome Address * PLENARY SESSION: "From Paris to Rome" * Deep Inelastic Physics with H1 * Recent Results from ZEUS * Overview of the Status of Polarised Structure Functions * Quarks and Gluons at Hadron Colliders * Deep Inelastic Scattering - Theory and Phenomenology * WORKING GROUP 1: Structure Functions * Inclusive Jet Cross Section Measurement at CDF * Measurement of Direct Photons by the DØ Experiment * MRS Parton Distributions * Global QCD Analysis, the Gluon Distribution, and High Et Inclusive Jet Data * F2 Measurement and QCD Analysis on 94 H1 Data * The ZEUS 1994 F2 Measurement * Measurement of the Total γ*p Cross Section at very Low x and Q2 at HERA * New Results on F2 Structure Functions * Proton Structure Function and Gluon Distribution Functions from Fermilab Experiment E665 * The Transition from the Photoproduction to the DIS Region * The BFKL Pomeron: Can It Be Detected? * BFKL/CCFM Phenomenology * Physics and Mathematics of Dynamical Partons * k⊥-Factorization and Perturbative Invariants at Small x * Double Scaling Violations * On the Asymptotic Behaviour of F2(x, Q2) * Double Logarithmic Scaling of F2 * Differential Charged Current Cross-Sections at HERA * Neutral Current ep Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 and Limits on New Physics * Charm Production in Charged-Current DIS and Extraction of the Strange Sea Density * Extraction of the Gluon Density * On Problems in Extracting the Gluon Density from the Nucleon Structure Function Measurements * Inclusive Measurement of the Strong Coupling at HERA * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering at the Tevatron * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic μ - p and μ - d Scattering * A Determination of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL(x, Q2) at Low x at HERA * Prospects for Measuring R = σL/σT at HERA in 1966 Low-Energy Running * A Leading Order, in ln(1/x) as well as

  16. Laser range profile of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained by laser range profile (LRP). A mathematical LRP model from rough sphere is presented. LRP includes laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile. A target coordinate system and an imaging coordinate system are established, the mathematical model of the range profile is derived in the imaging coordinate system. The mathematical model obtained has nothing to do with the incidence direction of laser. It is shown that the laser range profile of the sphere is independent of the incidence direction of laser. This is determined by the symmetry of the sphere. The laser range profile can reflect the shape and material properties of the target. Simulations results of LRP about some spheres are given. Laser range profile of sphere, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profile of sphere, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retro-reflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of sphere are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width on the range profiles are analyzed.

  17. Mastracchio during SPHERES Vertigo Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-24

    ISS038-E-035434 (23 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with a pair of basketball-sized, free-flying satellites known Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. For this experiment session, the crew members equipped one of the two SPHERES with a pair of stereoscopic goggles dubbed the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO. As the second SPHERES tumbled and spun, the VERTIGO-equipped robot attempted to map it and perform relative navigation around it.

  18. Mastracchio during SPHERES Vertigo Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-23

    ISS038-E-035432 (23 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with a pair of basketball-sized, free-flying satellites known Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. For this experiment session, the crew members equipped one of the two SPHERES with a pair of stereoscopic goggles dubbed the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO. As the second SPHERES tumbled and spun, the VERTIGO-equipped robot attempted to map it and perform relative navigation around it.

  19. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059478 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  20. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059467 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (mostly obscured), both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  1. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059344 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  2. Close Quarters Combat Shooting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-14

    1994.at the Palm Beach Community College Criminal Justice Institute ofLakeworth, Florida to the more dynamic force-on-force, realistic scenario...Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC...Shooting is the Superior Method for Close Quarters Combat 5b. GRANT NUMBER Shooting" N/A Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR( S ) Sd. PROJECT

  3. Empty Quarter, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    In the northeast end of the Saudi Arabian desert called the Rub-Al-Khali (Empty Quarter) (21.0N, 53.0E) is the great sand dune field known as the Ash Shaiba. Here, the dunes reach great heights and are held at the maximum angle of repose by the wind. Any disturbance of the base will cause a great cascade of sand burying an intruder like a great wave. The dunes are of a classic style known as 'Barcans'.

  4. Hopkins during SPHERES Slosh Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-22

    ISS038-E-033884 (22 Jan. 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, holds a plastic container partially filled with green-colored water which will be used in a new experiment using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, which are already on the station. For the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, two SPHERES robots are attached to opposite ends of a metal frame holding the plastic tank with the green-colored water. The new hardware for the SPHERES-Slosh study was delivered to the station aboard Orbital Sciences' Cygnus cargo craft on Jan. 12.

  5. Science off the Sphere: Bistronauts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  6. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

  7. Analysis of principal nested spheres.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungkyu; Dryden, Ian L; Marron, J S

    2012-09-01

    A general framework for a novel non-geodesic decomposition of high-dimensional spheres or high-dimensional shape spaces for planar landmarks is discussed. The decomposition, principal nested spheres, leads to a sequence of submanifolds with decreasing intrinsic dimensions, which can be interpreted as an analogue of principal component analysis. In a number of real datasets, an apparent one-dimensional mode of variation curving through more than one geodesic component is captured in the one-dimensional component of principal nested spheres. While analysis of principal nested spheres provides an intuitive and flexible decomposition of the high-dimensional sphere, an interesting special case of the analysis results in finding principal geodesics, similar to those from previous approaches to manifold principal component analysis. An adaptation of our method to Kendall's shape space is discussed, and a computational algorithm for fitting principal nested spheres is proposed. The result provides a coordinate system to visualize the data structure and an intuitive summary of principal modes of variation, as exemplified by several datasets.

  8. Analysis of principal nested spheres

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungkyu; Dryden, Ian L.; Marron, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A general framework for a novel non-geodesic decomposition of high-dimensional spheres or high-dimensional shape spaces for planar landmarks is discussed. The decomposition, principal nested spheres, leads to a sequence of submanifolds with decreasing intrinsic dimensions, which can be interpreted as an analogue of principal component analysis. In a number of real datasets, an apparent one-dimensional mode of variation curving through more than one geodesic component is captured in the one-dimensional component of principal nested spheres. While analysis of principal nested spheres provides an intuitive and flexible decomposition of the high-dimensional sphere, an interesting special case of the analysis results in finding principal geodesics, similar to those from previous approaches to manifold principal component analysis. An adaptation of our method to Kendall’s shape space is discussed, and a computational algorithm for fitting principal nested spheres is proposed. The result provides a coordinate system to visualize the data structure and an intuitive summary of principal modes of variation, as exemplified by several datasets. PMID:23843669

  9. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report is submitted in accordance with section 165(b) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, which requires that the Secretary of Energy submit quarterly reports to Congress on Activities undertaken with respect to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This August 15, 1990, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1990, through June 30, 1990. 3 tabs.

  10. Inelastic Scattering Of Electrons By Protons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cone, A. A.; Chen, K. W.; Dunning, J. R. Jr.; Hartwig, G.; Ramsey, N. F.; Walker, J. K.; Wilson, R.

    1966-12-01

    The inelastic scattering of electrons by protons has been measured at incident electron energies up to 5 BeV/c and momentum transfers q{sup 2}=4(BeV/c){sup 2}. Excitation of known nucleon resonances at M=1238, 1512, 1688 and possibly 1920 MeV have been observed. The calculations for the resonance at M=1238 MeV have been compared with calculations by Adler based on the dispersion theory of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu. The agreement is good. Qualitative models are discussed for the other resonances.

  11. On the inelastic shock profile in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, H.; Sherman, D.; Rosenberg, Z.; Murray, N.

    2002-11-01

    The dynamic response of alumina specimens, above their elastic limits, was studied using planar impact experiments with different tile thickness. Stress-time measurements with manganin gauges show a steady spreading of the inelastic portion of the shock profile with increasing tile thickness. Such behavior is typical of elastic waves moving at a constant speed that depends on their amplitude. This finding supports recent interpretations of the failure ramp, by which the elastic response of these materials should be extended to higher stresses than the initial jump. However, further analysis of these profiles raises some questions regarding the exact determination of the Hugoniot elastic limit.

  12. Nuclear PDFs from neutrino deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein; J. Y. Yu; C. Keppel; J. G. Morfin; F. Olness; J.F. Owens

    2007-11-13

    We study nuclear effects in charged current deep inelastic neutrino--iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2-analysis of parton distribution functions. We extract a set of iron PDFs and show that under reasonable assumptions it is possible to constrain the valence, light sea and strange quark distributions. We compare our results with nuclear parton distribution functions from the literature and find good agreement. Our iron PDFs are used to compute nuclear correction factors which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs.

  13. Quantum Chromodynamics and Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. Keith

    2016-10-01

    This article first describes the parton model which was the precursor of the QCD description of hard scattering processes. After the discovery of QCD and asymptotic freedom, the first successful applications were to Deep Inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The subsequent application of QCD to processes with two initial state hadrons required the understanding and proof of factorization. To take the fledgling theory and turn it into the robust calculational engine it has become today, required a number of technical and conceptual developments which will be described. Prospects for higher loop calculations are also reviewed.

  14. Deep inelastic scattering on asymmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Boros, C.; Tsushima, K.; Bissey, F.; Afnan, I. R.; Thomas, A. W.

    2000-11-01

    We study deep inelastic scattering on isospin asymmetric nuclei. In particular, the difference of the nuclear structure functions and the Gottfried sum rule for the lightest mirror nuclei, 3He and 3H, are investigated. It is found that such systems can provide significant information on charge symmetry breaking and flavor asymmetry in the nuclear medium. Furthermore, we propose a new method to extract the neutron structure function from radioactive isotopes far from the line of stability. We also discuss the flavor asymmetry in the Drell-Yan process with isospin asymmetric nuclei.

  15. Deep inelastic neutron scattering in condensed hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Celli, Milva; Zoppi, Marco

    1996-02-01

    The neutron cross-section of molecular hydrogen that is measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) is compared with two distinct models. One is a generalization of the molecular Young and Koppel model (1964) that takes into account the modification to the translational kinetic energy that is induced by quantum effects. The second model assumes a free particle wave function for the final state of the proton (C. Andreani et al., 1995). The comparison between these two models, and with the experimental results, provides information on the crossover between the molecular and atomic regime of hydrogen in DINS.

  16. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  17. Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, P.; Ramamurty, U.; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of strain accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic strain in the presence of a shear strain promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic strain is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.

  18. Inelastic Gas-Surface Scattering. I. Formalism.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    scattering ’. from copper. " -- PACS Nos. 82.65. 345,,M5.s 22.h C.2 % V 07- "󈨚 * r , -. r. : .. S.._ . *" - " p - " - 14 I. INTRODUCTION In all...discusses the use of stationary state scattering results to calculate the scattering probabilities, section V gives the approximations that mU made on the...lattice 1 Hi,.t + ftr-t + V ", t. (2.3) b. 9 . ...-. -. .. ,,,,, ~ . . .°-.. . . . .. . .....,- • - • . . ........ |... .. -. The weak inelastic scattering

  19. Porous Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    This document is a slide presentation that examines the use of a simple templating process to produce hollow ceramic spheres with a pore size of 1 to 10 microns. Using ion exchange process it was determined that the method produces porous ceramic spheres with a unique structure: (i.e., inner sphere surrounded by an outer sphere.)

  20. Department of Defense Quarterly Suicide Report, Calendar Year 2015 Third Quarter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Quarter 3, 2015 0 Department of Defense Quarterly Suicide Report Calendar Year 2015 3rd Quarter Defense Suicide Prevention...Office (DSPO) Keita Franklin, Ph.D. Director, DSPO Quarter 3, 2015 1 Department of Defense Quarterly Suicide Report Calendar Year 2015...Third Quarter Introduction Timely and accurate suicide data reporting allows leaders at all levels to have near real time

  1. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, fourth quarter 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    At the beginning of the fourth quarter of 1980, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station remained shutdown for the normally planned semiannual maintenance and testing program, initiated September 12, 1980. Operational testing began on November 7. Maximum power was achieved November 28 and was maintained throughout the remainder of the quarter except as noted. The LWBR Core has generated 19,046.07 EFPH from start-up through the end of the quarter. During this quarter, approximately 0.000025 curies of Xe 133 activity were released from the station. During the fourth quarter of 1980, 1081 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste was shipped out of state for burial. These shipments contained 0.037 curies of radioactivity.

  2. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Pindera, M-J.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model capable of predicting the thermomechanical response of continuously reinforced metal matrix composite laminates subjected to multiaxial loading was developed. A micromechanical model is used in conjunction with nonlinear lamination theory to determine inelastic laminae response. Matrix viscoplasticity, residual stresses, and damage to the fiber/matrix interfacial zone are explicitly included in the model. The representative cell of the micromechanical model is considered to be in a state of generalized plane strain, enabling a quasi two-dimensional analysis to be performed. Constant strain finite elements are formulated with elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. Interfacial debonding is incorporated into the model through interface elements based on the interfacial debonding theory originally presented by Needleman, and modified by Tvergaard. Nonlinear interfacial constitutive equations relate interfacial tractions to displacement discontinuities at the interface. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of an experimental program conducted on silicon carbide/titanium (SiC/Ti) unidirectional, (O4), and angle-ply, (+34)(sub s), tubular specimens. Multiaxial loading included increments of axial tension, compression, torque, and internal pressure. Loadings were chosen in an effort to distinguish inelastic deformation due to damage from matrix plasticity and separate time-dependent effects from time-independent effects. Results show that fiber/matrix debonding is nonuniform throughout the composite and is a major factor in the effective response. Also, significant creep behavior occurs at relatively low applied stress levels at room temperature.

  3. Antinucleon-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.; Millener, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the utility of antinucleon (anti N)-nucleus inelastic scattering studies is presented, emphasizing both the sensitivity of the cross sections to various components of the N anti N transition amplitudes and the prospects for the exploration of some novel aspects of nuclear structure. We start with an examination of the relation between NN and N anti N potentials, focusing on the coherences predicted for the central, spin-orbit and tensor components, and how these may be revealed by measurements of two-body spin observables. We next discuss the role of the nucleus as a spin and isospin filter, and show how, by a judicious choice of final state quantum numbers (natural or unnatural parity states, isospin transfer ..delta..T = 0 or 1) and momentum transfer q, one can isolate different components of the N anti N transition amplitude. Various models for the N anti N interaction which give reasonable fits to the available two-body data are shown to lead to strikingly different predictions for certain spin-flip nuclear transitions. We suggest several possible directions for future anti N-nucleus inelastic scattering experiments, for instance the study of spin observables which would be accessible with polarized anti N beams, charge exchange reactions, and higher resolution studies of the (anti p, anti p') reaction. We compare the antinucleon and the nucleon as a probe of nuclear modes of excitation. 40 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Phenomenology of deep-inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1983-03-01

    The field of heavy-ion deep-inelastic reactions is reviewed with particular attention to the experimental picture. The most important degrees of freedom involved in the process are identified and illustrated with relevant experiments. Energy dissipation and mass transfer are discussed in terms of particles and/or phonons exchanged in the process. The equilibration of the fragment neutron-to-proton ratios is inspected for evidence of giant isovector resonances. The angular momentum effects are observed in the fragment angular distributions and the angular momentum transfer is inferred from the magnitude and alignment of the fragments spins. The possible sources of light particles accompanying the deep-inelastic reactions are discussed. The use of the sequentially emitted particles as angular momentum probes is illustrated. The significance and uses of a thermalized component emitted by the dinucleus is reviewed. The possible presence of Fermi jets in the prompt component is shown to be critical to the justification of the one-body theories.

  5. Driven inelastic Maxwell gas in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, V. V.; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Dhar, Abhishek; Narayan, Onuttom

    2017-02-01

    A lattice version of the driven inelastic Maxwell gas is studied in one dimension with periodic boundary conditions. Each site i of the lattice is assigned with a scalar "velocity," vi. Nearest neighbors on the lattice interact, with a rate τc-1, according to an inelastic collision rule. External driving, occurring with a rate τw-1, sustains a steady state in the system. A set of closed coupled equations for the evolution of the variance and the two-point correlation is found. Steady-state values of the variance, as well as spatial correlation functions, are calculated. It is shown exactly that the correlation function decays exponentially with distance, and the correlation length for a large system is determined. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal correlation C (x ,t ) = can also be obtained. We find that there is an interior region -x* x* , the correlation function remains the same as the initial form. C (x ,t ) exhibits second-order discontinuity at the transition points x =±x* , and these transition points move away from the x =0 with a constant speed.

  6. Inelastic mechanics: A unifying principle in biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Kroy, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    Many soft materials are classified as viscoelastic. They behave mechanically neither quite fluid-like nor quite solid-like - rather a bit of both. Biomaterials are often said to fall into this class. Here, we argue that this misses a crucial aspect, and that biomechanics is essentially damage mechanics, at heart. When deforming an animal cell or tissue, one can hardly avoid inducing the unfolding of protein domains, the unbinding of cytoskeletal crosslinkers, the breaking of weak sacrificial bonds, and the disruption of transient adhesions. We classify these activated structural changes as inelastic. They are often to a large degree reversible and are therefore not plastic in the proper sense, but they dissipate substantial amounts of elastic energy by structural damping. We review recent experiments involving biological materials on all scales, from single biopolymers over cells to model tissues, to illustrate the unifying power of this paradigm. A deliberately minimalistic yet phenomenologically very rich mathematical modeling framework for inelastic biomechanics is proposed. It transcends the conventional viscoelastic paradigm and suggests itself as a promising candidate for a unified description and interpretation of a wide range of experimental data. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  7. Primordial Particles; Collisions of Inelastic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, George

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional matter is not defined by Euclidian or Cartesian geometries. Newton's and Einstein's laws are related to the motions of elastic masses. The study of collisions of inelastic particles opens up new vistas in physics. The present article reveals how such particles create clusters composed of various numbers of particles. The Probability of each formation, duplets, triplets, etc. can be calculated. The particles are held together by a binding force, and depending upon the angles of collisions they may also rotate around their center of geometry. Because of these unique properties such inelastic particles are referred to as primordial particles, Pp. When a given density of Pp per cubic space is given, then random collisions create a field. The calculation of the properties of such primordial field is very complex and beyond the present study. However, the angles of collisions are infinite in principle, but the probabilities of various cluster sizes are quantum dependent. Consequently, field calculations will require new complex mathematical methods to be discovered yet.

  8. Longitudinal and Transverse Inelastic Electron Scattering from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R.; Cafolla, A.; Day, D.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.; Wise, J. E.

    1980-04-01

    Inelastic-electron-scattering cross sections for 56Fe have been measured in the continuum region. The longitudinal and transverse inelastic response functions have been determined for vector momentum transfers, q, from 210-410 MeV/c and for energy losses 0<ω<=220 MeV.

  9. Deployable Crew Quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    The deployable crew quarters (DCQ) have been designed for the International Space Station (ISS). Each DCQ would be a relatively inexpensive, deployable boxlike structure that is designed to fit in a rack bay. It is to be occupied by one crewmember to provide privacy and sleeping functions for the crew. A DCQ comprises mostly hard panels, made of a lightweight honeycomb or matrix/fiber material, attached to each other by cloth hinges. Both faces of each panel are covered with a layer of Nomex cloth and noise-suppression material to provide noise isolation from ISS. On Earth, the unit is folded flat and attached to a rigid pallet for transport to the ISS. On the ISS, crewmembers unfold the unit and install it in place, attaching it to ISS structural members by use of soft cords (which also help to isolate noise and vibration). A few hard pieces of equipment (principally, a ventilator and a smoke detector) are shipped separately and installed in the DCQ unit by use of a system of holes, slots, and quarter-turn fasteners. Full-scale tests showed that the time required to install a DCQ unit amounts to tens of minutes. The basic DCQ design could be adapted to terrestrial applications to satisfy requirements for rapid deployable emergency shelters that would be lightweight, portable, and quickly erected. The Temporary Early Sleep Station (TeSS) currently on-orbit is a spin-off of the DCQ.

  10. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  11. Strategic petroleum reserve. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve serves as one of our most important investments in reducing the Nation`s vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. Its existence provides an effective response mechanism should a disruption occur and a formidable deterrent to the use of oil as a political instrument. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975, (Public Law 94-163) as amended, to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the first quarter of calendar year 1994, including: (1) inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve, under contract and in transit at the end of the calendar quarter; (2) fill rate for the current quarter and projected fill rate for the next calendar quarter; (3) average price of the petroleum products acquired during the calendar quarter; (4) current and projected storage capacity; (5) analysis of existing or anticipated problems with the acquisition and storage of petroleum products, and future expansion of storage capacity; (6) funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and (7) major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  12. Vector field generator for a direct mapping of the first order Poincare sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Melanie Anne

    This thesis presents an optical system able to generate all polarization states on the zero order Poincare sphere. An important characteristic of the zero order sphere is its spatial uniformity. This means that the polarization of the beam is uniform. This characterization can be proven using polarizers. Any change in the polarization of the beam will be consistent for all points in the beam. This is not necessarily true for all types of polarization states. There are new polarization states that are spatially variant in which the polarization is no longer uniform. The assumption that the polarization at one point in the beam is the same at all points is no longer valid. These are defined as higher order polarization states which have their own Poincare spheres that are similar to the zero order sphere but are spatially variant. The higher order polarization states are the focus of this thesis. Maxwell's equations are shown and the solution for light is derived. From this, Jones vectors are used to describe the polarization and how they relate to the Poincare sphere. Jones matrices are applied to the incoming polarization state to reflect the changes a waveplate causes to the system, and how to create a rotator to rotate the axis of polarization. The matrices describe an optical system consisting of a variable waveplate and a rotator created from 2 quarter waveplates and an additional variable waveplate that able to change the latitude and longitude of a polarization state on the Poincare sphere. The system is able to achieve any coordinate on the surface of the sphere. The system is applied to the zero order Poincare sphere and the positive and negative first order Poincare sphere. Experimental results are presented and agree with theory.

  13. Sphere forming method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided for forming small accurately spherical objects. Preformed largely spherical objects are supported at the opening of a conduit on the update of hot gas emitted from the opening, so the object is in a molten state. The conduit is suddenly jerked away at a downward incline, to allow the molten object to drop in free fall, so that surface tension forms a precise sphere. The conduit portion that has the opening, lies in a moderate vacuum chamber, and the falling sphere passes through the chamber and through a briefly opened valve into a tall drop tower that contains a lower pressure, to allow the sphere to cool without deformation caused by falling through air.

  14. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, third quarter 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    At the beginning of the third quarter of 1980, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station was operating with the 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D reactor coolant loops and the 1AC and 1BD purification loops in service. During the quarter, the Station was operated for Duquesne Light Company System grid including base load and swing load operation. Twelve (12) planned swing load operations were performed on the LWBR Core this quarter to complete the LWBR operating plan of fifty (50) during this operating phase. The Station was shutdown on September 12 for the Fall 1980 Shutdown and remained in this mode through the end of the quarter. The LWBR Core has generated 18,297.98 EFPH from start-up through the end of the quarter. There were no radioactive liquid discharges from the Radioactive Waste Processing System to the river this quarter. The radioactive liquid waste effluent line to the river remained blanked off to prevent inadvertent radioactive liquid waste discharges. During the quarter, approximately 0.001 curies of Xe 133 activity were released from the station. The radioactivity released from Shippingport Station is far too small to have any measurable effect on the general background environmental radioactivity outside the plant.

  15. Environemental Planning Quarterly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.

    The Environmental Planning Quarterly is a publication of the Environmental Planning Division of the American Planning Association (APA). Its current editor is G. William Page (Department of Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee). A recent issue included a feature article on forest management in the state of Washington and several lengthy and informative news items about activities of the Environmental Protection Agency related to groundwater contamination and hazardous waste. Other news items contained information on air pollution and acid rain as well as on surface water pollution. Subscriptions can be obtained by writing to the Environmental Planning Division. American Planning Association, Lock Box 97774, Chicago, IL 60690. Annual fees are as follows: $ 15 (APA member), $25 (affiliate), $5 (student), $30 (subscribing).

  16. Nonlinear, inelastic fast reactor subassembly interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W.H.; Bard, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core structural design is complicated by the trade-offs associated with keeping the subassemblies closely packed for the neutronic considerations and accommodating the volumetric changes associated with irradiation swelling. The environmental variation across the reactor core results in temperature and neutron flux gradients across the subassemblies which in turn cause the subassemblies to bow as well as dilate and grow volumetrically. These deformations in a tightly packed reactor core cause the subassemblies to interact and can potentially result in excessive withdrawal loads during the refueling operations. ABADAN, a general purpose, nonlinear, inelastic, multi-dimensional finite element structural analysis computer code, was developed for the express purpose of solving large nonlinear problems as typified by the above interaction problems. For the subassembly interaction problem ABADAN has been applied to the solution of an interacting radial row of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel assemblies.

  17. Medical applications of neutron inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Banuk-Waitekus, Anathea; Valtuena, Silvia; Sheahan, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    A sealed, D-T, pulsed neutron generator is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon and oxygen by neutron inelastic scattering. The generator is operated at 10 KHz, at a neutron output of about 2 X 107 n/s/4(pi) . Gamma ray spectra are collected with two B4Ge3O12 crystal detectors. The measurements are used to measure fat and lean content and distribution in the body, with minimal radiation exposure (0.08 mSv). When combined with other measurements (such as total body potassium), this whole body scanning device provides us with the `quality of lean mass', a measurable outcome of treatments designed to improve nutritional status and function. The method is used in studies of human nutrition and for assessing the efficacy of new anti-obesity and anti-cachexia pharmaceuticals.

  18. Inclusive Inelastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-10-26

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and Q{sup 2} is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi-elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark consitituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the infiuence of final state interactions and the approach to y-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to x-scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  19. Statistical properties of deep inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1983-08-01

    The multifaceted aspects of deep-inelastic heavy-ion collisions are discussed in terms of the statistical equilibrium limit. It is shown that a conditional statistical equilibrium, where a number of degrees of freedom are thermalized while others are still relaxing, prevails in most of these reactions. The individual degrees of freedom that have been explored experimentally are considered in their statistical equilibrium limit, and the extent to which they appear to be thermalized is discussed. The interaction between degrees of freedom on their way towards equilibrium is shown to create complex feedback phenomena that may lead to self-regulation. A possible example of self-regulation is shown for the process of energy partition between fragments promoted by particle exchange. 35 references.

  20. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    DOE PAGES

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; ...

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. Lastly, this modelmore » is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.« less

  1. Inelastic electron scattering from 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. E.; McCarthy, J. S.; Altemus, R.; Norum, B. E.; Whitney, R. R.; Heisenberg, J.; Dawson, J.; Schwentker, O.

    1985-05-01

    Inelastic electron scattering from 48Ca has been performed over a momentum transfer range from 0.6 to 3.0 fm-1 in both forward and backward directions. Form factors have been obtained for 25 levels up to 10 MeV excitation. Charge and current densities for 11 low lying electric transitions and current densities for two magnetic transitions have been reconstructed in Fourier Bessel analysis. Three high spin states observed in the region of 9 MeV excitation are found to have the dominant configuration ν(1g9/2,1f-17/2)8 - but with a total strength of only 36% predicted for the first 8- in a random-phase-approximation calculation. This is interpreted as evidence for particle-phonon coupling. Comparisons of the extracted densities are made with random-phase-approximation calculations using a zero-range, density-dependent Migdal interaction.

  2. Inelastic electron injection in a water chain

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, Valerio; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Kohanoff, Jorge J.

    2017-01-01

    Irradiation of biological matter triggers a cascade of secondary particles that interact with their surroundings, resulting in damage. Low-energy electrons are one of the main secondary species and electron-phonon interaction plays a fundamental role in their dynamics. We have developed a method to capture the electron-phonon inelastic energy exchange in real time and have used it to inject electrons into a simple system that models a biological environment, a water chain. We simulated both an incoming electron pulse and a steady stream of electrons and found that electrons with energies just outside bands of excited molecular states can enter the chain through phonon emission or absorption. Furthermore, this phonon-assisted dynamical behaviour shows great sensitivity to the vibrational temperature, highlighting a crucial controlling factor for the injection and propagation of electrons in water. PMID:28350013

  3. Elastic and inelastic collisions of swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Martin, Stephan; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Scattering interactions of swarms in potentials that are generated by an attraction-repulsion model are studied. In free space, swarms in this model form a well-defined steady state describing the translation of a stable formation of the particles whose shape depends on the interaction potential. Thus, the collision between a swarm and a boundary or between two swarms can be treated as (quasi)-particle scattering. Such scattering experiments result in internal excitations of the swarm or in bound states, respectively. In addition, varying a parameter linked to the relative importance of damping and potential forces drives transitions between elastic and inelastic scattering of the particles. By tracking the swarm's center of mass, a refraction rule is derived via simulations relating the incoming and outgoing directions of a swarm hitting the wall. Iterating the map derived from the refraction law allows us to predict and understand the dynamics and bifurcations of swarms in square boxes and in channels.

  4. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; Smith, R. F.; Suggit, M. J.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. Lastly, this model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.

  5. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, A.; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; Smith, R. F.; Suggit, M. J.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature. PMID:27071341

  6. Inelastic electron injection in a water chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Valerio; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Kohanoff, Jorge J.

    2017-03-01

    Irradiation of biological matter triggers a cascade of secondary particles that interact with their surroundings, resulting in damage. Low-energy electrons are one of the main secondary species and electron-phonon interaction plays a fundamental role in their dynamics. We have developed a method to capture the electron-phonon inelastic energy exchange in real time and have used it to inject electrons into a simple system that models a biological environment, a water chain. We simulated both an incoming electron pulse and a steady stream of electrons and found that electrons with energies just outside bands of excited molecular states can enter the chain through phonon emission or absorption. Furthermore, this phonon-assisted dynamical behaviour shows great sensitivity to the vibrational temperature, highlighting a crucial controlling factor for the injection and propagation of electrons in water.

  7. Inelastic torsion of steel I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Y. L.; Trahair, N. S.

    1993-09-01

    A nonlinear inelastic analysis of the non-uniform torsion of I-section beams is presented in this paper. Large twist rotations are included in the geometry non-linearity. The nonlinear equilibrium equations of beams in nonuniform torsion have been derived and a finite element procedure has been developed based on the analysis. The elastic-plastic behavior of beams in non-uniform torsion is studied using the finite element procedure and the results are compared with tests. It is found that I-section beams have much larger torsional capacities than can be predicted by linear plastic collapse analysis, and that torsional failure occurs not by the formation of a mechanism but by the tensile rupture of the flanges. A method is proposed for calculating the full plastic non-uniform torque for practical design purposes.

  8. Prospects for dark matter detection with inelastic transitions of xenon

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Christopher

    2016-05-16

    Dark matter can scatter and excite a nucleus to a low-lying excitation in a direct detection experiment. This signature is distinct from the canonical elastic scattering signal because the inelastic signal also contains the energy deposited from the subsequent prompt de-excitation of the nucleus. A measurement of the elastic and inelastic signal will allow a single experiment to distinguish between a spin-independent and spin-dependent interaction. For the first time, we characterise the inelastic signal for two-phase xenon detectors in which dark matter inelastically scatters off the {sup 129}Xe or {sup 131}Xe isotope. We do this by implementing a realistic simulation of a typical tonne-scale two-phase xenon detector and by carefully estimating the relevant background signals. With our detector simulation, we explore whether the inelastic signal from the axial-vector interaction is detectable with upcoming tonne-scale detectors. We find that two-phase detectors allow for some discrimination between signal and background so that it is possible to detect dark matter that inelastically scatters off either the {sup 129}Xe or {sup 131}Xe isotope for dark matter particles that are heavier than approximately 100 GeV. If, after two years of data, the XENON1T search for elastic scattering nuclei finds no evidence for dark matter, the possibility of ever detecting an inelastic signal from the axial-vector interaction will be almost entirely excluded.

  9. ''Fraunhofer theory'' of rotational inelastic scattering of He on small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Faubel, M.

    1984-12-15

    The well-known Fraunhofer approximation provides a simple and direct qualitative physical explanation for the diffraction oscillations and the oscillation phase shift phenomena observed in differential rotational state to state scattering cross sections for He on a number of small molecules. This approximation has been further developed to yield a simple analytical expression for the angular dependence of the inelastic cross sections. For the experimentally and theoretically well investigated systems He--N/sub 2/ and He--CH/sub 4/ the Fraunhofer formula is found to reproduce the measured cross sections to within better than a factor of 2. For the investigated collision energy E/sub cm/ roughly-equal30 meV (roughly-equal3 kJ/mol) the deformed sphere interaction potential model used in the Fraunhofer approximation appears to be closely related to the zero crossing equipotential line of the full interaction potential. The relationship to the cluster model of molecules composed of atomic hard spheres is discussed. The dependence of the rotational excitation on the interaction potential is shown to be primarily a dependence on the equilibrium positions of the atoms in the molecule.

  10. Jammed Ellipsoids Beat Jammed Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikin, Paul; Donev, Aleksandar; Man, Weining; Cisse, Ibrahim; Stillinger, Frank; Torquato, Salvatore

    2004-03-01

    We have performed experiments and computer simulations on random packings of ellipsoids. The experiments on M^textregistered Milk Chocolate candies (spheroids with aspect ratio ˜ 1.91:1) indicate a packing fraction 0.68-0.7 considerably higher than that for random sphere packings (0.64). Moreover the number of contacting neighbors is measured as Z ˜ 9.8, close to the isostatic result of twice the number of degrees of freedom f, Z=2f, per particle. For spheres f=3, Z ˜ 6, for ellipsoids of revolution f=5, Z ˜ 10, and for general ellipsoids Z ˜ 12. Simulations, for spheroids support this observation and show a remarkable downward cusp-like behavior for packing fraction vs aspect ratio with a local minimum for spheres. Experiments on general ellipsoids also show high packing fractions and simulations yield orientationally disordered ellipsoid packings up to a density of 0.75, i.e., exceeding even the densest crystal packing of spheres.

  11. Neuroscience in the public sphere.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cliodhna; Rees, Geraint; Joffe, Helene

    2012-04-26

    The media are increasingly fascinated by neuroscience. Here, we consider how neuroscientific discoveries are thematically represented in the popular press and the implications this has for society. In communicating research, neuroscientists should be sensitive to the social consequences neuroscientific information may have once it enters the public sphere. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved linings for integrating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fergerson, P. O.; French, B. O.

    1970-01-01

    Sphere surface is covered with plain weave of glass fibers coated with polytetrafluoroethylene and one or two layers of magnesium oxide vapor. The resultant lining is suitable for measurement of radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, is not damage prone, and is easily cleaned.

  13. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  14. Quarterly environmental data summary for first quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, S.H.

    1997-05-09

    This report supports the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. All data received and verified during the fourth quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those detailed in this support. Above normal occurrences are cited for groundwater data and NPDES. There were none for air, surface water or springs. A brief summary is presented of the data that met the above normal criteria merged during the first quarter and updates on past reported above normal data.

  15. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 56, 1st Quarter, January 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    between single - and double-loop learning.17 The contrast pertains to knowledge about improving what one is already doing based on a given set of...how they should be developed, and why many recent attempts at theories are really shallow approaches based on a single governing idea, ignor...Quarterly should be acknowledged whenever material is quoted from or based on its content. COMMUNICATIONS Please visit NDU Press and Joint Force Quarterly

  16. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  17. Vibrationally inelastic low-energy CO/+/ - Ar collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, F.; Moran, T. F.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of relative differential cross sections for inelastic scattering of CO(+) by Ar with a high-resolution ion-beam apparatus in which a CO(+) beam interacts with a neutral-Ar beam, and the energy, mass, and angular distribution of scattered ions are measured. Maxima in the inelastic energy-loss spectra occur at energies corresponding to CO(+) spectroscopic vibrational spacings. Weakly inelastic processes are observed below the threshold for vibrational energy loss, corresponding to rotational excitation with the relative importance of rotational transitions increasing with decreasing energy and scattering angle.

  18. Inelastic gas: An experimental study of vibro-fluidized dilute granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feitosa, Klebert Bezerra

    We conduct an experimental study of a two dimensional vibro-fluidized dilute granular medium. The system is composed of spherical beads confined to move in a vertical plane and excited by intense vertical vibrations. We perform full-field tracking of positions and orientations of the spheres by high speed photography. In steady-state, the motion of the grains resembles that of a molecular gas, thus the name granular gas. We study the distribution of linear velocities in the granular gas. The investigation shows that the distributions are non-gaussian, best fitted by the function P(v) ˜ exp(-beta| v|/sigma)1.5), and insensitive to number density, driving parameters and particle inelasticity. The distribution is a one parameter distribution, parameterized by the mean square velocity; which defines a granular temperature. T = ½ . We study binary mixtures of the granular media. We find that, in general, the granular temperature is not equal for the two types of spheres. However, the temperature ratio is constant in the bulk. The ratio depends strongly on the mass ratio of the spheres, but not on their inelasticity. The ratio is also insensitive to compositional parameters of the mixture such as number fraction and number density. We also investigate the statistics of the power flux into a subsystem of the granular gas. The power shows large fluctuations, including frequent large negative fluctuations. The relative probabilities of positive and negative fluctuations in the power flux are in close accord with the Fluctuation Theorem of Gallavotti and Cohen (Gallavotti & Cohen, 1995b). We also compare the effective temperature that emerges from this analysis to the kinetic granular temperature. Finally, we study the rotational dynamics of the granular gas. We find that the granular temperature is not equipartitioned between translational and rotational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate that the ratio of rotational to translational energy is independent of the

  19. Fulminant properties of high explosives equation of state studies. Quarterly report, April--June 1964

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J.K.; West, G.T.

    1997-09-01

    Installation of the new Altec-Lansing M-30 microphone system in the impact machine was completed during the quarter. Eighteen series of impact hammer tests were completed. Of these, eight were made with the new 2.5 kg hammer. Routine tests conducted with the 5 kg hammer included EL-511 {beta}, Tacot-T, TNT, PBX 9404, LX-04-1 and PBX 9010; tests made with the 2.5 kg hammer included PBX 9404, LX-04-1, PBX 9010 and PETN. Half-inch gap sensitivity testing continued with a group test on four RX-04-AB materials and four LX-04-1 materials. Differences in shock sensitivity due to particle size and recrystallization were observed. Equation of State work during the fourth quarter consisted of three cylinder shots of LX-04-1, two small spherical shots (mockup of the large sphere shot) fired as technique checks, and a full scale sphere shot.

  20. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  1. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, third quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the second quarter of 1996, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the third quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  2. Science off the Sphere: Fun with Antibubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit injects air bubbles inside a sphere of water to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership betwe...

  3. 20 CFR 404.146 - When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter... Coverage § 404.146 When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage. This section applies when we credit you with quarters of coverage (QCs) under § 404.141 for calendar years before 1978 and under §...

  4. 20 CFR 404.146 - When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter... Coverage § 404.146 When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage. This section applies when we credit you with quarters of coverage (QCs) under § 404.141 for calendar years before 1978 and under §...

  5. 20 CFR 404.146 - When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter... Coverage § 404.146 When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage. This section applies when we credit you with quarters of coverage (QCs) under § 404.141 for calendar years before 1978 and under §...

  6. 20 CFR 404.146 - When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter... Coverage § 404.146 When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage. This section applies when we credit you with quarters of coverage (QCs) under § 404.141 for calendar years before 1978 and under §...

  7. 20 CFR 404.146 - When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter... Coverage § 404.146 When a calendar quarter cannot be a quarter of coverage. This section applies when we credit you with quarters of coverage (QCs) under § 404.141 for calendar years before 1978 and under §...

  8. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975 (Public Law 94-163). Its purposes are to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the third quarter of calendar year 1995, including: inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve; current storage capacity and ullage available; current status of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities, major projects and the acquisition of petroleum products; funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  9. Coating a Sphere With Evaporated Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    In vacuum coating apparatus, metal evaporated onto sphere from small source located some distance away. Sphere held in path of metal vapor while rotated about axis that rocks back and forth. One tilting motion particularly easy to produce is sinusoidal rocking with frequency much lower than rotational frequency. Apparatus developed for coating single-crystal sapphire spheres with niobium.

  10. Rubber rolling over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiller, J.; Ehlers, K.

    2007-04-01

    “Rubber” coated bodies rolling over a surface satisfy a no-twist condition in addition to the no slip condition satisfied by “marble” coated bodies [1]. Rubber rolling has an interesting differential geometric appeal because the geodesic curvatures of the curves on the surfaces at corresponding points are equal. The associated distribution in the 5 dimensional configuration space has 2 3 5 growth (these distributions were first studied by Cartan; he showed that the maximal symmetries occurs for rubber rolling of spheres with 3:1 diameters ratio and materialize the exceptional group G 2). The 2 3 5 nonholonomic geometries are classified in a companion paper [2] via Cartan’s equivalence method [3]. Rubber rolling of a convex body over a sphere defines a generalized Chaplygin system [4 8] with SO(3) symmetry group, total space Q = SO(3) × S 2 and base S 2, that can be reduced to an almost Hamiltonian system in T* S 2 with a non-closed 2-form ωNH. In this paper we present some basic results on the sphere-sphere problem: a dynamically asymmetric but balanced sphere of radius b (unequal moments of inertia I j but with center of gravity at the geometric center), rubber rolling over another sphere of radius a. In this example ωNH is conformally symplectic [9]: the reduced system becomes Hamiltonian after a coordinate dependent change of time. In particular there is an invariant measure, whose density is the determinant of the reduced Legendre transform, to the power p = 1/2( b/a - 1). Using sphero-conical coordinates we verify the result by Borisov and Mamaev [10] that the system is integrable for p = -1/2 (ball over a plane). They have found another integrable case [11] corresponding to p = -3/2 (rolling ball with twice the radius of a fixed internal ball). Strikingly, a different set of sphero-conical coordinates separates the Hamiltonian in this case. No other integrable cases with different I j are known.

  11. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks. Coke production consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the second quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 72 tabs.

  12. Neutron inelastic scattering measurements on the stable isotopes of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, P.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A. J. M.

    2017-07-01

    The results of a neutron inelastic scattering experiment performed at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed white neutron source of the European Commission Joint Research Centre are reported. The neutrons with energies up to 18 MeV interacted with a natTi sample and the γ rays resulting from inelastic scattering reactions on the stable isotopes were detected using the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) spectrometer. We were able to measure the γ -production cross sections for 21 transitions in the five stable Ti isotopes. From these, the level cross sections and the total inelastic cross sections were determined. Our experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations performed using the talys 1.8 code, evaluated nuclear data libraries, and also with previously reported results.

  13. Use of inelastic design for radioactive material transportation packages

    SciTech Connect

    Heinstein, M.W.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    There is much interest within the radioactive material transportation container design community in the use of inelastic analysis. In other industries where inelastic analysis is used in design there is typically an improved knowledge of the capacity of the structure and a more efficient use of material. This report describes the results of a program in which the incentives for inelastic analysis for radioactive material transport container design were investigated to determine if there are similar benefits. Detailed are the elastic and inelastic analyses of two containers subjected to impacts onto a rigid target following a thirty-foot free fall in end-on, side-on, and center-of-gravity- over-corner orientations.

  14. Parity Violation in Composite Inelastic Dark Matter Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Recent experimental results indicate that the dark matter sector may have a non-minimal structure with a spectrum of states and interactions. Inelastic scattering has received particular attention in light of DAMA's annual modulation signal. Composite inelastic dark matter (CiDM) provides a dynamical origin for the mass splittings in inelastic dark matter models. We show that higher dimensional operators in the CiDM Lagrangian lead to an admixture of inelastic and elastic scattering in the presence of parity violation. This scenario is consistent with direct detection experiments, even when parity violation is nearly maximal. We present an effective field theory description of such models and discuss the constraints from direct detection experiments. The CiDM model with parity violation has non-trivial phenomenology because of the multiple scattering channels that are allowed.

  15. Energy Conservation and Restitution in Inelastic Collisions: A Simple Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Explores how the apparent loss of energy in inelastic collisions may be understood by considering a simple model of two rigid balls connected by a spring. Includes a numerical simulation of this and an extension to include Newton's Cradle. (DDR)

  16. Capture of inelastic dark matter in white dwarves

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Matthew; Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2010-04-15

    We consider the capture of inelastic dark matter in white dwarves by inelastic spin-independent scattering on nuclei. We show that if the dark matter annihilates to standard-model particles then, under the assumption of primordial globular cluster formation, the observation of cold white dwarves in the globular cluster M4 appears inconsistent with explanations of the observed DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal based on spin-independent inelastic dark matter scattering. Alternatively if the inelastic dark matter scenario were to be confirmed and it was found to annihilate to standard-model particles then this would imply a much lower dark matter density in the core of M4 than would be expected if it were to have formed in a dark matter halo. Finally we argue that cold white dwarves constitute a unique dark matter probe, complementary to other direct and indirect detection searches.

  17. Intermediate resonance of inelastic 12C + 12C scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamu, Tanimura

    1980-01-01

    The intermediate resonances observed in the inelastic 12C + 12C cross sections to the single and mutual 2 1+(4.43 MeV) excitations and the single 3 1- (9.64 MeV) excitation are studied by the coupled-channel method with the use of the coupling interaction derived by the folding procedure between 12C and 12C. It is shown that the model is successful in reproducing the gross structures of the inelastic cross sections and especially the correlated resonance energies of the inelastic channels. The inelastic resonances are shown to be due to the molecular resonances in an adiabatic potential between two 12C, which reproduces correctly the coupled channel resonances.

  18. Inelastic cross sections for electron interactions in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.N.; Ritchie, R.H.; Turner, J.E.; Wright, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    The task was to develop a set of cross sections for electron inelastic processes in liquid water suitable for use in a Monte Carlo transport calculation. Results are plotted as inverse mean free paths vs electron energy. (DLC)

  19. Lindblad equation for the inelastic loss of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Lepage, G. Peter

    2017-01-01

    The loss of ultracold trapped atoms due to highly inelastic reactions has previously been taken into account in effective theories for low-energy atoms by adding local anti-Hermitian terms to the effective Hamiltonian. We show that an additional modification is required in the equation governing the density matrix for multiatom systems. The effective density matrix obtained by tracing over states containing high-momentum atoms produced by the highly inelastic reactions satisfies the Lindblad equation, with local Lindblad operators that are determined by the anti-Hermitian terms in the effective Hamiltonian. We use the Lindblad equation to derive the universal relation for the two-atom inelastic loss rate for fermions with two spin states and the universal relation for the three-atom inelastic loss rate for identical bosons.

  20. Flow and design characteristics of the hydrocyclone for the recovery of coal fines. Sixth quarterly report, December 1, 1982-February 28, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Progress accomplished during the quarter ending February 28, 1983 is reported in this document under the headings: Effect of varying the inlet area of the hydrocyclone; effect of varying the inlet flowrate of the hydrocyclone; correlation of sphere data with coal data; content of the gob sample; selection of the hydrocyclone configuration for the separation of coal fines from gob; and the presentation of sphere data in a users manual. (DMC)

  1. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  2. Quarterly environmental data summary for first quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the first quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the data base during the first quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the data base, and KPA data are not merged into the regular data base. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined {open_quotes}above normal{close_quotes} Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES&H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that {open_quotes}above normal{close_quotes} data occur. All data received and verified during the first quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those detailed below. Above normal occurrences are cited for groundwater, air, and NPDES data. There were none for springs or surface water. The following discussion offers a brief summary of the data merged during the first quarter that exceeded the above normal criteria and updates on past reported above normal data. The attached tables present the most recent data for air and the data merged into the data base during the first quarter 1998 for groundwater, NPDES, surface water, and springs. Graphs showing concentrations of selected contaminants of concern at some of the critical locations have also been included in this QEDS. The graphs are discussed in the separate sections.

  3. Dynamics of inelastic and reactive gas-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smoliar, Laura Ann

    1995-04-01

    The dynamics of inelastic and reactive collisions in atomic beam-surface scattering are presented. The inelastic scattering of hyperthermal rare gaseous atoms from three alkali halide surfaces (LiF, NaCl, GI)was studied to understand mechanical energy transfer in unreactive systems. The dynamics of the chemical reaction in the scattering of H(D) atoms from the surfaces of LIF(001) and the basal plane of graphite were also studied.

  4. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  5. Active swarms on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion—a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band.

  6. Principal Fibrations from Noncommutative Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Suijlekom, Walter Van

    2005-11-01

    We construct noncommutative principal fibrations Sθ7→Sθ4 which are deformations of the classical SU(2) Hopf fibration over the four sphere. We realize the noncommutative vector bundles associated to the irreducible representations of SU(2) as modules of coequivariant maps and construct corresponding projections. The index of Dirac operators with coefficients in the associated bundles is computed with the Connes-Moscovici local index formula. "The algebra inclusion is an example of a not-trivial quantum principal bundle."

  7. Light Scattering by Charged Spheres.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-29

    Wyman Graduate Student: Mr. Alan Chu %"% ,’A% 4, % .1 % 70 References , % -- Arnold S. and N. Hessel , 1985: Photoemission from Single...position of the natural resonances of a sphere are used to determine its size or its chemical * composition ( Arnold , 1980; Lettieri, 1984). High...us very helpful suggestions during the program. We also kept close scientific contact with Dr. Arnold of the Polytechnic Institute of New York, and

  8. Elastic Curves on the Sphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-16

    12 = (K,, + )- (29) K 2 (see [3]). The parameter KM represents the amplitude of the periodic curva - ture function and sm denotes the value at which K...Additamentum De curvis elasticis. Methodus Inveniendi Lineas Curvas Maximi Minimive Proprietate Gaudentes, Ser. 1., Vol. 24, Lausanne 1744. 17 [10...Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. 4th. ed., Cambridge University Press, 1927. [12] G. Nielson. Bernstein/ Bezier Curves and Splines on Spheres based upon

  9. Dense, collisional, shearing flows of compliant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, James; Berzi, Diego

    2017-06-01

    We outline the development of theory to describe, dense, collisional shearing flows of identical compliant spheres. We begin with two simple theories: one for rigid, nearly elastic spheres that interact through instantaneous, binary collisions; the other for compliant spheres that interact through multiple, enduring contacts. We then join the two extremes by adding compliance to the collisions and collisions to the spheres in enduring contact. Finally, we compare the predictions of the resulting theory with the results of discrete numerical simulations of steady, homogeneous shearing of compliant frictional spheres.

  10. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  11. Dense shearing flows of inelastic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, James T.

    2006-10-01

    We introduce a simple phenomenological modification to the hydrodynamic equations for dense flows of identical, frictionless, inelastic disks and show that the resulting theory describes the area fraction dependence of quantities that are measured in numerical simulations of steady, homogeneous shearing flows and steady, fully developed flows down inclines. The modification involves the incorporation of a length scale other than the particle diameter in the expression for the rate of collisional dissipation. The idea is that enduring contacts between grains forced by the shearing reduce the collisional rate of dissipation while continuing to transmit momentum and force. The length and orientation of the chains of particles in contact are determined by a simple algebraic equation. When the resulting expression for the rate of dissipation is incorporated into the theory, numerical solutions of the boundary-value problem for steady, fully developed flow of circular disks down a bumpy incline exhibit a core with a uniform area fraction that decreases with increasing angles of inclination. When the height at which an inclined flow stops is assumed to be proportional to this chain length, a scaling between the average velocity, flow height, and stopping height similar to that seen in experiments and numerical simulations is obtained from the balance of fluctuation energy.

  12. Inelastic light scattering from correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hackl, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic light scattering is an intensively used tool in the study of electronic properties of solids. Triggered by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates and by new developments in instrumentation, light scattering in both the visible (Raman effect) and x-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum has become a method complementary to optical (infrared) spectroscopy while providing additional and relevant information. The main purpose of the review is to position Raman scattering with regard to single-particle methods like angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and other transport and thermodynamic measurements in correlated materials. Particular focus will be placed on photon polarizations and the role of symmetry to elucidate the dynamics of electrons in different regions of the Brillouin zone. This advantage over conventional transport (usually measuring averaged properties) provides new insights into anisotropic and complex many-body behavior of electrons in various systems. Recent developments in the theory of electronic Raman scattering in correlated systems and experimental results in paradigmatic materials such as the A15 superconductors, magnetic and paramagnetic insulators, compounds with competing orders, as well as the cuprates with high superconducting transition temperatures are reviewed. An overview of the manifestations of complexity in the Raman response due to the impact of correlations and developing competing orders is presented. In a variety of materials, observations which may be understood and a summary of important open questions that pave the way to a detailed understanding of correlated electron systems, are discussed.

  13. Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Burlein, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01

    Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

  14. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-14

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  15. Quarterly environmental data summary for fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1997 is prepared in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data presented constitute the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the data base during the fourth quarter of 1997. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the data base and KPA data are not merged into the regular data base. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined ``above normal`` level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in response to such data. Data received and verified during the fourth quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those which are detailed.

  16. Study of DD Neutrons and their Transmission in Iron Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sushil

    neutron spectrum in time of flight has been compared at various laboratory angles from 0° to 150°. The calculated and experimental neutron time of flight spectra for neutron counts under the main peak (D(d,n)3He peak region) agree within the error bars for angles 90°, 135° and 150° for larger sphere (8-cm thickness) whereas they agree for all angles 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 90°, 135° and 150° for smaller sphere (3-cm thickness). However, the calculated and experimental neutron spectra show a difference of 12%, 11.80%, 16.85% and 19.67% in the main peak neutron counts for larger sphere at angles 0°, 15°, 30° and 45° respectively which can not be accounted for by the systematic uncertainty in our measurement (the 5% uncertainty in the target thickness and the 5% efficiency systematics are the main contributors). The sphere-off to on ratios for the calculation and the experiment also show a significant difference at those angles and this comparison is more robust as it avoids most of the systematic uncertainties including the efficiency. These differences likely come from the uncertainty in the ENDF cross section used. To test the ENDF cross section sensitivity, elastic cross section is decreased by 10% and inelastic cross section is increased by 14.78% in the energy range 7.2 to 11 MeV which corresponds to the energy range of the monoenergetic neutron peak for angles between 0° to 45°. This cross section modification keeps the total cross section constant on average in that energy range as the total in the library is assumed to be correct. This modification reduces the difference between the calculation and the experiment and brings it in agreement within the error bars. This result implies the possibility of underestimation of inelastic cross section in the above energy range and hence the overestimation of elastic cross section in the ENDF library.

  17. Tunable photoluminescence in monodisperse silica spheres.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deyan; Zhang, Cuimiao; Xu, Zhenhe; Li, Guogang; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2010-12-15

    The nanometer-scale luminescent monodisperse silica spheres have been prepared by a water/oil (W/O) microemulsion method and the size of these spheres changed with the different concentrations of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The luminescent monodisperse silica spheres at the submicrometer scale have been prepared via Stöber method and the particles size increased with the increase of the amino concentrations. After calcination, all silica spheres do not change obviously in size. The annealed silica spheres contain C impurities and O defects, which resulted in the luminescence of silica spheres. The spheres showed variations in emission due to the different size and the concentration of organosiloxane precursors. Therefore, the emission can be tuned finely via the change of organosiloxane precursor and the size of samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the fourth quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook.

  20. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for April through June 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the first quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  1. Measurements of Elastic and Inelastic Properties under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions in Large Volume Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The interpretation of highly resolved seismic data from Earths deep interior require measurements of the physical properties of Earth's materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. More than decade ago seismic tomography clearly showed subduction of crustal material can reach the core mantle boundary under specific circumstances. That means there is no longer space for the assumption deep mantle rocks might be much less complex than deep crustal rocks known from exhumation processes. Considering this geophysical high pressure research is faced the challenge to increase pressure and sample volume at the same time to be able to perform in situ experiments with representative complex samples. High performance multi anvil devices using novel materials are the most promising technique for this exciting task. Recent large volume presses provide sample volumes 3 to 7 orders of magnitude bigger than in diamond anvil cells far beyond transition zone conditions. The sample size of several cubic millimeters allows elastic wave frequencies in the low to medium MHz range. Together with the small and even adjustable temperature gradients over the whole sample this technique makes anisotropy and grain boundary effects in complex systems accessible for elastic and inelastic properties measurements in principle. The measurements of both elastic wave velocities have also no limits for opaque and encapsulated samples. The application of triple-mode transducers and the data transfer function technique for the ultrasonic interferometry reduces the time for saving the data during the experiment to about a minute or less. That makes real transient measurements under non-equilibrium conditions possible. A further benefit is, both elastic wave velocities are measured exactly simultaneously. Ultrasonic interferometry necessarily requires in situ sample deformation measurement by X-radiography. Time-resolved X-radiography makes in situ falling sphere viscosimetry and even the

  2. Deep inelastic scattering in conformal QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-03-01

    We consider the Regge limit of a CFT correlation function of two vector and two scalar operators, as appropriate to study small-x deep inelastic scattering in mathcal{N} = 4 SYM or in QCD assuming approximate conformal symmetry. After clarifying the nature of the Regge limit for a CFT correlator, we use its conformal partial wave expansion to obtain an impact parameter representation encoding the exchange of a spin j Reggeon for any value of the coupling constant. The CFT impact parameter space is the three-dimensional hyperbolic space H 3, which is the impact parameter space for high energy scattering in the dual AdS space. We determine the small-x structure functions associated to the exchange of a Reggeon. We discuss unitarization from the point of view of scattering in AdS and comment on the validity of the eikonal approximation. We then focus on the weak coupling limit of the theory where the amplitude is dominated by the exchange of the BFKL pomeron. Conformal invariance fixes the form of the vector impact factor and its decomposition in transverse spin 0 and spin 2 components. Our formalism reproduces exactly the general results predict by the Regge theory, both for a scalar target and for γ* - γ* scattering. We compute current impact factors for the specific examples of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM and QCD, obtaining very simple results. In the case of the R-current of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM, we show that the transverse spin 2 component vanishes. We conjecture that the impact factors of all chiral primary operators of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM only have components with 0 transverse spin.

  3. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report First Quarter FY-04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Wheeler, Mark; Labert, Winifred; Jonathan Case; Short, David

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2004 (October - December 2003). Tasks reviewed are: (1) Objective Lightning Probability Forecast, (2) Mesonet Temperature and Wind Climatology, (3) Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid and (4) Anvil Transparency Relationship to Radar Reflectivity

  4. Short-term energy outlook, Quarterly projections. Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-04

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the second quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  5. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, first quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1998 through the fourth quarter of 1999. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the first quarter 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  7. Significance of matrix diagonalization in modelling inelastic electron scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Hambach, R; Kaiser, U; Rose, H

    2016-11-21

    Electron scattering is always applied as one of the routines to investigate nanostructures. Nowadays the development of hardware offers more and more prospect for this technique. For example imaging nanostructures with inelastic scattered electrons may allow to produce component-sensitive images with atomic resolution. Modelling inelastic electron scattering is therefore essential for interpreting these images. The main obstacle to study inelastic scattering problem is its complexity. During inelastic scattering, incident electrons entangle with objects, and the description of this process involves a multidimensional array. Since the simulation usually involves fourdimensional Fourier transforms, the computation is highly inefficient. In this work we have offered one solution to handle the multidimensional problem. By transforming a high dimensional array into twodimensional array, we are able to perform matrix diagonalization and approximate the original multidimensional array with its twodimensional eigenvectors. Our procedure reduces the complicated multidimensional problem to a twodimensional problem. In addition, it minimizes the number of twodimensional problems. This method is very useful for studying multiple inelastic scattering.

  8. Floating behavior of hydrophobic glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng

    2009-08-15

    When a hydrophobic solid sphere is floating on water or salt solutions with different concentrations, it is at equilibrium under the impact of gravity, buoyancy force, and curvature force, the component of surface tension in the vertical direction. We have changed the diameters of the spheres and the concentrations of the two selected salts, NaCl and NaNO(3), to study the floating behaviors of these spheres and the contributions of surface tension and buoyancy force to their floatation. Generally speaking, the surface tension plays a more important role than the buoyancy force when the gravity is small, but the buoyancy force plays an identical or a more important role when the spheres are big enough. The wettability of the spheres significantly influences the height below the contact perimeter especially in salt solutions. The theoretical calculation meniscus slope angles at the sphere three-phase contact line are in agreement with experimental results.

  9. Sphere-Pac Evaluation for Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the objective of conducting the research and development necessary to evaluate the use of sphere-pac transmutation fuel. Sphere-pac fuels were studied extensively in the 1960s and 1970s. More recently, this fuel form is being studied internationally as a potential plutonium-burning fuel. For transmutation fuel, sphere-pac fuels have potential advantages over traditional pellet-type fuels. This report provides a review of development efforts related to the preparation of sphere-pac fuels and their irradiation tests. Based on the results of these tests, comparisons with pellet-type fuels are summarized, the advantages and disadvantages of using sphere-pac fuels are highlighted, and sphere-pac options for the AFCI are recommended. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory development activities are also outlined.

  10. 49 CFR 573.7 - Quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; (2) For the second calendar quarter (April 1 through June 30), on or before July 30; (3) For the third calendar quarter (July 1 through September 30), on or before October 30; and (4) For the fourth...

  11. 49 CFR 573.7 - Quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; (2) For the second calendar quarter (April 1 through June 30), on or before July 30; (3) For the third calendar quarter (July 1 through September 30), on or before October 30; and (4) For the fourth...

  12. Gravity theory through affine spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-08-01

    In this work it is argued that in order to improve our understanding of gravity and spacetime our most successful theory, general relativity, must be destructured. That is, some geometrical assumptions must be dropped and recovered just under suitable limits. Along this line of thought we pursue the idea that the roundness of the light cone, and hence the isotropy of the speed of light, must be relaxed and that, in fact, the shape of light cones must be regarded as a dynamical variable. Mathematically, we apply some important results from affine differential geometry to this problem, the idea being that in the transition we should preserve the identification of the spacetime continuum with a manifold endowed with a cone structure and a spacetime volume form. To that end it is suggested that the cotangent indicatrix (dispersion relation) must be described by an equation of Monge-Ampère type determining a hyperbolic affine sphere, at least whenever the matter content is negligible. Non-relativistic spacetimes fall into this description as they are recovered whenever the center of the affine sphere is at infinity. In the more general context of Lorentz-Finsler theories it is shown that the lightlike unparametrized geodesic flow is completely determined by the distribution of light cones. Moreover, the transport of lightlike momenta is well defined though there could be no notion of affine parameter. Finally, we show how the perturbed indicatrix can be obtained from the perturbed light cone.

  13. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  14. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  15. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  16. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  17. Microgravity and the Formation of Latex Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This set of photographs illustrates the value of microgravity in the formation of latex spheres. The image at left shows irregular spheres produced on Earth, while the photograph at right shows uniform spheres produced during the STS-3 mission, March 22 - 30, 1982, in the Monodisperse Latex Reactor, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and Lehigh University. The Marshall-managed MLR experiment demonstrated the feasibility of producing monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in space and their application to medicine and industry.

  18. Simulation of Flow for an Immersed Sphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    creating an unlikely physical realization of the flow field around the sphere. Two measures are implemented to prevent this problem from occurring. First...AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2016-092 Simulation of Flow for an Immersed Sphere Pedro A. Lopez-Fernandez Ralph K. Tatum Douglas...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Simulation of Flow for an Immersed Sphere 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62602F

  19. Microgravity and the Formation of Latex Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This set of photographs illustrates the value of microgravity in the formation of latex spheres. The image at left shows irregular spheres produced on Earth, while the photograph at right shows uniform spheres produced during the STS-3 mission, March 22 - 30, 1982, in the Monodisperse Latex Reactor, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and Lehigh University. The Marshall-managed MLR experiment demonstrated the feasibility of producing monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in space and their application to medicine and industry.

  20. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the second quarter of 1998. 58 tabs.

  1. Aperture correction for a sphere interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Nicolaus, R.; Bönsch, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Considerations have been made to derive a correction for the diameter measurements of a sphere by means of a special sphere interferometer. This correction is caused by the finite diameter of the light source acting as the entrance 'pinhole' aperture in the light collimating system. The finite diameter has the effect that the wave which is incident on the sphere is a superposition of spherical waves which are slightly inclined with respect to each other. The resulting correction is essential for high accuracy dimensional measurements of silicon spheres to determine the Avogadro constant—a new determination of which is a contribution to a new definition of the kilogram.

  2. Chimera grid simulations of falling spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Thomas; Schauerhamer, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Many applications involve modeling a system with moving objects larger than the grid, such as air pollution, combustion systems, accident simulations, chemical and agricultural processes. The chimera grid approach is an efficient approach to solve such problems. Simulations of one sphere falling under the influence of gravity and suction through an orifice will be presented. Additionally, we will demonstrate collisions between two moving spheres. In this simulation the setup is the same as in the one sphere case, but two spheres are placed side by side. Both are released to be acted upon by gravity, the suction, and each other.

  3. Macromolecule-Induced Clustering of Hard Spheres.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Avik Prasun

    2001-06-01

    The connectivity Ornstein-Zernike formalism, together with the polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM), is employed to describe connectivity and network formation in mixtures of spheres and polymers. Results are presented for the percolation of spheres induced by both flexible coil-like and rigid rod-like linear polymers; the Percus-Yevick (PY) approximation is used throughout. Our results are compared with predictions based on the adhesive hard sphere (AHS) model, and correlations with the polymer-mediated second virial coefficient between spheres are discussed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Small-world networks on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, Gilberto; Torres Cruz, Claudia P.

    2017-01-01

    The Small-World Network on a Sphere SWNS is a non-crossing network that has no hubs and presents the small-world property diam log N with diam being the maximal distance between any two vertices and N being the number of vertices. The SWNS is constructed using a partition of the sphere and the parallels are regular sections of the sphere with constant latitude. The number of cells on the parallels, however, increases exponentially from the pole to the equator of the sphere. We analytically compute the distribution of connectivity, the clustering coefficient and the SWNS distances. The resilience of the model against selective attacks is also discussed.

  5. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  6. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  7. Magnetic torque on a rotating superconducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The London theory of superconductivity is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in a uniform applied magnetic field. The London theory is combined with classical electrodynamics for a calculation of the direct effect of excess charge on a rotating superconducting sphere. Classical electrodynamics, with the assumption of a perfect Meissner effect, is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in an arbitrary magnetic induction; this macroscopic approach yields results which are correct to first order. Using the same approach, the torque due to a current loop encircling the rotating sphere is calculated.

  8. Fluorescent integrating sphere for the vacuum ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, W M

    1970-02-01

    An integrating sphere for absolute, hemispherical reflectance measurements on imperfectly diffuse surfaces in the wavelength range between 1250 A and 3500 A has been built. The sphere uses a double layer coating consisting of a sodium salicylate film on top of a diffuse white paint. The phosphor coating, under uv irradiation, emits fluorescent radiation in the blue, and the underlying paint layer serves as a diffuser of the fluorescent radiation. The usual problem, encountered in ordinary integrating spheres where direct irradiation of the detector by the sample can lead to erroneous signals, is easily eliminated in the fluorescent integrating sphere by proper filtering of the detector.

  9. Science off the Sphere: Earth in Infrared

    NASA Image and Video Library

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit views cities, agricultural areas and deserts using an infrared camera for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA...

  10. Dynamical interactions between two uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Edwards, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the two-dimensional motion of a magnet sphere in the presence of a second, fixed sphere provide a convenient venue for exploring magnet-magnet interactions, inertia, friction, and rich nonlinear dynamical behavior. These studies exploit the equivalence of these magnetic interactions to the interactions between two equivalent point dipoles. We show that magnet-magnet friction plays a role when magnet spheres are in contact, table friction plays a role at large sphere separations, and eddy currents are always negligible. Web-based simulation and visualization software, called MagPhyx, is provided for education, exploration, and discovery.

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected

  12. Deep Inelastic Scattering on Ultracold Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    We discuss Bragg scattering on both Bose and Fermi gases with strong short-range interactions in the deep inelastic regime of large wave vector transfer q , where the dynamic structure factor is dominated by a resonance near the free-particle energy ℏω =ɛq=ℏ2q2/2 m . Using a systematic short-distance expansion, the structure factor at high momentum is shown to exhibit a nontrivial dependence on frequency characterized by two separate scaling regimes. First, for frequencies that differ from the single-particle energy by terms of order O (q ) (i.e., small deviations compared to the single-particle energy), the dynamic structure factor is described by the impulse approximation of Hohenberg and Platzman. Second, deviations of order O (q2) (i.e., of the same order or larger than the single-particle energy) are described by the operator product expansion, with a universal crossover connecting both regimes. The scaling is consistent with the leading asymptotics for a number of sum rules in the large momentum limit. Furthermore, we derive an exact expression for the shift and width of the single-particle peak at large momentum due to interactions, thus extending a result by Beliaev [J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 7, 299 (1958)] for the low-density Bose gas to arbitrary values of the scattering length a . The shift exhibits a maximum around q a ≃1 , which is connected with a maximum in the static structure factor due to strong short-range correlations. For Bose gases with moderate interaction strengths, the theoretically predicted shift is consistent with the value observed by Papp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 135301 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.135301]. Finally, we develop a diagrammatic theory for the dynamic structure factor which accounts for the correlations beyond Bogoliubov theory. It covers the full range of momenta and frequencies and provides an explicit example for the emergence of asymptotic scaling at large momentum.

  13. Visible Inelastic Light Scattering from Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Roger Allen

    In this work we studied the spectral shape of the intense continuum of light scattered inelastically from "bare" metals used in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. We derived cross sections, presented their spectral properties, and experimentally sought to characterize the observable spectral shape. Three scattering cross sections are derived. The development includes exposure of assumptions and limitations in the derivation. Elucidated are: contributions due to the few angstrom drastic spatial and polarization variations of the applied electromagnetic field at jellium metal surfaces; fluctuation induced light scattering, such as, spin density, charge density (plasmon and single electron), and current density fluctuations; and the light coupling operators that arise from a choice of gauge used in photoemission rather than the customary Coulomb gauge. The result is a set of matrix elements that carry the important physics of light scattering by metallic electrons, and that is more complete than is found in the Surface Enhanced Raman literature. Using one of these matrix elements in the electric dipole approximation we have developed a quantum chemistry computer algorithm to evaluate the strength of light interaction with any metal surface which can be modeled as a cluster. The algorithm uses spd Slater-type bases and can study transition and noble metals. It was tested on some model systems. A formalism is presented for further developing the algorithm to calculate adsorbed molecular vibrational Raman cross sections in the limit of the long wavelength electric dipole approximation. We further present known continuum spectral shapes from familiar light coupling operators (a subset of those we derived) and associate them with our experimentally observed spectral shapes. In the experimental study of spectral shapes we found the mechanical disorder, due to cold working smooth metals during polishing, to correlate with the strength of the continuum. Using microscopic

  14. An inelastic constitutive equation of fiber reinforced plastic laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Y.; Murakami, S.; Mizobe, T.

    1998-01-01

    A constitutive model for describing the time-dependent inelastic deformation of unidirectional and symmetric angle-ply CFRP (carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) laminates is developed. The kinematic hardening creep law of Malinin and Khadjinsky and the evolution equation of Armstrong and Frederick are extended to describe the creep deformation of initially anisotropic materials. In particular, the evolution equations of the back stresses of the anisotropic material were formulated by introducing a transformed strain tensor, by which the expression of the equivalent strain rate of the anisotropic material has the identical form as that of the isotropic materials. The resulting model is applied to analyze the time-dependent inelastic deformation of symmetric angle-ply laminates. Comparison between the predictions and the experimental observations shows that the present model can describe well the time-dependent inelastic behavior under different loadings.

  15. Deep-inelastic muon scattering from nuclei with hadron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H.; Kaufman, S.

    1995-08-01

    Deep-inelastic lepton scattering from nuclei provides a direct look at the quark structure of nuclear matter. These reactions revealed the first convincing evidence that the structure of nucleons is modified in the nuclear medium and had profound implications on the understanding of nuclear dynamics. FNAL experiment E665, using the 490-GeV muon beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, provides new information on the nuclear effects on nucleon properties by studying deep-inelastic muon scattering with coincident hadron detection. The high beam energy makes the experiment particularly suited to the study of the region of x < 0.1 (where x is the fraction of the momentum of the nucleon carried by the struck quark in the infinite momentum frame), and total center-of-mass hadronic energy > 25 GeV, where hard QCD processes are expected to become evident and there are little data from other deep-inelastic measurements.

  16. Inelastic thermal buckling of metal matrix laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paley, M.; Aboudi, J. )

    1991-12-01

    A method is proposed for determining the critical temperature changes that cause inelastic thermal bifurcation buckling of metal matrix composite plates. The inelastic behavior of the metallic matrix is described by an elastic-viscoplastic temperature-dependent constitutive law; the fibers are allowed to be either elastic or elastic-viscoplastic material. The approach is based on the applied thermal load and the history-dependent instantaneous effective thermomechanical properties of metal matrix composites, which are established by a micromechanical analysis. The method is illustrated by the prediction of the inelastic thermal buckling of SiC/Ti metal matrix angle-ply laminated plates by employing the classical and first-order shear deformable laminated plate theories. 15 refs.

  17. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy in molecular junctions showing quantum interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhani, C.; Della Rocca, M. L.; Bessis, C.; Bonnet, R.; Barraud, C.; Lafarge, P.; Chevillot, A.; Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C.

    2017-04-01

    Destructive quantum interference effect is implemented in large area molecular junctions to improve signatures of electron-phonon interaction. Vertical molecular junctions based on a cross-conjugated anthraquinone layer were fabricated and low-noise transport measurements were performed by acquiring simultaneously the current-voltage characteristics, its second derivative, and the differential conductance. Signatures of vibrational modes excited by inelastic events are present in the whole measured voltage range and superpose to the conductance suppression induced by destructive quantum interference. As a consequence vibrational modes have improved visibility in the low energy window (<80 meV ). Inelastic electron transport spectroscopy data are compared to infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy on Au/anthraquinone thin films. Common vibrational modes can be clearly identified, but inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy reveals the existence of vibrational modes in a wider energy range (0 -400 meV ) where infrared spectroscopy is lacking.

  18. Constraints on inelastic dark matter from XENON10

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J; Aprile, E; Arneodo, F; Baudis, L; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Coelho, L C; Dahl, C E; DeViveiros, L; Ferella, A D; Fernandes, L P; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Giboni, K L; Gomez, R; Hasty, R; Kastens, L; Kwong, J; Lopes, J M; Madden, N; Manalaysay, A; Manzur, A; McKinsey, D N; Monzani, M E; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orboeck, J; Plante, G; Santorelli, R; dos Santos, J; Shagin, P; Shutt, T; Sorensen, P; Schulte, S; Winant, C; Yamashita, M

    2009-11-23

    It has been suggested that dark matter particles which scatter inelastically from detector target nuclei could explain the apparent incompatibility of the DAMA modulation signal (interpreted as evidence for particle dark matter) with the null results from CDMS-II and XENON10. Among the predictions of inelastically interacting dark matter are a suppression of low-energy events, and a population of nuclear recoil events at higher nuclear recoil equivalent energies. This is in stark contrast to the well-known expectation of a falling exponential spectrum for the case of elastic interactions. We present a new analysis of XENON10 dark matter search data extending to E{sub nr} = 75 keV nuclear recoil equivalent energy. Our results exclude a significant region of previously allowed parameter space in the model of inelastically interacting dark matter. In particular, it is found that dark matter particle masses m{sub x} {approx}> 150 GeV are disfavored.

  19. Halo-independent methods for inelastic dark matter scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Zupan, Jure E-mail: juan.a.herrero@uv.es E-mail: jure.zupan@cern.ch

    2013-07-01

    We present halo-independent methods to analyze the results of dark matter direct detection experiments assuming inelastic scattering. We focus on the annual modulation signal reported by DAMA/LIBRA and present three different halo-independent tests. First, we compare it to the upper limit on the unmodulated rate from XENON100 using (a) the trivial requirement that the amplitude of the annual modulation has to be smaller than the bound on the unmodulated rate, and (b) a bound on the annual modulation amplitude based on an expansion in the Earth's velocity. The third test uses the special predictions of the signal shape for inelastic scattering and allows for an internal consistency check of the data without referring to any astrophysics. We conclude that a strong conflict between DAMA/LIBRA and XENON100 in the framework of spin-independent inelastic scattering can be established independently of the local properties of the dark matter halo.

  20. Inelastic billiard ball in a spacetime with a time machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheeva, E.V. ); Novikov, I.D. NORDITA, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Astro Space Center of the P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow )

    1993-02-15

    The nonrelativistic motion with self-collision of an inelastic billiard ball in spacetime with a time machine is discussed. We consider the wormhole-type time machine, assuming that [epsilon][equivalent to](radius of wormhole mouth)/(distance between mouths)[much lt]1, and that (radius of ball)/(distance between wormhole mouths)=[ital O]([epsilon][sup 2]). The coefficient of friction of the balls is of order [epsilon], and the balls can have an arbitrary amount of inelasticity. Solutions are sought with an accuracy up through order [epsilon][sup 4]. We demonstrate that the generic class of initial data has self-consistent solutions of the equations of motion. Up to the order studied the friction does have an effect, but the inelasticity has no effect whatsoever.

  1. Education Statistics Quarterly, Fall 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillow, Sally, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The "Education Statistics Quarterly" gives a comprehensive overview of work done across all parts of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Each issue contains short publications, summaries, and descriptions that cover all NCES publications and data products released during a 3-month period. Each message also contains a…

  2. Trustee Quarterly, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This document contains 4 issues of the Trustee Quarterly: fall 2000, spring 2001, summer 2001, and fall 2001. The fall 2000 issue contains seven features and six departments. Among the features are: "The New Economy: Who Will Lead the Education Movement," by Rucker; "Community Colleges Tackle IT Staffing Challenges," by Matina; and "Looking at…

  3. JLTN Quarterly, 1995-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JLTN Quarterly, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of the "JLTN Quarterly" issued from December 1995 to October 1996. This journal for high school Japanese language teachers contain articles on class activities and classroom teaching techniques. These include: exercises in interpretation of a Toys "R" Us store map and advertising; a weather discussion…

  4. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These four issues of a quarterly publication for gifted educators and parents of gifted children span winter 2002 through fall 2002. Featured articles include: (1) "Cultivating Courage, Creativity, and Caring" (James T. Webb), which discusses the need to encourage the development of courage and caring, as well as creativity in gifted students; (2)…

  5. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the four 1999 issues of a quarterly newsletter publication on gifted education. Issues regularly include major articles, book reviews, announcements, and letters. The major articles in these issues are: "The Mathematically Gifted: Bridging the Gender Gap" (Lynn H. Fox and Janet F. Soller); "Parenting for Education:…

  6. Apprentices & Trainees: September Quarter, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2013

    2013-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the September quarter 2012. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.74 (December 2012 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the March…

  7. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of the newsletter "Gifted Education Press Quarterly" published during 1995. This newsletter addresses issues in the education of gifted children and youth. The major articles are: (1) "Using Today's Technology: Parents Can Help Challenge Gifted Children" (Adrienne O'Neill); (2)…

  8. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Four issues of this quarterly publications on gifted education include the following articles: "Unrecognized Giftedness: The Frustrating Case of the Gifted Adult" (Marylou Kelly Streznewski); "Shakespeare in the Classroom: The Bard is Back!" (Rosanna DiMillo Sandell); "What Teachers, Parents, and Administrators Need To…

  9. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These four issues of this quarterly publication on the education of gifted students contain the following featured articles: (1) "Reflections on China: Implications for Gifted Education" (Andrea I. Prejean and Lynn H. Fox); (2) "Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Middle School Students in Heterogeneous Science Classes"…

  10. Education Statistics Quarterly, Spring 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Statistics Quarterly, 2001

    2001-01-01

    The "Education Statistics Quarterly" gives a comprehensive overview of work done across all parts of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Each issue contains short publications, summaries, and descriptions that cover all NCES publications, data products and funding opportunities developed over a 3-month period. Each issue…

  11. Strategic Studies Quarterly. Winter 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-19

    machines and unknown Resiliency in Future Cyber Combat Strategic Studies Quarterly ♦ Winter 2015 [ 91 ] vulnerabilities. Aristotle taught that virtue...27 November 2012, II-9. 7. Edward N. Luttwak, Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2003), 39–40. 8. Aristotle

  12. Writing: The Quarterly as Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Lawrence F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to examine how writing has shaped the nature of the Quarterly over 75 years. Here the author explores how stylistic elements have changed over time, how form has interacted with function and content, and how well the resulting text has served the several communities within physical education. He makes the following…

  13. Strategic petroleum reserve. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve reduces the Nation`s vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. Its existence provides a formidable deterrent to the use of oil as a political instrument and an effective response mechanism should a disruption occur. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975 (Public Law 94-163). Its purposes are to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the second quarter of calendar year 1995, including: inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve; current and projected storage capacity, analysis of existing or anticipated problems with the acquisition and storage of petroleum products, and future expansion of storage capacity; funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  14. Angular distributions for the inelastic scattering of NO(X2Π ) with O2(X3Σg-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, M.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Nichols, B.; Squires, E.; Walpole, V.; Aoiz, F. J.; Stolte, S.

    2017-05-01

    The inelastic scattering of NO(X2Π ) by O2(X3Σg-) was studied at a mean collision energy of 550 cm-1 using velocity-map ion imaging. The initial quantum state of the NO(X2Π , v = 0, j = 0.5, Ω =0.5 , 𝜖 = -1 , f) molecule was selected using a hexapole electric field, and specific Λ-doublet levels of scattered NO were probed using (1 +1' ) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization. A modified "onion-peeling" algorithm was employed to extract angular scattering information from the series of "pancaked," nested Newton spheres arising as a consequence of the rotational excitation of the molecular oxygen collision partner. The extracted differential cross sections for NO(X) f →f and f →e Λ-doublet resolved, spin-orbit conserving transitions, partially resolved in the oxygen co-product rotational quantum state, are reported, along with O2 fragment pair-correlated rotational state population. The inelastic scattering of NO with O2 is shown to share many similarities with the scattering of NO(X) with the rare gases. However, subtle differences in the angular distributions between the two collision partners are observed.

  15. Deformation of Reservoir Sandstones by Elastic versus Inelastic Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pijnenburg, R.; Verberne, B. A.; Hangx, S.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrocarbon or groundwater production from sandstone reservoirs can result in surface subsidence and induced seismicity. Subsidence results from combined elastic and inelastic compaction of the reservoir due to a change in the effective stress state upon fluid extraction. The magnitude of elastic compaction can be accurately described using poroelasticity theory. However inelastic or time-dependent compaction is poorly constrained. Specifically, the underlying microphysical processes controlling sandstone compaction remain poorly understood. We use sandstones recovered by the field operator (NAM) from the Slochteren gas reservoir (Groningen, NE Netherlands) to study the importance of elastic versus inelastic deformation processes upon simulated pore pressure depletion. We conducted conventional triaxial tests under true in-situ conditions of pressure and temperature. To investigate the effect of applied differential stress (σ1 - σ3 = 0 - 50 MPa) and initial sample porosity (φi = 12 - 24%) on instantaneous and time-dependent inelastic deformation, we imposed multiple stages of axial loading and relaxation. The results show that inelastic strain develops at all stages of loading, and that its magnitude increases with increasing value of differential stress and initial porosity. The stress sensitivity of the axial creep strain rate and microstructural evidence suggest that inelastic compaction is controlled by a combination of intergranular slip and intragranular cracking. Intragranular cracking is shown to be more pervasive with increasing values of initial porosity. The results are consistent with a conceptual microphysical model, involving deformation by poro-elasticity combined with intergranular sliding and grain contact failure. This model aims to predict sandstone deformation behavior for a wide range of stress conditions.

  16. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in a transverse MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Both mechanical behavior and microstructural evaluation were undertaken at room temperature, 538 and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics are significantly different in monotonic tension and compression. The inelastic deformation mechanisms in compression are controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture is a new damage mode observed for metal-matrix composites (MMC).

  17. Response functions for deep inelastic scattering from 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, M.; Williamson, C. F.; Wong, J.; Zimmerman, P. D.; Blatchley, C.; Finn, J. M.; Lerose, J.; Sioshansi, P.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.

    1983-08-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been measured from 40Ca at energies between 100 and 375 MeV and at scattering angles of 90° and 140°. Longitudinal and transverse response functions at three-vector momentum transfers of 330, 370, and 410 MeV/c were extracted from these data using a Rosenbluth separation. The integrated longitudinal response functions for the three momentum transfers are found to have, respectively, 65%, 75%, and 90% of the longitudinal strength predicted by the Fermi gas model. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Deep inelastic electron scattering from 40Ca, extracted transverse and longitudinal response functions.

  18. Inelastic transport through Aharonov-Bohm interferometer in Kondo regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Ryosuke; Eto, Mikio; Sakano, Rui; Affleck, Ian

    2013-12-04

    We formulate elastic and inelastic parts of linear conductance through an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring with an embedded quantum dot in the Kondo regime. The inelastic part G{sub inel} is proportional to T{sup 2} when the temperature T is much smaller than the Kondo temperature T{sub K}, whereas it is negligibly small compared with elastic part G{sub el} when T ≫ T{sub K}. G{sub inel} weakly depends on the magnetic flux penetrating the AB ring, which disturbs the precise detection of G{sub el}/(G{sub el}+G{sub inel}) by the visibility of AB oscillation.

  19. Inelastic insights for molecular tunneling pathways: bypassing the terminal groups.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Alessandro; Ratner, Mark A

    2007-05-21

    As an example of the use of inelastic transport to deduce structure in molecular transport junctions, we compute the orientation dependence of the Inelastic Electron Tunneling (IET) spectrum of the 1-pentane monothiolate. We find that upon increasing the tilting angle of the molecule with respect to the normal to the electrode the spectrum changes as the intensity of some vibrations is enhanced. These differences occur because for higher tilting angles the tunneling path that bypasses the terminal group grows in importance. IETS can therefore be used to establish the molecular orientation in junctions terminating with alkyl chains and to investigate experimentally the relative importance of the available tunneling paths.

  20. Molecular modeling of inelastic electron transport in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2008-09-01

    A quantum chemical approach for the modeling of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of molecular junctions based on scattering theory is presented. Within a harmonic approximation, the proposed method allows us to calculate the electron-vibration coupling strength analytically, which makes it applicable to many different systems. The calculated inelastic electron transport spectra are often in very good agreement with their experimental counterparts, allowing the revelation of detailed information about molecular conformations inside the junction, molecule-metal contact structures, and intermolecular interaction that is largely inaccessible experimentally.

  1. Raman linewidths and rotationally inelastic collision rates in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1993-01-01

    Using the N2-N2 interaction potential of van der Avoird et al. (1986) rotationally inelastic collision cross sections have been computed within the infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation, assuming the molecules are distinguishable. Methods for enforcing detailed balance and correcting for effects of inelasticity, which are ignored in the IOS approximation, are considered, including the energy corrected sudden (ECS) method. Suitably averaged cross sections are compared with experimental Raman Q-branch linewidths for temperatures from 295 to 1500 K and with recently measured room temperature state-to-state rates. Agreement is rather good, especially if ECS corrections are applied.

  2. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in a transverse MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Both mechanical behavior and microstructural evaluation were undertaken at room temperature, 538 and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics are significantly different in monotonic tension and compression. The inelastic deformation mechanisms in compression are controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture is a new damage mode observed for metal-matrix composites (MMC).

  3. Orientifolds of the 3-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, Constantin; Couchoud, Nicolas; Windey, Paul

    2001-12-01

    We study the geometry of orientifolds in the SU(2)k WZW model. They correspond to the two inequivalent, orientation-reversing involutions of S3, whose fixed-point sets are: the north and south poles (Script O0), or the equator two-sphere (Script O2). We show how the geometric action of these involutions leads unambiguously to the previously obtained algebraic results for the Klein bottle and Möbius amplitudes. We give a semiclassical derivation of the selection rules and signs in the crosscap couplings, paying particular attention to discrete B-fluxes. A novel observation, which does not follow from consistency of the one-loop vacuum diagrams, is that in the case of the Script O0 orientifolds only integer- or only half-integer-spin Cardy states may coexist.

  4. Dynamical simulations of sedimenting spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of rigid spheres has been studied by dynamical simulation; computational techniques are described and numerical results are reported. It has been found that there is a slow relaxation of the suspension microstructure during sedimentation, so that compared with the initial equilibrium distribution, there is an increased number of pairs of particles near contact; this leads to a 5%--10% increase in the average sedimentation velocity. Individual particle velocities fluctuate about the mean fall speed; these fluctuations are large and persist for long times. The resulting hydrodynamically induced dispersion of the particles can be characterized by strongly anisotropic diffusion coefficients; however, the dispersion process is non-Fickian at high solids concentrations.

  5. Tandem spheres in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf; Hornung, Hans G

    2009-01-01

    The problem of determining the forces acting on a secondary body when it is travelling at some point within the shocked region created by a hypersonic primary body is of interest in such situations as store or stage separation, re-entry of multiple vehicles, and atmospheric meteoroid fragmentation. The current work is concerned with a special case of this problem, namely that in which both bodies are spheres and are stationary with respect to one another. We first present an approximate analytical model of the problem; subsequently, numerical simulations are described and results are compared with those from the analytical model. Finally, results are presented from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel in which a newly-developed force-measurement technique was employed.

  6. Phase diagram of Hertzian spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pàmies, Josep C.; Cacciuto, Angelo; Frenkel, Daan

    2009-07-01

    We report the phase diagram of interpenetrating Hertzian spheres. The Hertz potential is purely repulsive, bounded at zero separation, and decreases monotonically as a power law with exponent 5/2, vanishing at the overlapping threshold. This simple functional describes the elastic interaction of weakly deformable bodies and, therefore, it is a reliable physical model of soft macromolecules, like star polymers and globular micelles. Using thermodynamic integration and extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we computed accurate free energies of the fluid phase and a large number of crystal structures. For this, we defined a general primitive unit cell that allows for the simulation of any lattice. We found multiple re-entrant melting and first-order transitions between crystals with cubic, trigonal, tetragonal, and hexagonal symmetries.

  7. Phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizaki, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Morvan, B.; Stefanou, N.

    2016-11-01

    An extension of the layer-multiple-scattering method to phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres immersed in a fluid medium is developed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on specific examples of close-packed fcc crystals of submerged water-saturated meso- and macroporous silica microspheres. It is shown that, by varying the pore size and/or the porosity, the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of finite slabs of these crystals are significantly altered. Strong absorption, driven by the slow waves in the poroelastic material and enhanced by multiple scattering, leads to negligible transmittance over an extended frequency range, which might be useful for practical applications in broadband acoustic shielding. The results are analyzed by reference to relevant phononic dispersion diagrams in the viscous and inertial coupling limits, and a consistent interpretation of the underlying physics is provided.

  8. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  9. Quarterly coal report, April--June, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for April through June 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the first quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  10. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.

    1998-08-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information has been integrated in this report. 58 tabs.

  11. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the third quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  12. The "Magical" Sphere: Uncovering the Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Bukleski, Miha

    2006-01-01

    A red sphere is seen at the bottom of a sealed glass tube filled with a colorless, transparent liquid. Holding the tube for a short period makes the sphere rise slowly from the bottom until it finally floats on the surface of the liquid. Instructions for preparing the demonstration are given, together with an explanation of the phenomenon. A…

  13. Inelastic Neutron Scattering of Nitric Acid Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloh, P.; Grothe, H.; Martín-Llorente, B.; Parker, S.

    2009-04-01

    The IPCC report 2007 underlines the particular importance of aerosol particles for the water cycle and the radiation balance, and thus for the global climate.[1] The contribution of aerosols and clouds to radiative forcing might be comparable to the most important greenhouse gases like CO2 but is comparatively less understood. Nitric acid hydrates are important constituents of solid cloud particles in the lower polar Stratosphere (Polar Stratospheric Clouds) and the upper Troposphere (Cirrus clouds). The exact phase composition of these particles is still a matter of controversial discussion.[2] Especially, metastable modifications have, as recent measurements show, a particular relevance for the atmosphere, which has been ignored up to now.[3] Spectroscopic data for their detection are urgently needed and can be gathered with laboratory models. Only recently we have recorded the FTIR and Raman spectra of all nitric acid hydrates, stable and metastable.[4,5] These data have been corroborated by X-ray diffraction measurements.[6] However, when interpreting the spectroscopic data it became evident that not all bands could be explained reasonably. Here, DFT calculations were extremely helpful,[7] but still the translational and librational bands were not fully understood. Hence, inelastic neutron scattering was employed in order to investigate this region. The INS measurements were carried out with the instrument TOSCA at the ISIS of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. The samples were prepared ex-situ in an amorphous state and were transferred into a helium-bath-cryostat, where the sample has been annealed between 20 K and 220 K. Characteristic changes of translational and librational modes have been observed and have been correlated with phase transitions. [1] Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report "Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Summary for Policymakers", Geneva, 2007; www.ipcc.ch [2] H. Grothe, H. Tizek and I. K

  14. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 52, 1st Quarter, January 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Quarter 2009 Inside JFQ dialogue 2 The National Defense Strategy: Striking the Right Balance By Robert M. Gates 8 From the Chairman 10 Open Letter...Striking the Right Balance By R o b e R t M . G a t e s T he defining principle driving our strategy is balance . Balance is not the same as treating all...Resources are scarce, yet we still must set priorities and consider inescapable tradeoffs and opportunity costs. We currently strive for balance

  15. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report Fourth Quarter FY-04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Wheeler, Mark; Lambert, Winifred; Case, Jonathan; Short, David

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (A MU) activities for the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 2004 (July -Sept 2004). Tasks covered are: (1) Objective Lightning Probability Forecast: Phase I, (2) Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid, (3) Hail Index, (4) Shuttle Ascent Camera Cloud Obstruction Forecast, (5) Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Optimization and Training Extension and (5) User Control Interface for ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS) Data Ingest.

  16. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 63, 4th Quarter 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    is quoted from or based on its content. COMMUNICATIONS Please visit NDU Press and Joint Force Quarterly online at ndupress.ndu.edu for more on...His final arguments are directed at the noncommissioned officer (NCO) corps (not petty officers), so I would like to know if his data are based ...on his experiences across the Services, or mainly based on his observations and study within his own branch. Though observant of and an occasional

  17. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, first quarter 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    At the beginning of the first quarter of 1982, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station remained shutdown for the planned 1981 to 1982 Winter Shutdown, initiated December 11, 1981. The station was in a cooldown condition at approximately 150/sup 0/F and 280 psig with a steam bubble maintained in the pressurizer and the reactor coolant pumps in slow speed. The reactor plant cooldown heat exchanger was in service to maintain coolant temperature. The 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D reactor coolant loops and the 1AC and 18D purification loops remained in service. The 1A, 1B, and 1C 991 psig self-actuated steam relief valves remained gagged during the quarter to prevent leakage through the valve seats. The 1D steam relief valve was removed during the Spring 1980 Shutdown for repairs and a blind flange was installed in its place. Gagging and/or removing of redundant relief valves is permitted by ASME Code and approved operating procedures. During the first quarter of 1982, a total of 1028 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste was shipped out of state for burial. The shipments contained 0.032 curies of radioactivity.

  18. Deep inelastic scattering as a probe of entanglement

    DOE PAGES

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Levin, Eugene M.

    2017-06-03

    Using nonlinear evolution equations of QCD, we compute the von Neumann entropy of the system of partons resolved by deep inelastic scattering at a given Bjorken x and momentum transfer q 2 = - Q 2 . We interpret the result as the entropy of entanglement between the spatial region probed by deep inelastic scattering and the rest of the proton. At small x the relation between the entanglement entropy S ( x ) and the parton distribution x G ( x ) becomes very simple: S ( x ) = ln [ x G ( x ) ] .more » In this small x , large rapidity Y regime, all partonic microstates have equal probabilities—the proton is composed by an exponentially large number exp ( Δ Y ) of microstates that occur with equal and exponentially small probabilities exp ( - Δ Y ) , where Δ is defined by x G ( x ) ~ 1 / x Δ . For this equipartitioned state, the entanglement entropy is maximal—so at small x , deep inelastic scattering probes a maximally entangled state. Here, we propose the entanglement entropy as an observable that can be studied in deep inelastic scattering. This will then require event-by-event measurements of hadronic final states, and would allow to study the transformation of entanglement entropy into the Boltzmann one. We estimate that the proton is represented by the maximally entangled state at x ≤ 10 -3 ; this kinematic region will be amenable to studies at the Electron Ion Collider.« less

  19. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  20. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Mcknight, R. L.; Dame, L. T.; Chen, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced 3-D inelastic structural/stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and yet more cost-effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes are being developed. The approach is to develop four different theories, one linear and three higher order with increasing complexities including embedded singularities. Progress in each area is reported.

  1. Extraction of hadron interactions above inelastic threshold in lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sinya; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method to extract hadron interactions above inelastic threshold from the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in lattice QCD. We consider the scattering such as A + B → C + D, where A, B, C, D are names of different 1-particle states. An extension to cases where particle productions occur during scatterings is also discussed.

  2. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Kamenev, K. V.

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm3. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe2.

  3. Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. W.; Graves, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is described. Tunnel junctions were fabricated, the tunneling spectra of several molecules absorbed on the surface of aluminum oxide measured, and mode assignments made for several of the prominent peaks in spectra using results obtained from optical…

  4. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Kamenev, K V

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm(3). The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe(2).

  5. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Kamenev, K. V.; Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.

    2011-07-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm{sup 3}. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe{sub 2}.

  6. Inelastic dark matter in light of DAMA/LIBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Spencer; Weiner, Neal; Kribs, Graham D.; Tucker-Smith, David

    2009-02-15

    Inelastic dark matter, in which weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-nucleus scatterings occur through a transition to an excited WIMP state {approx}100 keV above the ground state, provides a compelling explanation of the DAMA annual modulation signal. We demonstrate that the relative sensitivities of various dark matter direct detection experiments are modified such that the DAMA annual modulation signal can be reconciled with the absence of a reported signal at CDMS-Soudan, XENON10, ZEPLIN, CRESST, and KIMS for inelastic WIMPs with masses O(100 GeV). We review the status of these experiments, and make predictions for upcoming ones. In particular, we note that inelastic dark matter leads to highly suppressed signals at low energy, with most events typically occurring between 20 and 45 keV (unquenched) at xenon and iodine experiments, and generally no events at low ({approx}10 keV) energies. Suppressing the background in this high-energy region is essential to testing this scenario. The recent CRESST data suggest seven observed tungsten events, which is consistent with expectations from this model. If the tungsten signal persists at future CRESST runs, it would provide compelling evidence for inelastic dark matter, while its absence should exclude it.

  7. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  8. Inelastic deformation and microcracking process in human dentin.

    PubMed

    Eltit, Felipe; Ebacher, Vincent; Wang, Rizhi

    2013-08-01

    Dentin is a mineralized collagen tissue with robust mechanical performance. Understanding the mechanical behavior of dentin and its relations to the dentinal structure can provides insight into the design strategies to achieve tooth functions. This study focuses on the inelastic deformation of human dentin and its underlying mechanisms. By combining four-point bending tests with fluorescent staining and laser scanning confocal microscopy, it was found that human dentin, especially root dentin, exhibited significant inelastic deformation and developed extensive microdamage in the form of microcracks prior to fracture. Dense and wavy microcracks spread uniformly across the tensile surface of root dentin, while compressive microcracks formed cross-hatched patterns. The presence of peritubular dentin in coronal dentin dramatically decreased the extent of microcracking, reducing inelasticity. Dentinal tubules were found to be initiation sites of both tensile and compressive microcracks. A unique crack propagation process was observed in root dentin under tension: numerous ring-shaped cracks formed at each dentinal tubule ahead of a growing crack tip. The advance of the tensile microcracks occurred by the merging of those ring-shaped cracks. The current findings on the microcracking process associated with inelastic deformation helps to understand the nature of strength and toughness in dentin, as well as the mechanical significance for structural variations across the whole tooth.

  9. [12th International workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabalais, J.W.; Nordlander, P.

    1999-10-15

    The twelfth international workshop on inelastic ion surface collisions was held at the Bahia Mar Resort and Conference Center on South Padre Island, Texas (USA) from January 24-29, 1999. The workshop brought together most of the leading researchers from around the world to focus on both the theoretical and experimental aspects of particle - surface interactions and related topics.

  10. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-30

    National Marrow Donor Program® HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation Task 1: Product Validation Description: The objective of this study is to evaluate... Bone Marrow Transplantation Activity: During the past quarter, Scientific Services staff worked with a panel of cell processing experts to revise the...Technical Report April 1, 2006 - June 30, 2006 National Marrow Donor Program® HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation Task 2: Validation of the

  11. Software Engineering Institute Quarterly Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    developing a prototype tool that supports the configu- ration management of tools in a distributed workstation environment. This quarter, pro - ject...using these methodologies, project members visited six companies that pro - duce commercial or military software (Hewlett-Packard, Motorola, MITRE, Ford...concurrent and sequential formal methods to discover the ex- tent of their usage, the state of tool development, and the advances being considered. Pro

  12. Strategic Studies Quarterly- Spring 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, bordering Afghanistan. A number of analysts agree that if conflict breaks out with India, Pakistan would immediately rede - ploy...the military should not risk its capacity to fight just to become an instrument of social progress but at the same rook pride in ending the...the " social experiments" conducted during his tenure are not yet known. The former Secretary STRATEGIC STUDIES QuARTERLY + SPRING 2016 [ 149] Book

  13. Crew quarters for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, F. E.

    1989-01-01

    The only long-term U.S. manned space mission completed has been Skylab, which has similarities as well as differences to the proposed Space Station. With the exception of Skylab missions, there has been a dearth of experience on which to base the design of the individual Space Station Freedom crew quarters. Shuttle missions commonly do not have sleep compartments, only 'sleeping arrangements'. There are provisions made for each crewmember to have a sleep restraint and a sleep liner, which are attached to a bulkhead or a locker. When the Shuttle flights began to have more than one working shift, crew quarters became necessary due to noise and other disturbances caused by crew task-related activities. Shuttle missions that have planned work shifts have incorporated sleep compartments. To assist in gaining more information and insight for the design of the crew quarters for the Space Station Freedom, a survey was given to current crewmembers with flight experience. The results from this survey were compiled and integrated with information from the literature covering space experience, privacy, and human-factors issues.

  14. Crew quarters for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, F. E.

    1989-01-01

    The only long-term U.S. manned space mission completed has been Skylab, which has similarities as well as differences to the proposed Space Station. With the exception of Skylab missions, there has been a dearth of experience on which to base the design of the individual Space Station Freedom crew quarters. Shuttle missions commonly do not have sleep compartments, only 'sleeping arrangements'. There are provisions made for each crewmember to have a sleep restraint and a sleep liner, which are attached to a bulkhead or a locker. When the Shuttle flights began to have more than one working shift, crew quarters became necessary due to noise and other disturbances caused by crew task-related activities. Shuttle missions that have planned work shifts have incorporated sleep compartments. To assist in gaining more information and insight for the design of the crew quarters for the Space Station Freedom, a survey was given to current crewmembers with flight experience. The results from this survey were compiled and integrated with information from the literature covering space experience, privacy, and human-factors issues.

  15. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  16. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  17. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  18. Inelastic strain rate in the seismogenic layer of Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takuya; Ohkura, Takahiro

    2016-12-01

    Seismic activity is associated with crustal stress relaxation, creating inelastic strain in a medium due to faulting. Inelastic strain affects the stress field around a weak body and causes stress concentration around the body, because the body itself has already released stress. Therefore, the understanding of inelastic deformation is important as it generates earthquakes. We investigated average inelastic strain in a spatial bin of Kyushu Island, Japan, and obtained the inelastic strain rate distribution associated with crustal earthquakes, based on the analysis of fault plane solutions and seismic moments. Large inelastic strains (>10-7 year-1) were found in the Beppu-Shimabara area, located in the center of Kyushu Island. The strain rate tensor was similar to that of the stress tensor except the absolute value in the area, implying that the inelastic strain was controlled by the stress field. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence (maximum magnitude 7.3) occurred in the Beppu-Shimabara area, with the major earthquakes located around the high inelastic strain rate area. Inelastic strain in the volume released the stress. In addition, the inelastic strain created an increment of stress around the volume. This indicates that the spatial heterogeneity of inelastic strain might concentrate stress.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  20. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  1. DOD SPHERES-RINGS Test Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025915 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  2. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  3. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience,including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  4. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-23

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the third quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  5. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  6. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  7. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  8. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report Third Quarter FY-08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Dreher, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2008 (April - June 2008). Tasks reported on are: Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), Anvil Forecast Tool in AWIPS Phase II, Completion of the Edward Air Force Base (EAFB) Statistical Guidance Wind Tool, Volume Averaged Height Integ rated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), Impact of Local Sensors, Radar Scan Strategies for the PAFB WSR-74C Replacement, VAHIRR Cost Benefit Analysis, and WRF Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base

  9. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report. First Quarter FY-05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Wheeler, Mark; Lambert, Winifred; Case, Jonathan; Short, David

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2005 (October - December 2005). Tasks reviewed include: (1) Objective Lightning Probability Forecast: Phase I, (2) Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid, (3) Hail Index, (4) Stable Low Cloud Evaluation, (5) Shuttle Ascent Camera Cloud Obstruction Forecast, (6) Range Standardization and Automation (RSA) and Legacy Wind Sensor Evaluation, (7) Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Optimization and Training Extension, and (8) User Control Interface for ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS) Data Ingest

  10. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report - Fourth Quarter FY-09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (July - September 2009). Tasks reports include: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool. Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting. Phase II, (4) Update and Maintain Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS), (5) Verify MesoNAM Performance (6) develop a Graphical User Interface to update selected parameters for the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLlT)

  11. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 65, 2nd Quarter 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Mario Biagioli, Galileo’s Instruments of Credit: Telescopes, Images, Secrecy ( Chicago : Uni- versity of Chicago Press, 2006). 2 Philip Tetlock...Alan Shepard in Philippine Sea U .S . N av y (A da m M . B en ne tt ) 48 JFQ / issue 65, 2 d quarter 2012 ndupress .ndu.edu F acing major... Chicago noted recently that an “American-made” Jeep Patriot is only about 66 percent made in America and a “Japanese-made” Toyota Sequoia is about 80

  12. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 66, 3rd Quarter 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    he retired on August 1, 2007, after 34 years of service. ndupress .ndu.edu issue 66, 3 rd quarter 2012 / JFQ 5 officers capable of leading joint...Washington, DC: DOD, August 2010), 22–37; Jan Van Tol with Mark Gunzinger, Andrew Krepinev- ich, and Jim Thomas, AIRSEA Battle: A Point-of- Departure...control-system>. 37 U.S. Cyber Consequences Unit (US-CCU), special report, Overview by the US-CCU of the Cyber Campaign Against Georgia in August of

  14. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  15. Protective Measures for Basecamp Living Quarters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR BASECAMP LIVING QUARTERS Michael J. Roth, P.E.*, Nicholas Boone, Pamela Kinnebrew, Bart Durst, Toney Cummins, Thomas...implementation of protective measures in basecamp living quarter areas is one of the greatest challenges currently facing the Army force protection...is the basecamp living quarter area. Soldiers and civilians are being housed in standard trailers that are placed in exceptionally tight

  16. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-01

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ ≲160 keV ), iodine at PICO (when 160 ≲δ ≲300 keV ), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ ≳300 keV ). Amusingly, once δ ≳200 keV , weak scale (and larger) dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20-500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45-100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ ˜200 keV and an

  17. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  18. Please comply: the water entry of soft spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy; Fanning, Tate; Jandron, Michael; Rekos, John; Bower, Allan; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    The typical phenomena associated with sphere water impact are significantly altered when the sphere material is highly compliant rather than rigid. We describe the water impact physics of homogenous and hollow elastic spheres. The homogeneous spheres undergo large oscillatory deformations throughout entry that carve nested disturbances into the normally smooth air cavity, altering cavity shape and pinch off. Using an analytical model, we relate the maximum sphere deformation to the material properties and impact velocity. This characteristic deformation is used to reconcile the differences between cavities formed by compliant and rigid spheres. In addition to the nested disturbances seen with the homogeneous spheres, we observe azimuthal irregularities on the cavity during water entry of hollow elastic spheres. Based on experiments and finite-element modeling, we suggest that these disturbances are initiated by vibration mode shapes excited in the hollow spheres upon impact. For all sphere types, we compare the forces throughout water entry to the rigid sphere case.

  19. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-25

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  20. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  1. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  2. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-01-18

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  3. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  4. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  5. Science off the Sphere: Knitting Needles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit uses knitting needles and water droplets to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between N...

  6. Science off the Sphere: Lenses and Vortices

    NASA Image and Video Library

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  7. Science off the Sphere: Thin Film Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  8. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  9. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  10. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  11. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-02

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about US coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. This issue presents detailed quarterly data for April 1990 through June 1990, aggregated quarterly historical data for 1982 through the second quarter of 1990, and aggregated annual historical data for 1960 through 1989 and projected data for selected years from 1995 through 2010. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information and forecasts have been integrated in this report. 7 figs., 37 tabs.

  12. Microstructure and Properties of WC Spheres

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    Effective area vs. Weibull modulus for the 6.35-mm-diameter C-sphere specimen with 1.27-mm ligament thickness...6 Figure 5. Effective volume vs. Weibull modulus for the 6.35-mm-diameter C-sphere...performance in a thinner armor package (1–3). Conversely, it is also a preferred material for the core component of several armor piercing

  13. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.; Bader, N.F. III; Dorfman, M.R.

    1984-05-22

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate.

  14. Evaluation of bioadhesive glipizide spheres and compacts from spheres prepared by extruder/marumerizer technique.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Ghaly, E S

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to attempt to deliver glipizide from spheres and compacts containing the natural polymer Carrageenan (Gelcarin, GP 812) and prepared by extruder/marumerizer technique. A second objective was to evaluate the mucoadhesive strength of the bioadhesive spheres onto the mucus membrane of rabbit. The effects of polymer, drug level, and type of spheronizing material were evaluated. All sphere formulations were compacted into tablets using a rotary Manesty B-3B machine equipped with 12/32 flat face tooling. Results show drug release from spheres and compacts decreased as the level of Carrageenan was increased. However as the level of drug was increased drug release also increased. Spheres containing Avicel PH-101 gave higher drug release than spheres of the same composition but prepared with Avicel RC-581. In general, the drug release from tablets was higher than its corresponding spheres and drug release from spheres and tablets containing Carrageenan was higher than control spheres and tablets of the same composition but without Carrageenan. Tablet formulations compacted from spheres containing Avicel RC-581 gave higher release rate constants than tablet formulations of the same composition but prepared with Avicel PH-101. The bioadhesion study showed that mucoadhesion strength between spheres and mucus membrane of the rabbit depends on the levels of polymer, drug, and type of spheronizing material. Developed bioadhesive spheres and tablets increase the solubility of glipizide which may increase its bioavailability and also increased the adherence of the bioadhesive systems to the mucous membrane so that once daily dose can be administered.

  15. Laminar Flow past a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    In this study, laminar flow past a rotating sphere is numerically investigated to understand the effect of the streamwise rotation on the flow characteristics behind a sphere. The present numerical method is based on a newly developed immersed boundary method in a cylindrical coordinate. Numerical simulations are performed at Re =100, 250 and 300 in the range of 0 <= ω^* <= 1.0, where ω^* is the maximum circumferential speed at the sphere surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. At ω^*=0 (without rotation), the flow past a sphere experiences steady axisymmetry, steady plane-symmetry, and unsteady plane-symmetry, respectively, at Re =100, 250 and 300. When the rotational speed increases, the drag increases for all the Reynolds numbers investigated, whereas the lift shows a non-monotonic behavior depending on the Reynolds number. At Re =100, the flow past a sphere shows steady axisymmetry for all the rotational speeds considered and thus the lift is zero. On the other hand, at Re =250 and 300, the flow becomes unsteady with rotation. With increasing rotational speed, the lift first decreases and then increases, showing a local minimum of lift at a specific rotational speed. The three-dimensional vortical structures behind a sphere are significantly modified by the streamwise rotation. For example, the vortical structures at Re =300 are completely changed and phase locked with rotation at ω^*=0.6.

  16. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  17. Radiation of non-relativistic particle on a conducting sphere and a string of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul'ga, N. F.; Syshchenko, V. V.; Larikova, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The radiation resulting from the uniform motion of a charged particle by (or through) metal sphere is considered. The simple but rigorous description of the radiation process is developed for the case of non-relativistic particle and perfectly conducting sphere by the way of the method of images known from electrostatics. The spectral-angular and spectral densities of the diffraction and transition radiation on the single sphere are computed. The Smith-Purcell radiation caused by motion of the particle parallel to the periodic string of spheres is also considered.

  18. Neutron inelastic cross section measurements for natTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, Adina; Belloni, Francesca; Borcea, Catalin; Boromiza, Marian; Dessagne, Philippe; Henning, Gregoire; Kerveno, Maëlle; Negret, Alexandru; Nyman, Markus; Pirovano, Elisa; Plompen, Arjan

    2017-09-01

    A neutron inelastic scattering experiment was performed at the GELINA (Geel Electron LINear Accelerator) neutron source of the European Commission Joint Research Centre Geel (EC-JRC Geel) with the aim of determining the reaction cross sections for the stable isotopes of natural titanium. A 235U fission chamber was used to monitor neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. The GAINS (Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering) spectrometer was employed to detect the γ rays resulting from the decay of the excited nuclei. We determined the γ-ray production cross sections of the first transitions in the 46,48,49,50Ti isotopes. The experimental values were compared with previous reported results and also with theoretical calculations performed with the TALYS 1.8 code using the default input parameters. Uncertainties of around 5% were obtained for the strongest observed transitions.

  19. Inelastic scattering of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnyuk, I. A.; Berloff, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study inelastic interactions of particles with quantized vortices in superfluids by using a semiclassical matter wave theory that is analogous to the Landau two-fluid equations, but allows for the vortex dynamics. The research is motivated by recent experiments on xenon-doped helium nanodroplets that show clustering of the impurities along the vortex cores. We numerically simulate the dynamics of trapping and interactions of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluid helium and the obtained results can be extended to scattering of other impurities by quantized vortices. Different energies and impact parameters of incident particles are considered. We show that inelastic scattering is closely linked to the generation of Kelvin waves along a quantized vortex during the interaction even if there is no capture. The capture criterion of an impurity is formulated in terms of the binding energy.

  20. Inelastic scattering of neutrons and possible biological applications.

    PubMed

    Egelstaff, P A

    1976-05-01

    The field of neutron inelastic scattering has probably been developed to the stage where it can begin to help the biologist. Because essentially no experimental data have been obtained, it is difficult either to draw conclusions or to make forecasts except on the basis of general hypotheses. It seems likely, however, that the next stage is up to biologists. After reviewing those biological problems in which molecular dynamics might play an important role, they should suggest specimens of interest which can give inelastic peaks with existing spectrometers operating with 5 to 10-A neutrons at angles greater than 5degrees and with resolutions of approximately 50 mueV. These specimens may involve molecules slightly smaller and more mobile than some biologists would like, but a successful outcome might lead to the development of spectrometers capable of working in a more satisfactory range. In this event the return may well prove rewarding to the biologists.

  1. Deep Inelastic Transfer Reactions - A New Way to Exotic Nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sophie; Beliuskina, Olga

    2014-05-01

    We studied deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions in collisions of 64Ni+207Pb and 48Ca+238U at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt. One of the goals was to investigate if deep inelastic transfer is superior to fragmentation reactions for producing neutron-rich isotopes in the astrophysically interesting region of nuclei along the magic neutron number N = 126. With both collision systems, rather neutron-rich transfer products were populated, some of them reaching out to the limits of the present chart of nuclides. New isotopes could not be identified. A comparison of the measured transfer cross-sections and yields with those from fragmentation reactions allowed for interesting conclusions.

  2. Color dipole cross section and inelastic structure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Kim, C. S.; Luu, Minh Vu; Reno, Mary Hall

    2014-11-01

    Instead of starting from a theoretically motivated form of the color dipole cross section in the dipole picture of deep inelastic scattering, we start with a parametrization of the deep inelastic structure function for electromagnetic scattering with protons, and then extract the color dipole cross section. Using the parametrizations of F 2(ξ = x or W 2 , Q 2) by Donnachie-Landshoff and Block et al., we find the dipole cross section from an approximate form of the presumed dipole cross section convoluted with the perturbative photon wave function for virtual photon splitting into a color dipole with massless quarks. The color dipole cross section determined this way reproduces the original structure function within about 10% for 0 .1 GeV2 ≤ Q 2 ≤10 GeV2. We discuss the dipole cross section at large and small dipole sizes and compare our results with other parametrizations.

  3. Inelastic Collisions in Optically Trapped Ultracold Metastable Ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Uetake, S.; Hashimoto, D.; Doyle, J. M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We report measurement of inelastic loss in dense and cold metastable ytterbium (Yb[P23]). Use of an optical far-off-resonance trap enables us to trap atoms in all magnetic sublevels, removing m-changing collisional trap loss from the system. Trapped samples of Yb[P23] are produced at a density of 2×1013cm-3 and temperature of 2μK. We observe rapid two-body trap loss of Yb[P23] and measure the inelastic collision rate constant 1.0(3)×10-11cm3s-1. The existence of the fine-structure changing collisions between atoms in the P23 state is strongly suggested.

  4. Discovering inelastic thermal relic dark matter at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Krnjaic, Gordan; Shuve, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Dark Matter particles with inelastic interactions are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model, yet remain challenging to fully probe with existing strategies. We propose a series of powerful searches at hadron and lepton colliders that are sensitive to inelastic dark matter dynamics. In representative models featuring either a massive dark photon or a magnetic dipole interaction, we find that the LHC and BABAR could offer strong sensitivity to the thermal relic dark matter parameter space for dark matter masses between ˜100 MeV and 100 GeV and fractional mass-splittings above the percent level; future searches at Belle II with a dedicated monophoton trigger could also offer sensitivity to thermal relic scenarios with masses below a few GeV. Thermal scenarios with either larger masses or splittings are largely ruled out; lower masses remain viable yet may be accessible with other search strategies.

  5. Deep inelastic scattering at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Rehm, K.E.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    A large yield for a process that appears to have many of the features of deep inelastic scattering has been observed at energies, near the Coulomb barrier in the systems {sup 112,124}Sn + {sup 58}Ni by Wolfs et al. In order to better understand the mechanisms by which energy dissipation takes place close to the barrier, we have extended the measurements of Wolfs to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni. The use of inverse kinematics in the present measurements resulted in better mass and energy resolution due to reduced target effects and in more complete angular coverage. We have obtained angular distributions, mass distributions, and total cross sections for deep inelastic scattering at two energies near the barrier. The results on the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 136}Xe complement those from the closed proton shell Sn nuclei.

  6. Inelastic transitions in slow heavy-particle atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdo''rfer, J.

    2001-05-01

    It is a generally held belief that inelastic transition probabilities and cross sections in slow, nearly adiabatic atomic collisions decrease exponentially with the inverse of the collision velocity v [i.e., {sigma}{proportional_to}exp(-const/v)]. This notion is supported by the Landau-Zener approximation and the hidden crossings approximation. We revisit the adiabatic limit of ion-atom collisions and show that for very slow collisions radial transitions are dominated by the topology of the branch points of the radial velocity rather than the branch points of the energy eigensurface. This can lead to a dominant power-law dependence of inelastic cross sections, {sigma}{proportional_to}v{sup n}. We illustrate the interplay between different contributions to the transition probabilities in a one-dimensional collision system for which the exact probabilities can be obtained from a direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Scho''dinger equation.

  7. Open effective field theories from deeply inelastic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Lepage, G. Peter

    2016-09-01

    Effective field theories have often been applied to systems with deeply inelastic reactions that produce particles with large momenta outside the domain of validity of the effective theory. The effects of the deeply inelastic reactions have been taken into account in previous work by adding local anti-Hermitian terms to the effective Hamiltonian. Here, we show that when multiparticle systems are considered, an additional modification is required in equations governing the density matrix. We define an effective density matrix by tracing over the states containing high-momentum particles and show that it satisfies a Lindblad equation, with local Lindblad operators determined by the anti-Hermitian terms in the effective Hamiltonian density.

  8. Open Effective Field Theories from Deeply Inelastic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, Hans-Werner; Lepage, G. Peter

    2017-01-01

    Effective field theories have often been applied to systems with inelastic reactions that produce particles with large momenta outside the domain of validity of the effective theory. The effects of the deeply inelastic reactions have been taken into account in previous work by adding local anti-Hermitian terms to the effective Hamiltonian density. We show that an additional modification is required in equations governing the density matrix when multi-particle states are considered. We define an effective density matrix by tracing out states containing high-momentum particles, and show that it satisfies a Lindblad equation, with Lindblad operators determined by the anti-Hermitian terms in the effective Hamiltonian density. This research was supported in part by the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.

  9. Inelastic processes of electron interactions with halouracils - cancer therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbachiya, Chetan; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Swadia, Mohit

    2014-10-01

    We report electron impact total inelastic cross sections for important cancer treatment agents, 5-fluorouracil (5FU), 5-chlorouracil (5ClU) and 5-bromouracil (5BrU) from ionization threshold through 5000 eV. We have employed Spherical Complex Optical Potential [1,2] method to compute total inelastic cross sections Qinel and Complex Scattering Potential - ionization contribution (CSP-ic) formalism, to calculate total ionization cross sections Qion. Electron driven ionization cross sections for these important compounds of therapeutic interest are reported for the first time in this work. In absence of any ionization study for these cancer therapy agents, we have compared the data with their parent molecule Uracil. Present cross sections may serve as a reference estimates for experimental work.

  10. Low-energy inelastic neutrino reactions on 4He.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Doron; Barnea, Nir

    2007-05-11

    The inelastic scattering of neutrino off 4He is calculated microscopically at energies typical for core-collapse supernova environment. The calculation is carried out with the Argonne V18 nucleon-nucleon potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon force. Full final state interaction is included via the Lorentz integral transform method. The contribution of axial meson exchange currents to the cross sections is taken into account from effective field theory of nucleons and pions to order O(Q3).

  11. Low-Energy Inelastic Neutrino Reactions on He4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Doron; Barnea, Nir

    2007-05-01

    The inelastic scattering of neutrino off He4 is calculated microscopically at energies typical for core-collapse supernova environment. The calculation is carried out with the Argonne V18 nucleon-nucleon potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon force. Full final state interaction is included via the Lorentz integral transform method. The contribution of axial meson exchange currents to the cross sections is taken into account from effective field theory of nucleons and pions to order O(Q3).

  12. Relativistic mechanical-thermodynamical formalism—description of inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.; Fernández, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a relativistic formalism inspired by the Minkowski four-vectors that also includes conservation laws such as the first law of thermodynamics. It remains close to the relativistic four-vector formalism developed for a single particle, but is also related to the classical treatment of problems that require both Newton's second law and the energy conservation law. We apply the developed formalism to inelastic collisions to better show how it works.

  13. Alpha inelastic scattering and cluster structures in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, T.; Ishiguro, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Tomida, N.; Yokota, N.; Adachi, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Tamii, A.; Yasuda, Y.; Zenihiro, J.; Itoh, M.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Maeda, Y.; Miyasako, H.; Saito, T.; Matsubara, H.; Sasamoto, Y.; Tokieda, H.

    2011-05-06

    The alpha inelastic scattering from {sup 24}Mg was measured to obtain the isoscalar natural-parity excitation strengths and to search for the {alpha}-condensed states. The multipole decomposition analysis for the measured cross sections was performed. The strength distributions for the {Delta}L = 0-3 were successfully obtained and the possible candidates for the {alpha}-condensed states around the {sup 16}O core were found.

  14. Inelastic collisions of positrons with one-valence-electron targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    1990-01-01

    The total elastic and positronium formation cross sections of the inelastic collisions between positrons and various one-valence-electron atoms, (namely hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium), and one-valence-electron ions, (namely hydrogen-like, lithium-like and alkaline-earth positive ions) are determined using an elaborate modified coupled-static approximation. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the Ps cross sections at the energy regions lying above the Ps formation thresholds.

  15. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Chowdhury, Partha; Greife, Uwe; Fisher Hicks, Sally; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Rahn Vanhoy, Jeffrey; Hill, Tony; Kawano, Toshihiko; Slaughter, David

    2015-06-08

    The optical model is used to analyze the elastic and inelastic scattering of nucleons, deuterons, hellions, tritons, and alpha particles by the nuclei. Since this paper covers primarily neutron-nucleus scattering, the focus will be limited to only that interaction. For the sake of this model, the nucleus is described as a blob of nuclear matter with properties based upon its number of nucleons. This infers that a single potential can describe the interaction of particles with different energies with different nuclei.

  16. Inelastic stopping for deuterons in warm Al plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Liu, Chun-Lei; Liu, Ling; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-06-01

    The inelastic stopping is studied for deuterons in the Al plasmas with a fixed density 0.02 g cm-3 at 7 different temperatures from 2.7 to 64 eV within the projectile energy range from 100 keV u-1 to 10 MeV u-1 from our model (He and Wang 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 063111). All the results are compared in detail with those from the isolated ion model where all the bound electrons are assumed in the ground state and the target ions are in almost the same charge states as those in the plasmas. The relativistic plane wave Born approximation is tested by much improved methods and found to be able to describe well the inelastic processes in the plasmas. The relevant result of the inelastic stopping is found to reflect the joint effect of the transition probability, electron occupation number and transition energy. It is found that the transitions of the deeply bound states play a dominant role to the inelastic stopping in the two models. The results due to all the excitation and de-excitation and those due to all the ionization and three body recombination in the plasmas are usually lower and higher than those for the corresponding isolated ions, respectively. It is demonstrated that models with target ions in the ground state could agree well with experiments in plasmas at a high enough projectile energy provided by a proper choice of the charge state of the target ion. The obvious difference between our model and Casas et al's model (Casas et al 2013 Phys. Rev. E 88 033102) is seen for the stopping with the projectile energy around 100 keV u-1 due to the different physical picture underlying them, which is helpful to probe which model proves more reliable in future experiments.

  17. KAULAKYS: Inelastic collisions between hydrogen atoms and Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    KAULAKYS calculates cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic collisions between Rydberg atoms and hydrogen atoms according to the free electron model of Kaulakys (1986, 1991). It is written in IDL and requires the code MSWAVEF (ascl:1701.006) to calculate momentum-space wavefunctions. KAULAKYS can be easily adapted to collisions with perturbers other than hydrogen atoms by providing the appropriate scattering amplitudes.

  18. Three-dimensional inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, E. S.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. Each code embodies a progression of mathematical models for increasingly comprehensive representation of the geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of nonlinear material response that distinguish these three groups of hot section components.

  19. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. Each code embodies a progression of mathematical models for increasingly comprehensive representation of the geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of nonlinear material response that distinguish these three groups of hot section components.

  20. The 3-D inelastic analyses for computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The 3-D inelastic analysis method is a focused program with the objective to develop computationally effective analysis methods and attendant computer codes for three-dimensional, nonlinear time and temperature dependent problems present in the hot section of turbojet engine structures. Development of these methods was a major part of the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program over the past five years at Lewis Research Center.

  1. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.; Nielsen, K.; Skaarup, P.

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial.

  2. Controlling Inelastic Light Scattering Quantum Pathways in Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    dielectric21,22. Figure 1a displays a diagram of a typical device . The carrier concentration in graphene is controlled by the top gate voltage (Vg). The doping...dependence of electrical transport, optical transmis- sion and inelastic light scattering are measured on the same graphene devices . Figure 1b shows...the electrical resistance curve of a graphene device , which has a charge neutral point (CNP) at 1.2V. The resistance decreases from the CNP value on

  3. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-20

    The United States produced 242 million short tons of coal in the first quarter of 1993, a decrease of 6 percent (14 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first quarter of 1992. The decrease was due to a decline in production east of the Mississippi River. All major coal-producing States in this region had lower coal production levels led by West Virginia, which produced 5 million short tons less coal. The principal reasons for the overall drop in coal output compared to a year earlier were: A decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets; a slower rate of producer/distributor stock build-up; and a drawn-down of electric utility coal stocks. Distribution of US coal in the first quarter of 1993 was 10 million short tons lower than in the first quarter of 1992, with 5 million short tons less distributed to both electric utilities and overseas markets. The average price of coal delivered to electric utilities during the first quarter of 1993 was $28.65 per short ton, the lowest value since the first quarter of 1980. Coal consumption in the first quarter of 1993 was 230 million short tons, 4 percent higher than in the first quarter of 1992, due primarily to a 5-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Total consumer stocks, at 153 million short tons, and electric utility stocks, at 144 million short tons, were at their lowest quarterly level since the end of 1989. US. coal exports totaled 19 million short tons, 6 million short tons less than in the first quarter of 1992, and the lowest quarterly level since 1988. The decline was primarily due to a 1-million-short-ton drop in exports to each of the following destinations: Italy, France, Belgium and Luxembourg, and Canada.

  4. Phase transitions in the distribution of inelastically colliding inertial particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, S.; Chernykh, A.; Falkovich, G.

    2016-01-01

    It was recently suggested that the direction of particle drift in inhomogeneous temperature or turbulence depends on the particle inertia: weakly inertial particles localize near minima of temperature or turbulence intensity (effects known as thermophoresis and turbophoresis), while strongly inertial particles fly away from minima in an unbounded space. The problem of a particle near minima of turbulence intensity is related to that of two particles in a random flow, so that the localization-delocalization transition in the former corresponds to the path-coalescence transition in the latter. The transition is signaled by the sign change of the Lyapunov exponent that characterizes the mean rate of particle approach to the minimum (a wall or another particle). Here we solve analytically this problem for inelastic collisions and derive the phase diagram for the transition in the inertia-inelasticity plane. An important feature of the diagram is the region of inelastic collapse: if the restitution coefficient β of particle velocity is smaller than the critical value {β }0={exp}(-π /\\sqrt{3}), then the particle is localized for any inertia. We present direct numerical simulations which support the theory and in addition reveal the dependence of the transition of the flow correlation time, characterized by the Stokes number.

  5. Inelastic scattering at the B K edge of hexagonal BN

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J.J.; Callcott, T.A.; Zhou, L.

    1997-04-01

    Many recent soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) studies have shown that inelastic scattering processes make important contributions to the observed spectra for excitation near the x-ray threshold. These effects are all attributed to a process, usually called an electronic Raman scattering (ERS) process, in which energy is lost to an electronic excitation. The theory has been described using second order perturbation theory by Tulkki and Aberg. In different materials, the detailed nature of the electronic excitation producing the energy loss may be very different. In crystalline Si, diamond and graphite, changes in spectral shape and dispersion of spectral features with variation of the excitation energy are observed, which are attributed to k conservation between the photoelectron generated in the excitation process and the valence hole remaining after the coupled emission process. Hence the process is strongly localized in k-space. In haxagonal boron nitride, which has a lattice and band structure very similar to graphite, inelastic scattering produces very different effects on the observed spectra. Here, the inelastic losses are coupled to a strong resonant elastic scattering process, in which the intermediate state is a localized core exciton and the final state is a localized valence exciton, so that the electronic excitation is strongly localized in real rather than reciprocal space.

  6. Inelastic Strain Analysis of Solder Joint in NASA Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Oyan, Chen

    1991-01-01

    The solder fatigue specimen designed by NASA-GSFC/UNISYS is analyzed in order to obtain the inelastic strain history during two different representative temperature cycles specified by UNISYS. In previous reports (dated July 25, 1990, and November 15, 1990), results were presented of the elastic-plastic and creep analysis for delta T = 31 C cycle, respectively. Subsequent results obtained during the current phase, from viscoplastic finite element analysis of the solder fatigue specimen for delta T = 113 C cycle are summarized. Some common information is repeated for self-completeness. Large-deformation continuum formulations in conjunction with a standard linear solid model is utilized for modeling the solder constitutive creep-plasticity behavior. Relevant material properties are obtained from the literature. Strain amplitudes, mean strains, and residual strains (as well as stresses) accumulated due to a representative complete temperature cycle are obtained as a result of this analysis. The partitioning between elastic strains, time-independent inelastic (plastic) strains, and time-dependent inelastic (creep) strains is also explicitly obtained for two representative cycles. Detailed plots are presented for two representative temperature cycles. This information forms an important input for fatigue damage models, when predicting the fatigue life of solder joints under thermal cycling

  7. The interpretation of polycrystalline coherent inelastic neutron scattering from aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Daniel L.; Ross, D. Keith; Gale, Julian D.; Taylor, Jon W.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to the interpretation and analysis of coherent inelastic neutron scattering from polycrystals (poly-CINS) is presented. This article describes a simulation of the one-phonon coherent inelastic scattering from a lattice model of an arbitrary crystal system. The one-phonon component is characterized by sharp features, determined, for example, by boundaries of the (Q, ω) regions where one-phonon scattering is allowed. These features may be identified with the same features apparent in the measured total coherent inelastic cross section, the other components of which (multiphonon or multiple scattering) show no sharp features. The parameters of the model can then be relaxed to improve the fit between model and experiment. This method is of particular interest where no single crystals are available. To test the approach, the poly-CINS has been measured for polycrystalline aluminium using the MARI spectrometer (ISIS), because both lattice dynamical models and measured dispersion curves are available for this material. The models used include a simple Lennard-Jones model fitted to the elastic constants of this material plus a number of embedded atom method force fields. The agreement obtained suggests that the method demonstrated should be effective in developing models for other materials where single-crystal dispersion curves are not available. PMID:24282332

  8. Inelastic deformation and phenomenological modeling of aluminum including transient effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A review was made of several phenomenological theories which have recently been proposed to describe the inelastic deformation of crystalline solids. Hart's deformation theory has many advantages, but there are disagreements with experimental deformation at stress levels below yield. A new inelastic deformation theory was proposed, introducing the concept of microplasticity. The new model consists of five deformation elements: a friction element representing a deformation element controlled by dislocation glide, a nonrecoverable plastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the strong dislocation barriers, a microplastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the weak barriers, a short range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable anelastic strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the weak barriers, and a long range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the strong barriers. Load relaxation and tensile testing in the plastic range were used to determine the material parameters for the plastic friction elements. The short range and long range anelastic moduli and the material parameters for the kinetics of microplasticity were determined by the measurement of anelastic loops and by performing load relaxation tests in the microplastic region. Experimental results were compared with a computer simulation of the transient deformation behavior of commercial purity aluminum. An attempt was made to correlate the material parameters and the microstructure from TEM. Stability of material parameters during inelastic deformation was discussed and effect of metallurgical variables was examined experimentally. 71 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  10. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Caciolli, A.; Calzolai, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, 19F(p,p')19F, from the first five excited levels of 19F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm2) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm2). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF2) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  11. 1. CARRIAGE HOUSE (left) AND SLAVE QUARTERS, SOUTH FRONT. A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CARRIAGE HOUSE (left) AND SLAVE QUARTERS, SOUTH FRONT. A kitchen was included in the quarters. - Charles Fraser House, Carriage House & Slave Quarters, 55 King Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  12. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF SLAVE QUARTERS No. 2 (right). Located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF SLAVE QUARTERS No. 2 (right). Located north of main house. The building at left is Slave Quarters No. 1 (HABS No. VA-1233 C) - Westend, Slave Quarters No. 2, Route 638 vicinity, Trevilians, Louisa County, VA

  13. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  14. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  15. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  16. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology.

  17. United States housing, second quarter 2013

    Treesearch

    Delton Alderman

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. housing market’s quarter two results were disap¬pointing compared with the first quarter. Although overall expected gains did not materialize, certain sectors improved slightly. Housing under construction, completions, and new and existing home sales exhibited slight increases. Overall permit data declined, and the decrease in starts was due primarily to a...

  18. United States housing, fourth quarter 2013

    Treesearch

    Delton Alderman

    2017-01-01

    In the beginning of 2013, the U.S. housing construction market indicated increases in all sectors; yet, by the fourth quarter’s end, only housing under construction improved. Moderation and declines are to be expected in the fourth quarter, as winter is setting in. Permits, starts, housing under construction, completions, and new and existing house sales all exceeded...

  19. 14 CFR 93.325 - Quarterly reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quarterly reporting. 93.325 Section 93.325... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand..., within 30 days of the end of each calendar quarter, the total number of commercial SFRA...

  20. 40 CFR 75.64 - Quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... placed in long-term cold storage (as defined in § 72.2 of this chapter), quarterly reports are not... the unit). For units placed into long-term cold storage during a reporting quarter, the exemption from... long-term cold storage. For any provisionally-certified monitoring system, § 75.20(a)(3) shall apply...

  1. 40 CFR 75.64 - Quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... placed in long-term cold storage (as defined in § 72.2 of this chapter), quarterly reports are not... the unit). For units placed into long-term cold storage during a reporting quarter, the exemption from... long-term cold storage. For any provisionally-certified monitoring system, § 75.20(a)(3) shall apply...

  2. 40 CFR 75.64 - Quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... placed in long-term cold storage (as defined in § 72.2 of this chapter), quarterly reports are not... the unit). For units placed into long-term cold storage during a reporting quarter, the exemption from... long-term cold storage. For any provisionally-certified monitoring system, § 75.20(a)(3) shall apply...

  3. United States housing, third quarter 2013

    Treesearch

    Delton Alderman

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. housing construction market’s third quarter was subdued, as all sectors moderated or declined. Once again, consensus expectations were for aggregate housing market gains, and these expectations were not realized. Overall starts, housing under construction, and completion data indicated quarterly improvement. Viewed from a recent his¬torical context, all...

  4. RTO Technical Publications: A Quarterly Listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A quarterly listing of RTO technical publications is presented. The topics include: Handbook on the Analysis of Smaller-Scale Contingency Operations in Long Term Defence Planning; 2) Radar Polarimetry and Interferometry; 3) Combat Casualty Care in Ground-Based Tactical Situations: Trauma Technology and Emergency Medical Procedures; and 4) RTO Technical Publications: A Quarterly Listing

  5. RTO Technical Publications: A Quarterly Listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A quarterly listing of RTO technical publications is presented. The topics include: Handbook on the Analysis of Smaller-Scale Contingency Operations in Long Term Defence Planning; 2) Radar Polarimetry and Interferometry; 3) Combat Casualty Care in Ground-Based Tactical Situations: Trauma Technology and Emergency Medical Procedures; and 4) RTO Technical Publications: A Quarterly Listing

  6. 40 CFR 75.64 - Quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quarterly reports. 75.64 Section 75.64... EMISSION MONITORING Reporting Requirements § 75.64 Quarterly reports. (a) Electronic submission. The designated representative for an affected unit shall electronically report the data and information in...

  7. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    DOE PAGES

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; ...

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelasticmore » dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  8. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report - Fourth Quarter FY-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Three AMU tasks were completed in this Quarter, each resulting in a forecast tool now being used in operations and a final report documenting how the work was done. AMU personnel completed the following tasks (1) Phase II of the Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting task by delivering an improved wind forecasting tool to operations and providing training on its use; (2) a graphical user interface (GUI) she updated with new scripts to complete the ADAS Update and Maintainability task, and delivered the scripts to the Spaceflight Meteorology Group on Johnson Space Center, Texas and National Weather Service in Melbourne, Fla.; and (3) the Verify MesoNAM Performance task after we created and delivered a GUI that forecasters will use to determine the performance of the operational MesoNAM weather model forecast.

  9. Recent researches on the air resistance of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachsbart, O

    1928-01-01

    The following conclusions on air resistance of spheres are drawn: 1) disturbances in front of the sphere and even single fine wires affect the critical Reynolds Number; 2) disturbances around the sphere increased the drag of the sphere without martially affecting the value of the Reynolds Number(sub crith); 3) great disturbances of the boundary layer of the sphere likewise change R.N.(sub crith); 4) turbulence of the approaching air stream lowers critical R.N.

  10. Liberations and twists of real and complex spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Teodor

    2015-10-01

    We study the 10 noncommutative spheres obtained by liberating, twisting, and liberating +twisting the real and complex spheres SRN-1, SCN-1. At the axiomatic level, we show that, under very strong axioms, these 10 spheres are the only ones. Our main results concern the computation of the quantum isometry groups of these 10 spheres, taken in an affine real/complex sense. We formulate as well a proposal for an extended formalism, comprising 18 spheres.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann

    2015-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 85 reportable events (18 from the 4th Qtr FY-15 and 67 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 25 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (8 from this quarter and 17 from the prior three quarters).

  12. 14. INTERIOR OF TYPICAL SLEEPING QUARTERS, BUILDING 208, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR OF TYPICAL SLEEPING QUARTERS, BUILDING 208, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Bachelor Airmen Quarters, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  13. Perspective view of Superintendent's Quarters from southeast. Note main entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of Superintendent's Quarters from southeast. Note main entrance gate in left background. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Superintendent's Quarters, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  14. The effect of size ratio on the sphere structure factor in colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, G.; Doshi, N.; Prescott, S. W.; Cosgrove, T.; Grillo, I.; Lindner, P.; Phipps, J. S.; Gittins, D.; van Duijneveldt, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    Binary mixtures of colloidal particles of sufficiently different sizes or shapes tend to demix at high concentration. Already at low concentration, excluded volume interactions between the two species give rise to structuring effects. Here, a new theoretical description is proposed of the structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, based on a density expansion of the work needed to insert a pair of spheres and a single sphere in a sea of them, in the presence or not of plates. The theory is first validated using computer simulations. The predictions are then compared to experimental observations using silica spheres and gibbsite platelets. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the change of the structure factor of spheres on addition of platelets, under solvent contrast conditions where the platelets were invisible. Theory and experiment agreed very well for a platelet/sphere diameter ratio D/d = 2.2 and reasonably well for D/d = 5. The sphere structure factor increases at low scattering vector Q in the presence of platelets; a weak reduction of the sphere structure factor was predicted at larger Q, and for the system with D/d = 2.2 was indeed observed experimentally. At fixed particle volume fraction, an increase in diameter ratio leads to a large change in structure factor. Systems with a larger diameter ratio also phase separate at lower concentrations.

  15. Monodisperse sphere-on-sphere silica particles for fast HPLC separation of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Richard; Myers, Peter; Edge, Tony; Zhang, Haifei

    2014-11-21

    Monodisperse sphere-on-sphere (SOS) silica particles are produced in a one-pot reaction, removing the need for time-consuming preparation and classification steps. Analysis of peptides and proteins using HPLC displays faster separation at lower operating pressure than commercially available fused core materials.

  16. Competition of Brazil nut effect, buoyancy, and inelasticity induced segregation in a granular mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, R.; Soto, R.

    2009-12-01

    It has been recently reported that a granular mixture in which grains differ in their restitution coefficients presents segregation: the more inelastic particles sink to the bottom. When other segregation mechanisms as buoyancy and the Brazil nut effect are present, the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with them. First, a detailed analysis, based on numerical simulations of two dimensional systems, of the competition between buoyancy and the inelasticity induced segregation is presented, finding that there is a transition line in the parameter space that determines which mechanism is dominant. In the case of neutrally buoyant particles having different sizes the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with the Brazil nut effect (BNE). Reverse Brazil nut effect (RBNE) could be obtained at large inelasticities of the intruder. At intermediate values, BNE and RBNE coexist and large inelastic particles are found both near the bottom and at the top of the system.

  17. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids.

  19. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  20. Water exit dynamics of buoyant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Epps, Brenden P.; Munns, Randy H.

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant spheres released below the free surface can rise well above the surface in a phenomenon known as pop-up. Contrary to intuition, increasing the release depth sometimes results in a lower pop-up height. We present the pop-up height of rising buoyant spheres over a range of release depths (1-12.5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4 ×104 to 6 ×105 ). While the dynamics of rising buoyant spheres and bubbles has been thoroughly investigated for Reynolds numbers below 104, pop-up in these larger-Reynolds-number regimes has not been studied. Yet the underwater motions of the sphere for the Reynolds numbers we study are the key to understanding the pop-up height. Two major regimes are apparent: vertical and oscillatory. The vertical regime exhibits a nearly vertical underwater trajectory and results in the largest pop-up heights. The oscillatory regime exhibits an underwater trajectory with periodic lateral motions and results in lower pop-up heights; this periodic lateral motion is modulated by unsteady vortex shedding in the wake of the sphere. Despite these complex fluid structure interactions, the experiments presented herein yield extremely repeatable results.