Science.gov

Sample records for inert gas condensation

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster nucleation during inert gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Krasnochtchekov, Pavel; Averback, R S

    2005-01-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations of vapor-phase nucleation of germanium in an argon atmosphere were performed and a unexpected channel of nucleation was observed. This channel, vapor-induced cluster splitting, is important for more refractory materials since the critical nucleus size can fall below the size of a dimer. As opposed to conventional direct vapor nucleation of the dimer, which occurs by three-body collisions, cluster-splitting nucleation is a second-order reaction. The most important cluster-splitting reaction is the collision of a vapor atom and a trimer that leads to the formation of two dimers. The importance of the cluster-splitting nucleation channel relative to the direct vapor nucleation channel is observed to increase with decreasing vapor density and increasing ratio of vapor to carrier gas atoms.

  2. Silver and Gold:Palladium nanoparticles produced by Inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Tijerina, Eduardo; Gracia-Pinilla, Miguel A.; Mejia-Rosales, Sergio; de La Cruz Hernandez, Wencel; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2007-03-01

    We report the synthesis of (AuPd and Ag) metallic nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on silicon and sapphire wafers and TEM grids. The NPs are formed by an inert gas condensation technique, based on dc-magnetron sputtering followed by condensation in high pressure zone. The size of the NPs was controlled through the variation of gas flow (Ar and He) inside the condensation zone, magnetron power, and condensation zone length. The NPs are negatively charged and may therefore be mass selected by a quadrupole mass filter, obtaining the size-distribution of NPs. We performed morphological, structural and composition studies of the NPs by mass spectroscopy, AES, XPS, AFM, UV-Visible spectroscopy, TEM, and HRTEM. Our procedure allows both a remarkable control over average size of the nanoparticles on the sample, and deviations below 5% around this average size.

  3. Effect of variables in inert gas condensation processing on nanoparticle trajectory simulated by finite volume method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Min; Juhng, Woo-Nam; Choi, Bo-Young

    2006-11-01

    The finite volume method was applied to the determination of the three-dimensional convection current during inert gas condensation (IGC) processing by using the commercially available software, "Fluent". The lower velocity of the convection current at higher evaporation temperature resulted from the lower value of the coefficient of thermal expansion. The velocity of the convection current increased with increasing chamber pressure, because the driving force of the buoyancy was directly proportional to the gas density. 13% and 17.3% of the particles were trapped during the first period of circulation in the case of the single and double heaters, respectively.

  4. Synthesis of Cu nanoparticles with self-assembled monolayers via inert-gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Woong; Kwak, Min-Gi; Yoon, Ho-Gyu; Kim, Young-Seok

    2011-07-01

    Cu nanoparticles with vaporized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for the prevention of oxidation were synthesized via inert-gas condensation (IGC). When processing the nanoparticles, the convection in the vacuum chamber was controlled using carrier gases such as Ar and He. Cu shots (2-8 mm) were used as raw materials and were evaporated via resistance heating. Octanethiol (CH3(CH2)7SH) was used for the SAMs and was introduced with the carrier gases during the process. The prepared samples were examined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the particle sizes, the coating thicknesses of the SAMs, and the particle distribution states. The ingredients were confirmed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The particle size and morphology were controlled by introducing various combinations of carrier gases, such as He, Ar and H2. Finally, stabilized Cu nanoparticles stably coated with octanethiol were successfully fabricated.

  5. Deposition of Size-Selected Cu Nanoparticles by Inert Gas Condensation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanometer size-selected Cu clusters in the size range of 1–5 nm have been produced by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster deposition apparatus, which combines a grow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a strict control in size. The structure and size of Cu nanoparticles were determined by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron transmission microscopy (STEM) measurements. In order to preserve the structural and morphological properties, the energy of cluster impact was controlled; the energy of acceleration of the nanoparticles was in near values at 0.1 ev/atom for being in soft landing regime. From SEM measurements developed in STEM-HAADF mode, we found that nanoparticles are near sized to those values fixed experimentally also confirmed by AFM observations. The results are relevant, since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster size distributions. It was also demonstrated the efficiency of the method to obtain size-selected Cu clusters films, as a random stacking of nanometer-size crystallites assembly. The deposition of size-selected metal clusters represents a novel method of preparing Cu nanostructures, with high potential in optical and catalytic applications. PMID:20652132

  6. Deposition of Size-Selected Cu Nanoparticles by Inert Gas Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia-Pinilla, M.; Martínez, E.; Vidaurri, G. Silva; Pérez-Tijerina, E.

    2010-11-01

    Nanometer size-selected Cu clusters in the size range of 1-5 nm have been produced by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster deposition apparatus, which combines a grow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a strict control in size. The structure and size of Cu nanoparticles were determined by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron transmission microscopy (STEM) measurements. In order to preserve the structural and morphological properties, the energy of cluster impact was controlled; the energy of acceleration of the nanoparticles was in near values at 0.1 ev/atom for being in soft landing regime. From SEM measurements developed in STEM-HAADF mode, we found that nanoparticles are near sized to those values fixed experimentally also confirmed by AFM observations. The results are relevant, since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster size distributions. It was also demonstrated the efficiency of the method to obtain size-selected Cu clusters films, as a random stacking of nanometer-size crystallites assembly. The deposition of size-selected metal clusters represents a novel method of preparing Cu nanostructures, with high potential in optical and catalytic applications.

  7. Core/shell structured magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Abdullah

    In this work, it is our goal to investigate the structural and magnetic properties of core/shell magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by inert gas condensation technique. For that purpose, Fe/FeO, Fe/FeO/PMMA, Ni/NiO/CoO, and NiFe 2O4 have been chosen to study exchange bias phenomenon that is observed in these systems. Two sets (small and large) of Fe/FeO nanoparticles with different particle sizes, (6.0/1.5nm and 9.0/3.0nm) have been prepared and the magnetic properties in terms of temperature dependencies of exchange bias field (H EB, horizontal shift of the hysteresis loops) and magnetic viscosity were investigated. Small particles have shown superparamagnetic behavior above Blocking Temperature, TB and exhibited 1574+/-25Oe exchange bias whereas the large particles had 277+/-25Oe. It has been observed that HEB is inversely proportional with the particle size and exponentially decreases and vanishes as the temperature increases up to TB. Along with the horizontal shift, vertical shift of the hysteresis loops due to pinned interface spins has also been realized. Dispersion of 14nm Fe/FeO particles in a non-magnetic polymer PMMA in order to study interparticle interactions has revealed that the magnetic response is in general nonmonotonic as a function of particle concentration in the polymer. The nonmonotonic behavior is linked to the competition between the exchange and dipolar interactions one of which being dominant above/below a threshold concentration. In order to synthesize core/shell nanoparticles composed of different metal and metal oxides rather than metal and its native oxide forming the core/shell, two techniques, resistive evaporation and laser ablation, have been combined in our inert gas condensation system. Condensation of evaporated Ni and laser ablated CoO allowed us to prepare core/shell particles. Structural analyses have revealed that Ni/CoO nanoparticles with a thin (˜1nm) NiO intermediate layer in the form of Ni/NiO/CoO can only be formed

  8. Highly size-controlled synthesis of Au/Pd nanoparticles by inert-gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Tijerina, E; Pinilla, M Gracia; Mejía-Rosales, S; Ortiz-Méndez, U; Torres, A; José-Yacamán, M

    2008-01-01

    Gold/Palladium nanoparticles were fabricated by inert-gas condensation on a sputtering reactor. With this method, by controlling both the atmosphere on the condensation chamber and the magnetron power, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a high degree of monodispersity in size. The structure and size of the Au/Pd nanoparticles were determined by mass spectroscopy, and confirmed by atomic force microscopy and electron transmission microscopy measurements. The chemical composition was analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. From these measurements we confirmed that with the sputtering technique we are able to produce particles of 1, 3, and 5 nm on size, depending on the choice of the synthesis conditions. From TEM measurements made both in the regular HREM, as well as in STEM-HAADF mode, we found that the particles are icosahedral in shape, and the micrographs show no evidence of a core-shell structure, in contrast to what is observed in the case of nanoparticles prepared by chemical synthesis.

  9. Formation Mechanism of Fe Nanocubes by Magnetron Sputtering Inert Gas Condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junlei; Baibuz, Ekaterina; Vernieres, Jerome; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Jansson, Ville; Nagel, Morten; Steinhauer, Stephan; Sowwan, Mukhles; Kuronen, Antti; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2016-04-26

    In this work, we study the formation mechanisms of iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) grown by magnetron sputtering inert gas condensation and emphasize the decisive kinetics effects that give rise specifically to cubic morphologies. Our experimental results, as well as computer simulations carried out by two different methods, indicate that the cubic shape of Fe NPs is explained by basic differences in the kinetic growth modes of {100} and {110} surfaces rather than surface formation energetics. Both our experimental and theoretical investigations show that the final shape is defined by the combination of the condensation temperature and the rate of atomic deposition onto the growing nanocluster. We, thus, construct a comprehensive deposition rate-temperature diagram of Fe NP shapes and develop an analytical model that predicts the temporal evolution of these properties. Combining the shape diagram and the analytical model, morphological control of Fe NPs during formation is feasible; as such, our method proposes a roadmap for experimentalists to engineer NPs of desired shapes for targeted applications.

  10. Characterization of Pb24Te76 quantum dot thin film synthesized by inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, Manal A.; Mahdy, Iman A.; El Zawawi, I. K.

    2015-01-01

    Air-stable and thermal-stable lead telluride quantum dot was successfully prepared on glass substrate by inert gas condensation (IGC) method. Argon (Ar) is the inert gas used during deposition process with a constant flow rate of 3 × 10-3 Torr. The effect of heat-treatment process at different times was studies for structure, optical and electrical properties for nanocrystalline thin films. The structures of the as deposited and heat-treated films were investigated using grazing incident in-plane X-ray diffraction (GIIXD). The GIIXD pattern showed nanostructure face centered cubic structure of PbTe thin films. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of as deposited PbTe thin film was carried out and showed that the atomic ratio of Pb/Te was 24/76. The particle size of the as deposited PbTe film and after stored it in an unhumid atmosphere are 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 7.2 ± 0.3 nm respectively as estimated form TEM image (i.e. in the same level of particle size). However, the particle size was changed to be 11.8 ± 0.3 nm after heat-treated for 5 h at 473 K. These particle size values of PbTe thin film are smaller than its Bohr radius. The estimated value of optical band gap Eg decreased from 1.71 eV for the as deposited film to 1.62 eV for film heat-treated (5 h at 473 K). The dc electrical conductivity is increased with raising temperature in the range (303-473 K) for all thin films under investigation. The deduced activation energy decreased from 0.222 eV for as deposited sample to 0.125 eV after heat-treated at 473 K for 5 h.

  11. Characterization of Pb₂₄Te₇₆ quantum dot thin film synthesized by inert gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Manal A; Mahdy, Iman A; El Zawawi, I K

    2015-01-05

    Air-stable and thermal-stable lead telluride quantum dot was successfully prepared on glass substrate by inert gas condensation (IGC) method. Argon (Ar) is the inert gas used during deposition process with a constant flow rate of 3 × 10(-3)Torr. The effect of heat-treatment process at different times was studies for structure, optical and electrical properties for nanocrystalline thin films. The structures of the as deposited and heat-treated films were investigated using grazing incident in-plane X-ray diffraction (GIIXD). The GIIXD pattern showed nanostructure face centered cubic structure of PbTe thin films. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of as deposited PbTe thin film was carried out and showed that the atomic ratio of Pb/Te was 24/76. The particle size of the as deposited PbTe film and after stored it in an unhumid atmosphere are 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 7.2 ± 0.3 nm respectively as estimated form TEM image (i.e. in the same level of particle size). However, the particle size was changed to be 11.8 ± 0.3 nm after heat-treated for 5h at 473K. These particle size values of PbTe thin film are smaller than its Bohr radius. The estimated value of optical band gap Eg decreased from 1.71 eV for the as deposited film to 1.62 eV for film heat-treated (5 h at 473K). The dc electrical conductivity is increased with raising temperature in the range (303-473K) for all thin films under investigation. The deduced activation energy decreased from 0.222 eV for as deposited sample to 0.125 eV after heat-treated at 473K for 5 h.

  12. Preparing ultrafine PbS powders from the scrap lead-acid battery by sulfurization and inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Huipeng; Zhan, Lu; Xie, Bing

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for preparing ultrafine PbS powders involving sulfurization combined with inert gas condensation is developed in this paper, which is applicable to recycle Pb from lead paste of spent lead-acid batteries. Initially, the effects of the evaporation and condensation temperature, the inert gas pressure, the condensation distance and substrate on the morphology of as-obtained PbS ultrafine particles are intensively investigated using sulfur powders and lead particles as reagents. Highly dispersed and homogeneous PbS nanoparticles can be prepared under the optimized conditions which are 1223 K heating temperature, 573 K condensation temperature, 100 Pa inert gas pressure and 60 cm condensation distance. Furthermore, this method is successfully applied to recycle Pb from the lead paste of spent lead acid battery to prepare PbS ultrafine powders. This work does not only provide the theoretical fundamental for PbS preparation, but also provides a novel and efficient method for recycling spent lead-acid battery with high added-value products.

  13. Preparation of tunable-sized iron nanoparticles based on magnetic manipulation in inert gas condensation (IGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George

    2017-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by inert gas condensation were studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Wulff construction shape analysis. The NP size and shape show strong dependence on the magnetic field above the target surface. The effect of the magnetic field could be tuned by adjusting the thickness of the protective backing plate positioned in-between the target and the magnetron head. With increasing backing plate thickness, the particle size decreases and the NP morphologies evolve from faceted to close-to-spherical polyhedral shapes. Moreover, with changes in size and shape, the particle structure also varies so that the NPs exhibit: (i) a core-shell structure for the faceted NPs with size ˜15-24 nm; (ii) a core-shell structure for the close-to-spherical NPs with size ˜8-15 nm; and (iii) a fully oxidized uniform structure for NPs with sizes less than ˜8 nm having a void in the center due to the Kirkendall effect. The decrease of NP size with the increasing backing plate thickness can be attributed to a reduced magnetic field strength above the iron target surface combined with a reduced magnetic field confinement. These results pave the way to drastically control the NP size and shape in a simple manner without any other adjustment of the aggregation volume within the deposition system.

  14. Characterization of InSb Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Inert Gas Condensation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sneha G; Kordesch, Martin E

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of indium antimonide (InSb) were synthesized using a vapor phase synthesis technique known as inert gas condensation (IGC). NPs were directly deposited, at room temperature and under high vacuum, on glass cover slides, TEM grids and (111) p-type silicon wafers. TEM studies showed a bimodal distribution in the size of the NPs with average particle size of 13.70 nm and 33.20 nm. The Raman spectra of InSb NPs exhibited a peak centered at 184.27 cm(-1), which corresponds to the longitudinal optical (LO) modes of phonon vibration in InSb. A 1:1 In-to-Sb composition ratio was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies revealed polycrystalline behavior of these NPs with lattice spacing around 0.37 and 0.23 nm corresponding to the growth directions of (111) and (220), respectively. The average crystallite size of the NPs obtained using XRD peak broadening results and the Debye-Scherrer formula was 25.62 nm, and the value of strain in NPs was found to be 0.0015. NP's band gap obtained using spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was around 0.43-0.52 eV at 300 K, which is a blue shift of 0.26-0.35 eV. The effects of increased particle density resulting into aggregation of NPs are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Characterization of InSb Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Inert Gas Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of indium antimonide (InSb) were synthesized using a vapor phase synthesis technique known as inert gas condensation (IGC). NPs were directly deposited, at room temperature and under high vacuum, on glass cover slides, TEM grids and (111) p-type silicon wafers. TEM studies showed a bimodal distribution in the size of the NPs with average particle size of 13.70 nm and 33.20 nm. The Raman spectra of InSb NPs exhibited a peak centered at 184.27 cm-1, which corresponds to the longitudinal optical (LO) modes of phonon vibration in InSb. A 1:1 In-to-Sb composition ratio was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies revealed polycrystalline behavior of these NPs with lattice spacing around 0.37 and 0.23 nm corresponding to the growth directions of (111) and (220), respectively. The average crystallite size of the NPs obtained using XRD peak broadening results and the Debye-Scherrer formula was 25.62 nm, and the value of strain in NPs was found to be 0.0015. NP's band gap obtained using spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was around 0.43-0.52 eV at 300 K, which is a blue shift of 0.26-0.35 eV. The effects of increased particle density resulting into aggregation of NPs are also discussed in this paper.

  16. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high

  17. Sn and Cu oxide nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 nanoflower 3D substrates by Inert Gas Condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusior, A.; Kollbek, K.; Kowalski, K.; Borysiewicz, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Adamczyk, A.; Trenczek-Zajac, A.; Radecka, M.; Zakrzewska, K.

    2016-09-01

    Sn and Cu oxide nanoparticles were deposited by Inert Gas Condensation (IGC) technique combined with dc magnetron sputtering onto nanoflower TiO2 3D substrates obtained in the oxidation process of Ti-foil in 30% H2O2. Sputtering parameters such as insertion length and Ar/He flow rates were optimized taking into account the nanostructure morphology. Comparative studies with hydrothermal method were carried out. Surface properties of the synthesized nanomaterials were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy, SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS. X-ray diffraction, XRD and Raman spectroscopy were performed in order to determine phase composition. Impedance spectroscopy demonstrated the influence of nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity.

  18. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  19. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Inert gases, particularly argon and xenon, are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. Hollow cathode data were obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Some test conditions gave plasma coupling voltages at or below the sputtering threshold, hence should permit long operating lifetimes. All observations of hollow cathode operation were consistent with a single theory of operation, in which a significant amount of the total electron emission is from localized areas within the orifice. This mode of emission is also supported by scanning electron microscope photographs that indicate local temperatures at or near the melting temperature of the tungsten tip. Experimental hollow cathode performance was correlated for two orifice diameters, three inert gas propellants, and a range of flow rates for each propellant. The basic theory for the production of doubly ionized argon and xenon was completed. Experimental measurements of the doubly ionized fraction agree with theory within about plus or minus 20 percent. High voltage isolators were studied for the propellant feed line. The breakdown voltage per segment ranged from 300 to over 500 V with argon.

  20. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  1. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  2. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Xenon is of interest in that its physical characteristics are well suited to propulsion. High atomic weight and low tankage fraction were major factors in this choice. If a large amount of propellant was required, so that cryogenic storage was practical, argon is a more economical alternative. Argon was also the preferred propellant for ground applications of thruster technology, such as sputter etching and deposition. Additional magnetic field measurements are reported. These measurements should be of use in magnetic field design. The diffusion of electrons through the magnetic field above multipole anodes was studied in detail. The data were consistent with Bohm diffusion across a magnetic field. The theory based on Bohm diffusion was simple and easily used for diffusion calculations. Limited startup data were obtained for multipole discharge chambers. These data were obtained with refractory cathodes, but should be useful in predicting the upper limits for starting with hollow cathodes.

  3. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  4. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Inert gases are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole discharge chamber investigated was shown capable of low discharge chamber losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of optimization. Minimum discharge losses were 200 to 250 eV/ion for xenon and 300 to 350 eV/ion for argon, while flatness parameters in the plane of the accelerator grid were 0.85 to 0.95. The design used employs low magnetic field strengths, which permits the use of sheet-metal parts. The corner problem of the discharge chamber was resolved with recessed corner anodes, which approximately equalized both the magnetic field above the anodes and the electron currents to these anodes. Argon hollow cathodes were investigated at currents up to about 5 amperes using internal thermionic emitters. Cathode chamber diameter optimized in the 1.0 to 2.5 cm range, while orifices diameter optimized in the 0.5 to 5 mm range. The use of a bias voltage for the internal emitter extended the operating range and facilitated starting. The masses of 15 and 30 cm flight type thrusters were estimated at about 4.2 and 10.8 kg.

  5. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  6. Structural characterization and X-ray analysis by Williamson-Hall method for Erbium doped Aluminum Nitride nanoparticles, synthesized using inert gas condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Corbett, Joseph P.; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2016-05-01

    We have synthesized AlN nanoparticles (NPs) doped in-situ with Er (AlN:Er) using inert gas condensation technique. Using x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening analysis with the Williamson-Hall (W-H) Uniform Deformation Model (UDM) the crystallite size of the NPs and the strain in NPs were found to be 80±38 nm and 3.07×10-3±0.9×10-3 respectively. In comparison, using the Debye-Scherrer's (DS) formula, we have inferred that the crystallite size of the NPs was 23±6 nm and the average strain was 4.3×10-3±0.4×10-3. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the NPs are spherical and have an average diameter of ∼300 nm. The crystallite size is smaller than the size of the NPs revealing their polycrystalline behavior. In addition, the NPs strain, stress and energy density were also calculated using W-H analysis combined with the Uniform Deformation Stress Model (UDSM) and the Uniform Deformation Energy Density Model (UDEDM). Suggested by the spherical geometry and polycrystalline nature of the AlN NPs, the strain computed from UDM, UDSM and UDEDM were in agreement confirming an isotropic mechanical nature of the particle. Luminescence measurements revealed the temperature dependence of the optical emission of the Er3+ ions, confirming the use of AlN:Er NPs for nano-scale temperature sensing.

  7. Mechanisms of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Experiments describing the mechanism of inert gas narcosis are reported. A strain of mice, genetically altered to increase susceptibility to botulin poisoning (synaptic response) appears to increase metabolic rates while breathing argon; this infers a genetically altered synaptic response to both botulin toxin and narcotic gases. Studies of metabolic depression in human subjects breathing either air or a 30% mixture of nitrous oxide indicate that nitrous oxide narcosis does not produce pronounced metabolic depression. Tests on mice for relative susceptibilities to narcosis and oxygen poisoning as a function of fatty membrane composition show that alteration of the fatty acid composition of phospholipids increases resistance to metabolically depressant effects of argon but bas no effect on nitrous oxide narcosis. Another study suggests that acclimatization to low tension prior to high pressure oxygen treatment enhances susceptibility of mice to convulsions and death; developing biochemical lesions cause CNS metabolite reductions and pulmonary damage.

  8. Inert-gas thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Trock, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to recent advances in component technology for inert-gas thrusters. It is noted that the maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar can be increased 60-70% by using an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar but without emissive oxide has also been attained. A 30-cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages is found to give double-ion measurements consistent with a double-ion correlation developed earlier on the basis of 15-cm thruster data. An attempt is made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration is assessed. The ion impingement on the single-grid accelerator is found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator is 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  9. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas system... the cargo area meeting paragraph (a) of this section; (c) Automatic and manual inert gas...

  10. Inert gas transport in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Baker, A Barry; Farmery, Andrew D

    2011-04-01

    This article establishes the basic mathematical models and the principles and assumptions used for inert gas transfer within body tissues-first, for a single compartment model and then for a multicompartment model. From these, and other more complex mathematical models, the transport of inert gases between lungs, blood, and other tissues is derived and compared to known experimental studies in both animals and humans. Some aspects of airway and lung transfer are particularly important to the uptake and elimination of inert gases, and these aspects of gas transport in tissues are briefly described. The most frequently used inert gases are those that are administered in anesthesia, and the specific issues relating to the uptake, transport, and elimination of these gases and vapors are dealt with in some detail showing how their transfer depends on various physical and chemical attributes, particularly their solubilities in blood and different tissues. Absorption characteristics of inert gases from within gas cavities or tissue bubbles are described, and the effects other inhaled gas mixtures have on the composition of these gas cavities are discussed. Very brief consideration is given to the effects of hyper- and hypobaric conditions on inert gas transport.

  11. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501... Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for dry inert gas. When Table 1 refers to this section, an inert gas system for the containment system must supply inert gas containing no more than 100 ppm water....

  12. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  13. Inert gas effects on embryonic development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, H. S.; Grimard, M.

    1972-01-01

    It had been found in previous investigations that hatchability of fertile chicken eggs is reduced to 50% or less of controls if incubation takes place in a low nitrogen atmosphere containing He. Although these results suggest some role for nitrogen in embryogenesis, it is possible that a requirement exists for an inert molecule closer in physical characteristics to nitrogen than is He. An investigation is conducted involving incubation at ground level pressure in a gas mixture in which the 79% inert component was either neon or argon. The effect of varying combinations of nitrogen, helium, and oxygen was also studied.

  14. Production of light oil by injection of hot inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruidas, Bidhan C.; Ganguly, Somenath

    2016-05-01

    Hot inert gas, when injected into an oil reservoir is capable of generating a vaporization-condensation drive and as a consequence, a preferential movement of the lighter components to the production well. This form of displacement is an important unit mechanism in hot flue-gas injection, or in thermal recovery from a watered-out oil reservoir. This article presents the movement of heat front vis-à-vis the changes in the saturation profile, and the gas-phase composition. The plateau in the temperature profile due to the exchange of latent heat, and the formation of water bank at the downstream are elaborated. The broadening of the vaporization-condensation zone with continued progression is discussed. The effect of inert gas temperature on the cumulative production of oil is reviewed. The results provide insight to the vaporization-condensation drive as a stand-alone mechanism. The paper underscores the relative importance of this mechanism, when operated in tandem with other processes in improved oil recovery and CO2 sequestration.

  15. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  16. Plasma processes in inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters, particularly with large diameters, have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Two plasma processes are treated in this study: electron diffusion across magnetic fields and double ion production in inert-gas thrusters. A model is developed to describe electron diffusion across a magnetic field that is driven by both density and potential gradients, with Bohm diffusion used to predict the diffusion rate. This model has applications to conduction across magnetic fields inside a discharge chamber, as well as through a magnetic baffle region used to isolate a hollow cathode from the main chamber. A theory for double ion production is presented, which is not as complete as the electron diffusion theory described, but it should be a useful tool for predicting double ion sputter erosion. Correlations are developed that may be used, without experimental data, to predict double ion densities for the design of new and especially larger ion thrusters.

  17. Positron-inert gas differential elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauppila, W. E.; Smith, Steven J.; Kwan, C. K.; Stein, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are being made in a crossed beam experiment of the relative elastic differential cross section (DCS) for 5 to 300 eV positrons scattering from inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in the angular range from 30 to 134 deg. Results obtained at energies around the positronium (Ps) formation threshold provide evidence that Ps formation and possibly other inelastic channels have an effect on the elastic scattering channel.

  18. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  19. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  20. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  1. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  2. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dew point at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  3. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  4. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  5. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  6. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  7. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  8. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system must have a permanent inert gas system that: (a) Maintains the vapor space of the containment system in...

  9. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  10. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  11. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  12. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  13. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  14. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  15. A new understanding of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhang; Yi, Gao; Haiping, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetics are extremely important in modern surgery to greatly reduce the patient’s pain. The understanding of anesthesia at molecular level is the preliminary step for the application of anesthetics in clinic safely and effectively. Inert gases, with low chemical activity, have been found to cause anesthesia for centuries, but the mechanism is unclear yet. In this review, we first summarize the progress of theories about general anesthesia, especially for inert gas narcosis, and then propose a new hypothesis that the aggregated rather than the dispersed inert gas molecules are the key to trigger the narcosis to explain the steep dose-response relationship of anesthesia. Project supported by the Supercomputing Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, the Shanghai Supercomputer Center, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273268, 11290164, and 11175230), the Startup Funding from Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y290011011), “Hundred People Project” from Chinese Academy of Sciences, and “Pu-jiang Rencai Project” from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13PJ1410400).

  16. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  17. Performance of large inert-gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of large inert-gas thrusters is predicted based on present knowledge of ion optics performance and discharge chamber operation. Calculated performance data are given for argon and xenon propellants. The effect of varying propellant utilization and thruster diameter is discussed and the optimum choice of beam diameter for very large systems is indicated for low, intermediate, and high specific impulses. Optimum discharge chamber depths are also specified. Although detailed design considerations may modify the predictions, the general trends indicated should still be useful for directing future technology efforts and evaluating mission studies involving large thrusters.

  18. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  19. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  20. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  1. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  2. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  3. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  4. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  5. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  6. [Advances in research on neuroprotective effects of inert gas].

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Guo, Song-xue; Hong, Yuan; Zhang, Jian-min

    2011-01-01

    Inert gas is a group of rare gases with very low activity, their application in medical field has increasingly drawn attentions. It is known that inert gases helium, xenon and argon have protective effects on nervous system and the mechanisms are related to eradicating free radicals, anti-inflammation, suppressing apoptosis, influencing ion channels and so on. Further study on the neuroprotective effect of inert gas will shed light on a new approach to treat neurological diseases.

  7. Inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Xiao; Smith, Roger; Kenny, S. D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe is examined using a combination of static energy minimisation, molecular dynamics and barrier searching methods with empirical potentials. Static energy minimisation techniques indicate that for small Ar and Xe bubbles, the preferred gas to vacancy ratio at 0 K is about 1:1 for Ar and varies between 0.5:1 and 0.9:1 for Xe. In contrast to interstitial He atoms and small He interstitial clusters, which are highly mobile in the lattice, Ar and Xe atoms prefer to occupy substitutional sites and any interstitials present in the lattice soon displace Fe atoms and become substitutional. If a pre-existing bubble is present then there is a capture radius around a bubble which extends up to the 6th neighbour position. Collision cascades can also enlarge an existing bubble by the capture of vacancies. Ar and Xe can diffuse through the lattice through vacancy driven mechanisms but with relatively high energy barriers of 1.8 and 2.0 eV respectively. This indicates that Ar and Xe bubbles are much harder to form than bubbles of He and that such gases produced in a nuclear reaction would more likely be dispersed at substitutional sites without the help of increased temperature or radiation-driven mechanisms.

  8. Hyperpolarized and inert gas MRI: the future.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Blasiak, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Fox, Matthew S; Dowhos, Krista M; Albert, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potentially ideal imaging modality for noninvasive, nonionizing, and longitudinal assessment of disease. Hyperpolarized (HP) agents have been developed in the past 20 years for MR imaging, and they have the potential to vastly improve MRI sensitivity for the diagnosis and management of various diseases. The polarization of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-sensitive nuclei other than (1)H (e.g., (3)He, (129)Xe) can be enhanced by a factor of up to 100,000 times above thermal equilibrium levels, which enables direct detection of the HP agent with no background signal. In this review, a number of HP media applications in MR imaging are discussed, including HP (3)He and (129)Xe lung imaging, HP (129)Xe brain imaging, and HP (129)Xe biosensors. Inert fluorinated gas MRI, which is a new lung imaging technique that does not require hyperpolarization, is also briefly discussed. This technique will likely be an important future direction for the HP gas lung imaging community.

  9. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space....

  10. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space....

  11. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  12. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  13. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  14. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  15. Inert gas spraying device aids in repair of hazardous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teleha, S.

    1965-01-01

    Inert gas spraying device aids in safely making mechanical repairs to a cryogenic fluid system without prior emptying of the system. This method can be applied to any natural or bottled gas system and with modifications to gasoline transports.

  16. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  17. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  18. A sensitive image intensifier which uses inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerns, Q. A.; Miller, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    High gain optical image intensifier utilizes inert gas cavity with copper electrodes to form electron avalanches without excessive pulse voltages. Estimated optical gain for device is two times 10 to the power of seven.

  19. The use of inert gas xenon for cryopreservation of leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Laptev, D S; Polezhaeva, T V; Zaitseva, O O; Khudyakov, A N; Solomina, O N; Utemov, S V

    2014-06-01

    We studied the possibility of cryopreservation of human blood nuclear cells under protection with inert gas xenon. A method for inducing clathrate anabiosis of leukocytes was developed that preserved the cells for practical use in biology and medicine.

  20. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  1. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    SciTech Connect

    Maicu, Marina Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter; Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald; Hecker, Dominic

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  2. Experimental study of steam condensation on water in countercurrent flow in presence of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Althof, J.

    1984-08-01

    Experimental results of investigating steam condensation on water in the presence of (noncondensable) inert gases at low temperatures and pressures relevant to open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems are reported. Seven different condenser configurations were tested. The experimental data are correlated using a liquid flow fraction and a vent fraction to yield simple relationships of condenser performance over a wide range of test conditions. Performance maps and envelopes are provided for evaluating the relative merits of tested configurations. The height of transfer unit (HTU) for condensation ranges from 0.2 to 0.3 m among the various condenser geometries. Also reported are the pressure-loss coefficients for all the tested geometries.

  3. Heaterless ignition of inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Heaterless inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes were investigated with the aim of reducing ion thruster complexity and increasing ion thruster reliability. Cathodes heated by glow discharges are evaluated for power requirements, flowrate requirements, and life limiting mechanisms. An accelerated cyclic life test is presented.

  4. Inert fluorinated gas MRI: a new pulmonary imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Ball, Iain K; Li, Tao; Fox, Matthew S; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Biman, Birubi; Albert, Mitchell S

    2014-12-01

    Fluorine-19 ((19)F) MRI of the lungs using inhaled inert fluorinated gases can potentially provide high quality images of the lungs that are similar in quality to those from hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. Inert fluorinated gases have the advantages of being nontoxic, abundant, and inexpensive compared with HP gases. Due to the high gyromagnetic ratio of (19)F, there is sufficient thermally polarized signal for imaging, and averaging within a single breath-hold is possible due to short longitudinal relaxation times. Therefore, the gases do not need to be hyperpolarized prior to their use in MRI. This eliminates the need for an expensive polarizer and expensive isotopes. Inert fluorinated gas MRI of the lungs has been previously demonstrated in animals, and more recently in healthy volunteers and patients with lung diseases. The ongoing improvements in image quality demonstrate the potential of (19)F MRI for visualizing the distribution of ventilation in human lungs and detecting functional biomarkers. In this brief review, the development of inert fluorinated gas MRI, current progress, and future prospects are discussed. The current state of HP noble gas MRI is also briefly discussed in order to provide context to the development of this new imaging modality. Overall, this may be a viable clinical imaging modality that can provide useful information for the diagnosis and management of chronic respiratory diseases.

  5. Development and interactions of two inert gas bubbles during decompression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Homer, L D; Thalmann, E D

    1996-09-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the evolution of two inert gas bubbles in tissue. This is useful for understanding the dynamics of bubbles that presumably arise during decompression. It is assumed that they are spherical and that the tissue volume surrounding them is infinite. The total pressure in each bubble is determined by the barometric and metabolic gas pressures as well as the pressure due to surface tension. Bipolar coordinates are employed to determine the inert gas pressure distribution. Two coupled governing equations for bubble radii are then derived and solved numerically. The results demonstrate how bubble evolution is affected by the distance between bubbles and the initial bubble radii. The existence time and bubble surface flux of two equal-sized bubbles are calculated and compared with those of a single gas bubble model. The results indicate that when two bubbles are very close, it takes 20% more time for two bubbles to dissolve than for a single one, and the total surface flux of two bubbles is nearly 20% less than twice of a single bubble. When the center-to-center distance is 10 times of bubble radius, the effect of bubble interaction on bubble existence time and surface flux are about 6 and 9% changes, respectively. We conclude that if bubbles are not too small, the interactions among bubbles should be included in inert gas bubble models predicting bubble evolution.

  6. Permeabilization of adhered cells using an inert gas jet.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Scott; Jonak, Paul; Chouinard-Pelletier, Guillaume; Coulombe, Sylvain; Jones, Elizabeth; Leask, Richard L

    2013-09-04

    Various cell transfection techniques exist and these can be broken down to three broad categories: viral, chemical and mechanical. This protocol describes a mechanical method to temporally permeabilize adherent cells using an inert gas jet that can facilitate the transfer of normally non-permeable macromolecules into cells. We believe this technique works by imparting shear forces on the plasma membrane of adherent cells, resulting in the temporary formation of micropores. Once these pores are created, the cells are then permeable to genetic material and other biomolecules. The mechanical forces involved do run the risk of permanently damaging or detaching cells from their substrate. There is, therefore, a narrow range of inert gas dynamics where the technique is effective. An inert gas jet has proven efficient at permeabilizing various adherent cell lines including HeLa, HEK293 and human abdominal aortic endothelial cells. This protocol is appropriate for the permeabilization of adherent cells both in vitro and, as we have demonstrated, in vivo, showing it may be used for research and potentially in future clinical applications. It also has the advantage of permeabilizing cells in a spatially restrictive manner, which could prove to be a valuable research tool.

  7. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  8. Inert gas analysis of ventilation-perfusion matching during hemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, D D; Ott, S M; Sherrard, D J; Hlastala, M P

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoxemia during hemodialysis was investigated by the multiple inert gas elimination technique in anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated dogs. Profound leukopenia occurred in the first hour of a 2-h hemodialysis with a cuprophan membrane and dialysate that contained acetate. Arterial partial pressure of O2 and CO2 and oxygen consumption remained unchanged during dialysis. Pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination and lung respiratory exchange ratio decreased with the initiation of dialysis, remained depressed throughout the duration of dialysis, and returned to predialysis levels after the cessation of dialysis. Cardiac output diminished during dialysis but did not return to base-line levels after dialysis. Multiple indices calculated from inert gas analysis revealed no ventilation-perfusion mismatching during dialysis. The shunt and perfusion to regions of low alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (VA/Q) were unchanged during dialysis. There was no change in the mean or standard deviation of the profile of the percentage of total perfusion to regions of the lung that had VA/Q near 1.0; nor was there any increase in the directly calculated arterial-alveolar partial pressure differences for the inert gases during dialysis. Dead space became mildly elevated during dialysis. These results show that during dialysis with controlled ventilation there is no ventilation-perfusion mismatching that leads to hypoxemia. During spontaneous ventilation any hypoxemia must occur due to hypoventilation secondary to the CO2 exchange by the dialyzer and subsequent reduction in pulmonary CO2 exchange. PMID:6715542

  9. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  10. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  11. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  12. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  13. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  14. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    PubMed

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue.

  15. Fog inerting effects on hydrogen combustion in a PWR ice condenser contaminant

    SciTech Connect

    Luangdilok, W.; Bennett, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A mechanistic fog inerting model has been developed to account for the effects of fog on the upward lean flammability limits of a combustible mixture based on the thermal theory of flame propagation. Benchmarking of this model with test data shows reasonably good agreement between the theory and the experiment. Applications of the model and available fog data to determine the upward lean flammability limits of the H{sub 2}-air-steam mixture in the ice condenser upper plenum region of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice condenser contaminant during postulated large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions indicate that combustion may be suppressed beyond the downward flammability limit (8 percent H{sub 2} by volume). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  17. Development of a large inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, G.

    1982-01-01

    A 30 cm inert gas electrostatic ion thruster has been developed, exhibiting excellent performance. In the development, the effective anode area was reduced by altering the magnetic field geometry to improve plasma containment, consistent with operational stability. The propellant introduction scheme has the effect of 'folding' the discharge chamber without the increased wall loss penalty associated with a longer chamber. These features contribute to a low discharge cost (eV/ion) versus mass utilization characteristic which remains relatively flat even to high mass utilizations.

  18. Closed-Loop System Removes Contaminants From Inert Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of oxygen in this closed-loop system kept low by use of heated catalytic sorbent bed in cartridge. Proposed to keep concentration of water vapor low by use of predried zeolite sorbent bed in another cartridge, and to remove particles smaller than 0.1 micrometer by use of porous metal filters. In specific application, chamber is one in which semiconducting materials processed. By virtue of closed-loop operation, limited supply of inert gas adequate to provide atmosphere for industrial processing of semiconductors.

  19. Inert gas sparge leads to alternate reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M K; Carstensen, J T

    2000-06-01

    The effect of sparging with an inert gas (argon) was evaluated during the investigation of the solution kinetics of an oxidation-prone amphiphilic drug containing a sulphide moiety. Samples stored with an air headspace in pH7 and 8 phosphate buffers at elevated temperatures and in the absence of light degraded to two main products, a sulphoxide and a cinnamic acid analogue. Initially, this appeared to be a sequential mechanism which could be blocked by removing oxygen. Instead, argon-sparge forced the direct degradation to the cinnamate, which was evidenced by the formation of a strong odour of sulphide. In addition, argon-sparged samples remained colourless, while those sparged with oxygen or stored with an air headspace turned yellow and had negligible odour. The half-lives for samples stored in pH 8 buffers at 93 degrees C at an initial drug concentration of 25 mg mL(-1) were 128 days (argon sparged), 86 days (air headspace), and 65 days (oxygen sparged). The results indicated that for the drug under study, sparging with an inert gas affected the mechanism as well as the rate of the reaction at elevated temperatures.

  20. A high-temperature inert gas fusion apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mosen, A W; Kelley, R E; Mitchell, H P

    1966-03-01

    A high-temperature inert gas fusion apparatus capable of operating at crucible temperatures as high as 3,100 degrees is described. While this apparatus has been used primarily for the determination of oxygen in pyrolytic carbon-coated uranium carbide particles, its usefulness is not limited to this type of material. It can be generally applied to the determination of oxygen and nitrogen in metals, alloys and other materials amenable to analysis by vacuum-fusion techniques. Analytical results obtained on steel and uranium carbide samples are presented. The apparatus, in its present form, has been in daily use for nearly 2 years. Down time during this period has been negligible. A total of 20 samples can be run in duplicate in an 8-hr shift.

  1. Development of advanced inert-gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Inert gas ion thruster technology offers the greatest potential for providing high specific impulse, low thrust, electric propulsion on large, Earth orbital spacecraft. The development of a thruster module that can be operated on xenon or argon propellant to produce 0.2 N of thrust at a specific impulse of 3000 sec with xenon propellant and at 6000 sec with argon propellant is described. The 30 cm diameter, laboratory model thruster is considered to be scalable to produce 0.5 N thrust. A high efficiency ring cusp discharge chamber was used to achieve an overall thruster efficiency of 77% with xenon propellant and 66% with argon propellant. Measurements were performed to identify ion production and loss processes and to define critical design criteria (at least on a preliminary basis).

  2. Recent neurochemical basis of inert gas narcosis and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Balon, N

    2006-01-01

    Compressed air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture produces from 0.3 MPa nitrogen narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurs when the volume of a hydrophobic site is caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect on general anaesthesia has for a long time supported the lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories are in increasing consideration since results have been interpreted as evidence for a direct anaesthetic-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases act by binding processes on proteins of neurotransmitter receptors. Compression with breathing mixtures where nitrogen is replaced by helium which has a low narcotic potency induces from 1 MPa, the high pressure nervous syndrome which is related to neurochemical disturbances including changes of the amino-acid and monoamine neurotransmissions. The use of narcotic gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) added to a helium-oxygen mixture, reduced some symptoms of the HPNS but also had some effects due to an additional effect of the narcotic potency of the gas. The researches performed at the level of basal ganglia of the rat brain and particularly the nigro-striatal pathway involved in the control of the motor, locomotor and cognitive functions, disrupted by narcosis or pressure, have indicated that GABAergic neurotransmission is implicated via GABAa receptors.

  3. Relating indices of inert gas washout to localised bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jennine H; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2012-09-30

    Asthma is typically characterised by increased ventilation heterogeneity. This can be directly inferred from the visualisation of ventilation defects in imaging studies, or indirectly inferred from indices derived from the multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW). The basis for the understanding of the MBNW indices and their implication for changes in structure and function at the largest and smallest scales in the lung has been facilitated by mathematical models for inert gas transport. A new model is presented that couples airway resistance and regional tissue compliance, for simulation of the effect of 'patchy' bronchoconstriction - as inferred from imaging studies - on the Scond index of ventilation heterogeneity. Patches of reduced washin gas concentration can emerge by constricting only the terminal bronchioles within localised regions, however this pattern of constriction is insufficient to affect Scond; Scond from this model is only sensitive to constriction that occurs within entire contiguous regions. Furthermore the model illustrates the possibility that the MBNW may not detect gas trapped in ventilation defects.

  4. Does the evoked response measure inert gas narcosis?

    PubMed

    Fowler, B; Ackles, K N

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the validity of change in the cortical evoked response as a measure of inert gas narcosis in humans. Three criteria are defined which must all be met if a nonbehavioral measure is to be accepted as an indicator of narcosis. The evoked response is assessed in terms of these criteria. Two classes of experiments which have used the evoked response in hyperbaric ocnditions are identified. The first class allows the evoked response to be assessed against more than one of these criteria. The outcome of every experiment in this class supports the view that the evoked response is not a valid measure of narcosis. The second class of experiment assumed that the evoked response is a measure of narcosis and were not designed to assess validity appropriately. Arguments by Kinney and associates in support of the assumption of validity are shown to be unsound. Possible explanations for inability to demonstrate validity are discussed and it is suggested that factors other than narcotic potency of the breathing gas mixture determine or at least play a major role in determining amplitude of the evoked response.

  5. Inert-gas welding and brazing enclosure fabricated from sheet plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Custom-fabricated plastic bag maintains an inert-gas atmosphere for welding and brazing certain metals. The bag fits over part of the workpieces and the welding and brazing tools. It is also used for metal brazing and fusion plating which require an inert-gas atmosphere.

  6. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-12-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  7. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan; Hou, Jie; Li, Xiang-Yan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-04-01

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4-1.1 eV, 0.7-1.0 eV, and 0.6-0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  8. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  9. A review of recent neurochemical data on inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Lavoute, C; Risso, J J; Vallée, N; Weiss, M

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen narcosis occurs in humans at around 0.4 MPa (4 ATA). Hydrogen narcosis occurs between 2.6 and 3.0 MPa. In rats, nitrogen disturbances occur from 1 MPa and a loss of righting reflex around 4 MPa. Neurochemical studies in striatum of rats with nitrogen at 3 MPa (75% of anesthesia threshold) with differential pulse voltammetry have demonstrated a decrease in dopamine (DA) release by neurons originated from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Such a decrease is found also with compressed argon, which is more narcotic than nitrogen and with the anesthetic gas nitrous oxide. Inversely, compressed helium with its very low narcotic potency induces DA increase. Microdialysis studies in the striatum have indicated that nitrogen also induces a decrease of glutamate concentration. Nitrogen pressure did not modify NMDA glutamate receptor activities in SNc or striatum but enhanced GABAA receptors activities in SNc. Repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis suppressed the DA decrease and induced an increase. This fact and the lack of improvement of motor disturbances did not support the hypothesis of a physiological adaptation. The desensitization of the GABAA receptors on DA cells during recurrent exposures and the parallel long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled to the increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity suggest a nitrogen neurotoxicity or addiction induced by recurrent exposures. The differential changes produced by inert gases indifferent neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory.

  10. Simplified power processing for inert gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Pinero, L. R.; Hamley, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Significant simplifications to power processors for inert gas ion thrusters in the 1 to 5 kW range have been identified. They include elimination of all but three power supplies - one each for the neutralizer, main discharge, and beam. The neutralizer and discharge power supplies would provide both cathode heating and plasma generating functions. This dual-use power supply concept was validated via integration tests with a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster. The beam/accelerator power supply would have positive and negative outputs to allow a single power supply to provide both functions. The discharge and beam power supplies would incorporate full-bridge inverters similar to those proven for flight-ready arcjet propulsion systems. Operation of this simplified power processing scheme at an inverter frequency of 50 kHz results in a projected power processor design with low mass and high efficiency. A 2 kW reference point design has estimated values of specific mass of 5.4 kg/kW and an efficiency of 93 percent.

  11. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected.

  12. Effect of inert gas switching at depth on decompression outcome in rats.

    PubMed

    Lillo, R S; MacCallum, M E

    1989-10-01

    The present investigation was performed to determine whether inert gas sequencing at depth would affect decompression outcome in rats via the phenomenon of counterdiffusion. Unanesthetized rats (Rattus norvegicus) were subjected to simulated dives in either air, 79% He-21% O2, or 79% Ar-21% O2; depths ranged from 125 to 175 feet of seawater (4.8-6.3 atmospheres absolute). After 1 h at depth, the dive chamber was vented (with depth held constant) over a 5-min period with the same gas as in the chamber (controls) or one of the other two inert gas-O2 mixtures. After the gas switch, a 5- to 35-min period was allowed for gas exchange between the animals and chamber atmosphere before rapid decompression to the surface. Substantial changes in the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) were observed after the gas switch because of differences in potencies (He less than N2 less than Ar) for causing DCS and gas exchange rates (He greater than Ar greater than N2) among the three gases. Based on the predicted gas exchange rates, transient increases or decreases in total inert gas pressure would be expected to occur during these experimental conditions. Because of differences in gas potencies, DCS risk may not directly follow the changes in total inert gas pressure. In fact, a decline in predicted DCS risk may occur even as total inert gas pressure in increasing.

  13. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  14. Oxidation Processes in Blowing Steel With Inert Gas into the Ladle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Trifonov, V. A.; Valueva, A. V.; Serikbol, A.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the possible development of oxidative processes in a metal when treating the melt in the ladle under intensive stirring with an inert gas. The industrial data have been received, confirming the possibility of reducing the concentration of silicon and aluminum in the metal, as well as changing the slag chemical composition with the bath blowing with the inert gas through the top submerged lance.

  15. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  16. Operation of the J-series thruster using inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1982-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters using inert gases are candidates for large space systems. The J-Series 30 cm diameter thruster, designed for operation up to 3 k-W with mercury, is at a state of technology readiness. The characteristics of operation with xenon, krypton, and argon propellants in a J-Series thruster with that obtained with mercury are compared. The performance of the discharge chamber, ion optics, and neutralizer and the overall efficiency as functions of input power and specific impulse and thruster lifetime were evaluated. As expected, the discharge chamber performance with inert gases decreased with decreasing atomic mass. Aspects of the J-Series thruster design which would require modification to provide operation at high power with insert gases were identified.

  17. Correlation of inert gas hollow cathode performance. [for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehn, L.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    A use of the inert gases argon and xenon as possible alternatives to mercury and cesium is being considered for electrical propulsion applications. Operation up to 200 hours has been demonstrated for hollow cathodes employing argon as propellant. A description is presented of an investigation which has been conducted to obtain basic information for an improvement of hollow cathode performance with inert gases. Neutralizer tests were conducted in a 1.2-m diameter vacuum tank, with a 15-cm multipole thruster. Progress was achieved towards the goal of a generalized description of hollow cathode performance. Extrapolation of the erosion based upon a 200-hour endurance test predicts an ultimate lifetime of 1400 to 10,000 hours.

  18. The size-dependent morphology of Pd nanoclusters formed by gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearmain, D.; Park, S. J.; Abdela, A.; Palmer, R. E.; Li, Z. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Size-selected Pd nanoclusters in the size range from 887 to 10 000 atoms were synthesized in a magnetron sputtering, inert gas condensation cluster beam source equipped with a time of flight mass filter. Their morphologies were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and shown to be strongly size-dependent. The larger clusters exhibited elongated structures, which we attribute to the aggregation, through multiple collisions, of smaller clusters during the gas phase condensation process. This was confirmed from the atomically resolved STEM images of the Pd nanoclusters, which showed smaller primary clusters with their own crystalline structures.

  19. The size-dependent morphology of Pd nanoclusters formed by gas condensation

    PubMed Central

    Pearmain, D.; Park, S. J.; Abdela, A.; Palmer, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Size-selected Pd nanoclusters in the size range from 887 to 10 000 atoms were synthesized in a magnetron sputtering, inert gas condensation cluster beam source equipped with a time of flight mass filter. Their morphologies were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and shown to be strongly size-dependent. The larger clusters exhibited elongated structures, which we attribute to the aggregation, through multiple collisions, of smaller clusters during the gas phase condensation process. This was confirmed from the atomically resolved STEM images of the Pd nanoclusters, which showed smaller primary clusters with their own crystalline structures. PMID:26549633

  20. Effect of intrapulmonary hematocrit maldistribution on O2, CO2, and inert gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Young, I H; Wagner, P D

    1979-02-01

    The potential effect of intrapulmonary variations in hematocrit on gas exchange has been studied in theoretical models of the lung containing maldistribution of both hematocrit (Hct) and ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratio. Hematocrit inequality enhanced gas exchange when units of low VA/Q were given a low Hct, arterial PO2 rising by as much as 14 Torr and PCO2 falling by up to 2 Torr depending on the particular distributions of Hct and VA/Q, whereas gas exchange was depressed when units of low VA/Q had a high Hct. After measuring inert gas solubilities in both dog and human blood of different Hct, the effect of Hct inequality on inert gas exchange was similarly assessed. Solubility was found to increase with HCT for less soluble gases. Because of this, conditions for enhancement of inert and O2 exchange by HCt inequality coincided, and it was found that in general the effects on O2 and inert gas transfer were quantitatively internally consistent. Even when Hct inequality was extreme, the resulting perturbation of inert gas concentrations was sufficiently small that the main features of the recovered VA/Q distributions were unaltered.

  1. Gas transport during in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing of inert gas therapies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ira; Palgen, Marc; Murdock, Jacqueline; Martin, Andrew R.; Farjot, Géraldine; Caillibotte, Georges

    2016-01-01

    New gas therapies using inert gases such as xenon and argon are being studied, which require in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments. Examples of the kinetics of gas transport during such experiments are analyzed in this paper. Using analytical and numerical models, we analyze an in vitro experiment for gas transport to a 96 cell well plate and an in vivo delivery to a small animal chamber, where the key processes considered are the wash-in of test gas into an apparatus dead volume, the diffusion of test gas through the liquid media in a well of a cell test plate, and the pharmacokinetics in a rat. In the case of small animals in a chamber, the key variable controlling the kinetics is the chamber wash-in time constant that is a function of the chamber volume and the gas flow rate. For cells covered by a liquid media the diffusion of gas through the liquid media is the dominant mechanism, such that liquid depth and the gas diffusion constant are the key parameters. The key message from these analyses is that the transport of gas during preclinical experiments can be important in determining the true dose as experienced at the site of action in an animal or to a cell. PMID:27826419

  2. Gas transport during in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing of inert gas therapies.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ira; Palgen, Marc; Murdock, Jacqueline; Martin, Andrew R; Farjot, Géraldine; Caillibotte, Georges

    2016-03-01

    New gas therapies using inert gases such as xenon and argon are being studied, which require in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments. Examples of the kinetics of gas transport during such experiments are analyzed in this paper. Using analytical and numerical models, we analyze an in vitro experiment for gas transport to a 96 cell well plate and an in vivo delivery to a small animal chamber, where the key processes considered are the wash-in of test gas into an apparatus dead volume, the diffusion of test gas through the liquid media in a well of a cell test plate, and the pharmacokinetics in a rat. In the case of small animals in a chamber, the key variable controlling the kinetics is the chamber wash-in time constant that is a function of the chamber volume and the gas flow rate. For cells covered by a liquid media the diffusion of gas through the liquid media is the dominant mechanism, such that liquid depth and the gas diffusion constant are the key parameters. The key message from these analyses is that the transport of gas during preclinical experiments can be important in determining the true dose as experienced at the site of action in an animal or to a cell.

  3. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  4. Carbothermic Reduction of Chromite Ore Under Different Flow Rates of Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dolly; Ranganathan, S.; Sinha, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    The reduction of chromite ore with carbon has been studied extensively in many laboratories. Inert gases have been used in these investigations to control the experimental conditions. However, little information is available in the literature on the influence of the gas flow rate on the rate of reduction. Experiments were carried out to study the influence of the flow rate of inert gas on the reducibility of chromite ore. The experiments showed that the rate of reduction increased with the increasing flow rate of argon up to an optimum flow rate. At higher flow rates, the rate of reduction decreased. The influence of the proportion of reductant on the extent of reduction depended on the rate of flow rate of inert gas. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a model that postulates that the mechanism of reduction changes with the flow rate of argon.

  5. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1998-04-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  6. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  7. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  8. Vacuum rated flow controllers for inert gas ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, L. C.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical propulsion systems which use a gas as a propellant require a gas flowmeter/controller which is capable of operating in a vacuum environment. The presently available instruments in the required flow ranges are designed and calibrated for use at ambient pressure. These instruments operate by heating a small diameter tube through which the gas is flowing and then sensing the change in temperature along the length of the tube. This temperature change is a function of the flow rate and the gas heat capacity. When installed in a vacuum, the change in the external thermal characteristics cause the tube to overheat and the temperature sensors are then operating outside their calibrated range. In addition, the variation in heat capacity with temperature limit the accuracy obtainable. These problems and the work in progress to solve them are discussed.

  9. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  10. Highly sensitive solids mass spectrometer uses inert-gas ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Mass spectrometer provides a recorded analysis of solid material surfaces and bulk. A beam of high-energy inert-gas ions bombards the surface atoms of a sample and converts a percentage into an ionized vapor. The mass spectrum analyzer separates the vapor ionic constituents by mass-to-charge ratio.

  11. Inert gas clearance from tissue by co-currently and counter-currently arranged microvessels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Michel, C C; Wang, W

    2012-08-01

    To elucidate the clearance of dissolved inert gas from tissues, we have developed numerical models of gas transport in a cylindrical block of tissue supplied by one or two capillaries. With two capillaries, attention is given to the effects of co-current and counter-current flow on tissue gas clearance. Clearance by counter-current flow is compared with clearance by a single capillary or by two co-currently arranged capillaries. Effects of the blood velocity, solubility, and diffusivity of the gas in the tissue are investigated using parameters with physiological values. It is found that under the conditions investigated, almost identical clearances are achieved by a single capillary as by a co-current pair when the total flow per tissue volume in each unit is the same (i.e., flow velocity in the single capillary is twice that in each co-current vessel). For both co-current and counter-current arrangements, approximate linear relations exist between the tissue gas clearance rate and tissue blood perfusion rate. However, the counter-current arrangement of capillaries results in less-efficient clearance of the inert gas from tissues. Furthermore, this difference in efficiency increases at higher blood flow rates. At a given blood flow, the simple conduction-capacitance model, which has been used to estimate tissue blood perfusion rate from inert gas clearance, underestimates gas clearance rates predicted by the numerical models for single vessel or for two vessels with co-current flow. This difference is accounted for in discussion, which also considers the choice of parameters and possible effects of microvascular architecture on the interpretation of tissue inert gas clearance.

  12. Modeling the Phase Composition of Gas Condensate in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudin, S. M.; Zemenkov, Yu D.; Shabarov, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Gas condensate fields demonstrate a number of thermodynamic characteristics to be considered when they are developed, as well as when gas condensate is transported and processed. A complicated phase behavior of the gas condensate system, as well as the dependence of the extracted raw materials on the phase state of the deposit other conditions being equal, is a key aspect. Therefore, when designing gas condensate lines the crucial task is to select the most appropriate methods of calculating thermophysical properties and phase equilibrium of the transported gas condensate. The paper describes a physical-mathematical model of a gas-liquid flow in the gas condensate line. It was developed based on balance equations of conservation of mass, impulse and energy of the transported medium within the framework of a quasi-1D approach. Constitutive relationships are given separately, and practical recommendations on how to apply the research results are provided as well.

  13. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  14. The two faces of Eve: gaseous anaesthesia and inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cameron R; Spiess, Bruce D

    2010-06-01

    Gaseous anaesthesia has been a great boon for medicine. These drugs form a foundation from which modern surgery has sprung, yet their mechanism(s) of actions remains poorly understood. Inert gas narcosis is a limitation of deep sea diving, and its mechanisms also remain poorly understood. In this review article we summarise what is known about the mechanisms of both gaseous anaesthesia and inert gas narcosis, including both lipid-based biophysical models and protein-based biochemical models, as well as explore some striking similarities between the two. These two phenomena may, in reality, be gradations of the same underlying mechanism. Recent findings include biochemical evidence suggesting that both gaseous anaesthesia and inert gas narcosis may be mediated by the occupation of minute spaces within the structure of many biologically important proteins, impairing their ability to undergo conformational changes and biological actions. This is exemplified by exploring the effects of the noble gas xenon, which can behave as either a narcotic gas or gaseous anaesthetic, depending on the partial pressure in which it is present.

  15. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  16. Spark gap switch system with condensable dielectric gas

    DOEpatents

    Thayer, III, William J.

    1991-01-01

    A spark gap switch system is disclosed which is capable of operating at a high pulse rate comprising an insulated switch housing having a purging gas entrance port and a gas exit port, a pair of spaced apart electrodes each having one end thereof within the housing and defining a spark gap therebetween, an easily condensable and preferably low molecular weight insulating gas flowing through the switch housing from the housing, a heat exchanger/condenser for condensing the insulating gas after it exits from the housing, a pump for recirculating the condensed insulating gas as a liquid back to the housing, and a heater exchanger/evaporator to vaporize at least a portion of the condensed insulating gas back into a vapor prior to flowing the insulating gas back into the housing.

  17. Green spherules from Apollo 15 - Inferences about their origin from inert gas measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakatos, S.; Yaniv, A.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    Green spherules from the 'clod' 15426 and from fines 15421 contain about 100 times less trapped inert gases than normal bulk fines from Apollo 15. These spherules have apparently never been directly exposed to the solar wind. Spherules from other fines contain about 10 times more trapped gas than those from the 'clod.' The gas in the former is surface correlated. However, spherules from fines 15401 are exceptionally gas-poor. The trapped gases can be of solar-wind origin, but this origin requires a two-stage model for the spherules from the clods. Another possibility is that the gases were absorbed from an ambient gas phase. The trapped gases may also be assumed to represent primordial lunar gas. The composition of this gas is then similar to the 'solar' or 'unfractionated' component of gas-rich meteorites, but unlike that in most of the carbonaceous chondrites.

  18. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  19. Probing Toluene and Ethylbenzene Stable Glass Formation using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2015-09-01

    Inert gas permeation is used to investigate the formation of stable glasses of toluene and ethylbenzene. The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) on the kinetic stability of the vapor deposited glasses is determined using Kr desorption spectra from within sandwich layers of either toluene or ethylbenzene. The results for toluene show that the most stable glass is formed at Tdep = 0.92 Tg, although glasses with a kinetic stability within 50% of the most stable glass were found with deposition temperatures from 0.85 to 0.95 Tg. Similar results were found for ethylbenzene, which formed its most stable glass at 0.91 Tg and formed stable glasses from 0.81 to 0.96 Tg. These results are consistent with recent calorimetric studies and demonstrate that the inert gas permeation technique provides a direct method to observe the onset of molecular translation motion that accompanies the glass to supercooled liquid transition.

  20. Continuous crafting of uniform colloidal nanocrystals using an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailong; He, Yanjie; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; Zhang, Chuchu; Liu, Xiaobo; Lin, Zhiqun

    2015-06-07

    Recent research has witnessed rapid advances in synthesis of nanocrystals, which has led to the development of a large variety of approaches for producing nanocrystals with controlled dimensions. However, most of these techniques lack the high-throughput production. Herein, we report on a viable and robust strategy based on an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor for continuous crafting of high-quality colloidal nanocrystals. With the judicious introduction of the inert-gas driven capability, the microflow reactor provides an attractive platform for continuous production of colloidal nanocrystals in large quantities, including easily-oxidized nanocrystals. The as-synthesized nanocrystals possessed a uniform size and shape. Intriguingly, the size of nanocrystals can be effectively tailored by varying the flow rate and the precursor concentration. We envision that the microflow reactor strategy is general and offers easy access to a wide range of scalable nanocrystals for potential applications in sensors, optics, optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, batteries, photocatalysis, and electronic devices.

  1. Determination of oxygen content in magnesium and its alloys by inert gas fusion-infrared absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Akira; Achiwa, Hatsumi; Morikawa, Hisashi; Uemoto, Michihisa; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    A method for the determination of the oxygen content in magnesium and magnesium alloys has been developed. Inert gas fusion-infrared absorptiometry was modified by introducing a multistep heating process; a sample containing oxygen is fused with tin to form an eutectic mixture at 900°C in a graphite crucible, followed by a subsequent gradual temperature increase of up to 2000°C, which enables the evaporation of magnesium from the mixture, and subsequent solidification at the rim of the crucible. Residual tin including magnesium oxide remained at the bottom of the crucible. The oxygen in the tin is measured by a conventional inert gas fusion (IGF) method. From a comparison with the results of charged particle activation analysis, the IGF method is considered to be an attractive candidate for measuring the oxygen content in Mg and its alloys.

  2. Annealing-induced property improvements in 2-14-1 powders produced by inert gas atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.H.; Sellers, C.H.; Panchanathan, V.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of vacuum annealing on the phase constitution and magnetic properties of various size fractions of 3 alloy compositions produced by Inert-gas atomization (IGA) are examined. Annealing results in the oxidation of properitectic {alpha}-Fe formed during cooling of the melt, producing considerable improvement in the hard magnetic properties of the powders largely via the removal of lower-anisotropy magnetic reversal regions.

  3. Commandant’s International Technical Series. Volume 7. Regulations and Guidelines for Inert Gas Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    come into force on 25 May 1Q80, NOTING ALSO that the Maritime Safety Committee at its forty-first session approved a revised text of Regulation 62 for...related to individual scrubber designs and materials. MSC/Circ. 282 Page 25 .2 The water level in the scrubber shall be monitored by a high water...19 Inert Gas Distribution System 19 Chapter 6 - BLOWERS 21 Blower Service 21 Blower Type 22 Blower Component Requirements 22 Chapter 7 - VALVES 25

  4. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  5. A device for vacuum drying, inert gas backfilling and solder sealing of hermetic implant packages.

    PubMed

    Schuettler, Martin; Huegle, Matthias; Ordonez, Juan S; Wilde, Juergen; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Modern implanted devices utilize microelectronics that have to be protected from the body fluids in order to maintain their functionality over decades. Moisture protection of implants is addressed by enclosing the electronic circuits into gas-tight packages. In this paper we describe a device that allows custom-built hermetic implant packages to be vacuum-dried (removing residual moisture from inside the package), backfilled with an inert gas at adjustable pressure and hermetically sealed employing a solder seal. A typical operation procedure of the device is presented.

  6. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results.

  7. TIG WELDER LOCATED IN THE CLEAN ROOM OF THE TECHNICAL SERVICES BUILDING TSB - THE INERT GAS WELDING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    TIG WELDER LOCATED IN THE CLEAN ROOM OF THE TECHNICAL SERVICES BUILDING TSB - THE INERT GAS WELDING FACILITY IS USED FOR WELDING REFRACTORY METALS IN CONNECTION WITH THE COLUMBIUM LIQUID SODIUM LOOP PROJECT

  8. Inert gas washout: theoretical background and clinical utility in respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul D; Goldman, Michael D; Gustafsson, Per M

    2009-01-01

    Inert gas washout was first described more than 60 years ago and 2 principal tests have been developed from it: the single breath and multiple breath washout (MBW) techniques. The invention of fast responding gas analysers almost 60 years ago and small computers 30 years later have facilitated breath-by-breath analysis and the development of sophisticated analysis techniques. It is now possible to detect not only the degree of pulmonary ventilation inhomogeneity, but also to gain important insight into the location of the underlying disease process. While single breath washout requires a full vital capacity effort, tidal breathing during the multiple breath test requires minimal co-operation and co-ordination, and is feasible in subjects of all ages. Available MBW normative data from parameters, such as the lung clearance index, appears to vary minimally with age, making MBW particularly useful to follow children longitudinally. Multiple breath inert gas washout has demonstrated improved sensitivity, in comparison to spirometry, in the early detection of a number of important disease processes, including cystic fibrosis. Despite this, these important techniques remain under-utilised in the clinical setting and there is a lack of commercially available devices currently available. The recent resurgence of research in this area has produced a large number of important studies and a pronounced international interest has developed in these techniques. This review article will provide an overview of the theoretical background of inert gas washout and analysis indices, review important physiological and clinical insights gained from research to date (as well as from our own experience) to illustrate its utility, and outline the challenges that lie ahead in incorporating these techniques into the mainstream clinical setting.

  9. Noninvasive cardiac output determination for children by the inert gas-rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Gesa; Kerst, Gunter; Baden, Winfried; Hofbeck, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Standard methods for determination of cardiac output (CO) are either invasive or technically demanding. Measurement of CO by the inert gas-rebreathing (IGR) method, applied successfully in adults, uses a low-concentration mixture of an inert and a blood-soluble gas, respectively. This study tested the feasibility of this method for determining CO during exercise for pediatric patients with complete congenital atrioventricular block (CCAVB) stimulated with a VVI pacemaker. In this study, 5 CCAVB patients (age 9.2-17.4 years) were compared with 10 healthy age-matched boys and girls. Testing was performed with the Innocor system. The patients were instructed to breathe the test gas from a closed system. Pulmonary blood flow was calculated according to the washout of the soluble gas component. During standardized treadmill testing, CO was determined at three defined levels. The CO measurements were successful for all the study participants. The patients reached a lower peak CO than the control subjects (5.9 l/min/m(2) vs 7.3 [boys] and 7.2 [girls]). The stroke volume increase under exercise also was reduced in the patients compared with the control subjects. The feasibility of the IGR method for exercise CO testing in children was documented. Application of the IGR method for children requires careful instruction of the patients and appears restricted to subjects older than 8 years. The method offers new insights into mechanisms of cardiovascular adaptation in children with congenital heart disease.

  10. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of transition properties in highly charged inert-gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out an extensive investigation of various spectroscopic properties of highly charged inert-gas ions using a relativistic coupled-cluster method through a one-electron detachment procedure. In particular, we have calculated the atomic states 2 s22 p53/2 2P, 2 s22 p51/2 2P, and 2 s 2 p61/2 2S in F-like inert-gas ions; 3 s23 p53/2 2P, 3 s23 p51/2 2P, and 3 s 3 p61/2 2S states in Cl-like Kr, Xe, and Rn; and 4 s24 p53/2 2P, 4 s24 p51/2 2P, and 4 s 4 p61/2 2S states in Br-like Xe and Rn. Starting from a single-reference Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function, we construct our exact atomic states by including the dynamic correlation effects in an all-order perturbative fashion. Employing this method, we estimate the ionization potential energies of three low-lying orbitals present in their respective closed-shell configurations. Since the considered highly charged inert-gas ions exhibit huge relativistic effects, we have taken into account the corrections due to Breit interaction as well as from the dominant quantum electrodynamic correction such as vacuum polarization and self-energy effects in these systems. Using our calculated relativistic atomic wave functions and energies, we accurately determine various transition properties such as wavelengths, line strengths, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and lifetimes of the excited states.

  11. Polishing of Optical Media by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Inert Gas Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, C.; Weihs, T.; Luca, A.; Wieneke, S.; Viöl, W.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, surface smoothing of optical glasses, glass ceramic and sapphire using a low-power dielectric barrier discharge inert gas plasma at atmospheric pressure is presented. For this low temperature treatment method, no vacuum devices or chemicals are required. It is shown that by such plasma treatment the micro roughness and waviness of the investigated polished surfaces were significantly decreased, resulting in a decrease in surface scattering. Further, plasma polishing of lapped fused silica is introduced. Based on simulation results, a plasma physical process is suggested to be the underlying mechanism for initialising the observed smoothing effect.

  12. Trapping of He clusters by inert-gas impurities in tungsten: First-principles predictions and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Manh, Duc; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-06-01

    Properties of point defects resulting from the incorporation of inert-gas atoms in bcc tungsten are investigated systematically using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The most stable configuration for the interstitial neon, argon, krypton and xenon atoms is the tetrahedral site, similarly to what was found earlier for helium in W. The calculated formation energies for single inert-gas atoms at interstitial sites as well as at substitutional sites are much larger for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe than for He. While the variation of the energy of insertion of inert-gas defects into interstitial configurations can be explained by a strong effect of their large atomic size, the trend exhibited by their substitutional energies is more likely related to the covalent interaction between the noble gas impurity atoms and the tungsten atoms. There is a remarkable variation exhibited by the energy of interaction between inert-gas impurities and vacancies, where a pronounced size effect is observed when going from He to Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe. The origin of this trend is explained by electronic structure calculations showing that p-orbitals play an important part in the formation of chemical bonds between a vacancy and an atom of any of the four inert-gas elements in comparison with helium, where the latter contains only 1s2 electrons in the outer shell. The binding energies of a helium atom trapped by five different defects (He-v, Ne-v, Ar-v, Kr-v, Xe-v, where v denotes a vacancy in bcc-W) are all in excellent agreement with experimental data derived from thermal desorption spectroscopy. Attachment of He clusters to inert gas impurity atom traps in tungsten is analysed as a function of the number of successive trapping helium atoms. Variation of the Young modulus due to inert-gas impurities is analysed on the basis of data derived from DFT calculations.

  13. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tastandieva, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of "cooling down" liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  14. Quantitative analysis of trace bulk oxygen in silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion method.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masahiko; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a method for removing oxide film from the surface of silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion impulse furnace and precise determination of bulk oxygen within the wafer. A silicon wafer was cut to about 0.35 g (6 x 13 x 2 mm) and dropped into a graphite crucible. The sample was then heated for 40 s at 1300 degrees C. The wafer's oxide film was reduced by carbon and removed as carbon monoxide. The treated silicon sample was taken out of the graphite crucible and maintained again with the holder of the oxygen analyzer. The graphite crucible was then heated to 2100 degrees C. The treated silicon sample was dropped into the heated graphite crucible and the trace bulk oxygen in the wafer was measured using the inert gas fusion infrared absorption method. The relative standard deviations of the oxygen in silicon wafer samples with the removed surface oxide film were determined to be 0.8% for 9.8 x 10(17) atoms/cm3, and 2.7% for 13.0 x 10(17) atoms/cm3.

  15. Probing Toluene and Ethylbenzene Stable Glass Formation Using Inert Gas Permeation.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; May, R Alan; Kay, Bruce D

    2015-09-17

    Inert gas permeation is used to investigate the formation of stable glasses of toluene and ethylbenzene. The effect of deposition temperature (T(dep)) on the kinetic stability of the vapor deposited glasses is determined using Kr desorption spectra from within sandwich layers of either toluene or ethylbenzene. The results for toluene show that the most stable glass is formed at T(dep) = 0.92 T(g), although glasses with a kinetic stability within 50% of the most stable glass were found with deposition temperatures from 0.85 to 0.95 T(g). Similar results were found for ethylbenzene, which formed its most stable glass at 0.91 T(g) and formed stable glasses from 0.81 to 0.96 T(g). These results are consistent with recent calorimetric studies and demonstrate that the inert gas permeation technique provides a direct method to observe the onset of molecular translation motion that accompanies the glass to supercooled liquid transition.

  16. Stepwise Internal Energy Control for Protonated Methanol Clusters by Using the Inert Gas Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    Preferred isomer structures of hydrogen-bonded clusters should depend on their temperature because of the entropy term in the free energy. To observe such temperature dependence, we propose a new approach to control the internal energy (vibrational temperature) of protonated clusters in the gas phase. We performed IR spectroscopy of protonated methanol clusters, H+ (CH{_3}OH) {_n}, n= 5 and 7, with the tagging by various inert gas species (Ar, CO{_2}, CO, CS{_2}, C{_2}H{_2}, and C{_6}H{_6}). We found that vibrational temperature of the tagged clusters raises with increase of the interaction energy with the tag species, and the observed cluster structures follow the theoretical prediction of the temperature dependence of the isomer population.

  17. Multiple inert gas elimination technique for determining ventilation/perfusion distributions in rat during normoxia, hypoxia and hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, V; Roca-Acín, J; Palacios, L; Guitart, R

    2001-01-01

    1. The use of the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) in quantifying ventilation/perfusion distributions (V*A/Q*) in small animals, such as the rat, may cause results to be biased due to haemodilution produced by the large volume of liquid infused intravenously. 2. We tested two methods of administering inert gases in rats using the MIGET: (i) standard continuous intravenous administration of inert gases (method A); and (ii) a new method based on the physicochemical properties of each inert gas (method B). This method included acute simultaneous inert gas administration using three pathways: inhalation, intravenous infusion and rectal infusion. Both MIGET methods were applied to obtain data while breathing three different inspiratory fractions of oxygen (FIO2): normoxia, hypoxia and hyperoxia. 3. Inert gas levels obtained from blood or expired air samples were sufficient for chromatographic measurement, at least during a 2 h period. The V*A/Q* distributions reported using both methods were acceptable for all the physiological conditions studied; therefore, the alternative method used here may be useful in further MIGET studies in rats because haemodilution resulting from continuous intravenous infusion of less-soluble gases can be avoided. 4. Normoxic rats showed lower mean values of the V*A/Q* ratio of ventilation distribution and higher mean values of the V*A/Q* ratio of perfusion distribution with the usual method of inert gas administration (method A). These non-significant differences were observed under almost all physiological conditions studied and they could be caused by haemodilution. Nevertheless, the effect of interindividual differences cannot be discarded. An additional effect of the low haematocrit on cardiovascular changes due to low FIO2, such as pulmonary vasoconstriction or increased cardiac output, may explain the lower dispersion of perfusion distributions found in group A during hypoxia.

  18. Assessment of multiphoton absorption in inert gases for the measurement of gas temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Natalie J; Walewski, Joachim W; Sanders, Scott T

    2006-03-01

    A spatially resolved optical technique to measure gas temperature was assessed. The technique relies on multiphoton absorption in inert gases. In contrast to laser-induced fluorescence, absorption is insensitive to collisional deactivation, and, in contrast to one-photon absorption, multiphoton absorption only occurs around the focus point of a typical laser beam. Multiphoton absorption features both the merits of being insensitive to quenching and of being a spatially resolved technique. In a case study we assessed two-photon absorption in xenon upon exciting the 5p6 1S0-->5p56p[5/2]2 transition in xenon at a wavelength of 256 nm. The amount of light absorbed by xenon is related to the number density of the gas, and if the gas pressure is known then the gas temperature can be inferred from the number density. Two-photon absorbance was measured as a function of xenon number density and was used to validate a theoretical model of the absorption process. We discuss the circumnavigation of experimental challenges in applying this technique and analyze its precision in terms of the inferred gas temperature.

  19. Neurochemistry of Pressure-Induced Nitrogen and Metabolically Inert Gas Narcosis in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-06-13

    Gases that are not metabolized by the organism are thus chemically inactive under normal conditions. Such gases include the "noble gases" of the Periodic Table as well as hydrogen and nitrogen. At increasing pressure, nitrogen induces narcosis at 4 absolute atmospheres (ATAs) and more in humans and at 11 ATA and more in rats. Electrophysiological and neuropharmacological studies suggest that the striatum is a target of nitrogen narcosis. Glutamate and dopamine release from the striatum in rats are decreased by exposure to nitrogen at a pressure of 31 ATA (75% of the anesthetic threshold). Striatal dopamine levels decrease during exposure to compressed argon, an inert gas more narcotic than nitrogen, or to nitrous oxide, an anesthetic gas. Inversely, striatal dopamine levels increase during exposure to compressed helium, an inert gas with a very low narcotic potency. Exposure to nitrogen at high pressure does not change N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta and striatum but enhances gama amino butyric acidA (GABAA) receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta. The decrease in striatal dopamine levels in response to hyperbaric nitrogen exposure is suppressed by recurrent exposure to nitrogen narcosis, and dopamine levels increase after four or five exposures. This change, the lack of improvement of motor disturbances, the desensitization of GABAA receptors on dopamine cells during recurrent exposures and the long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled with the higher sensitivity of NMDA receptors, suggest a nitrogen toxicity induced by repetitive exposures to narcosis. These differential changes in different neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1579-1590, 2016.

  20. Measuring diffusivity in supercooled liquid nanoscale films using inert gas permeation. I. Kinetic model and scaling methods.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D

    2010-11-07

    We describe in detail a diffusion model used to simulate inert gas transport through supercooled liquid overlayers. In recent work, the transport of the inert gas has been shown to be an effective probe of the diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol in the experimentally challenging regime near the glass transition temperature. The model simulations accurately and quantitatively describe the inert gas permeation desorption spectra. The simulation results are used to validate universal scaling relationships between the diffusivity, overlayer thickness, and the temperature ramp rate for isothermal and temperature programmed desorption. From these scaling relationships we derive simple equations from which the diffusivity can be obtained using the peak desorption time or temperature for an isothermal or set of TPD experiments, respectively, without numerical simulation. The results presented here demonstrate that the permeation of gases through amorphous overlayers has the potential to be a powerful technique to obtain diffusivity data in deeply supercooled liquids.

  1. Comparison of inert-gas-fusion and modified Kjeldahl techniques for determination of nitrogen in niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Graab, J. W.; Davis, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    This report compares results obtained for the determination of nitrogen in a selected group of niobium-base alloys by the inert-gas-fusion and the Kjeldahl procedures. In the inert-gas-fusion procedure the sample is heated to approximately 2700 C in a helium atmosphere in a single-use graphite crucible. A platinum flux is used to facilitate melting of the sample. The Kjeldahl method consisted of a rapid decomposition with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid, phosphoric acid, and potassium chromate; distillation in the presence of sodium hydroxide; and highly sensitive spectrophotometry with nitroprusside-catalyzed indophenol. In the 30- to 80-ppm range, the relative standard deviation was 5 to 7 percent for the inert-gas-fusion procedure and 2 to 8 percent for the Kjeldahl procedure. The agreement of the nitrogen results obtained by the two techniques is considered satisfactory.

  2. Modeling of reflection of detonation and shock waves from a rigid wall in mixtures of a reactive gas and chemically inert particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Fomin, P. A.; Tropin, D. A.; Chen, J.-R.

    2012-05-01

    An algorithm of approximate calculation of the reflection of detonation waves in mixtures of a reactive gas and chemically inert microparticles has been proposed. Consideration has been given to the case where the gas behind the wave front is in chemical equilibrium (D → D reflection). It has been shown that the presence of the condensed phase can substantially decrease the parameters of the reflected wave (its velocity, pressure, and temperature). Within the framework of a one-dimensional nonstationary approach and with allowance for the detailed kinetics of chemical reactions, the evolution of the shock wave in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture with sand particles in its reflection from a rigid wall has been calculated. The limiting particle concentration below which the reflected wave is of the detonation type and above which it is of the shock type has been found.

  3. Gap states in pentacene thin film induced by inert gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Kahn, Antoine; Ueno, Nobuo

    2013-06-28

    We studied gas-exposure effects on pentacene (Pn) films on SiO2 and Au(111) substrates by ultrahigh sensitivity photoelectron spectroscopy, which can detect the density of states of ∼10(16) states eV-1 cm-3 comparable to electrical measurements. The results show the striking effects for Pn/SiO2: exposure to inert gas (N2 and Ar) produces a sharp rise in gap states from ∼10(16) to ∼10(18) states eV-1 cm-3 and pushes the Fermi level closer to the valence band (0.15-0.17 eV), as does exposure to O2 (0.20 eV), while no such gas-exposure effect is observed for Pn/Au(111). The results demonstrate that these gap states originate from small imperfections in the Pn packing structure, which are induced by gas penetration into the film through the crystal grain boundaries.

  4. Stepwise Internal Energy Change of Protonated Methanol Clusters By Using the Inert Gas Tagging.

    PubMed

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-11-23

    Structural isomer population of a hydrogen-bonded cluster generally depends on temperature. Therefore, determination of an isomer population profile in a wide temperature range is important to understand the nature of hydrogen bond networks of the cluster. To explore an isomer population profile, stepwise changes of internal vibrational energy of a protonated hydrogen-bonded cluster are performed by inert gas tagging. We observe infrared spectra of the protonated methanol pentamer with various tag species. The bare protonated methanol pentamer practically has only two possible isomer types. With the tagging, the relative population of the two isomer types changes according to the binding energy with the tag species. The observed relative population follows its theoretically predicted temperature dependence.

  5. Note: development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Das, S C; Majumdar, A; Shripathi, T; Hippler, R

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCN(x)) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup.

  6. Argon: systematic review on neuro- and organoprotective properties of an "inert" gas.

    PubMed

    Höllig, Anke; Schug, Anita; Fahlenkamp, Astrid V; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark

    2014-10-10

    Argon belongs to the group of noble gases, which are regarded as chemically inert. Astonishingly some of these gases exert biological properties and during the last decades more and more reports demonstrated neuroprotective and organoprotective effects. Recent studies predominately use in vivo or in vitro models for ischemic pathologies to investigate the effect of argon treatment. Promising data has been published concerning pathologies like cerebral ischemia, traumatic brain injury and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, models applied and administration of the therapeutic gas vary. Here we provide a systematic review to summarize the available data on argon's neuro- and organoprotective effects and discuss its possible mechanism of action. We aim to provide a summary to allow further studies with a more homogeneous setting to investigate possible clinical applications of argon.

  7. Note: Development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. C.; Majumdar, A.; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCNx) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup.

  8. 3D-Printing inside the Glovebox: A Versatile Tool for Inert-Gas Chemistry Combined with Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Felix; Kaldun, Christian; Namyslo, Jan C; Hübner, Eike G

    2016-04-01

    3D-Printing with the well-established 'Fused Deposition Modeling' technology was used to print totally gas-tight reaction vessels, combined with printed cuvettes, inside the inert-gas atmosphere of a glovebox. During pauses of the print, the reaction flasks out of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene were filled with various reactants. After the basic test reactions to proof the oxygen tightness and investigations of the influence of printing within an inert-gas atmosphere, scope and limitations of the method are presented by syntheses of new compounds with highly reactive reagents, such as trimethylaluminium, and reaction monitoring via UV/VIS, IR, and NMR spectroscopy. The applicable temperature range, the choice of solvents, the reaction times, and the analytical methods have been investigated in detail. A set of reaction flasks is presented, which allow routine inert-gas syntheses and combined spectroscopy without modifications of the glovebox, the 3D-printer, or the spectrometers. Overall, this demonstrates the potential of 3D-printed reaction cuvettes to become a complementary standard method in inert-gas chemistry.

  9. Controlling the Neutron Yield from a Small Dense Plasma Focus using Deuterium-Inert Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bures, B. L.; Krishnan, M.; Eshaq, Y.

    2009-01-21

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a well known source of neutrons when operating with deuterium. The DPF is demonstrated to scale from 10{sup 4} n/pulse at 40 kA to >10{sup 12} n/pulse at 2 MA by non-linear current scaling as described in [1], which is itself based on the simple yet elegant model developed by Lee [2]. In addition to the peak current, the gas pressure controls the neutron yield. Recent published results suggest that mixing 1-5% mass fractions of Krypton increase the neutron yield per pulse by more than 10x. In this paper we present results obtained by mixing deuterium with Helium, Neon and Argon in a 500 J dense plasma focus operating at 140 kA with a 600 ns rise time. The mass density was held constant in these experiments at the optimum (pure) deuterium mass density for producing neutrons. A typical neutron yield for a pure deuterium gas charge is 2x10{sup 6}{+-}15% n/pulse. Neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 7}{+-}10% n/pulse were observed with low mass fractions of inert gas. Time integrated optical images of the pinch, soft x-ray measurements and optical emission spectroscopy where used to examine the pinch in addition to the neutron yield monitor and the fast scintillation detector. Work supported by Domestic Nuclear Detection Office under contract HSHQDC-08-C-00020.

  10. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-09

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  11. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  12. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  13. Effects of inert gas narcosis on behavior--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Fowler, B; Ackles, K N; Porlier, G

    1985-12-01

    The effects of inert gas narcosis on behavior before unconsciousness are reviewed with particular attention to four issues. The first is whether the qualitative behavioral effects of all inert gases are identical. Evidence is limited but does not contradict an affirmative answer. This is consistent with the unitary hypothesis of narcosis at the physicochemical level. The second issue concerns the relative merits of four approaches to narcosis; (a) the descriptive model, (b) the hierarchical organization hypothesis, (c) the operant paradigm, and (d) the slowed processing model. It is concluded that the latter two are showing some promise. In particular, operant techniques allow more sophisticated measures of narcosis in animals than behavioral end points, such as loss of the righting reflex. The slowed processing model claims that the majority of performance deficits in humans are caused by a single fundamental deficit, slowing of information processing due to decreased arousal. This slowing is usually accompanied by alterations in task strategy. These alterations, in combination with cumulative slowing in working memory, are said to account for the various manifestations of narcosis on complex tasks. The third issue concerns adaptation to narcosis. There is some evidence that adaptation can occur but it is unclear whether the cause is learning specific to narcosis or development of a physiological tolerance. However, adaptation has not always been found and the variables controlling its presence or absence have yet to be identified. The fourth issue concerns the modifying effects of various factors, such as carbon dioxide and anxiety, on narcosis. Methodological and conceptual problems hinder interpretation of the evidence in this area but, contrary to some current views, there appears to be no conclusive evidence that any factor other than ethanol potentiates narcosis. Some implications of these conclusions for diving operations are discussed.

  14. Determination of micro amounts of oxygen in silicon by inert-gas fusion.

    PubMed

    Huannan, H; Yuezhen, L; Guandi, Z; Ronghua, Y; Qingren, L; Mingwei, Q

    1983-10-01

    A chromatographic inert-gas fusion method using an Ni-Sn fusion bath and helium as carrier gas has been developed for determining micro amounts of oxygen in silicon. With the Ni-Sn bath, the oxygen determination can be done at lower temperatures (1650-1700 degrees ) in a heated graphite crucible than in an empty crucible (with no molten metal bath) in which the sample is directly in contact with the carbon. Four samples can be analysed in succession in a single crucible with a relatively short time for oxygen extraction (5 min). Careful control of experimental conditions, and the use of a water-cooled quartz tube and a small unshielded graphite crucible have resulted in a lower blank (0.1 mug of oxygen), and better reproducibility, enabling oxygen in silicon to be determined down to 1 ppm. A calibration curve for determining oxygen in single crystals of silicon by measuring the infrared absorption at 9 mum has been constructed and gives results agreeing with those obtained by alpha-particle activation analysis.

  15. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10 (exp -3) sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  16. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  17. Bénard instabilities in a binary-liquid layer evaporating into an inert gas.

    PubMed

    Machrafi, H; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2010-09-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed for a horizontal layer of a binary liquid of which solely the solute evaporates into an inert gas, the latter being assumed to be insoluble in the liquid. In particular, a water-ethanol system in contact with air is considered, with the evaporation of water being neglected (which can be justified for a certain humidity of the air). External constraints on the system are introduced by imposing fixed "ambient" mass fraction and temperature values at a certain effective distance above the free liquid-gas interface. The temperature is the same as at the bottom of the liquid layer, where, besides, a fixed mass fraction of the solute is presumed to be maintained. Proceeding from a (quasi-)stationary reference solution, neutral (monotonic) stability curves are calculated in terms of solutal/thermal Marangoni/Rayleigh numbers as functions of the wavenumber for different values of the ratio of the gas and liquid layer thicknesses. The results are also presented in terms of the critical values of the liquid layer thickness as a function of the thickness of the gas layer. The solutal and thermal Rayleigh and Marangoni effects are compared to one another. For a water-ethanol mixture of 10wt.% ethanol, it appears that the solutal Marangoni effect is by far the most important instability mechanism. Furthermore, its global action can be described within a Pearson-like model, with an appropriately defined Biot number depending on the wavenumber. On the other hand, it is also shown that, if taken into account, water evaporation has only minor quantitative consequences upon the results for this predominant, solutal Marangoni mechanism.

  18. Calorimetry of a Bose–Einstein-condensed photon gas

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level. PMID:27090978

  19. Gas condensate reservoir characterisation for CO2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    During oil and gas production hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is significantly increased by injecting miscible CO2 gas in order to displace hydrocarbons towards producing wells. This process of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) might be used for the total CO2 storage after complete hydrocarbon reservoir depletion. This kind of potential storage sites was selected for detailed studies, including generalised development study to investigate the applicability of CO2 for storages. The study is focused on compositional modelling to predict the miscibility pressures. We consider depleted gas condensate field in Kazakhstan as important target for CO2 storage and EOR. This reservoir being depleted below the dew point leads to retrograde condensate formed in the pore system. CO2 injection in the depleted gas condensate reservoirs may allow enhanced gas recovery by reservoir pressurisation and liquid re-vaporisation. In addition a number of geological and petrophysical parameters should satisfy storage requirements. Studied carbonate gas condensate and oil field has strong seal, good petrophysical parameters and already proven successful containment CO2 and sour gas in high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions. The reservoir is isolated Lower Permian and Carboniferous carbonate platform covering an area of about 30 km. The reservoir contains a gas column about 1.5 km thick. Importantly, the strong massive sealing consists of the salt and shale seal. Sour gas that filled in the oil-saturated shale had an active role to form strong sealing. Two-stage hydrocarbon saturation of oil and later gas within the seal frame were accompanied by bitumen precipitation in shales forming a perfect additional seal. Field hydrocarbon production began three decades ago maintaining a strategy in full replacement of gas in order to maintain pressure of the reservoir above the dew point. This was partially due to the sour nature of the gas with CO2 content over 5%. Our models and

  20. Development of an Exhaled Breath Monitoring System with Semiconductive Gas Sensors, a Gas Condenser Unit, and Gas Chromatograph Columns

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshio; Miwa, Toshio; Tsuruta, Akihiro; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck; Park, Jangchul; Hida, Toyoaki; Eda, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath exhaled by patients with lung cancer, healthy controls, and patients with lung cancer who underwent surgery for resection of cancer were analyzed by gas condenser-equipped gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for development of an exhaled breath monitoring prototype system involving metal oxide gas sensors, a gas condenser, and gas chromatography columns. The gas condenser-GC/MS analysis identified concentrations of 56 VOCs in the breath exhaled by the test population of 136 volunteers (107 patients with lung cancer and 29 controls), and selected four target VOCs, nonanal, acetoin, acetic acid, and propanoic acid, for use with the condenser, GC, and sensor-type prototype system. The prototype system analyzed exhaled breath samples from 101 volunteers (74 patients with lung cancer and 27 controls). The prototype system exhibited a level of performance similar to that of the gas condenser-GC/MS system for breath analysis. PMID:27834896

  1. Development of an Exhaled Breath Monitoring System with Semiconductive Gas Sensors, a Gas Condenser Unit, and Gas Chromatograph Columns.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshio; Miwa, Toshio; Tsuruta, Akihiro; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck; Park, Jangchul; Hida, Toyoaki; Eda, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-10

    Various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath exhaled by patients with lung cancer, healthy controls, and patients with lung cancer who underwent surgery for resection of cancer were analyzed by gas condenser-equipped gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for development of an exhaled breath monitoring prototype system involving metal oxide gas sensors, a gas condenser, and gas chromatography columns. The gas condenser-GC/MS analysis identified concentrations of 56 VOCs in the breath exhaled by the test population of 136 volunteers (107 patients with lung cancer and 29 controls), and selected four target VOCs, nonanal, acetoin, acetic acid, and propanoic acid, for use with the condenser, GC, and sensor-type prototype system. The prototype system analyzed exhaled breath samples from 101 volunteers (74 patients with lung cancer and 27 controls). The prototype system exhibited a level of performance similar to that of the gas condenser-GC/MS system for breath analysis.

  2. Coercivity of Nd(Dy) - Fe - B bonded magnets made from the inert-gas-atomized powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jifan; Pan, Ching-Yan; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Lai, Wu-Yan; Hu, Bo-Ping; Wang, Zhenxi; Sellers, C. H.

    1996-07-01

    The coercivity behaviour of bonded magnets made from sieved inert-gas-atomized Nd(Dy) - Fe - B powders has been investigated. For magnets with particle sizes 0953-8984/8/27/019/img10, the coercivity is controlled by a nucleation mechanism as in the sintered magnet. For the magnet with particle sizes of 0953-8984/8/27/019/img11, the hardening mechanism is mainly controlled by nucleation as in the sintered magnet but the hardening mechanism of domain wall pinning or the nucleation of a single domain, which usually appears in melt-spun materials, may also be involved. The coercivity behaviour of bonded magnets made from gas-atomized powders seems to be between those of the sintered and melt-spun magnets depending on the particle size. Meanwhile it has been found that the demagnetizing field of bonded magnets made from the inert-gas-atomized powders is very small.

  3. The Condensate Wave Function of a Trapped Atomic Gas

    PubMed Central

    Dalfovo, F.; Pitaevskii, L.; Stringari, S.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss various properties of the ground state of a Bose-condensed dilute gas confined by an external potential. We devote particular attention to the role played by the interaction in determining the kinetic energy of the system and the aspect ratio of the velocity distribution. The structure of the wave function near the classical turning point is discussed and the drawback of the Thomas-Fermi approximation is explicitly pointed out. We consider also states with quantized vorticity and calculate the critical angular velocity for the production of vortices. The presence of vortex states is found to increases the stability of the condensate in the case of attractive interactions. PMID:27805106

  4. Industrial Research of Condensing Unit for Natural Gas Boiler House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemele, Jelena; Blumberga, Dagnija; Talcis, Normunds; Laicane, Ilze

    2012-12-01

    In the course of work industrial research was carried out at the boiler plant A/S "Imanta" where a 10MW passive condensing economizer working on natural gas was installed after the 116MW water boiler. The work describes the design of the condensing economizer and wiring diagram. During the industrial experiment, the following measurements were made: the temperature of water before and after the economizer; the ambient temperature; the quantity of water passing through the economizer; heat, produced by the economizer and water boilers. The work summarizes the data from 2010-2011.

  5. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  6. Energy balance in disk and CO2 laser beam inert gas fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scintilla, Leonardo Daniele; Tricarico, Luigi; Wetzig, Andreas; Beyer, Eckhard

    2012-03-01

    Experimental, numerical and analytical investigations were performed to give a possible explanation of the differences in cutting quality detected for inert gas laser beam cutting process performed with disk and CO2 laser sources. Cutting experiments were carried out at maximum cutting speed on cold work steel test specimens with different sheet thicknesses. The particular feature of the applied experimental setup was the similar geometry of both the CO2 and the disk laser beam with comparable values of the focus diameter and the Rayleigh length. The thermodynamic analysis was based on experimentally primary losses evaluation by means of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) blocks, on numerical computation of conductive power losses and analytical calculation of the remaining terms of energy balance. Energy balance allowed the evaluation of secondary losses and proportion of vaporized kerf volume used for justifying the lower quality of disk laser cuts. The lower proportion of vaporized kerf volume detected for disk laser cuts results in an increased process temperature, thus an increase of viscosity of molten material and the subsequent more difficult ejection of the melted material from the cut kerf.

  7. Detection of water molecules in inert gas based plasma by the ratios of atomic spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach is considered to detect the water leaks in inert plasma-forming gas present in the reactor chamber. It is made up of the intensity ratio of D α and H α spectral lines in combination with O, Ar and Xe lines intensity. The concentrations of H2O, O, H and D particles have been measured with high sensitivity. At the D2 admixture pressure {{p}{{\\text{D}\\text{2}}}}   =  0.025 mbar, we used the acquisition time of 10 s to measure the rate of water molecules injected from the outside, Γ0  =  1.4 · 10-9 mbar · m3 · s-1, and the incoming water molecules to plasma, Γ  =  5 ·10-11 mbar · m3 · s-1. The scaling proves that at small D2 admixtures (10-4 mbar), the leaks with the rates Γ0  ≈  6 · 10-12 mbar · m3 · s-1 and Γ  ≈  2 · 10-13 mbar · m3 · s-1 can be detected and measured. The difference between Γ0 and Γ values is due to the high degree of H2O dissociation, which can be up to 97-98%.

  8. Multiproperty empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4-inert gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    El-Kader, M S A

    2013-11-01

    An approximate empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4-inert gas mixtures are developed by simultaneously fitting the Exponential-Spline-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (ESMSV) potential form to viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion factors, diffusion coefficient, interaction second pressure virial coefficient and scattering cross-section data. Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures for CH4-He and at T = 87 K for CH4-Ar are computed using theoretical values for overlap, octopole and hexadecapole mechanisms and interaction potential as input. Also, the quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for the mixtures CH4-Ar and CH4-Xe at room temperature are calculated. The spectra of scattering consist essentially of an intense, purely translational component which includes scattering due to free pairs and bound dimers, and the other is due to the induced rotational scattering. These spectra have been interpreted by means of pair-polarizability terms, which arise from a long-range dipole-induced-dipole (DID) with small dispersion corrections and a short-range interaction mechanism involving higher-order dipole-quadrupole A and dipole-octopole E multipole polarizabilities. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when the models of potential, interaction-induced dipole and polarizability components are used.

  9. Consensus statement for inert gas washout measurement using multiple- and single- breath tests.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul D; Latzin, Philipp; Verbanck, Sylvia; Hall, Graham L; Horsley, Alexander; Gappa, Monika; Thamrin, Cindy; Arets, Hubertus G M; Aurora, Paul; Fuchs, Susanne I; King, Gregory G; Lum, Sooky; Macleod, Kenneth; Paiva, Manuel; Pillow, Jane J; Ranganathan, Sarath; Ranganathan, Sarah; Ratjen, Felix; Singer, Florian; Sonnappa, Samatha; Stocks, Janet; Subbarao, Padmaja; Thompson, Bruce R; Gustafsson, Per M

    2013-03-01

    Inert gas washout tests, performed using the single- or multiple-breath washout technique, were first described over 60 years ago. As measures of ventilation distribution inhomogeneity, they offer complementary information to standard lung function tests, such as spirometry, as well as improved feasibility across wider age ranges and improved sensitivity in the detection of early lung damage. These benefits have led to a resurgence of interest in these techniques from manufacturers, clinicians and researchers, yet detailed guidelines for washout equipment specifications, test performance and analysis are lacking. This manuscript provides recommendations about these aspects, applicable to both the paediatric and adult testing environment, whilst outlining the important principles that are essential for the reader to understand. These recommendations are evidence based, where possible, but in many places represent expert opinion from a working group with a large collective experience in the techniques discussed. Finally, the important issues that remain unanswered are highlighted. By addressing these important issues and directing future research, the hope is to facilitate the incorporation of these promising tests into routine clinical practice.

  10. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  11. Modelling responses of the inert-gas washout and MRI to bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Foy, Brody H; Kay, David; Bordas, Rafel

    2017-01-01

    Many lung diseases lead to an increase in ventilation heterogeneity (VH). Two clinical practices for the measurement of patient VH are in vivo imaging, and the inert gas multiple breath washout (MBW). In this study computational modelling was used to compare the responses of MBW indices LCI and scond and MRI measured global and local ventilation indices, σr and σlocal, to constriction of airways in the conducting zone of the lungs. The simulations show that scond, LCI and σr behave quite similarly to each other, all being sensitive to increases in the severity of constriction, while exhibiting little sensitivity to the depth at which constriction occurs. In contrast, the local MRI index σlocal shows strong sensitivity to depth of constriction, but lowered sensitivity to constriction severity. We finish with an analysis of the sensitivity of MRI indices to grid sizes, showing that results should be interpreted with reference to the image resolution. Overall we conclude that the application of both local and global VH measures may help to classify different types of bronchoconstriction.

  12. Inert Gas Buffered Milling and Particle Size Separation of μm-Scale Superconducting Precursor Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; McIntyre, P.

    2008-06-20

    The project developed an aerosol system for the met milling and particle size separation of the precursor powders used in fabrication of powder-in-tube superconductors. The work builds upon the results of a previous SBIR-funded development that proved the basic principles of the virtual impactor (VI) technology and its efficacy for the powders of interest. The new project extended that work in three respects: it integrated provisions for recirculating the aerosol flow using inert gas to avoid contamination from O2, CO2 and water in ambient air; a quad configuration of VI subassemblies to support kg/hr throughput; and it incorporated design features that eliminate error trajectories which would introduce trace contamination of larger particles into the separated flow. The project demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process and established its economic feasibility by achieving kg/hr throughput within a cost profile that would be profitable within the range of competitive toll fees. The project is beneficial to the public through its potential to improve the performance of superconducting materials for research and for biomedicine. It also conveys potential benefits for powders used in high-performance ceramics (for example for engines for automobiles and for aircraft) and for high-performance electrical insulators for telecommunications circuitry.

  13. Effect of Inert Cover Gas on Performance of Radioisotope Stirling Space Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Robert; Kumar, V; Ore, C; Schock, Alfred

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al. 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission.

  14. [Hydrogen and oxidative stress injury--from an inert gas to a medical gas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao-li; Du, Jun-bao; Tang, Chao-shu

    2011-04-18

    Oxidative stress is intensive cellular oxidation caused by redundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals. Redundant ROS causes DNA fracture, lipid peroxidation and protein inactivation, thus leading to severe cell damage. Recent studies have shown that hydrogen is a good anti-oxidant. It selectively reduces the hydroxyl radical, the most cytotoxic of ROS; however, it does not react with other ROS, which play physiological roles. As a result, it could protect tissues against oxidative stress injuries, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury of the heart, liver and intestine, cisplatin nephrotoxicity, sepsis and colon inflammation. As a medical gas, hydrogen may have a prospect for far-reaching clinical application.

  15. Condensation heat transfer of actual flue gas on horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Itoh, Tugue; Yagi, Kiyoyuki

    1999-07-01

    In order to improve the boiler efficiency, latent heat recovery from an exhaust flue gas is a very important concept. Condensation heat transfer on horizontal stainless steel tubes was investigated experimentally using an actual flue gas from a natural gas boiler. The experiment was conducted at different air ratios and steam mass concentrations of the flue gas, and in a wide range of tube wall temperature. The condensation pattern was similar to the dropwise condensation near the dew point. As the wall temperature was decreased, the wall region covered with a thin liquid film increased. The heat and mass transfer behavior were well predicted with the simple analogy correlation in the high wall temperature region. But in the low wall temperature region, the total heat transfer rate was higher than that predicted by the simple analogy correlation. At a high steam mass concentration artificially generated with steam injection, the total heat transfer rate was higher than that predicted by the simple analogy correlation. The analogy correlation using the modified Sherwood number taking account of the mass absorption effect was proposed. The modified correlation gave a good prediction of the heat flux at the high steam mass concentration.

  16. Electron-beam generation in a wide-aperture open gas discharge: A comparative study for different inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2010-08-30

    In the present study, electron-beam generation by open discharges was examined. The study was performed at gas pressures up to 20 Torr, and covered all inert gases. At voltages up to 8 kV, electron-beam currents up to 1600 A with current density {approx}130 A/cm{sup 2} and a beam generation efficiency in excess of 93% were obtained. The production of electrons from cold cathode was concluded to be of photoemissive nature, enabling the production of high-intensity electron beams in any noble gas or in a mixture of a noble gas with molecular gases irrespective of cathode material.

  17. A Model of Gas Recycling Based on Condensed H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenniger, D.

    2004-06-01

    To address, among other questions, puzzling observations about star forming in the extreme outer HI disk of M 31 (Cuillandre et al. 2001), a scenario of interstellar gas cycling between the visible and a very cold invisible phase is investigated. The key new element sketched here, allowing to maintain the bulk of the gas out of sight, is that molecular hydrogen becomes liquid or solid below 33 K at sufficiently high pressure, allowing AU-sized spheres of very cold gas to be stabilised by incompressible cores of condensed H2 (Pfenniger 2004). These predicted cold gas globules are relatively weakly bound (˜ 10-3 eV/nucleon), such that their lifetime depends directly on the ambient UV/CR excitation level. At galactic scale the globules behave as collisionless bodies, and evaporate and become the usual visible ISM gas through heating. Much of the ISM gas can thus spend a long time in this cold condensed phase in low excitation regions. N-body simulations of galactic disks modeling such effects have been run, and some of their features are described in more detail in this volume and elsewhere (Revaz & Pfenniger 2004).

  18. Comparison of methods for separating small quantities of hydrogen isotopes from an inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Willms, R.S.; Tuggle, D.; Birdsell, S.; Parkinson, J.; Price, B.; Lohmeir, D.

    1998-03-01

    It is frequent within tritium processing systems that a small amount of hydrogen isotopes (Q{sub 2}) must be separated from an inert gas such as He, Ar and N{sub 2}. Thus, a study of presently available technologies for effecting such a separation was performed. A base case and seven technology alternatives were identified and a simple design of each was prepared. These technologies included oxidation-adsorption-metal bed reduction, oxidation-adsorption-palladium membrane reactor, cryogenic adsorption, cryogenic trapping, cryogenic distillation, hollow fiber membranes, gettering and permeators. It was found that all but the last two methods were unattractive for recovering Q{sub 2} from N{sub 2}. Reasons for technology rejection included (1) the method unnecessarily turns the hydrogen isotopes into water, resulting in a cumbersome and more hazardous operation, (2) the method would not work without further processing, and (3) while the method would work, it would only do so in an impractical way. On the other hand, getters and permeators were found to be attractive methods for this application. Both of these methods would perform the separation in a straightforward, essentially zero-waste, single step operation. The only drawback for permeators was that limited low-partial Q{sub 2} pressure data is available. The drawbacks for getters are their susceptibility to irreversible and exothermic reaction with common species such as oxygen and water, and the lack of long-term operation of such beds. More research is envisioned for both of these methods to mature these attractive technologies.

  19. Closed circuit rebreathing to achieve inert gas wash-in for multiple breath wash-out

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Katherine; Downey, Damian G.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Bell, Nicholas J.; Smith, Jaclyn; Owers-Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple breath wash-out (MBW) testing requires prior wash-in of inert tracer gas. Wash-in efficiency can be enhanced by a rebreathing tracer in a closed circuit. Previous attempts to deploy this did not account for the impact of CO2 accumulation on patients and were unsuccessful. We hypothesised that an effective rebreathe wash-in could be delivered and it would not alter wash-out parameters. Computer modelling was used to assess the impact of the rebreathe method on wash-in efficiency. Clinical testing of open and closed circuit wash-in–wash-out was performed in healthy controls and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using a circuit with an effective CO2 scrubber and a refined wash-in protocol. Wash-in efficiency was enhanced by rebreathing. There was no difference in mean lung clearance index between the two wash-in methods for controls (6.5 versus 6.4; p=0.2, n=12) or patients with CF (10.9 versus 10.8; p=0.2, n=19). Test time was reduced by rebreathe wash-in (156 versus 230 s for CF patients, p<0.001) and both methods were well tolerated. End wash-in CO2 was maintained below 2% in most cases. Rebreathe–wash-in is a promising development that, when correctly deployed, reduces wash-in time and facilitates portable MBW testing. For mild CF, wash-out outcomes are equivalent to an open circuit. PMID:27730167

  20. How can an inert gas counterbalance a NMDA-induced glutamate release?

    PubMed

    Vallee, Nicolas; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Risso, Jean-Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Previous neurochemical studies performed in rats have revealed a decrease of striatal dopamine and glutamate induced by inert gas narcosis. We sought to establish the hypothetical role of glutamate and its main receptor, the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, in this syndrome. We aimed to counteract the nitrogen narcosis-induced glutamate and dopamine decreases by stimulating the NMDA receptor in the striatum. We used bilateral retrodialysis on awake rats, submitted to nitrogen under pressure (3 MPa). Continuous infusion of 2 mM of NMDA under normobaric conditions (0.01 MPa) (n = 8) significantly increased extracellular average levels of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, and asparagine by 241.8%, 292.5%, 108.3%, and 195.3%, respectively. The same infusion conducted under nitrogen at 3 MPa (n = 6) revealed significant lower levels of these amino acids (n = 8/6, P > 0.001). In opposition, the NMDA-induced effects on dopamine, dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) levels were statistically not affected by the nitrogen at 3 MPa exposure (n = 8/6, P > 0.05). Dopamine was increased by >240% on average. HVA was decreased (down to 40%), and there was no change in DOPAC levels, in both conditions. Results highlight that the NMDA receptor is not directly affected by nitrogen under pressure as indicated by the elevation in NMDA-induced dopamine release under hyperbaric nitrogen. On the other hand, the NMDA-evoked glutamate increase is counteracted by nitrogen narcosis. No improvement in motor and locomotor disturbances was observed with high striatal concentration in dopamine. Further experiments have to be done to specify why the striatal glutamate pathways, in association with the inhibition of its metabolism, only are affected by nitrogen narcosis in this study.

  1. Closed circuit rebreathing to achieve inert gas wash-in for multiple breath wash-out.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Alex R; O'Neill, Katherine; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Nicholas J; Smith, Jaclyn; Owers-Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple breath wash-out (MBW) testing requires prior wash-in of inert tracer gas. Wash-in efficiency can be enhanced by a rebreathing tracer in a closed circuit. Previous attempts to deploy this did not account for the impact of CO2 accumulation on patients and were unsuccessful. We hypothesised that an effective rebreathe wash-in could be delivered and it would not alter wash-out parameters. Computer modelling was used to assess the impact of the rebreathe method on wash-in efficiency. Clinical testing of open and closed circuit wash-in-wash-out was performed in healthy controls and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using a circuit with an effective CO2 scrubber and a refined wash-in protocol. Wash-in efficiency was enhanced by rebreathing. There was no difference in mean lung clearance index between the two wash-in methods for controls (6.5 versus 6.4; p=0.2, n=12) or patients with CF (10.9 versus 10.8; p=0.2, n=19). Test time was reduced by rebreathe wash-in (156 versus 230 s for CF patients, p<0.001) and both methods were well tolerated. End wash-in CO2 was maintained below 2% in most cases. Rebreathe-wash-in is a promising development that, when correctly deployed, reduces wash-in time and facilitates portable MBW testing. For mild CF, wash-out outcomes are equivalent to an open circuit.

  2. Inert gas narcosis disrupts encoding but not retrieval of long term memory.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Malcolm; Kneller, Wendy

    2015-05-15

    Exposure to increased ambient pressure causes inert gas narcosis of which one symptom is long-term memory (LTM) impairment. Narcosis is posited to impair LTM by disrupting information encoding, retrieval (self-guided search), or both. The effect of narcosis on the encoding and retrieval of LTM was investigated by testing the effect of learning-recall pressure and levels of processing (LoP) on the free-recall of word lists in divers underwater. All participants (n=60) took part in four conditions in which words were learnt and then recalled at either low pressure (1.4-1.9atm/4-9msw) or high pressure (4.4-5.0atm/34-40msw), as manipulated by changes in depth underwater: low-low (LL), low-high(LH), high-high (HH), and high-low (HL). In addition, participants were assigned to either a deep or shallow processing condition, using LoP methodology. Free-recall memory ability was significantly impaired only when words were initially learned at high pressure (HH & HL conditions). When words were learned at low pressure and then recalled at low pressure (LL condition) or high pressure (LH condition) free-recall was not impaired. Although numerically superior in several conditions, deeper processing failed to significantly improve free-recall ability in any of the learning-recall conditions. This pattern of results support the hypothesis that narcosis disrupts encoding of information into LTM, while retrieval appears to be unaffected. These findings are discussed in relation to similar effects reported by some memory impairing drugs and the practical implications for workers in pressurised environments.

  3. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  4. Inert gas narcosis has no influence on thermo-tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Miroljub; Vidmar, Gaj; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2012-05-01

    Contribution of skin thermal sensors under inert gas narcosis to the raising hypothermia is not known. Such information is vital for understanding the impact of narcosis on behavioural thermoregulation, diver safety and judgment of thermal (dis)comfort in the hyperbaric environment. So this study aimed at establishing the effects of normoxic concentration of 30% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) on thermo-tactile threshold sensation by studying 16 subjects [eight females and eight males; eight sensitive (S) and eight non-sensitive (NS) to N(2)O]. Their mean (SD) age was 22.1 (1.8) years, weight 72.8 (15.3) kg, height 1.75 (0.10) m and body mass index 23.8 (3.8) kg m(-2). Quantitative thermo-tactile sensory testing was performed on forearm, upper arm and thigh under two experimental conditions: breathing air (air trial) and breathing normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O (N(2)O trial) in the mixed sequence. Difference in thermo-tactile sensitivity thresholds between two groups of subjects in two experimental conditions was analysed by 3-way mixed-model analysis of covariance. There were no statistically significant differences in thermo-tactile thresholds either between the Air and N(2)O trials, or between S and NS groups, or between females and males, or with respect to body mass index. Some clinically insignificant lowering of thermo-tactile thresholds occurred only for warm thermo-tactile thresholds on upper arm and thigh. The results indicated that normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O had no influence on thermo-tactile sensation in normothermia.

  5. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training.

  6. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  7. Mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their glass transition temperatures investigated using inert gas permeation.

    PubMed

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers are heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg, and as a result, the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across 5 orders of magnitude (∼10(-14) to 10(-9) cm(2)/s). The diffusivity data are compared to viscosity measurements and reveal a breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship at low temperatures. However, the data are well fit by the fractional Stokes-Einstein equation with an exponent of 0.66. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  8. Efficient computation of the compositional model for gas condensate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jifu; Li, Jiachun; Ye, Jigen

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a direct method, unsymmetric-pattern multifrontal factorization, for a large sparse system of linear equations is applied in the compositional reservoir model. The good performances of this approach are shown by solving the Poisson equation. And then the numerical module is embedded in the compositional model for simulating X1/5 (3) gas condensate reservoir in KeKeYa gas field, Northwest China. The results of oil/gas reserves, variations of stratum pressure and oil/gas production, etc. are compared with the observation. Good agreement comparable to COMP4 model is achieved, suggesting that the present model is both efficient and powerful in compositional reservoir simulations.

  9. Born-Kothari condensation in an ideal Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2017-02-01

    ``Condensation" in Fermi-Dirac statistics [D. S. Kothari and B. Nath, Nature 151, 420 (1943), 10.1038/151420a0], which appears as a natural consequence of Born's reciprocity principle [M. Born, Proc. R. Soc. London A 165, 291 (1938), 10.1098/rspa.1938.0060; M. Born, Nature 141, 328 (1938), 10.1038/141327a0], is examined from a theoretical perspective. Since fermions obey the Pauli exclusion principle, it is conceptually different from Bose-Einstein condensation, which permits macroscopic occupation of bosons at the single-particle level below a critical temperature. Yet, in accordance with the Cahill and Glauber [Phys. Rev. A 59, 1538 (1999)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.59.1538 formulation for fermionic fields, and in close kinship to bosonic fields, we have shown that in analogy to Bose-Einstein condensation, it is possible to associate an intrinsic notion of symmetry breaking and the thermodynamic "order parameter" to characterize the foregoing hitherto unexplored phenomenon in an ideal Fermi-Dirac gas as condensation-like coherence within fermions.

  10. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  11. Effect of inert species in gas phase on oscillatory dynamics of oxidation system of CO on Pt(100).

    PubMed

    Hua, Da-yin; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2003-05-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation for the global oscillation of the CO catalytic oxidation system in the presence of inert species in gas phase, which can adsorb and desorb on the catalytic surface but cannot react with other species. It is found that the impurity has a dramatic effect on the oscillatory dynamics, although it does not involve in the reaction of CO oxidation. The simulation results show that with an increase in the fraction of impurity in gas phase, the periodic oscillation may change into an irregular oscillation and even can be inhibited completely. However, as the desorption rate of the impurity is increased, the regular oscillation will be recovered again.

  12. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  13. Evidence for inert gas narcosis mechanisms in the occurrence of psychotic-like episodes at pressure environment.

    PubMed

    Abraini, J H

    1995-11-27

    Psychotic-like episodes in divers exposed to high pressure have been attributed to either the high-pressure neurological syndrome, confinement in pressure chamber, the subject's personality, or the addition of nitrogen or hydrogen to the basic helium-oxygen breathing mixture used for deep diving. Alternatively, it is suggested that these disorders are in fact paroxysmal narcotic symptoms that result from the sum of the individual narcotic potencies of each inert gas in the breathing mixture. This hypothesis is tested against a variety of lipid solubility theories of narcosis. The results clearly support the hypothesis and provide new information about the cellular interactions between inert gases at raised pressure and pressure itself.

  14. Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon-in-place volumes and formation volume factors for all the oil, gas, and gas-condensate reservoirs within the U.S. sedimentary basins. The procedures to calculate in-place volumes for oil and gas reservoirs have already been presented by Verma and Bird (2005) to help with the USGS assessment of the undiscovered resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, but there is no straightforward procedure available for calculating in-place volumes for gas-condensate reservoirs for the carbon sequestration project. The objective of the present study is to propose a simple procedure for calculating the hydrocarbon-in-place volume of a condensate reservoir to help estimate the hydrocarbon pore volume for potential CO2 sequestration.

  15. Temperature variability of the last 1000 years in Antarctica from inert gas isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Anais; Landais, Amaelle; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2015-04-01

    A large effort has been made to document the climate history of the last two thousand years, but there are still substantial gaps in the Southern Hemisphere, especially at high latitudes, where the changes in the climate are the largest. These gaps limit our understanding of the most fundamental driving mechanisms of the climate. In particular, the impact of solar minima on surface temperature is not fully understood. Here, we investigate the spatial structure of multi decadal climate variability in Antarctica, assess the significance of the Little Ice Age minimum documented elsewhere. We present a 1000 year temperature record at two sites in Antarctica: WAIS Divide (79°S, 112°W, 1766 m a.s.l), and Talos Dome (72°S, 159°E, 2315 m a.s.l), reconstructed from the combination of inert gas isotopes from the ice core and borehole temperature measurements. Borehole temperature provides an absolute estimate of long-term trends, while noble gases track decadal to centennial scale changes. This method provides a temperature reconstruction that is independent of water isotopes, and allows us to improve our understanding of water isotopes as a temperature proxy, and use them to track circulation changes. We find that there is a pronounced cooling trend over the last millennium at both sites, but it is stronger in East Antarctica (Talos Dome) than West Antarctica (WAIS-D). At WAIS Divide, we find that "Little Ice Age" cold period of 1400-1800 was 0.52°C colder than the last century, and that the recent warming trend (0.23°C/decade since 1960) has past analogs about every 200 years. At Talos Dome, the pronounced cooling trend over the whole record is not visible in the water isotope record, which suggests that there is a compensation of several sources of fractionation. Overall, both records are consistent with the idea that the solar minima and persistent volcanic activity of the Little Ice Age (1400-1850 A.D.) had a significant impact on the surface temperature in

  16. Noninvasive cardiac output measurement by inert gas rebreathing in suspected pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Farina, Stefania; Teruzzi, Giovanni; Cattadori, Gaia; Ferrari, Cristina; De Martini, Stefano; Bussotti, Maurizio; Calligaris, Giuseppe; Bartorelli, Antonio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate inert gas rebreathing (IGR) reliability in cardiac output (CO) measurement compared with Fick method and thermodilution. IGR is a noninvasive method for CO measurement; CO by IGR is calculated as pulmonary blood flow plus intrapulmonary shunt. IGR may be ideal for follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), sparing the need of repeated invasive right-sided cardiac catheterization. Right-sided cardiac catheterization with CO measurement by thermodilution, Fick method, and IGR was performed in 125 patients with possible PH by echocardiography. Patients were grouped according to right-sided cardiac catheterization-measured mean pulmonary and wedge pressures: normal pulmonary arterial pressure (n = 20, mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 18 ± 3 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 11 ± 5 mm Hg), PH and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PH-NW, n = 37 mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 42 ± 13 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 11 ± 6 mm Hg), and PH and high pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PH-HW, n = 68, mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 37 ± 9 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 24 ± 6 mm Hg). Thermodilution and Fick measurements were comparable. Fick and IGR agreement was observed in normal pulmonary arterial pressure (CO = 4.10 ± 1.14 and 4.08 ± 0.97 L/min, respectively), whereas IGR overestimated Fick in patients with PH-NW and those with PH-HW because of intrapulmonary shunting overestimation in hypoxemic patients. When patients with arterial oxygen saturation (SO2) ≤90% were excluded, IGR and Fick agreement improved in PH-NW (CO = 4.90 ± 1.70 and 4.76 ± 1.35 L/min, respectively) and PH-HW (CO = 4.05 ± 1.04 and 4.10 ± 1.17 L/min, respectively). In hypoxemic patients, we estimated pulmonary shunt as Fick - pulmonary blood flow and calculated shunt as: -0.2423 × arterial SO2 + 21.373 L/min. In conclusion, IGR is reliable for CO measurement in patients with PH

  17. Evaluation of phase envelope on natural gas, condensate and gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promkotra, S.; Kangsadan, T.

    2015-03-01

    The experimentally gas hydrate are generated by condensate and natural gas. Natural gas and condensate samples are collected from a gas processing plant where is situated in the northeastern part of Thailand. Physical properties of the API gravity and density of condensate are presented in the range of 55-60° and 0.71-0.76 g/cm3. The chemical compositions of petroleum-field water are analyzed to evaluate the genesis of gas hydrate by experimental procedure. The hydrochemical compositions of petroleum-field waters are mostly the Na-Cl facies. This condition can estimate how the hydrate forms. Phase envelope of condensate is found only one phase which is liquid phase. The liquid fraction is 100% at 15°C and 101.327 kPa, with the critical pressure and temperature of 2,326 kPa and 611.5 K. However, natural gas can be separated in three phases which are vapor, liquid and solid phase with the pressure and temperature at 100 kPa and 274.2 K. The hydrate curves explicit both hydrate zone and nonhydrate zone. Phase envelope of gas hydrate from the phase diagram indicates the hydrate formation. The experimental results of hydrate form can correlate to the hydrate curve. Besides, the important factor of hydrate formation depends on impurity in the petroleum system.

  18. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD.

  19. Boundary layers for the nonlinear discrete Boltzmann equation: Condensing vapor flow in the presence of a non-condensable gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhoff, N.

    2012-11-01

    Half-space problems for the Boltzmann equation are of great importance in the study of the asymptotic behavior of the solutions of boundary value problems of the Boltzmann equation for small Knudsen numbers. Half-space problems provide the boundary conditions for the fluid-dynamic-type equations and Knudsen-layer corrections to the solution of the fluid-dynamic-type equations in a neighborhood of the boundary. Here we consider a half-space problem of condensation for a pure vapor in the presence of a non-condensable gas by using discrete velocity models (DVMs) of the Boltzmann equation. The Boltzmann equation can be approximated by DVMs up to any order, and these DVMs can be applied for numerical methods, but also for mathematical studies to bring deeper understanding and new ideas. For one-dimensional half-space problems, the discrete Boltzmann equation (the general DVM) reduces to a system of ODEs. We obtain that the number of parameters to be specified in the boundary conditions depends on whether the condensing vapor flow is subsonic or supersonic. This behavior has earlier been found numerically. We want to stress that our results are valid for any finite number of velocities. This is an extension of known results for single-component gases (and for binary mixtures of two vapors) to the case when a non-condensable gas is present. The vapor is assumed to tend to an assigned Maxwellian, with a flow velocity towards the condensed phase, at infinity, while the non-condensable gas tends to zero at infinity. Steady condensation of the vapor takes place at the condensed phase, which is held at a constant temperature. We assume that the vapor is completely absorbed, that the non-condensable gas is diffusively reflected at the condensed phase, and that vapor molecules leaving the condensed phase are distributed according to a given distribution. The conditions, on the given distribution at the condensed phase, needed for the existence of a unique solution of the

  20. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Cargo Operational Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  2. Inert gas influence on the laminar burning velocity of methane-air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mitu, Maria; Giurcan, Venera; Razus, Domnina; Oancea, Dumitru

    2017-01-05

    Flame propagation was studied in methane-air-inert (He, Ar, N2 or CO2) mixtures with various initial pressures and compositions using pressure-time records obtained in a spherical vessel with central ignition. The laminar burning velocities of CH4-air and CH4-air-inert mixtures obtained from experimental p(t) records of the early stage of combustion were compared with literature data and with those obtained from numerical modeling of 1D flames. The overall reaction orders of methane oxidation were determined from the baric coefficients of the laminar burning velocities determined from power-law equations. For all mixtures, the adiabatic flames temperatures were computed, assuming that the chemical equilibrium is reached in the flame front. The overall activation energy for the propagation stage of the combustion process was determined from the temperature dependence of the laminar burning velocity.

  3. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-01-01

    Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

  4. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  5. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  6. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied.

  7. An investigation of condensation heat transfer in a closed tube containing a soluble noncondensable gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hanson, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    An exact one-dimensional condensation heat transfer model for insoluble gases has been developed and compared with experimental data. Modifications to this model to accommodate soluble gas behavior have also been accomplished, and the effects on gas front behavior demonstrated. Analytical models for condensation heat transfer are documented, and a novel optical method used for measuring gas concentration profiles is outlined.

  8. Exact statistical mechanical lattice model and classical Lindemann theory of melting of inert gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Murrell, John N.; Manos, George

    2008-05-01

    A modified form of Lindemann's model shows that the melting points of the heavy inert gases and other effectively spherical molecular species are proportional to the depths of their diatomic potential wells. The success of the model when compared with experiment seems to rely on the almost constant value of the ratio of the fractional volume and entropy changes during fusion. The Lindemann proposal can be incorporated into an exactly treated statistical mechanical lattice model utilising expandable clusters which reproduces the solid-liquid melting phenomenon for argon with a realistic volume change and melting line.

  9. Quantum hydrodynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The peculiar dynamics of superfluids are a fascinating research topic. Since the first generation of a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in 1995, quantum degenerate atomic gases have taken the investigation of quantum hydrodynamics to a new level. The atomic physics toolbox has grown tremendously and now provides unique and powerful ways to explore nonlinear quantum systems. As an example, pioneering results have recently revealed that the counterflow between two superfluids can be used as a well controlled tool to access the rich dynamics of vector systems. New structures, such as beating dark-dark solitons which only exist in multicomponent systems and have never been observed before, can now be realized in the lab for the first time. Furthermore, the field of nonlinear quantum hydrodynamics is entering new regimes by exploiting Raman dressing as a tool to directly modify the dispersion relation. This leads to the generation of spin-orbit coupled BECs, artificial gauge fields, etc. that are currently receiving tremendous interest due to their parallels to complex condensed-matter systems. Studies of quantum hydrodynamics help to develop a profound understanding of nonlinear quantum dynamics, which is not only of fundamental interest but also of eminent importance for future technological applications, e.g. in telecommunication applications using optical solitons in fibers. This talk will showcase some ``classic'' hallmark results and highlight recent advances from the forefront of the field.

  10. Vortex patterns in moderately rotating Bose-condensed gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Mohd; Ahsan, M. A. H.

    2017-02-01

    Using exact diagonalization, we investigate the many-body ground state for regular vortex patterns in a rotating Bose-condensed gas of N spinless particles, confined in a quasi-two-dimensional harmonic trap and interacting repulsively via finite-range Gaussian potential. The N-body Hamiltonian matrix is diagonalized in given subspaces of quantized total angular momentum L z , to obtain the lowest-energy eigenstate. Further, the internal structure of these eigenstates is analyzed by calculating the corresponding conditional probability distribution. Specifically, the quantum mechanically stable as well as unstable states in a co-rotating frame are examined in the moderately rotating regime corresponding to angular momenta 4N≤slant {L}z< 5N for N = 16 bosons. In response to externally impressed rotation, the patterns of singly quantized vortices are formed, shaping into canonical polygons with a central vortex at the trap center. The internal structure of unstable states reveals the mechanism of entry, nucleation and pattern formation of vortices with structural phase transition, as the condensate goes from one stable vortical state to the other. The stable polygonal vortex patterns having discrete p-fold rotational symmetry with p = 5 and p = 6 are observed. The hexagonal vortex pattern with p = 6 symmetry is a precursor to the triangular vortex lattice of singly quantized vortices in the thermodynamic limit. For unstable states, quantum melting of vortex patterns due to uncertainty in positions of individual vortices, is also briefly discussed.

  11. Multispectral actinometry of water and water-derivative molecules in moist, inert gas discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.; Kochetov, I. V.

    2016-10-01

    A new version of optical actinometry (OA) is used to determine the concentrations of water molecules and their fragments in hollow cathode discharge plasma in moist inert gases. Use is made of two actinometer particles, namely, the atoms Xe and Ar, for concurrent measurements of the concentrations of the H2O molecule and its fragments O, H, and OH. A self-consistent method is suggested for the determination of particle concentrations with due regard for the quenching of the emitting states. The temporal behavior of particles during discharge glow is studied. Noted are fast variations (lasting from a few to a few tens of s) in the concentrations of all the particles, followed by their stabilization (within a few to a few tens of mins). The scheme of the processes responsible for the observed dynamics of the plasma composition is discussed.

  12. Examination of laser-triggered discharge using a virtual gas model and the similarity of its Paschen curve with those of inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    2009-09-15

    We examined laser-triggered discharge (LTD) under asymmetric electric fields in air. Upon introducing a virtual gas with npd (n=2.8-3) instead of pd in Paschen's law [Ann. Phys. Chem. 37, 69 (1889)], the results of LTD in air coincided with the Paschen curve. A Paschen curve similar to those of inert gases, i.e., Ne and He, can be obtained even in air. This implies that in LTD, the number of gas molecules between electrodes appears to be n times higher than that in air. In LTD in air, the gamma effect is presumed to be significant, similar to in inert gases.

  13. Computation of decompression schedules for single inert gas-oxygen dives using a hand-held programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Ranade, A; Peterson, R E

    1980-08-01

    An algorithm for on-site computation with a hand-held programmable calculator (TI-59, Texas Instruments) of single inert-gas decompression schedules is described. This program is based on Workman's 'M-value' method. It can compute decompression schedules with changes in the oxygen content of the breathing mixture and extension of stay at any decompression stop. The features of the program that enable calculation of atypical dive profiles, along with the portability of small calculators, would make such an algorithm suitable for on-site applications. However, since dive profiles generated by the program have not yet been tested, divers are warned not to generate schedules until their safety has been established by field tests.

  14. Spectroscopy of Cosmic Carbon Analogs in Inert-Gas Matrices and in the Gas-Phase: Comparative Results and Perspectives for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of the spectroscopy of large (up to approx. 50 carbon atoms) neutral and Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Fullerenes isolated in inert gas matrices will be presented. The advantages and the limitations of matrix isolation spectroscopy for the study of the molecular spectroscopy of interstellar dust analogs will be discussed. The laboratory data will be compared to the astronomical spectra (the interstellar extinction, the diffuse interstellar bands). Finally, the spectra of PAH ions isolated in neon/argon matrices will be compared to the spectra obtained for PAH ion seeded in a supersonic expansion. The astrophysical implications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  15. Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu

    2011-01-17

    Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

  16. Effects of inert species in the gas phase in a model for the catalytic oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, G. M.; Rikvold, P. A.

    2012-03-01

    We study by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on a surface in the presence of contaminants in the gas phase. The process is simulated by a Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model that has been modified to include the effect of the contaminants and to eliminate an unphysical oxygen poisoned phase at very low CO partial pressures. The impurities can adsorb and desorb on the surface but otherwise remain inert. We find that if the impurities cannot desorb, no matter how small their proportion in the gas mixture, the reactive window and discontinuous transition to a CO poisoned phase at high CO pressures that characterize the original ZGB model disappear. The coverages become continuous, and once the surface has reached a steady state there is no production of CO2. This is quite different from the behavior of systems in which the surface presents a fixed percentage of impurities. When the contaminants are allowed to desorb, the reactive phase appears again for CO pressures below a value that depends on the proportion of contaminants in the gas and on their desorption rate.

  17. Effects of inert species in the gas phase in a model for the catalytic oxidation of CO.

    PubMed

    Buendía, G M; Rikvold, P A

    2012-03-01

    We study by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on a surface in the presence of contaminants in the gas phase. The process is simulated by a Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model that has been modified to include the effect of the contaminants and to eliminate an unphysical oxygen poisoned phase at very low CO partial pressures. The impurities can adsorb and desorb on the surface but otherwise remain inert. We find that if the impurities cannot desorb, no matter how small their proportion in the gas mixture, the reactive window and discontinuous transition to a CO poisoned phase at high CO pressures that characterize the original ZGB model disappear. The coverages become continuous, and once the surface has reached a steady state there is no production of CO(2). This is quite different from the behavior of systems in which the surface presents a fixed percentage of impurities. When the contaminants are allowed to desorb, the reactive phase appears again for CO pressures below a value that depends on the proportion of contaminants in the gas and on their desorption rate.

  18. Inert gas stratigraphy of Apollo 15 drill core sections 15001 and 15003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W.; Kirsten, T.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    Rare gase contents were studied in Apollo 15 drill core sections corresponding to 207 to 238 and 125 to 161-cm depths, with respect to layering of the core, turnover on a centimeter scale, and cosmic proton bombardment history. Trapped gas abundance was established in all samples, the mean grain size being a major factor influencing the absolute rare gas contents. Analysis of the results suggests that the regolith materials were exposed to galactic and solar cosmic rays long before their deposition.

  19. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  20. Characterization of pure Ni ultrafine/nanoparticles synthesized by electromagnetic levitational gas condensation method

    SciTech Connect

    Khodaei, Azin Hasannasab, Malihe; Amousoltani, Narges; Kermanpur, Ahmad

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Ni ultrafine/nanoparticles were produced using the single-step ELGC method. • Ar and He–20%Ar gas mixtures were used as the condensing gas under 1 atm. • Effects of gas type and flow rate on particle size distribution were investigated. • The nanoparticles showed both high saturation magnetization and low coercivity. - Abstract: In this work, Ni ultrafine/nanoparticles were directly produced using the one-step, relatively large-scale electromagnetic levitational gas condensation method. In this process, Ni vapors ascending from the levitated droplet were condensed by Ar and He–20%Ar gas mixtures under atmospheric pressure. Effects of type and flow rate of the condensing gas on the size, size distribution and crystallinity of Ni particles were investigated. The particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The process parameters for the synthesis of the crystalline Ni ultrafine/nanoparticles were determined.

  1. In Vivo Measurements Of Coronary Blood Volumi By Dye And Inert Gas Dilution Technic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, A.; Korb, H.; Wolpers, H. G.

    1984-10-01

    The application of a double fiberoptic device for measurements of arterial and coronary venous dye dilution curves facilitates the determination of coronary mean transit times even under clinical conditions. Since the dye, indocyanine green, is an intravascular tracer, the calculation of tissue blood flow would be possible if the intracoronary blood volume per unit of muscular weight is known. This study was therefore designed to investigate the physiologic range and the influence of coronary vasodilation and different hemodynamic conditions on the amount of myocardial blood volume. All experiments were carried out on anaesthetized close chest mongrel dogs in heart catheterization technic. Myocardial preload, afterload and inotropism and coronary vascular tone were varied by induction of hypo-, normo- and hypervolemia as well as by intravenous application of catecholamines, 13-blocking agents and vasodilating drugs. The determination of coronary blood volume was based on arterial and coronary venous kinetics of the intravascular tracer indocyanine green and the freely diffusible tracers helium and argon. Simultaneous measurements of the dye and the inert gases were obtained by a double fiberoptic system and a twin mass spectrometer, respectively. The intravascular and the tissue mean transit times as well as the coronary blood volume per unit of tissue weight were computed from the impulse response functions obtained by numerical deconvolution of the arterial and coronary venous indicator dilution curves. In contrast to reports of other authors coronary blood volume did not increase to a major extend during coronary vasodilation or elevated afterload. These new results suggest that the variation of coronary blood volume described in the literature is mainly due to methodological errors resulting from monoexponential extrapolation and distortion of the dye signal by the sampling catheter. These systematic errors, which, in particular, lead to an overestimation of

  2. Horizontal gas-condensate find brightens Louisiana chalk outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1994-12-19

    A ray of hope may have appeared in the Louisiana portion of the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend after several years of expensive disappointment. OXY USA Inc. plans to use dual leg horizontal wells to develop a fracture chalk reservoir named Masters Creek field in Rapides Parish. The state has approved four 1,920 acre spacing units, one of which contains OXY's A1 Monroe well. The A1 Monroe flowed 6.6 MMcfd of gas with 2,162 b/d of 48[degree] gravity condensate, not oil as previously reported, through a 26/64 in. choke with 6,196 psi flowing tubing pressure from a single southward 4,000 ft horizontal leg at 14,803 ft true vertical depth. Bottomhole pressure is 13,100 psi. OXY called A1 Monroe a significant discovery and said it has additional exploration acreage blocks along the trend. Louisiana exempts production from horizontal wells from state severance tax until all project costs are returned. The paper briefly discusses OXY's program.

  3. An investigation of condensation heat transfer in a closed tube containing a soluble noncondensable gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hanson, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A more exact one-dimensional condensation heat transfer model for insoluble gases was developed and compared with experimental data. Modifications to this model to accommodate soluble gas behavior were also accomplished, and the effects on gas front behavior demonstrated. Analytical models for condensation heat transfer are documented, and an optical method used for measuring gas concentration profiles is outlined. Experimental data is then presented and interpreted.

  4. Ultra-trace level analysis of morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and diethylaminoethanol in steam condensate by gas chromatography with multi-mode inlet, and flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Luong, J; Shellie, R A; Cortes, H; Gras, R; Hayward, T

    2012-03-16

    Steam condensate water treatment is a vital and integral part of the overall cooling water treatment process. Steam condensate often contains varying levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen which acts as an oxidizer. Carbon dioxide forms corrosive carbonic acid when dissolved in condensed steam. To neutralize the harmful effect of the carbonic acid, volatile amine compounds such as morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and diethylaminoethanol are often employed as part of a strategy to control corrosion in the water treatment process. Due to the high stability of these compounds in a water matrix, the indirect addition of such chemicals into the process via steam condensate often results in their presence throughout the process and even into the final product. It is therefore important to understand the impact of these chemicals and their fate within a chemical plant. The ability to analyze such compounds by gas chromatography has historically been difficult due to the lack of chromatographic system inertness at the trace level concentrations especially in an aqueous matrix. Here a highly sensitive, practical, and reliable gas chromatographic approach is described for the determination of morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and diethylaminoethanol in steam condensate at the part-per-billion (ppb) levels. The approach does not require any sample enrichment or derivatization. The technique employs a multi-mode inlet operating in pulsed splitless mode with programmed inlet temperature for sample introduction, an inert base-deactivated capillary column for solute separation and flame ionization detection. Chromatographic performance was further enhanced by the incorporation of 2-propanol as a co-solvent. Detection limits for morpholine, cyclohexylamine, diethylaminoethanol were established to be 100 ppb (v/v), with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 6% at the 95% confidence level (n=20) and a percent recovery of 96% or higher for the solutes of interest over a range of 0

  5. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19)F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary

  6. AVO in North of Paria, Venezuela: Gas methane versus condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Regueiro, J.; Pena, A.

    1996-07-01

    The gas fields of North of Paria, offshore eastern Venezuela, present a unique opportunity for amplitude variations with offset (AVO) characterization of reservoirs containing different fluids: gas-condensate, gas (methane) and water (brine). AVO studies for two of the wells in the area, one with gas-condensate and the other with gas (methane) saturated reservoirs, show interesting results. Water sands and a fluid contact (condensate-water) are present in one of these wells, thus providing a control point on brine-saturated properties. The reservoirs in the second well consist of sands highly saturated with methane. Clear differences in AVO response exist between hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs and those containing brine. However, it is also interesting that subtle but noticeable differences can be interpreted between condensate-and methane-saturated sands. These differences are attributed to differences in both in-situ fluid density and compressibility, and rock frame properties.

  7. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising.

  8. Mixing and Residence Time Distribution in an Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Asad, Amjad; Kratzsch, Christoph; Schwarze, Rüdiger; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2017-02-01

    Tracer dispersion experiments were carried out in a multi-strand tundish by injecting 1 (N) NaCl solution into water. The variation of dimensionless concentration-time curves known as C-curves and mixing times with different gas flow rates were studied. The proportions of dead, mixed, and dispersed plug volumes were calculated using the `modified mixed model.' The observations were explained by analyzing the behavior of the bubble plume, incoming jet velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy within the tundish.

  9. A tidal breathing model of the inert gas sinewave technique for inhomogeneous lungs.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, J P; Gavaghan, D J; Hahn, C E

    2001-01-01

    The tidal breathing model conservation of mass equations for the sinewave technique have been described for a homogeneous alveolar compartment by Gavaghan and Hahn, 1996 [Gavaghan, D.J., Hahn, C.E.W., 1996. A tidal breathing model of the forced inspired gas sinewave technique. Respir. Physiol. 106, 209-221]. We develop these equations first to a multi-discrete alveolar compartment lung model and then to a lung model with a continuous distribution of volume, ventilation and perfusion. The effect on the output parameters of a multi-compartment model is discussed, and the results are compared to those derived from the conventional continuous-ventilation model. Using the barely soluble gas argon as the tracer gas, an empirical index of alveolar inhomogeneity is presented which uses the end-expired and mixed-expired partial pressures on each breath. This index distinguishes between a narrow unimodal distribution of ventilation-volume, a wide unimodal distribution of ventilation-volume and a bimodal distribution of ventilation-volume. By using Monte Carlo simulations, this index is shown to be stable to experimental error of realistic magnitude.

  10. Comparison of water-based foam and inert-gas mass emergency depopulation methods.

    PubMed

    Alphin, R L; Rankin, M K; Johnson, K J; Benson, E R

    2010-03-01

    Current control strategies for avian influenza (AI) and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. Selection of the best method of emergency mass depopulation involves maximizing human health and safety while minimizing disease spread and animal welfare concerns. Proper selection must ensure that the method is compatible with the species, age, housing type, and disposal options. No one single method is appropriate for all situations. Gassing is one of the accepted methods for euthanatizing poultry. Whole-house, partial-house, or containerized gassing procedures are currently used. The use of water-based foam was developed for emergency mass depopulation and was conditionally approved by the United States Department of Agriculture in 2006. Research has been done comparing these different methods; parameters such as time to brain death, consistency of time to brain death, and pretreatment and posttreatment corticosterone stress levels were considered. In Europe, the use of foam with carbon dioxide is preferred over conventional water-based foam. A recent experiment comparing CO2 gas, foam with CO2 gas, and foam without CO2 gas depopulation methods was conducted with the use of electroencephalometry results. Foam was as consistent as CO2 gassing and more consistent than argon-CO2 gassing. There were no statistically significant differences between foam methods.

  11. Determination of free nitrogen in carbon steels by inert gas fusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakov, Ya. I.; Grigorovich, K. V.; Mansurova, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility to use hot extraction (thermal extraction in a carrier-gas flow) for fractional analysis of nitrogen in carbon steels is shown for cord and reinforcing-bar steels. A rapid procedure is developed for an analysis of free nitrogen in carbon steels. The validity of the analytical procedure is confirmed by high-temperature hydrogen extraction. The data obtained by the two methods correlate well with each other. A sample preparation procedure is developed for the determination of the content of dissolved nitrogen.

  12. The Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique: Current Methodology at the US Army Institute of Surgical Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    observed by one of us in the lab of Dr. Wagner. The study involved a human vigorously exercising on a bicycle. The subject salivated excessively and...hematocrit, oxygen consumption, CO2 production, 99000 for tolerance, FIO2, FICO2, P50, PaO2, PaCO2 and pH from the blood gas machine data. IMPORTANT: the...program requires entry of the VO2 and VCO2 once again 62 62 here after the pH value. Each data value should be followed by pressing the Enter key. We

  13. Condensate fraction of a two-dimensional attractive Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, Luca

    2007-07-15

    We investigate the Bose-Einstein condensation of fermionic pairs in a two-dimensional uniform two-component Fermi superfluid obtaining an explicit formula for the condensate density as a function of the chemical potential and the energy gap. By using the mean-field extended Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, we analyze, as a function of the bound-state energy, the off-diagonal long-range order in the crossover from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state of weakly bound Cooper pairs to the Bose-Einstein condensate of strongly-bound molecular dimers.

  14. Continual Non-Condensable Gas Removal Testing -- Performance and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mohr; Greg Mines

    2005-09-01

    The operating experience and plant benefit analysis of a membrane-based continuous non-condensable gas (NCG) removal system is discussed. Results from testing at the Mammoth Pacific (Ormat) geothermal plant provide the basis for the benefit analysis.

  15. Flammability limits of lithium-ion battery thermal runaway vent gas in air and the inerting effects of halon 1301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Matthew Eugene

    Lithium-ion (rechargeable) and lithium-metal (non-rechargeable) battery cells put aircraft at risk of igniting and fueling fires. Lithium batteries can be packed in bulk and shipped in the cargo holds of freighter aircraft; currently lithium batteries are banned from bulk shipment on passenger aircraft [1]. The federally regulated Class C cargo compartment extinguishing system's utilization of a 5 %vol Halon 1301 knockdown concentration and a sustained 3 %vol Halon 1301 may not be sufficient at inerting lithium-ion battery vent gas and air mixtures [2]. At 5 %vol Halon 1301 the flammability limits of lithium-ion premixed battery vent gas (Li-Ion pBVG) in air range from 13.80 %vol to 26.07 %vol Li-Ion pBVG. Testing suggests that 8.59 %vol Halon 1301 is required to render all ratios of the Li-Ion pBVG in air inert. The lower flammability limit (LFL) and upper flammability limit (UFL) of hydrogen and air mixtures are 4.95 %vol and 76.52 %vol hydrogen, respectively. With the addition of 10 %vol and 20 %vol Halon 1301 the LFL is 9.02 %vol and 11.55 %vol hydrogen, respectively, and the UFL is 45.70 %vol and 28.39 %vol hydrogen, respectively. The minimum inerting concentration (MIC) of Halon 1301 in hydrogen and air mixtures is 26.72 %vol Halon 1301 at 16.2 %vol hydrogen. The LFL and UFL of Li-Ion pBVG and air mixtures are 7.88 %vol and 37.14 %vol Li-Ion pBVG, respectively. With the addition of 5 %vol, 7 %vol, and 8 %vol Halon 1301 the LFL is 13.80 %vol, 16.15 %vol, and 17.62 % vol Li-Ion pBVG, respectively, and the UFL is 26.07 %vol, 23.31 %vol, and 21.84 %vol Li- Ion pBVG, respectively. The MIC of Halon 1301 in Li-Ion pBVG and air mixtures is 8.59 %vol Halon 1301 at 19.52 %vol Li-Ion pBVG. Le Chatelier's mixing rule has been shown to be an effective measure for estimating the flammability limits of Li-Ion pBVGes. The LFL has a 1.79 % difference while the UFL has a 4.53 % difference. The state of charge (SOC) affects the flammability limits in an apparent parabolic

  16. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  17. Tundish Open Eye Formation in Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundishes: A Macroscopic Model from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-10-01

    Open eye formation in tundishes can result in reoxidation of liquid steel leading to the formation of harmful inclusions. Moreover, it is also a site for heat loss, gas absorption, and slag emulsification. All these factors make it necessary to understand the fundamentals of open eye formation, which in turn will allow us to prevent or control its harmful effects. In the present study, the bubble plume regions in a ladle and tundish were compared, and it was observed that there are significant differences between the two. Moreover, a simplistic model for predicting the open eye area in tundishes for `thin slag' practices was derived using the principles of conservation of mass and momentum. The proposed model was able to predict open eye areas in tundish reasonably well and was compared with other models, and experimental results.

  18. Abnormal distribution of microhardness in tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Nan; Shen Jun; Xie Weidong; Wang Linzhi; Wang Dan; Min Dong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the effects of heat input on the distribution of microhardness of tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welded hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were investigated. The results show that with an increase of heat input, the distributions of microhardness at the top and bottom of the welded joints are different because they are determined by both the effect of grain coarsening and the effect of dispersion strengthening. With an increase of the heat input, the microhardness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) at the top and bottom of welded joints and the fusion zone (FZ) at the bottom of welded joints decreased gradually, while the microhardness of the FZ at the top of welded joints decreased initially and then increased sharply. The reason for the abnormal distribution of microhardness of the FZ at the top of the welded joints is that this area is close to the heat source during welding and then large numbers of hard {beta}-Mg{sub 17}(Al,Zn){sub 12} particles are precipitated. Hence, in this case, the effect of dispersion strengthening dominated the microhardness.

  19. Non-invasive assessment of cardiac output during mechanical ventilation - a novel approach using an inert gas rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Nickl, Werner; Bugaj, Till; Mondritzki, Thomas; Kuhlebrock, Kathrin; Dinh, Winfried; Krahn, Thomas; Sohler, Florian; Truebel, Hubert

    2011-06-01

    Measurement of cardiac output (CO) is of importance in the diagnostic of critically ill patients. The invasive approach of thermodilution (TD) via pulmonary artery catheter is clinically widely used. A new non-invasive technique of inert gas rebreathing (IGR) shows a good correlation with TD measurements in spontaneously breathing individuals. For the first time, we investigated whether IGR can also be applied to sedated and mechanically ventilated subjects with a clinical point of care device. CO data from IGR were compared with TD in six healthy mongrel dogs. Data sampling was repeated under baseline conditions (rest) and under stress challenge by applying 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine intravenously. Switching from mechanical ventilation to IGR, as well as the rebreathing procedures, were carried out manually. Cardiac output data from IGR and TD correlated with a coefficient of r=0.90 (95% confidence interval [0.81; 0.95]). The Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 0.46 l/min for the IGR CO measurements. Ninety-five percent of all differences fall in the interval [-1.03; 1.95], being the limit of the ± 1.96 standard deviation lines. IGR is a new approach for non-invasive cardiac output measurement in mechanically ventilated individuals, but requires further investigation for clinical use.

  20. Use of nuclear explosions to create gas condensate storage in the USSR. LLL Treaty Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.

    1982-08-23

    The Soviet Union has described industrial use of nuclear explosions to produce underground hydrocarbon storage. To examples are in the giant Orenburg gas condensate field. There is good reason to believe that three additional cavities were created in bedded salt in the yet to be fully developed giant Astrakhan gas condensate field in the region of the lower Volga. Although contrary to usual western practice, the cavities are believed to be used to store H/sub 2/S-rich, unstable gas condensate prior to processing in the main gas plants located tens of kilometers from the producing fields. Detonations at Orenburg and Astrakhan preceded plant construction. The use of nuclear explosions at several sites to create underground storage of highly corrosive liquid hydrocarbons suggests that the Soviets consider this time and cost effective. The possible benefits from such a plan include degasification and stabilization of the condensate before final processing, providing storage of condensate during periods of abnormally high natural gas production or during periods when condensate but not gas processing facilities are undergoing maintenance. Judging from information provided by Soviet specialists, the individual cavities have a maximum capacity on the order of 50,000 m/sup 3/.

  1. An analysis of the correlation energy contribution to the interaction energy of inert gas dimers.

    PubMed

    Snook, Ian; Per, Manolo C; Russo, Salvy P

    2008-10-28

    An accurate description of electron correlation is essential for the calculation of interaction energies in cases where dispersion energy is a major component, for example, for the rare gas atoms, physisorption on graphite, and graphene-graphene interactions. Such calculations are computationally demanding using supermolecule methods and the energies calculated lack a simple, physical interpretation. Alternatively density functional theories (DFTs) may be used to give an approximate estimate of the correlation energy. However, the physical nature of this DFT estimate of electron correlation energy is not well understood and, in fact, most current DFT methods do not describe dispersion energy at all. Hence, an analysis of the correlation energy contribution to interaction energies where dispersion energy is important is needed. In order to do this we provide an analysis of the correlation energy contribution to the potential energy curves of He(2), Ne(2), and Ar(2) in terms of the Hartree-Fock (HF) interaction term DeltaE(int) (HF), a dispersion energy term E(disp) and an electron correlation term DeltaE(int) (C). DeltaE(int) (C) includes all other correlation energy effects besides E(disp) and is shown to be repulsive, of a similar short range character to, but of smaller magnitude than DeltaE(int) (HF). This analysis was used to develop a theoretical model which gives a very good estimate of the potential energy wells for He(2), Ne(2), Ar(2), HeNe, HeAr, and NeAr.

  2. Plasma-weld pool interaction in tungsten inert-gas configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, J.; Gonzalez, J.-J.; Freton, P.; Masquère, M.

    2013-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) transient model of a transferred argon arc in interaction with an anode material is presented and the results discussed. The model based on a finite volume method is developed using the open software @Saturne distributed by Electricité de France. The 3D model includes the characterization of the plasma gas and of the work piece with a current continuity resolution in the whole domain. Transport and thermodynamic properties are dependent on the local temperature and on the vapours emitted by the eroded material due to the heat flux transferred by the plasma. Drag force, Marangoni force, Laplace and gravity forces are taken into account on the weld pool description. The plasma and the weld pool characteristics are presented and compared with experimental and theoretical results from the literature. For a distance between the two electrodes of d = 5 mm and an applied current intensity of I = 200 A, the vapour concentration is weak. The influence of the parameters used in the Marangoni formulation is highlighted. Finally, in agreement with some authors, we show with this global transient 3D model that it is not necessary to include the voltage drop in the energy balance.

  3. Simulation and demonstration of magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion in a high-temperature inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-15

    The present paper describes high-density magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion in a high-temperature seed-free argon plasma, for which a quasi-three-dimensional numerical simulation and a single-pulse shock-tunnel-based demonstration are conducted. The numerical model simulates the two-dimensional profiles of both the electron and the heavy-particle system of the supersonic argon plasma flow, of which the total inflow temperature is 8000 K. The MHD power-generating experiment clarifies the relationship between the plasma quality and the energy conversion efficiency as functions of the total inflow temperature (7600-9600 K) and the applied magnetic flux density (up to 4.0 T). The increase in the total inflow temperature from 7600 to 9400 K and the application of magnetic flux with density of 0.5-1.2 T change the plasma state; unstable behavior accompanied by an inhomogeneous structure is transformed to a homogeneous and stable state, which results in the significant improvement of the power generation performance. Even in low-density magnetic flux, the attained generator performance is comparable or superior to previous results obtained using a conventional low-temperature seeded gas.

  4. Inert gas cutting of titanium sheet with pulsed mode CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. Tirumala; Kaul, Rakesh; Tiwari, Pragya; Nath, A. K.

    2005-12-01

    The present work aimed at studying the dynamic behavior of melt ejection in laser cutting of 1 mm thick titanium sheet and to obtain dross-free cuts with minimum heat affected zone (HAZ). CO 2 laser cutting of titanium sheet was carried out with continuous wave (CW) and pulsed mode laser operation with different shear gases namely argon, helium and nitrogen. Laser cutting with high frequency and low-duty cycle pulse mode operation produced dross-free cuts with no noticeable HAZ. Helium, because of its high heat convection and ability to generate high shear stress, produced laser-cuts with narrow HAZ and low dross, as compared to those produced with argon as the shear gas. Microscopic features of laser cut surfaces were analyzed and correlated with dynamic mechanism involved in laser cutting process. Process parameters for laser piercing, required for the initiation of fusion cut within the sheet, were also studied. Laser piercing requires either CW or high-duty cycle (>80%) pulse mode operation.

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation in an ultra-hot gas of pumped magnons.

    PubMed

    Serga, Alexander A; Tiberkevich, Vasil S; Sandweg, Christian W; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I; Bozhko, Dmytro A; Chumak, Andrii V; Neumann, Timo; Obry, Björn; Melkov, Gennadii A; Slavin, Andrei N; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2014-03-11

    Bose-Einstein condensation of quasi-particles such as excitons, polaritons, magnons and photons is a fascinating quantum mechanical phenomenon. Unlike the Bose-Einstein condensation of real particles (like atoms), these processes do not require low temperatures, since the high densities of low-energy quasi-particles needed for the condensate to form can be produced via external pumping. Here we demonstrate that such a pumping can create remarkably high effective temperatures in a narrow spectral region of the lowest energy states in a magnon gas, resulting in strikingly unexpected transitional dynamics of Bose-Einstein magnon condensate: the density of the condensate increases immediately after the external magnon flow is switched off and initially decreases if it is switched on again. This behaviour finds explanation in a nonlinear 'evaporative supercooling' mechanism that couples the low-energy magnons overheated by pumping with all the other thermal magnons, removing the excess heat, and allowing Bose-Einstein condensate formation.

  6. Alternative inert gas washout outcomes in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Nyilas, Sylvia; Schlegtendal, Anne; Singer, Florian; Goutaki, Myrofora; Kuehni, Claudia E; Casaulta, Carmen; Latzin, Philipp; Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula

    2017-01-01

    The lung clearance index (LCI) derived from a nitrogen multiple breath washout test (N2-MBW) is a promising tool to assess small airways disease in primary ciliary dyskinesia, but it is difficult to apply in routine clinical settings because of its long measuring time. In this study, we aimed to assess alternative indices derived from shorter washout protocols.49 patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (mean age 14.7±6.6 years) and 37 controls (mean age 14.3±1.4 years) performed N2-MBW and double-tracer gas (DTG) single-breath washout tests. Global (LCI and moment ratio (M2/M0)), conductive (Scond) and acinar ventilation inhomogeneity (DTG Slope III (SIII-DTG)) were determined for each individual. The main outcomes were 1) the ability to detect abnormal lung function from washout indices (>1.64 z-scores) and 2) measurement duration.The prevalence of abnormal values for LCI2.5% was 37 out of 47 (79%), for LCI5% was 34 out of 47 (72%), for M2/M0 was 34 out of 47 (72%), for Scond was 36 out of 46 (78%) and for SIII-DTG was 12 out of 35 (34%). Mean±sd duration of measurement was 19.8±11.2 min for LCI2.5%, 10.8±4.6 min for LCI5% and 8.6±2.3 min for ScondCompared to standard LCI2.5%, ventilation inhomogeneity was detected by LCI5%, moment ratio and Scond with comparable sensitivity while measurement duration was significantly shorter. Longitudinal studies will show which outcome is most suitable and practical in terms of sensitivity, duration and variability within the course of primary ciliary dyskinesia lung disease.

  7. Technology of the recovery of helium from Bratsk condensed gas deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, V.V.

    1995-09-01

    The close location of gas consumers to Bratsk condensed gas deposit and its high helium content have made it possible to organize the economical processing of gas and with small volumes of output (of the order of 440 million m{sup 3}/yr) to obtain each year more than 1 million m{sup 3} of helium, 421 million m{sup 3} of commercial gas, up to 3 thousand tons of liquefied gases, 16.4 thousand tons of gasoline fraction, 35 tons thousand of diesel fuel, and 2.5 thousand tons of boiler fuel. The formation gas contains (in vol. %): helium (0.27), hydrogen (0.12), carbon dioxide (0.24), methane (over 86), propane and butane (1.7), condensate (2.4), and also ethane and nitrogen. The materials from the industrial treatment of gas and condensate and their processing stages are combined in a single complex. The processing of gas and condensate extracted at the industrial separation plant is discussed. In the technology developed for the separation of helium, the energy of the gas itself is principally used, and preliminary absorption (or adsorption) purification of the gas to remove traces of carbon dioxide, a propane cooling unit, or additional compressors for transporting gas to the consumer are not required. Only in the latter stages of helium concentration and its purification is a circulatory compressor used to obtain liquid nitrogen.

  8. Economic analysis of condensers for water recovery in steam injected gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    De Paepe, M.; Huvenne, P.; Dick, E.

    1998-07-01

    Steam injection cycles are interesting for small power ranges because of the high efficiency and the relatively low investment costs. A big disadvantage is the consumption of water by the cycle. Water recovery is seldom realized in industrial practice. In this paper an analysis of the technical and economical possibilities of water recovery by condensation of water out of the exhaust gases is made. Three gas turbines are considered : the Kawasaki M1A-13CC (2.3 MWe), the Allison 501KH (6.8 MWe) and the General Electric LM1600 (17 MWe). For every gas turbine two types of condensers are designed. In the water cooled condenser finned tubes are used to cool the exhaust gases, flowing at the outside of the tubes. The water itself flows at the inside of the tubes and is cooled by a water to air cooler. In the air cooled condenser the exhaust gases flow at the inside of the tubes and the cooling air at the outside. The investment costs of the condensers is compared to the costs of the total installation. The investment costs are relatively smaller if the produced power goes up. The water cooled condenser with water to air cooler is cheaper than the air cooled condenser. Using a condenser results in higher exploitation costs due to the fans and pumps. It is shown that the air cooled condenser has lower exploitation costs than the water cooled one. Pay back time of the total installation does not significantly vary compared to the installation without recovery. Water prices are determined for which water recovery is profitable. For the water cooled condenser the turning point lies at 2.2 Euro/m; for the air cooled condenser this is 0.6 Euro/m.

  9. Chemical alteration of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) TFE teflon induced by exposure to electrons and inert-gas ions.

    PubMed

    Everett, Michael L; Hoflund, Gar B

    2005-09-08

    In this study the chemical alterations of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (TFE Teflon) by approximately 1.0-keV electrons and 1.0-keV He and Ar ions have been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The initial F/C atom ratio of 1.99 decreases to a steady-state value of 1.48 after 48 h of electron exposure. Exposure to either He+ or Ar+ decreases the initial F/C atom ratio from approximately 2 to a steady-state value of 1.12. The high-resolution XPS C 1s data indicate that new chemical states of carbon form as the F is removed and that the relative amounts of these states depend on the F content of the near-surface region. These states are most likely due to C bonded only to one F atom, C bonded only to other C atoms and C that have lost a pair of electrons through emission of F-. Exposures of the electron-damaged and He+- or Ar+-damaged surfaces to research-grade O2 result in chemisorption of very small amounts of O indicating that large quantities of reactive sites are not formed during the chemical erosion. Further exposure to the electron or ion fluxes quickly removes this chemisorbed oxygen. Exposure of the He+-damaged surface to air at room temperature results in the chemisorption of a larger amount of O than the O2 exposure but no N is adsorbed. The chemical alterations due to electrons and ions are compared with those caused by hyperthermal (approximately 5 eV) atomic oxygen (AO) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. The largest amount of damage is caused by AO followed by VUV, inert-gas ions, and then electrons.

  10. Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, Robert; Pruess, Karsten

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas.

  11. Isobaric Inert Gas Counterdiffusion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    20 minutes. A second group of animals pretreated with 10 milligrams of valium, intramuscularly, showed a time lag of 248 minutes with an SE of 24...low z 20 - T x Pf Is. Cc) tPo L Q" TIME - 15- . N 200 w X N= a30 _. Dr O N=aIO " H 1 0 z1 0-- , / a- . 0 05 1- 20 CRUSHING PRESSURE PCRUSH Pm-Po

  12. Spinor condensate of {sup 87}Rb as a dipolar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Swislocki, Tomasz; Gajda, Mariusz; RzaPzewski, Kazimierz

    2010-03-15

    We consider a spinor condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms in the F=1 hyperfine state confined in an optical dipole trap. Putting initially all atoms in the m{sub F}=0 component, we find that the system evolves toward a state of thermal equilibrium with kinetic energy equally distributed among all magnetic components. We show that this process is dominated by the dipolar interaction of magnetic spins rather than spin-mixing contact potential. Our results show that because of a dynamical separation of magnetic components, the spin-mixing dynamics in the {sup 87}Rb condensate is governed by the dipolar interaction which plays no role in a single-component rubidium system in a magnetic trap.

  13. One-step synthesis of MoO3 and MoO3-x nanostructures by condensation in gas: effect of the carrier gas.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Droguett, D E; Fuenzalida, V M

    2010-10-01

    MoO3 and MoO3-x nanostructures were grown in a simple one-step process by direct evaporation of MoO3 pellets from a tungsten resistive source in presence of helium or hydrogen at pressures from 100 to 1200 Pa. This method uses no templates, catalysts or oxidizing agents. It leads to one dimensional (1-D) crystalline nanostructures mixed with amorphous material in variable ratios. Amorphous structures grew preferentially when hydrogen was used as carrier gas while crystalline material predominated when helium was used. In fact, only crystalline structures were found when the evaporation was carried out under a helium pressure of 600 Pa with source temperatures between 763 and 910 degrees C. Hydrated MoO3 phases with different water concentrations were preferentially formed using hydrogen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy detected only molybdenum in its +6 oxidation state in the samples grown under helium, exhibiting the same chemical composition of the source material. Molybdenum in its +6 as well as its +5 oxidation states was detected in the samples obtained under hydrogen at 600 Pa. Hydroxyl groups were identified in samples grown using both gases. The effect of the helium pressure on the growth kinetics and crystallinity of the samples is discussed according to the kinetics conditions (supersaturation, evaporation, cooling and convection rates) driving to the formation of nanostructures in the inert-gas condensation. Finally, the effect of hydrogen on the growth of MoO3 is discussed.

  14. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

    2010-05-14

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

  15. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  16. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  17. Combined measurement of pulmonary inert gas washout and regional ventilation heterogeneity by MR of a single dose of hyperpolarized 3He.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Martin H; Parra-Robles, Juan; Ajraoui, Salma; Wild, Jim M

    2011-04-01

    Washout of inert gases is a measure of pulmonary function well-known in lung physiology. This work presents a method combining inert gas washout and spatially resolved imaging using hyperpolarized (3) He, thus providing complementary information on lung function and physiology. The nuclear magnetic resonance signal of intrapulmonary hyperpolarized (3) He is used to track the total amount of gas present within the lungs during multiple-breath washout via tidal breathing. Before the washout phase, 3D ventilation images are acquired using (3) He magnetic resonance imaging from the same dose of inhaled gas. The measured washout signal is corrected for T(1) relaxation and radiofrequency depletion, converting it into a quantity proportional to the apparent amount of gas within the lungs. The use of a pneumotachograph for acquisition of breathing volumes during washout, together with lung volumes derived from the magnetic resonance imaging data, permits assessment of the washout curves against physiological model predictions for healthy lungs. The shape of the resulting washout curves obtained from healthy volunteers matches the predictions, demonstrating the utility of the technique for the quantitative assessment of lung function. The proposed method can be readily integrated with a standard breath-hold (3) He ventilation imaging sequence, thus providing additional information from a single dose of gas.

  18. On the retrograde condensation behavior of lean natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgaris, M. E.; Peters, C. J.; de Swaan Arons, J.

    1995-05-01

    The occurrence of liquid dropout in natural gas pipelines may cause operational problems during storage, transport, and processing. Therefore, the availability of a model that accurately predicts the amount of liquid formed is of great importance for the natural gas industry. The objective of this study is to develop a thermodynamic model for the accurate prediction of the amount of liquid formed in natural gas pipelines at transportation conditions. As input, the model requires an accurate gas analysis. A modified Peng-Robinson equation of state was selected for the phase equilibrium calculations. Interaction parameters were optimized from experimental data at conditions of practical interest, i.e., at pressures 10 < p < 70 bar and at temperatures 250 < T < 290 K. For a number of “keysystems,” the interaction parameters were calculated from new accurate solubility data of heavy hydrocarbons in some of the main constituents of natural gas like methane and nitrogen. Also, an extensive experimental program was carried out to study the influence of minute amounts of nitrogen, ethane and carbon dioxide in methane on the solubility behavior of decane in these gas mixtures. From a sensitivity analysis, it could be concluded that the liquid dropout is influenced mainly by the concentration and characterization of C7-C13 fractions. In this work, two characterization procedures to represent these fractions are compared. For two types of lean natural gas, the model predictions are compared with field measurement data, recently supplied by the Dutch natural gas industry.

  19. Silurian shale origin for light oil, condensate, and gas in Algeria and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Zumberge, J.E.; Macko, S. Engel, M.

    1996-12-31

    Two of the largest gas fields in the world, Hasi R`Mel, Algeria and North Dome, Qatar, also contain substantial condensate and light oil reserves. Gas to source rock geochemical correlation is difficult due to the paucity of molecular parameters in the former although stable isotope composition is invaluable. However, by correlating source rocks with light oils and condensates associated with gas production using traditional geochemical parameters such as biomarkers and isotopes, a better understanding of the origin of the gas is achieved. Much of the crude oil in the Ghadames/Illizi Basins of Algeria has long been thought to have been generated from Silurian shales. New light oil discoveries in Saudi Arabia have also been shown to originate in basal euxinic Silurian shales. Key sterane and terpane biomarkers as well as the stable carbon isotopic compositions of the C15+ saturate and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions allow for the typing of Silurian-sourced, thermally mature light oils in Algeria and the Middle East. Even though biomarkers are often absent due to advanced thermal maturity, condensates can be correlated to the light oils using (1) carbon isotopes of the residual heavy hydrocarbon fractions, (2) light hydrocarbon distributions (e.g., C7 composition), and (3) compound specific carbon isotopic composition of the light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotopes of the C2-C4 gas components ran then be compared to the associated condensate and light oil isotopic composition.

  20. Silurian shale origin for light oil, condensate, and gas in Algeria and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Zumberge, J.E. ); Macko, S. ) Engel, M. )

    1996-01-01

    Two of the largest gas fields in the world, Hasi R'Mel, Algeria and North Dome, Qatar, also contain substantial condensate and light oil reserves. Gas to source rock geochemical correlation is difficult due to the paucity of molecular parameters in the former although stable isotope composition is invaluable. However, by correlating source rocks with light oils and condensates associated with gas production using traditional geochemical parameters such as biomarkers and isotopes, a better understanding of the origin of the gas is achieved. Much of the crude oil in the Ghadames/Illizi Basins of Algeria has long been thought to have been generated from Silurian shales. New light oil discoveries in Saudi Arabia have also been shown to originate in basal euxinic Silurian shales. Key sterane and terpane biomarkers as well as the stable carbon isotopic compositions of the C15+ saturate and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions allow for the typing of Silurian-sourced, thermally mature light oils in Algeria and the Middle East. Even though biomarkers are often absent due to advanced thermal maturity, condensates can be correlated to the light oils using (1) carbon isotopes of the residual heavy hydrocarbon fractions, (2) light hydrocarbon distributions (e.g., C7 composition), and (3) compound specific carbon isotopic composition of the light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotopes of the C2-C4 gas components ran then be compared to the associated condensate and light oil isotopic composition.

  1. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND CARBONACEOUS SOLIDS IN GAS-PHASE CONDENSATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, C.; Huisken, F.; Henning, Th.; Mutschke, H.; Jansa, I. Llamas

    2009-05-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile three to five ring systems. At condensation temperatures higher than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot asymptotic giant branch stars or Wolf-Rayet stars should be different and should have distinct spectral properties.

  2. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yuann, R Y; Schrock, V E; Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  3. Analysis of Vapour Liquid Equilibria in Unconventional Rich Liquid Gas Condensate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyński, Szymon

    2014-12-01

    At the beginning of 21st century, natural gas from conventional and unconventional reservoirs has become important fossil energy resource and its role as energy fuel has increased. The exploration of unconventional gas reservoirs has been discussed recently in many conferences and journals. The paper presents considerations which will be used to build the thermodynamic model that will describe the phenomenon of vapour - liquid equilibrium (VLE) in the retrograde condensation in rocks of ultra-low permeability and in the nanopores. The research will be limited to "tight gas" reservoirs (TGR) and "shale gas" reservoirs (SGR). Constructed models will take into account the phenomenon of capillary condensation and adsorption. These studies will be the base for modifications of existing compositional simulators

  4. The Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Iron- and Cobalt-Based Magnetic Nanoparticle Fluids Fabricated by Inert-Gas Condensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    surfactant-laden fluid eliminates agglomeration and produces a well-dispersed magnetic fluid in a single step [9]. Figure 1 shows a schematic illustration...are removed prior to making the magnetic fluid . Octoilo (vapor pressure = 10-7 torr) or Octoil-Se (vapor pressure = 10- torr) diffusion pump oil is...Fe4N (I 11) 0.5 y-Fe4N (110) -0.0 , , -10000 -50W 0 5000 1i000 H (0e) (a) (b) Figure 3: (a) Electron diffraction pattern for Fe4N magnetic fluid with

  5. Fluid-dynamical and poro-elastic coupling of gas permeability of inert and sorbing gases on an Australian sub-bituminous coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Krooss, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction and the coupling of slip-flow, a fluid dynamic phenomenon, and the cleat volume compressibility which is a poroelastic phenomenon has been investigated on two samples from the Taroom coal measure, Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. Measurements were performed using inert (helium and argon) and sorbing gases (nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide) at controlled effective stress. We observed the following regular sequence of permeability coefficients for the different gases: Helium >> argon => nitrogen > methane >> CO2 Even after slip-flow correction, different intrinsic permeability coefficients are obtained for the same sample if different gases are used in the tests. The permeability values determined with helium are largest while those measured with CO2 are lowest. Inert gases like helium and argon show higher apparent- and even slip flow-corrected permeability coefficients than sorbing gases like methane or carbon dioxide. This observation is contrary to the prediction that the slip-flow corrected permeability have to be the same for all gases. The cleat volume compressibility cf was evaluated using the 'matchstick approach' [1, 2]. The cleat volume compressibility coefficients cf are almost identical for the two samples taken from the same well. However, for one sample a strong dependence of the cf with the mean pore pressure was observed. This is attributed to a strong slip-flow effect caused by a narrow cleat system as compared to the sister sample. The cleat volume compressibility coefficient cf is almost the same for inert and sorbing gases. We conclude that the occurrence of slip-flow in coals is able to compensate the permeability reduction resulting from increasing effective stress. This should lead to a much higher productivity of coal bed methane reservoirs in the third production phase (pseudo-steady state phase; [3]). This conclusion appears to be also valid for shale gas and tight gas reservoirs, where the gas transport takes place in

  6. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  7. An Evaluation of the International Maritime Organization’s Gaseous Agents Test Protocol with Halocarbon Agents and an Inert Gas, 180 Deg Nozzles, and Low Temperature Conditioned Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    halocarbons and one inert gas) were included in this evaluation. These agents include heptafluoropropane C3HF7 (FM-200), perfluoropropane C3F8 (CEA-308...CEA-308 FM-200 NAF-SIII* Inergen** Chemical Formula CF3Br C3F8 C3HF7 82%CHClF2(R-22), 9.5% C2HCIF4 (R-124), 4.75% C2HCI2F3 (R-123), and 3.75...Product Wave Numbers Agent / Compound Wave Number (cm") FM-200 (C3HF7) 2034 CEA-308 ( C3F8 ) 2040 Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) 4003,4041, and 4077 The HF

  8. The Dynamics of Partial Cavities and Effect of Non-Condensable Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo A.; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2015-11-01

    Partial cavitation is encountered in a variety of common applications, from fuel injectors to lifting surfaces, and in general it has detrimental effects on the system wear and performance. Partial cavities undergoing auto-oscillation can cause large pressure oscillations, unsteady hydrodynamic loading, and significant noise. In the present study, experiments were conducted focusing on the dynamics of shedding cavities forming in a canonical geometry (downstream of a wedge apex). The inlet cavitation number was fixed at 2.0 and the Reynolds number based on the hydraulic diameter was 6x105. The effects of dissolved gas content and of non-condensable gas injection into the cavity were carefully studied utilizing dynamic pressure transducers and x-ray densitometry. Gas was injected either immediately downstream of the wedge's apex or further downstream into mid-cavity. The gas injected near the wedge apex was found to end up in the separated shear layer, and relatively miniscule amounts of gas were enough to significantly reduce the vapor production rate and dampen the cavity's auto-oscillations. In addition, the results suggest that non-condensable gas injection can cause the shedding mechanism to switch from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominated by re-entrant liquid jet. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research Grant N00014-14-1-0292, program manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  9. Effects of non-condensable gas on the dynamic oscillations of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuning

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is an essential topic of multiphase flow with a broad range of applications. Generally, there exists non-condensable gas in the liquid and a complex vapor/gas mixture bubble will be formed. A rigorous prediction of the dynamic behavior of the aforementioned mixture bubble is essential for the development of a complete cavitation model. In the present paper, effects of non-condensable gas on the dynamic oscillations of the vapor/gas mixture bubble are numerically investigated in great detail. For the completeness, a large parameter zone (e.g. bubble radius, frequency and ratio between gas and vapor) is investigated with many demonstrating examples. The mechanisms of mass diffusion are categorized into different groups with their characteristics and dominated regions given. Influences of non-condensable gas on the wave propagation (e.g. wave speed and attenuation) in the bubbly liquids are also briefly discussed. Specifically, the minimum wave speed is quantitatively predicted in order to close the pressure-density coupling relationship usually employed for the cavitation modelling. Finally, the application of the present finding on the development of cavitation model is demonstrated with a brief discussion of its influence on the cavitation dynamics. This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No.: 51506051).

  10. Confined Phase Envelope of Gas-Condensate Systems in Shale Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Stanislaw; Siemek, Jakub

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas from shales (NGS) and from tight rocks are one of the most important fossil energy resource in this and next decade. Significant increase in gas consumption, in all world regions, will be marked in the energy sector. The exploration of unconventional natural gas & oil reservoirs has been discussed recently in many conferences. This paper describes the complex phenomena related to the impact of adsorption and capillary condensation of gas-condensate systems in nanopores. New two phase saturation model and new algorithm for search capillary condensation area is discussed. The algorithm is based on the Modified Tangent Plane Criterion for Capillary Condensation (MTPCCC) is presented. The examples of shift of phase envelopes are presented for selected composition of gas-condensate systems. Gaz ziemny z łupków (NGS) oraz z ze złóż niskoprzepuszczalnych (typu `tight') staje się jednym z najważniejszych zasobów paliw kopalnych, w tym i następnym dziesięcioleciu. Znaczący wzrost zużycia gazu we wszystkich regionach świata zaznacza się głównie w sektorze energetycznym. Rozpoznawanie niekonwencjonalnych złóż gazu ziemnego i ropy naftowej w ostatnim czasie jest omawiane w wielu konferencjach. Niniejszy artykuł opisuje złożone zjawiska związane z wpływem adsorpcji i kapilarnej kondensacji w nanoporach w złożach gazowo-kondensatowych. Pokazano nowy dwufazowy model równowagowy dwufazowy i nowy algorytm wyznaczania krzywej nasycenia w obszarze kondensacji kapilarnej. Algorytm bazuje na kryterium zmodyfikowanym płaszczyzny stycznej dla kapilarnej kondensacji (MTPCCC). Przykłady zmiany krzywych nasycenia są przedstawiane w wybranym składzie systemów gazowo- kondensatowych

  11. Simulation of waves of partial discharges in a chain of gas inclusions located in condensed dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupershtokh, A. L.; Karpov, D. I.

    2016-10-01

    A stochastic model of partial discharges inside gas inclusions in condensed dielectrics was developed. The possibility of a "relay-race" wave propagation mechanism of partial discharges in a linear chain of gas inclusions is shown. The lattice Boltzmann method is successfully implemented for three-dimensional computer simulations of flows of dielectric fluid with bubbles. Growth and elongation of bubbles in a liquid dielectric under the action of a strong electric field are simulated. The physical model of propagation of partial discharges along a chain of gas bubbles in a liquid is formulated.

  12. [Effect of inert gas xenon on the functional state of nucleated cells of peripheral blood during freezing].

    PubMed

    Laptev, D S; Polezhaeva, T V; Zaitseva, O O; Khudyakov, A N; Utemov, S V; Knyazev, M G; Kostyaev, A A

    2015-01-01

    A new method of preservation of nucleated cells in the electric refrigerator with xenon. After slow freezing and storage is even one day at -80 °C persists for more than 60% leukocytes. Cell membranes are resistant to the vital dye. In 85% of granulocytes stored baseline lysosomal-cationic protein, reduced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity. Cryopreservation of biological objects in inert gases is a promising direction in the practice of medicine and can be an alternative to the traditional method using liquid nitrogen.

  13. Correlation of leak rates of various fluids with the leak rate of an inert gas in the same configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleier, Howard

    1990-01-01

    NASA is interested in field testing for possible leakage in their fueling systems; however, many fuels are hazardous to the extent that personnel cannot be on hand when the system is being monitored. It is proposed that an inert material such as helium be used on the field test, and that those results be calibrated to simulate the actual process. A technique such as this would allow personnel to be on site during the testing and use techniques to determine the behavior of the system that could not be used otherwise. This endeavor attempts to develop such a correlation. The results show promise, but more refinement and data are needed.

  14. Effect of disorder on condensation in the lattice gas model on a random graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handford, Thomas P.; Dear, Alexander; Pérez-Reche, Francisco J.; Taraskin, Sergei N.

    2014-07-01

    The lattice gas model of condensation in a heterogeneous pore system, represented by a random graph of cells, is studied using an exact analytical solution. A binary mixture of pore cells with different coordination numbers is shown to exhibit two phase transitions as a function of chemical potential in a certain temperature range. Heterogeneity in interaction strengths is demonstrated to reduce the critical temperature and, for large-enough degreeS of disorder, divides the cells into ones which are either on average occupied or unoccupied. Despite treating the pore space loops in a simplified manner, the random-graph model provides a good description of condensation in porous structures containing loops. This is illustrated by considering capillary condensation in a structural model of mesoporous silica SBA-15.

  15. The evaluation of the pyrochemistry for the treatment of Gen IV nuclear fuels Inert matrix chlorination studies in the gas phase or molten chloride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, S.; Péron, F.; Lacquement, J.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fuels for the future Gen IV nuclear reactors will be totally different from those of PWR, especially for the GFR concept including a closed cycle. In these reactors, fissile materials (carbides or nitrides of actinides) should be surrounded by an inert matrix. In order to build a reprocessing process scheme, the behavior of the potential inert matrices (silicon carbide, titanium nitride, and zirconium carbide and nitride) was studied by hydro- and pyrometallurgy. This paper deals with the chlorination results at high temperature by pyrometallurgy. For the first time, the reactivity of the matrix towards chlorine gas was assessed in the gas phase. TiN, ZrN and ZrC are very reactive from 400 °C whereas it is necessary to be over 900 °C for SiC to be as fast. In molten chloride melts, the bubbling of chlorine gas is less efficient than in gas phase but it is possible to attack the matrices. Electrochemical methods were also used to dissolve the refractory materials, leading to promising results with TiN, ZrN and ZrC. The massive SiC samples used were not conductive enough to be studied and in this case specific SiC-coated carbon electrodes were used. The key point of these studies was to find a method to separate the matrix compounds from the fissile material in order to link the head to the core of the process (electrochemical separation or liquid-liquid reductive extraction in the case of a pyrochemical reprocessing).

  16. Peptide bond formation via glycine condensation in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Van Dornshuld, Eric; Vergenz, Robert A; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2014-07-24

    Four unique gas phase mechanisms for peptide bond formation between two glycine molecules have been mapped out with quantum mechanical electronic structure methods. Both concerted and stepwise mechanisms, each leading to a cis and trans glycylglycine product (four mechanisms total), were examined with the B3LYP and MP2 methods and Gaussian atomic orbital basis sets as large as aug-cc-pVTZ. Electronic energies of the stationary points along the reaction pathways were also computed with explicitly correlated MP2-F12 and CCSD(T)-F12 methods. The CCSD(T)-F12 computations indicate that the electronic barriers to peptide bond formation are similar for all four mechanisms (ca. 32-39 kcal mol(-1) relative to two isolated glycine fragments). The smallest barrier (32 kcal mol(-1)) is associated with the lone transition state for the concerted mechanism leading to the formation of a trans peptide bond, whereas the largest barrier (39 kcal mol(-1)) was encountered along the concerted pathway leading to the cis configuration of the glycylglycine dipeptide. Two significant barriers are encountered for the stepwise mechanisms. For both the cis and trans pathways, the early electronic barrier is 36 kcal mol(-1) and the subsequent barrier is approximately 1 kcal mol(-1) lower. A host of intermediates and transition states lie between these two barriers, but they all have very small relative electronic energies (ca. ± 4 kcal mol(-1)). The isolated cis products (glycylglycine + H2O) are virtually isoenergetic with the isolated reactants (within -1 kcal mol(-1)), whereas the trans products are about 5 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy. In both products, however, the water can hydrogen bond to the dipeptide and lower the energy by roughly 5-9 kcal mol(-1). This study indicates that the concerted process leading to a trans configuration about the peptide bond is marginally favored both thermodynamically (exothermic by ca. 5 kcal mol(-1)) and kinetically (barrier height ≈ 32 kcal mol(-1

  17. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas Injection on Cavitation Dynamics of Partial Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkiharju, Simo A.; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2015-12-01

    Partial cavities can undergo auto-oscillation causing large pressure pulsations, unsteady loading of machinery and generate significant noise. In the current experiments fully shedding cavities forming in the separated flow region downstream of a wedge were investigated. The Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter was of the order of one million. The cavity dynamics were studied with and without injection of non-condensable gas into the cavity. Gas was injected directly into the cavitation region downstream of the wedge's apex, or into the recirculating region at mid cavity so that for the same amount of injected gas less ended up in the shear layer. It was found that relatively miniscule amounts of gas introduced into the shear layer at the cavity interface can reduce vapour production and dampen the auto oscillations, and the same amount of gas injected into the mid cavity would not have the same effect. The authors also examined whether the injected gas can switch the shedding mechanism from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominantly by reentrant jet.

  18. Lorentz-violating effects in the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal bosonic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, Rodolfo; da Silva, Kleber A. T.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the effects of Lorentz-violation in the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of an ideal boson gas, by assessing both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic limits. Our model describes a massive complex scalar field coupled to a CPT-even and Lorentz-violating background. We first analyze the nonrelativistic case, at this level by using experimental data, we obtain upper-bounds for some LIV parameters. In the sequel, we have constructed the partition function for the relativistic ideal boson gas which to be able of a consistent description requires the imposition of severe restrictions on some LIV coefficients. In both cases, we have demonstrated that the LIV contributions are contained in an overall factor, which multiplies almost all thermodynamical properties. An exception is the fraction of the condensed particles.

  19. Oxidative and inert pyrolysis on-line coupled to gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection: On the pyrolysis products of tobacco additives.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Meike; Hutzler, Christoph; Henkler, Frank; Luch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    According to European legislation, tobacco additives may not increase the toxicity or the addictive potency of the product, but there is an ongoing debate on how to reliably characterize and measure such properties. Further, too little is known on pyrolysis patterns of tobacco additives to assume that no additional toxicological risks need to be suspected. An on-line pyrolysis technique was used and coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify the pattern of chemical species formed upon thermal decomposition of 19 different tobacco additives like raw cane sugar, licorice or cocoa. To simulate the combustion of a cigarette it was necessary to perform pyrolysis at inert conditions as well as under oxygen supply. All individual additives were pyrolyzed under inert or oxidative conditions at 350, 700 and 1000°C, respectively, and the formation of different toxicants was monitored. We observed the generation of vinyl acrylate, fumaronitrile, methacrylic anhydride, isobutyric anhydride and 3-buten-2-ol exclusively during pyrolysis of tobacco additives. According to the literature, these toxicants so far remained undetectable in tobacco or tobacco smoke. Further, the formation of 20 selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with molecular weights of up to 278Da was monitored during pyrolysis of cocoa in a semi-quantitative approach. It was shown that the adding of cocoa to tobacco had no influence on the relative amounts of the PAHs formed.

  20. Assessment of MELCOR condensation models with the presence of noncondensable gas in natural convection flow regime

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Dhongik S; Jo, HangJin; Corradini, Michael L

    2017-04-01

    Condensation of steam vapor is an important mode of energy removal from the reactor containment. The presence of noncondensable gas complicates the process and makes it difficult to model. MELCOR, one of the more widely used system codes for containment analyses, uses the heat and mass transfer analogy to model condensation heat transfer. To investigate previously reported nodalization-dependence in natural convection flow regime, MELCOR condensation model as well as other models are studied. The nodalization-dependence issue is resolved by using physical length from the actual geometry rather than node size of each control volume as the characteristic length scale formore » MELCOR containment analyses. At the transition to turbulent natural convection regime, the McAdams correlation for convective heat transfer produces a better prediction compared to the original MELCOR model. The McAdams correlation is implemented in MELCOR and the prediction is validated against a set of experiments on a scaled AP600 containment. The MELCOR with our implemented model produces improved predictions. For steam molar fractions in the gas mixture greater than about 0.58, the predictions are within the uncertainty margin of the measurements. The simulation results still underestimate the heat transfer from the gas-steam mixture, implying that conservative predictions are provided.« less

  1. Local Observation of Pair Condensation in a Fermi Gas at Unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingham, M. G.; Fenech, K.; Hoinka, S.; Vale, C. J.

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of the local (homogeneous) density-density response function of a Fermi gas at unitarity using spatially resolved Bragg spectroscopy. By analyzing the Bragg response across one axis of the cloud, we extract the response function for a uniform gas which shows a clear signature of the Bose-Einstein condensation of pairs of fermions when the local temperature drops below the superfluid transition temperature. The method we use for local measurement generalizes a scheme for obtaining the local pressure in a harmonically trapped cloud from the line density and can be adapted to provide any homogeneous parameter satisfying the local density approximation.

  2. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  3. Role of inert gas additive on dry etch patterning of InGaP in planar inductively coupled BCl 3 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. W.; Lim, W. T.; Baek, I. K.; Yoo, S. R.; Jeon, M. H.; Cho, G. S.; Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The dry etch characteristics of InGaP in BCl 3 planar inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) with additions of Ar or Ne were determined. The inert gas additive provided enhanced etch rates relative to pure BCl 3 and Ne addition in particular produced much higher etch rates at low ratios of BCl 3 in the mixture. The etched features tended to have sloped sidewalls and much rougher surfaces than for GaAs and AlGaAs etched under the same conditions. The practical effect of the Ar or Ne addition was the ability to operate the ICP source over a somewhat broader range of pressures and still maintain practical etch rates. The use of room temperature BCl 3-based etching in a planar ICP appears feasible for base and emitter mesa applications in InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors.

  4. Effect of Inert Gas Additive Species on Cl(2) High Density Plasma Etching of Compound Semiconductors: Part 1. GaAs and GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.C.; Jung, K.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-12-23

    The role of the inert gas additive (He, Ar, Xe) to C12 Inductively Coupled Plasmas for dry etching of GaAs and GaSb was examined through the effect on etch rate, surface roughness and near-surface stoichiometry. The etch rates for both materials go through a maximum with Clz 0/0 in each type of discharge (C12/'He, C12/Ar, C12/Xc), reflecting the need to have efficient ion-assisted resorption of the etch products. Etch yields initially increase strongly with source power as the chlorine neutral density increases, but decrease again at high powers as the etching becomes reactant-limited. The etched surfaces are generally smoother with Ax or Xe addition, and maintain their stoichiometry.

  5. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys.

  6. Condensate fraction of a resonant Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling in three and two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anna, L.; Mazzarella, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2011-09-15

    We study the effects of laser-induced Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling along the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-Bose-Einstein condensate (BCS-BEC) crossover of a Feshbach resonance for a two-spin-component Fermi gas. We calculate the condensate fraction in three and two dimensions and find that this quantity characterizes the crossover better than other quantities, like the chemical potential or the pairing gap. By considering both the singlet and the triplet pairings, we calculate the condensate fraction and show that a large-enough spin-orbit interaction enhances the singlet condensate fraction in the BCS side while suppressing it on the BEC side.

  7. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  8. Method and apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid in a binary power system

    DOEpatents

    Mohr, Charles M.; Mines, Gregory L.; Bloomfield, K. Kit

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid utilized in a thermodynamic system comprises a membrane having an upstream side operatively connected to the thermodynamic system so that the upstream side of the membrane receives a portion of the working fluid. The first membrane separates the non-condensible gas from the working fluid. A pump operatively associated with the membrane causes the portion of the working fluid to contact the membrane and to be returned to the thermodynamic system.

  9. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF... that: (1) Hold and interbarrier spaces on a vessel with full secondary barriers are inerted so that the... interbarrier spaces contain only dry air or inert gas on: (i) A vessel with partial secondary barriers; (ii)...

  10. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  11. Microbial reduction of sulfate injected to gas condensate plumes in cold groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Armstrong, James; Mayer, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    Despite a rapid expansion over the past decade in the reliance on intrinsic bioremediation to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater, significant research gaps remain. Although it has been demonstrated that bacterial sulfate reduction can be a key electron accepting process in many petroleum plumes, little is known about the rate of this reduction process in plumes derived from crude oil and gas condensates at cold-climate sites (mean temperature < 10 °C), and in complex hydrogeological settings such as silt/clay aquitards. In this field study, sulfate was injected into groundwater contaminated by gas condensate plumes at two petroleum sites in Alberta, Canada to enhance in-situ bioremediation. In both cases the groundwater near the water table had low temperature (6-9 °C). Monitoring data had provided strong evidence that bacterial sulfate reduction was a key terminal electron accepting process (TEAP) in the natural attenuation of dissolved hydrocarbons at these sites. At each site, water with approximately 2000 mg/L sulfate and a bromide tracer was injected into a low-sulfate zone within a condensate-contaminant plume. Monitoring data collected over several months yielded conservative estimates for sulfate reduction rates based on zero-order kinetics (4-6 mg/L per day) or first-order kinetics (0.003 and 0.01 day - 1 ). These results favor the applicability of in-situ bioremediation techniques in this region, under natural conditions or with enhancement via sulfate injection.

  12. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  13. Continuous measurement of multiple inert and respiratory gas exchange in an anaesthetic breathing system by continuous indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Andrews, Christopher; Peyton, Philip; Humphries, Craig; Robinson, Gavin; Lithgow, Brian

    2009-02-01

    A method was tested which permits continuous monitoring from a breathing system of the rate of uptake of multiple gas species, such as occurs in patients during inhalational anaesthesia. The method is an indirect calorimetry technique which uses fresh gas rotameters for control, regulation and measurement of the gas flows into the system, with continuous sampling of mixed exhaust gas, and frequent automated recalibration to maintain accuracy. Its accuracy was tested in 16 patients undergoing pre-cardiopulmonary bypass coronary artery surgery, breathing mixtures of oxygen/air and sevoflurane with/without nitrous oxide, by comparison with the reverse Fick method. Overall mean bias [95% confidence interval (CI)] of rate of uptake was 17.9 [7.3 to 28.5] ml min(-1) for oxygen, 0.04 [-0.42 to 0.50] ml min(-1) for sevoflurane, 10.9 [-16.1 to 37.8] for CO(2), and 8.8 [-14.8 to 32.4] ml min(-1) for nitrous oxide where present. The method proved to be accurate and precise, and allows continuous monitoring of exchange of multiple gases using standard gas analysis devices.

  14. Half-space problem of unsteady evaporation and condensation of polyatomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Masashi; Yano, Takeru

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of polyatomic version of the ellipsoidal-statistical Bhatnager-Gross-Krook (ES-BGK) model, we consider time-periodic gas flows in a semi-infinite expanse of an initially equilibrium polyatomic gas (methanol) bounded by its planar condensed phase. The kinetic boundary condition at the vapor-liquid interface is assumed to be the complete condensation condition with periodically time-varying macroscopic variables (temperature, saturated vapor density and velocity of the interface), and the boundary condition at infinity is the local equilibrium distribution function. The time scale of variation of macroscopic variables is assumed to be much larger than the mean free time of gas molecules, and the variations of those from a reference state are assumed to be sufficiently small. We numerically investigate thus formulated time-dependent half-space problem for the polyatomic version of linearized ES-BGK model equation with the finite difference method for the case of the Strouhal number Sh=0.01 and 0.1. It is shown that the amplitude of the mass flux at the interface is the maximum, and the phase difference in time between the mass flux and v∞ - vℓ (v∞: vapor velocity at infinity, vℓ: velocity of the vapor-liquid interface) is the minimum absolute value, when the phase difference in time between the liquid surface temperature (the saturated vapor density) and the velocity of interface is close to zero.

  15. The relationship between inert gas wash-out and radioactive tracer microspheres in measurement of bone blood flow: effect of decreased arterial supply and venous congestion on bone blood flow in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Kiaer, T; Dahl, B; Lausten, G S

    1993-01-01

    Several methods have been employed in the study of bone perfusion. We used a method of determining inert gas wash-out by mass spectrometry in the study of blood flow rates in pigs. The method was validated by comparison of the result obtained with inert gas wash-out to that with measurement by microspheres. Furthermore, the effect of decreased inlet flow and venous congestion on the bone perfusion data was tested. The undisturbed bone blood flow was not significantly different when measured with wash-out of inert gas (7 +/- 0.7 ml/min/100 g) or with microspheres (9 +/- 2.9 ml/min/100 g), and the methods were correlated. Perfusion was reduced significantly, to 20% of the original value, after arterial occlusion. The changes in wash-out curves and accumulation of radioactive tracer provided substantial evidence for impaired intraosseous circulation following venous obstruction also. In conclusion, the study showed that this method of determining inert gas wash-out is feasible for studies of local perfusion rates in bone. The flow rates obtained by wash-out correlated well with the results of microsphere studies. In this animal model, both methods detected a fivefold reduction in flow rate after clamping of the arterial inflow. Obstruction of the venous outflow also impaired blood flow and lowered the cellular supply.

  16. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas on Cavity Dynamics and Sheet to Cloud Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Partial cavitation occurs in numerous industrial and naval applications. Cavities on lifting surfaces, in cryogenic rocket motors or in fuel injectors can damage equipment and in general be detrimental to the system performance, especially as partial cavities can undergo auto-oscillation causing large pressure pulsations, unsteady loading of machinery and generate significant noise. In the current experiments incipient, intermittent cloud shedding and fully shedding cavities forming in the separated flow region downstream of a wedge were investigated. The Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter was of the order of one million. Gas was injected directly into the cavitation region downstream of the wedge's apex or into the recirculating region such that with the same amount of injected gas less ended up in the shear layer. The cavity dynamics were studied with and without gas injection. The hypothesis to be tested were that i) relatively miniscule amounts of gas introduced into the shear layer at the cavity interface can reduce vapor production and ii) gas introduced into the separated region can dampen the auto oscillations. The authors also examined whether the presence of gas can switch the shedding mechanism from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominantly by re-entrant jet. The work was supported by ONR Grant Number N00014-11-1-0449.

  17. Intraspecific variation in tracheal volume in the American locust, Schistocerca americana, measured by a new inert gas method.

    PubMed

    Lease, Hilary M; Wolf, Blair O; Harrison, Jon F

    2006-09-01

    The volume of a tracheal system influences breath-holding capacity and provides an index of an insect's investment in its respiratory system. Here, we describe a new, generally applicable method to measure tracheal volume that enables repeatable determinations on live animals. Animals are isolated in a closed chamber of a known volume and equilibrated with a helium:oxygen gas mixture. The chamber is then rapidly flushed with a nitrogen:oxygen gas mixture to eliminate the helium surrounding the animal, and sealed. After a period of time sufficient to allow equilibration of helium between tracheal system and chamber air, a gas sample is taken from the chamber, and tracheal volumes are calculated from the helium content of the sample, using a gas chromatograph. We show that relative investment in the tracheal system increases with age/size in the grasshopper; tracheal volume scales with mass to the power 1.3. This increased proportional investment in the tracheal system provides a mechanistic basis for the enhanced respiratory capacity of older grasshoppers. Tracheal volumes decrease strongly as grasshoppers grow within an instar stage, explaining reduced safety margins for oxygen delivery. Finally, tracheal volumes are smaller in gravid females than males, probably due to compression of air sacs by eggs.

  18. Surface Region of Superfluid Helium as an Inhomogeneous Bose-Condensed Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, A.; Stringari, S.

    1996-01-01

    We present arguments that the low density surface region of self-bounded superfluid 4He systems is an inhomogeneous dilute Bose gas, with almost all of the atoms occupying the same single-particle state at T = 0. Numerical evidence for this complete Bose-Einstein condensation was first given by the many-body variational calculations of 4He droplets by Lewart, Pandharipande, and Pieper in 1988 [Phys. Rev. B 37, 4950 (1988)]. We show that the low density surface region can be treated rigorously using a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the Bose order parameter.

  19. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  20. Hydrogen-bonded ring closing and opening of protonated methanol clusters H(+)(CH3OH)(n) (n = 4-8) with the inert gas tagging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Cheng; Hamashima, Toru; Yamazaki, Ryoko; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Yuta; Mizuse, Kenta; Fujii, Asuka; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2015-09-14

    The preferential hydrogen bond (H-bond) structures of protonated methanol clusters, H(+)(MeOH)n, in the size range of n = 4-8, were studied by size-selective infrared (IR) spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. The IR spectra of bare clusters were compared with those with the inert gas tagging by Ar, Ne, and N2, and remarkable changes in the isomer distribution with the tagging were found for clusters with n≥ 5. The temperature dependence of the isomer distribution of the clusters was calculated by the quantum harmonic superposition approach. The observed spectral changes with the tagging were well interpreted by the fall of the cluster temperature with the tagging, which causes the transfer of the isomer distribution from the open and flexible H-bond network types to the closed and rigid ones. Anomalous isomer distribution with the tagging, which has been recently found for protonated water clusters, was also found for H(+)(MeOH)5. The origin of the anomaly was examined by the experiments on its carrier gas dependence.

  1. Laboratory Infrared Spectroscopy of Oxide and Carbide Nanoparticles Condensed from the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschke, Harald; Clément, Dominik; Posch, Thomas

    Oxide and carbide dust belong to the first condensates in either oxygen- or carbon-rich stellar outflows. Evidence for their presence in such circumstellar environments comes from infrared spectroscopy (e.g. the 13 micron and 11+ micron bands of M and C stars) and from the study of meteoritic presolar grains (corundum, SiC). We have measured in the laboratory the infrared absorption spectra of oxide and carbide particles produced in condensation experiments. For the production we applied the laser pyrolysis technique in a gas flow reactor as well as laser ablation of metals in reactive atmospheres. The products have been analysed by electron microscopy and other techniques for determination of their chemical composition and structure. They consist of nanoparticles of 5-10 nm size. Silicon carbide particles produced by laser pyrolysis are crystalline (in the cubic SiC structure) whereas oxide nanoparticles produced by laser ablation have a strongly disordered lattice. For the spectroscopic measurement, the particles are extracted from the condensation zone by a molecular beam technique and are deposited on a KBr substrate. At the same time, an Ar ice layer can be grown on the substrate which then incorporates the particles to isolate them from each other. The in-situ measurement also prevents the particles from degradation by environmental influences, e.g. carbonate formation. We discuss the spectra of isolated vs. agglomerated particles and their applicability for comparison with infrared observations of AGB star outflows.

  2. Visualization of inert gas wash-out during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation using fluorine-19 MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ursula; Scholz, Alexander; Terekhov, Maxim; Koebrich, Rainer; David, Matthias; Schreiber, Laura Maria

    2010-11-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation is looked upon as a lung-protective ventilation strategy. For a further clarification of the physical processes promoting gas transport, a visualization of gas flow and the distribution of ventilation are of considerable interest. Therefore, fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging of the imaging gas octafluorocyclobutane (C(4) F(8) ) during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation was performed in five healthy pigs. For that, a mutually compatible ventilation-imaging system was set up and transverse images were acquired every 5 sec using FLASH sequences on a 1.5 T scanner. Despite a drop in signal-to-noise ratio after the onset of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for each pig, the four experiments could be analyzed. A mean wash-out time (τ) at 5 Hz of 52.7 ± 18 sec and 125.9 ± 39 sec at 10 Hz, respectively, were found for regions of interest including the whole lung. This is in agreement with the clinical findings, in that wash-out of respiratory gases is significantly prolonged for increased high-frequency oscillatory ventilation frequencies. Our study could be a good starting-point for a further optimization of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

  3. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  4. Monodisperse, submicrometer droplets via condensation of microfluidic-generated gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minseok; Matsuura, Naomi

    2012-09-10

    Microfluidics (MFs) can produce monodisperse droplets with precise size control. However, the synthesis of monodisperse droplets much smaller than the minimum feature size of the microfluidic device (MFD) remains challenging, thus limiting the production of submicrometer droplets. To overcome the minimum micrometer-scale droplet sizes that can be generated using typical MFDs, the droplet material is heated above its boiling point (bp), and then MFs is used to produce monodisperse micrometer-scale bubbles (MBs) that are easily formed in the size regime where standard MFDs have excellent size control. After MBs are formed, they are cooled, condensing into dramatically smaller droplets that are beyond the size limit achievable using the original MFD, with a size decrease corresponding to the density difference between the gas and liquid phases of the droplet material. Herein, it is shown experimentally that monodisperse, submicrometer droplets of predictable sizes can be condensed from a monodisperse population of MBs as generated by MFs. Using perfluoropentane (PFP) as a representative solvent due to its low bp (29.2 °C), it is demonstrated that monodisperse PFP MBs can be produced at MFD temperatures >3.6 °C above the bp of PFP over a wide range of sizes (i.e., diameters from 2 to 200 μm). Independent of initial size, the generated MBs shrink rapidly in size from about 3 to 0 °C above the bp of PFP, corresponding to a phase change from gas to liquid, after which they shrink more slowly to form fully condensed droplets with diameters 5.0 ± 0.1 times smaller than the initial size of the MBs, even in the submicrometer size regime. This new method is versatile and flexible, and may be applied to any type of low-bp solvent for the manufacture of different submicrometer droplets for which precisely controlled dimensions are required.

  5. Experimental investigation on fiber and CO2 inert gas fusion cutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scintilla, L. D.; Tricarico, L.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of processing parameters and laser source type on cutting edge quality of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and differences in cutting efficiency between fiber and CO2 lasers were studied. A first part of the cutting experiments compared a fiber and CO2 laser source when cutting 1 mm thick sheets in continuous wave mode and using Argon as an assist gas. The effects of cutting speed and assist gas pressure were investigated and optimal conditions were identified. In the second part of the experimental investigation, 3.3 mm thick sheets were cut using fiber laser. Focal position and cutting speed were varied in order to detect the optimal combination of processing parameters to obtain the best edge quality. For both sheet thicknesses investigated, surface roughness, dross height, and striation pattern inclination were measured. Cutting quality assessment and classification was carried out according to UNI EN ISO 9013 standard. Results showed that productivity, process efficiency and cutting edges quality obtained using fiber lasers outperform CO2 laser performances and therefore are considered suitable for application like sheet metal trimming.

  6. The improvement of the effectiveness of using natural gas in hot-water boilers by means of condensing economizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vnukov, A. K.; Rozanova, F. A.

    2013-07-01

    The paper describes the results of the study of the mathematical model of a condensing economizer (CE) interacting with the technological parameter of the particular district heating station. This model has been developed by the authors. It is shown that the CE, due to condensation of water vapor and augmentation of convective heat exchange between products of natural gas combustion, makes it possible to save up to 8% of fuel.

  7. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Sazzad Hossain, Md.; Muktadir Rahman, Md.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  8. Passive Fuel Tank Inerting Systems for Ground Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    operating principle is to supply an inert gas , usually nitrogen (N2 ) or carbon dioxide (CO), into the ullage or dry bay. The inert gas dilutes ?he available...logistics and economics tend to favor N2 . The source of the inert gas can be either a liquid (cryogenic) supply or an onboard generator. Liquid supplies have...Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 5.1.3. Damage Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5.2. Current Fuel SIstem Descriptions . . . . . . . 14 5.2.1

  9. Carbon Monoxide Gas Is Not Inert, but Global, in Its Consequences for Bacterial Gene Expression, Iron Acquisition, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Lauren K.; Begg, Ronald; Jesse, Helen E.; van Beilen, Johan W.A.; Ali, Salar; Svistunenko, Dimitri; McLean, Samantha; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Carbon monoxide is a respiratory poison and gaseous signaling molecule. Although CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) deliver CO with temporal and spatial specificity in mammals, and are proven antimicrobial agents, we do not understand the modes of CO toxicity. Our aim was to explore the impact of CO gas per se, without intervention of CORMs, on bacterial physiology and gene expression. Results: We used tightly controlled chemostat conditions and integrated transcriptomic datasets with statistical modeling to reveal the global effects of CO. CO is known to inhibit bacterial respiration, and we found expression of genes encoding energy-transducing pathways to be significantly affected via the global regulators, Fnr, Arc, and PdhR. Aerobically, ArcA—the response regulator—is transiently phosphorylated and pyruvate accumulates, mimicking anaerobiosis. Genes implicated in iron acquisition, and the metabolism of sulfur amino acids and arginine, are all perturbed. The global iron-related changes, confirmed by modulation of activity of the transcription factor Fur, may underlie enhanced siderophore excretion, diminished intracellular iron pools, and the sensitivity of CO-challenged bacteria to metal chelators. Although CO gas (unlike H2S and NO) offers little protection from antibiotics, a ruthenium CORM is a potent adjuvant of antibiotic activity. Innovation: This is the first detailed exploration of global bacterial responses to CO, revealing unexpected targets with implications for employing CORMs therapeutically. Conclusion: This work reveals the complexity of bacterial responses to CO and provides a basis for understanding the impacts of CO from CORMs, heme oxygenase activity, or environmental sources. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 1013–1028. PMID:26907100

  10. Classification of gasoline by octane number and light gas condensate fractions by origin with using dielectric or gas-chromatographic data and chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    Rudnev, Vasiliy A; Boichenko, Alexander P; Karnozhytskiy, Pavel V

    2011-05-15

    The approach for classification of gasoline by octane number and light gas condensate fractions by origin with using dielectric permeability data has been proposed and compared with classification of same samples on the basis of gas-chromatographic data. The precision of dielectric permeability measurements was investigated by using ANOVA. The relative standard deviation of dielectric permeability was in the range from 0.3 to 0.5% for the range of dielectric permeability from 1.8 to 4.4. The application of exploratory chemometrics tools (cluster analysis and principal component analysis) allow to explicitly differentiate the gasoline and light gas condensate fractions into groups of samples related to specific octane number or origin. The neural networks allow to perfectly classifying the gasoline and light gas condensate fractions.

  11. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Gas; the First 70 Years and Some Recent Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, E. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of ``How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why?'' We will review some of our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging. This article is our ``Nobel Lecture'' and as such takes a relatively personal approach to the story of the development of experimental Bose-Einstein condensation. For a somewhat more scholarly treatment of the history, the interested reader is referred to E. A. Cornell, J. R. Ensher and C. E. Wieman, ``Experiments in dilute atomic Bose-Einstein condensation in Bose-Einstein Condensation in Atomic Gases, Proceedings of the International School of Physics ``Enrico Fermi'' Course CXL'' (M. Inguscio, S. Stringari and C. E. Wieman, Eds., Italian Physical Society, 1999), pp. 15-66, which is also available as cond-mat/9903109. For a reasonably complete technical review of the three years of explosive progress that immediately followed the first observation of BEC, we recommend reading the above article in combination with the corresponding review from Ketterle, cond-mat/9904034.

  12. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  13. Inert electrode connection

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, John D.; Woods, Robert W.; DeYoung, David H.; Ray, Siba P.

    1985-01-01

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000-20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C.

  14. Inert electrode connection

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, J.D.; Woods, R.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Ray, S.P.

    1985-02-19

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000--20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1,200--1,500 C. 5 figs.

  15. The Role of Spraying Parameters and Inert Gas Shrouding in Hybrid Water-Argon Plasma Spraying of Tungsten and Copper for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějíček, J.; Kavka, T.; Bertolissi, G.; Ctibor, P.; Vilémová, M.; Mušálek, R.; Nevrlá, B.

    2013-06-01

    Tungsten-based coatings have potential application in the plasma-facing components in future nuclear fusion reactors. By the combination of refractory tungsten with highly thermal conducting copper, or steel as a construction material, functionally graded coatings can be easily obtained by plasma spraying, and may result in the development of a material with favorable properties. During plasma spraying of these materials in the open atmosphere, oxidation is an important issue, which could have adverse effects on their properties. Among the means to control it is the application of inert gas shrouding, which forms the subject of this study and represents a lower-cost alternative to vacuum or low-pressure plasma spraying, potentially applicable also for spraying of large surfaces or spacious components. It is a continuation of recent studies focused on the effects of various parameters of the hybrid water-argon torch on the in-flight behavior of copper and tungsten powders and the resultant coatings. In the current study, argon shrouding with various configurations of the shroud was applied. The effects of torch parameters, such as power and argon flow rate, and powder morphology were also investigated. Their influence on the particle in-flight behavior as well as the structure, composition and properties of the coatings were quantified. With the help of auxiliary calculations, the mass changes of the powder particles, associated with oxidation and evaporation, were assessed.

  16. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Min Dong; Shen Jun; Lai Shiqiang; Chen Jie

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, the effects of heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates were investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests and tensile tests. The results show that with an increase of the heat input, the grains both in the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone coarsen and the width of the heat-affected zone increased. Moreover, an increase of the heat input resulted in a decrease of the continuous {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase and an increase of the granular {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase in both the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint increased with an increase of the heat input, while, too high a heat input resulted in a decrease of the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint. In addition, the average microhardness of the heat-affected zone and fusion zone decreased sharply with an increase of the heat input and then decreased slowly at a relatively high heat input.

  17. Effects of CaF2 Coating on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Tungsten Inert Gas Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Wang, Linzhi; Peng, Dong; Wang, Dan

    2012-11-01

    The effects of CaF2 coating on the macromorphologies of the welded seams were studied by morphological analysis. Microstructures and mechanical properties of butt joints welded with different amounts of CaF2 coatings were investigated using optical microscopy and tensile tests. The welding defects formed in the welded seams and the fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. An increase in the amount of CaF2 coating deteriorated the appearances of the welded seams but it improved the weld penetration depth and the depth/width ( D/ W) ratio of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded joints. The α-Mg grains and Mg17(Al,Zn)12 intermetallic compound (IMC) were coarser in the case of a higher amount of CaF2 coating. The increase in the amount of CaF2 coating reduced the porosities and total length of solidification cracks in the fusion zone (FZ). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) value and elongation increased at first and then decreased sharply.

  18. Tungsten Inert Gas and Friction Stir Welding Characteristics of 4-mm-Thick 2219-T87 Plates at Room Temperature and -196 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuefeng; Deng, Ying; Yin, Zhimin; Xu, Guofu

    2014-06-01

    2219-T87 aluminum alloy is widely used for fabricating liquid rocket propellant storage tank, due to its admirable cryogenic property. Welding is the dominant joining method in the manufacturing process of aerospace components. In this study, the tungsten inert gas welding and friction stir welding (FSW) characteristics of 4-mm-thick 2219-T87 alloy plate at room temperature (25 °C) and deep cryogenic temperature (-196 °C) were investigated by property measurements and microscopy methods. The studied 2219 base alloy exhibits a low strength plane anisotropy and excellent room temperature and cryogenic mechanical properties. The ultimate tensile strength values of TIG and FSW welding joints can reach 265 and 353 MPa at room temperature, and 342 and 438 MPa at -196 °C, respectively. The base metal consists of elongated deformed grains and many nano-scaled θ (Al2Cu) aging precipitates. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the TIG joint are characterized by coarsening dendritic grains and equiaxed recrystallized grains, respectively. The FSW-welded joint consists of the weld nugget zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and HAZ. In the weld nugget zone, a micro-scaled sub-grain structure is the main microstructure characteristic. The TMAZ and HAZ are both characterized by coarsened aging precipitates and elongated deformed grains. The excellent FSW welding properties are attributed to the preservation of the working structures and homogenous chemical compositions.

  19. Controlled inert gas environment for enhanced chlorine and fluorine detection in the visible and near-infrared by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimellis, George; Hamilton, Stephen; Giannoudakos, Aggelos; Kompitsas, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Efficient quantitative detection for halogens is necessary in a wide range of applications, ranging from pharmaceutical products to air polluting hazardous gases or organic compounds used as chemical weapons. Detection of the non-metallic elements such as fluorine (F) and chlorine (Cl) presents particular difficulty, because strong emission lines originating from their resonance states lie in the VUV spectral range (110-190 nm). In the present work we detect F and Cl in the upper visible and in the near IR (650-850 nm) under controlled inert gas ambient atmosphere. Investigation of the controlled atmosphere effects suggests that there exists an optimum pressure range that optimizes signal strength and quality. Ablation and ionization were achieved with a UV laser at 355 nm, and a gated GaAs photocathode-based detector was used for detection with quantum efficiency in the range of 20% in the wavelengths of interest. Our results indicate that our approach provides quantitative detection with linearity over at least two orders of magnitude that is achieved without the need for Internal Standardization Method, and improved limits of detection. In particular, fluorine has been detected for concentration values down to 0.03 wt.% Definite spectral assignment revealing all major emission lines centered around 837 nm for F and 687 nm for Cl has been obtained for the first time in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application.

  20. Colloidal gas-liquid condensation of polystyrene latex particles with intermediate kappa a values (5 to 160, a > kappa(-1)).

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masamichi; Kitano, Ryota

    2010-02-16

    Polystyrene latex particles showed gas-liquid condensation under the conditions of large particle radius (a > kappa(-1)) and intermediate kappa a, where kappa is the Debye-Hückel parameter and a is the particle radius. The particles were dissolved in deionized water containing ethanol from 0 to 77 vol %, settled to the bottom of the glass plate within 1 h, and then laterally moved toward the center of a cell over a 20 h period in reaching a state of equilibrium condensation. All of the suspensions that were 1 and 3 microm in diameter and 0.01-0.20 vol % in concentration realized similar gas-liquid condensation with clear gas-liquid boundaries. In 50 vol % ethanol solvent, additional ethanol was added to enhance the sedimentation force so as to restrict the particles in a monoparticle layer thickness. The coexistence of gas-liquid-solid (crystalline solid) was microscopically recognized from the periphery to the center of the condensates. A phase diagram of the gas-liquid condensation was created as a function of KCl concentration at a particle diameter of 3 microm, 0.10 vol % concentration, and 50:50 water/ethanol solvent at room temperature. The miscibility gap was observed in the concentration range from 1 to 250 microM. There was an upper limit of salt concentration where the phase separation disappeared, showing nearly critical behavior of macroscopic density fluctuation from 250 microM to 1 mM. These results add new experimental evidence to the existence of colloidal gas-liquid condensation and specify conditions of like-charge attraction between particles.

  1. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  2. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas-fired furnaces. Final report Oct 79-Dec 81

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Schaus, O.O.

    1982-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired heat exchangers and similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were examined on test equipment built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchangers. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloys, anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  3. Mathematical modeling of gas-condensate mixture filtration in porous media taking into account non-equilibrium of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachalov, V. V.; Molchanov, D. A.; Sokotushchenko, V. N.; Zaichenko, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    At the present time, a considerable part of the largest dry gas reservoirs in Russia are found in the stage of declining production, therefore active exploitation of gas-condensate fields will begin in the coming decades. There is a significant discrepancy between the project and the actual value of condensate recovery factor while producing reservoir of this type, which is caused by insufficient knowledge about non-equilibrium filtration mechanisms of gas-condensate mixtures in reservoir conditions. A system of differential equations to describe filtration process of two-phase multicomponent mixture for one-, two- and three-dimensional cases is presented in this work. The solution of the described system was made by finite-element method in the software package FlexPDE. Comparative distributions of velocities, pressures, saturations and phase compositions of three-component mixture along the reservoir model and in time in both cases of equilibrium and non-equilibrium filtration processes were obtained. Calculation results have shown that system deviation from the thermodynamic equilibrium increases gas phase flow rate and reduces liquid phase flow rate during filtration process of gas-condensate mixture.

  4. Pyrolysis process for producing condensed stabilized hydrocarbons utilizing a beneficially reactive gas

    DOEpatents

    Durai-Swamy, Kandaswamy

    1982-01-01

    In a process for recovery of values contained in solid carbonaceous material, the solid carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to pyrolysis, in the presence of a carbon containing solid particulate source of heat and a beneficially reactive transport gas in a transport flash pyrolysis reactor, to form a pyrolysis product stream. The pyrolysis product stream contains a gaseous mixture and particulate solids. The solids are separated from the gaseous mixture to form a substantially solids-free gaseous stream which comprises volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals newly formed by pyrolysis. Preferably the solid particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing part of the separated particulate solids. The beneficially reactive transport gas inhibits the reactivity of the char product and the carbon-containing solid particulate source of heat. Condensed stabilized hydrocarbons are obtained by quenching the gaseous mixture stream with a quench fluid which contains a capping agent for stabilizing and terminating newly formed volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals. The capping agent is partially depleted of hydrogen by the stabilization and termination reaction. Hydrocarbons of four or more carbon atoms in the gaseous mixture stream are condensed. A liquid stream containing the stabilized liquid product is then treated or separated into various fractions. A liquid containing the hydrogen depleted capping agent is hydrogenated to form a regenerated capping agent. At least a portion of the regenerated capping agent is recycled to the quench zone as the quench fluid. In another embodiment capping agent is produced by the process, separated from the liquid product mixture, and recycled.

  5. Inert gas ion thruster development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Two 12 cm magneto-electrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters were performance mapped with argon and xenon. The first, hexagonal, thruster produced optimized performance of 48.5to 79 percent argon mass utilization efficiencies at discharge energies of 240 to 425 eV/ion, respectively, Xenon mass utilization efficiencies of 78 to 95 percent were observed at discharge energies of 220 to 290 eV/ion with the same optimized hexagonal thruster. Changes to the cathode baffle reduced the discharge anode potential during xenon operation from approximately 40 volts to about 30 volts. Preliminary tests conducted with the second, hemispherical, MESC thruster showed a nonuniform anode magnetic field adversely affected thruster performance. This performance degradation was partially overcome by changes in the boundary anode placement. Conclusions drawn the hemispherical thruster tests gave insights into the plasma processes in the MESC discharge that will aid in the design of future thrusters.

  6. Large inert-gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Using present technology as a starting point, performance predictions were made for large thrusters. The optimum beam diameter for maximum thruster efficiency was determined for a range of specific impulse. This optimum beam diameter varied greatly with specific impulse, from about 0.6 m at 3000 seconds (and below) to about 4 m at 10,000 seconds with argon, and from about 0.6 m at 2,000 seconds (and below) to about 12 m at 10,000 seconds with Xe. These beams sizes would require much larger thrusters than those presently available, but would offer substantial complexity and cost reductions for large electric propulsion systems.

  7. Inert gas ion source program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    THe original 12 cm hexagonal magneto-electrostatic containment discharge chamber has been optimized for argon and xenon operation. Argon mass utilization efficiencies of 65 to 77 percent were achieved at keeper-plus-main discharge energy consumptions of 200 to 458 eV/ion, respectively. Xenon performance of 84 to 96 percent mass utilization was realized at 203 to 350 eV/ion. The optimization process and test results are discussed.

  8. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Gas:. the First 70 Years and Some Recent Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, E. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    2003-04-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of "How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why?" We will review some of our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging.

  9. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  10. Condensed-phase versus gas-phase ozonolysis of catechol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Timothy J.; Medeiros, Nicholas; Hinrichs, Ryan Z.

    2012-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of volatile aromatic compounds contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), especially in urban environments. Aromatic SOA precursors typically require oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, although recent work suggests that ozonolysis of 1,2-benzenediols produces SOA in high yields. We employed attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy to investigate the heterogeneous ozonolysis of catechol thin films. Formation of the dominant condensed-phase product muconic acid was highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) with few products detected below 40% RH and a maximum reactive uptake coefficient of γ = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-5 measured at 81.2% RH. We also performed quantum chemical calculations mapping out several reaction pathways for the homogeneous ozonolysis of gaseous catechol. 1,3-cycloaddition transition states were rate limiting with the most favorable activation energies at 45.4 and 47.1 kJ mol-1 [CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)] corresponding to addition across and adjacent to the diol Cdbnd C, respectively. Gas-phase rate constants, calculated using transition state theory, were six orders of magnitude slower than experimental values. In contrast, a calculated activation energy was lower for the ozonolysis of a catechol•H2O complex, which serves as a first-approximation for modeling the ozonolysis of condensed-phase catechol. These combined results suggests that homogeneous ozonolysis of catechol may not be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosols but that ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed catechol may contribute to SOA growth.

  11. Hydrocarbon habitat of San Martin and Cashiriari gas/condensate discoveries, southern Ucayali basin of Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, H.P.

    1989-03-01

    Fifteen trillion ft/sup 3/ of wet gas in place containing some 800 million bbl of associated liquids have been discovered in the San Martin and Cashiriari anticlines, which are located in the Subandean thrusted foldbelt of the Southern Ucayali basin of Peru. Ultimate recoverable volumes are estimated at 10 trillion ft/sup 3/ of gas and 500 million bbl of liquids including condensate (C5+) and LPG (C3/C4). Most of these potentially recoverable reserves are located in the Cashiriari structure (80% of the gas and 70% of the liquids). They were encountered in fair-excellent sandstone reservoirs of Early Permian and Late Cretaceous age and are thought to be derived from Carboniferous coaly shale source rocks. The Paleozoic (pre-Andean) sedimentary megacycle is represented by deeper shallow marine clastics of Ordovician to Early Carboniferous age (5000 m maximum), including Silurian glaciomarine deposits, overlain by up to 1200 m of Permian-Carboniferous platform carbonates and 600-1000( ) m of Lower Permian-lower Upper Permian coastal-continental clastics. The Mesozoic-Tertiary (Andean) megacycle is represented by a Campanian-Maastrichtian transgressive marine clastic/carbonate and overlying regressive clastic sequence (450 m maximum), followed by several thousand meters of Molasse-type continental infill of the Tertiary foredeep, which was created by the crustal loading in the wake of the compressional Andean orogeny (Peru, Inca, and Quechua phases). Late Tertiary folding and thrusting of the sub-Andean belt was superseded by regional Pleistocene uplift, and parts of the foreland continue to subside.

  12. An investigation of condensation from steam-gas mixtures flowing downward inside a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.Z.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F.

    1995-09-01

    Previous experiments have been carried out by Vierow, Ogg, Kageyama and Siddique for condensation from steam/gas mixtures in vertical tubes. In each case the data scatter relative to the correlation was large and there was not close agreement among the three investigations. A new apparatus has been designed and built using the lessons learned from the earlier studies. Using the new apparatus, an extensive new data base has been obtained for pure steam, steam-air mixtures and steam-helium mixtures. Three different correlations, one implementing the degradation method initially proposed by Vierow and Schrock, a second diffusion layer theory initially proposed by Peterson, and third mass transfer conductance model are presented in this paper. The correlation using the simple degradation factor method has been shown, with some modification, to give satisfactory engineering accuracy when applied to the new data. However, this method is based on very simplified arguments that do not fully represent the complex physical phenomena involved. Better representation of the data has been found possible using modifications of the more complex and phenomenologically based method which treats the heat transfer conductance of the liquid film in series with the conductance on the vapor-gas side with the latter comprised of mass transfer and sensible heat transfer conductance acting in parallel. The mechanistic models, based on the modified diffusion layer theory or classical mass transfer theory for mass transfer conductance with transpiration successfully correlate the data for the heat transfer of vapor-gas side. Combined with the heat transfer of liquid film model proposed by Blangetti, the overall heat transfer coefficients predicted by the correlations from mechanistic models are in close agreement with experimental values.

  13. User's manual for the TRW gaspipe 2 program: A vapor-gas front analysis program for heat pipes containing non-condensible gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Fleischman, G. L.; Marcus, B. D.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program for design and analysis of heat pipes which contain non-condensible gases, either for temperature control or to aid in start-up from the frozen state, is presented. Some of the calculations which are possible with the program are: (1) wall temperature profile along a gas-loaded heat pipe, (2) amount of gas loading necessary to obtain desired evaporator temperature at a desired heat load, (3) heat load versus evaporator temperature for a fixed amount of gas in the pipe, and (4) heat and mass transfer along the pipe, including the vapor-gas front region.

  14. Consideration of real gas effects and condensation in a spray-combustion rocket-thrust-chamber design tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M.; Kniesner, B.; Knab, O.

    2011-10-01

    For the prediction of hot gas side heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers, Astrium Space Transportation (ST) uses the second generation multiphase Navier-Stokes solver Rocflam-II. To account for real-gas and condensation effects, pressure-dependent and even multiphase fluid data are included in the chemistry tables used by the code. Thus, the changing fluid properties near the two-phase region as well as transformation from gaseous to liquid and even solid state are reflected properly. Heat flux measurements for a dedicated subscale test campaign with strongly cooled walls show a clearly increasing heat load as soon as the combustion gases condense at the wall, due to the released latent heat of condensation. Corresponding coupled Rocflam-II/CFX simulations show a good quantitative agreement in heat flux for load cases with and without condensation, showing the ability of the code to correctly simulate flows in the real-gas and even inside the two-phase region.

  15. Hot nanoindentation in inert environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkle, Jonathan C.; Packard, Corinne E.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2010-07-01

    An instrument capable of performing nanoindentation at temperatures up to 500 °C in inert atmospheres, including partial vacuum and gas near atmospheric pressures, is described. Technical issues associated with the technique (such as drift and noise) and the instrument (such as tip erosion and radiative heating of the transducer) are identified and addressed. Based on these considerations, preferred operation conditions are identified for testing on various materials. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the hardness and elastic modulus of three materials are measured: fused silica (nonoxidizing), aluminum, and copper (both oxidizing). In all cases, the properties match reasonably well with published data acquired by more conventional test methods.

  16. Electron clusters in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Nazin, S; Shikin, V

    2008-10-17

    This Letter addresses the counterintuitive behavior of electrons injected into dense cryogenic media with negative scattering length L. Instead of strongly reduced mobility at all but the lowest densities due to the polaronic effect involving the formation of density enhancement clusters (expected in the theory with a simple gas-electron interaction successfully applied earlier to electrons in helium where L>0) which should substantially decrease the electron mobility, an opposite picture is observed: with increasing |L| (the trend taking place for inert gases with the growth of atomic number) and the gas density, the electrons remain practically free. An explanation of this behavior is provided based on consistent accounting for the nonlinearity of the electron interaction with the gaseous medium in the gas atom number density.

  17. Treating of produced water for surface discharge at the Arun gas condensate field

    SciTech Connect

    Madian, E.S.; Moelyodihardjo, T.; Snavely, E.S.; Jan, R.J.

    1995-11-01

    Mobil`s Arun Field in northern Sumatra produces natural gas, hydrocarbon liquids and water condensate. Purification of the water for surface disposal is the subject of this paper. The Arun waste water contains about 2,000 ppm of liquid hydrocarbons in the form of a very stable oil-in-water emulsion. Stability of the emulsion is enhanced by the small diameters of the oil droplets, low salt content of the water and low pH. The water is saturated with carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon gases which bubble from the water when pressure is released. Returns of acids, surfactants, emulsifying agents and corrosion inhibitors from acid fracturing operations also contribute to the composition of Arun waste water. Increases in waste water production, now about 32,000 BPD, and relatively high concentrations of BOD, phenols and ammonia have prompted Mobil to upgrade the Arun waste water treating facilities to protect the receiving bodies of water from contamination. The upgrade focused on two areas of water treating: (1) removal of suspended liquid hydrocarbons from the water; and (2) biological oxidation of dissolved organics. Demulsifier chemical and a skim tank were added to the oil removal facility; the decarbonator and caustic addition before air flotation were eliminated. Without added caustic, the gas flotation units remove acid gases from the water very effectively. The new skim tank removes over 90% of the suspended hydrocarbons. The biological oxidation ponds were upgraded by adding barriers to improved plug flow, increasing dispersed air flow, increasing sludge recycle volume, lowering the oil input and by adding nutrients and biological seeding. Results of the biological pond upgrades are not yet available because increased sludge recirculation and the optimization of biological seeding are not yet completed. Tests of the use of locally-produced biological sludge are planned.

  18. Core acid treatment influence on well reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janishevskii, A.; Ezhova, A.

    2015-11-01

    The research involves investigation of the influence of hydrochloric acid (HCI-12%) and mud acid (mixture: HCl - 10% and HF - 3%) treatment on the Upper-Jurassic reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field wells. The sample collection included three lots of core cylinders from one and the same depth (all in all 42). Two lots of core cylinders were distributed as following: first lot - reservoir properties were determined, and, then thin sections were cut off from cylinder faces; second lot- core cylinders were exposed to hydrochloric acid treatment, then, after flushing the reservoir properties were determined, and thin sections were prepared. Based on the quantitative petrographic rock analysis, involvin 42 thin sections, the following factors were determined: granulometric mineral composition, cement content, intergranular contacts and pore space structure. According to the comparative analysis of initial samples, the following was determined: content decrease of feldspar, clay and mica fragments, mica, clay and carbonate cement; increase of pore spaces while in the investigated samples- on exposure of rocks to acids effective porosity and permeability value range is ambiguous.

  19. In situ measurements of plasma properties during gas-condensation of Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, M. A.; Voeller, S. A.; Patterson, M. M.; Shield, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    Since the mean, standard deviation, and modality of nanoparticle size distributions can vary greatly between similar input conditions (e.g., power and gas flow rate), plasma diagnostics were carried out in situ using a double-sided, planar Langmuir probe to determine the effect the plasma has on the heating of clusters and their final size distributions. The formation of Cu nanoparticles was analyzed using cluster-plasma physics, which relates the processes of condensation and evaporation to internal plasma properties (e.g., electron temperature and density). Monitoring these plasma properties while depositing Cu nanoparticles with different size distributions revealed a negative correlation between average particle size and electron temperature. Furthermore, the modality of the size distributions also correlated with the modality of the electron energy distributions. It was found that the maximum cluster temperature reached during plasma heating and the material's evaporation point regulates the growth process inside the plasma. In the case of Cu, size distributions with average sizes of 8.2, 17.3, and 24.9 nm in diameter were monitored with the Langmuir probe, and from the measurements made, the cluster temperatures for each deposition were calculated to be 1028, 1009, and 863 K. These values are then compared with the onset evaporation temperature of particles of this size, which was estimated to be 1059, 1068, and 1071 K. Thus, when the cluster temperature is too close to the evaporation temperature, less particle growth occurs, resulting in the formation of smaller particles.

  20. Synthesis of ZnO:Ge Thin Films via Plasma Gas Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Abdullah; Ali, Janan; Ozcan, Sadan

    2013-03-01

    we introduce a new method for the synthesis of Ge nanoparticle embedded ZnO thin films that are considered to be a potential candidate for photovoltaic applications. As opposed to current techniques, for the independent preparation of Ge nanoparticles, Cluster Deposition Source (CDS) utilising gas condensation of sputtered Ge atoms is used. For the synthesis of ZnO thin film host material conventional sputtering is employed. In the proposed technique independently synthesized Ge nanoparticles and ZnO thin films are combined into a composite structure on Si. XRD patterns of the samples have revealed that Ge nanoparticles preferentially settle on (113) planes on top of the (002) oriented ZnO layer. It is realized that Ge nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 16 nm to 20 nm could be embedded into a well-defined ZnO matrix. In fact, TEM studies performed on Ge nanoparticles captured on a Cu grids have manifested that Ge reach to ZnO matrix as clusters composed of particles with sizes of about 7-8 nm and then eventually grow larger due to substrate heating implemented during capping layer deposition. Optical absorption measurements have revealed that Ge nanoparticle inclusion lead to an additional absorption edge at about 2.75 eV along with 3.17 eV edge resulting from ZnO host.

  1. Effect of a condensation utilizer on the operation of steam and hot-water gas-fired boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionkin, I. L.; Ragutkin, A. V.; Roslyakov, P. V.; Supranov, V. M.; Zaichenko, M. N.; Luning, B.

    2015-05-01

    Various designs for condensation utilizers of the low-grade heat of furnace gases that are constructed based on an open-type heat exchanger are considered. Computational investigations are carried out for the effect of the condensation utilizer with tempering and moistening of air on the operation of steam and hot-water boilers burning natural gas. The investigations are performed based on the predeveloped adequate calculating models of the steam and hot-water boilers in a Boiler Designer program complex. Investigation results for TGM-96B and PTVM-120 boilers are given. The enhancement of the operation efficiency of the condensation utilizer can be attained using a design with tempering and moistening of air supplied to combustion that results in an insignificant increase in the temperature of waste gases. This has no effect on the total operation efficiency of the boiler and the condenser unit, because additional losses with waste gases are compensated owing to the operation of the last. The tempering and moistening of air provide a substantial decrease in the temperature in the zone of active combustion and shortening the nitrogen oxide emission. The computational investigations show that the premoistening of air supplied to combustion makes the technical and economic efficiency of boilers operating with the Condensation Utilizer no worse.

  2. Pore diameter effects on phase behavior of a gas condensate in graphitic one-and two-dimensional nanopores.

    PubMed

    Welch, William R W; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on a hydrocarbon mixture representing a typical gas condensate composed mostly of methane and other small molecules with small fractions of heavier hydrocarbons, representative of mixtures found in tight shale reservoirs. The fluid was examined both in bulk and confined to graphitic nano-scale slits and pores. Numerous widths and diameters of slits and pores respectively were examined under variable pressures at 300 K in order to find conditions in which the fluid at the center of the apertures would not be affected by capillary condensation due to the oil-wet walls. For the bulk fluid, retrograde phase behavior was verified by liquid volumes obtained from Voronoi tessellations. In cases of both one and two-dimensional confinement, for the smallest apertures, heavy molecules aggregated inside the pore space and compression of the gas outside the solid structure lead to decreases in density of the confined fluid. Normal density/pressure relationships were observed for slits having gaps of above 3 nm and pores having diameters above 6 nm. At 70 bar, the minimum gap width at which the fluid could pass through the center of slits without condensation effects was predicted to be 6 nm and the corresponding diameter in pores was predicted to be 8 nm. The models suggest that in nanoscale networks involving pores smaller than these limiting dimensions, capillary condensation should significantly impede transmission of natural gases with similar composition.

  3. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas fired furnaces. Annual report Oct 79-Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Khoo, S.W.; Schaus, O.O.

    1981-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired furnace heat exchangers and in similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were selected and tested on one of two identical test rigs built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in an actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchanger. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated and CaCO3 dipped galvanized steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloy anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  4. Manure ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle fed condensed tannins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of three levels of condensed tannins fed to 27 beef feed yard steers on ammonia and GHG emissions from manure. Condensed tannins were fed at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 percent on a dry matter basis. Manure and urine were collected from two periods over 6 d...

  5. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  6. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis.Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs

  7. Sublimating comets as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in the gas outflow from AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, D. P.; Matese, John J.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A growing amount of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that most main sequence stars are surrounded by disks of cometary material. The dust production by comets in such disks is investigated when the central stars evolve up the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Once released, the dust is ablated and accelerated by the gas outflow and the fragments become the seeds necessary for condensation of the gas. The origin of the requisite seeds has presented a well known problem for classical nucleation theory. This model is consistent with the dust production observed in M giants and supergiants (which have increasing luminosities) and the fact that earlier supergiants and most WR stars (whose luminosities are unchanging) do not have significant dust clouds even though they have significant stellar winds. Another consequence of the model is that the spatial distribution of the dust does not, in general, coincide with that of the gas outflow, in contrast to the conventional condensation model. A further prediction is that the condensation radius is greater that that predicted by conventional theory which is in agreement with IR interferometry measurements of alpha-Ori.

  8. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... oxygen concentration is 8 percent or less by volume when flammable cargoes are carried; (2) Hold and... tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the oxygen concentration in the tank is 8 percent or less by volume before cargo liquid or vapor is introduced. (b)...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... oxygen concentration is 8 percent or less by volume when flammable cargoes are carried; (2) Hold and... tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the oxygen concentration in the tank is 8 percent or less by volume before cargo liquid or vapor is introduced. (b)...

  10. Effect of inert propellant injection on Mars ascent vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James E.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A Mars ascent vehicle is limited in performance by the amount of propellant which can be brought from earth. In some cases the vehicle performance can be improved by injecting inert gas into the engine, if the inert gas is available as an in situ resource. CO2, N2 and Ar are constituents of the Martian atmosphere which are available at every point on the Martian surface and could be produced by a very simple processing technique, consisting essentially of compressing the atmosphere. The effect of inert gas injection on rocket engine performance was analyzed with a numerical code calculating chemical equilibrium in the engine, for engines of varying combustion chamber pressure, expansion ratio, oxidizer/fuel ratio, and inert injection fraction. Results of this analysis were applied to several candidate missions to determine how the required mass of return propellant needed in LEO could be decreased using inert propellant injection.

  11. Effect of inert propellant injection on Mars ascent vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James E.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A Mars ascent vehicle is limited in performance by the propellant which can be brought from Earth. In some cases the vehicle performance can be improved by injecting inert gas into the engine, if the inert gas is available as an in-situ resource and does not have to be brought from Earth. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon are constituents of the Martian atmosphere which could be separated by compressing the atmosphere, without any chemical processing step. The effect of inert gas injection on rocket engine performance was analyzed with a numerical combustion code that calculated chemical equilibrium for engines of varying combustion chamber pressure, expansion ratio, oxidizer/fuel ratio, and inert injection fraction. Results of this analysis were applied to several candidate missions to determine how the required mass of return propellant needed in low Earth orbit could be decreased using inert propellant injection.

  12. Inert Anode Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1999-07-01

    This ASME report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issues associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint.

  13. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  14. Condensate fraction in a 2D Bose gas measured across the Mott-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Spielman, I B; Phillips, W D; Porto, J V

    2008-03-28

    We realize a single-band 2D Bose-Hubbard system with Rb atoms in an optical lattice and measure the condensate fraction as a function of lattice depth, crossing from the superfluid to the Mott-insulating phase. We quantitatively identify the location of the superfluid to normal transition by observing when the condensed fraction vanishes. Our measurement agrees with recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations for a finite-sized 2D system to within experimental uncertainty.

  15. Modification of Inert Gas Condensation Technique to Achieve Wide Area Distribution of Nanoparticles and Synthesis and Characterization of Nanoparticles for Semiconductor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.

    The aim of this dissertation is to develop a versatile experimental technique for synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs), which can be used to deposit NPs in various patterns for semiconductor device applications. In addition, the dissertation also aims at the synthesis and characterization of semiconductor NPs capable of nano-scale temperature measurement and infrared sensing. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  16. Inert Ingredients Overview and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page provides information on inert ingredients approved for use in pesticide products and the guidance documents that are available to assist in obtaining approval for a new inert ingredient.

  17. Inert gases in Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Zadorozhnyy, I. K.

    1974-01-01

    The content and isotopic composition were studied of inert gases -- He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe -- in samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The samples were taken from depths of about 12 and 30 cm. The high concentrations of inert gases exceed by several orders their concentrations observed in ordinary stony meteorites. The gases in lunar regolith were a complex mixture of gases of different origins: Solar, cosmogenic, radiogenic, and so on. Solar wind gases predominated, distributed in the thin surficial layer of the regolith grains. The concentrations of these gases in the surficial layer is several cubic centimeters per gram. The isotopic composition of the inert gases of solar origin approaches their composition measured in gas-rich meteorites.

  18. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  19. Crossover behavior in the phase transition of the Bose-Einstein condensation in a microwave-driven magnon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2009-09-01

    A magnon gas in a film of yttrium iron garnet driven by microwave radiation exhibits Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) when the driving power exceeds a critical value. We show that the nature and the critical exponents of the BEC transition change dramatically if the BEC magnons are significantly coupled to the zone-center magnons. The theoretical results explain the diverse behavior of the order parameter inferred from the experimental data for the light scattering and the microwave emission from the BEC observed with coherent and incoherent microwave pumping.

  20. Studies of cluster-assembled materials: From gas phase to condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin

    Clusters, defined as "a number of similar things that occur together" in Webster's dictionary, has different meanings depending on the given subject. To physicists and chemists, the word cluster means "a group of atoms or molecules formed by interactions ranging from very weak van der Waals interactions to strong ionic bonds." Unlike molecules, which are made by nature and are stable under ambient conditions, clusters discovered in a laboratory are often metastable. Molecules have specific stoichiometry, whereas the cluster's composition can usually be altered atom by atom. Thus, clusters can be taken as intrinsically "artificial molecules" with considerably more tunabilities in their properties. Research into the relative stability and instability of clusters has in recent years become a very active research area, especially following the study by Khanna and Castleman that first suggested that by varying size and composition, clusters can expand the periodic table to the 3 rd-dimension; that is, clusters can mimic the chemistry of atoms and may, therefore, be used as the building blocks of new materials. The discovery of Met-Cars has drawn worldwide interests and has been actively investigated by researchers from a variety of fields, including physics, chemistry and material science. However, the unsuccessful search for a solvent capable of isolating Met-Cars has impeded progress in characterizing the material in the condensed state and, hence, limited its potential applications as a novel nanoscale material. An alternative method involving the deposition of mass-gated species and the subsequent structural investigation via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been employed. With particularly interesting results, soft-landed deposits of zirconium Met-Cars were found to form a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure with a lattice parameter ˜ 15A. The production of Met-Cars is conducted with the direct laser vaporization (DLV) of metal/graphite composite pellets

  1. Assessment of the effect of development of the Bovanenkovskoe gas-condensate field in the middle Yamal region on the dynamics of the polar fox population

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrinskii, N.L.; Sosin, V.F.

    1995-05-01

    Based on the findings of integrated monitoring research, the state of polar fox population in a zone of heavy technogenic pressure is assessed experimentally. Networks of breeding burrows on permanent experimental and control plots were carefully examined over the course of three summer seasons. Active development of the Bovanenkovskoe gas-condensate field has led to loss of the central portion of this area as a zone of polar fox restocking. Heavy accelerated exploitation of other gas and gas-condensate fields in the Yamal Peninsula may lower the Yamal population of polar fox to the verge of extinction. 15 refs.

  2. Orgin and significance of geochemical variability among oils and gas-condensates in the Tiger Shoal Field, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, P.A.; Imbus, S.W.; McKeever, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Geochemical data placed in geological context is key to understanding the processes controlling the variability of oils and gas-condensates in the Tiger Shoal Field, northern Gulf of Mexico. Thermal maturity at generation and phase partitioning are the principal processes accounting for variability in the bulk and molecular properties of the oils and gas-condensates. Quantification of the extent that these processes altered the oils and gas-condensates between fault blocks and among individual sands permits: (1) documentation of the most effective migration conduits, (2) inference of deeper or shallower pay zones, (3) and assessment of vertical and lateral fluid connectivity. Calibration of bulk to molecular properties will permit rapid assessment of the type and extent of alteration using basic parameters such as API gravity and gas oil ratio (GOR). Upon mass balancing with initial reserves data, a detailed risking scheme for remaining prospects within the field can be formulated.

  3. Synthesis of fluorinated nano-silica and its application in wettability alteration near-wellbore region in gas condensate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, M. A.; Hassanajili, Sh.; Rahimpour, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    Fluorinated silica nanoparticles were prepared to alter rock wettability near-wellbore region in gas condensate reservoirs. Hence fluorinated silica nanoparticles with average diameter of about 80 nm were prepared and used to alter limestone core wettability from highly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet state. Water and n-decane contact angles for rock were measured before and after treatment. The contact angle measured 147° for water and 61° for n-decane on the core surface. The rock surface could not support the formation of any water or n-decane droplets before treatment. The functionalized fluorinated silica nanoparticles have been confirmed by the Csbnd F bond along with Sisbnd Osbnd Si bond as analyzed by FT-IR. The elemental composition of treated limestone core surface was determined using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses. The final evaluation of the fluorinated nanosilica treatment in terms of its effectiveness was measured by core flood experimental tests.

  4. Origin of saline, neutral-pH, reduced epithermal waters by reaction of acidic magmatic gas condensates with wall rock

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite of epithermal veins containing galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite with silver sulfides and electrum commonly have salinities of 2 to 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Examples include Bohemia, OR, Comstock, NV, and Creede, CO. Salinities in such base metal-rich systems are apparently greater than those in gold-adularia, base metal-poor systems such as Sleeper, NV, Republic, WA, and Hishikare, Kyushu. Saline epithermal fluids are commonly assumed to have been derived from saline magmatic brines, from local host formations, as has been suggested for Creede, or from evaporative concentration (boiling) of more dilute meteoric ground water. Another possibility, which may be the most common origin, is reaction of wall rocks with magmatic gas condensates rich in HCl and sulfuric acid. A mixture of one part Augustine Volcanic gas condensate in 10 parts cold ground water has a pH of 0.7 and the dominant cation is H[sup +] by a factor of 10[sup 4]. Calculated reaction of this condensate mixture with andesite at 300 C to a water/rock ratio (w/r) of 4.6 yields an NaCl-dominated fluid with a total salinity of 2.1 wt %. and pH 3.7. Further reaction, to w/r 0.14 yields a fluid salinity of 2.6 wt % and pH of 5.7; this fluid is in equilibrium with a propylitic alteration assemblage. Aqueous sulfide accumulates during the rock reaction as sulfate is reduced to sulfide when ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron. Sulfide concentration in the latter fluid is 32 ppm, far exceeding sulfate concentration. In the overall reaction, hydrogen ion is exchanged for base cations (including base metals) and sulfate is reduced to sulfide.

  5. Metallofullerene and fullerene formation from condensing carbon gas under conditions of stellar outflows and implication to stardust

    PubMed Central

    Dunk, Paul W.; Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Quinn, John P.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Ewels, Christopher P.; Marshall, Alan G.; Kroto, Harold W.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous presolar grains of supernovae origin have long been isolated and are determined to be the carrier of anomalous 22Ne in ancient meteorites. That exotic 22Ne is, in fact, the decay isotope of relatively short-lived 22Na formed by explosive nucleosynthesis, and therefore, a selective and rapid Na physical trapping mechanism must take place during carbon condensation in supernova ejecta. Elucidation of the processes that trap Na and produce large carbon molecules should yield insight into carbon stardust enrichment and formation. Herein, we demonstrate that Na effectively nucleates formation of Na@C60 and other metallofullerenes during carbon condensation under highly energetic conditions in oxygen- and hydrogen-rich environments. Thus, fundamental carbon chemistry that leads to trapping of Na is revealed, and should be directly applicable to gas-phase chemistry involving stellar environments, such as supernova ejecta. The results indicate that, in addition to empty fullerenes, metallofullerenes should be constituents of stellar/circumstellar and interstellar space. In addition, gas-phase reactions of fullerenes with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated to probe “build-up” and formation of carbon stardust, and provide insight into fullerene astrochemistry. PMID:24145444

  6. Metallofullerene and fullerene formation from condensing carbon gas under conditions of stellar outflows and implication to stardust.

    PubMed

    Dunk, Paul W; Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Kaiser, Nathan K; Quinn, John P; Blakney, Gregory T; Ewels, Christopher P; Marshall, Alan G; Kroto, Harold W

    2013-11-05

    Carbonaceous presolar grains of supernovae origin have long been isolated and are determined to be the carrier of anomalous (22)Ne in ancient meteorites. That exotic (22)Ne is, in fact, the decay isotope of relatively short-lived (22)Na formed by explosive nucleosynthesis, and therefore, a selective and rapid Na physical trapping mechanism must take place during carbon condensation in supernova ejecta. Elucidation of the processes that trap Na and produce large carbon molecules should yield insight into carbon stardust enrichment and formation. Herein, we demonstrate that Na effectively nucleates formation of Na@C60 and other metallofullerenes during carbon condensation under highly energetic conditions in oxygen- and hydrogen-rich environments. Thus, fundamental carbon chemistry that leads to trapping of Na is revealed, and should be directly applicable to gas-phase chemistry involving stellar environments, such as supernova ejecta. The results indicate that, in addition to empty fullerenes, metallofullerenes should be constituents of stellar/circumstellar and interstellar space. In addition, gas-phase reactions of fullerenes with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated to probe "build-up" and formation of carbon stardust, and provide insight into fullerene astrochemistry.

  7. Off-diagonal long-range order, cycle probabilities, and condensate fraction in the ideal Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Maguelonne; Krauth, Werner

    2007-11-01

    We discuss the relationship between the cycle probabilities in the path-integral representation of the ideal Bose gas, off-diagonal long-range order, and Bose-Einstein condensation. Starting from the Landsberg recursion relation for the canonic partition function, we use elementary considerations to show that in a box of size L3 the sum of the cycle probabilities of length k>L2 equals the off-diagonal long-range order parameter in the thermodynamic limit. For arbitrary systems of ideal bosons, the integer derivative of the cycle probabilities is related to the probability of condensing k bosons. We use this relation to derive the precise form of the pik in the thermodynamic limit. We also determine the function pik for arbitrary systems. Furthermore, we use the cycle probabilities to compute the probability distribution of the maximum-length cycles both at T=0, where the ideal Bose gas reduces to the study of random permutations, and at finite temperature. We close with comments on the cycle probabilities in interacting Bose gases.

  8. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  9. Acute ecotoxicology of natural oil and gas condensate to coral reef larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Andrew P.; Brinkman, Diane L.; Flores, Florita; Botté, Emmanuelle S.; Jones, Ross J.; Webster, Nicole S.

    2016-02-01

    Risks posed by oil spills to coral reefs are difficult to evaluate, partially due to the absence of studies that adequately assess toxicity to relevant coral reef species. Here we experimentally tested the acute toxicity of condensate, representing a fraction of light crude oil, to coral (Acropora tenuis) and sponge (Rhopaloeides odorabile) larvae. The metamorphosis of coral larvae was inhibited at total petroleum aromatic hydrocarbon (TPAH) concentrations of water accommodated fractions (WAF) as low as 103 μg l‑1, similar to concentrations detected in seawater following large spills. The sensitivity of coral larvae increased by 40% when co-exposed to UV light that they might encounter in shallow reefal systems. Condensate WAF was more toxic to coral larvae than predicted by summing the toxicity of its main components (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and napthalene). In contrast, the sensitivity of sponge larvae to condensate WAF (>10,000 μg l‑1 TPAH) was far less than coral in the presence and absence of UV, but similar to that of other marine invertebrates. While these results highlight the relative sensitivity of coral larvae to oil, further research is needed to better understand and predict the impacts and risks posed by hydrocarbons to tropical reef systems.

  10. Acute ecotoxicology of natural oil and gas condensate to coral reef larvae

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Andrew P.; Brinkman, Diane L.; Flores, Florita; Botté, Emmanuelle S.; Jones, Ross J.; Webster, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Risks posed by oil spills to coral reefs are difficult to evaluate, partially due to the absence of studies that adequately assess toxicity to relevant coral reef species. Here we experimentally tested the acute toxicity of condensate, representing a fraction of light crude oil, to coral (Acropora tenuis) and sponge (Rhopaloeides odorabile) larvae. The metamorphosis of coral larvae was inhibited at total petroleum aromatic hydrocarbon (TPAH) concentrations of water accommodated fractions (WAF) as low as 103 μg l−1, similar to concentrations detected in seawater following large spills. The sensitivity of coral larvae increased by 40% when co-exposed to UV light that they might encounter in shallow reefal systems. Condensate WAF was more toxic to coral larvae than predicted by summing the toxicity of its main components (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and napthalene). In contrast, the sensitivity of sponge larvae to condensate WAF (>10,000 μg l−1 TPAH) was far less than coral in the presence and absence of UV, but similar to that of other marine invertebrates. While these results highlight the relative sensitivity of coral larvae to oil, further research is needed to better understand and predict the impacts and risks posed by hydrocarbons to tropical reef systems. PMID:26892387

  11. Acute ecotoxicology of natural oil and gas condensate to coral reef larvae.

    PubMed

    Negri, Andrew P; Brinkman, Diane L; Flores, Florita; Botté, Emmanuelle S; Jones, Ross J; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-02-19

    Risks posed by oil spills to coral reefs are difficult to evaluate, partially due to the absence of studies that adequately assess toxicity to relevant coral reef species. Here we experimentally tested the acute toxicity of condensate, representing a fraction of light crude oil, to coral (Acropora tenuis) and sponge (Rhopaloeides odorabile) larvae. The metamorphosis of coral larvae was inhibited at total petroleum aromatic hydrocarbon (TPAH) concentrations of water accommodated fractions (WAF) as low as 103 μg l(-1), similar to concentrations detected in seawater following large spills. The sensitivity of coral larvae increased by 40% when co-exposed to UV light that they might encounter in shallow reefal systems. Condensate WAF was more toxic to coral larvae than predicted by summing the toxicity of its main components (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and napthalene). In contrast, the sensitivity of sponge larvae to condensate WAF (>10,000 μg l(-1) TPAH) was far less than coral in the presence and absence of UV, but similar to that of other marine invertebrates. While these results highlight the relative sensitivity of coral larvae to oil, further research is needed to better understand and predict the impacts and risks posed by hydrocarbons to tropical reef systems.

  12. Rapid, conformal gas-phase formation of silica (SiO2) nanotubes from water condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Changdeuck; Kim, Hyunchul; Yang, Yunjeong; Yoo, Hyunjun; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Bachmann, Julien; Nielsch, Kornelius; Shin, Hyunjung

    2013-06-01

    An innovative atomic layer deposition (ALD) concept, with which nanostructures of water condensates with high aspect ratio at equilibrium in cylindrical nanopores can be transformed uniformly into silica (SiO2) at near room temperature and ambient pressure, has been demonstrated for the first time. As a challenging model system, we first prove the conversion of cylindrical water condensates in porous alumina membranes to silica nanotubes (NTs) by introducing SiCl4 as a metal reactant without involving any catalytic reaction. Surprisingly, the water NTs reproducibly transformed into silica NTs, where the wall thickness of the silica NTs deposited per cycle was found to be limited by the amount of condensed water, and it was on the orders of ten nanometers per cycle (i.e., over 50 times faster than that of conventional ALD). More remarkably, the reactions only took place for 10-20 minutes or less without vacuum-related equipment. The thickness of initially adsorbed water layers in cylindrical nanopores was indirectly estimated from the thickness of formed SiO2 layers. With systematic experimental designs, we tackle the classical Kelvin equation in the nanosized pores, and the role of van der Waals forces in the nanoscale wetting phenomena, which is a long-standing issue lacking experimental insight. Moreover, we show that the present strategy is likely generalized to other oxide systems such as TiO2. Our approach opens up a new avenue for ultra-simple preparation of porous oxides and allows for the room temperature formation of dielectric layers toward organic electronic and photovoltaic applications.An innovative atomic layer deposition (ALD) concept, with which nanostructures of water condensates with high aspect ratio at equilibrium in cylindrical nanopores can be transformed uniformly into silica (SiO2) at near room temperature and ambient pressure, has been demonstrated for the first time. As a challenging model system, we first prove the conversion of

  13. Cloud Condensation in Titan's Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Paul N.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2011-01-01

    A 1-D condensation model is developed for the purpose of reproducing ice clouds in Titan's lower stratosphere observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), and ethane (C2H6) vapors are treated as chemically inert gas species that flow from an upper boundary at 500 km to a condensation sink near Titan's tropopause (-45 km). Gas vertical profiles are determined from eddy mixing and a downward flux at the upper boundary. The condensation sink is based upon diffusive growth of the cloud particles and is proportional to the degree of supersaturation in the cloud formation regIOn. Observations of the vapor phase abundances above the condensation levels and the locations and properties of the ice clouds provide constraints on the free parameters in the model. Vapor phase abundances are determined from CIRS mid-IR observations, whereas cloud particle sizes, altitudes, and latitudinal distributions are derived from analyses of CIRS far-IR observations of Titan. Specific cloud constraints include: I) mean particle radii of2-3 J.lm inferred from the V6 506 cm- band of HC3N, 2) latitudinal abundance distributions of condensed nitriles, inferred from a composite emission feature that peaks at 160/cm , and 3) a possible hydrocarbon cloud layer at high latitudes, located near an altitude of 60 km, which peaks between 60 and 80 cm l . Nitrile abundances appear to diminish substantially at high northern latitudes over the time period 2005 to 2010 (northern mid winter to early spring). Use of multiple gas species provides a consistency check on the eddy mixing coefficient profile. The flux at the upper boundary is the net column chemical production from the upper atmosphere and provides a constraint on chemical pathways leading to the production of these compounds. Comparison of the differing lifetimes, vapor phase transport, vapor phase loss rate, and particle sedimentation, sheds light on temporal stability

  14. Geological emission of methane from the Yakela condensed oil/gas field in Talimu Basin, Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junhong; Bao, Zhengyu; Xiang, Wu; Gou, Qinghong

    2008-01-01

    A static flux chamber method was applied to study natural emissions of methane into the atmosphere in the Yakela condensed oil/gas field in Talimu Basin, Xinjiang, China. Using an online method, which couples a gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/MS) together, the 13C/12C ratios of methane in the flux chambers were measured. The results demonstrated that methane gases were liable to migrate from deep oil/gas reservoir to the surface through microseepage and pervasion, and that a part of the migrated methane that remained unoxidized could emit into the atmosphere. Methane emission rates varied less in the oil/gas field because the whole region was homogeneous in geology and geography, with a standard deviation of less than 0.02 mg/(m2 x h). These were the differences in methane emission flux in the day and at night in the oil/gas field. The maximum methane emission flux reached 0.15 mg/(m2 x h) at 5:00-6:00 early in the morning, and then decreased gradually. The minimum was shown 0.10 mg/(m2 x h) at 17:00-18:00 in the afternoon, and then increased gradually. The daily methane released flux of the study area was 2.89 mg/(m2 x d), with a standard deviation of 0.43 mg/(m2 x d), using the average methane flux of every hour in a day for all chambers. delta13C of methane increased with the increase of methane concentration in the flux chambers, further indicating that the pyrogenetic origin of methane was come from deep oil/gas reservoirs.

  15. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; McCabe, D.

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  16. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Decontamination of Cs, Sr, and Actinides from Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2015-01-06

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also substantially decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  17. Condensation of N bosons. II. Nonequilibrium analysis of an ideal Bose gas and the laser phase-transition analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharovsky, V. V.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Suhail Zubairy, M.

    2000-02-01

    A nonequilibrium approach to the dynamics and statistics of the condensate of an ideal N-atom Bose gas cooling via interaction with a thermal reservoir using the canonical ensemble is developed. We derive simple analytical expressions for the canonical partition function and equilibrium distribution of the number of atoms in the ground state of a trap under different approximations, and compare them with exact numerical results. The N-particle constraint associated with the canonical ensemble is usually a burden. In the words of Kittel, ``in the investigation of the Bose-Einstein...laws it is very inconvenient to impose the restriction that the number of particles in the subsystem shall be held constant.'' But in the present approach, based on the analogy between a second-order phase transition and laser threshold behavior, the N-particle constraint makes the problem easier. We emphasize that the present work provides another example of a case in which equilibrium (detailed balance) solutions to nonequilibrium equations of motion provide a useful supplementary approach to conventional statistical mechanics. We also discuss some dynamical and mesoscopic aspects of Bose-Einstein condensation. The conclusion is that the present analytical (but approximate) results, based on a nonequilibrium approach, are in excellent agreement with exact (but numerical) results. The present analysis has much in common with the quantum theory of the laser.

  18. Reproductive effects of the water-accommodated fraction of a natural gas condensate in the Indo-Pacific reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, R D; Yap, H T; Montaño, M N E

    2011-11-01

    Toxic effects of the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of a natural gas condensate on the reproduction of the brooding coral Pocillopora damicornis were studied in short-term (24 h) laboratory experiments. Coral fragments were exposed to varying concentrations of condensate WAF during different reproductive phases: gametogenesis, early embryogenesis, and late embryogenesis (when nighttime planulation occurs). During gametogenesis, exposure to condensate WAF did not inhibit subsequent production of larvae. On the other hand, exposure to >25% WAF of gravid corals, at early and late embryogenesis, resulted in abortion and early release of larvae, respectively, with higher percentages of larvae expelled in fragments treated with higher concentrations of condensate WAF at least 3h after onset of exposure. Aborted larvae during early embryogenesis were 'premature', as they are of small size (0.06±0.03 mm³), low metamorphic competency (54%), and white in coloration, with a pale brown oral end (indicating low density of zooxanthellae). Those larvae released at the latter part of embryogenesis are bigger in size (0.22±0.08 mm³), possess 100% metamorphic competency, and are brown in coloration (high density of zooxanthellae). Aside from direct effects on reproduction, fragment mortality index was higher in samples exposed to higher concentrations of condensate WAF (>25%), hence lowering the number of potentially reproducing polyps. Altogether, exposure to >25% natural gas condensate WAF for at least 3h can potentially disrupt the replenishment of coral populations due to negative effects on reproduction and early life processes.

  19. Applications of UT results to confirm defects findings by utilization of relevant metallurgical investigations techniques on gas/condensate pipeline working in wet sour gas environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Azhari, O. A.; Gajam, S. Y.

    2015-03-01

    The gas/condensate pipe line under investigation is a 12 inch diameter, 48 km ASTM, A106 steel pipeline, carrying hydrocarbons containing wet CO2 and H2S.The pipe line had exploded in a region 100m distance from its terminal; after 24 years of service. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sour gas corrosion were expected due to the presence of wet H2S in the gas analysis. In other areas of pipe line ultrasonic testing was performed to determine whether the pipeline can be re-operated. The results have shown presence of internal planner defects, this was attributed to the existence of either laminations, type II inclusions or some service defects such as HIC and step wise cracking (SWC).Metallurgical investigations were conducted on fractured samples as per NACE standard (TM-0284-84). The obtained results had shown macroscopic cracks in the form of SWC, microstructure of steel had MnS inclusions. Crack sensitivity analyses were calculated and the microhardness testing was conducted. These results had confirmed that the line material was suffering from sour gas deteriorations. This paper correlates the field UT inspection findings with those methods investigated in the laboratory. Based on the results obtained a new HIC resistance material pipeline needs to be selected.

  20. SiO(x) nanoparticles synthesized by an evaporation and condensation process using induction melting of silicon and gas injection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Yun; Lee, Jin Seok; Kim, Joon Soo

    2013-05-01

    SiO(x) nanoparticles were synthesized using a specially designed induction melting system equipped with a segmented graphite crucible. The graphite crucible with the segmented wall was the key to enhancing the evaporation rate due to the increase of the evaporation area and convection of the silicon melt. Injection of the gas mixture of oxygen (O2) and argon (Ar) on silicon (Si) melt caused the formation of SiO(x) nanoparticles. The evaporated SiO(x) nanoparticles were then cooled and condensed in a process chamber. The effects of the O2/Ar ratio in the injection gas on the microstructures of the SiO(x) nanoparticles were then investigated. Synthesized SiO(x) nanoparticles were proven to be of a homogeneous amorphous phase with average diameters of 30-35 nm. The microstructures were independent from the O2/Ar ratio of the injected gas. However, x increased from 1.36 to 1.84 as the O2/Ar ratio increased. The purity of the synthesized nanoparticles was about 99.9%. SiO(x) nanoparticles could be applied as the active anode material in a lithium (Li) ion secondary battery.

  1. Theory of coherence in Bose-Einstein condensation phenomena in a microwave-driven interacting magnon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2009-05-01

    Strong experimental evidences of the formation of quasiequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons at room temperature in a film of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) excited by microwave radiation have been recently reported. Here we present a theory for the dynamics of the magnon gas driven by a microwave field far out of equilibrium that provides rigorous support for the formation of a BEC of magnons in a YIG film magnetized in the plane. We show that if the microwave driving power exceeds a threshold value the nonlinear magnetic interactions create cooperative mechanisms for the onset of a phase transition leading to the spontaneous generation of quantum coherence and magnetic dynamic order in a macroscopic scale. The theoretical results agree with the experimental data for the intensity and the decay rate of the Brillouin light scattering from the BEC as a function of power and for the microwave emission from the uniform mode generated by the confluence of BEC magnon pairs.

  2. Unusual well control techniques pay off. [Well drilling techniques in the Elgin gas condensate field, North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Idelovici, J.L.

    1993-07-01

    Well control and completion operations were seriously complicated by an unusual pressure phenomena encountered while drilling an appraisal well through Jurassic sandstones in a high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT), gas and condensate field located in the United Kingdom continental shelf. The HPHT sandstone reservoir is located in the Upper Jurassic Franklin formation. Unorthodox well-control techniques were used because it was determined that the abnormally high pressure was generated by a mechanical reaction of the rock under the effect of heavy mud and equivalent circulating density, rather than by entry into the wellbore of formation fluids. This paper reviews the complex drilling fluid control procedures which had to be utilized to maintain an open bore hole during drilling.

  3. Effect of scenedesmus acuminatus green algae extracts on the development of Candida lipolytic yeast in gas condensate-containing media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmes, B. I.; Kasymova, G. A.; Runov, V. I.; Karavayeva, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given of a comparative study of the growth and development as well as the characteristics of the biomass of the C. Lipolytica yeast according to the content of raw protein, protein, lipids, vitamins in the B group, and residual hydrocarbons during growth in media with de-aromatized gas-condensate FNZ as the carbon source with aqueous and alcohol extracts of S. acuminatus as the biostimulants. It is shown that the decoction and aqueous extract of green algae has the most intensive stimulating effect on the yeast growth. When a decoction of algae is added to the medium, the content of residual hydrocarbons in the biomass of C. lipolytica yeast is reduced by 4%; the quantity of protein, lipids, thamine and inositol with replacement of the yeast autolysate by the decoction of algae is altered little.

  4. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time".

  5. Techniques for optimizing inerting in electron processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwalla, I. J.; Korn, D. J.; Nablo, S. V.

    1993-07-01

    The design of an "inert gas" distribution system in an electron processor must satisfy a number of requirements. The first of these is the elimination or control of beam produced ozone and NO x which can be transported from the process zone by the product into the work area. Since the tolerable levels for O 3 in occupied areas around the processor are <0.1 ppm, good control techniques are required involving either recombination of the O 3 in the beam heated process zone, or exhausting and dilution of the gas at the processor exit. The second requirement of the inerting system is to provide a suitable environment for completing efficient, free radical initiated addition polymerization. In this case, the competition between radical loss through de-excitation and that from O 2 quenching must be understood. This group has used gas chromatographic analysis of electron cured coatings to study the trade-offs of delivered dose, dose rate and O 2 concentrations in the process zone to determine the tolerable ranges of parameter excursions can be determined for production quality control purposes. These techniques are described for an ink:coating system on paperboard, where a broad range of process parameters have been studied (D, Ġ, O 2. It is then shown how the technique is used to optimize the use of higher purity (10-100 ppm O 2) nitrogen gas for inerting, in combination with lower purity (2-20, 000 ppm O 2) non-cryogenically produced gas, as from a membrane or pressure swing adsorption generators.

  6. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  7. Dynamics and Evolution of SO2 Gas Condensation Around Prometheus-like Volcanic Plumes on Io as Seen by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doute, S.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L. W.; Carlson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer data acquired during the I24, 25, and 27 Io's Fly-bys by Galileo are analyzed to map the SO2 frost abundance and granularity. This allows a better understanding of the dynamics and evolution of gas condensation around volcanic plumes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Effects of inert gases on fatigue crack growth and their transportation into subsurface regions in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Shimojo, M.; Higo, Y.; Oya-Seimiya, Y.

    2000-05-01

    To clarify the effects of inert gases on the fatigue behavior of titanium, fatigue crack growth tests were carried out in pure inert gases and in vacuum. Fatigue crack growth rates increased, and the fracture surface appearance was changed in inert gases, as compared to those in vacuum. The transportation of inert gases into subsurface regions of fracture surfaces was confirmed using Auger electron spectroscopy. This transportation is considered to be due to the reverse slip of slip planes on which inert gas atoms have adsorbed.

  9. Use of a Vortex-Type Contact Condenser in Absorption of Methanol and Formaldehyde from a Contact Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalev, L. N.; Ponikarov, S. I.

    2016-09-01

    Consideration has been given to the process of absorption of methanol and formaldehyde from a contact gas in the production of technical formalin. Using computer simulation, the authors set up a model of a standard flow diagram of methanol and formaldehyde absorption of a contact gas. For the process of absorption, use was made of NRTL and Lee-Kesler mathematical models which allow for the heat and mass transfer. Empirical coefficients for these models have been determined. The amount of methanol and formaldehyde has been established in absorption gases utilized by burning with a standard flow diagram and on adding a supplementary stage of condensation. A comparison has been made of experimental and calculated data of the process. A heat- and mass transfer apparatus of the vortex type has been proposed, which will make it possible to remove an environmental burden and to improve energy-resource saving. The conditions of operation of the absorber with an increase of 22% in the output have been considered.

  10. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth.

  11. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lijuan; Ten Brink, Gert H; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-27

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth.

  12. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2016-02-16

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. In conclusion, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  13. Inert gases in closed crystal growth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, Witold

    1997-07-01

    The effect of desorption from, and diffusion through the wall on inert gas pressure in sealed fused silica ampoules was investigated. It is shown, that desorption from the surface and the bulk of silica may lead to an accumulation of residual gas on the order of a few Torr or more upon annealing. A prior outgassing of the ampoules under vacuum at high temperature reduces the amount of gas released from the glass by at least one order of magnitude. Presence of oxide and other impurities in the source material was found to increase the residual gas pressure, affect its composition, and reduce the vapor transport rate in PVT systems. It is shown, that light gases (hydrogen, helium, and neon) diffuse through silica wall and may change the pressure inside the sealed ampoule considerably even at moderate temperatures.

  14. A common single-site Pt(II)-O(OH)x- species stabilized by sodium on "active" and "inert" supports catalyzes the water-gas shift reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Liu, Jilei; Lee, Sungsik; Zugic, Branko; Huang, Jun; Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2015-03-18

    While it has long been known that different types of support oxides have different capabilities to anchor metals and thus tailor the catalytic behavior, it is not always clear whether the support is a mere carrier of the active metal site, itself not participating directly in the reaction pathway. We report that catalytically similar single-atom-centric Pt sites are formed by binding to sodium ions through -O ligands, the ensemble being equally effective on supports as diverse as TiO2, L-zeolites, and mesoporous silica MCM-41. Loading of 0.5 wt % Pt on all of these supports preserves the Pt in atomic dispersion as Pt(II), and the Pt-O(OH)x- species catalyzes the water-gas shift reaction from ∼120 to 400 °C. Since the effect of the support is "indirect," these findings pave the way for the use of a variety of earth-abundant supports as carriers of atomically dispersed platinum for applications in catalytic fuel-gas processing.

  15. PEFC catalytic properties of Pt - Ni nanoparticles prepared by a plasma-gas-condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Michihisa; Ishikawa, Ryoichi; Miyazaki, Reona; Hihara, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    Pt - Ni nanoparticles were fabricated via the gas phase method. Their performance as anode catalysts for the proton exchange membrane fuel cell was investigated as a function of Ni concentration. The microscopic configurations of the nanoparticles were rather heterogeneous; Pt-rich alloys existed in the core region of particles while a part of the surface layer was composed of the Ni-rich layer. Despite the Ni-rich layer in the shell region, the anode catalyst performance of the Pt - Ni nanoparticles was never deteriorated compared with that of the Pt ones. When the anode catalyst was composed of the Pt nanoparticles, a maximum power density of 112 mW/cm2 was obtained. However, 90% of the power density was still kept even when 40 at. % of Pt was replaced with Ni. The results suggest that a further decrease of Pt composition with maintaining its catalyst performance can be feasible by effective particle dispersing.

  16. Optical properties of palladium nanoparticles under exposure of hydrogen and inert gas prepared by dewetting synthesis of thin-sputtered layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracker, Michael; Worsch, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Thin layers of palladium with a thickness of 5 nm were sputtered on fused silica substrates. Subsequently, the coated glasses were annealed at a temperature of 900 °C for 1 h. This resulted in the formation of small and well-separated palladium nanoparticles with diameters in the range from 20 to 200 nm on the glass surface. The existence of a palladium oxide layer can be detected using optical absorption spectroscopy. Purging with hydrogen leads to an irreversible change in the optical spectra due to the reduction of PdO to metallic palladium. Changing the gas atmosphere from hydrogen to argon leads to significant reversible changes in the optical properties of the particle layer. Based on Mie theory and the respective dielectric functions, the spectra were calculated using the real particle size distribution, weighted dispersions relation to adapt the geometrical conditions and complex dielectric functions of palladium and palladium hydride. A good agreement with measured spectra was found and the dependency of the surrounding media can be explained.

  17. Tuning of the internal energy and isomer distribution in small protonated water clusters H(+)(H2O)(4-8): an application of the inert gas messenger technique.

    PubMed

    Mizuse, Kenta; Fujii, Asuka

    2012-05-24

    Infrared spectroscopy of gas-phase hydrated clusters provides us much information on structures and dynamics of water networks. However, interpretation of spectra is often difficult because of high internal energy (vibrational temperature) of clusters and coexistence of many isomers. Here we report an approach to vary these factors by using the inert gas (so-called "messenger")-mediated cooling technique. Protonated water clusters with a messenger (M), H(+)(H(2)O)(4-8)·M (M = Ne, Ar, (H(2))(2)), are formed in a molecular beam and probed with infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the OH stretch region. Observed spectra are compared with each other and with bare H(+)(H(2)O)(n). They show clear messenger dependence in their bandwidths and relative band intensities, reflecting different internal energy and isomer distribution, respectively. It is shown that the internal energy follows the order H(+)(H(2)O)(n) > H(+)(H(2)O)(n)·(H(2))(2) > H(+)(H(2)O)(n)·Ar > H(+)(H(2)O)(n)·Ne, while the isomer-selectivity, which changes the isomer distribution in the bare system, follows the order H(+)(H(2)O)(n)·Ar > H(+)(H(2)O)(n)·(H(2))(2) > H(+)(H(2)O)(n)·Ne ~ (H(+)(H(2)O)(n)). Although the origin of the isomer-selectivity is unclear, comparison among spectra measured with different messengers is very powerful in spectral analyses and makes it possible to easily assign spectral features of each isomer.

  18. Pattern formation arising from condensation of a homogeneous gas into a binary, phase-separating liquid.

    PubMed

    Pooley, C M; Balazs, Anna C; Yeomans, J M

    2005-08-01

    We examine the nucleated growth of a binary, immiscible liquid drop within a homogeneous gas. The system couples the growth of the liquid drop with the phase separation of the immiscible components and, thus, can potentially reveal novel pattern formation. To carry out this study, we first characterize the thermodynamic properties of the system in terms of an appropriate Ginzburg-Landau free energy density. By minimizing this free energy, we construct the equilibrium phase diagram for the system. We then use a lattice Boltzmann algorithm to solve the hydrodynamic equations describing the dynamical evolution of the fluid. We observe intriguing tentaclelike structures within the nucleation and growth regime and explore how the formation of these structures depends on the thermodynamic and transport properties of the system. We give scaling laws describing domain growth in both the diffusion- and flow-limited regimes. The results highlight the novel physics that can emerge when there is interplay between the ordering of a density and a concentration field.

  19. Formation of ordered CoAl alloy clusters by the plasma-gas condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Toyohiko J.; Yamamuro, Saeki; Sumiyama, Kenji

    2001-09-01

    CoxAl1-x alloy clusters were synthesized from a mixture of Co and Al metal vapors generated by the sputtering of pure metal targets. We observed that the produced alloy clusters were uniform in size, ranging from approximately 20 nm for Al-rich clusters to 10 nm for Co-rich clusters. For a wide average composition range (x≈0.4-0.7), the alloy clusters have the ordered B2 (CsCl-type) structure. In the Co-rich cluster aggregates (x=0.76), the clusters are composed of face-centered-cubic (fcc) Co and minor CoAl(B2) clusters. In the Al-rich aggregates (x=0.23), the clusters are mainly composed of the fcc-Al phase, although clusters occasionally possess a "core-shell structure" with the CoAl(B2) phase surrounded by an Al-rich amorphous phase. These observations are in general agreement with our prediction based on the equilibrium phase diagram. We also noticed that the average composition depends not only on the relative amount of Co and Al vapors, but also on their absolute amount, and even on the Ar gas flow rate, which promotes mixing and cooling the two vapors. These findings show that the formation of alloy clusters in vapor phase is strongly influenced by the kinetics of cluster formation, and is a competing process between the approach to equilibrium and the quenching of the whole system.

  20. A new apparatus for studies of quantized vortex dynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Zachary L.

    The presence of quantized vortices and a high level of control over trap geometries and other system parameters make dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) a natural environment for studies of vortex dynamics and quantum turbulence in superfluids, primary interests of the BEC group at the University of Arizona. Such research may lead to deeper understanding of the nature of quantum fluid dynamics and far-from-equilbrium phenomena. Despite the importance of quantized vortex dynamics in the fields of superfluidity, superconductivity and quantum turbulence, direct imaging of vortices in trapped BECs remains a significant technical challenge. This is primarily due to the small size of the vortex core in a trapped gas, which is typically a few hundred nanometers in diameter. In this dissertation I present the design and construction of a new 87Rb BEC apparatus with the goal of studying vortex dynamics in trapped BECs. The heart of the apparatus is a compact vacuum chamber with a custom, all-glass science cell designed to accommodate the use of commercial high-numerical-aperture microscope objectives for in situ imaging of vortices. The designs for the new system are, in part, based on prior work in our group on in situ imaging of vortices. Here I review aspects of our prior work and discuss some of the successes and limitations that are relevant to the new apparatus. The bulk of the thesis is used to described the major subsystems of the new apparatus which include the vacuum chamber, the laser systems, the magnetic transfer system and the final magnetic trap for the atoms. Finally, I demonstrate the creation of a BEC of ˜ 2 x 106 87Rb atoms in our new system and show that the BEC can be transferred into a weak, spherical, magnetic trap with a well defined magnetic field axis that may be useful for future vortex imaging studies.

  1. Peptide conformation in gas phase probed by collision-induced dissociation and its correlation to conformation in condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongqi; Bordas-Nagy, Joseph

    2006-06-01

    A kinetic peptide fragmentation model for quantitative prediction of peptide CID spectra in an ion trap mass spectrometer has been reported recently. When applying the model to predict the CID spectra of large peptides, it was often found that the predicted spectra differed significantly from their experimental spectra, presumably due to noncovalent interactions in these large polypeptides, which are not considered in the fragmentation model. As a result, site-specific quantitative information correlated to the secondary/tertiary structure of an ionized peptide may be extracted from its CID spectrum. To extract this information, the kinetic peptide fragmentation model was modified by incorporating conformation-related parameters. These parameters are optimized for best fit between the predicted and the experimental spectrum. A conformational stability map is then generated from these conformation-related parameters. Analysis of a few bioactive alpha-helical peptides including melittin, glucagon and neuropeptide Y by this technique demonstrated that their stability maps in the gas phase correlate strongly to their secondary structures in the condensed phases.

  2. Absorption spectroscopy of xenon and ethylene-noble gas mixtures at high pressure: towards Bose-Einstein condensation of vacuum ultraviolet photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Christian; Brausemann, Rudolf; Schmitt, Julian; Vewinger, Frank; Christopoulos, Stavros; Weitz, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation is a phenomenon well known for material particles as cold atomic gases, and this concept has in recent years been extended to photons confined in microscopic optical cavities. Essential for the operation of such a photon condensate is a thermalization mechanism that conserves the average particle number, as in the visible spectral regime can be realized by subsequent absorption re-emission processes in dye molecules. Here we report on the status of an experimental effort aiming at the extension of the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation of photons towards the vacuum ultraviolet spectral regime, with gases at high-pressure conditions serving as a thermalization medium for the photon gas. We have recorded absorption spectra of xenon gas at up to 30 bar gas pressure of the 5p^6-5p^56s transition with a wavelength close to 147 nm. Moreover, spectra of ethylene noble gas mixtures between 158 and 180 nm wavelength are reported.

  3. Stardust: Studies in microgravity of condensation and agglomeration of cosmic dust analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dellaversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1992-01-01

    A short description of the program Stardust whose goal is to study the formation and properties of high temperature particles and gases, including silicate and carbonaceous materials, that are of interest in astrophysics and planetary science, is given. The international program was carried out in microgravity conditions in parabolic flight. A description of the laboratory equipment, conceived to perform experimental tests in reduced gravity conditions, and which is based on the gas evaporation technique, is given. The gas evaporation technique utilizes one or more heated crucible to vaporize solids materials (SiO, Mg) in a low pressure of inert or reactive gas inside of a vacuum bell jar. The vapor pressures of the materials are controlled by the temperature of the crucibles. The temperature and pressure of inert gas are also controlled. By varying the vapor pressure relative to the gas temperature and pressure, the conditions for substantial grain condensation can be controlled and grain formation measured using light scattering techniques. Thus the partial pressure for grain condensation, can be measured as a function of temperature. The gas evaporation technique has the advantage that complex chemical systems can be studied by using multiple crucibles each containing solid source material. Experimental results and future trends are addressed.

  4. Method and apparatus for maintaining condensable constituents of a gas in a vapor phase during sample transport

    DOEpatents

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-18

    A system for fluid transport at elevated temperatures having a conduit having a fluid inlet end and a fluid outlet end and at least one heating element disposed within the conduit providing direct heating of a fluid flowing through the conduit. The system is particularly suited for preventing condensable constituents of a high temperature fluid from condensing out of the fluid prior to analysis of the fluid. In addition, operation of the system so as to prevent the condensable constituents from condensing out of the fluid surprisingly does not alter the composition of the fluid.

  5. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 106 Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 lN min-1 and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD.

  6. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 10(6) Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 l(N) min(-1) and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD.

  7. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R; Althof, J A

    1985-06-01

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  8. Broad iron emission lines in Seyfert galaxies - re-condensation of gas onto an inner disk below the ADAF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Hofmeister, E.; Meyer, F.

    2011-03-01

    Context. The number of strong iron Kα line detections in Seyfert AGN is clearly growing in the Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku era. The iron emission lines are broad, some are relativistically blurred. These relativistic disk lines have also been observed for galactic black hole X-ray binaries. Thermal components found in hard spectra were interpreted as an indication for a weak inner cool accretion disk underneath a hot corona. Aims: Accretion in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) occurs during phases of high and low mass accretion rate, outburst and quiescence, soft and hard spectral state, respectively. After the soft/hard transition for some sources a thermal component is found, which can be interpreted as sustained by re-condensation of gas from an advection-dominated flow (ADAF) onto the disk. In view of the similarity of accretion flows around stellar mass and supermassive black holes we discuss whether the broad iron emission lines in Seyfert 1 AGN (active galactic nuclei) can be understood as arising from a similar accretion flow geometry as in X-ray binaries. Methods: We derive accretion rates for those Seyfert galaxies for which broad iron emission lines were observed, the "best candidates" in the investigations of Miller (2007, ARA&A, 45, 441) and Nandra et al. (2007, MNRAS, 382, 194). For the evaluation of the Eddington-scaled rates we use the observed X-ray luminosity, bolometric corrections and black hole masses from the literature. Results: The accretion rates derived for the Seyfert galaxies in our sample are less than 0.1 of the Eddington rate for more than half of the sources. For 107 to 108M⊙ black holes in Seyfert 1 AGN this limit corresponds to 0.01 to 0.2 M⊙/yr. This documents that the sources probably are in a hard spectral state and iron emission lines can arise from an inner weak accretion disk surrounded by an ADAF as predicted by the re-condensation model. Some of the remaining sources with higher accretion rates may be in a spectral

  9. METAL SPRAYER FOR USE IN VACUUM OR INERT ATMOSPHERE

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, R.E.

    1958-10-14

    A metal sprayer is described for use in a vacuum or inert atmosphere with a straight line wire feed and variable electrode contact angle. This apparatus comprises two wires which are fed through straight tubes of two mechanisms positioned on opposite sides of a central tube to which an inert gas is fed. The two mechanisms and the wires being fed constitute electrodes to which electrical current is supplied so that the wires are melted by the electric are formed at their contacting region and sprayed by the gas supplied by the central tube. This apparatus is designed specifically to apply a zirconium coating to uranium in an inert atmosphere and without the use of an oxidizing flame.

  10. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  11. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  12. [On-line method for measurement of the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric methane and its application to atmosphere of Yakela condensed gas field].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun-Hong; Bao, Zheng-Yu; Xiang, Wu; Qiao, Sheng-Ying; Li, Bing

    2006-01-01

    An on-line method for measurement of the 13C/12C ratio of methane by a gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/ isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/MS) technique was developed. This method is less laborious, more rapid (45 min), of high precision (+/- 0.4 x 10(-3)) and by using a small amount of sample (about 200 mL of atmosphere). Its application to isotopic characterization, and hence methane source identification, was demonstrated by examination of atmosphere sample collected in Yakela condensed gas field, China. The average 13C/12C ratio of atmospheric methane in Yakela field was -45.0 x 10(-3) heavier by 1.2 x 10(-3) -2.0 x 10(-3) than the global average. This is caused by seepage and diffusing of methane from Yakela condensed gas reservoir. The concentrations of atmospheric methane in daytimes are found to be lower than those in nighttimes, and the corresponding 13C/12C ratios in daytimes are lighter compared to those in nighttimes, a phenomena probably caused by the fact that a small part of methane from Yakela condensate reservoir is consumed in soil's surface under sunlight.

  13. Developing a scalable inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, E.; Ramsey, W.; Steiner, G.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical studies to identify and then design a high performance scalable ion thruster operating with either argon or xenon for use in large space systems are presented. The magnetoelectrostatic containment concept is selected for its efficient ion generation capabilities. The iterative nature of the bounding magnetic fields allows the designer to scale both the diameter and length, so that the thruster can be adapted to spacecraft growth over time. Three different thruster assemblies (conical, hexagonal and hemispherical) are evaluated for a 12 cm diameter thruster and performance mapping of the various thruster configurations shows that conical discharge chambers produce the most efficient discharge operation, achieving argon efficiencies of 50-80% mass utilization at 240-310 eV/ion and xenon efficiencies of 60-97% at 240-280 eV/ion. Preliminary testing of the large 30 cm thruster, using argon propellant, indicates a 35% improvement over the 12 cm thruster in mass utilization efficiency. Since initial performance is found to be better than projected, a larger 50 cm thruster is already in the development stage.

  14. Adapting magnetoelectrostatic containment to inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.; James, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    Two different types of 12 cm magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters have been adapted to argon-xenon operation. Discharge chamber optimization produced excellent performance with both the hexagonal and hemispherical shaped thrusters. The hemispherical thruster design yielded the best performance, ionizing 75 to 96 percent of the xenon propellant with a discharge energy consumption rate of 185 to 320 eV/ion. Argon operation of the same thruster achieved 60 to 80 percent propellant ionization at 215 to 370 eV/ion.

  15. Kinetics and energy states of nanoclusters in the initial stage of homogeneous condensation at high supersaturation degrees

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, A. G.; Gel'chinskii, B. R.; Korenchenko, A. E.

    2012-11-15

    The condensation of metal vapor in an inert gas is studied by the molecular dynamics method. Two condensation regimes are investigated: with maintenance of partial pressure of the metal vapor and with a fixed number of metal atoms in the system. The main focus is the study of the cluster energy distribution over the degrees of freedom and mechanisms of the establishment of thermal equilibrium. It is shown that the internal temperature of a cluster considerably exceeds the buffer gas temperature and the thermal balance is established for a time considerably exceeding the nucleation time. It is found that, when the metal vapor concentration exceeds 0.1 of the argon concentration, the growth of clusters with the highest possible internal energy occurs, the condensation rate being determined only by the rate of heat removal from clusters.

  16. 33 CFR 154.824 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... oxygen analyzers are used, the higher oxygen concentration reading controls the inerting or enriching... section. (f) Each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer required by this section must: (1) Be installed in... concentration continuously not more than 30 pipe diameters from the gas injection point. (g) Oxygen...

  17. Product characteristics from the torrefaction of oil palm fiber pellets in inert and oxidative atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Zhuang, Yi-Qing; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Juang, Tarng-Tzuen; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the characteristics of solid and liquid products from the torrefaction of oil palm fiber pellets (OPFP) in inert and oxidative environments. The torrefaction temperature and O2 concentration in the carrier gas were in the ranges of 275-350°C and 0-10 vol%, respectively, while the torrefaction duration was 30 min. The oxidative torrefaction of OPFP at 275°C drastically intensified the HHV of the biomass when compared to the non-oxidative torrefaction. OPFP torrefied at 300°C is recommended to upgrade the biomass, irrespective of the atmosphere. The HHV of condensed liquid was between 10.1 and 13.2 MJ kg(-)(1), and was promoted to 23.2-28.7 MJ kg(-)(1) following dewatering. This accounts for 92-139% improvement in the calorific value of the liquid. This reveals that the recovery of condensed liquid with dewatering is able to enhance the energy efficiency of a torrefaction system.

  18. Kinetic boundary layers in gas mixtures: Systems described by nonlinearly coupled kinetic and hydrodynamic equations and applications to droplet condensation and evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors consider a mixture of heavy vapor molecules and a light carrier gas surrounding a liquid droplet. The vapor is described by a variant of the Klein-Kramers equation; the gas is described by the Navier-Stokes equations; the droplet acts as a heat source due to the released heat of condensation. The exchange of momentum and energy between the constituents of the mixture is taken into account by force terms in the kinetic equation and source terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. These are chosen to obtain maximal agreement with the irreversible thermodynamics of a gas mixture. The structure of the kinetic boundary layer around the sphere is determined from the self-consistent solution of this set of coupled equations with appropriate boundary conditions at the surface of the sphere. The kinetic equation is rewritten as a set of coupled moment equations. A complete set of solutions of these moment equations is constructed by numerical integration inward from the region far away from the droplet, where the background inhomogeneities are small. A technique developed earlier is used to deal with the numerical instability of the moment equations. The solutions obtained for given temperature and pressure profiles in the gas are then combined linearly such that they obey the boundary conditions at the droplet surface; from this solution source terms for the Navier-Stokes equation of the gas are constructed and used to determine improved temperature and pressure profiles for the background gas. For not too large temperature differneces between the droplet and the gas at infinity, self-consistency is reached after a few iterations. The method is applied to the condensation of droplets from a supersaturated vapor as well as to strong evaporation of droplets under the influence of an external heat source, where corrections of up to 40% are obtained.

  19. Antifoam Degradation Products in Off Gas and Condensate of Sludge Batch 9 Simulant Nitric-Formic Flowsheet Testing for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.

    2016-04-14

    Ten chemical processing cell (CPC) experiments were performed using simulant to evaluate Sludge Batch 9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on eight of the ten. The other two were SRAT cycles only. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has previously shown antifoam decomposes to form flammable organic products, (hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), and propanal), that are present in the vapor phase and condensate of the CPC vessels. To minimize antifoam degradation product formation, a new antifoam addition strategy was implemented at SRNL and DWPF to add antifoam undiluted.

  20. Non-equilibrium Properties of a Pumped-Decaying Bose-Condensed Electron-Hole Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanai, R.; Littlewood, P. B.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate a Bose-condensed exciton gas out of equilibrium. Within the framework of the combined BCS-Leggett strong-coupling theory with the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we show how the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of excitons is suppressed to eventually disappear, when the system is in the non-equilibrium steady state. The supply of electrons and holes from the bath is shown to induce quasi-particle excitations, leading to the partial occupation of the upper branch of Bogoliubov single-particle excitation spectrum. We also discuss how this quasi-particle induction is related to the suppression of exciton BEC, as well as the stability of the steady state.

  1. Relation between biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate and internal exposure to metals from gas metal arc welding.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Weiss, Tobias; Lehnert, Martin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Kendzia, Benjamin; Harth, Volker; Henry, Jana; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Concerning possible harmful components of welding fumes, besides gases and quantitative aspects of the respirable welding fumes, particle-inherent metal toxicity has to be considered.The objective of this study was to investigate the effect markers leukotriene B4 (LTB4),prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane (8-Iso PGF2α) as well as the acid–base balance(pH) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 43 full-time gas metal arc welders (20 smokers) in relation to welding fume exposure. We observed different patterns of iron, chromium and nickel in respirable welding fumes and EBC. Welders with undetectable chromium in EBC(group A, n = 24) presented high iron and nickel concentrations. In this group, higher 8-isoPGF2α and LTB4 concentrations could be revealed compared to welders with detectable chromium and low levels of both iron and nickel in EBC (group B): 8-iso PGF2α443.3 pg mL−1 versus 247.2 pg mL−1; p = 0.001 and LTB4 30.5 pg mL−1 versus 17.3 pgmL−1; p = 0.016. EBC-pH was more acid in samples of group B (6.52 versus 6.82; p = 0.011).Overall, effect markers in welders were associated with iron concentrations in EBC according to smoking habits--non-smokers/smokers: LTB4 (rs = 0.48; p = 0.02/rs = 0.21; p = 0.37),PGE2 (rs = 0.15; p = 0.59/rs = 0.47; p = 0.07), 8-iso PGF2α (rs = 0.18; p = 0.54/rs = 0.59;p = 0.06). Sampling of EBC in occupational research provides a matrix for the simultaneous monitoring of metal exposure and effects on target level. Our results suggest irritative effects in the airways of healthy welders. Further studies are necessary to assess whether these individual results might be used to identify welders at elevated risk for developing a respiratory disease.

  2. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  3. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter. [5 FR 31, Jan. 4, 1940]...

  4. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  5. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  6. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter. [5 FR 31, Jan. 4, 1940]...

  7. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics.

  9. Propagation of first and second sound in a highly elongated trapped Bose-condensed gas at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahata, Emiko; Nikuni, Tetsuro

    2013-03-01

    We study sound propagation in Bose-condensed gases in a highly elongated harmonic trap at finite temperatures. This problem is studied within the framework of the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin (ZNG) formalism, which consists of a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate and a kinetic equation for the thermal cloud. We extend the ZNG formalism to deal with a highly anisotropic trap potential and use it to simulate sound propagation using the trap parameters corresponding to an experiment on sound pulse propagation at finite temperature. We focus on the high-density two-fluid hydrodynamic regime, and explore the possibility of observing first- and second-sound pulse propagation. The results of numerical simulation are compared with analytical results derived from linearized ZNG hydrodynamic equations. We show that the second-sound mode makes the dominant contribution to condensate motion at relatively high temperature, while the first-sound mode makes an appreciable contribution.

  10. Nonlinear Pressure Shifts of Rubidium in Inert Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2009-05-01

    Vapor-cell atomic frequency standards are based on the hyperfine (microwave) magnetic-resonance frequencies of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gas. Through the hyperfine-shift interaction, buffer gas induces pressure shift and broadening in these microwave resonances. Previous work uncovered nonlinear dependence in the pressure shifts of ^87Rb and Cs atoms to the pressure of buffer gases Ar and Kr, but not He or N2. The nonlinearity is thought to result from alteration to the hyperfine-shift interaction due to temporary van der Waals molecules formed between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms. We investigate nonlinear pressure shifts for both isotopes of Rb, ^87Rb and ^85Rb. This study will test the current model for nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali metals in inert gases.

  11. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  12. Magnetic-modulation spectroscopy of an atomic Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Dissociation spectra in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of magnetic-field modulation on a Fermi gas of atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover is studied analytically. Recent experimental findings on the system response to a sinusoidal variation of the field are explained. Specifically, the dissociation processes induced by the modulation in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime are described. The role played by the frequency, amplitude, and application time of the perturbation in the emergence of the observed behavior is clarified. The results uncover also the relevance of the detuning from the Feshbach resonance to the appearance of particular spectral features. The applicability of the field modulation as a spectroscopic tool for probing the crossover is discussed.

  13. Condensation of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of current experimental results concerned with the kinetic constraints on chondrule formation showed that the major physical properties of chondrules could have been produced by direct condensation of metastable liquid silicates droplets from a hot gas in the primordial nebula. It is argued that such a condensation process would have to be followed by crystallization, accretion, and partial comminution of the droplets. The chemical mechanisms driving this process are described, including: nucleation constraints on comminution and crystallization; slow transformations and chemical reactions in chain silicates; and the slow diffusion of ions. It is shown that the physical mechanisms for chondrule condensation are applicable to a broad spectrum of chondrule sources.

  14. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  15. Perturbative treatment of quantum to classical transition in chiral molecules: dilute phase versus condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher Ghahramani, Farhad; Tirandaz, Arash

    2017-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the chiral states of chiral molecules with high tunneling rates in dilute and condensed phases in the context of time-dependent perturbation theory. The chiral molecule is effectively described by an asymmetric double-well potential, whose asymmetry is a measure of chiral interactions. The dilute and condensed phases are conjointly described by a collection of harmonic oscillators but with temperature-dependent sub-ohmic and temperature-independent ohmic spectral densities, respectively. We examine our method quantitatively by applying the dynamics to an isotopic ammonia molecule, NHDT, in an inert background gas (as the dilute phase) and in water (as the condensed phase). As the different spectral densities imply, the extension of the dynamics from the dilute phase to the condensed phase is not trivial. While the dynamics in the dilute phase leads to racemization, the chiral interactions in the condensed phase induce the quantum Zeno effect. Moreover, contrary to the condensed phase, the short-time dynamics in the dilute phase is sensitive to the initial state of the chiral molecule and to the strength of the coupling between the molecule and the environment.

  16. Effect of condensed tannin extract supplementation of performance, nitrogen, balance, gas emissions, and energetic losses of beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations are of increasing concern to regulatory agencies and consumers. We evaluated the effect of top-dressing a finishing diet (14.4% crude protein) for beef steers with a commercially-available condensed tannin extract (CT) at three levels (0...

  17. The implementation of non-condensable mass equations including a dissolved gas source term in WCOBRA/TRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, David Lee, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    In the era of passively cooled reactors, condensation is playing a larger role in the emergency cooling of the reactor. With this added emphasis it is more important than ever to be able to accurately predict the condensation rate. It is well known that the presence of non-condensable gases will diminish this rate. This thesis describes the changes which were necessary to enable WCOBRA/TRAC to calculate the non-condensable distribution in the reactor system. WCOBRA/TRAC is Westinghouse's Large Break LOCA code. The ability to track both gaseous nitrogen and hydrogen was implemented in both portions of WCOBRA/TRAC. Furthermore, a mass equation was also added for dissolved hydrogen. This dissolved mass equation when combined with the calculation of the dissolved hydrogen solubility forms the basis of a gaseous hydrogen source term. This source had not previously been included in reactor safety codes. Several different models for this flashing mechanism are presented. The effect on the interfacial heat transfer for both portions of WCOBRA/TRAC is also discussed. This discussion primarily focuses on the necessary changes required to maintain the proper driving forces for the interfacial heat transfer as well the changes required to assure conservation of energy in the new system. Several types of test problems are used to show the importance of the models which have been implemented on the modelling of reactor transients. The most important effect is that by properly accounting for the effects of the non-condensables on condensation, the ability to model the impact of the ECCS injection during a Large Break Loca is drastically improved. The ability of the code to properly track the dissolved hydrogen and its emergence from solution was demonstrated. Several different scenarios for the emergence of the hydrogen have been studied. The results of these studies show that the hydrogen which is liberated has the ability to play a significant role in the progression of reactor

  18. Implementation of Sub-Cooling of Cryogenic Propellants by Injection of Non-condensing Gas to the Generalized Fluid Systems Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, Daniel J.; Majumdar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants are readily heated when used. This poses a problem for rocket engine efficiency and effective boot-strapping of the engine, as seen in the "hot" LOX (Liquid Oxygen) problem on the S-1 stage of the Saturn vehicle. In order to remedy this issue, cryogenic fluids were found to be sub-cooled by injection of a warm non-condensing gas. Experimental results show that the mechanism behind the sub-cooling is evaporative cooling. It has been shown that a sub-cooled temperature difference of approximately 13 deg F below saturation temperature [1]. The phenomenon of sub-cooling of cryogenic propellants by a non-condensing gas is not readily available with the General Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) [2]. GFSSP is a thermal-fluid program used to analyze a wide variety of systems that are directly impacted by thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. In order to model this phenomenon, additional capabilities had to be added to GFSSP in the form of a FORTRAN coded sub-routine to calculate the temperature of the sub-cooled fluid. Once this was accomplished, the sub-routine was implemented to a GFSSP model that was created to replicate an experiment that was conducted to validate the GFSSP results.

  19. Effects of proton irradiation on a gas phase in which condensation takes place. I Negative Mg-26 anomalies and Al-26. [applied to solar and meteoritic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.; Walker, A.; Huss, G.; Morgan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, isotopic effects in magnesium generated in a proton-irradiated gas phase are examined, taking only (p,n), (p,d), and (p, alpha) reactions in magnesium, aluminum, and silicon into consideration. In the presence of proton radiation, the three elements are 'removed' from the gas phase by condensation. It is required that a value of Al-26/Al-27 greater than 6 times 10 to the -5th must be reached, consistent with the value deduced by Lee Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg (1976) from their studies of the Allende meteorite. The calculations show that fast aluminum condensation reduces the required proton fluence substantially, that a significant fraction of aluminum remains uncondensed when the above value of the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is reached, that a detectable MG-24 excess is very likely to occur, that detectable negative MG-28 anomalies can be generated, and that proton fluxes and irradiation times can be varied simultaneously, and over a wide range of values, without significant changes in the required proton fluence.

  20. Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Spezia, Riccardo; Martínez-Nuñez, Emilio; Vazquez, Saulo; Hase, William L

    2017-04-28

    In this Introduction, we show the basic problems of non-statistical and non-equilibrium phenomena related to the papers collected in this themed issue. Over the past few years, significant advances in both computing power and development of theories have allowed the study of larger systems, increasing the time length of simulations and improving the quality of potential energy surfaces. In particular, the possibility of using quantum chemistry to calculate energies and forces 'on the fly' has paved the way to directly study chemical reactions. This has provided a valuable tool to explore molecular mechanisms at given temperatures and energies and to see whether these reactive trajectories follow statistical laws and/or minimum energy pathways. This themed issue collects different aspects of the problem and gives an overview of recent works and developments in different contexts, from the gas phase to the condensed phase to excited states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  1. Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Spezia, Riccardo; Martínez-Nuñez, Emilio; Vazquez, Saulo; Hase, William L.

    2017-01-01

    In this Introduction, we show the basic problems of non-statistical and non-equilibrium phenomena related to the papers collected in this themed issue. Over the past few years, significant advances in both computing power and development of theories have allowed the study of larger systems, increasing the time length of simulations and improving the quality of potential energy surfaces. In particular, the possibility of using quantum chemistry to calculate energies and forces ‘on the fly’ has paved the way to directly study chemical reactions. This has provided a valuable tool to explore molecular mechanisms at given temperatures and energies and to see whether these reactive trajectories follow statistical laws and/or minimum energy pathways. This themed issue collects different aspects of the problem and gives an overview of recent works and developments in different contexts, from the gas phase to the condensed phase to excited states. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces’. PMID:28320909

  2. Gibbons-Hawking effect in the sonic de Sitter space-time of an expanding Bose-Einstein-condensed gas.

    PubMed

    Fedichev, Petr O; Fischer, Uwe R

    2003-12-12

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe the Gibbons-Hawking effect in the acoustic analog of a (1+1)-dimensional de Sitter universe, produced in an expanding, cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate. It is shown that a two-level system created at the center of the trap, an atomic quantum dot interacting with phonons, observes a thermal Bose distribution at the de Sitter temperature.

  3. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  4. Evidence for a palaeo-oil column and alteration of residual oil in a gas-condensate field: Integrated oil inclusion and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Julien; Burruss, Robert C.; Chou, I.-Ming; Kempton, Richard; Liu, Keyu; Hung, Nguyen Viet

    2014-10-01

    In the Phuong Dong gas condensate field, Cuu Long Basin, Vietnam, hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz trapped a variety of petroleum fluids in the gas zone. Based on the attributes of the oil inclusion assemblages (fluorescence colour of the oil, bubble size, presence of bitumen), the presence of a palaeo-oil column is inferred prior to migration of gas into the reservoir. When a palaeo-oil column is displaced by gas, a residual volume fraction of oil remains in pores. If the gas does not completely mix with the oil, molecular partitioning between the residual oil and the new gas charge may change the composition and properties of the residual oil (gas stripping or gas washing). To simulate this phenomenon in the laboratory, we sealed small amounts of crude oil (42 and 30 °API) and excess pure gas (methane, ethane, or propane) in fused silica capillary capsules (FSCCs), with and without water. These mixtures were characterized with the same methods used to characterize the fluid inclusions, heating and cooling stage microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, synchrotron FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, mixtures of ethane and propane with the 30 °API oil formed a new immiscible fluorescent liquid phase with colour that is visually more blue than the initial oil. The fluorescence of the original oil phase shifted to yellow or disappeared with formation of semi-solid residues. The blue-shift of the fluorescence of the immiscible phases and strong CH stretching bands in FT-IR spectra are consistent with stripping of hydrocarbon molecules from the oil. In experiments in FSCCs with water solid residues are common. At elevated temperature, reproducing geologic reservoir conditions, the fluorescence changes and therefore the molecular fractionation are enhanced. However, the precipitation of solid residues is responsible of more complex changes. Mixing experiments with the 42 °API oil do not form a new immiscible hydrocarbon liquid although the fluorescence

  5. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  6. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  7. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  8. Diamondoid characterization in condensate by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry: The Junggar Basin of Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuifu; Hu, Shouzhi; Cao, Jian; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    Diamondoids in crude oil are useful for assessing the maturity of oil in high maturation. However, they are very difficult to separate and accurately quantify by conventional geochemical methods due to their low abundance in oil. In this paper, we use comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) to study the compounds in condensates from the Junggar Basin of northwest China and address their geological and geochemical applications. GC×GC-TOFMS improves the resolution and separation efficiency of the compounds. It not only separates the compounds that coelute in conventional GC-MS (e.g., 4, 8-dimethyl-diamantane and trimethyl-diamantane) but also allows the identification of compounds that were not previously detected (e.g., trimethyl-diamantane (15A)). A reversed-phase column system improves the separation capabilities over the normal phase column system. The diamondoid indexes indicate that a representative condensate from Well DX 10 is highly mature with equivalent Ro being approximately 1.5%.

  9. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Heavy Elements: Interatomic potentials and Lines Shift for Systems 'Alkali Elements-Inert Gases'

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O.; Gurnitskaya, E.; Loboda, A.; Mischenko, E.

    2009-03-09

    New relativistic approach, based on the gauge-invariant perturbation theory (PT) with using the optimized wave functions basis's, is applied to calculating the inter atomic potentials, hyper fine structure (hfs) collision shift for alkali atoms in atmosphere of inert gases. Data for inter atomic potentials, collision shifts of the Rb and Cs atoms in atmosphere of the inert gas He are presented.

  10. Visualization of the freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe - Effects of non-condensible gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    The freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe of rectangular cross section were investigated experimentally to determine the effect of variations in the amount of non-condensible gases (NCG) present. The transient internal temperature profiles in both the liquid and vapor channels are presented along with contours of the frozen fluid configuration obtained through visual observation. Several interesting phenomena were observed including total blockage of the vapor channel by a solid plug, evaporator dryout during restart, and freezing blowby. In addition, the restart characteristics are shown to be strongly dependent upon the shutdown procedure used prior to freezing, indicating that accurate prediction of the startup or restart characteristics requires a complete thermal history. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the freeze/thaw characteristics of room temperature heat pipes may be significantly different from those occurring in higher temperature, liquid metal heat pipes due to differences in the vapor pressures in the frozen condition.

  11. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  12. Fundamental insights on impact of non-condensible gas evolution from coating pyrolysis and intentional injection on molten-aluminum water explosion onset during direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Gulec, K.

    1998-05-01

    Explosive interactions between molten aluminum and water are being studied with a focus on fundamentals to determine what causes robust-enough triggers for explosion onset, to determine the extent of protection provided from various coatings and to develop a fundamentally-based simple, cost-effective novel methodology for prevention. The workscope includes experimentation and mathematical modeling of the interactions between molten metals and water at various different coated and uncoated surfaces. Phenomenological issues related to surface wettability, gas generation from coatings, charring of coatings, inertial constraint, melt temperature, water temperature, external shocks are being investigated systematically to gage their relative impact on the triggerability of surface-assisted steam explosions. The steam explosion triggering studies (SETS) facility was designed and constructed as a rapid-turnaround, cost-effective, and safe means to address these phenomenological issues. Data from SETS tests have indicated that, non-condensible gas (NCG) generation during paint pyrolysis plays a predominant role in explosion prevention. This paper describes results of studies on impact of deliberate NCG injection on explosion prevention, via molten melt drops free-falling into water, as well as from tests using the SETS facility for studying entrapment induced explosive boiling. SETS is also being used to obtain information on time-varying and integral amounts of NCGs generated from various paints. Relevant data are presented. Results of investigations, taken together provide compelling evidence on the positive role NCGs play on explosion prevention.

  13. Formation of Globular Clusters in Atomic-cooling Halos Via Rapid Gas Condensation and Fragmentation during the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue; Rosdahl, Joakim; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the formation of metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) at the center of two dark matter halos with {M}{{halo}}˜ 4× {10}7 {M}⊙ at z\\gt 10 using cosmological radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. We find that very compact (≲1 pc) and massive (˜ 6× {10}5 {M}⊙ ) clusters form rapidly when pristine gas collapses isothermally with the aid of efficient Lyα emission during the transition from molecular-cooling halos to atomic-cooling halos. Because the local free-fall time of dense star-forming gas is very short (\\ll 1 {{Myr}}), a large fraction of the collapsed gas is turned into stars before stellar feedback processes blow out the gas and shut down star formation. Although the early stage of star formation is limited to a small region of the central star-forming disk, we find that the disk quickly fragments due to metal enrichment from supernovae. Sub-clusters formed in the fragmented clouds eventually merge with the main cluster at the center. The simulated clusters closely resemble the local GCs in mass and size but show a metallicity spread that is much wider than found in the local GCs. We discuss a role of pre-enrichment by Pop III and II stars as a potential solution to the latter issue. Although not without shortcomings, it is encouraging that a naive blind (not tuned) cosmological simulation presents a possible channel for the formation of at least some massive GCs.

  14. Dynamics of galloping detonations: inert hydrodynamics with pulsed energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models for galloping and cellular detonations of Ulyanitski, Vasil'ev and Higgins assume that the unit shock decay or cell can be modeled by Taylor-Sedov blast waves. We revisit this concept for galloping detonations, which we model as purely inert hydrodynamics with periodically pulsed energy deposition. At periodic time intervals, the chemical energy of the non-reacted gas accumulating between the lead shock and the contact surface separating reacted and non reacted gas is released nearly instantaneously. In between these pulses, the gas evolves as an inert medium. The resulting response of the gas to the periodic forcing is a sudden gain in pressure followed by mechanical relaxation accompanied by strong shock waves driven both forward and backwards. It is shown that the decay of the lead shock in-between pulses follows an exponential decay, whose time constant is controlled by the frequency of the energy deposition. More-over, the average speed of the lead shock is found to agree within 2 percent to the ideal Chapman-Jouguet value, while the large scale dynamics of the wave follows closely the ideal wave form of a CJ wave trailed by a Taylor expansion. When friction and heat losses are accounted for, velocity deficits are predicted, consistent with experiment. Work performed while MIR was on sabbatical at Caltech.

  15. Isentropic Compression of Multicomponent Mixtures of Fuels and Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Julien, Howard L.; Woods, Stephen S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2000-01-01

    In selected aerospace applications of the fuels hydrazine and monomethythydrazine, there occur conditions which can result in the isentropic compression of a multicomponent mixture of fuel and inert gas. One such example is when a driver gas such as helium comes out of solution and mixes with the fuel vapor, which is being compressed. A second example is when product gas from an energetic device mixes with the fuel vapor which is being compressed. Thermodynamic analysis has shown that under isentropic compression, the fuels hydrazine and monomethylhydrazine must be treated as real fluids using appropriate equations of state. The appropriate equations of state are the Peng-Robinson equation of state for hydrazine and the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state for monomethylhydrazine. The addition of an inert gas of variable quantity and input temperature and pressure to the fuel compounds the problem for safety design or analysis. This work provides the appropriate thermodynamic analysis of isentropic compression of the two examples cited. In addition to an entropy balance describing the change of state, an enthalpy balance is required. The presence of multicomponents in the system requires that appropriate mixing rules are identified and applied to the analysis. This analysis is not currently available.

  16. Oxidation and Condensation of Zinc Fume From Zn-CO2-CO-H2O Streams Relevant to Steelmaking Off-Gas Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronson, Tyler M.; Ma, Naiyang; Zhu, Liang Zhu; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the condensation of zinc vapor to metallic zinc and zinc oxide solid under varying environments to investigate the feasibility of in-process separation of zinc from steelmaking off-gas dusts. Water vapor content, temperature, degree of cooling, gas composition, and initial zinc partial pressure were varied to simulate the possible conditions that can occur within steelmaking off-gas systems, limited to Zn-CO2-CO-H2O gas compositions. The temperature of deposition and the effect of rapidly quenching the gas were specifically studied. A homogeneous nucleation model for applicable experiments was applied to the analysis of the experimental data. It was determined that under the experimental conditions, oxidation of zinc vapor by H2O or CO2 does not occur above 1108 K (835 °C) even for highly oxidizing streams (CO2/CO = 40/7). Rate expressions that correlate CO2 and H2O oxidation rates to gas composition, partial pressure of water vapor, temperature, and zinc partial pressure were determined to be as follows: Rate ( mol/m2s ) = 406 exp ( -50.2 kJ/mol/RT ) ( p_{Zn} p_{CO}2 - p_{CO} /K_{eq}, CO2 ) mol/m2 × s Rate ( mol/m2 s ) = 32.9 exp ( -13.7 kJ/mol/RT ) ( p_{Zn} p_{H}2 O - p_{H}2 /K_{eq}, H2 O ) mol/m2 × s It was proven that a rapid cooling rate (500 K/s) significantly increases the ratio of metallic zinc to zinc oxide as opposed to a slow cooling rate (250 K/s). SEM analysis found evidence of heterogeneous growth of ZnO as well as of homogeneous formation of metallic zinc. The homogeneous nucleation model fit well with experiments where only metallic zinc deposited. An expanded model with rates of oxidation by CO2 and H2O as shown was combined with the homogenous nucleation model and then compared with experimental data. The calculated results based on the model gave a reasonable fit to the measured data. For the conditions used in this study, the rate equations for the oxidation of zinc by carbon dioxide and water vapor

  17. Oxidation and Condensation of Zinc Fume From Zn-CO2-CO-H2O Streams Relevant to Steelmaking Off-Gas Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronson, Tyler M.; Ma, Naiyang; Zhu, Liang Zhu; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this research was to study the condensation of zinc vapor to metallic zinc and zinc oxide solid under varying environments to investigate the feasibility of in-process separation of zinc from steelmaking off-gas dusts. Water vapor content, temperature, degree of cooling, gas composition, and initial zinc partial pressure were varied to simulate the possible conditions that can occur within steelmaking off-gas systems, limited to Zn-CO2-CO-H2O gas compositions. The temperature of deposition and the effect of rapidly quenching the gas were specifically studied. A homogeneous nucleation model for applicable experiments was applied to the analysis of the experimental data. It was determined that under the experimental conditions, oxidation of zinc vapor by H2O or CO2 does not occur above 1108 K (835 °C) even for highly oxidizing streams (CO2/CO = 40/7). Rate expressions that correlate CO2 and H2O oxidation rates to gas composition, partial pressure of water vapor, temperature, and zinc partial pressure were determined to be as follows: Rate( mol/m2 s ) = 406 \\exp ( - 50.2 kJ/mol/RT )( p_Zn p_{CO2 - p_CO /K_{eq,CO2 ) mol/m2 × s Rate( mol/m2 s ) = 32.9 \\exp ( - 13.7 kJ/mol/RT )( p_Zn p_{H2 O - p_{H2 /K_{eq,H2 O ) mol/m2 × s It was proven that a rapid cooling rate (500 K/s) significantly increases the ratio of metallic zinc to zinc oxide as opposed to a slow cooling rate (250 K/s). SEM analysis found evidence of heterogeneous growth of ZnO as well as of homogeneous formation of metallic zinc. The homogeneous nucleation model fit well with experiments where only metallic zinc deposited. An expanded model with rates of oxidation by CO2 and H2O as shown was combined with the homogenous nucleation model and then compared with experimental data. The calculated results based on the model gave a reasonable fit to the measured data. For the conditions used in this study, the rate equations for the oxidation of zinc by carbon dioxide and water vapor as well

  18. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  19. [Acute-phase proteins in the saliva of workers engaged in processing natural gas and condensate high in hydrogen sulfide].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V I; Dotsenko, Iu I; Boĭko, O V

    2011-06-01

    The paper considers current methods for assessing the workers' health status. It shows it possible to identify increased quantities of acute-phase serum proteins upon exposure to the negative factors characteristic of the Astrakhan gas processing plant. A wider range of tests for acute-phase tissue and serum proteins is proposed to be included in order to gain a fuller insight into the influence of unfavorable industrial factors on man and to make monitoring that enables the existing health risks and the efficiency of preventive measures to be controlled.

  20. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Gas-Fluid and Fluid-Solid Phase Instability for Restricted Primitive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2009-08-01

    By considering the fluctuation of grand potential Ω around equilibrium with respect to small one-particle density fluctuations δρα(vec r), the phase instability of restricted primitive model (RPM) of ionic systems is investigated. We use the integral equation theory to calculate the direct correlation functions in the reference hypernetted chain approximation and obtain the spinodal line of RPM. Our analysis explicitly indicates that the gas-fluid phase instability is induced by k = 0 fluctuation mode, while the fluid-solid phase instability is related to k ≠ 0 fluctuation modes. The spinodal line is qualitatively consistent with the result of computer simulations by others.

  1. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  2. Herbert P. Broida Prize Talk: Molecular photofragmentation dynamics in the gas and condensed phase: similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfold, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Phenols and azoles are important chromophores in the nucleobases and aromatic amino-acids that dominate the near-UV absorption spectra of many biological molecules. π* <-- π excitations are responsible for these strong UV absorptions, but these molecules also possess excited states formed from σ* <-- π electron promotions. πσ * excited states typically have much smaller absorption cross-sections, but their photochemical importance is becoming ever more widely recognized. We have used photofragment translational spectroscopy (PTS) methods (and complementary ab initio theory) to explore X-H bond fission (X = heteroatom) following UV photoexcitation of many such heteroaromatic molecules in the gas phase and, more recently, started ultrafast pump-probe studies of the same (and related) processes in solution. This presentation will (i) summarize the state of knowledge derived from PTS studies of phenol and related molecules in the gas phase, (ii) highlight the extent to which such knowledge can inform our interpretation of ultrafast pump-probe studies of the UV photofragmentation of similar molecules ((thio)phenols, anisoles and ethers) in solution and (iii) demonstrate how such solution phase studies offer a route to exploring photoinduced (πσ *-state mediated) ring opening of heterocyclic molecules like furans and thiophenes. Funding from EPSRC (EP/G00224X and EP/L005913) is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide, methane, and total gas production and sulfate-reducing bacteria in in vitro swine manure by tannins, with focus on condensed quebracho tannins.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Terence R; Spence, Cheryl; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Management practices from large-scale swine production facilities have resulted in the increased collection and storage of manure for off-season fertilization use. Odor and emissions produced during storage have increased the tension among rural neighbors and among urban and rural residents. Production of these compounds from stored manure is the result of microbial activity of the anaerobic bacteria populations during storage. In the current study, the inhibitory effects of condensed quebracho tannins on in vitro swine manure for reduction of microbial activity and reduced production of gaseous emissions, including the toxic odorant hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), was examined. Swine manure was collected from a local swine facility, diluted in anaerobic buffer, and mixed with 1 % w/v fresh feces. This slurry was combined with quebracho tannins, and total gas and hydrogen sulfide production was monitored over time. Aliquots were removed periodically for isolation of DNA to measure the SRB populations using quantitative PCR. Addition of tannins reduced overall gas, hydrogen sulfide, and methane production by greater than 90 % after 7 days of treatment and continued to at least 28 days. SRB population was also significantly decreased by tannin addition. qRT-PCR of 16S rDNA bacteria genes showed that the total bacterial population was also decreased in these incubations. These results indicate that the tannins elicited a collective effect on the bacterial population and also suggest a reduction in the population of methanogenic microorganisms as demonstrated by reduced methane production in these experiments. Such a generalized effect could be extrapolated to a reduction in other odor-associated emissions during manure storage.

  4. Acid-catalyzed condensed-phase reactions of limonene and terpineol and their impacts on gas-to-particle partitioning in the formation of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Jie; Cheong, Gema Y L; Lau, Arthur P S; Chan, Chak K

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the condensed-phase reactions of biogenic VOCs with C double bond C bonds (limonene, C(10)H(16), and terpineol, C(10)H(18)O) catalyzed by sulfuric acid by both bulk solution (BS) experiments and gas-particle (GP) experiments using a flow cell reactor. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that cationic polymerization led to dimeric and trimeric product formation under conditions of relative humidity (RH) <20% (in the GP experiments) and a sulfuric acid concentration of 57.8 wt % (in the BS experiments), while hydration occurred under conditions of RH > 20% (in the GP experiments) and sulfuric acid concentrations of 46.3 wt % or lower (in the BS experiments). Apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) were estimated from the GP experiments by including the reaction products. Only under extremely low RH conditions (RH < 5%) did the values of K(p,rxn) ( approximately 5 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for limonene and approximately 2 x 10(-5) m(3)/microg for terpineol) substantially exceed the physical partitioning coefficients (K(p) = 6.5 x 10(-8) m(3)/microg for limonene and =2.3 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for terpineol) derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. At RH higher than 5%, the apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) of both limonene and terpineol were in the same order of magnitude as the K(p) values derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. Compared with other conditions including VOC concentration and degree of neutralization (by ammonium) of acidic particles, RH is a critical parameter that influences both the reaction mechanisms and the uptake ability (K(p,rxn) values) of these processes. The finding suggests that RH needs to be considered when taking the effects of acid-catalyzed reactions into account in estimating organic aerosol formation from C double bond C containing VOCs.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of silica coated silicon nano-tubes (SCSNT) and silica coated silicon nano-particles (SCSNP) synthesized by gas phase condensation.

    PubMed

    Tank, Chiti; Raman, Sujatha; Karan, Sujoy; Gosavi, Suresh; Lalla, Niranjan P; Sathe, Vasant; Berndt, Richard; Gade, W N; Bhoraskar, S V; Mathe, Vikas L

    2013-06-01

    Silica-coated, silicon nanotubes (SCSNTs) and silica-coated, silicon nanoparticles (SCSNPs) have been synthesized by catalyst-free single-step gas phase condensation using the arc plasma process. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy showed that SCSNTs exhibited a wall thickness of less than 1 nm, with an average diameter of 14 nm and a length of several 100 nm. Both nano-structures had a high specific surface area. The present study has demonstrated cheaper, resistance-free and effective antibacterial activity in silica-coated silicon nano-structures, each for two Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was estimated, using the optical densitometric technique, and by determining colony-forming units. The MIC was found to range in the order of micrograms, which is comparable to the reported MIC of metal oxides for these bacteria. SCSNTs were found to be more effective in limiting the growth of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus over SCSNPs at 10 μg/ml (IC 50 = 100 μg/ml).

  6. Infinite statistics condensate as a model of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadi, Zahra; Mirza, Behrouz; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein E-mail: b.mirza@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2013-11-01

    In some models, dark matter is considered as a condensate bosonic system. In this paper, we prove that condensation is also possible for particles that obey infinite statistics and derive the critical condensation temperature. We argue that a condensed state of a gas of very weakly interacting particles obeying infinite statistics could be considered as a consistent model of dark matter.

  7. Performance of an adjustable, threaded inertance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Nellis, G. F.; Liu, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler depends strongly on the design of the inertance tube. The phase angle produced by the inertance tube is very sensitive to its diameter and length. Recent developments are reported here regarding an adjustable inertance device that can be adjusted in real time. The inertance passage is formed by the root of a concentric cylindrical threaded device. The depth of the threads installed on the outer screw varies. In this device, the outer screw can be rotated four and half turns. At the zero turn position the length of the passage is 1.74 m and the hydraulic diameter is 7 mm. By rotating the outer screw, the inner threaded rod engages with additional, larger depth threads. Therefore, at its upper limit of rotation, the inertance passage includes both the original 1.74 m length with 7mm hydraulic diameter plus an additional 1.86 m length with a 10 mm hydraulic diameter. A phase shift change of 24° has been experimentally measured by changing the position of outer screw while operating the device at a frequency of 60 Hz. This phase angle shift is less than the theoretically predicted value due to the presence of a relatively large leak through the thread clearance. Therefore, the distributed component model of the inertance tube was modified to account for the leak path causing the data to agree with the model. Further, the application of vacuum grease to the threads causes the performance of the device to improve substantially.

  8. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  9. a Study of Behavior of Inert Gases in Some Candidate Materials for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. H.; Chen, K. Q.; Wang, Y. S.; Sun, J. G.; Hu, B. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2003-06-01

    This paper gives a review of our study of inert gases (helium, argon) in several materials candidate to future fusion reactors. The study is focused on the agglomeration of gas atoms and formation of nanoscale cavities in several materials including stainless steels and silicon carbide under irradiation with ions with energy ranging from 10 keV to 100 MeV.

  10. Two systems developed for purifying inert atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Johnson, C. E.; Kyle, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Two systems, one for helium and one for argon, are used for purifying inert atmospheres. The helium system uses an activated charcoal bed at liquid nitrogen temperature to remove oxygen and nitrogen. The argon system uses heated titanium sponge to remove nitrogen and copper wool beds to remove oxygen. Both use molecular sieves to remove water vapor.

  11. Investigation of Metal and Metal Oxide Clusters Small Enough to Constitute the Critical Size for Gas Phase Nucleation in Combustion Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    contract a variety of techniques have been employed to study the properties of small atomic and molecular clusters formed in the gas phase via...an inert carrier gas (e.g. helium), or as a mixing process using a hot condensable (e.g. lead, s-ilver, copper, indium or bismuth) and a cold carrier... gas (e.g. argon, j DD 0" 1473 EDITION OF I NOV81 IS OBSOLETE NS/N 0102-014736601 I SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (U~h.. De Sneered) S’",A

  12. Temperature and gas-phase composition measurements in supersonic flows using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy: the effect of condensation on the boundary-layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Shinobu; Zvinevich, Yury; Wyslouzil, Barbara E; Zahniser, Mark; Shorter, Joanne; Nelson, David; McManus, Barry

    2005-05-15

    We used a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer and a static-pressure probe to follow changes in temperature, vapor-phase concentration of D2O, and static pressure during condensation in a supersonic nozzle. Using the measured static-pressure ratio p/p0 and the mass fraction of the condensate g as inputs to the diabatic flow equations, we determined the area ratio (A/A*)wet and the corresponding centerline temperature of the flow during condensation. From (A/A*)wet we determined the boundary-layer displacement thickness during condensation (delta#)wet. We found that (delta#)wet first increases relative to the value of delta# in a dry expansion (delta#)Dry before becoming distinctly smaller than (delta#)Dry downstream of the condensation region. After correcting the temperature gradient across the boundary layers, the temperature determined from p/p0 and g agreed with the temperature determined by the laser-absorption measurements within our experimental error (+/-2 K), except when condensation occurred too close to the throat. The agreement between the two temperature measurements let us draw the following two conclusions. First, the differences in the temperature and mole fraction of D2O determined by the two experimental techniques, first observed in our previous study [P. Paci, Y. Zvinevich, S. Tanimura, B. E. Wyslouzil, M. Zahniser, J. Shorter, D. Nelson, and B. McManus, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9964 (2004)], can be explained sufficiently by changes in delta# caused by the condensation of D2O, except when the phase transition occurs too close to the throat. Second, the extrapolation of the equation, which expresses the temperature dependence of the heat of vaporization of bulk D2O liquid, is a good estimate of the heat of condensation of supercooled D2O down to 210 K.

  13. High-temperature condensates in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, L.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of the sequence of condensation of minerals from a cooling gas of solar composition play an important role in explaining the mineralogy and trace element content of different types of inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Group IV B iron meteorites and enstatite chondrites may also be direct condensates from the solar nebula. Condensation theory provides a framework within which chemical fractionations between different classes of chondrites may be understood.

  14. Electron ejection by heavy particles as precursor of track formation in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann

    2004-08-01

    The detailed knowledge of the structure of ion tracks is a key issue for our understanding of radiation effects in condensed matter. Important examples are the radial energy deposition profile by electronic excitation for numerical simulations of track formation (via "Coulomb explosion" or "thermal spike") in inert matter, and calculations of the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) of heavy particles in living matter (with important applications in dosimetry and hadrontherapy). In both cases, differential electron ejection cross sections are used as input parameter. The precursor of track formation is thus electron ejection from target atoms, or from the projectile itself. These primary electrons and their subsequent secondary interactions lead to the deposition of energy along and around the ion trajectory. We first briefly discuss "primary ionization" (binary encounter and soft electron emission, multiple collision sequences: "Fermi shuttle") common to single atoms (gas targets) and condensed matter. Then, specific effects in condensed matter (electron transport, jet-like electron spikes, wake effects due to collective excitation of plasmons and emission of shock wave electrons) will be presented. Finally, we concentrate on effects connected to the high density of deposited energy and strong perturbation induced by heavy particles such as heavy ions and clusters (reduction effects due to screening, transport and "sweeping away", multiple ionization, electronic temperatures from Auger spectroscopy).

  15. Simple Techniques For Assessing Impacts Of Oil And Gas Operations On Public Lands: A Field Evaluation Of A Photoionization Detector (PID) At A Condensate Release Site, Padre Island National Seashore, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Zielinski, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Simple, cost-effective techniques are needed for land managers to assess the environmental impacts of oil and gas production activities on public lands, so that sites may be prioritized for remediation or for further, more formal assessment. Field-portable instruments provide real-time data and allow the field investigator to extend an assessment beyond simply locating and mapping obvious disturbances. Field investigators can examine sites for the presence of hydrocarbons in the subsurface using a soil auger and a photoionization detector (PID). The PID measures volatile organic compounds (VOC) in soil gases. This allows detection of hydrocarbons in the shallow subsurface near areas of obvious oil-stained soils, oil in pits, or dead vegetation. Remnants of a condensate release occur in sandy soils at a production site on the Padre Island National Seashore in south Texas. Dead vegetation had been observed by National Park Service personnel in the release area several years prior to our visit. The site is located several miles south of the Malaquite Beach Campground. In early 2001, we sampled soil gases for VOCs in the area believed to have received the condensate. Our purpose in this investigation was: 1) to establish what sampling techniques might be effective in sandy soils with a shallow water and contrast them with techniques used in an earlier study; and 2) delineate the probable area of condensate release. Our field results show that sealing the auger hole with a clear, rigid plastic tube capped at the top end and sampling the soil gas through a small hole in the cap increases the soil VOC gas signature, compared to sampling soil gases in the bottom of an open hole. This sealed-tube sampling method increases the contrast between the VOC levels within a contaminated area and adjacent background areas. The tube allows the PID air pump to draw soil gas from the volume of soil surrounding the open hole below the tube in a zone less influenced by atmospheric air

  16. Report on the source of the electrochemical impedance on cermet inert anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Stice, N.D.

    1991-02-01

    the Inert Electrode Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes of the US Department of Energy and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (a) to evaluate the anode material in a scaled-up, pilot cell facility, (b) to investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anode surface, and (c) to develop sensors for monitoring anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report covers the results of a portion of the studies on anode reaction mechanisms. The electrochemical impedances of cermet inert anodes in alumina-saturated molten cryolite as a function of frequency, current density, and time indicated that a significant component of the impedance is due to the gas bubbles produced at the anode during electrolysis. The data also showed a connection between surface structure and impedance that appears to be related to the effects of surface structure on bubble flow. Given the results of this work, it is doubtful that a resistive film contributes significantly to the electrochemical impedances on inert anodes. Properties previously assigned to such a film are more likely due to the bubbles and those factors that affect the properties and dynamics of the bubbles at the anode surface. 12 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  18. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  19. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  20. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...