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Sample records for infantile hypertrophic pyloric

  1. Laparoscopic management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gogolja, D; Visnjić, S; Maldini, B; Radesić, L; Roić, G; Zganjer, M; Fattorini, I

    2001-01-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common problem in pediatric surgery. Conventional management by the upper laparotomy was the method of choice over the last few decades. Advanced minimally invasive surgery allows successful endoscopic management of this entity too. We report on our initial experience with endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with respect to some technical details. The operative procedure was well tolerated by the infant. After a short and uneventful postoperative course, the infant regained eating habits and was discharged from the hospital on the fifth postoperative day. Our favourable initial experience suggests that laparoscopic pyloromyotomy could be a safe and efficient alternative to the open surgery. PMID:11428282

  2. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: a study of feeding practices and other possible causes.

    PubMed Central

    Habbick, B F; Khanna, C; To, T

    1989-01-01

    We carried out a case-control study of the hospital charts of 91 infants with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) to determine the feeding practices at the time of discharge from the neonatal nursery. We excluded infants whose feeding might have been influenced by confounding factors. The infants were matched with controls for gestational age. The mean birth weight of the IHPS group was 3501 g and of the control group 3543 g. The male:female ratio for the IHPS group was 5.5. The odds ratio of male predominance was 4. We found that bottle-feeding was 2.9 times more prevalent among the infants with IHPS than among the control subjects. We speculate that the recently observed decrease in the incidence of IHPS is due to the decline in bottle-feeding. PMID:2914261

  3. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: evaluation of three positional candidate genes, TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC6, by association analysis and re-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Everett, Kate V; Chioza, Barry A; Georgoula, Christina; Reece, Ashley; Gardiner, R Mark; Chung, Eddie M K

    2009-12-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) is the most common inherited form of gastrointestinal obstruction in infancy with a striking male preponderance. Infants present with vomiting due to gastric outlet obstruction caused by hypertrophy of the smooth muscle of the pylorus. Two loci specific to extended pedigrees displaying autosomal dominant inheritance have been identified. A genome scan identified loci on chromosomes 11q14-q22 and Xq23-q24 which are predicted to be responsible for a subset of smaller families with IHPS demonstrating non-Mendelian inheritance. The two linked chromosomal regions both harbour functional candidate genes which are members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) family of ion channels. Both TRPC5 (Xq23-q24) and TRPC6 (11q14-q22) have a potential role in smooth muscle control and hypertrophy. Here, we report suggestive evidence for a third locus on chromosome 3q12-q25 (Zmax = 2.7, p < 0.004), a region which harbours a third TRPC gene, TRPC1. Fine mapping of all three genes using a tagSNP approach and re-sequencing identified a SNP in the promoter region of TRPC6 and a missense variant in exon 4 of TRPC6 which may be putative causal variants. PMID:19701773

  4. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn. PMID:26500857

  5. [Role of nitric oxide synthase in the etiopathogenesis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in infants

    PubMed

    Barbosa, I M; Ferrante, S M; Mandarim-De-Lacerda, C A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To experimentally reproduce, in rats, the findings corresponding to the histopathology of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS), using nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NAME). METHODS: L-NAME was administered to pregnant rats (L-NAME group), from the 14th gestational day on in order to reproduce the model of NOS inhibition in the production of IHPS. This group was then compared to control animals. After birth, all the animals in the L-NAME group were maintained under NOS inhibition until the 42nd day of life, when they were sacrificed. The control animals, which did not receive any kind of drug, were also sacrificed on the 42nd day of life. The animals and their internal organs were analyzed and weighed. The pyloric region was technically prepared and observed through light microscopy. RESULTS: The L-NAME group presented lower body and intestinal weight and higher gastric weight than the control group. Light microscopy revealed hypertrophy of the circular smooth muscle layer of the pyloric muscle in L-NAME animals. CONCLUSIONS: This work reproduced an experimental model of an IHPS study, confirming the effect of NOS blockade on the pyloric musculature. PMID:14647863

  6. Late-onset hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with gastric outlet obstruction: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Lindsey L; Nijagal, Amar; Flores, Alejandro; Buchmiller, Terry L

    2016-10-01

    We report late-onset hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a 17-year-old female. She presented with abdominal pain and an episode of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and subsequently developed gastric outlet obstruction. Work-up revealed circumferential pyloric thickening, delayed gastric emptying, and a stenotic, elongated pyloric channel. Biopsies showed benign gastropathy, negative for Helicobacter pylori, without eosinophilic infiltrates. Botulinum toxin injection provided limited relief. Diagnostic laparoscopy confirmed the hypertrophic pylorus and we performed laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. The patient tolerated the procedure well and had complete symptom resolution at 1-year follow-up. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction in adolescents and may be managed successfully with laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. PMID:27506212

  7. Is there any correlation between radiologic findings and eradication of symptoms after pyloromyotomy in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis?

    PubMed Central

    Badebarin, Davoud; Aslanabadi, Saeid; Yazdanpanah, Fereshteh; Zarrintan, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders during early infancy, with an incidence of 1-2:1000 live births in the world. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between radiologic findings and eradication of symptoms after pyloromyotomy in HPS. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-five (102 boys and 23 girls) patients with suspected infantile HPS were treated surgically by Ramstedt pyloromyotomy between March 21, 2004 and March 20, 2014 at paediatric surgery ward of Tabriz Children's Hospital, Iran. The demographic features, clinical findings, diagnostic work-up, operation type and postoperative specifications of the patients were studied retrospectively. Results: Male to female ratio was 4:1. The patients were 16-90 days of old and the mean age was 39 ± 1.42 days. The range of pyloric canal length was 7.60-29.00 mm and the mean length was 19.54 ± 3.42 mm. Pyloric muscle diameter was 2.70-9.00 mm, and the mean diameter was 4.86 ± 1.14 mm. Seventy-two percent of patients had episodes of vomiting after operation. Mean time of persistence of vomiting after pyloromyotomy was 15.73 ± 0.15 h. Mean discharge time was 55.22 ± 0.08 h. Radiologic findings did not show any significant correlation with persistence of vomiting or discharge time. Conclusion: The present study revealed that radiographic findings could not predict postoperative symptom eradication after pyloromyotomy in HPS. PMID:27251656

  8. Role of bottle feeding in the etiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    McAteer, Jarod P; Ledbetter, Daniel J; Goldin, Adam B

    2013-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Bottle feeding has been implicated in the etiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS). Further data are needed to define the nature of this relationship and the clinical variables that influence it. OBJECTIVE To determine if bottle feeding after birth is associated with the development of HPS in infants. We hypothesized that bottle feeding is associated with an increased risk of HPS and that this risk is modified by other risk factors. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Population-based case-control study of births from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2009, using Washington State birth certificates linked to hospital discharge data. Cases included all singleton infants born within the study period and subsequently admitted with both a diagnostic code for HPS and a procedure code for pyloromyotomy (n = 714). Controls were randomly chosen among singleton infants who did not develop HPS and were frequency matched to cases by birth year. EXPOSURE Feeding status (breast vs bottle) was coded on the birth certificate as the type of feeding the infant was receiving at birth discharge. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Diagnosis of HPS. RESULTS Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis incidence decreased over time, from 14 per 10,000 births in 2003 to 9 per 10,000 in 2009. Simultaneously, breastfeeding prevalence increased from 80% in 2003 to 94% in 2009. Compared with controls, cases were more likely to be bottle feeding after birth (19.5% vs 9.1%). After adjustment, bottle feeding was associated with an increased risk of HPS (odds ratio [OR], 2.31; 95% CI, 1.81-2.95). This association did not differ according to sex or maternal smoking status but was significantly modified by maternal age (<20 years OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.51-1.88; ≥35 years OR, 6.07; 95% CI, 2.81-13.10) and parity (nulliparous OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.07-2.38; multiparous OR, 3.42; 95% CI, 2.23-5.24). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Bottle feeding is associated with an increased risk of HPS, and this effect seems to

  9. Two brothers with an unbalanced 8;17 translocation and infantile pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, S V; Berry, A C; Dunbar, H M

    1995-12-01

    Two half-brothers are described who had developmental delay and minor dysmorphic features, both of whom had operative treatment for pyloric stenosis. They had identical unbalanced karyotypes: 46,XY,-17,+der(17)t(8;17) (q24;q25). This was inherited from their mother who had the balanced form of the translocation. She was of normal intelligence and had no history of pyloric stenosis herself or in her extended family. It is suggested that the unbalanced chromosomal rearrangement could have been associated with the development of pyloric stenosis in these two brothers. PMID:8835331

  10. Prolonged prostaglandin E1 therapy in a neonate with pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect and the development of antral foveolar hyperplasia and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Perme, Tina; Mali, Senja; Vidmar, Ivan; Gvardijančič, Diana; Blumauer, Robert; Mishaly, David; Grabnar, Iztok; Nemec, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E1 (alprostadil) is widely used for maintaining the patency of ductus arteriosus in ductus-dependent congenital heart defects in neonates to improve oxygenation. Among more common side effects are fever, rash, apnoea, diarrhoea, jitteriness, and flushing. More severe side effects are brown fat necrosis, cortical hyperostosis, and gastric outlet obstruction, most commonly the result of antral foveolar hyperplasia or hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. We report on an infant with a ductus-dependent congenital heart defect who developed symptoms and sonographic evidence of focal foveolar hyperplasia and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis after prolonged treatment with prostaglandin E1. Gastrointestinal symptoms persisted after corrective cardiac surgery, and pyloromyotomy was required. Study of the case and of available literature showed an association between the total dose of prostaglandin E1 administered and duration of treatment and the development of gastric outlet obstruction. We conclude that if patients are treated with a prostaglandin E1 infusion, careful monitoring for symptoms and signs of gastric outlet obstruction is required. PMID:23521358

  11. Contemporary management of pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jobson, Matthew; Hall, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common surgical cause of vomiting in infants. Following appropriate fluid resuscitation, the mainstay of treatment is pyloromyotomy. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, its clinical presentation, the role of imaging, the preoperative and postoperative management, current surgical approaches and non-surgical treatment options. Contemporary postoperative feeding regimens, outcomes and complications are also discussed. PMID:27521712

  12. Fatal infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy associated with a homozygous OPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Flannery, Padraig J; Burté, Florence; Soiferman, Devorah; Khayat, Morad; Eisner, Verónica; Vladovski, Eugene; Taylor, Robert W; Bindoff, Laurence A; Shaag, Avraham; Mandel, Hanna; Schuler-Furman, Ora; Shalev, Stavit A; Elpeleg, Orly; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Infantile-onset encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defects are genetically heterogeneous with defects involving both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Objective To identify the causative genetic defect in two sisters presenting with lethal infantile encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy. Methods We describe a comprehensive clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic investigation of two affected siblings from a consanguineous family. Molecular genetic analysis was done by a combined approach involving genome-wide autozygosity mapping and next-generation exome sequencing. Biochemical analysis was done by enzymatic analysis and Western blot. Evidence for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was investigated using long-range and real-time PCR assays. Mitochondrial cristae morphology was assessed with transmission electron microscopy. Results Both affected sisters presented with a similar cluster of neurodevelopmental deficits marked by failure to thrive, generalised neuromuscular weakness and optic atrophy. The disease progression was ultimately fatal with severe encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were globally decreased in skeletal muscle biopsies. They were found to be homozygous for a novel c.1601T>G (p.Leu534Arg) mutation in the OPA1 gene, which resulted in a marked loss of steady-state levels of the native OPA1 protein. We observed severe mtDNA depletion in DNA extracted from the patients’ muscle biopsies. Mitochondrial morphology was consistent with abnormal mitochondrial membrane fusion. Conclusions We have established, for the first time, a causal link between a pathogenic homozygous OPA1 mutation and human disease. The fatal multisystemic manifestations observed further extend the complex phenotype associated with pathogenic OPA1 mutations, in particular the previously unreported association

  13. Infantile pyloric stenosis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go to slide 5 out of 5 Normal anatomy Overview The stomach connects the esophagus to the ... M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn ...

  14. [The sonographic diagnosis of hypertrophic stenosis of the pylorus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R I; Briceño de Rodríguez, J A; Urrutia, M

    1993-09-01

    The clinical records of 18 children were studied, between 15 and 60 days old. They were hospitalized due to vomiting and diagnosis of suspected pyloric hypertrophic stenosis (PHS). The sonography confirmed the diagnosis in 8 children, by the thickening of the muscular layer and enlargement of the pyloric canal. The surgery (pyloromyotomy) ratified the diagnosis in all 8 children. They all were in good health after being operated. PMID:8146343

  15. [The sonographic diagnosis of hypertrophic stenosis of the pylorus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R I; Briceño de Rodríguez, J A; Urrutia, M

    1993-05-01

    The clinical records of 18 children were studied, between 15 and 60 days old. They were hospitalized due to vomiting and diagnosis of suspected pyloric hypertrophic stenosis (PHS). The sonography confirmed the diagnosis in 8 children, by the thickening of the muscular layer and enlargement of the pyloric canal. The surgery (pyloromyotomy) ratified the diagnosis in all 8 children. They all were in good health after being operated. PMID:8327749

  16. Pyloric stenosis in the age of ultrasonography: fading skills, better patients?

    PubMed

    Chen, E A; Luks, F I; Gilchrist, B F; Wesselhoeft, C W; DeLuca, F G

    1996-06-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis can be diagnosed accurately by physical examination alone. However, ultrasonographic confirmation is obtained in the majority of cases, often before clinical evaluation by the surgeon. The present study examines whether the easy access to ultrasonography by the primary physician has affected the care of infants with pyloric stenosis. During a 24-month period, 100 infants were treated for pyloric stenosis at the authors' institution. There were 78 boys and 22 girls; the age range was 9 to 90 days (median, 30.0 days). The children were referred for surgical evaluation, but abdominal ultrasonography was ordered concomitantly (or within 1 hour of surgical consultation) in all cases. The median age at the onset of the first symptoms was 24.0 days. The time between onset and hospital admission was less than 7 days for 72 patients, and more than 2 weeks for seven. Metabolic alkalosis or acidosis, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and dehydration were noted in 10%, 5%, 3% and 9%, respectively. Six infants had prolonged pre- and postoperative courses, because of prematurity (4) or associated conditions (2). For the remaining patients, total hospitalization period and postoperative stay were 3.8 +/- 0.9 days and 2.8 +/- 0.6 days, respectively. Although the diminished importance of clinical skills in the diagnosis of pyloric stenosis may be regrettable, the availability to the primary care physician of this easy, safe, inexpensive, and reliable imaging modality may contribute to prompter treatment. The patients were hospitalized, with a correct diagnosis, within days of the appearance of the initial symptoms. Because so little time had elapsed, water and electrolyte imbalances were not present, and the patients could be operated on within hours of admission. PMID:8783115

  17. The changing presentation of pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, K; Chen, E A; Luks, F I; Lessin, M S; Wesselhoeft, C W; DeLuca, F G

    1999-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities described in pyloric stenosis are now rare, probably because of prompter recognition of the disease. This report reviews the trend in presentation over three decades. All infants treated for pyloric stenosis during three mid-decade target periods were reviewed. Comparison between the 1975 group and the 1985 group and between the 1995 group and previous decades were designed to identify the impact of ultrasonography, since this modality has only been available in the last decade. Parameters included age at diagnosis and incidence of water and electrolyte imbalance as measures of delay in presentation. Two hundred eighty-three patients were reviewed. Mean age (weeks) at presentation was 5.4+/-3.0 in 1975, 4.6+/-2.0 in 1985, and 3.4+/-1.3 in 1995 (P < .05, ANOVA). Overall, 88% had no electrolyte anomalies on admission. There was no statistical difference in frequency of abnormal results between the three decades. Total and postoperative hospitalization was significantly shorter in the recent period: in 1985, 5.34 and 4.36 days; in 1985, 4.48 and 3.4 days; and in 1995, 3.8 and 2.8 days. These data show that pyloric stenosis is now recognized earlier than in previous decades. The availability of ultrasonography cannot solely be credited for earlier diagnosis, since this trend was already apparent before its introduction. The "classic" metabolic derangements associated with pyloric stenosis have been highly uncommon for the past three decades. PMID:9928704

  18. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Lewis D; Fulbright, Robert; Baehring, Joachim M

    2016-08-15

    Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis (HP) denotes inflammation and thickening of the dura mater that can be idiopathic or secondary to a wide variety of conditions. Clinically, HP can present as debilitating headaches and cranial nerve defects but in other cases may be completely asymptomatic. We aimed to determine the relative incidence of different etiologies of HP and compare their associated imaging findings. Additionally, we sought to compare the clinical features of the underlying syndromes. We retrospectively examined twenty-two consecutive cases of HP seen in a single practitioner neurology practice over a ten-year time period. The most common etiologies were idiopathic HP and neurosarcoidosis. No imaging features were completely specific to any etiology. Nonetheless, idiopathic HP typically demonstrated diffuse regular enhancement whereas neurosarcoidosis was more likely to display a nodular enhancement pattern. Headache and cranial neuropathies were the most common clinical presentation. HP symptoms were often responsive to steroids but complete responses were rare. HP is a diagnostic challenge without specific findings on minimally or non-invasive diagnostic studies. Biopsy is often required and serves as the basis for effective therapy. PMID:27423604

  19. Epidermolysis bullosa and congenital pyloric atresia

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar Adil; Hashmi, Asif; Adil, Salman

    2013-01-01

    The association between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and pyloric atresia (PA) is rare but well documented. Herein, we report a case of EB associated with congenital PA. A female baby, weighing 1480 g, was born vaginally to a 31-year-old gravida 7 lady at 33 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios was detected on antenatal assessment. The parents were non-consanguineous Saudis with no family history of significant illness. At birth, well-demarcated areas of peeled skin were present over knees, left leg and periumbilical region. Systemic examination revealed no other abnormality. On second day, the patient developed recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. An abdominal X-ray revealed a single gastric gas bubble suggesting pyloric obstruction. Following gastroduodenostomy, the baby developed severe sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction and expired on 25th day of life. Skin biopsy showed cleavage within lamina lucida. PMID:24068383

  20. Identification of groupers based on pyloric caeca differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roy, T S C; Gopalakrishnan, A

    2011-11-01

    The examination of nine species of groupers present in south-east Indian waters has indicated that the pyloric caeca number, pattern and colouration are reliable and useful characters for identification. Three distinct morphotypes of pyloric caeca were observed in this study. PMID:22026609

  1. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. PMID:12966640

  2. Gastric versus post-pyloric feeding: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Marik, Paul E; Zaloga, Gary P

    2003-01-01

    Background Our objective was to evaluate the impact of gastric versus post-pyloric feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, caloric intake, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), and mortality in critically ill and injured ICU patients. Method Data sources were Medline, Embase, Healthstar, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, personal files, and contact with expert informants. From 122 articles screened, nine were identified as prospective randomized controlled trials (including a total of 522 patients) that compared gastric with post-pyloric feeding, and were included for data extraction. Descriptive and outcomes data were extracted from the papers by the two reviewers independently. Main outcome measures were the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, average caloric goal achieved, average daily caloric intake, time to the initiation of tube feeds, time to goal, ICU LOS, and mortality. The meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Results Only medical, neurosurgical and trauma patents were enrolled in the studies analyzed. There were no significant differences in the incidence of pneumonia, percentage of caloric goal achieved, mean total caloric intake, ICU LOS, or mortality between gastric and post-pyloric feeding groups. The time to initiation of enteral nutrition was significantly less in those patients randomized to gastric feeding. However, time to reach caloric goal did not differ between groups. Conclusion In this meta-analysis we were unable to demonstrate a clinical benefit from post-pyloric versus gastric tube feeding in a mixed group of critically ill patients, including medical, neurosurgical, and trauma ICU patients. The incidences of pneumonia, ICU LOS, and mortality were similar between groups. Because of the delay in achieving post-pyloric intubation, gastric feeding was initiated significantly sooner than was post-pyloric feeding. The present study, while providing the best current evidence regarding

  3. [Ultrasound diagnosis of pyloric stenosis in young children].

    PubMed

    Krivchenia, D Iu; Babko, S A; Chekanova, L R

    1992-01-01

    The results of observation of 12 children ranging in age from 1 to 4 mos with tentative diagnosis of pyloric stenosis are presented. The study was performed by special method, using "Aloka" SSD-280 (Japan) ultrasound apparatus. The characteristic symptoms of the disease were revealed in 9 children, diagnosis of pyloric stenosis was confirmed by means of endoscopy, palpation, and intraoperatively. The use of US is practically harmless, and can completely substitute for a roentgenologic method in detecting the given congenital pathology. PMID:1453618

  4. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Brian A; Stevens, Gerin R

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a global disease with cases reported in all continents, affecting people of both genders and of various racial and ethnic origins. Widely accepted as a monogenic disease caused by a mutation in 1 of 13 or more sarcomeric genes, HCM can present catastrophically with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or ventricular arrhythmias or insidiously with symptoms of heart failure. Given the velocity of progress in both the fields of heart failure and HCM, we present a review of the approach to patients with HCM, with particular attention to those with HCM and the clinical syndrome of heart failure. PMID:25657602

  5. INFANTILE PARALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    1917-01-01

    At the recent Forty-fourth Annual Meetings of the American Public Health Association, Cincinnati, Ohio, there was held a Round Table Discussion on Infantile Paralysis, in which health authorities throughout the country took part. This discussion was held under the auspices of the Section on Public Health Administration. Dr. George W. Goler, Health Officer of Rochester, N. Y., Chairman of this Section, presided. We take great pleasure in being able to reproduce for readers of the Journal what took place at this most important session. PMID:18009618

  6. Pyloric trichobezoar in a Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack; Munsterman, Amelia S

    2013-12-01

    An adult female Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) was presented with a 3-wk history of anorexia and lethargy. Initial examination and diagnostics did not provide a diagnosis. The lynx continued to demonstrate vague clinical signs, including anorexia and an abnormal gait. During follow-up immobilizations 2 wk later, a barium gastrointestinal study revealed a pyloric obstruction. Abdominal exploratory surgery was elected, and a gastrotomy and an enterotomy of the proximal duodenum were performed to remove the pyloric obstruction. The obstruction was determined to be a trichobezoar. Fleas, a likely cause of hair ingestion through grooming, were noted during surgical preparation. The lynx made a full recovery from surgery. Reoccurrence of the trichobezoar was prevented after surgery with the use of monthly flea control and three times a week hairball laxative. PMID:24450081

  7. Antral or Pyloric Deformity Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Postendoscopic Submucosal Dissection Pyloric Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Kyu Yeon; Park, Jun Chul; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Chan Hyuk; Chung, Hyunsoo; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgeons must be aware of risk factors for strictures before performing endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), to enable early interventions to prevent severe strictures. Methods This study was a single-center retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical data of patients who has undergone gastric ESD from January 2007 to December 2012. Results Among the 3,819 patients who had undergone gastric ESD, 11 patients (7.2%) developed pyloric strictures and received successful endoscopic balloon dilation. Significant differences were noted between the patients without and with post-ESD strictures for pretreatment of antral or pyloric deformities (46.4% vs 81.8%), the proportion of extension to the lumen circumference (>3/4, 9.4% vs 54.5%), the longitudinal extent of mucosal defects (27.9±10.1 mm vs 51.5±10.8 mm), and post-ESD bleeding (2.9% vs 27.3%). Multivariate analysis revealed that pretreatment antral or pyloric deformities (odds ratio [OR], 30.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.476 to 631.565; p=0.027), larger longitudinal extent of mucosal defects (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.074 to 1.340; p=0.001), and circumferential extension of 3/4 (OR, 13.69; 95% CI, 1.583 to 118.387; p=0.017) were independent risk factors for post-ESD stricture. Conclusions Antral or pyloric deformities, sub-circumferential resection over more than 75% of the circumference and greater longitudinal extent of mucosal defects are independent risk factors for post-ESD stricture. PMID:27282263

  8. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  9. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists modify the pyloric output of the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Krenz, Wulf D

    2005-11-16

    We have studied the effects of groups I, II, and III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists and antagonists on pyloric activity in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus. We have found that agonists for all three groups of mGluRs modify the pyloric output. The group I agonist, l-quisqualic acid (l-QA), activated the pyloric central pattern generator (CPG). When the pyloric rhythm was partially suppressed by sucrose-block of input fibers in the stomatogastric nerve (stn), l-QA accelerated the rhythmic activity. In addition, the number of spike discharges was increased in pyloric motoneurons: pyloric (PY), and lateral pyloric (LP). In completely blocked preparations, a slow pyloric rhythm was initiated by l-QA. Groups II and III agonists exerted an inhibitory effect on pyloric activity. The group II agonist, (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(Carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I), decreased both the frequency of the pyloric rhythm and the number of spike discharges in the motoneurons: ventricular dilator (VD), PY, and LP. The effects of L-CCG-I were dose-dependent. The group III agonist, l-(+)-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4), slightly decreased the frequency of the pyloric rhythm and suppressed spike discharges in the VD neuron. All effects of mGluR agonists were reversible. The effect of l-QA was blocked by the broad spectrum mGluR antagonist (S)-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). The inhibitory effect of L-CCG-I was prevented by MCPG and by the group II/III mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-Methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), and was partially blocked by the group II mGluR antagonist (RS)-1-amino-5-phosphonoindan-1-carboxylic acid (APICA). The inhibitory effect of l-AP4 was blocked by MPPG and partially blocked by APICA. PMID:16256086

  11. Obstruction is unimportant in the pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Criley, J. M.; Siegel, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    There has been a longstanding controversy about the significance of intracavitary pressure gradients in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). It has been generally assumed that the gradient is the result of an 'obstruction' that impedes left ventricular outflow and which can be relieved by operative intervention. In the first decade after the discovery of HCM (1957-66), the site of 'obstruction' was thought to be a muscular sphincter or contraction ring in the submitral region of the left ventricle, and operations designed to emulate pyloromyectomy (for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis) were developed. Following a challenge to the existence of the 'contraction ring' and an alternative non-obstructive explanation of the pressure gradient, the site of 'obstruction' was translocated to a point of apposition between the anterior mitral leaflet and the interventricular septum, a result of systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve. Despite the translocation of the site and mechanism of 'obstruction', the operation for 'relief of obstruction' has not changed significantly. The newer site of 'obstruction' has been challenged on the grounds that the ventricle is not demonstrably impeded in its emptying; when a gradient is provoked, the ventricle empties more rapidly and more completely than it does without a gradient. In addition to a non-obstructive explanation of the gradient, other phenomena thought to be indicative of 'obstruction' can be explained by rapid and complete emptying of the ventricle (cavitary obliteration). Since the morbidity and mortality of symptomatic HCM patients without pressure gradients may exceed that of patients with pressure gradients, it is suggested that 'obstruction' may be unimportant in the pathophysiology of HCM and attention should be focused on abnormal diastolic function and life threatening arrhythmias. Images Figure 4 Figure 8b PMID:3534838

  12. Infantilizing Autism.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Harp, Bev; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    When members of the public envision the disability of autism, they most likely envision a child, rather than an adult. In this empirically based essay, three authors, one of whom is an autistic self-advocate, analyzed the role played by parents, charitable organizations, the popular media, and the news industry in infantilizing autism. Parents portrayed the face of autism to be that of a child 95% of the time on the homepages of regional and local support organizations. Nine of the top 12 autism charitable organizations restricted descriptions of autism to child-referential discourse. Characters depicted as autistic were children in 90% of fictional books and 68% of narrative films and television programs. The news industry featured autistic children four times as often as they featured autistic adults in contemporary news articles. The cyclical interaction between parent-driven autism societies, autism fundraising charities, popular media, and contemporary news silences adult self-advocates by denying their very existence. Society's overwhelming proclivity for depicting autism as a disability of childhood poses a formidable barrier to the dignity and well-being of autistic people of all ages. PMID:25520546

  13. Pyloric Stenosis - Do Males and Females Present Differently?

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Nuala; Walls, Andrew; Milliken, Irene; McCullagh, Majella

    2011-01-01

    Aims In infants with pyloric stenosis we explored (a) if males develop symptoms and present to hospital earlier than females and (b) does any delay in presentation influence the severity of metabolic derangement. Method A retrospective casenote review of 99 infants who underwent pyloromyotomy (with confirmation of pyloric stenosis) over a two year period (Jan 2006-Dec 2007) in our hospital. The data collected included: sex, age at onset of symptoms, age at presentation to hospital and initial blood results. Results The group comprised 84 males and 15 females. Symptoms developed at 26 (0-70) days in males and 35 (0-77) in females. (Mann-Whitney U=428, p=0.04 two tailed). Males presented to hospital at 34 (13-91) days, females at 45 (13-98) days (Mann-Whitney U=391, p=0.01 two tailed). The differences between males and females for (1) age at onset of symptoms and (2) age at presentation to hospital became more significant when weighted averages were calculated using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences). The lower weighted averages for male infants can be seen in the final table. Increasing duration of symptoms showed a positive correlation with fall in Chloride level. (Spearman’s rho: rs= -0.2, p=0.049 two tailed). There was a positive correlation between duration of symptoms and bicarbonate level but this was not significant. (rs=0.06, p>0.05 two tailed). There was a positive correlation between duration of symptoms and pH, but this was not significant (rs=0.12, p>0.05 two tailed). Conclusion In our hospital, females with pyloric stenosis develop symptoms and present significantly later than males. This should be considered when assessing a female with vomiting outside the usual 20-40 day range. PMID:23526330

  14. Gastroduodenal ulcer treated by pylorus and pyloric vagus-preservinggastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun-Fu; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Zhao, Ge; Zhu, Qing-Hua

    1999-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the curative effect of pylorus and pyloric vagus-preserving gastrectomy (PPVPG) on peptic ulcer. METHODS Treating 132 cases of GU and DU with PPVPG, and com parative studies made with 24 cases treated with Billroth I (B I) and 20 cases with Billroth II (B II); advantages and shortcomings evaluated. RESULTS Not a single death after PPVPG. No recurrence of the disorder in the subsequent follow-up for an average of 6.5 years. Curative effect (visik I-&-II) 97.7%. Acidity reduction similar to that found in B I and B II, but 97.7% of the B I and all B II cases having more than second degree intestinal fluid reflux, in contrast to 7.1% in PPVPG cases. Dumping syndrome occurred in the B I and B II cases, none in PPVPG cases. With regard to gastric emptying, food digestion, absorption, body weight and life quality, PPVPG proved to be superior to Billroth procedure. CONCLUSION PPVPG has the advantages of conventional Billroth gastrectomy in reducing acid, removing ulcer focus, and at the same time preserves the pylorus and pyloric vagus for maintaining the normal gastric physiological function. Dumping syndrome, intestinal fluid reflux and other complications of conventional gastrectomy may be avoided. PMID:11819417

  15. [Arachnoid cyst associated with pyloric stenosis in a young boy].

    PubMed

    Diaconescu, Smaranda; Păduraru, Gabriela; Bărbuţă, O; Vâscu, B; Lupu, V V; Burlea, M; Aprodu, G

    2010-01-01

    An unusual association between an arachnoid cyst and a decompensated pyloric stenosis in a three years-old boy is presented. The little patient was admitted into hospital with haematemesis, melena, influenced generally condition and acute posthemorrhagic anaemia following aspirin intake for hypertermia. Specific intensive care was successful and the little patient was discharged but without an upper digestive endoscopy(parents refusal, technical reasons). After one week he returned with progressive worsening vomitings and an intracranial hypertension was suspected. CT documented an arachnoid cyst in the right middle cranial fossa and the patient is directed to the Neurosurgical Clinic where a cyst fenestration was done. Subsequent to operation the vomitings reinstaled with severe dehydration and an upper GI series showed a decompensated pyloric stenosis. He was operated on underwenting an antrectomy. Finally the child recovered with good short and long-term evolution. The coincidental presence of an intracranial congenital mass and a complicated aspirin-induced peptic ulcer in this young patient, misleaded us and in the lack of an early endoscopy an intempestive neurosurgical operation was initially done. PMID:21500459

  16. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  17. Topical treatments for hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zurada, Joanna M; Kriegel, David; Davis, Ira C

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic scars represent an abnormal, exaggerated healing response after skin injury. In addition to cosmetic concern, scars may cause pain, pruritus, contractures, and other functional impairments. Therapeutic modalities include topical medications, intralesional corticosteroids, laser therapy, and cryosurgery. Topical therapies, in particular, have become increasingly popular because of their ease of use, comfort, noninvasiveness, and relatively low cost. This review will discuss the properties and effectiveness of these agents, including pressure therapy, silicone gel sheeting and ointment, polyurethane dressing, onion extract, imiquimod 5% cream, and vitamins A and E in the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scars. PMID:17097399

  18. Management of infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome, or infantile spasms syndrome is a frequently catastrophic infantile epileptic encephalopathy with a variety of etiologies. Despite the heterogeneous nature of causes of infantile spasms, a careful diagnostic evaluation can lead to diagnosis in many patients and may guide treatment choices. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain remains the highest yield initial study in determining the etiology in infantile spasms. Treatment of infantile spasms has little class I data, but adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), prednisolone and vigabatrin have the best evidence as first-line medications. Other therapies including the ketogenic diet and other anti-epileptics medications may also prove useful in the treatment of infantile spasms. In general, more studies are needed to determine the best treatment regimen for this condition. Prognosis is generally poor, with the majority of patients having some or profound neurocognitive delays. Patients without delays at diagnosis and without an identifiable etiology, if treated appropriately, have the greatest likelihood of a normal outcome. PMID:26835388

  19. NSAID-induced pyloric stenosis leading to oesophageal intramucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Tey, Kai Rou; Kemmerly, Thomas; Banerjee, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 75-year-old woman with significant non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use who presented with haematemesis. Upper endoscopy revealed a large (9 cm) intramucosal dissection of the oesophagus without extension into the gastro-oesophageal junction and a severely narrowed pylorus. We postulate that she developed pyloric stenosis due to peptic ulcer disease from chronic NSAID use. This then led to gastro-oesophageal reflux. Undigested pills in the refluxate had contacted oesophageal mucosa, leading to pill-induced oesophageal injury. This, along with vomiting, is postulated to have led to the oesophageal intramucosal dissection. She improved with conservative medical management with a clear liquid diet and proton pump inhibitors, and a follow-up upper endoscopy 1 week later showed recovery of the previously seen intramucosal dissection. PMID:27199442

  20. Analog electronic model of the lobster pyloric central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovskii, A.; Brugioni, S.; Levi, R.; Rabinovich, M.; Selverston, A.; Abarbane, H. D. I.

    2005-01-01

    An electronic circuit intended to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of a simplified 3-cell model of the pyloric central pattern generator in California spiny lobster stomato gastric ganglion is presented. The model employs the synaptic phase locked loop (SPLL) concept where the frequency of oscillations of a postsynaptic cell is mainly controlled by the synaptic current which depends on the phase shift between the oscillations. The theoretical study showed that the system has a stable steady state with correct phase shifts between the oscillations and that this regime is stable when the frequency of the pacemaker cell is varied over a wide range. The main bifurcations in the system were studied analytically, in computer simulations, and in experiments with the electronic circuit. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the expectations of the theoretical model.

  1. Mathematical modeling of subthreshold resonant properties in pyloric dilator neurons.

    PubMed

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium (I(Ca)) and calcium-dependent potassium (I(KCa)) currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value) increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)) and I(Ca) (in association with I(KCa)) are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that I h and I(KCa) affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, I(Ca) only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons. PMID:25960999

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Subthreshold Resonant Properties in Pyloric Dilator Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium (ICa) and calcium-dependent potassium (IKCa) currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value) increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) and ICa (in association with IKCa) are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that Ih and IKCa affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, ICa only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons. PMID:25960999

  3. Histidinemia and Infantile Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, S.; Kutty, K. M.

    1979-01-01

    The article presents a case history of a boy with both infantile autism and histidenia (an inborn error of amino acid metabolism), and discusses the possible relationship between the two conditions. (DLS)

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Pyloric Cholinergic Muscle Contractility of Rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Sun, Hong-Xu; Chu, Min; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2016-08-31

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) selectively cleaves synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and results in inhibition of the fusion of synaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitters with the presynaptic membrane to undergo exocytosis and release. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BTX-A inhibited the pyloric smooth muscle contractility induced by acetylcholine (ACh) after BTX-A-mediated cleavage of SNAP-25 antagonized by toosendanin (TSN). Three groups of rat pyloric muscle strips were studied in vitro. All strips were allowed to equilibrate for 52 min under a basal loading tension of 1 g in Krebs solution and spontaneous contractile waves were recorded as their own controls before adding each drug. According to experimental protocols, 100 μM ACh, 1 μM atropine, 29.6 μM TSN and 10 U/ml BTX-A was added, respectively. BTX-A directly inhibited pyloric spontaneous contraction and ACh-induced contractile response. Addition of 10 U/ml BTX-A still inhibited pyloric smooth muscle contractility following incubation of TSN, while subsequent administration of 100 μM ACh had no effect. BTX-A inhibits pyloric smooth muscle contractility in our study suggesting BTX-A inhibits not only ACh release from cholinergic nerves but also muscarinic cholinergic muscular transmission. PMID:27426259

  5. Surgical and Medical Treatment of Pyloric and Duodenal Pythiosis in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Dycus, David Lee; Fisher, Cory; Butler, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    A 5 yr old, male, neutered mixed-breed dog was referred for persistent vomiting 2 wk following a pyloric biopsy for a pyloric outflow obstruction. Histopathology at the time of initial surgery was suggestive of pythiosis. Following referral, the dog underwent radical surgical treatment with a Billroth II procedure, partial pancreatectomy, and cholecystoduodenostomy. Histopathology and serology confirmed the diagnosis of pythiosis and medical treatment consisting of itraconazole and terbinafine was started postoperatively. Serology titers were checked again at 8, 12, and 24 wk postoperatively revealing a positive response to treatment and no reoccurrence of pythiosis. Since surgery, the patient experienced waxing and waning elevations of liver values and laparoscopic liver biopsies 10 mo postoperatively revealed hepatic cirrhosis with fibrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, and chronic inflammation. This report documents successful treatment of pyloric/duodenal pythiosis and the long-term (17 mo) consequences associated with the Billroth II, partial pancreatectomy, and biliary rerouting in the dog. PMID:26535457

  6. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  7. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. PMID:26538250

  8. Experimental Therapies in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Marian, Ali J.

    2010-01-01

    The quintessential clinical diagnostic phenotype of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is primary cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac hypertrophy is also a major determinant of mortality and morbidity including the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with HCM. Reversal and attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy and its accompanying fibrosis is expected to improve morbidity as well as decrease the risk of SCD in patients with HCM. The conventionally used pharmacological agents in treatment of patients with HCM have not been shown to reverse or attenuate established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. An effective treatment of HCM has to target the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the pathogenesis of the phenotype. Mechanistic studies suggest that cardiac hypertrophy in HCM is secondary to activation of various hypertrophic signaling molecules and, hence, is potentially reversible. The hypothesis is supported by the results of genetic and pharmacological interventions in animal models. The results have shown potential beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan, mineralocorticoid receptor blocker spironolactone, 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors simvastatin and atorvastatin, and most recently, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reversal or prevention of hypertrophy and fibrosis in HCM. The most promising results have been obtained with NAC, which through multiple thiol-responsive mechanisms completely reversed established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in three independent studies. Pilot studies with losartan and statins in humans have established the feasibility of such studies. The results in animal models have firmly established the reversibility of established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in HCM and have set the stage for advancing the findings in the animal models to human patients with HCM through conducting large-scale efficacy studies. PMID:20560006

  9. Propranolol (Infantile Hemangioma)

    MedlinePlus

    Propranolol oral solution is used to treat proliferating infantile hemangioma (benign [noncancerous] growths or tumors appearing on or under the skin ... Propranolol comes as an oral solution (liquid) to take by mouth. ... is usually taken twice daily (9 hours apart) during or immediately after a ...

  10. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. PMID:26439957

  11. Gastric and pyloric sphincter muscle function and the developmental-dependent regulation of gastric content emptying in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sobchak, Curtis; Fajardo, A Felipe; Shifrin, Yulia; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2016-06-01

    Feeding intolerance is a common issue in the care of preterm neonates. The condition manifests as delayed emptying of gastric contents and represents a therapeutic challenge, since the factors accounting for its manifestations are unknown. The main goal of this study was to comparatively investigate the age-related function of rat gastric and pyloric smooth muscle and their putative regulators. We hypothesized that a reduced gastric muscle contraction potential early in life contributes to the delayed gastric emptying of the newborn. Newborn and adult rat gastric (fundus) and pyloric sphincter tissues were comparatively studied in vitro. Shortening of the tissue-specific dissociated smooth muscle cell was evaluated, and expression of the key regulatory proteins Rho-associated kinase 2 and myosin light chain kinase was determined. Gastric and pyloric smooth muscle cell shortening was significantly greater in the adult than the respective newborn counterpart. Expression of myosin light chain kinase and Rho-associated kinase 2 was developmentally regulated and increased with age. Pyloric sphincter muscle expresses a higher neuronal nitric oxide synthase and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein content in newborn than adult tissue. Compared with later in life, the newborn rat gastropyloric muscle has a Ca(2+)-related reduced potential for contraction and the pyloric sphincter relaxation-dependent modulators are overexpressed. To the extent that these rodent data can be extrapolated to humans, the delayed gastric emptying in the newborn reflects reduced stomach muscle contraction potential, as opposed to increased pyloric sphincter tone. PMID:27125274

  12. Bioengineered Human Pyloric Sphincters Using Autologous Smooth Muscle and Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen Lee; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-01-01

    Gastroparesis leads to inadequate emptying of the stomach resulting in severe negative health impacts. Appropriate long-term treatments for these diseases may require pyloric sphincter tissue replacements that possess functional smooth muscle cell (SMC) and neural components. This study aims to bioengineer, for the first time, innervated human pylorus constructs utilizing autologous human pyloric sphincter SMCs and human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Autologous SMCs and NPCs were cocultured in dual-layered hydrogels and formed concentrically aligned pylorus constructs. Innervated autologous human pylorus constructs were characterized through biochemical and physiologic assays to assess the phenotype and functionality of SMCs and neurons. SMCs within bioengineered human pylorus constructs displayed a tonic contractile phenotype and maintained circumferential alignment. Neural differentiation within bioengineered constructs was verified by positive expression of βIII-tubulin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Autologous bioengineered innervated human pylorus constructs generated a robust spontaneous basal tone and contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl). Contraction in response to exogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), relaxation in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also observed. Neural network integrity was demonstrated by inhibition of EFS-induced relaxation in the presence of a neurotoxin or nNOS inhibitors. Partial inhibition of ACh-induced contraction and VIP-induced relaxation following neurotoxin treatment was observed. These studies provide a proof of concept for bioengineering functional innervated autologous human pyloric sphincter constructs that generate a robust basal tone and contain circumferentially aligned SMCs, which display a tonic contractile phenotype and functional differentiated neurons. These autologous constructs have

  13. Infantile sexuality and Freud's legacy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The topic of sexuality and infantile sexuality, though less frequently discussed by psychoanalysis in recent decades, has received renewed attention for some years. The intention of this paper is to share some reflections around the role of infantile sexuality in our thinking, how we encounter it in our work with patients and in clinical material. Through reference to questions put forward by Freud (1905) in Three Essays, this paper takes into consideration some areas of the debate that has developed on the subject of infantile sexuality, starting from Freud's original intuition, including various hypotheses on the genesis of the sexual drive. The author will concentrate on two specific points. Firstly, how infantile sexuality - as a permanent dimension of the subject's existence - unfolds in the relationship and is deeply influenced by it. And that is how in childhood and adolescence, infantile sexuality ushers in parental sexuality - just as, in the case of our patients, infantile sexuality ushers in the analyst's sexuality. The second point pertains to the temporal dimension within which infantile sexuality is inscribed. The hypothesis that the author proposes is that infantile sexuality may be understood in the specific time of psychoanalysis [Nachträglichkeit], distinct and different with respect to the linear, evolutionary dimension. PMID:25988723

  14. Role of Ih in differentiating the dynamics of the gastric and pyloric neurons in the stomatogastric ganglion of the lobster, Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Selverston, Allen I; Ayers, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated inward cationic current (Ih) is known to regulate the rhythmicity, excitability, and synaptic transmission in heart cells and many types of neurons across a variety of species, including some pyloric and gastric mill neurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) in Cancer borealis and Panulirus interruptus However, little is known about the role of Ih in regulating the gastric mill dynamics and its contribution to the dynamical bifurcation of the gastric mill and pyloric networks. We investigated the role of Ih in the rhythmic activity and cellular excitability of both the gastric mill neurons (medial gastric, gastric mill) and pyloric neurons (pyloric dilator, lateral pyloric) in Homarus americanus Through testing the burst period between 5 and 50 mM CsCl, and elimination of postinhibitory rebound and voltage sag, we found that 30 mM CsCl can sufficiently block Ih in both the pyloric and gastric mill neurons. Our results show that Ih maintains the excitability of both the pyloric and gastric mill neurons. However, Ih regulates slow oscillations of the pyloric and gastric mill neurons differently. Specifically, blocking Ih diminishes the difference between the pyloric and gastric mill burst periods by increasing the pyloric burst period and decreasing the gastric mill burst period. Moreover, the phase-plane analysis shows that blocking Ih causes the trajectory of slow oscillations of the gastric mill neurons to change toward the pyloric sinusoidal-like trajectories. In addition to regulating the pyloric rhythm, we found that Ih is also essential for the gastric mill rhythms and differentially regulates these two dynamics. PMID:26912595

  15. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  16. Gastrojejunostomy for pyloric stenosis after acute gastric dilatation due to overeating

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Akiharu; Masuda, Norihiro; Haga, Norihiro; Ito, Tomokazu; Otsuka, Kichirou; Takita, Jyunko; Satomura, Hitoshi; Kumakura, Yuji; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented at our hospital with abdominal distention due to overeating. Acute gastric dilatation was diagnosed. The patient was hospitalized, and nasogastric decompression was initiated. On hospitalization day 3, she developed shock, and her respiratory state deteriorated, requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Nasogastric decompression contributed to the improvement in her clinical condition. She was discharged 3 mo after admission. During outpatient follow-up, her dietary intake decreased, and her body weight gradually decreased by 14 kg. An upper gastrointestinal series and endoscopy revealed pyloric stenosis; therefore, we performed gastrojejunostomy 18 mo after her initial admission. The patient was discharged from the hospital with no postoperative complications. Gastric necrosis and perforation due to overeating-induced gastric dilatation are life-threatening conditions. Surgical intervention may be required if delayed pyloric stenosis occurs after conservative treatment. We report a case of pyloric stenosis due to overeating-induced gastric dilatation treated by gastrojejunostomy 18 mo after the initial presentation. PMID:25663789

  17. Slow Conductances Could Underlie Intrinsic Phase-Maintaining Properties of Isolated Lobster (Panulirus interruptus) Pyloric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Buchman, Einat; Weaver, Adam L.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.; Hobbs, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    The rhythmic pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric system approximately maintains phase (that is, the burst durations and durations between the bursts of its neurons change proportionally) when network cycle period is altered by current injection into the network pacemaker (Hooper, 1997a,b). When isolated from the network and driven by rhythmic hyperpolarizing current pulses, the delay to firing after each pulse of at least one network neuron type (Pyloric, PY) varies in a phase-maintaining manner when cycle period is varied (Hooper, 1998). These variations require PY neurons to have intrinsic mechanisms that respond to changes in neuron activity on time scales at least as long as two seconds. Slowly activating and deactivating conductances could provide such a mechanism. We tested this possibility by building models containing various slow conductances. This work showed that such conductances could indeed support intrinsic phase-maintenance and we show here results for one such conductance, a slow potassium conductance. These conductances supported phase maintenance because their mean activation level changed, hence altering neuron post-inhibition firing delay, when the rhythmic input to the neuron changed. Switching the sign of the dependence of slow conductance activation and deactivation on membrane potential resulted in neuron delays switching to change in an anti-phase maintaining manner. These data suggest that slow conductances or similar slow processes such as changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could underlie phase maintenance in pyloric network neurons. PMID:19211890

  18. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  19. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  20. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  1. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  2. Pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Uihlein, Lily Changchien; Liang, Marilyn G; Mulliken, John B

    2012-08-01

    1.Review the key features of the life cycle of infantile hemangiomas.2.Highlight cellular and molecular pathways involved in hemangioma-genesis.3.Discuss theories that may account for hemangioma-genesis.In the past, it was believed that a mother's visual impressions or behavior during pregnancy caused the growth of infantile hemangioma in her unborn child. She might have had an excessive craving for strawberries, witnessed the slaughter of an animal, directly contacted human or animal blood, or mocked a child with a similar birthmark.1 This folklore began to slowly fade once hemangiomas were examined through the light microscope. In 1863, Virchow2 suggested that hemangiomas are composed of proliferating new blood vessels resulting from progressive irritation of tissue. In 1933, Laidlow and Murray3 proposed a phylogenetic origin for hemangiomas and hypothesized that hemangiomas are remnants of vascular tufts functioning as accessory lungs for primitive amphibia. Pack and Miller4 (1950) hypothesized that hemangiomas develop from embryonic islands of angioblastic cells that were isolated from the systemic vasculature during fetal development. PMID:22881413

  3. Classification of infantile nystagmus waveforms.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Maria; Clement, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Classification of infantile nystagmus waveforms is an important problem because the characteristic waveforms can be used to distinguish between infantile and acquired nystagmus. A clear description of the nystagmus is also a necessary first stage in understanding its origin. Currently infantile nystagmus waveforms are classified into at least 12 different types. In this study we analyse a database of nystagmus recordings in order to investigate if this classification can be simplified. Application of principal components analysis revealed that 96.9% of the variance of the waveforms is described by a linear sum of two component waveforms. The components consist of sawtooth and pseudocycloid waveforms that account for 78.7% and 18.2% of the variance respectively for the most common single cycle waveforms. This simplified description of infantile nystagmus highlights the importance of identifying the origin of the jerk component and its synchronisation with the pseudocycloid component for the characterisation and treatment of the nystagmus. PMID:27125578

  4. Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for pyloric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands in a young female: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Satoru; Takahashi, Shusaku; Ueki, Shinya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Ichihara, Shin

    2015-06-01

    A 17-year-old female was referred to our hospital with worsening dietary intake and abdominal bloating. She had epigastric fullness, but no abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed food residue and pyloric stenosis. A contrast-enhanced radiograph also showed pyloric stenosis, and gastrografin was not passed well through her pylorus. Computed tomography revealed similar findings. The biopsy results indicated hyperplasia of the gastric glands. The patient was diagnosed with a benign lesion, and underwent endoscopic balloon dilation several times. However, her stenosis worsened and we decided to perform surgery. In consideration of the cosmetic outcome, we performed laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. The postoperative course was good, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. The final diagnosis was pyloric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands. No malignant lesions were found. Since gastric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands has not been reported previously, we consider this to be a very rare case. PMID:24986451

  5. Pyloric gland metaplasia/differentiation in multiple organ systems in a patient with Peutz-Jegher's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kato, Noriko; Sugawara, Masato; Maeda, Kunihiko; Hosoya, Noriyuki; Motoyama, Teiichi

    2011-06-01

    Peutz-Jegher's syndrome (PJS) involves multiple organ systems and the development of hamartomatous, metaplastic, or neoplastic lesions of different cell lineages. Among them, glandular lesions are the most common, but their properties are obscure. We report here a 53-year-old woman with PJS who developed multiple hamartomatous polyps in the jejunum and mucinous glandular lesions in multiple organ systems: glandular metaplasia in the urinary bladder; lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia in the uterine cervix; mucinous metaplasia in the right fallopian tube; mucinous adenoma in the left ovary. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses disclosed that all of the intestinal and extra-intestinal lesions were associated with pyloric gland metaplasia/differentiation across the organ systems. In the general population, the organs described above rarely or infrequently show pyloric gland phenotype, to say nothing of trans-organ involvement. It is strongly suggested that commitment to pyloric gland metaplasia/differentiation is closely associated with PJS. PMID:21615613

  6. Pattern generation in the lobster (Panulirus) stomatogastric ganglion. II. Pyloric network simulation.

    PubMed

    Hartline, D K

    1979-08-01

    1. Results from the companion paper were incorporated into a physiologically realistic computer model of the three principal cell types (PD/AB, LP, PY) of the pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion. Parameters for the model were mostly calculated (sometimes estimated) from experimental data rather than fitting the model to observed output patterns. 2. The initial run was successful in predicting several features of the pyloric pattern: the observed gap between PD and LP bursts, the appropriate sequence of the activity periods (PD, LP, PY), and a substantial PY burst not properly simulated by an earlier model. 3. The major discrepancy between model and observed patterns was the too-early occurrence of the PY burst, which resulted in a much shortened LP burst. Motivated by this discrepancy, additional investigations were made of PY properties. A hyperpolarization-enabled depolarization-activated hyperpolarizing conductance change was discovered which may make an important contribution to the late phase of PY activity in the normal burst cycle. Addition of this effect to the model brought its predictions more in line with observed patterns. 4. Other discrepancies between model and observation were instructive and are discussed. The findings force a substantial revision in previously held ideas on pattern production in the pyloric system. More weight must be given to functional properties of individual neurons and less to properties arising purely from network interactions. This shift in emphasis may be necessary in more complicated systems as well. 5. An example has been provided of the value quantitative modeling can be to network physiology. Only through rigorous quantitative testing can qualitative theories of how the nervous system operates be substantiated. PMID:227480

  7. Differential immune response between fundic and pyloric abomasal regions upon experimental ovine infection with Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Guzmán, M A; Cuenca-Verde, C; Valdivia-Anda, G; Cuéllar-Ordaz, J A; Alba-Hurtado, F

    2012-04-30

    The effect of experimental haemonchosis on the number of tissue eosinophils, plasma cells and lymphocyte subpopulations was evaluated in the fundic abomasal region, the pyloric abomasal region and the abomasal lymph node of Blackbelly lambs, which are resistant to infection, and Columbia lambs, which are susceptible to infection. An increase in the number of tissue eosinophils and CD4+ and WC1(+)γδ T-cells was observed in the pyloric abomasal region of Blackbelly lambs and correlated with lower worm burden and greater resistance to infection. Increases in IgA+ plasma cells from the pyloric abomasal region were observed in both infected groups, but there was no difference between the groups. Therefore, increases in IgA+ plasma cells did not explain the resistance observed. Infection caused a significant increase in tissue eosinophils in the abomasal lymph node of Blackbelly lambs and a decrease in the number of CD4+ T-cells in lambs of both breeds. CD8+ T-cells and IgG+ and IgM+ plasma cells were not associated with either infection or resistance. In this work, clear differences were observed in the numbers of CD4+ and WC1(+)γδ T-cells, tissue eosinophils and IgA+ plasma cells between the abomasal regions studied. These differences indicate that the immunological response is not homogenous in all abomasal mucosa and that evaluating the response from a single abomasal region may not be representative of the cellular response across the abomasum. PMID:22153120

  8. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  9. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: ultrasound and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brook; Amin, Tania; Leone, Valentina; Wood, Mark; Kraft, Jeannette K

    2016-05-01

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is a rare genetic disorder related to failures in prostaglandin metabolism. Patients present with joint pain, limb enlargement, skin thickening and finger clubbing. Radiographs show characteristic periosteal reaction and thickening along the long bones. We present MRI and US findings in a child with the condition. Ultrasound showed echogenic tissue surrounding the long bones, presumably reflecting oedema and inflammatory tissue. Doppler sonograms demonstrated increased vascularity on the surface of some superficial bony structures. PMID:26939972

  10. Pathological features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Pomerance, Ariela; Teare, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The macroscopic features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are variable. The most easily recognized picture is of disproportionate and asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy with a small ventricular volume. Symmetrical ventricular hypertrophy also occurs and dilatation of the ventricular cavity may lead to a configuration more usually associated with congestive cardiomyopathy. Papillary muscle involvement leads to a bullet shape, often retained even when the ventricle dilates. Eighteen of the hearts showed a distinctive band of fibrous thickening below the aortic valve. This was a mirror image of the free edge of the anterior mitral cusp, had the microscopic features of an endocardial friction lesion, and was clearly the morphological expression of the systolic contact between cusp and septum seen on cineangiography. This band is characteristic of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy; it was more common in older patients and is of particular diagnostic value in cases with symmetrical hypertrophy, including those with dilated ventricular cavities. Sudden death was the commonest presentation in the younger cases but in several cases over 60 years at death hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was an incidental necropsy finding. Images PMID:4472994

  11. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M; Mohun, Timothy J; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  12. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C.; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J.; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  13. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  14. Right ventricular obstruction in various types of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Stierle, U; Sheikhzadeh, A; Shakibi, J G; Langbehn, A F; Diederich, K W

    1987-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is most probably a genetically transmitted disease with different clinical and hemodynamic features. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) the obstruction is predominantly in the left ventricular outflow tract (IHSS). In a minority of cases the obstruction is strictly located in midventricle (midventricular obstruction, MO). Hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HNCM) includes asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) and apical hypertrophy (AH). Right ventricular hypertrophic obstruction (RVHO) is an uncommon type of HCM and is almost always combined with other types of left ventricular HCM. We describe in the present report 1 case of RVHO with IHSS, 2 cases with MO and, to our knowledge, the first case with AH. PMID:3599397

  15. Exome Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations in Infantile Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Alexandra; Tyynismaa, Henna; Euro, Liliya; Ellonen, Pekka; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ojala, Tiina; Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Tommiska, Johanna; Raivio, Taneli; Oresic, Matej; Karikoski, Riitta; Tammela, Outi; Simola, Kalle O.J.; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Infantile cardiomyopathies are devastating fatal disorders of the neonatal period or the first year of life. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of this group of diseases, but the underlying gene defects have been characterized in only a minority of cases, because tissue specificity of the manifestation hampers functional cloning and the heterogeneity of causative factors hinders collection of informative family materials. We sequenced the exome of a patient who died at the age of 10 months of hypertrophic mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with combined cardiac respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency. Rigorous data analysis allowed us to identify a homozygous missense mutation in AARS2, which we showed to encode the mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS). Two siblings from another family, both of whom died perinatally of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, had the same mutation, compound heterozygous with another missense mutation. Protein structure modeling of mtAlaRS suggested that one of the mutations affected a unique tRNA recognition site in the editing domain, leading to incorrect tRNA aminoacylation, whereas the second mutation severely disturbed the catalytic function, preventing tRNA aminoacylation. We show here that mutations in AARS2 cause perinatal or infantile cardiomyopathy with near-total combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in the heart. Our results indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying mutations in single patients and allows recognition of the genetic background in single-gene disorders of variable clinical manifestation and tissue-specific disease. Furthermore, we show that mitochondrial disorders extend to prenatal life and are an important cause of early infantile cardiac failure. PMID:21549344

  16. Infantile scurvy: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, K

    2001-10-01

    Scurvy, a disease of dietary deficiency of vitamin C, is uncommon today. Among diseases, scurvy has a rich history and an ancient past. The Renaissance (14th to 16th centuries) witnessed several epidemics of scurvy among sea voyagers. In 1747, James Lind, a British Naval surgeon, performed a carefully designed clinical trial and concluded that oranges and lemons had the most antiscorbutic effect. Eventually, with the provision of lemon juice to the sea voyagers, scurvy became rare at sea. Infantile scurvy appeared almost as a new disease toward the end of the 19th century. The increased incidence of infantile scurvy during that period was attributed to the usage of heated milk and proprietary foods. Thomas Barlow described the classic clinical and pathologic features of infantile scurvy in 1883. Between 1907 and 1912, Holst and Frolich induced and cured scurvy in guinea pigs by dietary modification. In 1914, Alfred Hess established that pasteurization reduced the antiscorbutic value of milk and recommended supplementation of fresh fruit and vegetable juices to prevent scurvy. Such pioneering efforts led to the eradication of infantile scurvy in the United States. A brief history of infantile scurvy is provided. PMID:11581484

  17. Muscular (hypertrophic) subaortic stenosis (hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy): the evidence for true obstruction to left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, E. D.; Henderson, M.; Rakowski, H.; Wilansky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical and haemodynamic significance of the subaortic pressure gradient in patients with muscular (hypertrophic) subaortic stenosis (hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy) has long been debated. In this report we summarize the evidence which indicates that true obstruction to left ventricular outflow exists in these patients. Rapid left ventricular ejection, through an outflow tract narrowed by ventricular septal hypertrophy, results in Venturi forces causing systolic anterior motion of the anterior (or posterior) mitral leaflets. Mitral leaflet-septal contact results in obstruction to outflow and the accompanying mitral regurgitation. The time of onset of mitral leaflet-septal contact determines the magnitude of the pressure gradient and the severity of the mitral regurgitation, as well as the degree of prolongation of left ventricular ejection time and the percentage of left ventricular stroke volume that is ejected in the presence of an obstructive pressure gradient. Early and prolonged mitral leaflet-septal contact results in a large pressure gradient, significant mitral regurgitation, as well as dramatic prolongation of the ejection time and a large percentage of left ventricular stroke volume being obstructed. Late and short mitral leaflet-septal contact results in little haemodynamic perturbation. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with obstructive pressure gradients are significantly more symptomatic than those without. Thus the obstructive pressure gradients in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are of clinical as well as haemodynamic significance. To deny the existence of obstruction to outflow in patients with muscular subaortic stenosis is to deny these patients appropriate medical and surgical therapy. PMID:3774688

  18. Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Victoria D.; Souza, Carlos; Vanderhart, Daniel; Boston, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female dog diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma and hypertrophic osteopathy was negative for additional lesions on computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen. Resection of the affected liver lobe resulted in resolution of clinical signs. This is the first case of hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26130837

  19. End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew J.M.

    2015-01-01

    A 14-year-old Persian cat was referred for evaluation of the progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after an acute episode of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis of HCM had been made almost 13 years ago. Echocardiography and electrocardiography revealed end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and multifocal atrial tachycardia. The patient was discharged on medical management with a grave prognosis. PMID:25969586

  20. End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cat.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew J M

    2015-05-01

    A 14-year-old Persian cat was referred for evaluation of the progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after an acute episode of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis of HCM had been made almost 13 years ago. Echocardiography and electrocardiography revealed end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and multifocal atrial tachycardia. The patient was discharged on medical management with a grave prognosis. PMID:25969586

  1. Atrioventricular Sequential Pacing for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy During Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan; Pai, Sher-Lu; Perry, Dana K; Blackshear, Joseph L; Aniskevich, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disorder that carries an increased risk of morbidity and mortality during liver transplantation. We describe the use of atrioventricular sequential pacing, placed preoperatively, to assist with intraoperative management of a patient with severe refractory hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation. We discuss the pathogenesis and treatment of this infrequent but serious comorbidity. PMID:26466305

  2. Topical modalities for treatment and prevention of postsurgical hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chong Wee; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2011-08-01

    There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars. This article summarizes the existing literature regarding topical treatments such as silicone gel sheeting and ointment, onion extract, vitamin E, pressure garment therapy, massage therapy, and topical imiquimod 5% cream in the management of hypertrophic scars. PMID:21856542

  3. Blepharoptosis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Aysun Şanal; Acaroğlu, Gölge; Dikmetas, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a history of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) associated with an abdominal neoplasia and blepharoptosis. He had finger clubbing, hyperhidrosis, and hypertrichosis. He also had a recent history of extensive abdominal surgery with a pathology report of myelolipoma. Routine blood work was unremarkable. Upper eyelid reconstruction with blepharoplasty, upper eyelid wedge resection, and brow suspension was performed to address his eyelid concerns. By this case report, we would like to attract notice that the eyelid involvement may be a part of HOA and to emphasize the importance of systemic and pathologic evaluation in failed blepharoptosis surgery. PMID:27221686

  4. Inhibitory effects and mechanisms of intestinal electrical stimulation on gastric tone, antral contractions, pyloric tone, and gastric emptying in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaotuan; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jihong; Song, Gengqing; Wang, Lijie; Zhu, Hongbing; Brining, Doug; Chen, Jiande D. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of intestinal electrical stimulation (IES) on gastric tone, antral and pyloric contractions, and gastric emptying in dogs. Female hound dogs were equipped with a duodenal or gastric cannula, and one pair of serosal electrodes was implanted in the small intestine. The study consisted of five different experiments. Liquid gastric emptying was assessed by collection of chyme from the duodenal cannula in a number of sessions with and without IES and with and without N-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA). Postprandial antral and pyloric contractions were measured with and without IES and in the absence and presence of l-NNA or phentolamine by placement of a manometric catheter into the antrum and pylorus via the duodenal cannula. Gastric tone was assessed by measurement of gastric volume at a constant pressure. Gastric emptying was substantially and significantly delayed by IES or l-NNA compared with the control session. IES-induced delay of gastric emptying became normal with addition of l-NNA. IES reduced gastric tone, which was blocked by l-NNA. IES also inhibited antral contractions (frequency and amplitude), and this inhibitory effect was not blocked by l-NNA but was blocked by phentolamine. IES alone did not affect pyloric tone or resistance, but IES + l-NNA decreased pyloric tone. In conclusion, IES reduces gastric tone via the nitrergic pathway, inhibits antral contractions via the adrenergic pathway, does not affect pyloric tone, and delays liquid gastric emptying. IES-induced delay of gastric emptying is attributed to its inhibitory effects on gastric motility. PMID:18945955

  5. Infantile Hemangioma: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    BOTA, MADALINA; POPA, GHEORGHE; BLAG, CRISTINA; TATARU, ALEXANDRU

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas as frequent infancy tumors have been a controversial issue of medical scientists worldwide. Their clinical aspects are various and their physiopathology is yet to be fully understood. Numerous publications outline the characteristics, causes, evolution possibilities and therapeutic approaches. Deciding whether to treat or not is the main question of this kind of pathology. Hemangiomas that have complications or can cause irreversible damage need therapy. This is a brief review of up-to-date information regarding the presentation of infantile hemangiomas and target-therapies. PMID:26528043

  6. Pyloric Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other conditions can have similar symptoms. For instance, gastroesophageal reflux (GER) usually begins before 8 weeks of age, ... after feedings. However, the majority of infants with GERD do not experience projectile vomiting, and although they ...

  7. Pyloric stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... after vomiting and wants to feed again Other symptoms appear several weeks after birth and may include: Abdominal pain Burping Constant hunger Dehydration (gets worse as vomiting gets worse) Failure to ...

  8. Biology of Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Itinteang, Tinte; Withers, Aaron H. J.; Davis, Paul F.; Tan, Swee T.

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by an initial proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous involution over the next 5–10 years, often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. IH is traditionally considered a tumor of the microvasculature. However, recent data show the critical role of stem cells in the biology of IH with emerging evidence suggesting an embryonic developmental anomaly due to aberrant proliferation and differentiation of a hemogenic endothelium with a neural crest phenotype that possesses the capacity for endothelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neuronal differentiation. Current evidence suggests a putative placental chorionic mesenchymal core cell embolic origin of IH during the first trimester. This review outlines the emerging role of stem cells and their interplay with the cytokine niche that promotes a post-natal environment conducive for vasculogenesis involving VEGFR-2 and its ligand VEGF-A and the IGF-2 ligand in promoting cellular proliferation, and the TRAIL-OPG anti-apoptotic pathway in preventing cellular apoptosis in IH. The discovery of the role of the renin–angiotensin system in the biology of IH provides a plausible explanation for the programed biologic behavior and the β-blocker-induced accelerated involution of this enigmatic condition. This crucially involves the vasoactive peptide, angiotensin II, that promotes cellular proliferation in IH predominantly via its action on the ATIIR2 isoform. The role of the RAS in the biology of IH is further supported by the effect of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, in inducing accelerated involution of IH. The discovery of the critical role of RAS in IH represents a novel and fascinating paradigm shift in the understanding of human development, IH, and other tumors in general. PMID:25593962

  9. Biology of infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Withers, Aaron H J; Davis, Paul F; Tan, Swee T

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by an initial proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous involution over the next 5-10 years, often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. IH is traditionally considered a tumor of the microvasculature. However, recent data show the critical role of stem cells in the biology of IH with emerging evidence suggesting an embryonic developmental anomaly due to aberrant proliferation and differentiation of a hemogenic endothelium with a neural crest phenotype that possesses the capacity for endothelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neuronal differentiation. Current evidence suggests a putative placental chorionic mesenchymal core cell embolic origin of IH during the first trimester. This review outlines the emerging role of stem cells and their interplay with the cytokine niche that promotes a post-natal environment conducive for vasculogenesis involving VEGFR-2 and its ligand VEGF-A and the IGF-2 ligand in promoting cellular proliferation, and the TRAIL-OPG anti-apoptotic pathway in preventing cellular apoptosis in IH. The discovery of the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the biology of IH provides a plausible explanation for the programed biologic behavior and the β-blocker-induced accelerated involution of this enigmatic condition. This crucially involves the vasoactive peptide, angiotensin II, that promotes cellular proliferation in IH predominantly via its action on the ATIIR2 isoform. The role of the RAS in the biology of IH is further supported by the effect of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, in inducing accelerated involution of IH. The discovery of the critical role of RAS in IH represents a novel and fascinating paradigm shift in the understanding of human development, IH, and other tumors in general. PMID:25593962

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  11. Isolation and characteristics of carboxypeptidase B from the pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Kishimura, Hideki; Hayashi, Kenji

    2002-10-01

    Carboxypeptidase B was purified from the pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterias amurensis. The final enzyme preparation was nearly homogeneous in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and its molecular weight was estimated as approximately 34,000. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme for hydrolysis of benzoyl-glycyl-L-arginine were at approximately pH 7.5 and 55 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was unstable at above 50 degrees C and at below pH 5.0. The enzyme was activated by Co(2+), but was inhibited by EDTA and Hg(2+). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. amurensis carboxypeptidase B was ASFDYNVYHSYQEIMNWITN. PMID:12381380

  12. Gastric wall ischemia following massive gastric distension due to peptic pyloric stenosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tatiana; Freitas, Carla; Pinto-de-Sousa, João

    2016-01-01

    Gastric necrosis is a rare entity mainly due to the rich collateral blood flow the stomach is supplied by. Acute gastric dilation is one of the described underlying causes, and although not fully understood, many potential alterations, such as vascular compression, herniation, volvulus, acute necrotizing gastritis, complications after abdominal surgery, anorexia, bulimia nervosa, trauma, exposure to caustic materials, diabetes, medications, infections, debilitating chronic illness, gastric outlet obstruction, aerophagia and acute pancreatitis have been described. In this report, we present a case of partial gastric ischemia with necrosis and consequent perforation of the lesser curvature of the stomach, as a result of gastric outlet obstruction due to pyloric stenosis. The patient underwent an emergency laparotomy. An atypical gastrectomy and a Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty were performed. We emphasize the need for the quick recognition of this condition and for the urgent management because of the high mortality rate associated with undiagnosed gastric necrosis. PMID:26851051

  13. Gastric wall ischemia following massive gastric distension due to peptic pyloric stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tatiana; Freitas, Carla; Pinto-de-Sousa, João

    2016-01-01

    Gastric necrosis is a rare entity mainly due to the rich collateral blood flow the stomach is supplied by. Acute gastric dilation is one of the described underlying causes, and although not fully understood, many potential alterations, such as vascular compression, herniation, volvulus, acute necrotizing gastritis, complications after abdominal surgery, anorexia, bulimia nervosa, trauma, exposure to caustic materials, diabetes, medications, infections, debilitating chronic illness, gastric outlet obstruction, aerophagia and acute pancreatitis have been described. In this report, we present a case of partial gastric ischemia with necrosis and consequent perforation of the lesser curvature of the stomach, as a result of gastric outlet obstruction due to pyloric stenosis. The patient underwent an emergency laparotomy. An atypical gastrectomy and a Heineke–Mikulicz pyloroplasty were performed. We emphasize the need for the quick recognition of this condition and for the urgent management because of the high mortality rate associated with undiagnosed gastric necrosis. PMID:26851051

  14. Temperature Sensitivity of the Pyloric Neuromuscular System and Its Modulation by Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Thuma, Jeffrey B.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Burstein, Helaine J.; Seiter, Natasha S.; Hooper, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the effects of temperature on the p1 neuromuscular system of the stomatogastric system of the lobster (Panulirus interruptus). Muscle force generation, in response to both the spontaneously rhythmic in vitro pyloric network neural activity and direct, controlled motor nerve stimulation, dramatically decreased as temperature increased, sufficiently that stomach movements would very unlikely be maintained at warm temperatures. However, animals fed in warm tanks showed statistically identical food digestion to those in cold tanks. Applying dopamine, a circulating hormone in crustacea, increased muscle force production at all temperatures and abolished neuromuscular system temperature dependence. Modulation may thus exist not only to increase the diversity of produced behaviors, but also to maintain individual behaviors when environmental conditions (such as temperature) vary. PMID:23840789

  15. Isolation and characteristics of trypsin from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Kishimura, Hideki; Hayashi, Kenji

    2002-06-01

    Trypsin was purified from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina Pectinifera by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and cation-exchange chromatography. Final enzyme preparation was nearly homogeneous in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and its molecular weight was estimated as approximately 28000. Optimum pH and temperature of A. pectinifera trypsin for hydrolysis of N(alpha)-p-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride were approximately pH 8.0 and 55 degrees C, respectively. A. pectinifera trypsin was unstable at above 50 degrees C and below pH 5.0, and was not activated by adding Ca(2+). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. pectinifera trypsin, IVGGHEF, was found. PMID:12031475

  16. Phenotypic identity of gastric mucous neck cells and mucous cells of cardiac, pyloric, and Brunner's glands.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, N R; Bhathal, P S; Francis, D M

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To investigate the tissue specificity of a novel monoclonal antibody raised to a tissue fraction of normal human liver and which identified certain cells of gastric and duodenal mucosa. METHODS--A total of 155 samples of various tissues obtained from 100 surgical specimens were fixed in cold ethanol-paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin wax, and 3 microns sections were studied by immunohistochemical and lectin staining procedures. RESULTS--Immunohistochemical staining showed a major tissue specific component which was strongly expressed by mucous neck cells of the body of the stomach, glands of the cardia and pyloric antrum, and by Brunner's glands. Staining for antigen in the periductal glands of normal major biliary and pancreatic ducts was variable and relatively weaker. It was not detected elsewhere in normal intestine or in the other normal tissues tested. Barrett's mucosa of gastric cardia type, and pyloric gland metaplasia in the gall bladder and small bowel affected with Crohn's disease stained for the antigen. The tissue distribution of the antigen was identical with that of a glycoprotein, demonstrated by an induced affinity for concanavalin A following treatment of tissue sections with periodic acid. The antigen was not sensitive to sialidase. CONCLUSIONS--The tissue component identified (designated here as antigen D10) seems to be characteristic of certain differentiated epithelial cells derived from that part of foregut giving rise to stomach, duodenum, and biliary and pancreatic ducts. The antibody will be of use in investigating pathological processes involving tissue differentiation at these sites, and in the oesophagus and intestines. Images PMID:8132810

  17. Lgr5-expressing stem cells are not the cells of origin of pyloric neuroendocrine carcinomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Elena; Kronast, Mira; Tölge, Mariana; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In intestinal and pyloric epithelia, leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5)-expressing cells represent long-lived adult stem cells that give rise to all epithelial cell types, including endocrine cells. Ablation of the Apc gene in Lgr5-expressing cells leads to intestinal and pyloric adenomas. To assess whether all epithelial tumours of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from LGR5-positive stem cells, we crossed Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) mice, which express EGFP and Cre recombinase driven by the Lgr5 promoter, with CEA424-SV40-TAg mice, which develop pyloric neuroendocrine carcinomas of epithelial origin. In 19 day-old mice, single SV40 T antigen (TAg)-positive cells were identified preferentially at the the bases of pyloric glands, close to the stem cell compartment. However, contrary to previous publications describing subpopulations of LGR5-positive cells in gastrointestinal neoplasia, we could not detect Lgr5-EGFP-positive tumour cells in malignant lesions. The lack of expression of the Wnt target gene Lgr5 is probably not caused by suppression of Wnt signalling by TAg, since β-catenin-mediated Wnt signalling, as measured by the TOPflash assay, was not inhibited. To determine the cellular origin of CEA424-SV40-TAg tumours, we performed tracing experiments using Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2:CEA424-SV40-TAg:ROSA26-tdRFP mice. Following tamoxifen induction, it was possible to efficiently trace the progeny of Lgr5-expressing cells in gastrointestinal tissue via red fluorescent protein (RFP) expression. No RFP-positive tumour cells were detected, even when RFP gene activation occurred in 7 day-old mice well before the appearance of TAg-positive tumour cells. Hence, we conclude that Lgr5-expressing stem cells probably do not constitute the cells of origin in CEA424-SV40-TAg mice. Consequently, not all epithelial tumours in the pyloric region are initiated by transformation of LGR5-positive stem cells. Thus, additional long-lived LGR5

  18. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  19. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy ...

  20. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI and MR tractography in bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debraj; Gulati, Yoginder S.; Malik, Virender; Mohimen, Aneesh; Sibi, Eranki; Reddy, Deepak Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a trans-synaptic neuronal degeneration associated with hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus due to a lesion in the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret. Familiarity with this entity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential to avoid other erroneous ominous diagnoses. We present a case of bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration and discuss the etiopathogenesis and MRI findings in this entity. The contributory role of MR tractography in the diagnosis is also highlighted. PMID:25489133

  2. Activated keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed Central

    Machesney, M.; Tidman, N.; Waseem, A.; Kirby, L.; Leigh, I.

    1998-01-01

    The etiology of hypertrophic scarring, a pathological end point of wound healing, is unknown. The scars most commonly occur when epithelialization has been delayed during, for example, the healing of deep dermal burn wounds. Hypertrophic scars are conventionally described as a dermal pathology in which the epidermis has only a passive role. In this study, the expression of keratin intermediate filament proteins and filaggrin has been investigated in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars and site-matched controls from the same patients. Hypertrophic scar epidermis was found to express the hyperproliferative keratins K6 and K16 in interfollicular epidermis in association with K17 and precocious expression of filaggrin. K16 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization using a highly specific cRNA probe. In contrast to the immunohistochemical location of K16 protein, the K16 mRNA was found to be expressed in the basal cell layer of normal skin. In hypertrophic scars the mRNA distribution corroborated the abnormal K16 protein distribution. These results suggest the keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis have entered an alternative differentiation pathway and are expressing an activated phenotype. Activated keratinocytes are a feature of the early stages of wound healing producing growth factors that influence fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and the inflammatory response. We propose that cellular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring are more complex than isolated dermal phenomena. The persistence of activated keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis implicates abnormal epidermal-mesenchymal interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9588880

  3. Morphological and immunochemical differences between keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, H. P.; Desmoulière, A.; Diegelmann, R. F.; Cohen, I. K.; Compton, C. C.; Garner, W. L.; Kapanci, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    There are two types of excessive scarring, keloid and hypertrophic scar. Contrary to hypertrophic scars, keloids do not regress with time, are difficult to revise surgically, and do not provoke scar contractures. These two lesions require different therapeutic approaches but are often confused because of an apparent lack of morphological differences. We have investigated the collagen organization and the possible presence of alpha-smooth muscle (SM) actin-expressing myofibroblasts in these conditions. Keloids contain large, thick collagen fibers composed of numerous fibrils closely packed together. In contrast hypertrophic scars exhibit modular structures in which fibroblastic cells, small vessels, and fine, randomly organized collagen fibers are present. We confirm that such nodular structures are always present in hypertrophic scar and rarely in keloid. Furthermore, only nodules of hypertrophic scars contain alpha-SM actin-expressing myofibroblasts. Electron microscopic examination supports the above-mentioned differences in collagen organization and in fibroblastic features and shows the presence of an amorphous extracellular material surrounding fibroblastic cells in keloid. The presence in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells, may represent an important element in the pathogenesis of contraction. Interestingly, when placed in culture fibroblasts from hypertrophic scars and keloid express similar amounts of alpha-SM actin, suggesting that local microenvironmental factors influence in vivo the expression of this protein. Thus several morphological and immunohistochemical differences exist between hypertrophic scar and keloid that are useful for the biological and pathological characterization of the two lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8030742

  4. The Inhibitory Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Rat Pyloric Smooth Muscle Contractile Response to Substance P In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Jun-Fan; Ren, Yin-Xiang; Wang, Can; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Zong, Xiao-Jian; Fan, Lin-Lan; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A decrease in pyloric myoelectrical activity and pyloric substance P (SP) content following intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in free move rats have been demonstrated in our previous studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of BTX-A on rat pyloric muscle contractile response to SP in vitro and the distributions of SP and neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) immunoreactive (IR) cells and fibers within pylorus. After treatment with atropine, BTX-A (10 U/mL), similar to [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp7,9, Leu11]-SP (APTL-SP, 1 μmol/L) which is an NK1R antagonist, decreased electric field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractile tension and frequency, whereas, subsequent administration of APTL-SP did not act on contractility. Incubation with BTX-A at 4 and 10 U/mL for 4 h respectively decreased SP (1 μmol/L)-induced contractions by 26.64% ± 5.12% and 74.92% ± 3.62%. SP-IR fibers and NK1R-IR cells both located within pylorus including mucosa and circular muscle layer. However, fewer SP-fibers were observed in pylorus treated with BTX-A (10 U/mL). In conclusion, BTX-A inhibits SP release from enteric terminals in pylorus and EFS-induced contractile responses when muscarinic cholinergic receptors are blocked by atropine. In addition, BTX-A concentration- and time-dependently directly inhibits SP-induced pyloric smooth muscle contractility. PMID:26501321

  5. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  6. [Therapy of duodenal ulcer and pyloric ulcer with 800 mg cimetidine nightly].

    PubMed

    Schütze, K; Hentschel, E; Weiss, W; Kratochvil, P; Brandstätter, G; Menthe, W; Okulski, G

    1986-04-18

    The efficacy of cimetidine 400 mg b.i.d. as compared with a single evening dose 800 mg was evaluated in a single-blind multicentre trial involving 86 patients with endoscopically proven duodenal or pyloric ulcer. After four weeks of treatment the healing rates were 64.4% (29/45) with 400 mg cimetidine twice daily and 78% (32/41) with 800 mg nocte; after eight weeks the corresponding rates were 77.7% (35/45) and 85.3% (35/41). Administration of 800 mg cimetidine every evening is, consequently, at least as effective as a twice-daily regimen. In the second half of the treatment period it was significantly more effective in reducing pain and antacid consumption. The single noctural dose takes the pathogenetic importance of overnight gastric acidity into consideration, entails a simplification of therapy and may improve patient compliance. It should, therefore, take preference over the conventional twice-daily regimen. PMID:3521103

  7. Is there a role for pyloric exclusion after severe duodenal trauma?

    PubMed

    Cruvinel Neto, José; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro Tavares; Ribeiro, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle; Rizoli, Sandro; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Rezende-Neto, João Baptista

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal trauma is an infrequent injury, but linked to high morbidity and mortality. Surgical management of duodenal injuries is dictated by: patient's hemodynamic status, injury severity, time of diagnosis, and presence of concomitant injuries. Even though most cases can be treated with primary repair, some experts advocate adjuvant procedures. Pyloric exclusion (PE) has emerged as an ancillary method to protect suture repair in more complex injuries. However, the effectiveness of this procedure is debatable. The "Evidence Based Telemedicine - Trauma & Acute Care Surgery" (EBT-TACS) Journal Club performed a critical appraisal of the literature and selected three relevant publications on the indications for PE in duodenal trauma. The first study retrospectively compared 14 cases of duodenal injuries greater than grade II treated by PE, with 15 cases repaired primarily, all of which penetrating. Results showed that PE did not improve outcome. The second study, also retrospective, compared primary repair (34 cases) with PE (16 cases) in blunt and penetrating grade > II duodenal injuries. The authors concluded that PE was not necessary in all cases. The third was a literature review on the management of challenging duodenal traumas. The author of that study concluded that PE is indicated for anastomotic leak management after gastrojejunostomies. In conclusion, the choice of the surgical procedure to treat duodenal injuries should be individualized. Moreover, there is insufficient high quality scientific evidence to support the abandonment of PE in severe duodenal injuries with extensive tissue loss. PMID:25140657

  8. Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia: novel mutations in the beta4 integrin gene (ITGB4).

    PubMed Central

    Pulkkinen, L.; Kim, D. U.; Uitto, J.

    1998-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA; OMIM 226730) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive blistering disorder, including lethal and nonlethal variants. Recently, expression of alpha6beta4 integrin, a transmembrane protein of the epithelial basement membranes, has been shown to be altered in these patients. In this work, we have explored the molecular pathology of the lethal form of EB-PA, and we describe novel ITGB4 mutations in five alleles of three patients. The mutation detection strategy included polymerase chain reaction amplification of each exon of ITGB4, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct nucleotide sequencing. The novel mutations included a homozygous 2-bp deletion in exon 34 (4501delTC), compound heterozygosity for a 2-bp deletion within the paternal allele (120delTG) within exon 3 and a cysteine substitution in the maternal allele (C245G) within exon 7, and the paternal nonsense mutation within exon 4 (Q73X). Thus, three of four distinct mutations predicted truncated polypeptide chains, whereas the missense mutation in the extracellular domain of beta4 integrin may affect ligand binding or dimerization of alpha6 and beta4 integrin subunits. These mutations emphasize the critical importance of the alpha6beta4 integrin in providing stability to the association of epidermis to the underlying dermis at the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Images Figure 1 Figure2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9422533

  9. MR Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: From Magnet to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Jan; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2014-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ( HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ), the most common genetically transmitted cardiac disorder, has been the focus of extensive research over the past 50 years. HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a multifaceted disease with highly heterogeneous genetic background, phenotypic expression, clinical presentation, and long-term outcome. Though most patients have an indolent course with a life expectancy comparable to that of the general population, early diagnosis and accurate risk profiling are essential to identify the sizeable subset at increased risk of sudden cardiac death or disease progression and heart failure-related complications, requiring aggressive management options. Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and prognostic assessment of HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients, as well as screening of potentially affected family members. In this context, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has recently emerged as an ideal complement to transthoracic echocardiography. Its multiparametric approach, fusing spatial, contrast, and temporal resolution, provides the clinician with detailed characterization of the HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype and assessment of its functional consequences including causes and site of dynamic obstruction, presence and extent of myocardial perfusion abnormalities, and fibrosis. Moreover, MR is key in differentiating HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from "phenocopies"-that is, hearts with similar morphology but profoundly different etiology, such as amyloid or Anderson-Fabry disease. Long term, the incremental information provided by MR is relevant to planning of septal reduction therapies, identification of the early stages of end-stage progression, and stratification of arrhythmic risk. The aim of this review is to depict the increasingly important role of MR imaging in relation to the complexity of HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy , highlighting its role in clinical decision making. PMID:25340269

  10. Treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with verapamil.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, M; Hopf, R; Kober, G; Bussmann, W D; Keller, M; Petersen, Y

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were treated with the calcium inhibitor, verapamil, which was administered in a mean oral dose of 480 mg per day. After an average of 15 months of treatment (4 to 24 months), the QRS amplitude in the electrocardiogram was significantly reduced from 4.2 to 3.8 mV. Heart volume calculated from chest x-ray films in the supine position decreased significantly from 858 to 766 ml per 1.73 m2. In 10 patients, follow-up heart catheterisation showed a decrease in left ventricular muscle mass in 7 patients and a slight increase in 3 patients. Coronary artery diameter decreased in 7 patients, increased in 1, and was unchanged in 2. The reduction in coronary artery diameter is considered to be a consequence of a reduced heart muscle mass. From all available clinical data it is concluded that verapamil treatment is superior to beta-blocker therapy. Images PMID:573129

  11. Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy in 30 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Withers, S. S.; Johnson, E. G.; Culp, W. T. N.; Rodriguez, C. O.; Skorupski, K. A.; Rebhun, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy (pHO) is known to occur in both canine and human cancer patients. While the pathology of pHO is well-described in the dog, very little information exists regarding the true clinical presentation of dogs affected with pHO. The primary objective of this study was to provide a more comprehensive clinical picture of pHO. To this end, we retrospectively identified 30 dogs and recorded data regarding presenting complaints and physical examination (PE) findings on the date of pHO diagnosis. As a secondary objective, any blood test results were also collected from the computerized records. The most common clinical signs included leg swelling, ocular discharge and/or episcleral injection, lameness, and lethargy. The most common haematological and serum biochemical abnormalities included anaemia, neutrophilia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. In addition to presenting a more detailed clinical description of pHO in the dog, these data support the previously described haematological, serum biochemical and PE abnormalities published in individual case reports. PMID:23489591

  12. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis: significance of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Yokoseki, Akiko; Saji, Etsuji; Arakawa, Musashi; Kosaka, Takayuki; Hokari, Mariko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Takeda, Shigeki; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Akazawa, Kouhei; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kawachi, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics, pathogenesis and treatment strategy of hypertrophic pachymeningitis that is associated with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). We retrospectively investigated clinical, radiological, immunological and pathological profiles of 36 patients with immune-mediated or idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, including 17 patients with myeloperoxidase-ANCA, four patients with proteinase 3-ANCA, six patients with other immune-mediated disorders, and nine patients with 'idiopathic' variety. Myeloperoxidase-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis was characterized by: (i) an elderly female predominance; (ii) 82% of patients diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (previously known as Wegener's granulomatosis) according to Watts' algorithm; (iii) a high frequency of patients with lesions limited to the dura mater and upper airways, developing headaches, chronic sinusitis, otitis media or mastoiditis; (iv) a low frequency of patients with the 'classical or generalized form' of granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the entire upper and lower airways and kidney, or progressing to generalized disease, in contrast to proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (v) less severe neurological damage according to the modified Rankin Scale and low disease activity according to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score compared with proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (vi) increased levels of CXCL10, CXCL8 and interleukin 6 in cerebrospinal fluids, and increased numbers of T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, plasma cells and monocytes/macrophages in autopsied or biopsied dura mater with pachymeningitis, suggesting TH1-predominant granulomatous lesions in hypertrophic pachymeningitis, as previously reported in pulmonary or renal lesions of granulomatosis with polyangiitis; and (vii) greater efficacy of combination therapy with prednisolone and

  13. Efficacy of Gastric Balloon Dilatation and/or Retrievable Stent Insertion for Pyloric Spasms after Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy: Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jae Seok; Kim, Se Hyung; Shin, Cheong-il; Joo, Ijin; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang; Baek, Jee Hyun; Kim, Tae Han; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We retrospectively investigated the feasibility and clinical efficacy of balloon dilatation and subsequent retrievable stent insertion, when necessitated, for pyloric spasms after pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG). Materials and Methods Forty-five patients experiencing pyloric spasms after PPG underwent fluoroscopic balloon dilations to alleviate obstructive symptoms due to delayed gastric emptying. Patients showing poor response to balloon dilation underwent subsequent retrievable stent insertion. Safety of the procedures was analyzed, and subjective symptoms and objective signs of pyloric spasms were analyzed and compared before and after treatment. Results Thirty-three patients (73.3%, 33/45) showed good response to balloon dilatation requiring no further treatment (balloon group). Conversely, 12 patients (26.7%, 12/45) showed poor or no response after balloon dilation requiring subsequent stent insertion (stent group). Balloon dilations and/or stent insertions were safely performed in all patients except one patient who suffered a transmural tear after balloon dilatation. In both groups, mean subjective symptom score was significantly improved and mean pyloric canal-to-height of the adjacent vertebral body ratio was significantly increased after the procedures (P <.05). Conclusion Balloon dilation is a safe and effective treatment for patients with pyloric spasms after PPG. In patients refractory to balloon dilations, retrievable stent placement can be a safe alternative tool. PMID:26657405

  14. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  15. Infantile spasms: A prognostic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Mary; Saradakutty, Geetha; Kunju, Puthuvathra Abdul Mohammed; Mohan, Devi; Nair, Muttathu Krishnapanicker Chandrasekharan; George, Babu; Ahamed, Shahanaz M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few papers address the comprehensive prognosis in infantile spasms and look into the seizure profile and psychomotor outcome. Objective: We aimed to follow up children with infantile spasms to study: a) the etiology, demographics, semiology, electroencephalogram (EEG), and radiological pattern; b) seizure control, psychomotor development, and EEG resolution with treatment; c) the effects of various factors on the control of spasms, resolution of EEG changes, and psychomotor development at 3-year follow-up. Materials and Methods: Fifty newly diagnosed cases with a 1-12 month age of onset and who had hypsarrhythmia in their EEG were recruited and 43 were followed up for 3 years. Results: Of the children followed up, 51% were seizure-free and 37% had a normal EEG at the 3-year follow-up. Autistic features were seen in 74% of the children. Only 22.7% among the seizure-free (11.6% of the total) children had normal vision and hearing, speech with narration, writing skills, gross and fine motor development, and no autism or hyperactivity. On multivariate analysis, two factors could predict bad seizure outcome — the occurrence of other seizures in addition to infantile spasms and no response to 28 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). No predictor could be identified for abnormal psychomotor development. Discussion and Conclusion: In our study, we could demonstrate two factors that predict seizure freedom. The cognitive outcome and seizure control in this group of children are comparable to the existing literature. However, the cognitive outcome revealed by our study and the survey of the literature are discouraging. PMID:27293335

  16. Familial spontaneous complete heart block in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, E K; Maron, B J

    1986-01-01

    Two siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy developed spontaneous complete heart block requiring permanent pacemaker implantation at similar ages (29 and 33 years). The clinical, morphological, and haemodynamic expressions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy differed considerably in these two patients. The sister had severe functional limitation due to dyspnoea, pronounced and diffuse left ventricular hypertrophy (maximum ventricular septal thickness of 41 mm), and left ventricular outflow obstruction (peak subaortic gradient of 75 mm Hg under basal conditions). In contrast the brother was symptom free, had only modest left ventricular hypertrophy which was confined to the anterior ventricular septum (maximal thickness of 16 mm), and had no echocardiographic evidence of subaortic obstruction. These dissimilar findings in siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy suggest that the predisposition to develop complete heart block was probably genetically transmitted, although it was unrelated to the phenotypic and clinical expression of the disease. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3707787

  17. Phonoechocardiography and intracardiac phonocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, J. A.; Alvares, R. F.; Reddy, P. S.; Salerni, R.

    1986-01-01

    The salient phonoechocardiographic features of patients having hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) with or without left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradients are reviewed. Intracardiac sound and pressure recordings from high fidelity catheter-tipped micromanometers have documented that the precordial murmur is the summation of both the systolic ejection murmur (SEM) arising from the LVOT, as well as the mitral regurgitant murmur recorded from the left atrium. The intensity of the precordial murmur varies directly with the LVOT gradient, which in turn is determined primarily by the contractility and loading conditions of the left ventricle. Reversed splitting of the second heart sound (S2) with paradoxical respiratory movement is a common finding in HCM, and when present, almost always denotes a significant LVOT gradient. It is due to marked lengthening of the left ventricular ejection time secondary to prolongation of the contraction and relaxation phases of left ventricular systole. The presence of a fourth heart sound (S4) is the rule in HCM when normal sinus rhythm is present, and is a reflection of a forceful left atrial contraction into a hypertrophied noncompliant left ventricle. A third heart sound (S3) is also common in HCM, and often the initial vibrations occur before the 0 point of the apexcardiogram (ACG) and continue giving the auscultatory impression of a diastolic rumble. When associated with a loud S1, which is frequently present, the clinical presentation may mimic mitral stenosis. This is particularly true when the patient has chronic atrial fibrillation. Careful attention to evidence of marked left ventricular hypertrophy as well as the typical echocardiographic findings of HCM preclude this diagnosis. In conclusion, phonoechocardiography is a simple non-invasive technique which almost always makes the definitive diagnosis of HCM. PMID:3774689

  18. Differential Gene Expression in the Oxyntic and Pyloric Mucosa of the Young Pig

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michela; Priori, Davide; Trevisi, Paolo; Bosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The stomach is often considered a single compartment, although morphological differences among specific areas are well known. Oxyntic mucosa (OXY) and pyloric mucosa (PYL, in other species called antral mucosa) are primarily equipped for acid secretion and gastrin production, respectively, while it is not yet clear how the remainder of genes expressed differs in these areas. Here, the differential gene expression between OXY and PYL mucosa was assessed in seven starter pigs. Total RNA expression was analyzed by whole genome Affymetrix Porcine Gene 1.1_ST array strips. Exploratory functional analysis of gene expression values was done by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, comparing OXY and PYL. Normalized enrichment scores (NESs) were calculated for each gene (statistical significance defined when False Discovery Rate % <25 and P-values of NES<0.05). Expression values were selected for a set of 44 genes and the effect of point of gastric sample was tested by analysis of variance with the procedure for repeated measures. In OXY, HYDROGEN ION TRANSMEMBRANE TRANSPORTER ACTIVITY gene set was the most enriched set compared to PYL, including the two genes for H+/K+-ATPase. Pathways related to mitochondrial activity and feeding behavior were also enriched (primarily cholecystokinin receptors and ghrelin). Aquaporin 4 was the top-ranking gene. In PYL, two gene sets were enriched compared with OXY: LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION and LIPID RAFT, a gene set involved in cholesterol-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane. The single most differentially expressed genes were gastrin and secretoglobin 1A, member 1, presumably located in the epithelial line, to inactivate inflammatory mediators. Several genes related to mucosal integrity, immune response, detoxification and epithelium renewal were also enriched in PYL (P<0.05). The data indicate that there is significant differential gene expression between OXY of the young pig and PYL and further functional studies are needed to confirm their

  19. Isolation and characterization of trypsin from pyloric caeca of Monterey sardine Sardinops sagax caerulea.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Yáñez, Francisco Javier; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; García-Carreño, Fernando Luis; Navarrete-Del Toro, María de Los Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin from pyloric caeca of Monterey sardine was purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel filtration, affinity and ionic exchange chromatography. Fraction 102, obtained from ionic exchange chromatography, generated one band in sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. The molecular mass of the isolated trypsin was 25 kDa and showed esterase-specific activity on Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) that was 4.5 times greater than amidase-specific activity on N-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide. The purified enzyme was partially inhibited by the serine-protease phenyl-methyl-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibitor and fully inhibited by the soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) and benzamidine, but was not inhibited by the metallo-protease inactivator EDTA or the chymotrypsin inhibitor tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl-ketone. The optimum pH for activity was 8.0 and maximum stability was observed between pH 7 and 8. A marked loss in stability was observed below pH 4 and above pH 11. Activity was optimum at 50 degrees C and lost activity at higher temperatures. The kinetic trypsin constants K(m) and k(cat) were 0.051 mM and 2.12 s(-1), respectively, while the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) was 41 s(-1) mM(-1). General characteristics of the Monterey sardine trypsin resemble those of trypsins from other fish, especially trypsins from the anchovy Engraulis japonica and Engraulis encrasicholus and the sardine Sardinops melanostica. PMID:15621514

  20. Infantile Colic: Recognition and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy D; Cocker, Katherine; Chang, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Infantile colic is a benign process in which an infant has paroxysms of inconsolable crying for more than three hours per day, more than three days per week, for longer than three weeks. It affects approximately 10% to 40% of infants worldwide and peaks at around six weeks of age, with symptoms resolving by three to six months of age. The incidence is equal between sexes, and there is no correlation with type of feeding (breast vs. bottle), gestational age, or socioeconomic status. The cause of infantile colic is not known; proposed causes include alterations in fecal microflora, intolerance to cow's milk protein or lactose, gastrointestinal immaturity or inflammation, increased serotonin secretion, poor feeding technique, and maternal smoking or nicotine replacement therapy. Colic is a diagnosis of exclusion after a detailed history and physical examination have ruled out concerning causes. Parental support and reassurance are key components of the management of colic. Simethicone and proton pump inhibitors are ineffective for the treatment of colic, and dicyclomine is contraindicated. Treatment options for breastfed infants include the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri (strain DSM 17938) and reducing maternal dietary allergen intake. Switching to a hydrolyzed formula is an option for formula-fed infants. Evidence does not support chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation, infant massage, swaddling, acupuncture, or herbal supplements. PMID:26447441

  1. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  2. Morphological and cytochemical studies on the secretory granules of the pyloric caeca of the starfish, Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Hori, S H; Tanahashi, K; Matsuoka, N

    1977-02-01

    A fraction rich in secretory granules was prepared from the pyloric caeca of Asterias amurensis by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The freshly prepared fraction exhibited no casein-hydrolyzing activity, but showed nine times as much specific activity as that of tissue homogenates after incubation at 37 degrees C for thirty minutes. Electron microscopy showed that the secretory granules were membrane-bound granules measuring 0.5-2.0 mu in diameter and contained dense and/or light amorphous substances. PMID:836911

  3. [Left ventricular hypertrophy in the cat - "when hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not hypertrophic cardiomyopathy"].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Wess, G

    2010-07-01

    According to WHO classification hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary genetic cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographically HCM is characterized by symmetric, asymmetric or focal left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) without recognizable underlying physical cause. However, echocardiographically HCM in cats may not be distinguishable from other causes of a thick appearing left ventricle. Hypovolemia can look like a hypertrophied ventricle but is basically only pseudohypertrophic. Well recognized and logical physical causes of LVH include systemic hypertension and outflow obstruction. LVH similar to HCM may also be found in feline hyperthyroidism. The context of the disease helps to differentiate these physical / physiological causes of LVH. Difficult to distinguish from HCM, particularly when based on a snapshot of a single echocardiographic exam, are myocarditis and . Only the clinical and echocardiographic course allow a reasonably confident etiological diagnosis and the differentiation between HCM and secondary LVH. PMID:20582898

  4. Early Infantile Autism and Autistic Psychopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Krevelen, D. Arn

    1971-01-01

    The paper tries to assign to autistic psychopathy a definite place in psychiatric nosology and to delineate sharply the differences between the essential characteristics of it and of early infantile autism. (Author)

  5. Genetics Home Reference: infantile systemic hyalinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with infantile systemic hyalinosis have severe physical limitations, mental development is typically normal. Affected individuals often ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 ...

  6. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy presenting as unilateral cellulitis with successful treatment using pamidronate disodium.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Sebastian G; Emer, Jason J; Burnett, Mark E; Gordon, Marsha

    2012-09-01

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy is a paraneoplastic syndrome seen in patients with lung cancer. This condition is characterized by the presence of digital clubbing, periosteal thickening, synovial thickening, and severe pain of the affected joints. Other syndromes exhibiting clubbing may or may not have underlying diseases causing their manifestation. An example is primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, or pachydermoperiostosis. While clubbing makes up part of the clinical picture in both hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, the latter has no underlying disease associations. Rather, primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is familial, idiopathic, and has a chronic course often beginning during puberty in males. Secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is an acquired form of clubbing that is classically associated with lung disease. However, it has also been associated with diseases of the heart, liver, and intestines. In the setting of pulmonary malignancy, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is known as hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy has a distinct constellation of clinical findings that includes intractable pain often refractory to treatments other than resolution of the underlying disease process. The authors herein report a case of hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy masquerading as recurrent lower extremity cellulitis with chronic hand and foot pain in the setting of pulmonary malignancy that responded dramatically to intravenous pamidronate disodium (a bisphosphonate). Given the rarity of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with lung cancer and the difficulty with pain management in such circumstances, the authors present the following case in which pain was mitigated by treatment with bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:23050033

  7. Red blood cell sodium heteroexchange in familial primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Semplicini, A; Mozzato, M G; Bongiovi, S; Marzola, M; Macor, F; Ceolotto, G; Serena, L; Pessina, A C

    1994-03-01

    The hallmark of primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an inappropriate myocardial hypertrophy, linked to myofibril disarray of the left ventricle. Its variable clinical expression may be due to genetic heterogeneity and variable penetrance. Since we have recently shown that abnormalities of cation transport in the erythrocytes are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in essential hypertensives and insulin-dependent diabetics, we have investigated the relationship between cardiac anatomy and function and red cell Li+/Na+ and Na+/H+ exchange in 33 relatives of a patient who died of cardiac failure and was found to have a primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at autopsy. According to echocardiographic examination, 11 members of the family also had a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a family distribution compatible with autosomal dominant genetic transmission and variable penetrance. Red cell Li+/Na+ and Na+/H+ exchange were not significantly different in the affected members as compared to the unaffected, but in the former, after correction for potentially confounding variables, interventricular septum thickness was positively correlated to Na+/H+ exchange and diastolic function (Area E/Area A and Vmax E/Vmax A) negatively correlated to Li+/Na+ exchange. Since a generalized overactivity of the cell membrane Na+/H+ exchange, reflected by increased Na+/H+ and Li+/Na+ exchanges in the red cells, could favour cellular growth and diastolic dysfunction, our data suggest that abnormalities of cell membrane cation transport could play a role in the phenotypic expression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:8013504

  8. Difficulty of diagnosing infected hypertrophic pseudarthrosis by radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjipavlou, A.; Lisbona, R.; Rosenthall, L.

    1983-02-01

    Hypertrophic pseudarthrosis was studied with /sup 99m/Tc MDP and /sup 67/Ga citrate in 11 patients. Two of the 11 pseudarthroses were complicated by infection. A high concentration of both radiopharmaceuticals was obtained at all 11 sites and their distribution patterns were identical. It was therefore impossible to distinguish the infected from the noninfected pseudarthroses by using /sup 67/Ga.

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  11. A Survey of Infantile Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Alastair G.; Tuxford, Ann F.; Heyworth, Barrie

    1970-01-01

    In 1967 we admitted 339 cases of infantile gastroenteritis; one-third of these were dehydrated, and in this group the commonest biochemical abnormality found was hypernatraemia, sometimes with metabolic acidosis. A higher incidence of dehydration was found in the patients who had received oral glucose fluids before admission. Enteropathic Escherichia coli were isolated from the faeces of 16% of the cases. Associated infections, especially of the respiratory tract, were common. Treatment was aimed at the restoration of fluid and electrolyte balance. Usually this was achieved with oral fluids, though intravenous fluids were used in the most severely dehydrated cases. Recovery was complete in 320 cases and a further 14 cases were discharged as carriers of enteropathic E. coli. There were five deaths (1·5%) in the series; three occurred immediately after admission. PMID:4913493

  12. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  13. Neurological complications of infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Reeves, J D; Wilson, W B; Wesenberg, R L

    1977-11-01

    Seven cases of infantile osteopetrosis are presented. Five of these were available for detailed clinical examination and 2 for retrospective review, including autopsy slides. Neurological deficits in these patients are reviewed. Involvement of the central nervous system parenchyma was suggested by observations of delayed development, ocular abnormalities, and reflex changes as well as radiographic and autopsy findings. Cerebral atrophy was present in several of our patients as well as some reported in the literature and may account for the ventricular enlargement found in many of these patients. Though hydrocephalus may be present, it is unclear that this is frequent or that it can occur without antecedent intracranial hemorrhage. The large head size is not accounted for by calvarial thickening or by hydrocephalus. Despite our patients' small stature, pituitary function appeared to be normal. Surgical decompression may stabilize cranial nerve function, particularly when the optic nerves are involved. PMID:617576

  14. Considerations for the Treatment of Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Infantile Batten Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The infantile form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ie, infantile Batten disease) is the most rapidly progressing type and is caused by an inherited deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1. The absence of enzyme activity leads to progressive accumulation of autofluorescent material in many cell types, particularly neurons of the central nervous system. Clinical signs of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis appear between 6 months and 1 year of age and include vision loss, cognitive decline, motor deficits, seizures, and premature death, typically by 3 to 5 years of age. There is currently no effective treatment. However, preclinical experiments in the murine model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis have shown that gene therapy, enzyme replacement, stem cell transplantation, and small molecule drugs, alone or in combination, can significantly slow disease progression. A more thorough understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis will identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:24014510

  15. Prolonged esophagitis after primary dysfunction of the pyloric sphincter in the rat and therapeutic potential of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Petrovic, Igor; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Sever, Marko; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Zoricic, Ivan; Mise, Sandro; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Babel, Jaksa; Ilic, Spomenko; Vuksic, Tihomir; Jelic, Ivan; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2007-05-01

    Seven or fourteen days or twelve months after suturing one tube into the pyloric sphincter (removed by peristalsis by the seventh day), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis with a constantly lowered pressure not only in the pyloric, but also in the lower esophageal sphincter and a failure of both sphincters. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) is given intraperitoneally once a day (10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg, last application 24 h before assessment), or continuously in drinking water at 0.16 microg/ml, 0.16 ng/ml (12 ml/rat per day), or directly into the stomach 5 min before pressure assessment (a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through an esophageal or duodenal incision). This treatment alleviates i) the esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or interval), ii) the pressure in the pyloric sphincter, and iii) the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (cmH2O). In the normal rats it increases lower esophageal sphincter pressure, but decreases the pyloric sphincter pressure. Ranitidine, given using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) does not have an effect in either rats with esophagitis or in normal rats. PMID:17452811

  16. The Influence of Antral Ulcers on Intramural Gastric Nerve Projections Supplying the Pyloric Sphincter in the Pig (Sus scrofa domestica)—Neuronal Tracing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zalecki, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric ulcerations in the region of antrum pylori represent a serious medical problem in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers can influence the intrinsic descending nerve supply to the pyloric sphincter. The pyloric function is precisely regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic nerves. Impaired neural regulation could result in pyloric sphincter dysfunction and gastric emptying malfunction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of gastric antral ulcerations on the density and distribution of intramural gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter in pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings The experiment was performed on 2 groups of pigs: healthy gilts (n=6) and gilts with experimentally induced peptic ulcers in the region of antrum pylori (n=6). Gastric neurons supplying pyloric sphincter were labeled using the retrograde neuronal tracing technique (20μl of Fast Blue tracer injected into the pyloric sphincter muscle). After a week survival period the animals were sacrificed and the stomachs were collected. Then, the stomach wall was cross-cut into 0.5cm thick sections taken in specified intervals (section I - 1.5cm; section II - 3.5cm; section III - 5.5cm; section IV – 7.5cm) starting from the sphincter. Consecutive microscopic slices prepared from each section were analyzed under fluorescent microscope to count traced neurons. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. The total number of FB-positive perikarya observed within all studied sections significantly decreased from 903.3 ± 130.7 in control to 243.8 ± 67.3 in experimental animals. In healthy pigs 76.1 ± 6.7% of labeled neurons were observed within the section I, 23.53 ± 6.5% in section II and only occasional cells in section III. In experimental animals, as many as 93.8 ± 2.1% of labeled cells were observed within the section I and only 6.2 ± 2.2% in section II, while section III was devoid of such neurons. There were no traced perikarya in section IV

  17. Analysis of hypertrophic and normal scar gene expression with cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tsou, R; Cole, J K; Nathens, A B; Isik, F F; Heimbach, D M; Engrav, L H; Gibran, N S

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one form of abnormal wound healing. Previous studies have suggested that hypertrophic scar formation results from altered gene expression of extracellular matrix molecules. A broadscale evaluation of gene expression in hypertrophic scars has not been reported. To better understand abnormalities in hypertrophic scar gene expression, we compared messenger RNA expression in hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin with the use of complementary (c)DNA microarrays. Total RNA was extracted from freshly excised human hypertrophic scars, normal scars, or uninjured skin and reverse transcribed into cDNA with the incorporation of [33P] deoxycytidine triphosphate. The resulting radioactive cDNA probes were hybridized onto cDNA microarrays of 4000 genes. Hybridization signals were normalized and analyzed. In the comparison of tissue samples, mean intensities were calculated for each gene within each group (hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin). Ratios of the mean intensities of hypertrophic scars to normal scars, hypertrophic scars to uninjured skin, and normal scars to uninjured skin were generated. A ratio that was greater than 1 indicated upregulation of any particular gene and a ratio that was less than 1 indicated downregulation of any particular gene. Our data indicated that 142 genes were overexpressed and 50 genes were underexpressed in normal scars compared with uninjured skin, 107 genes were overexpressed and 71 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with uninjured skin, and 44 genes were overexpressed and 124 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with normal scars. Our analysis of collagen, growth factor, and metalloproteinase gene expression confirmed that our molecular data were consistent with published biochemical and clinical observations of normal scars and hypertrophic scars. cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for the investigation of differential gene expression in

  18. Rapidly Progressive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in an Infant with Noonan syndrome with multiple Lentigines. Palliative Treatment with a Rapamycin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Lauriol, Jessica; Thul, Josef; Behnke-Hall, Kachina; Logeswaran, Tushiha; Schänzer, Anne; Böğürcü, Nuray; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; von Gerlach, Susanne; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Schranz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) frequently manifests with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recently, it was demonstrated that mTOR inhibition reverses HCM in NSML mice. We report for the first time on the effects of treatment with a rapamycin analog in an infant with LS and a malignant form of HCM. In the boy, progressive HCM was diagnosed during the first week of life and diagnosis of NSML was established at age 20 weeks by showing a heterozygous Q510E mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Immunoblotting with antibodies against pERK, pAkt, and pS6RP in fibroblasts demonstrated reduced RAS/MAPK and enhanced Akt/mTOR pathway activities. Because of the patient’s critical condition, everolimus therapy was started at age 24 weeks and continued until heart transplantation at age 36 weeks. Prior to surgery, heart failure improved from NYHA stage IV to II and brain natriuretic peptide values decreased from 9600 to <1000 pg/ml, but no reversal of cardiac hypertrophy was observed. Examination of the explanted heart revealed severe hypertrophy and myofiber disarray with extensive perivascular fibrosis. These findings provide evidence that Akt/mTOR activity is enhanced in NSML with HCM and suggest that rapamycin treatment could be principally feasible for infantile NSML. But the preliminary experiences made in this single patient indicate that therapy should start early to prevent irreversible cardiac remodelling. PMID:25708222

  19. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  20. Desmoplastic infantile and non-infantile ganglioglioma. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gelabert-Gonzalez, Miguel; Serramito-García, Ramón; Arcos-Algaba, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    Desmoplastic gangliogliomas (DIG) are rare primary neoplasms that comprise 0.5-1.0% of all intracranial tumors. Clinically, there are two forms of DIG, the infantile and the non-infantile. These tumors invariably arise in the supratentorial region and commonly involve more than one lobe, preferentially the temporal and frontal. On neuroimaging are seen as large hypodense cystic masses with a solid isodense or slightly hyperdense superficial portion. The histologic diagnosis is characterized by the presence of three different cell lines: astrocytic, neuronal, and primitive neuroectodermal marker sites, which were demonstrable. The treatment of choice is radical surgical excision, and if this is done, achieved complete healing of the patient does not require additional treatment. A literature review of DIG was compiled through Medline/Ovid using the keywords "desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma", "desmoplastic non-infantile ganglioglioma" covering the years 1984-2009. We present a review of a total of 113 cases of infantile (94) and non-infantile gangliogliomas (19) published to date, examining the clinical, radiologic, surgical, and pathological aspects, as well as the outcome. Desmoplastic gangliogliomas represent a rare tumor group with two well-defined age groups, the children and non-children. Desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas are the most common and occur in children below 5 years of age, and the large majority of them present within the first year of life. Surgery is the treatment of choice and no complementary treatment is needed in cases of complete tumor resection. PMID:21246390

  1. Effects of Noscarna™ on hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model: histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Hiep, Tran Tuan; Han, Sang Duk; Kim, Bo Gyun; Kang, Min Kyung; Do, Eui Seon; Jun, Joon Ho; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Sohn, Young Taek; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of silicone-based gel on the healing of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model. After 4-week application of silicone-based gel containing allantoin, dexpanthenol and heparin (Noscarna™) to scars in a rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scarring, significant improvements in hypertrophic scar healing and a great loss of skin pigment were observed compared to the non-treated control, base or silicone control-treated scars. Furthermore, histological analysis of Noscarna™-treated scars revealed a significant reduction in scar elevation index (SEI), anterior skin and epithelial thicknesses, inflammatory cells, vessels, collagen disorganization and fibroblasts compared to all control hypertrophic scars. Furthermore, Noscarna™ showed more favorable effects on hypertrophic scars than a commercial product, Contractubex®. Therefore, these results clearly demonstrated that the newly developed silicone-based gel, Noscarna™, could be a promising formulation as an effective therapeutic agent for hypertrophic scars. PMID:23212642

  2. The effects of restraint on uptake of radioactive sulfate in the salivary and gastric secretions of rats with pyloric ligation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chayvialle, J. A.; Lambert, R.; Ruet, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of restraint on the amount of nondialysable radioactive sulfate in the gastric wall and the gastric juice and saliva were investigated. It was found that restraint provokes a significant decrease in salivary radioactive sulfate. This, in turn, is responsible for the decrease of sulfate in the gastric contents observed under these conditions in rats with pyloric ligation. Esophageal ligation associated with this prevents passage of saliva and lowers the amount of radioactive sulfate in the gastric juice. Restraint causes then an increase in the amount of sulfate in the gastric juice, the value observed being very much lower than that of rats with a free esophagus. At the level of the gastric wall, the change observed during restraint does not reach a significant threshold.

  3. Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with a renal adenoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Lenz, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic osteopathy is a hyperostotic syndrome of the appendicular skeleton that is most commonly associated with intrathoracic neoplasia or inflammation. The condition is rarely associated with intra-abdominal lesions. The majority of cases have occurred in dogs and human beings, with fewer cases reported in cats, horses, and other species. A 15-year-old male neutered Domestic Shorthair cat presented for swollen limbs and difficulty in ambulation. Radiographs and gross postmortem revealed severe periosteal hyperostosis of the diaphysis and metaphysis of all 4 limbs, including the humerus, radius, ulna, carpi, metacarpi, femur, tibia, tarsi, metatarsi, and phalanges. The axial skeleton was spared. Hyperostotic lesions were characterized microscopically by lamellar bony trabeculae separated by adipocytes and scant hematopoietic tissue. In several areas, fibrovascular connective tissue, woven bone, and islands of cartilage were also present. A 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm perirenal neoplasm compressed the left kidney and adrenal gland. This mass consisted of well-differentiated tubules of cuboidal epithelial cells and was most consistent with a renal tubular adenoma, because mitotic figures were rare, and no distant metastases were found. Thoracic pathology was absent. Hyperostosis was consistent with hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to the renal adenoma. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic osteopathy is uncertain, but predominant theories point to increased peripheral circulation and angiogenesis as a key initiating event. Recent literature highlights the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in the human condition. The mechanism by which this renal adenoma caused hypertrophic osteopathy is unknown. PMID:21217054

  4. Hypertrophic neuropathy in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Sole, Guilhem; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Taieb, Alain

    2016-06-01

    RASopathies comprise several genetic syndromes with mainly cardio-facial-cutaneous manifestations. We report a patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) due to a PTPN11 (p.Thr468Met) mutation associated with hypertrophic neuropathy of lumbar plexus in an adult woman, initially referred for neuropathic pain. Differential diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and other RASopathies is difficult without molecular testing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26952712

  5. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism.

    PubMed

    Kellermair, Joerg; Kammler, Juergen; Laubichler, Peter; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder associated with arterial/venous thrombosis. Cardiac manifestations of APS include valve stenosis/insufficiency, coronary artery disease and myocardial dysfunction presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy. In the following report, we present the case of a man with primary APS, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism-a combination that has not yet been reported in the literature. PMID:27048398

  6. Monomelic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy secondary to aortic prosthesis infection.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M V; Antonio del Olmo, J; Orellana, C; Mestres, C A; Mũnoz-Gómez, J

    1995-01-01

    We describe a case of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA), exclusively located in the left lower leg and secondary to vascular prosthesis infection. Four years before, the patient underwent aortofemoral bifurcation grafting because of a ruptured aortic aneurysm. The investigations revealed prosthesis infection by Pseudomona aeruginosa and Bacteroides thetaiotamicron. The onset of HOA in a patient with a vascular prosthesis can help to achieve an early diagnosis of graft infection. The literature on this uncommon association is reviewed. PMID:7699670

  7. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Akaishi, Satoshi; Koike, Sachiko; Dohi, Teruyuki; Kobe, Kyoko; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cutaneous scars such as keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are characterized by a diffuse redness that is caused by the overgrowth of capillary vessels due to chronic inflammation. Our group has been using long-pulsed, 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in noncontact mode with low fluence and a submillisecond pulse duration to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars since 2006 with satisfactory results. The present study examined the efficacy of this approach in 22 Japanese patients with keloids (n = 16) or hypertrophic scars (n = 6) who were treated every 3 to 4 weeks. Treatment settings were as follows: 5 mm spot size diameter; 14 J/cm2 energy density; 300 μs exposure time per pulse; and 10 Hz repetition rate. The responses of the pathological scars to the treatment were assessed by measuring their erythema, hypertrophy, hardness, itching, and pain or tenderness. Moreover, skin samples from 3 volunteer patients were subjected to histological evaluation and 5 patients underwent thermography during therapy. The average total scar assessment score dropped from 9.86 to 6.34. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Elastica Masson-Goldner staining showed that laser treatment structurally changed the tissue collagen. This influence reached a depth of 0.5 to 1 mm. Electron microscopy revealed plasma protein leakage, proteoglycan particles, and a change in the collagen fiber fascicles. Further analyses revealed that noncontact mode Nd:YAG laser treatment is highly effective for keloids and hypertrophic scars regardless of patient age, the origin and multiplicity of scarring, the location of the scar(s), or the tension on the scar. PMID:22259645

  8. Pregnancy related complications in women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thaman, R; Varnava, A; Hamid, M S; Firoozi, S; Sachdev, B; Condon, M; Gimeno, J R; Murphy, R; Elliott, P M; McKenna, W J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether pregnancy is well tolerated in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Setting: Referral clinic. Design: The study cohort comprised 127 consecutively referred women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Forty (31.5%) underwent clinical evaluation before pregnancy. The remaining 87 (68.5%) were referred after their first pregnancy. All underwent history, examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Pregnancy related symptoms and complications were determined by questionnaire and review of medical and obstetric records where available. Results: There were 271 pregnancies in total. Thirty six (28.3%) women reported cardiac symptoms in pregnancy. Over 90% of these women had been symptomatic before pregnancy. Symptoms deteriorated during pregnancy in fewer than 10%. Of the 36 women with symptoms during pregnancy, 30 had further pregnancies. Symptoms reoccurred in 18 (60%); symptomatic deterioration was not reported. Heart failure occurred postnatally in two women (1.6%). No complications were reported in 19 (15%) women who underwent general anaesthesia and in 22 (17.4%) women who received epidural anaesthesia, three of whom had a significant left ventricular outflow tract gradient at diagnosis after pregnancy. Three unexplained intrauterine deaths occurred in women taking cardiac medication throughout pregnancy. No echocardiographic or clinical feature was a useful indicator of pregnancy related complications. Conclusions: Most women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tolerate pregnancy well. However, rare complications can occur and therefore planned delivery and fetal monitoring are still required for some patients. PMID:12807849

  9. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: vectorcardiographic findings in echocardiographically unaffected relative.

    PubMed Central

    Loperfido, F; Fiorilli, R; Digaetano, A; Di Gennaro, M; Santarelli, P; Bellocci, F; Coppola, E; Zecchi, P

    1982-01-01

    The electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic (Frank system) features of the first degree relatives of subjects with documented familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were analysed. A total of nine affected members and 29 relatives were examined in four families. THe subjects were considered to be affected when the septal to free posterior wall thickness ratio exceeded 1.3 at M-mode echocardiography. Four relatives had asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Among 25 relatives without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, two over 20 years and 10 under 20 years of age showed increased voltage of QRS anterior forces (Qz amplitude greater than 0.80 mV) on the orthogonal electrocardiogram. The vectorcardiographic data of the relatives under 20 years of age without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy (18 subjects) were compared with those of 38 normal control subjects of comparable age range. The young relatives without disproportionate septal hypertrophy had significantly greater Qz amplitude and Q/Rz ratio than the normal control subjects. In contrast, the echocardiographic data were not significantly different. We suggest that the electrocardiographic finding of abnormal anterior forces in one or more first degree relatives of subjects with documented hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may constitute a valuable aid in ascertaining the genetic transmission of the disease and in recognising affected members without echocardiographic evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:7200794

  10. A nude mouse model of hypertrophic scar shows morphologic and histologic characteristics of human hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Momtazi, Moein; Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Anderson, Colin C; Honardoust, Dariush; Goekjian, Serge; Tredget, Edward E

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) is a fibroproliferative disorder that occurs following deep dermal injury. Lack of a relevant animal model is one barrier toward better understanding its pathophysiology. Our objective is to demonstrate that grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in survival of engrafted human skin and murine scars that are morphologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically consistent with human HSc. Twenty nude mice were xenografted with split-thickness human skin. Animals were euthanized at 30, 60, 120, and 180 days postoperatively. Eighteen controls were autografted with full-thickness nude mouse skin and euthanized at 30 and 60 days postoperatively. Scar biopsies were harvested at each time point. Blinded scar assessment was performed using a modified Manchester Scar Scale. Histologic analysis included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue, and picrosirius red staining. Immunohistochemistry included anti-human human leukocyte antigen-ABC, α-smooth muscle actin, decorin, and biglycan staining. Xenografted mice developed red, shiny, elevated scars similar to human HSc and supported by blinded scar assessment. Autograft controls appeared morphologically and histologically similar to normal skin. Xenografts survived up to 180 days and showed increased thickness, loss of hair follicles, adnexal structures and rete pegs, hypercellularity, whorled collagen fibers parallel to the surface, myofibroblasts, decreased decorin and increased biglycan expression, and increased mast cell density. Grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in persistent scars that show morphologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical consistency with human HSc. Therefore, this model provides a promising technique to study HSc formation and to test novel treatment options. PMID:23126488

  11. Radiological features of infantile glioblastoma and desmoplastic infantile tumors: British Columbia's Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Bader, Ahmad; Heran, Manraj; Dunham, Christopher; Steinbok, Paul

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Two of the more common infantile brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and desmoplastic infantile tumors (DITs), can be difficult to distinguish on MRI. Both tumors occur in the supratentorial compartment and both have solid and cystic components. Differentiating between the 2 on MRI studies could assist the surgeon in discussions with family and child management. The authors report on their institutional experience with both tumors, focusing on radio-graphic features, especially the diffusion studies, which might be useful in distinguishing between infantile GBM and DIT. METHODS A retrospective review was undertaken of all infantile brain tumors treated at British Columbia's Children's Hospital between 1982 and 2012, and cases of GBM and DIT were recorded. Only cases that had imaging were included in the study. A literature review was completed to identify reported cases of infantile GBM and DIT. Only reports that described or included radiological studies (particularly MRI) of the tumors were included. Certain radiographic features of the tumors were reviewed, including location, size, consistency, pattern of enhancement, and features on MR diffusion studies. RESULTS Of 70 cases of infantile brain tumors, 2 GBM cases and 3 DIT cases (all 3 of which were desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas [DIGs]) met the inclusion criteria. The radiological studies obtained in all 5 cases were reviewed by a neuroradiologist. All 5 patients had supratentorial tumors with cystic-solid consistency. Diffusion MRI studies showed restricted diffusion in the 2 GBM cases, but no evidence of restricted diffusion in the DIG tumors. The GBM tumors were heterogeneously enhancing, and the DIG tumors showed avid and homogeneous enhancement. The literature review revealed 29 cases of infantile GBM and 32 cases of DIG/DIT that met the inclusion criteria. The tumors were large in both groups. The tumors were cystic-solid in consistency in 10 of 30 (33%) of GBM cases and 28 of 32

  12. Infantile Amnesia: Forgotten but Not Gone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Stella; Callaghan, Bridget L.; Richardson, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Unlike adult memories that can be remembered for many years, memories that are formed early in life are more fragile and susceptible to being forgotten (a phenomenon known as "infantile" or "childhood" amnesia). Nonetheless, decades of research in both humans and nonhuman animals demonstrate the importance of early life…

  13. Hirschsprung's disease with infantile nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepak; Bagga, Arvind; Tandon, Radhika; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar

    2015-01-01

    The case of a 3-year-old boy diagnosed to have Hirschsprung's disease with infantile nephropathic cystinosis is being reported. Both these conditions are etiologically and genetically different as per current understanding and available information. The association is incidental and has not reported before in the English literature. PMID:26166990

  14. Malassezia furfur in infantile seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tollesson, A; Frithz, A; Stenlund, K

    1997-01-01

    Malassezia furfur is important in the pathogenesis of a number of dermatologic diseases including seborrheic dermatitis in adults. It has also recently been suggested that M. furfur might be the etiologic agent in infantile seborrheic dermatitis (ISD). We studied the presence of M. furfur in 21 children with the clinical diagnosis of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. Laboratory analyses showed aberrant patterns of essential fatty acids (EFA) in serum characterized by elevated levels of 18:1w9 and 20:2w6. Samples for M. furfur were taken from the foreheads and chests of children with infantile seborrheic dermatitis at the time of diagnosis, directly after treatment to complete healing, and after 1 year with no signs of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. All the patients were treated topically with borage oil containing 25% gammalinolenic acid (GLA). No reduced growth of M. furfur was seen on contact plates prepared with borage oil. The growth of M. furfur seems not to be related to the clinical symptoms in ISD. PMID:9436835

  15. Role of verapamil in preventing and treating hypertrophic scars and keloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Mao, Yu; Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhengyong; Chen, Junjie; Cen, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Keloid and hypertrophic scars are difficult to manage and remain a therapeutic challenge. Verapamil has shown a great potential in the management of keloid and hypertrophic scars. Comparing with conventional corticosteroid injections, verapamil could improve the appearance of keloid and hypertrophic scars, and is associated with a lower incidence of adverse effects. Is verapamil an effective alternative modality in the prevention and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars? The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of verapamil in preventing and treating keloid and hypertrophic scars. Searches were conducted in Medline, EMbase and Cochrane databases from 1974 to January 2015. The selection of articles was limited to human subjects. Five randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cluster-randomised trials or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing the efficacy of verapamil with conventional treatments were identified. The results showed that verapamil could improve keloid and hypertrophic scars, and was not significantly different from conventional corticosteroid injections. Few adverse effects were observed. However, this result should be considered carefully, as most of the included studies have a high risk of bias because of issues with randomization, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcomes and selective reporting. In conclusion, verapamil could act as an effective alternative modality in the prevention and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars. More high-quality, multiple-centre, large-sample (RCTs) are required to define the role of verapamil in preventing and treating keloid and hypertrophic scars. PMID:25968157

  16. Thallium-201 imaging in a patient with mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakasugi, S.; Shibata, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Fudemoto, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Nakano, S.

    1988-10-01

    Findings specific to mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were obtained in a patient by means of /sup 201/Tl planar myocardial scintigraphy. Namely, a myocardial band-like image dividing the left ventricle into two chambers was clearly shown. This was identified as hypertrophic muscle with sphincter-like muscular stenosis at the mid portion of the left ventricle.

  17. The Outcome of Infantile Onset Pompe Disease in South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moravej, Hossein; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Paran, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infantile Onset Pompe Disease (IOPD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder. It is associated with cardiomegaly, hypotonia, paresis, and death in the first year of life. Since 2006, following the use of Alglucosidase alfa as Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT), the patients’ survival is improved to a noticeable extent. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the outcome of IOPD patients in South of Iran and the degree of responsiveness to ERT. Patients and Methods: All patients who were diagnosed with IOPD on the bases of clinical symptoms, and enzyme assay on dried blood spot, were included in the study; and were followed up regarding cardiac function, locomotor activity, and cognition. Results: Six patients with IOPD were identified. All these six patients suffered from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Four (67%) of them also had generalized hypotonia. Three patients expired during the first weeks due to severe respiratory infection. One of them also got involved with Acute Cardiopulmonary Failure while receiving the fifth dose of ERT; and expired. However, the remaining two patients had a significant improvement after the maximum of 117 weeks of following up both cardiac and locomotor findings. These two patients were the same patients who showed cardiac symptoms from the beginning but did not have generalized hypotonia. Conclusions: Although ERT has a significant effect on enhancing the survival of IOPD patients, it should be associated with meticulous heart-respiratory cares during the first months of treatment and preventing infection especially nosocomial infections. PMID:26848380

  18. A Novel Triple Medicine Combination Injection for the Resolution of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars remain one of the more difficult treatment concerns for clinicians. A variety of therapies have been used in the past with moderate success. On occasion, combination therapy has been used to treat these lesion, in an attempt to lessen the symptoms of pain and pruritus that often accompanies keloids and hypertrophic scars, as well as treating the actual lesions themselves. A novel triple combination injection process is introduced here in an attempt to further reduce the signs and symptoms of these lesions. The combination includes 5-fluoruracil, triamcinolone acetonide, and hyaluronidase. All three work in concert to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars, and this is the first work at looking at these medicines given together, at the same time, in a series of recalcitrant keloids and hypertrophic scars. The positive results warrant further investigation and hope for those with keloids and hypertrophic scars. PMID:25489380

  19. Pseudoidiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis in a patient with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Pandi, A S; Kronik, G

    1987-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman with a large pericardial effusion and tamponade presented with signs of IHSS including a grade 4/6 apical systolic murmur, severe SAM, early systolic aortic valve closure and a small hypercontractile left ventricle but at most borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. Following pericardiocentesis, the clinical and echocardiographic signs of subvalvular obstruction resolved completely. One year later the patient died of bronchial carcinoma and no evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was found at autopsy. Pericardial tamponade should be added to the list of possible causes of dynamic subvalvular obstruction in a structurally normal heart. PMID:3829760

  20. Sports and Exercise in Athletes with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Craig; Day, Sharlene M; Saberi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Current guidelines restrict the participation of patients with HCM in competitive sports, limiting the health benefits of exercise. However, many individuals with HCM have safely participated in sports, with a low incidence of SCD. Improved stratification of patients and desired activity may allow most individuals with HCM to engage in physical activity safely. Therefore, physicians should create an individualized approach in guiding each patient with HCM eager to enjoy the benefits of physical activity in a safe manner. PMID:26100424

  1. Giant infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver. Scintigraphic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Park, C H; Hwang, H S; Hong, J; Pak, M S

    1996-04-01

    Infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver is benign mesenchymal tumor composed of anastomosing vascular channels lined with plump endothelial cells. It is a congenital lesion noted at birth or during the first 6 months of life. The authors report a large infantile hemangioendothelioma that was imaged with anatomical modalities and Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy. An early "blush" on Tc-99m RBC hepatic scintigraphy is a diagnostic feature of infantile hemangioendothelioma. PMID:8925610

  2. Low-dose propranolol for infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Swee T; Itinteang, Tinte; Leadbitter, Philip

    2011-03-01

    In 2008, propranolol was serendipitously observed to cause accelerated involution of infantile haemangioma. However, the mechanism by which it causes this dramatic effect is unknown, the dosage empirical and the optimal duration of treatment unexplored. This study determines the minimal dosage and duration of propranolol treatment to achieve accelerated involution of problematic infantile haemangioma. Consecutive patients with problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma treated with propranolol were culled from our prospective vascular anomalies database. The patients were initially managed as inpatients and commenced on propranolol at 0.25 mg kg(-1) twice daily, and closely monitored. The dosage was increased to 0.5 mg kg(-1) twice daily after 24 h, if there was no cardiovascular or metabolic side effect. The dosage was increased further by 0.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) until a visible effect was noticed or up to a maximum of 2 mg kg(-1) day(-1), and was maintained until the lesion had fully involuted or the child was 12-months old. A total of 15 patients aged 3 weeks to 8.5 months (mean, 11 weeks) underwent propranolol treatment for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma, which threatened life (n=1) or vision (n=2) or nasal obstruction (n=3) and/or caused ulceration (n=6) and/or bleeding (n=2) and/or significant tissue distortion (n=12). The minimal dosage required to achieve accelerated involution was 1.5-2.0 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Rebound growth occurred in the first patient when the dose was withdrawn at 7.5 months of age requiring reinstitution of treatment. No rebound growth was observed in the remaining patients. No other complications were observed. Propranolol at 1.5-2.0 mg kg(-1) day(-1), administered in divided doses with gradual increase in the dose, is effective and safe for treating problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma in our cohort of patients. Treatment should be maintained until the lesion is completely involuted or the child is 12

  3. The Influence of Gastric Antral Ulcerations on the Expression of Galanin and GalR1, GalR2, GalR3 Receptors in the Pylorus with Regard to Gastric Intrinsic Innervation of the Pyloric Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zalecki, Michal; Sienkiewicz, Waldemar; Franke-Radowiecka, Amelia; Klimczuk, Magdalena; Kaleczyc, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Gastric antrum ulcerations are common disorders occurring in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers disturbs the gastric emptying process, which is precisely controlled by the pylorus. Galanin (Gal) and its receptors are commonly accepted to participate in the regulation of inflammatory processes and neuronal plasticity. Their role in the regulation of gastrointestinal motility is also widely described. However, there is lack of data considering antral ulcerations in relation to changes in the expression of Gal and GalR1, GalR2, GalR3 receptors in the pyloric wall tissue and galaninergic intramural innervation of the pylorus. Two groups of pigs were used in the study: healthy gilts and gilts with experimentally induced antral ulcers. By double immunocytochemistry percentages of myenteric and submucosal neurons expressing Gal-immunoreactivity were determined in the pyloric wall tissue and in the population of gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter (labelled by retrograde Fast Blue neuronal tracer). The percentage of Gal-immunoreactive neurons increased only in the myenteric plexus of the pyloric wall (from 16.14±2.06% in control to 25.5±2.07% in experimental animals), while no significant differences in other neuronal populations were observed between animals of both groups. Real-Time PCR revealed the increased expression of mRNA encoding Gal and GalR1 receptor in the pyloric wall tissue of the experimental animals, while the expression(s) of GalR2 and GalR3 were not significantly changed. The results obtained suggest the involvement of Gal, GalR1 and galaninergic pyloric myenteric neurons in the response of pyloric wall structures to antral ulcerations. PMID:27175780

  4. Restrictive myocardium with an unusual pattern of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takuma; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Seguchi, Osamu; Murata, Yoshihiro; Sunami, Haruki; Yanase, Masanobu; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Loeffler endocarditis is a fibrous restrictive cardiomyopathy thought to be caused by persistent eosinophilia. It is difficult to diagnose, and the prognosis is often poor if the underlying eosinophilia is not promptly recognized and treated. We describe the case of a middle-aged woman treated for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy first detected during a routine check-up at age 35years but whose symptoms gradually progressed over the next 14years. Right ventricular biopsy showed extensive fibrosis of the endocardial tissue, and right heart catheterization revealed right heart failure and a low cardiac output state. Ultimately, she became reliant on inotropic and mechanical cardiovascular support, but we were not able to bridge her to transplant. Autopsy findings were typical of endocardial fibroelastosis, but she had not suffered from any tropical disease or traveled to high-risk areas. The presence of abnormal capillary proliferation suggested a diagnosis of Loeffler endocarditis. Nonetheless, apart from a 6-month period of eosinophilia 7years before her death, a history of well-controlled asthma and several drug sensitivities, we were unable to definitively identify the disease trigger. It is critical to diagnose and treat the underlying eosinophilia of Loeffler endocarditis to avoid a poor prognosis. This case highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of eosinophilic endomyocarditis in patients with an unusual pattern of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (or myocardial fibrosis of unknown etiology), even when there is no apparent history of eosinophilia. PMID:25804825

  5. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  6. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  7. Family communication in a population at risk for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Batte, Brittany; Sheldon, Jane P; Arscott, Patricia; Huismann, Darcy J; Salberg, Lisa; Day, Sharlene M; Yashar, Beverly M

    2015-04-01

    Encouraging family communication is an integral component of genetic counseling; therefore, we sought to identify factors impacting communication to family members at risk for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Participants (N = 383) completed an online survey assessing: 1) demographics (gender, genetic test results, HCM family history, and disease severity); 2) illness representations; 3) family functioning and cohesiveness; 4) coping styles; 5) comprehension of HCM autosomal dominant inheritance; and 6) communication of HCM risk information to at-risk relatives. Participants were a national sample of individuals with HCM, recruited through the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Data from 183 participants were analyzed using a logistic regression analysis, with family communication as a dichotomous dependent variable. We found that female gender and higher comprehension of autosomal dominant inheritance were significant predictors of participants' communication of HCM risk information to all their siblings and children. Our results suggest that utilizing interventions that promote patient comprehension (e.g., a teaching-focused model of genetic counseling) are important and may positively impact family communication within families with HCM. PMID:25304619

  8. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response. Results The coding regions of KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, and KCNE5 were examined, by direct DNA sequencing, in a cohort of 93 unrelated HCM probands and 188 blood donor controls. Fifteen genetic variants, four previously unknown, were identified in the HCM probands. Eight variants were non-synonymous and one was located in the 3'UTR-region of KCNE4. No disease-causing mutations were found and no significant difference in the frequency of genetic variants was found between HCM probands and controls. Two variants of likely functional significance were found in controls only. Conclusions Mutations in KCNE genes are not a common cause of HCM and polymorphisms in these genes do not seem to be associated with a propensity to develop arrhythmia PMID:21967835

  9. Upper GI tract lesions in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP): enrichment of pyloric gland adenomas and other gastric and duodenal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Salaria, Safia N; Cruise, Michael W; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the APC gene, develop neoplasms in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. To clarify the upper GI tract lesions in FAP patients in a tertiary care setting, we reviewed specimens from 321 endoscopies in 66 patients with FAP. Tubular adenomas in the small bowel were the most common neoplasms (present in 89% of patients), although only 1 patient developed invasive carcinoma of the small bowel. Several types of gastric neoplasms were identified--65% of patients had at least 1 fundic gland polyp, and 23% of patients had at least 1 gastric foveolar-type gastric adenoma. Pyloric gland adenomas were also enriched, occurring in 6% of patients--this is a novel finding in FAP patients. Despite the high frequency of gastric neoplasms, only 1 patient developed carcinoma in the stomach. The very low frequency of carcinoma in these patients suggests that current screening procedures prevent the vast majority of upper GI tract carcinomas in patients with FAP, at least in the tertiary care setting. PMID:24525509

  10. Upper tract juvenile polyps in juvenile polyposis patients: dysplasia and malignancy are associated with foveolar, intestinal, and pyloric differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changqing; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    Patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS), a hereditary autosomal dominant hamartomatous polyposis syndrome, are at increased risk for colorectal adenocarcinoma. The upper gastrointestinal tract is less often involved by JPS than the colorectum, and, consequently, upper tract juvenile polyps (JPs) are not well studied. We reviewed upper endoscopies and corresponding biopsies in JPS patients documented in our Polyposis Registry. A total of 199 upper gastrointestinal biopsies from 69 endoscopies were available in 22 of 41 (54%) JPS patients. Thirteen of the 22 patients (59%) had ≥1 gastric JP; 5 also had 6 small bowel JPs. Gastric JP was identified as early as age 7 in a patient with an SMAD4 gene mutation. Two patients (9%) had high-grade dysplasia in gastric JP. Invasive adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the gastrectomy specimen of 1 patient. Five patients had a huge gastric polyp burden; 3 underwent total gastrectomy. Three patients died of complications associated with extensive upper JP. Histologically, 8 of the 56 (14%) gastric JPs identified had dysplasia. All of the 8 polyps demonstrated intestinalized and pyloric gland differentiation intermixed with foveolar epithelium. Dysplasia was seen arising in all 3 types of epithelium. The flat gastric mucosa in 11 patients was unremarkable without inflammation or intestinal metaplasia. The 6 small bowel JPs had no dysplasia. Our findings suggest that JPS patients are at increased risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. Detection of malignancy in syndromic gastric JP indicates that the current screening procedures are insufficient in removal of precursor lesions to prevent progression to carcinoma. PMID:25390638

  11. Dopamine-induced oscillations of the pyloric pacemaker neuron rely on release of calcium from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Kadiri, Lolahon R; Kwan, Alex C; Webb, Watt W; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2011-09-01

    Endogenously bursting neurons play central roles in many aspects of nervous system function, ranging from motor control to perception. The properties and bursting patterns generated by these neurons are subject to neuromodulation, which can alter cycle frequency and amplitude by modifying the properties of the neuron's ionic currents. In the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, the anterior burster (AB) neuron is a conditional oscillator in the presence of dopamine (DA) and other neuromodulators and serves as the pacemaker to drive rhythmic output from the pyloric network. We analyzed the mechanisms by which DA evokes bursting in the AB neuron. Previous work showed that DA-evoked bursting is critically dependent on external calcium (Harris-Warrick RM, Flamm RE. J Neurosci 7: 2113-2128, 1987). Using two-photon microscopy and calcium imaging, we show that DA evokes the release of calcium from intracellular stores well before the emergence of voltage oscillations. When this release from intracellular stores is blocked by antagonists of ryanodine or inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor channels, DA fails to evoke AB bursting. We further demonstrate that DA enhances the calcium-activated inward current, I(CAN), despite the fact that it significantly reduces voltage-activated calcium currents. This suggests that DA-induced release of calcium from intracellular stores activates I(CAN), which provides a depolarizing ramp current that underlies endogenous bursting in the AB neuron. PMID:21676929

  12. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    PubMed

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; Del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management. PMID:26739954

  13. Infantile systemic hyalinosis in identical twins.

    PubMed

    Koonuru, Mahesh Kumar; Venugopal, Satya Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) is a rare disorder belonging to the heterogeneous group of genetic fibromatoses. It is a rare, progressive, fatal autosomal recessive condition characterized by widespread deposition of hyaline material in many tissues caused by mutations in the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene - ANTXR2. It presents hyperpigmented skin over bony prominences. Characteristic purplish patches develop over the medial and lateral malleoli of the ankles, the metacarpophalangeal joints, spine and elbows, with progressive joint contractures, osteopenia, skin abnormalities and chronic severe pain. The present case reports the occurrence of infantile systemic hyalinosis in twin brothers five months of age who had come for early intervention for joint contractures representing characteristic brownish patches over bony prominences. ISH cases reported until this date have been less than 20 and the present case is unique in nature since this is the first time ISH is reported in twins globally and the symptoms have been identified at an early age. PMID:26668783

  14. Infantile systemic hyalinosis in identical twins

    PubMed Central

    Koonuru, Mahesh Kumar; Venugopal, Satya Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) is a rare disorder belonging to the heterogeneous group of genetic fibromatoses. It is a rare, progressive, fatal autosomal recessive condition characterized by widespread deposition of hyaline material in many tissues caused by mutations in the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene - ANTXR2. It presents hyperpigmented skin over bony prominences. Characteristic purplish patches develop over the medial and lateral malleoli of the ankles, the metacarpophalangeal joints, spine and elbows, with progressive joint contractures, osteopenia, skin abnormalities and chronic severe pain. The present case reports the occurrence of infantile systemic hyalinosis in twin brothers five months of age who had come for early intervention for joint contractures representing characteristic brownish patches over bony prominences. ISH cases reported until this date have been less than 20 and the present case is unique in nature since this is the first time ISH is reported in twins globally and the symptoms have been identified at an early age. PMID:26668783

  15. Idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia--a continuing enigma.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N D; Snodgrass, G J; Cohen, R D

    1984-01-01

    Seventy six children with documented Fanconi-type idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia were studied and compared with 41 with the Williams-Beuren syndrome. Clinical comparison showed, as expected, very close similarities but also considerable differences, particularly in the severity of feeding problems and the degree of failure to thrive. The estimated incidence of idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia alone has remained constant for the past 20 years, at approximately 18 cases per year in the United Kingdom (1 per 47 000 total live births). Long term morbidity in these children is mainly due to mental handicap and arteriopathy, but hypertension (29%), kyphoscoliosis (19%), hyperacusis (75%), and obesity (50%) may be added complications. In one child, hypercalcaemia recurred during adolescence but this seems to be excessively rare. More detailed investigation before treatment is required to discover the aetiology of hypercalcaemia in this condition. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6465928

  16. Changing trends in characteristics of infantile hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nickavar, Azar; Nasiri, Seyyed Javad; Lahouti Harahdashti, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hydronephrosis (HN) or calycial dilatation is the most common prenatal urologic abnormality. The aim of this study was to identify the possible changes in demographic and clinical manifestations of infantile HN in previously and recently diagnosed patients. Methods: 193 children with infantile HN admitted to Ali-asghar Children's Hospital in two different periods (group 1; 1997-2003, and group 2; 2005-2011) were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. Variables such as time at diagnosis, gender, clinical manifestations, etiology, laterality, grade, and associated anomalies were also evaluated. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 32.3± 42.6 (group 1) and 21.4± 36.4 (group 2), respectively. 69.8% of patients were males. 75% of prenatally diagnosed patients were asymptomatic. Urinary tract infection was the most common symptom, followed by pain, hematuria, and decreased renal function. Obstruction in ureteropelvic junction was the most common etiology, accounting for 39.6% of all patients. Neurogenic bladder, vesicoureteral reflux, nephrolithiasis, and ureterovesical junction obstruction were the other common etiologies. 55.5% of all patients had unilateral HN, which was more common on the left side. No significant difference documented between two groups of patients, except for mild HN (23.7% vs. 39%), which was more common in newly diagnosed patients (p= 0.001). Conclusion: There was no changing trend in demographic and clinical manifestations of infantile HN. However, the severity of infantile HN has been decreased significantly in recently diagnosed patients. PMID:25250281

  17. Infantile refsum disease in four Amish sibs.

    PubMed

    Bader, P I; Dougherty, S; Cangany, N; Raymond, G; Jackson, C E

    2000-01-17

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) appears with varying degrees of impaired vision, hearing loss, developmental delays, and neuromotor deficiencies. We report on four Amish sibs with IRD from a consanguineous marriage; biochemical testing supported the diagnosis of IRD. Of particular interest in this sibship are characteristic poorly formed yellow-orange teeth in at least three of the four affected sibs and behavior problems in the affected females. PMID:10607947

  18. Youngest netherton patient with infantile asthma.

    PubMed

    Kutsal, Ebru; Gücüyener, Kivilcim; Bakirtaş, Arzu; Eldeş, Nilüfer; Oztaş, Murat; Dursun, Ayşe

    2008-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is a very rare disorder characterized with icthyosis, atopy, bamboo hair and intermittant aminoaciduria. The specifity of clinical and histopathological features of netherton syndrome is low in neonates and young infants who presents with predominating erythrodermia. Being the youngest infant presenting with the symptoms of infantile asthma we found it worth to report a six months old girl presenting with the feature of severe respiratory distress, generalized erythrodermia, and brittle hair. PMID:18330764

  19. [Clinical research progress in infantile nystagmus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zong, Yao; Wang, Li-hua

    2013-07-01

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is an ocular motor disorder that presents at birth or early infancy. It is clinically characterized by involuntary and conjugated oscillation of the eyes, which often causes several complications such as amblyopia, lateral view, strabismus and torticollis. The etiology of INS is not fully understood, and this disease cannot be cured completely. This paper reviews the progress of research on the concept, etiology and pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, common examination methods, diagnosis and treatment of INS. PMID:24257363

  20. Infantile and acquired nystagmus in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ehrt, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    Nystagmus is an involuntary, periodic eye movement caused by a slow drift of fixation which is followed by a fast refixation saccade (jerk nystagmus) or a slow movement back to fixation (pendular nystagmus). In childhood most cases are benign forms of nystagmus: idiopathic infantile, ocular or latent nystagmus. They arise at the age of 3 months, without oscillopsia and show the absence of the physiologic opto-kinetic nystagmus. A full ophthalmologic evaluation is all that is needed in most cases: albinism, macular or optic nerve hypoplasia and congenital retinal dystrophies are the most common forms of ocular nystagmus. Idiopathic infantile nystagmus can be hereditary, the most common and best analyzed form being a mutation of the FRMD7 gene on chromosome Xq26.2. The mutation shows a mild genotype-phenotype correlation. In all female carriers the opto-kinetic nystagmus is absent and half had mild nystagmus. Latent nystagmus is part of the infantile esotropia syndrome and shows the unique feature of change of direction when the fixing eye changes: it is always beating to the side of the fixing eye. There is no cure for infantile nystagmus but therapeutic options include magnifying visual aids or eye muscle surgery at the age of 6-8 y in patients with head turn. Less than 20% of childhood nystagmus are acquired and need further neurological and imaging work-up. Alarming signs and symptoms are: onset after the age of 4 months, oscillopsia, dissociated (asymmetric) nystagmus, preserved opto-kinetic nystagmus, afferent pupillary defect, papilloedema and neurological symptoms like vertigo and nausea. The most common cause is due to pathology of the anterior optic pathway (e.g. optic nerve gliomas). It shows the same clinical feature of dissociated nystagmus as spasmus nutans but has a higher frequency as in INO. Other forms of acquired nystagmus are due to brainstem, cerebellar or metabolic diseases. PMID:22459007

  1. Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 expression is enhanced in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts from burned children

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C; He, Jing; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in hypertrophic scar formation. A lot of studies have shown that TGF-β1 stimulates fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, inhibits matrix degradation and eventually leads to scar formation. Smad proteins are important intracellular mediators of TGF-β1 signaling, and Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2), an ubiquitin ligase for Smads, plays critical roles in the regulation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling. It was reported that Smurf2 was abnormally expressed during the process of liver fibrosis and lung fibrosis. Hypertrophic scarring is a fibroproliferative disorder of the dermis that occurs following wounding. However, little is known about the expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scarring. We hypothesized that TGF-β1 signaling cannot be disrupted after wound epithelialization probably due to abnormal expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. In the present study, we found that hypertrophic scar fibroblasts exhibited increased Smurf2 protein and mRNA levels compared with normal fibroblasts, and the expression of Smurf2 gradually increased in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts after TGF-β1 stimulation. Furthermore, we transfected Smurf2 siRNA into hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, and we found that silencing the expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts dramatically reduced TGF-β1 production, inhibited TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression and inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen I synthesis. Our results suggest that the enhanced expression of Smurf2 is involved in the progression of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:21920670

  2. Abnormalities of the Mitral Apparatus in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Echocardiographic, Pathophysiologic, and Surgical Insights.

    PubMed

    Silbiger, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disorder characterized by increased cardiac muscle mass. This disorder has broad phenotypic expression, including, among others, asymmetric septal hypertrophy, midcavity hypertrophy, and apical hypertrophy. In recent years, it has been recognized that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not characterized solely by ventricular hypertrophy but that a number of abnormalities of the mitral apparatus (papillary muscles, leaflets, chords, and annulus) may also occur. These figure prominently in the echocardiographic evaluation and surgical planning of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and serve as the focus of this review. PMID:27146120

  3. CSF B-Endorphin Levels in Patients with Infantile Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A Japanese study measured CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) levels of beta-endorphin in 19 children (ages 4-6) with infantile autism and in 3 children (ages 10-14) with Rett syndrome. In infantile autism, levels did not differ significantly from control participants (n=23). However, levels were significantly higher in those with Rett syndrome. (Author/CR)

  4. Part Two: Infantile Spasms--The New Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellock, John M.; O'Hara, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the conclusion made by the consensus group regarding infantile spasms. The consensus group concluded that "infantile spasms are a major form of severe epileptic encephalopathy of early childhood that results in neurodevelopmental regression and imposes a significant health burden." The entire group agrees that the best…

  5. Physiological Regulation and Infantile Anorexia: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatoor, Irene; Ganiban, Jody; Surles, Jaclyn; Doussard-Roosevelt, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether infantile anorexia is associated with physiological dysregulation. Method: This study included eight toddlers with infantile anorexia and eight healthy eaters matched for age, race, socioeconomic status, and gender. Physiological measures of heart period and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were assessed across three…

  6. Extending Childhood into the Teen Years: "Infantilization" and Its Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skager, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    Young people sandwiched between childhood and adulthood often rebel when adults treat them like children rather than with the respect that acknowledges their intelligence and potential. Research and theory supporting the view of "infantilizing" adolescents has proliferated. The extent to which modern cultures infantilize youth is evident in…

  7. [Infantile hemangiomas: the revolution of beta-blockers].

    PubMed

    Leaute-Labreze, Christine

    2014-12-01

    Infantile hemangioma is the consequence of both postnatal vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Hypoxia appears to play an important role as a contributory factor. Infantile hemangiomas have variable clinical features: superficial, deep or mixed. They can be localized or segmental involving a large skin area. Localized infantile hemangiomas are usually benign, unless they are located near a noble structure (airway orbit...), while segmental infantile hemangioma may be associated with complex underlying birth defects (PHACES and SACRAL syndromes). Clinical follow-up of infants with infantile hemangioma must be particularly careful in the first weeks of life since 80% of all infantile hemangiomas have reached their final size at age 5 months. A majority of infantile hemangiomas are mild and do not required any treatment. Main indications for treatment are: vital risk (heart failure, respiratory distress), functional risk (amblyopia, swallowing disorders...), painful ulceration and disfigurement (face involvement of nose, lips...). Propranolol, has been quickly adopted as the first line medical treatment for complicated infantile hemangioma; and it is the only treatment to have a marketing authorization in this indication. It is recommended to begin the treatment as early as possible before three months of age to minimize the risk of complications and sequelae. PMID:25665327

  8. PRRT2 mutation in Japanese children with benign infantile epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Kubota, Tetsuo; Abe, Shinpei; Yamashita, Shintaro; Imai, Katsumi; Okanishi, Tohru; Enoki, Hideo; Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Takuya; Dibbens, Leanne M; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in PRRT2 genes have been identified as a major cause of benign infantile epilepsy and/or paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We explored mutations in PRRT2 in Japanese patients with BIE as well as its related conditions including convulsion with mild gastroenteritis and benign early infantile epilepsy. We explored PRRT2 mutations in Japanese children who had had unprovoked infantile seizures or convulsion with mild gastroenteritis. The probands included 16 children with benign infantile epilepsy, 6 children with convulsions with mild gastroenteritis, and 2 siblings with benign early infantile epilepsy. In addition, we recruited samples from family members when PRRT2 mutation was identified in the proband. Statistical analyses were performed to identify differences in probands with benign infantile epilepsy according to the presence or absence of PRRT2 mutation. Among a total of 24 probands, PRRT2 mutations was identified only in 6 probands with benign infantile epilepsy. A common insertion mutation, c.649_650insC, was found in 5 families and a novel missense mutation, c.981C>G (I327M), in one. The family history of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia was more common in probands with PRRT2 mutations than in those without mutations. Our study revealed that PRRT2 mutations are common in Japanese patients with benign infantile epilepsy, especially in patients with a family history of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. PMID:23131349

  9. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  10. Pressure therapy for hypertrophic scarrings: preliminary communication1

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J C; Druett, J E; Hodgson, B; Druett, Jane

    1980-01-01

    A six-point programme for the prevention and pressure therapy of hypertrophic scarring started in 1975 at Odstock Hospital. The work reported here includes a pressure calibration of batches of the material chosen for pressure bandaging; a pressure study of the bandages on volunteers' limbs; and the formation of a pressure therapy clinic. The clinic results were similar to those reported by Thomson (1974) and were considered sufficiently favourable to justify continuing the clinic and instituting a policy of close review and early therapy for all burns patients. The programme proved the accuracy of the pressure sensor and attempted to develop an objective method of recording progress. Arguments for pressure versus occlusion as the therapeutic agent are discussed and supported by a case report. It is suggested that a controlled trial of pressure therapy should be carried out. PMID:7241460

  11. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: A Spectrum of Clinical Challenges.

    PubMed

    Trace, Anthony P; Enos, Clinton W; Mantel, Alon; Harvey, Valerie M

    2016-06-01

    Since their earliest description, keloids and hypertrophic scars have beleaguered patients and clinicians alike. These scars can be aesthetically disfiguring, functionally debilitating, emotionally distressing, and psychologically damaging, culminating in a significant burden for patients. Our current understanding of keloid pathophysiology has grown and continues to advance while molecular biology, genetics, and technology provide ever-deepening insight into the nature of wound healing and the pathologic perturbations thereof. Greater understanding will lead to the development and application of refined therapeutic modalities. This article provides an overview of our current understanding of keloids, highlighting clinical characteristics and diagnostic criteria while providing a comprehensive summary of the many therapeutic modalities available. The proposed mechanism, application, adverse events, and reported efficacy of each modality is evaluated, and current recommendations are summarized. PMID:26894654

  12. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  13. Surgery Management of Rare Hypertrophic Frenum in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, Sheila de Carvalho; da Silva, Juliana Yassue Barbosa; Tavares, Maria Cristina Reis; Duda, João Gilberto; Losso, Estela Maris

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare case of a lateral frenum hypertrophy in an infant, this paper describes the case of a girl who came to a first dental appointment when she was 4 months old. A hypertrophic lateral frenum in the upper left canine region was detected. A great depression in the gingival rodet separated the anterior maxillary segment from the posterior one and also decreased the lip mobility in this region. A frenectomy was performed when the patient was 11 months old and the clinical follow-up was done up to the age of 30 months. There was normalization in the vestibular insertion of the lateral frenum, lip mobility, physiological development of the maxilla, and eruption of the upper incisors, canines, and first primary molars. Infants should go to a dental examination precociously in order to detect possible congenital and development alterations. PMID:25180104

  14. Cerebrovascular complications associated with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Furlan, A J; Craciun, A R; Raju, N R; Hart, N

    1984-01-01

    One hundred fifty patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) were followed-up for an average of 5.5 years. There were 95 males and 55 females with a mean age of 51 years. Patients usually presented with cardiac symptoms or syncope; no patient presented with stroke. Eight patients (5%) died during follow-up, all from cardiac causes. Eleven patients (7%) developed cerebrovascular complications; 5 (3%) had a stroke and 6 (4%) had TIA only. Patients with IHSS and atrial fibrillation have a much greater stroke risk. Mitral annulus calcification may also increase stroke risk in IHSS. However, stroke is almost never the presenting manifestation of IHSS, and the longterm risk of stroke for most patients with known IHSS is low. PMID:6538354

  15. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy demonstrated on SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Russo, Robert R; Lee, Allen; Mansberg, Robert; Emmett, Louise

    2009-09-01

    A 51-year-old man with a known history of hepatic cirrhosis and a right lung mass presented with hemoptysis and widespread bone pain. Sputum cytology demonstrated atypical cells. A CT scan of the chest demonstrated a 3-cm spiculating mass in the right lower lobe, in addition to nodules in both upper lobes and lymphadenopathy within the mediastinum and both hila. Skeletal scintigraphy was performed to assess for metastatic bone disease, and demonstrated increased tracer uptake along the cortex of the distal femurs bilaterally. There was also low-grade cortical uptake in the mid femur and tibia bilaterally on planar imaging. SPECT/CT was able to improve the specificity of the planar scintigraphic findings, by confirming tracer uptake was localized to the periosteum as expected for hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy, thereby excluding the presence of skeletal metastases. PMID:19692832

  16. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM. PMID:27236124

  17. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in patient with Crohn's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-05-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  18. Recent advances in diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siswanto, B B; Aryani, R

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterised by a thickened but non-dilated left ventricle in the absence of another cardiac or systemic condition capable of producing the magnitude of hypertrophy evident. It is the most common familial genetic disease of the heart (1/500 to 1/1000), as well as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes. Survival rates of patients with HCM have improved from the 1960s onwards. Natural history in patients with HCM might vary from developing severe heart failure or atrial fibrillation, some die suddenly, often at a young age and in the absence of previous symptoms. Because of its heterogeneous clinical course and expression, HCM frequently presents uncertainty and represents a management dilemma to cardiovascular specialists and other practitioners.

  19. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; Santos, Adaílton Araújo dos; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; dos Santos, Adaílton Araújo; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  1. DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a multicentre clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Slade, A. K.; Sadoul, N.; Shapiro, L.; Chojnowska, L.; Simon, J. P.; Saumarez, R. C.; Dodinot, B.; Camm, A. J.; McKenna, W. J.; Aliot, E.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--DDD pacing has been advocated as an effective treatment for drug refractory obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This study reports the outcome of pacing in 56 patients with refractory symptoms referred to four tertiary centres. METHODS--Core data on symptoms, drug burden, and left ventricular outflow tract gradient were recorded. Patients underwent a temporary pacing study with optimisation of the atrioventricular (AV) delay for greatest gradient reduction without haemodynamic compromise. Patients were assessed after implantation in terms of changes in symptoms, drug load, and outflow tract gradient. RESULTS--56 patients underwent pacing assessment. The mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient before pacing was 78 (31) mm Hg. At temporary study the mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient was 38 (24) mm Hg with a median (range) optimised sensed AV delay of 65 (25-125) ms. Fifty three patients were implanted and followed up for a mean (SD) of 11 (11) months. The median (range) programmed sensed AV delay was 60 (31-200) ms. Left ventricular outflow tract gradient at follow up was 36 (25) mm Hg. Forty four patients had improved functional class. Although a correlation (r = 0.69) was shown between acute and chronic left ventricular outflow tract gradient reduction, there was no correlation between magnitude of gradient reduction and functional improvement, and no appreciable change in pharmacological burden. CONCLUSION--This series confirms symptomatic improvement after DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There remains, however, a discrepancy between perceived symptomatic benefit and modest objective improvement. Furthermore, the optimal outcome has been achieved only with continued pharmacological treatment. Current methods of temporary evaluation do not predict functional outcome which seems to be independent of the magnitude of gradient reduction. PMID:8624871

  2. Abnormal skeletal muscle bioenergetics in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C. H.; Kemp, G. J.; Taylor, D. J.; Conway, M.; Rajagopalan, B.; O'Donoghue, A.; Styles, P.; McKenna, W. J.; Radda, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the skeletal muscle metabolic manifestations of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. DESIGN: A case-control study. SETTING: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed on volunteers from a centre specialising in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS: Five patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein in cardiac and skeletal muscle and five patients with a troponin T abnormality in cardiac muscle were compared with healthy controls. RESULTS: High energy phosphate metabolism in vivo was examined in a non-invasive manner. In resting muscle, the beta myosin heavy chain group had a higher ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP concentration (4.51 (SD 0.17)) than either the troponin T group (3.88 (0.42)) or controls (n = 16; 4.04 (0.40)). Exercise duration was reduced compared to controls, and during the fourth minute of exercise phosphocreatine depletion and muscle acidification were greater in both patient groups. After exercise, the recovery of phosphocreatine-an index of oxidative metabolic capacity of the muscle-was slower in the beta myosin heavy chain group (mean half time 0.65 (0.08) minutes) than in the troponin T group (0.60 (0.17) minutes) or controls (0.48 (0.14) minutes). CONCLUSIONS: Exercise metabolism was abnormal in both groups of subjects, and the affected contractile protein determined the metabolic changes in muscle at rest and during recovery. In patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein, there was a decrease in oxidative capacity consistent with the reduction in mitochondria reported in muscle biopsy studies of similar patients. PMID:9326994

  3. Metal-sensitive and thermostable trypsin from the crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) pyloric caeca: purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past decades, the economic development and world population growth has led to increased for food demand. Increasing the fish production is considered one of the alternatives to meet the increased food demand, but the processing of fish leads to by-products such as skin, bones and viscera, a source of environmental contamination. Fish viscera have been reported as an important source of digestive proteases with interesting characteristics for biotechnological processes. Thus, the aim of this study was to purify and to characterize a trypsin from the processing by-products of crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) fish. Results A 27.5 kDa trypsin with N-terminal amino acid sequence IVGGFECTPHVFAYQ was easily purified from the pyloric caeca of the crevalle jack. Its physicochemical and kinetic properties were evaluated using N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BApNA) as substrate. In addition, the effects of various metal ions and specific protease inhibitors on trypsin activity were determined. Optimum pH and temperature were 8.0 and 50°C, respectively. After incubation at 50°C for 30 min the enzyme lost only 20% of its activity. K m , k cat, and k cat /K m values using BApNA as substrate were 0.689 mM, 6.9 s-1, and 10 s-1 mM-1, respectively. High inhibition of trypsin activity was observed after incubation with Cd2+, Al3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ at 1 mM, revealing high sensitivity of the enzyme to metal ions. Conclusions Extraction of a thermostable trypsin from by-products of the fishery industry confirms the potential of these materials as an alternative source of these biomolecules. Furthermore, the results suggest that this trypsin-like enzyme presents interesting biotechnological properties for industrial applications. PMID:24112762

  4. Echo-guided transaortic left ventricular myotomy for idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nitta, S; Yambe, T; Nitta, K; Katahira, Y; Saijo, Y; Sonobe, T; Naganuma, S; Kakinuma, Y; Tanaka, M; Miura, M

    1991-12-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) is a progressive cardiac disease known to induce sudden death occasionally. The authors tested echocardiography as a method of guiding myotomy, and observed its clinical usefulness as a safe surgical procedure for IHSS. PMID:1843048

  5. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy caused by homozygous deletion in HPGD gene in a family: changing clinical and radiological findings with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Yılmaz, Saliha; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Erener-Ercan, Tuğba; Ceyhun, Emre; Bilguvar, Kaya; Günel, Murat

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy1 (PHOAR1) is characterized by delayed closure of the fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy and periostosis. Homozygous mutations in hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) gene are the underlying pathology of PHOAR1. The aim of this study was to analyze the HPGD gene and the changing clinical and radiological findings with advancing age of two siblings with the diagnosis of PHOAR1. A novel 2-bp homozygous deletion was found in exon 3 (c.310-311delCT) of HPGD gene in the patients. Clinical and radiological findings of the siblings were evaluated between 4 months and 8 years and 6 months of age. The painful swelling and sweating of the hands and feet, cranial ossification defect and expanded diaphyses were evident at infantile period and gradually showed improvement until 4 years of age. After the age of 4 years, digital clubbing and swelling of knees persisted, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis developed and acro-osteolysis became evident on hand radiographs. In conclusion, we suggest that the clinical findings of the patients with PHOAR1 should be classified in two periods as early and late childhood. We also observed that there was intrafamilial variability of clinical findings. PMID:24816859

  6. Sudden death following AV node ablation in a man with Fabry disease mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rodda, Odette A; Lynch, Matthew; Parsons, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of Fabry disease with an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hypertrophy with septal prominence resulting in an erroneous diagnosis of hypertrophic cardilmyopathy clinically. The deceased presented for a medicolegal autopsy following his sudden death after an AV node ablation. Fabry disease continues to be an important misdiagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a clinical setting. Early diagnosis of Fabry disease is essential so that early treatment can be instituted. PMID:27213840

  7. Surgical Treatment of a 4-Year-Old Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Wu, Qingyu; Xu, Zhonghua; Kong, Xiangchen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is low. The lesions usually involve the left ventricle or ventricular septum, leading to either left or right ventricular outflow tract stenosis. However, combined left and right ventricular outflow tract stenosis is rare, and the surgical treatment is limited, especially in children. Surgery to release the obstruction was performed successfully in a 4-year-old child with right and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction together with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The result was excellent. PMID:26913685

  8. Successful treatment of hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis in HIV-infected patient with topical imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Deza, Gustavo; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Curto-Barredo, Laia; Villar García, Judit; Pujol, Ramon M

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis is an atypical presentation of genital herpes described in the context of immunosuppression, particularly HIV-positive patients. This situation can become a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. For this reason, alternative therapies are currently being discussed in the literature. We report a case of hypertrophic genital herpes in a HIV-positive patient who was successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod after treatment failures with oral and i.v. antivirals. PMID:26074211

  9. Natural History of Infantile GM2 Gangliosidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bley, Annette E.; Giannikopoulos, Ourania A.; Hayden, Doug; Kubilus, Kim; Tifft, Cynthia J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: GM2 gangliosidoses are caused by an inherited deficiency of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase and result in ganglioside accumulation in the brain. Onset during infancy leads to rapid neurodegeneration and death before 4 years of age. We set out to quantify the rate of functional decline in infantile GM2 gangliosidosis on the basis of patient surveys and a comprehensive review of existing literature. METHODS: Patients with infantile GM2 gangliosidosis (N = 237) were surveyed via questionnaire by the National Tay Sachs & Allied Diseases Association (NTSAD). These data were supplemented by survival data from the NTSAD database and a literature survey. Detailed retrospective surveys from 97 patients were available. Five patients who had received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were evaluated separately. The mortality rate of the remaining 92 patients was comparable to that of the 103 patients from the NTSAD database and 121 patients reported in the literature. RESULTS: Common symptoms at onset were developmental arrest (83%), startling (65%), and hypotonia (60%). All 55 patients who had learned to sit without support lost that ability within 1 year. Individual functional measures correlated with each other but not with survival. Gastric tube placement was associated with prolonged survival. Tay Sachs and Sandhoff variants did not differ. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was not associated with prolonged survival. CONCLUSIONS: We studied the timing of regression in 97 cases of infantile GM2 gangliosidosis and conclude that clinical disease progression does not correlate with survival, likely because of the impact of improved supportive care over time. However, functional measures are quantifiable and can inform power calculations and study design of future interventions. PMID:22025593

  10. Looking for new treatments of Infantile Colic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Infantile colic is a common disturbance occurring in the first three months of life. It is a benign condition and one of the main causes of pediatric consultation in the early part of life because of its great impact on family life. Some pediatricians are prone to undervalue this issue mainly because of the lack of evidence based medicine guidelines. Up to now, there is no consensus concerning management and treatment. Literature reports growing evidence about the effectiveness of dietary, pharmacological, complementary and behavioral therapies as options for the management of infantile colic. Dietary approach, usually based on the avoidance of cow’s milk proteins in breast-feeding mothers and bottle-fed infants, more recently has seen the rise of new special formulas, such as partially hydrolyzed proteins and low lactose added with prebiotics or probiotics: their efficacy needs to be further documented. Investigated pharmacological agents are Simethicone and Cimetropium Bromide: the first is able to reduce bloating while the second could reduce fussing crying, but it has been tested only for severe infantile colic. No other pain relieving agents have been proposed until now, but some clinical trials are ongoing for new drugs. There is limited evidence supporting the use of complementary and alternative treatments (herbal supplements, manipulative approach and acupuncture) or behavioral interventions. Recent studies have focused the role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of this disturb and so new treatments, such as probiotics, have been proposed, but only few strains have been tested. Further investigations are needed in order to provide evidence-based guidelines. PMID:24898541

  11. Looking for new treatments of Infantile Colic.

    PubMed

    Savino, Francesco; Ceratto, Simone; De Marco, Angela; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Infantile colic is a common disturbance occurring in the first three months of life. It is a benign condition and one of the main causes of pediatric consultation in the early part of life because of its great impact on family life. Some pediatricians are prone to undervalue this issue mainly because of the lack of evidence based medicine guidelines. Up to now, there is no consensus concerning management and treatment. Literature reports growing evidence about the effectiveness of dietary, pharmacological, complementary and behavioral therapies as options for the management of infantile colic. Dietary approach, usually based on the avoidance of cow's milk proteins in breast-feeding mothers and bottle-fed infants, more recently has seen the rise of new special formulas, such as partially hydrolyzed proteins and low lactose added with prebiotics or probiotics: their efficacy needs to be further documented. Investigated pharmacological agents are Simethicone and Cimetropium Bromide: the first is able to reduce bloating while the second could reduce fussing crying, but it has been tested only for severe infantile colic. No other pain relieving agents have been proposed until now, but some clinical trials are ongoing for new drugs.There is limited evidence supporting the use of complementary and alternative treatments (herbal supplements, manipulative approach and acupuncture) or behavioral interventions.Recent studies have focused the role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of this disturb and so new treatments, such as probiotics, have been proposed, but only few strains have been tested.Further investigations are needed in order to provide evidence-based guidelines. PMID:24898541

  12. Probiotics for infantile colic: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile colic is a common paediatric condition which causes significant parental distress. Increased intestinal coliform colonization in addition to alteration in Lactobacillus abundance and distribution may play an important role in its pathogenesis. The objectives of this systematic review are to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic supplementation in the reduction of crying time and successful treatment of infantile colic. Methods Literature searches were conducted of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Only randomized controlled trials enrolling term, healthy infants with colic were included. A meta-analysis of included trials was performed utilizing the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. Results Three trials that enrolled 220 breastfed infants met inclusion criteria, of which 209 infants were available for analysis. Two of the studies were assessed as good quality. Lactobacillus reuteri (strains-American Type Culture Collection Strain 55730 and DSM 17 938) was the only species utilized in the therapeutic intervention. Two of the trials were industry funded. Probiotic supplementation compared to simethicone or placebo significantly and progressively shortened crying times to 7 days reaching a plateau at three weeks post initiation of therapy [mean difference −56.03 minutes; 95% CI (−59.92, -52.15)]. Similarly, probiotics compared to placebo significantly increased the treatment success of infantile colic with a relative risk (RR) of 0.06; 95% CI (0.01, 0.25) and a number needed to treat of 2. Conclusions Although L. reuteri may be effective as a treatment strategy for crying in exclusively breastfed infants with colic, the evidence supporting probiotic use for the treatment of infant colic or crying in formula-fed infants remains unresolved. Results from larger rigorously designed studies will help draw more definitive conclusions. PMID:24238101

  13. Time-course changes in the expression of Na+, K+-ATPase in gills and pyloric caeca of brown trout (Salmo trutta) during acclimation to seawater.

    PubMed

    Seidelin, M; Madsen, S S; Blenstrup, H; Tipsmark, C K

    2000-01-01

    Changes in protein and mRNA expression of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in gills and pyloric caeca of brown trout were investigated on a detailed time course after transfer from freshwater to 25 ppt seawater (SW). A transient deflection in plasma osmolality and muscle water content lasting from 4 h until day 3 was followed by restoration of hydromineral balance from day 5 onward. Gills and pyloric caeca responded to SW transfer by increasing Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity from days 5 and 3, respectively, onward. In both tissues, this response was preceded by an increase in alpha-subunit Na(+), K(+)-ATPase mRNA as early as 12 h posttransfer. The similarity of the response in these two organs suggests that they both play significant physiological roles in restoring hydromineral balance after abrupt increase in salinity. Further, SW transfer induced a slight, though significant, increase in primary gill filament Na(+), K(+)-ATPase immunoreactive (NKIR) cell abundance. This was paralleled by a marked (50%) decrease in secondary lamellar NKIR cell abundance after less than 1 d in SW. Thus, SW acclimation in brown trout is characterised by a lasting decrease in overall NKIR cell abundance in the gill. We propose that SW transfer stimulates Na(+),K(+)-ATPase enzymatic activity within individual chloride cells long before (<1 d) it becomes apparent in measurements of whole-gill homogenate enzymatic activity. This is supported by the early stabilisation (12 h) of hydromineral balance. PMID:11009398

  14. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation. PMID:25922301

  15. MicroRNA-21 Regulates hTERT via PTEN in Hypertrophic Scar Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jia-Qi; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Cai, Wei-Xia; Bai, Xiao-Zhi; Jia, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Bin; Wu, Xue; Li, Jun; Hu, Da-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Background As an important oncogenic miRNA, microRNA-21 (miR-21) is associated with various malignant diseases. However, the precise biological function of miR-21 and its molecular mechanism in hypertrophic scar fibroblast cells has not been fully elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed significant upregulation of miR-21 in hypertrophic scar fibroblast cells compared with that in normal skin fibroblast cells. The effects of miR-21 were then assessed in MTT and apoptosis assays through in vitro transfection with a miR-21 mimic or inhibitor. Next, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) was identified as a target gene of miR-21 in hypertrophic scar fibroblast cells. Furthermore, Western-blot and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that miR-21 increased the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) via the PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway. Introduction of PTEN cDNA led to a remarkable depletion of hTERT and PI3K/AKT at the protein level as well as inhibition of miR-21-induced proliferation. In addition, Western-blot and qRT-PCR analyses confirmed that hTERT was the downstream target of PTEN. Finally, miR-21 and PTEN RNA expression levels in hypertrophic scar tissue samples were examined. Immunohistochemistry assays revealed an inverse correlation between PTEN and hTERT levels in high miR-21 RNA expressing-hypertrophic scar tissues. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that miR-21 regulates hTERT expression via the PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by directly targeting PTEN, therefore controlling hypertrophic scar fibroblast cell growth. MiR-21 may be a potential novel molecular target for the treatment of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:24817011

  16. Pathogenesis and therapies for infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (infantile CLN1 disease).

    PubMed

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A; Cooper, Jonathan D; Sands, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL, Batten disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, infantile Batten disease, or infantile CLN1 disease) is caused by a deficiency in the soluble lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and has the earliest onset and fastest progression of all the NCLs. Several therapeutic strategies including enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell-mediated therapy, and small molecule drugs have resulted in minimal to modest improvements in the murine model of PPT1-deficiency. However, more recent studies using various combinations of these approaches have shown more promising results; in some instances more than doubling the lifespan of PPT1-deficient mice. These combination therapies that target different pathogenic mechanisms may offer the hope of treating this profoundly neurodegenerative disorder. Similar approaches may be useful when treating other forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in soluble lysosomal proteins. Different therapeutic targets will need to be identified and novel strategies developed in order to effectively treat forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in integral membrane proteins such as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Finally, the challenge with all of the NCLs will lie in early diagnosis, improving the efficacy of the treatments, and effectively translating them into the clinic. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23747979

  17. Pathogenesis and Therapies for Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (infantile CLN1 disease)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Sands, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCL, Batten Disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Infantile Neuronal Ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, Infantile Batten Disease, or infantile CLN1 disease) is caused by a deficiency in the soluble lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and has the earliest onset and fastest progression of all the NCLs. Several therapeutic strategies including enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell-mediated therapy, and small molecule drugs have resulted in minimal to modest improvements in the murine model of PPT1-deficiency. However, more recent studies using various combinations of these approaches have shown more promising results; in some instances more than doubling the life span of PPT1-deficient mice. These combination therapies that target different pathogenic mechanisms may offer the hope of treating this profoundly neurodegenerative disorder. Similar approaches may be useful when treating other forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in soluble lysosomal proteins. Different therapeutic targets will need to be identified and novel strategies developed in order to effectively treat forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in integral membrane proteins such as Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis. Finally, the challenge with all of the NCLs will lie in early diagnosis, improving the efficacy of the treatments, and effectively translating them into the clinic. PMID:23747979

  18. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked infantile nystagmus

    MedlinePlus

    ... infantile nystagmus is a condition characterized by abnormal eye movements. Nystagmus is a term that refers to involuntary ... the first six months of life. The abnormal eye movements may worsen when an affected person is feeling ...

  19. [Familial syndrome combining short small intestine, intestinal malrotation, pyloric hypertrophy and brain malformation. 3 anatomoclinical case reports].

    PubMed

    Nezelof, C; Jaubert, F; Lyon, G

    1976-01-01

    Anatomoclinical study of 3 cases of an exceptional malformative condition characterized by: --extreme shortness of the small intestine, --mesenterium commune, --hypertrophic pylorus, --malformation of the central nervous system (heterotopia, absence of operculum temporale). Clinically this malformative condition is characterized by failure and inertia of the intestinal peristalsis producing at intervals of 10-15 days episodes of subocclusion, the repetition of which causes death. The syndrome is familial and seems to be of autosomal recessive inheritance. The absence of mechanical obstruction, the repeated failure of colostomy and ileostomy, the normal aspect of the myenteric plexuses verified by cytoenzymatic and silver stains allow to individualize this anatomoclinical syndrome and to rule out the hypothesis of Hirschsprung's disease, Chagas' disease, idiopathic megacolon or hypoplasia of the myenteric plexuses. The association of cerebral malformations leads to consider the responsibility of a lack of synthesis of a same specific intermediate factor which is up to now poorly determined, implicated in the neuronal migration and neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1023783

  20. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Update and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenyu; Murphy, George F.; Akaishi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The development of cutaneous pathological scars, namely, hypertrophic scars (HSs) and keloids, involves complex pathways, and the exact mechanisms by which they are initiated, evolved, and regulated remain to be fully elucidated. The generally held concepts that keloids and HSs represent “aberrant wound healing” or that they are “characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles” have done little to promote their accurate clinicopathological classification or to stimulate research into the specific causes of these scars and effective preventative therapies. To overcome this barrier, we review here the most recent findings regarding the pathology and pathogenesis of keloids and HSs. The aberrations of HSs and keloids in terms of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases of the wound healing process are described. In particular, the significant roles that the extracellular matrix and the epidermal and dermal layers of skin play in scar pathogenesis are examined. Finally, the current hypotheses of pathological scar etiology that should be tested by basic and clinical investigators are detailed. Therapies that have been found to be effective are described, including several that evolved directly from the aforementioned etiology hypotheses. A better understanding of pathological scar etiology and manifestations will improve the clinical and histopathological classification and treatment of these important lesions. PMID:25289219

  1. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis Misdiagnosed as Acute Subtentorial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ik-Seong; Kim, Hoon; Chung, Eun Yong

    2010-01-01

    A case of idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (IHCP) misdiagnosed as an acute subdural hematoma is reported. A 37-year-old male patient presented with headache following head trauma 2 weeks earlier. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse high-density lesion along the left tentorium and falx cerebri. Initial chest X-rays revealed a small mass in the right upper lobe with right lower pleural thickening, which suggested lung cancer, such as an adenoma or mediastinal metastasis. During conservative treatment under the diagnosis of a subdural hematoma, left cranial nerve palsies were developed (3rd and 6th), followed by scleritis and uveitis involving both eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an unusual tentorium-falx enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Non-specific chronic inflammation of the pachymeninges was noticed on histopathologic examination following an open biopsy. Systemic steroid treatment was initiated, resulting in dramatic improvement of symptoms. A follow-up brain MRI showed total resolution of the lesion 2 months after steroid treatment. IHCP should be included in the differential diagnosis of subtentorial-enhancing lesions. PMID:20856672

  2. Current concepts related to hypertrophic scarring in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ryan S; Borovikova, Anna A; King, Kassandra; Banyard, Derek A; Lalezari, Shadi; Toranto, Jason D; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-05-01

    Scarring following burn injury and its accompanying aesthetic and functional sequelae still pose major challenges. Hypertrophic scarring (HTS) can greatly impact patients' quality of life related to appearance, pain, pruritus and even loss of function of the injured body region. The identification of molecular events occurring in the evolution of the burn scar has increased our knowledge; however, this information has not yet translated into effective treatment modalities. Although many of the pathophysiologic pathways that bring about exaggerated scarring have been identified, certain nuances in burn scar formation are starting to be recognized. These include the effects of neurogenic inflammation, mechanotransduction, and the unique interactions of burn wound fluid with fat tissue in the deeper dermal layers, all of which may influence scarring outcome. Tension on the healing scar, pruritus, and pain all induce signaling pathways that ultimately result in increased collagen formation and myofibroblast phenotypic changes. Exposure of the fat domes in the deep dermis is associated with increased HTS, possibly on the basis of altered interaction of adipose-derived stem cells and the deep burn exudate. These pathophysiologic patterns related to stem cell-cytokine interactions, mechanotransduction, and neurogenic inflammation can provide new avenues of exploration for possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:27027596

  3. What Do Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Die from?

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Rowin, Ethan J; Casey, Susan A; Garberich, Ross F; Maron, Martin S

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) has become a contemporary and treatable genetic heart disease, now with disease-related mortality reduced to as low as 0.5% per year, based largely on more effective risk stratification and the use of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden death. This paradigm change in the natural history of HC has caused us to reconsider the overall mortality risk in this disease. We interrogated the databases of 2 HC referral centers, Minneapolis Heart Institute and Tufts Medical Center. Of 1,902 consecutive patients evaluated between 1992 and 2013, 1,653 patients (87%) have survived to the end of follow-up and 249 patients (13%) have died. Most deaths (178 of 249; 72%) were unrelated to HC, commonly because of cancer and predominantly in older patients. Non-HC mortality was significantly more common in adults presenting ≥ 60 years and least common in the youngest patients aged <30 years (p <0.001). Notably, deaths from non-HC causes substantially exceeded HC-related causes by 2.6-fold (p <0.001). In conclusion, only about 25% of patients with HC ultimately died of their disease, including predominantly those who were <30 years of age. These data allow patients with HC to develop a more realistic and reassured perception of their disease. PMID:26718233

  4. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christian M.; Aidt, Frederik H.; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446 variants. After elimination of 312 (69.9%) non-coding and synonymous variants, a further 109 (24.4%) with a global prevalence > 0.1%, three (0.7%) haplogroup associated and 19 (2.0%) variants with a low predicted in silico likelihood of pathogenicity, three variants: MT-TC: m.5772G>A, MT-TF: m.644A>G, and MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM. PMID:25923817

  5. Comprehensive Versus Targeted Genetic Testing in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bales, Nathan D; Johnson, Nicole M; Judge, Daniel P; Murphy, Anne M

    2016-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disease of the sarcomere that can be found in both children and adults and is associated with many causative mutations. In children who are not the index case of HCM in their families, current recommendations call only for targeted genetic testing for familial mutations. However, clinical experience suggests that de novo mutations are possible, as are mutations inherited from apparently an unaffected parent. A chart review was conducted of all patients who received HCM genetic testing at Johns Hopkins from 2004 to 2013. In total, 239 patient charts were analyzed for personal and familial genetic findings. Eighty-one patients with sarcomere gene mutations were identified, of which 66 had a clinical diagnosis of HCM. Importantly, eight patients had >1 pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutation, including six patients who were diagnosed with HCM as children (18 or younger). In this analysis, when a sarcomere mutation is identified in a family, the likelihood of a child with HCM having >1 mutation is 25 % (6/24), compared to 4.8 % (2/42) for adults. The large number of children with multiple mutations suggests that broad panel rather than targeted genetic testing should be considered in HCM presenting during childhood even if the child is not the index case. PMID:26936621

  6. Diastolic filling in a physical model of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schovanec, Joseph; Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited heart disease that affects as much as one in 500 individuals, and is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes. The myocardium becomes abnormally thick in HCM and deforms the internal geometry of the left ventricle (LV). Previous studies have shown that a vortex is formed during diastolic filling, and further that the dilated LV morphology seen in systolic heart failure results in altering the filling vortex from elliptical to spherical shape. We have also previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness decreases the filling vortex circulation. However, alterations to intraventricular filling fluid dynamics due to an obstructive LV morphology and locally elevated wall stiffness (in the hypertrophied region) have not been previously examined from a mechanistic standpoint. We conducted an experimental study using an idealized HCM physical model and compared the intraventricular flow fields obtained from 2D PIV to a baseline LV physical model with lower wall stiffness and anatomical geometry. The obstruction in the HCM model leads to earlier breakdown of the filling vortex as compared to the anatomical LV. Intraventricular filling in both models under increased heart rates will be discussed.

  7. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis mimicking prolactinoma with recurrent vision loss.

    PubMed

    Lok, Julie Y C; Yip, Nelson K F; Chong, Kelvin K L; Li, C L; Young, Alvin L

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a rare inflammatory condition with diffuse thickening of the dura mater, which may cause a compressive effect or vascular compromise. We report on a 28-year-old Chinese woman with a history of granulomatous mastitis 7 years previously and oligomenorrhoea, headache, blurred vision, and raised prolactin level 2 years previously, that was diagnosed as prolactinoma and treated conservatively with bromocriptine. However, she had recurrent bilateral vision loss when the bromocriptine was stopped. Her symptoms were resolved by high-dose steroid injection but remained steroid-dependent. Serial magnetic resonance imaging scan showed progressive diffuse thickening of the pachymeningitis with disappearance of pituitary apoplexy. Lumbar puncture showed lymphocytosis with no organisms. Open biopsy of the meninges was performed and histology showed features of inflammatory infiltrates and vasculitis. This is an unusual presentation of a rare condition in this age-group, with co-existing granulomatous mastitis and chronic otitis media, and is a diagnostic challenge mimicking pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma in initial magnetic resonance imaging scans. PMID:26238133

  8. Distinguishing ventricular septal bulge versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Marco; Pozios, Iraklis; Vianello, Pier Filippo; Ameri, Pietro; Brunelli, Claudio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Abraham, Theodore P

    2016-07-15

    The burgeoning evidence of patients diagnosed with sigmoidal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) later in life has revived the quest for distinctive features that may help discriminate it from more benign forms of isolated septal hypertrophy often labelled ventricular septal bulge (VSB). HCM is diagnosed less frequently than VSB at older ages, with a reversed female predominance. Most patients diagnosed with HCM at older ages suffer from hypertension, similar to those with VSB. A positive family history of HCM and/or sudden cardiac death and the presence of exertional symptoms usually support HCM, though they are less likely in older patients with HCM, and poorly investigated in individuals with VSB. A more severe hypertrophy and the presence of left ventricular outflow obstruction are considered diagnostic of HCM, though stress echocardiography has not been consistently used in VSB. Mitral annulus calcification is very prevalent in both conditions, whereas a restrictive filling pattern is found in a minority of older patients with HCM. Genetic testing has low applicability in this differential diagnosis at the current time, given that a causative mutation is found in less than 10% of elderly patients with suspected HCM. Emerging imaging modalities that allow non-invasive detection of myocardial fibrosis and disarray may help, but have not been fully investigated. Nonetheless, there remains a considerable morphological overlap between the two conditions. Comprehensive studies, particularly imaging based, are warranted to offer a more evidence-based approach to elderly patients with focal septal thickening. PMID:27122487

  9. Echocardiographic diagnosis of the different phenotypes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Parato, Vito Maurizio; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Sozzi, Fabiola; Marazia, Stefania; Zito, Annapaola; Maiello, Maria; Palmiero, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited cardiovascular disorder of great genetic heterogeneity and has a prevalence of 0.1 - 0.2 % in the general population. Several hundred mutations in more than 27 genes, most of which encode sarcomeric structures, are associated with the HCM phenotype. Then, HCM is an extremely heterogeneous disease and several phenotypes have been described over the years. Originally only two phenotypes were considered, a more common, obstructive type (HOCM, 70 %) and a less common, non-obstructive type (HNCM, 30 %) (Maron BJ, et al. Am J Cardiol 48:418 -28, 1981). Wigle et al. (Circ 92:1680-92, 1995) considered three types of functional phenotypes: subaortic obstruction, midventricular obstruction and cavity obliteration. A leader american working group suggested that HCM should be defined genetically and not morphologically (Maron BJ, et al. Circ 113:1807-16, 2006). The European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases recommended otherwise a morphological classification (Elliott P, et al. Eur Heart J 29:270-6, 2008). Echocardiography is still the principal tool for the diagnosis, prognosis and clinical management of HCM. It is well known that the echocardiographic picture may have a clinical and prognostic impact. For this reason, in this article, we summarize the state of the art regarding the echocardiographic pattern of the HCM phenotypes and its impact on clinical course and prognosis. PMID:27519172

  10. Infantile or Malignant Osteopetrosis: Case Report of Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Rao P., Tarakeswara; V., Sunita; T.P., Gandhi; Harsha, Sri

    2013-01-01

    Infantile or Malignant osteopetrosis is a rare congenital disorder of bone resorption. It is caused by failure of osteoclasts to reabsorb immature bone. Severe infantile or malignant osteopetrosis present at birth or develops within the first few months of life. We are reporting here a case of two siblings with malignant osteopetrosis. Prominent clinical features included marked pallor, noisy respiration, progressive blindness and developmental delay. PMID:24086906

  11. Neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is a cause of infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUANG; ZOU, LI-PING; WANG, JING; SHI, XIUYU; TIAN, SHUPING; YANG, XIAOFAN; JU, JUN; YAO, HONGXIANG; LIU, YUJIE

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is one of the causes of infantile spasms. In the present study, the clinical history and auxiliary examination results of 18 patients who developed infantile spasms several months after neonatal hypoglycemia were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 666 patients with infantile spasms admitted to two pediatric centers between January 2008 and October 2012, 18 patients developed infantile spasms after being diagnosed with neonatal hypoglycemia, defined as a whole blood glucose concentration of <2.6 mmol/l. These patients developed infantile spasms from between 2 and 10 months (mean, 4.9 months) following the diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia. All 18 patients had abnormal electroencephalographic findings with either classical or modified hypsarrhythmia. Upon examination using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 10 patients (55.6%) exhibited abnormalities. The MRI results principally showed a disproportional involvement of parietal and occipital cortices and sub-cortical white matter lesions. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is associated with the subsequent development of infantile spasms. PMID:27168852

  12. Enteric neuronal plasticity and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in hypertrophic rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    Ekblad, E; Sjuve, R; Arner, A; Sundler, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Partial obstruction of the ileum causes a notable hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and enteric neurones in the proximally located intestine. 
Aims—To study the expression of neuromessengers in the hypertrophic ileum of rat as little is known about neuromessenger plasticity under these conditions. To investigate the presence of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in hypertrophic ileum. 
Methods—Ileal hypertrophy was induced by circumferential application of a strip of plastic film for 18-24 days. Immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridisation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry, and ethidium bromide staining were used to investigate the number of enteric neurones expressing neuropeptides and nitric oxide synthase, and the frequency of ICC. 
Results—In the hypertrophic ileum several neuronal populations showed changes in their expression of neuromessengers. Myenteric neurones expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, and galanin were notably increased in number. In submucous ganglia the number of VIP immunoreactive neurones decreased while those expressing VIP mRNA increased. NADPH diaphorase positive submucous neurones increased dramatically while the number of neuronal type nitric oxide synthase expressing ones was unchanged. The number of ICC decreased notably in hypertrophic ileum. 
Conclusion—Enteric neurones change their levels of expression of neuromessengers in hypertrophic ileum. ICC are also affected. The changes are presumably part of an adaptive response to the increased work load. 

 Keywords: enteric nerves; interstitial cells of Cajal; hypertrophy; neuropeptides; nitric oxide; neuronal plasticity PMID:9691923

  13. Curative Effects of Oleanolic Acid on Formed Hypertrophic Scars in the Rabbit Ear Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Lan-Ke; Peng, Cheng; He, Kun; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a common proliferative disorder of dermal fibroblasts characterized by collagen overproduction and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). There is no consensus about the best therapeutics to produce complete and permanent improvement of scars with few side effects. To investigate the therapeutic effects of oleanolic acid (OA) on hypertrophic scars and explore the possible mechanism of action involved, a rabbit ear model with hypertrophic scars was established. OA (2.5%, 5%, and 10%) was given once daily to the scars for 28 consecutive days. As a result, OA significantly alleviated formed hypertrophic scars on rabbit ears. The levels of TGF-β1, MMP-1, TIMP-1, and collagens I and III were notably decreased, and the number of apoptosis cells and mRNA expression of MMP-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 were markedly increased in the scar tissue. The scar elevation index (SEI) was also evidently reduced. Histological findings exhibited significant amelioration of the collagen tissue. These results suggest that OA has the favorable curative effects on formed hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model, and the possible mechanism of action is that OA decreases HSFs proliferation and increases HSFs apoptosis by reduction of P311 gene expression and TGF-β1 production, inhibition of TIMP-1 secretion, enhancement of MMP-2 activity, and subsequently facilitation of degradation of collagen types I and III. PMID:23326292

  14. Abnormal head position in infantile nystagmus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Infantile Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Darrow, David H; Greene, Arin K; Mancini, Anthony J; Nopper, Amy J

    2015-10-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common tumors of childhood. Unlike other tumors, they have the unique ability to involute after proliferation, often leading primary care providers to assume they will resolve without intervention or consequence. Unfortunately, a subset of IHs rapidly develop complications, resulting in pain, functional impairment, or permanent disfigurement. As a result, the primary clinician has the task of determining which lesions require early consultation with a specialist. Although several recent reviews have been published, this clinical report is the first based on input from individuals representing the many specialties involved in the treatment of IH. Its purpose is to update the pediatric community regarding recent discoveries in IH pathogenesis, treatment, and clinical associations and to provide a basis for clinical decision-making in the management of IH. PMID:26416931

  16. [An epileptic syndrome in infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Sumerkina, M L

    1997-01-01

    The results of examination of 102 patients with infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP) with epileptic syndrome (ES) at the age from 3 months to 14 years are presented. Epileptic fits predominated in patients with hemiparetic form of ICP (40.8%) and spastic diplegia (32.4%). ES manifestations were observed in ICP during the first 3 years of life (more than 80% of cases). The peculiarities of ES clinical course were revealed. There were determined the main types of seizures in patients with ICP which depended on age of their manifestation, as well as their further transformation and prognosis. Computer tomographic and EEG-correlations were established in different forms of ICP. They permitted to revealed pathogenetic mechanisms of ES development in patients with ICP and to determine therapeutic policy and prognosis of the disease. PMID:9163254

  17. Multifocal infantile haemangioma: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Torres, Erica; Rosa, João; Leaute-Labreze, Christine; Soares-de-Almeida, Luis

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a newborn who presented with multiple dark red macules that developed into red-to-purple papules associated with thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal ultrasound showed multiple hyperechoic papules and nodules. Endothelial cells from a skin biopsy stained positively for endothelial cell glucose transporter 1, which was consistent with a diagnosis of multifocal infantile haemangioma. At the age of 2 months, the child developed intestinal bleeding and anaemia. Upper and lower endoscopies showed no intestinal haemangiomas. Oral treatment with propranolol (3 mg/kg/day) resulted in complete involution of the skin and hepatic haemangiomas over the period of treatment, which lasted until the child was aged 15 months. This is a rare case of multifocal cutaneous haemangioma with hepatic and probable intestinal involvement, successfully treated with propranolol. PMID:27317759

  18. Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nip, Siu Ying Angel; Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Wing Kwan Alex; Leung, Alexander K. C.; Choi, Paul C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments. PMID:27110421

  19. Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Nip, Siu Ying Angel; Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Wing Kwan Alex; Leung, Alexander K C; Choi, Paul C L

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments. PMID:27110421

  20. Mechanisms of propranolol action in infantile hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jina JY; Khan, Zia A

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma is a common tumor of infancy. Although most hemangiomas spontaneously regress, treatment is indicated based on complications, risk to organ development and function, and disfigurement. The serendipitous discovery of propranolol, a non-selective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, as an effective means to regress hemangiomas has made this a first-line therapy for hemangioma patients. Propranolol has shown remarkable response rates. There are, however, some adverse effects, which include changes in sleep, acrocyanosis, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. Over the last few years, researchers have focused on understanding the mechanisms by which propranolol causes hemangioma regression. This has entailed study of cultured vascular endothelial cells including endothelial cells isolated from hemangioma patients. In this article, we review recent studies offering potential mechanisms of how various cell types found in hemangioma may respond to propranolol. PMID:26413184

  1. Flunarizine in therapy-resistant infantile epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, P; Cusmai, R; Bruni, O; Pruna, D; Brindesi, I

    1986-01-01

    An open add-on trial with flunarizine has been carried out in 27 cases of therapy resistant infantile epilepsies: 15 partial and 12 generalized epilepsies. Etiology was an hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in 13 cases, cerebral malformations in 10 cases and 4 various prenatal and perinatal cases. After a 2 months baseline period, flunarizine was given in addition to the previous therapy in a 5 mg once daily dose. A single blind versus placebo study was carried out in another series of 16 cases. Better results were found in HIE cases than in malformative cases, and in cases with perinatal HIE than in cases with prenatal hypoxic encephalopathy. The improvement in symptomatic generalized epilepsies was more evident than in symptomatic partial epilepsies. Drowsiness was the only side effect reported. PMID:3609883

  2. Bimodal spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of hypertrophic skin tissue : pre-clinical experimentation, data selection and classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Gisquet, H; Blondel, W; Guillemin, F

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at investigating the efficiency of bimodal spectroscopy in detection of hypertrophic scar tissue on a preclinical model. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance spectra were collected from 55 scars deliberately created on ears of 20 rabbits, amongst which some received tacrolimus injection to provide non-hypertrophic scar tissue. The spectroscopic data measured on hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic scar tissues were used for developing our classification algorithm. Spectral features were extracted from corrected data and analyzed to classify the scar tissues into hypertrophic or non-hypertrophic. The Algorithm was developed using k-NN classifier and validated by comparing to histological classification result with Leave-One-Out cross validation. Bimodal spectroscopy showed promising results in detecting hypertrophic tissue (sensibility 90.5%, specificity 94.4%). The features used for classification were extracted from the autofluorescence spectra collected at 4 CEFS with excitations at 360, 410, and 420 nm. This indicates the hypertrophic process may involve change in concentration of several fluorophores (collagen, elastin and NADH) excited in this range, or modification in volume of explored tissue layers (epidermis and dermis) due to tissue thickening. PMID:23243577

  3. An Atypical Case of Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Absence of Giant T Waves in spite of Extreme Apical Wall Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sanidas, Elias; Bonou, Maria; Anastasiadis, Georgios; Tzanis, Georgios; Barbetseas, John

    2015-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an uncommon variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with hypertrophy mainly affecting the apex of the left ventricle. We hereby describe a case of an octogenarian female patient who was randomly diagnosed with AHCM due to other comorbidities. PMID:26779351

  4. An Atypical Case of Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Absence of Giant T Waves in spite of Extreme Apical Wall Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sanidas, Elias; Bonou, Maria; Anastasiadis, Georgios; Tzanis, Georgios; Barbetseas, John

    2015-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an uncommon variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with hypertrophy mainly affecting the apex of the left ventricle. We hereby describe a case of an octogenarian female patient who was randomly diagnosed with AHCM due to other comorbidities. PMID:26779351

  5. The presence of lysylpyridinoline in the hypertrophic cartilage of newly hatched chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, M. W.; Martinez, D. A.; Cook, M. E.; Vailas, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of lysylpyridinoline (LP) as a nonreducible cross-link in appreciable quantities has primarily been limited to the mineralized tissues, bone and dentin. However, the results reported here show that LP is not only present in the hypertrophic cartilage of the tibiotarsus isolated from newly hatched broiler chicks, but it is approx. 4-fold as concentrated as hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP). Bone and articular cartilage surrounding the hypertrophic cartilage do not contain measurable quantities of LP. Purified LP has a fluorescent scan similar to purified HP and literature values, confirming that we indeed were measuring LP. Also, the cartilage lesion produced by immature chondrocytes from birds with tibial dyschondroplasia had LP but the HP:LP ratio was > 1. Thus, the low HP:LP ratio could be a marker for hypertrophic cartilage in avians.

  6. Pak1 as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Anti-Hypertrophic Treatment in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zi, Min; Naumann, Ronald; Ulm, Susanne; Jin, Jiawei; Taglieri, Domenico M.; Prehar, Sukhpal; Gui, Junhong; Tsui, Hoyee; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Neyses, Ludwig; Solaro, R. John; Ke, Yunbo; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Lei, Ming; Wang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Background Stress-induced hypertrophic remodeling is a critical pathogenetic process leading to heart failure. While many signal transduction cascades are demonstrated as important regulators to facilitate the induction of cardiac hypertrophy, the signaling pathways for suppressing hypertrophic remodeling remain largely unexplored. In this study, we identified p21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1) as a novel signaling regulator which antagonizes cardiac hypertrophy. Methods and Results Hypertrophic stress applied to primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs), or murine hearts caused the activation of Pak1. Analysis of NRCMs expressing constitutively active Pak1 or in which Pak1 was silenced disclosed that Pak1 played an anti-hypertrophic role. To investigate the in vivo role of Pak1 in the heart, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Pak1 (Pak1cko). When subject to 2 weeks of pressure overload, Pak1cko mice compared to controls, developed greater cardiac hypertrophy with attendant blunting of JNK activation, and these knockout mice underwent the transition into heart failure when prolonged stress was applied. In addition, chronic angiotensin II infusion also caused increased cardiac hypertrophy in Pak1cko mice. Moreover, we discovered that the Pak1 activator FTY720, a sphingosine-like analogue, was able to prevent pressure overload-induced hypertrophy in wild-type mice, without compromising their cardiac functions. Meanwhile FTY720 failed to exert such an effect on Pak1cko mice, suggesting that the anti-hypertrophic effect of FTY720 likely acts through Pak1 activation. Conclusions These results, for the first time, establish Pak1 as a novel anti-hypertrophic regulator and suggest that it may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:22082674

  7. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P < 0.05), whereas at a concentration of 1 μg/mL inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Collagen synthesis by normal skin fibroblasts after LPS stimulation mimicked those derived from hypertrophic scar tissue. LPS of 0.1 μg/mL had significant effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. PMID:23653386

  8. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:26961572

  9. Occurrence of Clinically Diagnosed Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Maron, Martin S; Hellawell, Jennifer L; Lucove, Jaime C; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is the most common genetic heart disease and an important cause of sudden death and heart failure symptoms. The current prevalence for HC (1:500) is based on echocardiographic population studies in which a substantial proportion of affected subjects have not come to clinical recognition. Therefore, we sought to define the subset of patients with HC who are diagnosed in the US. A proprietary integrated claims database including medical condition International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic codes for over 160 million individual patients in the US was interrogated for 2013 to identify the prevalence of clinically recognized HC. Patients with ≥1 claim for any of the HC International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes from January to December 2013 were identified. The combined occurrence rate of HC was stratified by age and gender and multiplied by the 2013 United States population in the same age/gender categories to produce the final projected prevalence. The analysis was performed on 169,089,614 patients, of whom 59,009 unique patients were identified with ≥1 claim for HC. The projected estimated occurrence of diagnosed HC in the US in 2013 was 1:3,195 for a total of 98,958 subjects. Average age at HC diagnosis was in the fifth decade of life, with 43% of the cohort composed of women. In conclusion, leveraging a claims-based data analytic technique, about 100,000 patients are diagnosed clinically with HC in the US, an occurrence which is less than the prevalence reported in systematic population studies based on echocardiographic diagnosis. This observation supports the view that many patients with HC are undiagnosed throughout life and enhances our understanding of the burden of this genetic heart disease on the health care system. PMID:27006153

  10. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  11. Clinical significance of giant negative T waves in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, F.; Nihoyannopoulos, P.; Stewart, J.; Dickie, S.; Lemery, R.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-04-01

    To assess the clinical significance of giant negative T waves in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from Western nations, clinical, echocardiographic, radionuclide and 48 h electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring findings were compared in 27 patients with and 56 patients without giant negative T waves. Patients with giant negative T waves were older at diagnosis (43 +/- 15 versus 32 +/- 14 years, p less than 0.005), had greater ECG voltage (SV1 + RV5 = 57 +/- 20 versus 37 +/- 18 mm, p less than 0.001) and had a more vertical frontal plane axis (38.4 +/- 34 versus 13.4 +/- 45 degrees, p less than 0.05). Left ventricular wall thickness on two-dimensional echocardiography was similar at the mitral valve level (mean 16.5 +/- 4 versus 16.6 +/- 3 cm), but was greater at the papillary muscle level (mean 20.7 +/- 5 versus 17.6 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.01) and apex (mean 23.3 +/- 5 versus 17.3 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.001) in patients with giant negative T waves. Fewer patients with giant negative T waves had asymmetric septal hypertrophy (12 (44%) of 27 versus 36 (64%) of 56, p = 0.08) or systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (4 (14%) of 27 versus 25 (45%) of 56, p less than 0.01), whereas left ventricular end-diastolic (44.1 +/- 6 versus 39.6 +/- 5 mm, p = 0.01) and end-systolic dimensions (27.8 +/- 4 versus 24 +/- 6 mm, p less than 0.05) were greater in this group. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was seen on ECG monitoring in 21% of patients in both groups.

  12. Operation for hypertrophic subaortic stenosis in the aged.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M M; McIntosh, C L; Tucker, E; Clark, R E

    1987-10-01

    To determine if operative palliation of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) is worthwhile in the elderly, hemodynamic, cardiac conduction, symptomatological, functional, and survival data were examined in 52 patients (39 women) 65 years old and older (mean age, 69 years; range, 65 to 81 years) who had a left ventricular myotomy and myectomy (LVMM) (Morrow procedure) alone or with concomitant operations. Seventy-four percent of all operative survivors underwent catheterization an average of 6 months postoperatively. The mean follow-up was 54 months (range, 5 to 120 months). The population was divided for analyses into those with coronary artery disease (CAD) (N = 11,21%) and those without (N = 41). The peak resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient was reduced from 65 +/- 16 mm Hg to 3 +/- 1 mm Hg (p less than 0.01) in the group with CAD and from 95 +/- 13 mm Hg to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg (p less than 0.001) in the group without CAD. Significant reductions in peak gradients in response to provocation also occurred in both groups. New conduction abnormalities occurred in 72% of survivors, 85% of whom showed improvement in regard to symptoms. The overall average New York Heart Association Functional Class was 3.2 +/- 0.1 preoperatively and at latest follow-up, 1.9 +/- 0.1 (p less than 0.001). The hospital mortality for LVMM alone in the absence of CAD was 8% with a 5-year actuarial survival of 75 +/- 8%. LVMM in the presence of CAD resulted in an operative mortality of 27% (N = 3); all deaths were related to an acquired ventricular septal defect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3662685

  13. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way. PMID:18388576

  14. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  15. Hypertrophic lichen planus versus prurigo nodularis: a dermoscopic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ankad, Balachandra S.; Beergouder, Savitha L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic lichen planus (HLP) classically involves shin and ankles and is characterized by hyperkeratotic plaques and nodules. Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a chronic neurodermatitis that presents with intensely pruritic nodules. Histopathology of HLP and PN demonstrate epidermal hyperplasia, hypergranulosis, and compact hyperkeratosis. The dermis shows vertically arranged collagen fibers and an increased number of fibroblasts and capillaries in both conditions. Moreover, basal cell degeneration is confined to the tips of rete ridges, and band-like infiltration is conspicuously absent in HLP. Therefore, both conditions mimic each other clinically, which makes diagnosis difficult. Hence, there is a need for a diagnostic technique to differentiate both conditions. Objective: To evaluate dermoscopic patterns in HLP and PN and to study these patterns histopathologically. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at S. Nijalingappa Medical College in Bagalkot. It was an observational case series study. Ethical clearance and informed consent was obtained. A Dermlite 3 dermoscope (3Gen, San Juan Capistrano, CA, USA) attached to a Sony Cyber Shot camera DSC-W800 (Sony Electronics Inc., San Diego, California, USA) was employed. Histopathology was done to confirm the diagnosis. Results: There were 10 patients each with HLP and PN. HLP was seen in 8 males and 2 females. PN was observed in 7 females and 3 males. Dermoscopy of HLP demonstrated pearly white areas and peripheral striations (100%), gray-blue globules (60%), comedo-like openings (30%), red dots (40%), red globules (10%), brownish-black globules (30%), and yellowish structures (90%). In PN, red dots (70%), red globules (60%), and pearly white areas with peripheral striations (100%) were observed under dermoscopy. Conclusion: Both HLP and PN demonstrated specific dermoscopic patterns which can be demonstrated on histopathologic findings. The authors propose that these patterns are hallmarks of each

  16. [Regional right ventricular hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Seo, T; Yokota, Y; Kumaki, T; Takarada, A; Kubo, M; Kaku, K; Toh, S; Fukuzaki, H

    1985-06-01

    The mode of right ventricular hypertrophy was assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) for 24 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and the results were compared with those of 51 patients with hypertension (HT). The patients with HT were categorized in four groups depending on the thickness of the interventricular septum (IVST) and left ventricular posterior wall (PWT): HT-ASH with both left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (IVST greater than or equal to 13 mm) and asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) (IVST/PWT greater than or equal to 1.3), severe HT with LVH and without ASH, and mild HT without LVH and ASH. Anterior wall thickness (AWT), posterior wall thickness (PWT), and diaphragmatic wall thickness (DWT) of the right ventricle were obtained from 2DE in the parasternal long-axis view, the short-axis view and subxiphoid view, respectively. These were recorded on video tape, and the measurements were made on the stop frames. Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) was estimated by the maximal right ventricular wall thickness (max RVWT), and the ratio of the maximal and minimal thickness (max RVWT/min RVWT) was calculated to evaluate asymmetrical hypertrophy (AH) of the right ventricle (RV). The incidence of RVH (Max RVWT greater than or equal to 5 mm) and asymmetrical hypertrophy (AH) (max RVWT/min RVWT greater than or equal to 1.3) of the RV in HCM, HT-ASH and mild HT were 67% and 41%, 57% and 45%, and 15% and 11%, respectively. The incidence of RVH with AH was more frequent in patients with HCM as well as HT with ASH than in patients with HT without ASH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4093619

  17. Utilizing ECG-Based Heartbeat Classification for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Identification.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Quazi Abidur; Tereshchenko, Larisa G; Kongkatong, Matthew; Abraham, Theodore; Abraham, M Roselle; Shatkay, Hagit

    2015-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease where the heart muscle is partially thickened and blood flow is (potentially fatally) obstructed. A test based on electrocardiograms (ECG) that record the heart electrical activity can help in early detection of HCM patients. This paper presents a cardiovascular-patient classifier we developed to identify HCM patients using standard 10-second, 12-lead ECG signals. Patients are classified as having HCM if the majority of their recorded heartbeats are recognized as characteristic of HCM. Thus, the classifier's underlying task is to recognize individual heartbeats segmented from 12-lead ECG signals as HCM beats, where heartbeats from non-HCM cardiovascular patients are used as controls. We extracted 504 morphological and temporal features—both commonly used and newly-developed ones—from ECG signals for heartbeat classification. To assess classification performance, we trained and tested a random forest classifier and a support vector machine classifier using 5-fold cross validation. We also compared the performance of these two classifiers to that obtained by a logistic regression classifier, and the first two methods performed better than logistic regression. The patient-classification precision of random forests and of support vector machine classifiers is close to 0.85. Recall (sensitivity) and specificity are approximately 0.90. We also conducted feature selection experiments by gradually removing the least informative features; the results show that a relatively small subset of 264 highly informative features can achieve performance measures comparable to those achieved by using the complete set of features. PMID:25915962

  18. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  19. Differential expression of cyclooxygenases in hypertrophic scar and keloid tissues.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Luigi; D'Andrea, Francesco; Grella, Roberto; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Abbondanza, Ciro; De Rosa, Caterina; Prudente, Mariaevelina; Morlando, Marianna; Rossiello, Raffaele

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) and keloid (KL) are two forms of an abnormal cutaneous scarring process, mainly characterized by excessive extracellular matrix deposition and fibroblast proliferation. Despite the increased understanding of the molecular and cellular events leading to HS and KL, the pathogenesis of these lesions remains poorly understood. A pivotal role in the formation of abnormal scars has been ascribed to transforming growth factor-beta, whose activity appears to be mediated through a link with pathways acting via cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2). To date, there is no report on the in vivo expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in human HS and KL tissues. Therefore, using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, we investigated 36 cases of KL, 32 cases of HS, and 25 cases of normal skin in order to define the localization and distribution of COX-1 and COX-2 in the tissues of these scar lesions and the overlying epidermis. The results mainly show the following: (a) a significant overexpression of COX-1 in HS tissues and the overlying epidermis as compared with normal skin and KL tissues and (b) a significant overexpression of COX-2 in KL tissue and the overlying epidermis in contrast to normal skin and HS tissues. Our data support the hypothesis that both COXs are involved in the pathogenesis of scar lesions in different ways and, particularly, COX-1 in the formation of HS and COX-2 in the formation of KL. In addition, the overexpression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the epidermis overlying HS and KL tissues, respectively, underlines the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the pathogenesis of scar lesions. PMID:19769727

  20. Malalignment of the sarcomeric filaments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with cardiac myosin heavy chain gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Muraishi, A; Kai, H; Adachi, K; Nishi, H; Imaizumi, T

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate changes in the alignment of the sarcomeric filaments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and the effects of cardiac β myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) mutation on the sarcomeric ultrastructure.
DESIGN—A retrospective analysis.
PATIENTS—Endomyocardial biopsy samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy in seven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and β-MHC mutation, six with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but without the mutation, and five controls (with chest pain syndromes).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE—Alignment of the sarcomeric filaments and the distance between neighbouring thick myosin filaments.
RESULTS—In controls, cross sections of the sarcomere at the A band showed a highly organised orthohexagonal array with 6 thin actin filaments surrounding one thick myosin filament, whereas in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the alignment of the sarcomeric filaments was sparse and disrupted. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with a mutation, the distance between neighbouring thick myosin filaments was greater than in controls (mean (SD) 45.3 (4.7) v 38.5 (3.5) nm, p < 0.05), and the variance of the distance was greater than in controls (8.0 (0.7) v 4.8 (1.0) nm, p < 0.001) or in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without a mutation (6.7 (0.6) nm, p < 0.05). In the latter, the variance of the distance was also greater than in the controls (p < 0.01). A significant correlation was found between the grade of the myocyte hypertrophy and the variance of the distance (r = 0.654; p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—The alignment of the sarcomeric filaments is disrupted in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, particularly when there is β-MHC mutation.


Keywords: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; β myosin heavy chain; myosin filament; sarcomere PMID:10525522

  1. Identification and characterization of the novel Col10a1 regulatory mechanism during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Lu, Y; Li, F; Qiao, L; Wang, Q; Li, N; Borgia, J A; Deng, Y; Lei, G; Zheng, Q

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human skeleton develops through the endochondral pathway, in which cartilage-forming chondrocytes proliferate and enlarge into hypertrophic chondrocytes that eventually undergo apoptosis and are replaced by bone. Although at a terminal differentiation stage, hypertrophic chondrocytes have been implicated as the principal engine of bone growth. Abnormal chondrocyte hypertrophy has been seen in many skeletal dysplasia and osteoarthritis. Meanwhile, as a specific marker of hypertrophic chondrocytes, the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) is also critical for endochondral bone formation, as mutation and altered COL10A1 expression are often accompanied by abnormal chondrocyte hypertrophy in many skeletal diseases. However, how the type X collagen gene is regulated during chondrocyte hypertrophy has not been fully elucidated. We have recently demonstrated that Runx2 interaction with a 150-bp mouse Col10a1 cis-enhancer is required but not sufficient for its hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific reporter expression in transgenic mice, suggesting requirement of additional Col10a1 regulators. In this study, we report in silico sequence analysis of this 150-bp enhancer and identification of its multiple binding factors, including AP1, MEF2, NFAT, Runx1 and TBX5. Using this enhancer as bait, we performed yeast one-hybrid assay and identified multiple candidate Col10a1-interacting genes, including cyclooxygenase 1 (Cox-1) and Cox-2. We have also performed mass spectrometry analysis and detected EF1-alpha, Fus, GdF7 and Runx3 as components of the specific complex formed by the cis-enhancer and nuclear extracts from hypertrophic MCT (mouse chondrocytes immortalized with large T antigen) cells that express Col10a1 abundantly. Notably, some of the candidate genes are differentially expressed in hypertrophic MCT cells and have been associated with chondrocyte hypertrophy and Runx2, an indispensible Col10a1 regulator. Intriguingly, we detected high-level Cox-2 expression in

  2. The Pyloric Caeca Area Is a Major Site for IgM+ and IgT+ B Cell Recruitment in Response to Oral Vaccination in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Natalia A.; Castro, Rosario; Abos, Beatriz; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, Sylvia S.; Pérez-Prieto, Sara I.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have characterized some aspects of the immune response of the teleost gut in response to diverse pathogens or stimuli, most studies have focused on the posterior segments exclusively. However, there are still many details of how teleost intestinal immunity is regulated that remain unsolved, including the location of IgM+ and IgT+ B cells along the digestive tract and their role during the course of a local stimulus. Thus, in the current work, we have studied the B cell response in five different segments of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) digestive tract in both naïve fish and fish orally vaccinated with an alginate-encapsulated DNA vaccine against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). IgM+ and IgT+ cells were identified all along the tract with the exception of the stomach in naïve fish. While IgM+ cells were mostly located in the lamina propria (LP), IgT+ cells were primarily localized as intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). Scattered IgM+ IELs were only detected in the pyloric caeca. In response to oral vaccination, the pyloric caeca region was the area of the digestive tract in which a major recruitment of B cells was demonstrated through both real time PCR and immunohistochemistry, observing a significant increase in the number of both IgM+ and IgT+ IELs. Our findings demonstrate that both IgM+ and IgT+ respond to oral stimulation and challenge the paradigm that teleost IELs are exclusively T cells. Unexpectedly, we have also detected B cells in the fat tissue associated to the digestive tract that respond to vaccination, suggesting that these cells surrounded by adipocytes also play a role in mucosal defense. PMID:23785475

  3. The evaluation of anti-ulcerogenic effect of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.) on pyloric ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekhara, N.; Ashok, B. K.; Sharma, Parmeshwar P.; Ravishankar, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the present era, because of the life-style, the disorders such as hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently. Satwa (starch) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn. are used in folklore practice for the treatment of above complaints under the name Tugaksheeree. Aim: To compare the anti-ulcerogenic activity of the above two drugs in pyloric ligation induced gastric ulcer in albino rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 Wistar strain albino rats of both sexes grouped into three groups. Group C served as pyloric ligated control group, Group I received starch of C. angustifolia suspension and Group II received starch of M. arundinacea for seven days. On 8th day pylorus was ligated. After ligation the animals were deprived of food and water and sacrificed at the end of 14 h. The collected gastric contents were used for biochemical estimation and ulcer index was calculated from excised stomach. Results: Both the test drugs showed statistically significant decrease in the volume, increase in the pH, reduced the free acidity of gastric juice and decreased the peptic activity. The starch of C. angustifolia reduced a total acidity non-significantly while M. arundinacea reduced it significantly. Among the two drugs the M. arundinacea has effectively reduced the peptic activity, which is statistically significant. M. arundinacea shown statistically significant increase of total carbohydrates. Conclusion: Both the test drugs proved anti-ulcer activity and prevents the chance of gastric ulcer. Among these two M. arundinacea is more effective. PMID:25558167

  4. Has infantile sexuality anything to do with infants?

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, Björn

    2012-06-01

    Classical psychoanalytic theory draws many concepts from mental processes that are assumed to arise in the infant and influence the adult mind. Still, psychoanalytic practice with mothers and infants has been integrated but little within general psychoanalytic theory. One reason is that only few analysts have utilized such practice to further theory. Another reason is that infant therapists tend to abandon classical psychoanalytic concepts in favour of attachment concepts. As a result the concept of infantile sexuality, so central to classical theory, plays an unobtrusive role in clinical discussions on infant therapy. The author argues that infantile sexuality plays an important role in many mother-infant disturbances. To function as a clinical concept, it needs to be delineated from attachment and be understood in the context of mother-infant interaction. Two examples are provided; one where the analyst's infantile sexuality emerged in a comment to the infant. Another is a case of breast-feeding problems with a little boy fretting at the breast. This is interpreted as reflecting the mother's infantile sexual conflicts as well as the boy's emerging internalization of them. Thus, to conceptualize such disorders we need to take into account the infantile sexuality in both mother and baby. PMID:22671253

  5. Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Global Strain in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Zo, Joo-Hee; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with adverse outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although left atrial (LA) remodeling and dysfunction are known to associate with the development of atrial fibrillation in HCM, the changes of the LA in HCM patients remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in LA size and mechanical function in HCM patients compared to control subjects and to determine the characteristics of HCM associated with LA remodeling and dysfunction. Methods Seventy-nine HCM patients (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) were compared to 79 age- and sex-matched controls (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) and 20 young healthy controls (mean age, 33 ± 5 years; 45% were men). The LA diameter, volume, and mechanical function, including global strain (ε), were evaluated by 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography. The phenotype of HCM, maximal left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, LV mass, and presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results HCM patients showed increased LA volume index, impaired reservoir function, and decreased LA ε compared to the control subjects. When we divided the HCM group according to a maximal LA volume index (LAVImax) of 38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε of 21%, no significant differences in the HCM phenotype and maximal LV wall thickness were observed for patients with LAVImax >38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε ≤21%. Conversely, the LV mass index was significantly higher both in patients with maximal LA volume index >38.7 ml/m2 and with LA ε ≤21% and was independently associated with LAVImax and LA ε. Although the LGE extent was increased in patients with LA ε ≤21%, it was not independently associated with either LAVImax or LA ε. Conclusions HCM patients showed progressed LA remodeling and dysfunction; the determinant of LA remodeling and dysfunction was LV mass index rather than LV myocardial fibrosis

  6. Relationship between Regional Fat Distribution and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Maresca, Luciano; Lanzillo, Chiara; Marinoni, Giorgia Michela; D’Adamo, Monica; Di Roma, Mauro; Preziosi, Paolo; Bellia, Alfonso; Calò, Leonardo; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common genetic heart disease, is characterized by heterogeneous phenotypic expression. Body mass index has been associated with LV mass and heart failure symptoms in HCM. The aim of our study was to investigate whether regional (trunk, appendicular, epicardial) fat distribution and extent could be related to hypertrophy severity and pattern in HCM. Methods Cardiovascular magnetic resonance was performed in 32 subjects with echocardiography-based diagnosis of HCM (22M/10F, 57.2±12.6 years) characterized by predominant hypertrophy at the interventricular septum (IVS). Regional fat distribution was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Gender differences were detected in maximum IVS thickness (M: 18.3±3.8 mm vs. F: 14.3±4 mm, p = 0.012), right ventricle (RV) systolic function (M: 61.3±6.7%; F: 67.5±6.3%, p = 0.048), indexed RV end-diastolic (M: 64.8±16.3 ml/m2; F: 50.7±15.5 ml/m2, p = 0.04) and end-systolic volumes (M: 24.3±8.3 ml/m2; F: 16.7±7.4 ml/m2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for age and gender, maximum IVS thickness was associated with truncal fat (Tr-FAT) (β = 0.43, p = 0.02), but not with either appendicular or epicardial fat. Epicardial fat resulted independently associated with NT-proBNP levels (β = 0.63, p = 0.04). Late Gadolinium Enhancement-positive subjects displayed greater maximum IVS thickness (p = 0.02), LV mass index (p = 0.015) and NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.04), but no associations with fat amount or distribution were observed. Conclusion Truncal, but not appendicular or epicardial fat amount, seems to be related with maximum IVS thickness, the hallmark feature in our cohort of HCM patients. Further prospective researches are needed to assess a potential causative effect of central adiposity on HCM phenotype. PMID:27388274

  7. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex) not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent). High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected), end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance risk stratification. At

  8. Hypertrophic scars and keloids in surgery: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Song, Colin

    2014-09-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids remain a challenge in surgery. We appreciate that our understanding of the process at cellular and molecular level, profound as it is, when it comes to the clinical evidence much is left to be desired. Although the bench to bedside conundrum remains, the science of translational research calls for an even higher level of cooperation between the scientist and the clinician for the impetus to succeed.The clinicians alerted us to the possible theories in the pathogenesis of keloid formation, inter alia, the ischemia theory, mast cell theory, immune theory, transforming growth factor β interaction, mechanical theory, and the melanocyte stimulating hormone theory. All of the above presupposed a stimulus that would result in an uncontrolled upregulation of collagen and extracellular matrix expression in the pathogenesis of the keloid. This bedside to bench initiative, as in true science, realized more ponderables than possibilities.By the same token, research into the epidermal-mesenchymal signaling, molecular biology, genomics, and stem cell research holds much promise in the bench top arena. To assess efficacy, many scar assessment scores exist in the literature. The clinical measurement of scar maturity can aid in determining end points for therapeutics. Tissue oxygen tension and color assessment of scars by standardized photography proved to be useful.In surgery, the use of dermal substitutes holds some promise as we surmise that quality scars that arise from dermal elements, molecular and enzyme behavior, and balance. Although a systematic review shows some benefit for earlier closure and healing of wounds, no such review exists at this point in time for the use of dermal substitutes in scars.Adipose-derived stem cell, as it pertains to scars, will hopefully realize the potential of skin regeneration rather than by repair in which we are familiar with as well as the undesirable scarring as a result of healing through the inflammatory

  9. Aortic Stiffness in Youth with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Genotype.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Justin P; Johnson, Philip K; Colan, Steven D

    2016-06-01

    Clinical events in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients are related to the degree of hypertrophy. Aortic stiffness in adult HCM patients has been reported to be higher than control patients. Increased stiffness may cause more LV hypertrophy and thus lead to more clinical events. We sought to (a) noninvasively compare aortic structure and function between youth with sarcomeric HCM genotype versus control youth and (b) explore the relation between aortic function and degree of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. In a prospective study from a single referral center, clinical, anthropometric, and hemodynamic data were acquired on 28 consecutive pathogenic HCM gene mutation carriers and 26 unrelated controls (mean age 16.3, 50 % girls). Hemodynamic data included applanation tonometry measured central pulse pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV), reflected wave augmentation index (AIx). In the HCM gene carriers, LV mass-to-volume ratio was extracted from clinically indicated echocardiograms as an index of hypertrophy. Associations were assessed using multivariable adjusted linear regression. The HCM group was comprised of 14 myosin binding protein C3 carriers, 13 myosin heavy chain 7 carriers, and 1 child with both. HCM and control groups did not differ by age, sex, height, body mass index, heart rate, or blood pressure. HCM carriers had significantly lower CFPWV than controls (4.46 ± 0.88 vs. 4.97 ± 0.44 m/s, p = 0.01) and higher AIx magnitude (27 ± 19 vs. 18 ± 7 %, p = 0.04). These associations persisted after adjustment for age, sex, height, heart rate, mean pressure, and medication use. Within the HCM group, LV hypertrophy was related to AIx but not CFPWV. CFPWV nor AIx differed by genotype. Aortic stiffness appears lower, but wave reflection appears higher in youth carrying HCM gene mutations. The degree of wave reflection appears correlated with LV hypertrophy in this high-risk cohort, suggesting that mitigation of wave

  10. Prediction of Sarcomere Mutations in Subclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Lopes, Luis R.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Patel, Vimal; Li, Chunming; Bassett, Paul; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Esteban, Maite Tome; Muthurangu, Vivek; Sherrid, Mark V.; Day, Sharlene M.; Canter, Charles E.; McKenna, William J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Bluemke, David A.; Elliott, Perry M.; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Moon, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sarcomere protein mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) induce subtle cardiac structural changes prior to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We have proposed that myocardial crypts are part of this phenotype and independently associated with the presence of sarcomere gene mutations. We tested this hypothesis in genetic HCM pre-LVH (G+LVH−). Methods and Results A multi-centre case-control study investigated crypts and 22 other cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) parameters in subclinical HCM to determine their strength of association with sarcomere gene mutation carriage. The G+LVH− sample (n=73) was 29±13 years old and 51% male. Crypts were related to the presence of sarcomere mutations (for ≥1 crypt, β=2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-4.4, p=0.014; for ≥2 crypts, β=3.0, 95%CI 0.8-7.9, p=0.004). In combination with 3 other parameters: anterior mitral valve leaflet (AMVL) elongation (β=2.1, 95%CI 1.7-3.1, p<0.001), abnormal LV apical trabeculae (β=1.6, 95%CI 0.8-2.5, p<0.001), and smaller LV end-systolic volumes (β=1.4, 95%CI 0.5-2.3, p=0.001), multiple crypts indicated the presence of sarcomere gene mutations with 80% accuracy and an area under the curve of 0.85 (95%CI 0.8-0.9). In this G+LVH− population cardiac myosin-binding protein C mutation carriers had twice the prevalence of crypts when compared to the other combined mutations (47 vs. 23%; odds ratio, 2.9; 95%CI 1.1–7.9; p=0.045). Conclusions The subclinical HCM phenotype measured by CMR in a multi-center environment and consisting of crypts (particularly multiple), AMVL elongation, abnormal trabeculae and smaller LV systolic cavity, is indicative of the presence of sarcomere gene mutations and highlights the need for further study. PMID:25228707

  11. [Accompanying symptoms in infantile spastic hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, M; Schuknecht, C; Eisenkolb, T

    1985-01-01

    Various concomitant disorders in 535 children with infantile hemiplegia were evaluated; 159 of the cases were particularly well documented. The right/left distribution of the hemiplegia was 56 to 44, the ratio of boys to girls 59 to 41. Severe impairments of hand function (lack of function, first grip) were found more frequently in right hemiplegics than left; the ratio of severe to slight disorders was approx. 3 to 1 in right hemiplegics and 3 to 2 in left hemiplegics. Impairment of hand function was closely related to the quality of sensitivity, the tests of this being based on two-point discrimination and stereognosis. Sixty-two percent of the children were of normal intelligence; of the remainder, approximately equal-sized groups suffered from impairment of the learning faculty or were mentally retarded. There was a positive correlation between reduced intelligence and the severity of impairment of hand function. Impaired speech development was found in 7 percent of the children, right and left hemiplegics being equally affected. Thus, there was no evidence that the brain lesion had any special influence on development of speech. Observations of growth in the legs revealed average differences of length of 2 mm and up to 3.5 cm in isolated cases. After eight year of life there was practically no further increase in the differences in length. PMID:4050042

  12. Psychosocial predisposing factors for infantile colic.

    PubMed Central

    Rautava, P; Helenius, H; Lehtonen, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study associations between characteristics of families during the first pregnancy and after childbirth and the development of infantile colic. DESIGN--Randomised, stratified cluster sampling. Follow up from the first visit to a maternity health care clinic during pregnancy to three months after birth with confidential semistructured questionnaires. SETTING--Maternity health care clinics in primary health care centres in Finland. SUBJECTS--1443 nulliparous women and 1407 partners. Altogether 1333 women and 1279 men returned the questionnaires. When the infants were 3 months old 1208 women and 1115 men returned questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Marital relationship; personal and social behaviour of parents during the pregnancy and their coping with the pregnancy; mothers' physical health and events, symptoms, and experiences in relation to pregnancy; self confidence and experiences of mothers and fathers in relation to childbirth; and parents' sociodemographic and educational variables. Measure of colic when the infant was 3 months old. RESULTS--Experience of stress and physical symptoms during the pregnancy, dissatisfaction with the sexual relationship, and negative experiences during childbirth were associated with the development of colic in the baby. None of the sociodemographic factors was associated with colic. CONCLUSIONS--Early preventive health work during pregnancy should attempt to improve parents' tolerance of symptoms of stress and ability to cope and increase their confidence in parenting abilities. PMID:8401016

  13. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  14. Enhanced in vivo delivery of 5-fluorouracil by ethosomal gels in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model.

    PubMed

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  15. Sudden cardiac death associated with occult hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a dog under anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A 6-year-old, 3.0 kg, neutered female, Yorkshire terrier was referred for orthopedic surgery. Cardiac arrest followed unsuccessful treatment of bradycardia and systemic arterial hypotension under general anesthesia. Postmortem examination revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A possible relationship between treatment of bradycardia, systemic arterial hypotension, and sudden cardiac death is described. PMID:16422064

  16. [Molecular targets and novel pharmacological options to prevent myocardial hypertrophic remodeling].

    PubMed

    Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Poggesi, Corrado; Mugelli, Alessandro; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is a pathophysiological feature of several cardiac conditions and is the hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common monogenic inherited disease of the heart. In recent years, preclinical and clinical studies investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways involved in pathologic cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and highlighted a number of possible molecular targets of therapy aimed at preventing its development. Early prevention of myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is particularly sought after in HCM, as current therapeutic strategies are unable to remove the primary cause of disease, i.e. the disease-causing gene mutation. Studies on transgenic animal models or human myocardial samples from patients with HCM identified intracellular calcium overload as a central mechanism driving pathological hypertrophy. In this review, we analyze recent preclinical and clinical studies on animal models and patients with HCM aimed at preventing or modifying hypertrophic myocardial remodeling. Mounting evidence shows that prevention of pathological hypertrophy is a feasible strategy in HCM and will enter the clinical practice in the near future. Considering the close mechanistic similarities between HCM and secondary hypertrophy, these studies are also relevant for the common forms of cardiac hypertrophy, such as hypertensive or valvular heart disease. PMID:27029877

  17. Assessing a murmur, saving a life: current trends in the management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, J R; Krafft, P; Fox, K

    1996-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, formerly called idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a non-dilated cardiomyopathy primarily affecting the left ventricle, left atria, intraventricular septum, and mitral valve. It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that impairs diastolic and systolic function. Diagnosis is complex due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Symptoms and morphology are not always related and clinical signs may be absent or limited to a soft systolic murmur. The first symptom of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is frequently sudden cardiac death. Echocardiogram is an accurate diagnostic tool. Asymptomatic patients are generally not treated. Treatment for symptomatic patients begins with beta or calcium channel blockers. Antiarrhythmics may be added to protect against sudden cardiac death. Surgical intervention is done if other treatments fall and involves removal of a portion of the obstructive septum. Operative mortality is 5% with a 60% reduction in symptoms. A promising alternative to surgery is dual-chamber pacemakers. Patient and family teaching is the emphasis of long-term management. PMID:8933537

  18. Videodensitometric time-density curve change after alcohol septal ablation of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nemes, A; Kalapos, A; Sasi, V; Ungi, T; Ungi, I; Forster, T; Sepp, R

    2015-02-01

    A recently developed computerized method for estimation of myocardial perfusion, based on the analysis of the time-density curves, is demonstrated to assess myocardial blush over a selected myocardial region of interest in a patient with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy before and after alcohol septal ablation. PMID:23184598

  19. The Metabolome in Finnish Carriers of the MYBPC3-Q1061X Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Heliö, Tiina; Jääskeläinen, Pertti; Laine, Mika; Hilvo, Mika; Nieminen, Markku S.; Laakso, Markku; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Orešič, Matej; Kuusisto, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mutations in the cardiac myosin-binding protein C gene (MYBPC3) are the most common genetic cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) worldwide. The molecular mechanisms leading to HCM are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic profiles of mutation carriers with the HCM-causing MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation with and without left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and non-affected relatives, and the association of the metabolome to the echocardiographic parameters. Methods and Results 34 hypertrophic subjects carrying the MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation, 19 non-hypertrophic mutation carriers and 20 relatives with neither mutation nor hypertrophy were examined using comprehensive echocardiography. Plasma was analyzed for molecular lipids and polar metabolites using two metabolomics platforms. Concentrations of branched chain amino acids, triglycerides and ether phospholipids were increased in mutation carriers with hypertrophy as compared to controls and non-hypertrophic mutation carriers, and correlated with echocardiographic LVH and signs of diastolic and systolic dysfunction in subjects with the MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation. Conclusions Our study implicates the potential role of branched chain amino acids, triglycerides and ether phospholipids in HCM, as well as suggests an association of these metabolites with remodeling and dysfunction of the left ventricle. PMID:26267065

  20. Comparison of proteomic datasets from hypertrophic chondrocytes in response to ER stress.

    PubMed

    Kudelko, Mateusz; Sharma, Rakesh; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Chan, Danny

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage proteomics is challenging due to the dominance of poorly soluble matrix components and limited available tissue. Using a "spatial" strategy coupled to MS/MS analysis we have specifically labeled and extracted hypertrophic chondrocytes within the growth plate providing thus a comprehensive proteomic map of normal hypertrophic chondrocytes. Furthermore our established 13del mouse model in which the activation of ER stress did not lead to apoptosis of the hypertrophic cells allowed us to address the natural consequences of ER stress in vivo. Thus our data provide also an overview of proteomic changes occurring in cells under ER stress. Associated with the published study [1] this dataset article provided the detailed information of experimental designing, methods, features as well as the raw data of mass spectrometry (MS) identification. Furthermore the data presented here allow the reader to assert the extent of proteomic changes occurring under ER stress in hypertrophic chondrocytes as well as address the data technical reproducibility in both wild type and stress condition. The mass spectrometry proteomics data can be fully accessed from the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002125. PMID:27014728

  1. Dietary copper supplementation reverses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy induced by chronic pressure overload in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy and the transition to heart failure. We show here that dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper (Cu) reverses pre-established hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the presence of pressure overload induced by ascending aor...

  2. RARS2 mutations in a sibship with infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Ngoh, Adeline; Bras, Jose; Guerreiro, Rita; Meyer, Esther; McTague, Amy; Dawson, Eleanor; Mankad, Kshitij; Gunny, Roxana; Clayton, Peter; Mills, Philippa B; Thornton, Rachel; Lai, Ming; Forsyth, Robert; Kurian, Manju A

    2016-05-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia is a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by reduced volume of the brainstem and cerebellum. We report two male siblings who presented with early infantile clonic seizures, and then developed infantile spasms associated with prominent isolated cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using whole exome sequencing techniques, both were found to be compound heterozygotes for one previously reported and one novel mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetase 2 (RARS2). Mutations in this gene have been classically described in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type six (PCH6), a phenotype characterized by early (often intractable) seizures, profound developmental delay, and progressive pontocerebellar atrophy. The electroclinical spectrum of PCH6 is broad and includes a number of seizure types: myoclonic, generalized tonic-clonic, and focal clonic seizures. Our report expands the characterization of the PCH6 disease spectrum and presents infantile spasms as an associated electroclinical phenotype. PMID:27061686

  3. Visuo-vestibular eye movements: infantile strabismus in 3 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Michael C

    2005-06-01

    Infantile strabismus is accompanied by latent nystagmus, primary inferior oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence. If we examine the evolutionary underpinnings of these ocular rotations, we can construct a unifying mechanism for the sensorimotor abnormalities that arise in humans with infantile strabismus. Latent nystagmus, primary inferior oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence correspond to visual balancing reflexes that are operative in lateral-eyed animals in yaw, pitch, and roll, respectively. In humans with infantile strabismus, these subcortical visual reflexes are reactivated by a physiologic imbalance in binocular visual input, which resets central vestibular tone in 3-dimensional space. These visual reflexes reveal the evolutionary role of the eyes as sensory balance organs that can directly modulate central vestibular tone. Latent nystagmus, primary oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence should be reclassified as visuo-vestibular eye movements. PMID:15955986

  4. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories' shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods. Left

  5. A New 4D Trajectory-Based Approach Unveils Abnormal LV Revolution Dynamics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories’ shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods

  6. Hypertrophic stimuli induce transforming growth factor-beta 1 expression in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N; Calderone, A; Izzo, N J; Mäki, T M; Marsh, J D; Colucci, W S

    1994-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a peptide growth factor that may play a role in the myocardial response to hypertrophic stimuli. However, the cellular distribution, mechanism of induction, and source of increased TGF-beta 1 in response to hypertrophic stimuli are not known. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiac myocyte responds to hypertrophic stimuli with the increased expression of TGF-beta 1. In adult rat ventricular myocardium freshly dissociated into myocyte and nonmyocyte cellular fractions, the preponderance of TGF-beta 1 mRNA visualized by Northern hybridization was in the nonmyocyte fraction. Abdominal aortic constriction (7 d) and subcutaneous norepinephrine infusion (36 h) each caused ventricular hypertrophy associated with 3.1-fold and 3.8-fold increases, respectively, in TGF-beta 1 mRNA in the myocyte fraction, but had no effect on the level of TGF-beta 1 mRNA in the nonmyocyte fraction. In ventricular myocytes, norepinephrine likewise caused a 4.1-fold increase in TGF-beta 1 mRNA associated with an increase in TGF-beta bioactivity. This induction of TGF-beta 1 mRNA occurred at norepinephrine concentrations as low as 1 nM and was blocked by prazosin, but not propranolol. NE did not increase the TGF-beta 1 mRNA level in nonmyocytes, primarily fibroblasts, cultured from neonatal rat ventricle. Thus, the cardiac myocyte responds to two hypertrophic stimuli, pressure overload and norepinephrine, with the induction of TGF-beta 1. These data support the view that TGF-beta 1, released by myocytes and acting in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner, is involved in myocardial remodeling by hypertrophic stimuli. Images PMID:7929822

  7. Dual pathways to endochondral osteoblasts: a novel chondrocyte-derived osteoprogenitor cell identified in hypertrophic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung; Gebhardt, Matthias; Golovchenko, Svitlana; Perez-Branguli, Francesc; Hattori, Takako; Hartmann, Christine; Zhou, Xin; deCrombrugghe, Benoit; Stock, Michael; Schneider, Holm; von der Mark, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    According to the general understanding, the chondrocyte lineage terminates with the elimination of late hypertrophic cells by apoptosis in the growth plate. However, recent cell tracking studies have shown that murine hypertrophic chondrocytes can survive beyond “terminal” differentiation and give rise to a progeny of osteoblasts participating in endochondral bone formation. The question how chondrocytes convert into osteoblasts, however, remained open. Following the cell fate of hypertrophic chondrocytes by genetic lineage tracing using BACCol10;Cre induced YFP-reporter gene expression we show that a progeny of Col10Cre-reporter labelled osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts appears in the primary spongiosa and participates – depending on the developmental stage – substantially in trabecular, endosteal, and cortical bone formation. YFP+ trabecular and endosteal cells isolated by FACS expressed Col1a1, osteocalcin and runx2, thus confirming their osteogenic phenotype. In searching for transitory cells between hypertrophic chondrocytes and trabecular osteoblasts we identified by confocal microscopy a novel, small YFP+Osx+ cell type with mitotic activity in the lower hypertrophic zone at the chondro-osseous junction. When isolated from growth plates by fractional enzymatic digestion, these cells termed CDOP (chondrocyte-derived osteoprogenitor) cells expressed bone typical genes and differentiated into osteoblasts in vitro. We propose the Col10Cre-labeled CDOP cells mark the initiation point of a second pathway giving rise to endochondral osteoblasts, alternative to perichondrium derived osteoprogenitor cells. These findings add to current concepts of chondrocyte-osteocyte lineages and give new insight into the complex cartilage-bone transition process in the growth plate. PMID:25882555

  8. miR-182 Modulates Myocardial Hypertrophic Response Induced by Angiogenesis in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Hwangbo, Cheol; Jaba, Irina M.; Zhang, Jiasheng; Papangeli, Irinna; Han, Jinah; Mikush, Nicole; Larrivée, Bruno; Eichmann, Anne; Chun, Hyung J.; Young, Lawrence H.; Tirziu, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an adaptive response to hemodynamic demands. Although angiogenesis is critical to support the increase in heart mass with matching blood supply, it may also promote a hypertrophic response. Previously, we showed that cardiac angiogenesis induced by placental growth factor (PlGF), promotes myocardial hypertrophy through the paracrine action of endothelium-derived NO, which triggers the degradation of regulator of G protein signaling 4 (RGS4) to activate the Akt/mTORC1 pathways in cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated whether miRNAs contribute to the development of hypertrophic response associated with myocardial angiogenesis. We show that miR-182 is upregulated concurrently with the development of hypertrophy in PlGF mice, but not when hypertrophy was blocked by concomitant expression of PlGF and RGS4, or by PlGF expression in eNOS−/− mice. Anti-miR-182 treatment inhibits the hypertrophic response and prevents the Akt/mTORC1 activation in PlGF mice and NO-treated cardiomyocytes. miR-182 reduces the expression of Bcat2, Foxo3 and Adcy6 to regulate the hypertrophic response in PlGF mice. Particularly, depletion of Bcat2, identified as a new miR-182 target, promotes AktSer473/p70-S6KThr389 phosphorylation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. LV pressure overload did not upregulate miR-182. Thus, miR-182 is a novel target of endothelial-cardiomyocyte crosstalk and plays an important role in the angiogenesis induced-hypertrophic response. PMID:26888314

  9. miR-182 Modulates Myocardial Hypertrophic Response Induced by Angiogenesis in Heart.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hwangbo, Cheol; Jaba, Irina M; Zhang, Jiasheng; Papangeli, Irinna; Han, Jinah; Mikush, Nicole; Larrivée, Bruno; Eichmann, Anne; Chun, Hyung J; Young, Lawrence H; Tirziu, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an adaptive response to hemodynamic demands. Although angiogenesis is critical to support the increase in heart mass with matching blood supply, it may also promote a hypertrophic response. Previously, we showed that cardiac angiogenesis induced by placental growth factor (PlGF), promotes myocardial hypertrophy through the paracrine action of endothelium-derived NO, which triggers the degradation of regulator of G protein signaling 4 (RGS4) to activate the Akt/mTORC1 pathways in cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated whether miRNAs contribute to the development of hypertrophic response associated with myocardial angiogenesis. We show that miR-182 is upregulated concurrently with the development of hypertrophy in PlGF mice, but not when hypertrophy was blocked by concomitant expression of PlGF and RGS4, or by PlGF expression in eNOS(-/-) mice. Anti-miR-182 treatment inhibits the hypertrophic response and prevents the Akt/mTORC1 activation in PlGF mice and NO-treated cardiomyocytes. miR-182 reduces the expression of Bcat2, Foxo3 and Adcy6 to regulate the hypertrophic response in PlGF mice. Particularly, depletion of Bcat2, identified as a new miR-182 target, promotes Akt(Ser473)/p70-S6K(Thr389) phosphorylation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. LV pressure overload did not upregulate miR-182. Thus, miR-182 is a novel target of endothelial-cardiomyocyte crosstalk and plays an important role in the angiogenesis induced-hypertrophic response. PMID:26888314

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  11. The genetic landscape of infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jacques L; Lachance, Mathieu; Hamdan, Fadi F; Carmant, Lionel; Lortie, Anne; Diadori, Paola; Major, Philippe; Meijer, Inge A; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Cossette, Patrick; Mefford, Heather C; Rouleau, Guy A; Rossignol, Elsa

    2014-09-15

    Infantile spasms (IS) is an early-onset epileptic encephalopathy of unknown etiology in ∼40% of patients. We hypothesized that unexplained IS cases represent a large collection of rare single-gene disorders. We investigated 44 children with unexplained IS using comparative genomic hybridisation arrays (aCGH) (n = 44) followed by targeted sequencing of 35 known epilepsy genes (n = 8) or whole-exome sequencing (WES) of familial trios (n = 18) to search for rare inherited or de novo mutations. aCGH analysis revealed de novo variants in 7% of patients (n = 3/44), including a distal 16p11.2 duplication, a 15q11.1q13.1 tetrasomy and a 2q21.3-q22.2 deletion. Furthermore, it identified a pathogenic maternally inherited Xp11.2 duplication. Targeted sequencing was informative for ARX (n = 1/14) and STXBP1 (n = 1/8). In contrast, sequencing of a panel of 35 known epileptic encephalopathy genes (n = 8) did not identify further mutations. Finally, WES (n = 18) was very informative, with an excess of de novo mutations identified in genes predicted to be involved in neurodevelopmental processes and/or known to be intolerant to functional variations. Several pathogenic mutations were identified, including de novo mutations in STXBP1, CASK and ALG13, as well as recessive mutations in PNPO and ADSL, together explaining 28% of cases (5/18). In addition, WES identified 1-3 de novo variants in 64% of remaining probands, pointing to several interesting candidate genes. Our results indicate that IS are genetically heterogeneous with a major contribution of de novo mutations and that WES is significantly superior to targeted re-sequencing in identifying detrimental genetic variants involved in IS. PMID:24781210

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Paul J; Fasth, Anders L; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K; Kapoor, Neena; O'Brien, Tracey A; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A; Eapen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  13. Echocardiography Differences Between Athlete’s Heart Hearth and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kreso, Amir; Barakovic, Fahir; Medjedovic, Senad; Halilbasic, Amila; Klepic, Muhamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Among long term athletes there is always present hypertrophy of the left ventricle walls as well as increased cardiac mass. These changes are the result of the heart muscle adaptation to load during the years of training, which should not be considered as pathology. In people suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), there is also present hypertrophy of the left ventricle walls and increased mass of the heart, but these changes are the result of pathological changes in the heart caused by a genetic predisposition for the development HCM of. Differences between myocardial hypertrophy in athletes and HCM are not clearly differentiated and there are always dilemmas between pathological and physiological hypertrophy. The goal of the study is to determine and compare the echocardiographic cardiac parameters of longtime athletes to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Material and methods: The study included 60 subjects divided into two groups: active athletes and people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Results: Mean values of IVSd recorded in GB is IVSd=17.5 mm (n=20, 95% CI, 16.00–19.00 mm), while a significantly smaller mean value is recorded in GA, IVSd=10.0 mm (n=40, 95% CI, 9.00-11.00 mm). The mean value of the left ventricle in diastole (LVDd) recorded in the GA is LVDd=51 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 48.00 to 52.00 mm), while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVDd value is 42 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 40.00 to 48.00 mm). The mean value of the rear wall of the left ventricle (LVPWd) recorded in the GA is LVDd=10 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 9.00-10.00 mm) while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVDd is 14 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 12.00 to 16.00 mm). The mean of the left ventricle during systole (LVSD) observed in GA is LVSD=34 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 32.00 to 36.00 mm), while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVSD is 28 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 24.00 to 28.83 mm). The mean ejection fraction (EF%) observed in GA is EF

  14. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  15. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked infantile spasm syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... A new paradigm for West syndrome based on molecular and cell biology. Epilepsy Res. 2006 Aug;70 Suppl 1:S87-95. Epub 2006 Jun 23. Review. Citation on PubMed Kossoff ... JL. Interneuron, interrupted: molecular pathogenesis of ARX mutations and X-linked infantile ...

  16. Infantile amnesia reflects a developmental critical period for hippocampal learning.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Alessio; Bisaz, Reto; Sweet, Eric S; Blitzer, Robert D; Alberini, Cristina M

    2016-09-01

    Episodic memories formed during the first postnatal period are rapidly forgotten, a phenomenon known as 'infantile amnesia'. In spite of this memory loss, early experiences influence adult behavior, raising the question of which mechanisms underlie infantile memories and amnesia. Here we show that in rats an experience learned during the infantile amnesia period is stored as a latent memory trace for a long time; indeed, a later reminder reinstates a robust, context-specific and long-lasting memory. The formation and storage of this latent memory requires the hippocampus, follows a sharp temporal boundary and occurs through mechanisms typical of developmental critical periods, including the expression switch of the NMDA receptor subunits from 2B to 2A, which is dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Activating BDNF or mGluR5 after training rescues the infantile amnesia. Thus, early episodic memories are not lost but remain stored long term. These data suggest that the hippocampus undergoes a developmental critical period to become functionally competent. PMID:27428652

  17. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease. PMID:22818990

  18. Part One: Infantile Spasms--The New Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellock, John

    2011-01-01

    Infantile spasms (IS, West syndrome) represent a difficult to treat and sometimes not immediately recognized form of epilepsy which is relatively rare. West Syndrome or IS is one of the most recognized types of epileptic encephalopathy, a form of epilepsy usually associated with developmental regression and delay, frequently difficult to treat and…

  19. Infantile Autism and the Temporal Lobe of the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Bruce E.; Griffin, Judith L.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed that support the hypothesis that infantile autism results from a neuropathology of the temporal lobes of the brain. It is concluded that the main autistic symptoms are most consistent with a neurological model involving bilateral dysfunction of the temporal lobes. (Author)

  20. The Organic Etiology of Infantile Autism: Myth or Fact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanua, Victor D.

    The author reviews theories and research on the etiology of infantile autism, specifically regarding its organic basis. He cites controversies over its organic vs. environmental basis and over the family's impact on autism. Quotes from such theoriests as L. Kanner, B. Bettleheim, and B. Rimland are presented along with E. R. Ritvo and M. Coleman.…

  1. Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. By Irwin M. Freundlich, J. Thomas McMurray, J. Stauffer Lehman, 1967.

    PubMed

    Freundlich, I M; McMurray, J T; Lehman, J S

    1988-06-01

    In patients with a systolic ejection murmur and without a history of rheumatic fever, a probable diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) can be made from the roentgenologic findings. Left ventricular enlargement, associated at times with minimal left atrial enlargement, without intracardiac calcification and with a normal ascending aorta are the most frequent roentgen findings. For a positive diagnosis, a pressure gradient within the left ventricle and hypertrophic muscular obstruction should be demonstrated by angiocardiography. PMID:3285643

  2. Plasma Transglutaminase in Hypertrophic Chondrocytes: Expression and Cell-specific Intracellular Activation Produce Cell Death and Externalization

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria; Magee, Cordula; Nurminsky, Dmitry; Linsenmayer, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    We previously used subtractive hybridization to isolate cDNAs for genes upregulated in chick hypertrophic chondrocytes (Nurminskaya, M., and T.F. Linsenmayer. 1996. Dev. Dyn. 206:260–271). Certain of these showed homology with the “A” subunit of human plasma transglutaminase (factor XIIIA), a member of a family of enzymes that cross-link a variety of intracellular and matrix molecules. We now have isolated a full-length cDNA for this molecule, and confirmed that it is avian factor XIIIA. Northern and enzymatic analyses confirm that the molecule is upregulated in hypertrophic chondrocytes (as much as eightfold). The enzymatic analyses also show that appreciable transglutaminase activity in the hypertrophic zone becomes externalized into the extracellular matrix. This externalization most likely is effected by cell death and subsequent lysis—effected by the transglutaminase itself. When hypertrophic chondrocytes are transfected with a cDNA construct encoding the zymogen of factor XIIIA, the cells convert the translated protein to a lower molecular weight form, and they initiate cell death, become permeable to macromolecules and eventually undergo lysis. Non-hypertrophic cells transfected with the same construct do not show these degenerative changes. These results suggest that hypertrophic chondrocytes have a novel, tissue-specific cascade of mechanisms that upregulate the synthesis of plasma transglutaminase and activate its zymogen. This produces autocatalytic cell death, externalization of the enzyme, and presumably cross-linking of components within the hypertrophic matrix. These changes may in turn regulate the removal and/or calcification of this hypertrophic matrix, which are its ultimate fates. PMID:9722623

  3. Biological and Chemical Removal of Primary Cilia Affects Mechanical Activation of Chondrogenesis Markers in Chondroprogenitors and Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Matthew E.; Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chondroprogenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes, which are the first and last stages of the chondrocyte differentiation process, respectively, are sensitive to mechanical signals. We hypothesize that the mechanical sensitivity of these cells depends on the cell surface primary cilia. To test this hypothesis, we removed the primary cilia by biological means with transfection with intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88) siRNA or by chemical means with chloral hydrate treatment. Transfection of IFT88 siRNA significantly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells in both chondroprogenitor ATDC5 cells as well as primary hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cyclic loading (1 Hz, 10% matrix deformation) of ATDC5 cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture stimulates the mRNA levels of chondrogenesis marker Type II collagen (Col II), hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Type X collagen (Col X), and a molecular regulator of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). The reduction of ciliated chondroprogenitors abolishes mechanical stimulation of Col II, Col X, and BMP-2. In contrast, cyclic loading stimulates Col X mRNA levels in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but not those of Col II and BMP-2. Both biological and chemical reduction of ciliated hypertrophic chondrocytes reduced but failed to abolish mechanical stimulation of Col X mRNA levels. Thus, primary cilia play a major role in mechanical stimulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondroprogenitor cells and at least a partial role in hypertrophic chondrocytes. PMID:26861287

  4. Factors associated with infantile eczema in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Ling; Zheng, Lei; Jin, Hai-Yan; Xu, Xia; Song, Li-Li

    2013-01-01

    The removal of aggravating factors is important to reduce the severity of infantile eczema, but there are few studies on the assessment and identification of the aggravating factors in infantile eczema. Parents of children with infantile eczema ages 1 to 10 months (N = 250) were recruited. Parents were required to complete a questionnaire. Two hundred forty-two (96.8%) children had skin dryness, 80% bathed with soap or shower gel, 82% often perspired, 84.8% wore tight-fitting clothes, 80.8% dressed in five layers of thick clothing, 85.6% were in contact with wool or feathers, and 59.2% were exposed to sunlight (>20 minutes/day). Eczema severity was greater after vaccination in 20%. Two hundred thirty-five mothers avoided eating potential food allergens (e.g., milk, egg whites, and fish), but this failed to improve the severity of symptoms in 93.6% of the children. Thirty patients had Neocate as a substitute for cow's milk, which resulted in symptom severity improvement in 10%. Thirty children were given food allergens, which exacerbated symptoms in 13.3%. One hundred twenty-eight (51.2%) of the children were treated with corticosteroid ointment; 62.5% had the ointment applied for only 2 to 3 days, and 6.2% had the corticosteroid ointment applied to weeping lesions. The vast majority of parents did not know about the aggravating factors for infantile eczema. The results demonstrated a strong need for educational programs to help parents understand and control infantile eczema. PMID:23106156

  5. From Infantile Citizens to Infantile Institutions: The Metaphoric Transformation of Political Economy in the 2008 Housing Market Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Megan

    2012-01-01

    The logic of political economy depends on a domestic metaphor, using the "oikos" or household as a model for the "polis." Historically, this metaphor has imagined citizens as the children of a paternal state. However during the 2008 housing crisis, this metaphor was turned upside down, depicting citizens as the parents of infantile state…

  6. [Keeping dogs indoor aggravates infantile atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Hizawa, T; Fukuzumi, T; Kataoka, Y

    1999-12-01

    We had a two-month-old girl with severe dermatitis since birth. Her serum RAST to HD, Df and Dp were 1.06, 0.03 and 0.01 Ua/ml respectively. A Yorkshire terrier were kept at her mother's parents' home where the patient had lived for a month since birth. Her eczema, which became markedly aggravated whenever she visited there, improved after the elimination of the dog. We investigated the relationship between keeping dogs and infantile atopic dermatitis. We studied 368 patients under the age of two years (211 boys and 157 girls). Skin symptoms were graded globally mild, moderate or severe. Total serum IgE and specific antibody titer to dog dander were measured. We asked them whether they kept dogs and specifically, where they kept dogs, outdoor, indoor, in their own house, or in their grandparents' house. 197 patients had no contact with dogs, 90 patients kept dogs outdoor and 81 patients did indoor. The positive rate of RAST (> or = 0.7 Ua/ml) to dog dander was 6.1%, 17.8% and 46.9% respectively in these three groups. There were strong statistical differences between three groups. On the other hand, among the 81 patients who kept indoor, the RAST positive rates were almost same regarding where the dogs were kept, in their own house or their grandparents' house. Interestingly this difference happens only with patients under the age of 3 months. Patients older than 4 months showed no significant differences in the positive RAST rates, whether they kept dogs indoor or outdoor. This suggests the sensitization occurs before the age of 3 months. Speaking of symptoms, patients who kept dogs indoor showed significantly more severe symptoms than patients who had no contact with dogs and patients who kept dogs outdoor. There was no significant difference between the symptoms of patients who had no contact with dogs and those of patients who kept dogs outdoor. This implies the patient's symptom will improve only by moving the dog out of the house. PMID:10666918

  7. Tubular Pyloric Gland Adenoma of the Left and Right Hepatic Ducts: Report of a Unique Case With Immunohistochemical and Molecular Studies.

    PubMed

    Hatzibougias, Dimitris I; Fouzas, Ioannis; Bobos, Mattheos; Papanikolaou, Vasileios; Daoudaki, Maria; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Pyloric gland adenomas (PGAs) of the extrahepatic biliary system are rare lesions. We report a case of a tubular PGA that led to biliary obstruction. The tumor was located at the confluence of the right and left hepatic ducts, extending to the left hepatic duct. The tumor cells expressed MUC6 and MUC5AC. MUC1 and CD10 were focally positive. MUC2, p53, and CDX2 were not expressed. The Ki67 positivity was estimated at <15%. None of the KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR coding regions resulted in clinically relevant amino acid substitutions. SNP rs1050171 (EGFR p.Q787Q, silent mutation) corresponding to c.2361G>A transition in exon 20 was noticed. Awareness of this rare lesion is important for pathologists and clinicians alike, because it may cause significant morphologic and clinical difficulties, especially when presenting as an obstructive mass. Because of the possible risk of evolving malignancy, surgical resection is recommended whenever possible. PMID:26762143

  8. Up-to-date approach to manage keloids and hypertrophic scars: A useful guide

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Barret, Juan P.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars occur anywhere from 30 to 90% of patients, and are characterized by pathologically excessive dermal fibrosis and aberrant wound healing. Both entities have different clinical and histochemical characteristics, and unfortunately still represent a great challenge for clinicians due to lack of efficacious treatments. Current advances in molecular biology and genetics reveal new preventive and therapeutical options which represent a hope to manage this highly prevalent, chronic and disabling problem, with long-term beneficial outcomes and improvement of quality of life. While we wait for these translational clinical products to be marketed, however, it is imperative to know the basics of the currently existing wide array of strategies to deal with excessive scars: from the classical corticotherapy, to the most recent botulinum toxin and lasers. The main aim of this review paper is to offer a useful up-to-date guideline to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. PMID:24767715

  9. A coordinate axis transformation study of spatial QRS loop in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Takimiya, A; Nakajima, S; Mugikura, M; Mutoh, K; Ibukiyama, C

    1991-01-01

    To obtain an overall view of the QRS loop on vectorcardiograms (VCG) of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the coordinate axis was transformed using the resolver method. The morphological features and planarity of the loop were compared with hypertrophic patterns and hypertensive heart disease (HHD). The subjects in the present study included 30 normal individuals, 40 patients with HCM and 30 with HHD. The HHD group was selected from patients showing left ventricular hypertrophy on VCG similar to that of HCM patients. The HCM group showed significantly greater values than the HHD group in the thickness/length ratio, which represents the planarity of the spatial QRS loop. The above finding suggests that the HCM group had greater deformation in the QRS loop than the HHD group. This may provide a useful indicator for the differential diagnosis of the two diseases. PMID:1920958

  10. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the work of the cardiologist at a diagnostic center].

    PubMed

    Mandrusova, R V

    1991-01-01

    The author demonstrates a possibility of diagnosing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) at the diagnostic center where the main facilities required for examining cardiological patients are available. Provides the results of examining 23 patients with HCMP (according to sex, age, symptoms, clinical course, localization of myocardial hypertrophy, the presence of obstructive and nonobstructive forms, cases of familial diseases). Describes patients seen for HCMP during 6-10 years, in whom idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) transformed to symmetric HCMP with hypertrophy of the interventricular septum and free walls of the left and right ventricles associated with changes in the clinical picture of the disease. It is assumed that in some cases, IHSS may be a stage in the development of symmetric HCMP. In the course of the disease, the localization of myocardial hypertrophy, the presence of obstruction and the clinical picture are variable rather than permanent characteristics. PMID:1839469

  11. Myocardial stunning in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: recovery predicted by single photon emission computed tomographic thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, D.G.; Clements, I.P.; Callahan, M.J.

    1989-05-01

    A young woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization presented with chest pain and features of a large left ventricular aneurysm. The initial diagnosis was myocardial ischemia with either an evolving or an ancient myocardial infarction. Subsequently, verapamil therapy was associated with complete resolution of the extensive left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, normalization of left ventricular ejection fraction and a minimal myocardial infarction. Normal thallium uptake on single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy early in the hospital course predicted myocardial viability in the region of the aneurysm. Thus, orally administered verapamil may reverse spontaneous extensive myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and possibly limit the extent of myocardial infarction in such circumstances.

  12. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  13. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM): How Flow Analysis May Drive Medical Management and Surgical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease and occurs in 1 in 500 persons worldwide regardless of race, age and gender. It is the most common cause of sudden death in the young and also causes heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. The primary anatomic abnormality is thickening of certain walls, or sometimes global thickening of the left or right ventricle. The patterns of thickening along with increased ventricular stiffness lead to suboptimal ventricular filling and inefficient ejection of blood from the ventricle. Treatment for HCM can be medical or surgical. The choice of therapy is driven by the presence and severity of outflow obstruction. Flow analysis could provide sophisticated information about outflow and inflow ventricular dynamics. These flow dynamics features may enable better medical choices and provide information that would allow superior surgical planning. Associate Professor of Medicine & Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic

  14. Comparison of ventricular emptying with and without a pressure gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, R J; Criley, J M

    1985-01-01

    Thirty three patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied to determine whether the presence of an intraventricular pressure gradient impaired left ventricular emptying. Patients with resting gradients had a higher mean left ventricular ejection fraction (92 (6.4)%) than patients without a resting or inducible pressure gradient (75.5 (9)%). The rate and degree of emptying increased when gradients greater than 85 mm Hg were induced in two patients with insignificant mitral regurgitation. If the induced gradients had been the result of obstruction a decrease in the rate or degree of ventricular emptying would be expected. Higher ejection fractions in patients with intracavitary pressure gradients as well as enhanced rate and degree of left ventricular emptying with induced gradients are inconsistent with outflow obstruction. These findings support the concept that cavity obliteration is responsible for the pressure gradient in these patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:4038604

  15. Difficult anesthesia management in a case of living donor liver transplantation with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takashi; Kusunoki, Shinji; Kuroda, Masahiko; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2013-12-01

    Liver transplantation with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is associated with acute hemodynamic changes, which can exacerbate left ventricular outflow tract obstruction during surgery. Therefore, selection of general anesthetic agents is important, as most can result in hemodynamic instability by reducing systemic vascular resistance and blood pressure. We report successful anesthetic management in a case of living donor liver transplantation with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy using ketamine, propofol, and fentanyl to avoid vasodilation by anesthetic agents. In addition, landiolol, phenylephrine, and low-dose dopamine were administered to prevent left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and were found to be effective for improving acute hemodynamic changes during surgery. In the case of this patient, the combination of transesophageal echocardiography and a pulmonary artery catheter was beneficial for intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring. PMID:24597212

  16. Pregnancy outcome in a case of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Habib, A; Haque, T

    2013-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively common genetic disorder (1:500) inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is caused by mutations in any one of 10 genes encoding protein components of cardiac sarcomere. Some theoretically calculated risks exist when patients with HCM become pregnant. The physiologic increase of cardiac output and increased stroke volume may be impaired due to the non-compliant ventricular walls. In the first trimester, the physiologic hypervolemia of pregnancy to some extent counteracts the natural decrease in peripheral vascular resistance which would have otherwise provoked an obstruction gradientin systolic flow. As pregnancy advances, the vena caval compression may decrease venous return causing cardiac compromise, whereas the stress of labour may precipitate arrhythmia. We report our experience of a pregnancy with co-existant non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and nodal bradycardia ultimately resulting in pre-term delivery, neonatal death and maternal death in puerperium from overt cardiac failure after a relatively uneventful gestation. PMID:23982559

  17. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  18. Exome Sequencing Identifies SLCO2A1 Mutations as a Cause of Primary Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenlin; Xia, Weibo; He, Jinwei; Zhang, Zeng; Ke, Yaohua; Yue, Hua; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Jiemei; Hu, Weiwei; Fu, Wenzhen; Hu, Yunqiu; Li, Miao; Liu, Yujuan

    2012-01-01

    By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous guanine-to-adenine transition at the invariant −1 position of the acceptor site of intron 1 (c.97−1G>A) in solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 2A1 (SLCO2A1), which encodes a prostaglandin transporter protein, as the causative mutation in a single individual with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) from a consanguineous family. In two other affected individuals with PHO from two unrelated nonconsanguineous families, we identified two different compound heterozygous mutations by using Sanger sequencing. These findings confirm that SLCO2A1 mutations inactivate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) transport, and they indicate that mutations in SLCO2A1 are the pathogenic cause of PHO. Moreover, this study might also help to explain the cause of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. PMID:22197487

  19. A case of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome presenting with hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Wataru; Hayashi, Shintaro; Iwanaga, Yasutaka; Murai, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-15

    A 43-year-old woman with a 3-year history of headache, fever, and swelling of the forehead, presented to our hospital. A general examination revealed palmar and plantar pustules. Blood analyses showed an elevated white blood cell count, C-reactive protein level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Brain MRI revealed a partially thickened cranial bone with gadolinium enhancement, and also abnormally enhanced dura mater. Bone scintigraphy showed involvement of the cranial bone and bilateral sternoclavicular joints. Palmar skin biopsy indicated palmoplantar pustulosis. From these results, SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) syndrome with associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis was diagnosed. After corticosteroid therapy and tonsillectomy, the clinical symptoms and radiological abnormalities were improved. Clinicians should be aware of SAPHO as a potential unusual cause of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. PMID:25549534

  20. [Sporadic recurrent hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Clinical-histological contributions on differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, G; Regli, F

    1976-01-01

    The authors report about an own case of recurrent sporadic hypertrophic polyneuropathy and describe the clinical course and histologic picture with reference to the literature. The disease is characterized by recurrences of subacutely occurring polyradiculoneuropathy and sequent nearly complete remission. Clinical examination discloses preferentially symmetrically and distally occurring motor paresis while sensibility in most cases is less affected. The peripheral nerves may be enlarged after a few relapses and frequently painful to pressure during the bout. Excessive increase in CSF proteins is found only during the bout. Motor nerve conduction velocity is considerably reduced. Histological pictures typically present an onion bulb formation of the Schwann cells with marked proliferation of connective tissue. There frequently younger individuals are involved; the relation female to male is 3:1. Differentiation has to be made concerning hereditary and symptomatic forms of hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Etiological factors of the disease are discussed. PMID:185690

  1. The Mitral Valve in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Test in Context.

    PubMed

    Sherrid, Mark V; Balaram, Sandhya; Kim, Bette; Axel, Leon; Swistel, Daniel G

    2016-04-19

    Mitral valve abnormalities were not part of modern pathological and clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the 1950s, which focused on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and myocyte fiber disarray. Although systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve was discovered as the cause of LV outflow tract obstruction in the M-mode echocardiography era, in the 1990s structural abnormalities of the mitral valve became appreciated as contributing to SAM pathophysiology. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mitral malformations have been identified at all levels. They occur in the leaflets, usually elongating them, and also in the submitral apparatus, with a wide array of malformations of the papillary muscles and chordae, that can be detected by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and by cardiac magnetic resonance. Because they participate fundamentally in the predisposition to SAM, they have increasingly been repaired surgically. This review critically assesses imaging and measurement of mitral abnormalities and discusses their surgical relief. PMID:27081025

  2. Microvascular Permeability Changes Might Explain Cardiac Tamponade after Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-01-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade—alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability—is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions. PMID:24808788

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Rapamycin-Treated Fibroblasts From Hypertrophic and Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; You, Fanglei; Januszyk, Michael; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Kuang, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Excess scar formation after cutaneous injury can result in hypertrophic scar (HTS) or keloid formation. Modern strategies to treat pathologic scarring represent nontargeted approaches that produce suboptimal results. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central mediator of inflammation, has been proposed as a novel target to block fibroproliferation. To examine its mechanism of action, we performed genomewide microarray on human fibroblasts (from normal skin, HTS, and keloid scars) treated with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. Hypertrophic scar and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated overexpression of collagen I and III that was effectively abrogated with rapamycin. Blockade of mTOR specifically impaired fibroblast expression of the collagen biosynthesis genes PLOD, PCOLCE, and P4HA, targets significantly overexpressed in HTS and keloid scars. These data suggest that pathologic scarring can be abrogated via modulation of mTOR pathways in procollagen and collagen processing. PMID:24835866

  4. Hypertrophic Scarring and Keloids: Pathomechanisms and Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Korting, Hans C; Pavicic, Tatiana; Ruzicka, Thomas; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20927486

  5. [Utility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: when is it superior to echocardiography?].

    PubMed

    Kammoun, I; Marrakchi, S; Zidi, A; Ibn ElHaj, Z; Naccache, S; Ben Amara, W; Jebri, F; Bennour, E; Kachboura, S

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is usually established by echocardiography. Recently, there has been greatly increased use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) because of its precise determination of myocardial anatomy and the depiction of myocardial fibrosis. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography and magnetic resonance in the assessment of this complex disease. In conclusion, there is a complementarity between cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography for the diagnosis and the management of HCM. PMID:24834991

  6. Development of a Hypertrophic Ovarian Artery After Uterine Artery Embolization with Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun S. Paxton, Ben E.

    2007-09-15

    Uterine artery embolization (UAE) for the treatment of symptomatic leiomyomata has shown excellent short-term clinical efficacy and minimal complications, yet recurrences after successful treatments at mid- and long-term follow-up have been reported. Exact etiologies for such recurrences have not been fully understood. We present a case of symptom recurrence with the development of a hypertrophic ovarian artery after successful UAE with polyvinyl alcohol particles, successfully treated with ovarian and repeat UAEs.

  7. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong; Yu, Jiren

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  8. Myocardial fragmentation associated with disruption of the Z-band in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Koichi; Ishijima, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Abe, Kuniko; Kawai, Kioko; Maemura, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old female with Noonan syndrome had been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and she died of heart failure at the age of 25 years. Light microscopic and electron microscopic examination of her biopsied myocardium and autopsy heart showed myocardial fragmentation associated with Z-band disruption as well as myocardial hypertrophy and disarray with interstitial fibrosis. Myocardial fragmentation associated with Z-band disruption may be related to the progression of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27216919

  9. Role of endocardial septal ablation in the treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Tolga; Güler, Tümer Erdem; Yalın, Kıvanç; Gölcük, Şükriye Ebru; Özcan, Kazım Serhan

    2016-09-01

    Septal reduction therapy is accepted as a first therapeutic option for symptomatic drug-resistant hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Although, surgical septal myectomy is the gold standard method, alcohol septal ablation is a well-studied alternative approach in the patients with suitable anatomy. Endocardial septal ablation (ESA) therapy was relatively new defined modality and outcomes of the procedure were not clearly elucidated yet. We aimed to review the clinical aspects of ESA procedure and provide some historical background. PMID:27609434

  10. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  11. Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy in An Infant With Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Answer to a Riddle.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Fatma; Beshlawi, Ismail; Wali, Yasser; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al Senaidi, Khalfan

    2015-08-01

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH) is a hereditary hyperinflammatory condition with T-cell and macrophage activation. Treatment consists of immunosuppressive therapy plus bone marrow transplantation. Cardiac manifestations of FHLH were scarcely mentioned in the literature with conflicting pathophysiological explanations. We report a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy associated with FHLH. Guided by such a case, a clear vision regarding the real cause is thought to be obtained in the cloudy landscape of pathophysiology. PMID:25222062

  12. Systemic depletion of macrophages in the subacute phase of wound healing reduces hypertrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Iwashina, Takashi; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic scars are caused by trauma or burn injuries to the deep dermis and can cause cosmetic disfigurement and psychological issues. Studies suggest that M2-like macrophages are pro-fibrotic and contribute to hypertrophic scar formation. A previous study from our lab showed that M2 macrophages were present in developing hypertrophic scar tissues in vivo at 3-4 weeks after wounding. In this study, the effect of systemic macrophage depletion on scar formation was explored at subacute phase of wound healing. Thirty-six athymic nude mice that received human skin transplants were randomly divided into macrophage depletion group and control group. The former received intraperitoneal injections of clodronate liposomes while the controls received sterile saline injections on day 7, 10, and 13 postgrafting. Wound area, scar thickness, collagen abundance and collagen bundle structure, mast cell infiltration, myofibroblast formation, M1, and M2 macrophages together with gene expression of M1 and M2 related factors in the grafted skin were investigated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks postgrafting. The transplanted human skin from the control group developed contracted, elevated, and thickened scars while the grafted skin from the depletion group healed with significant less contraction and elevation. Significant reductions in myofibroblast number, collagen synthesis, and hypertrophic fiber morphology as well as mast cell infiltration were observed in the depletion group compared to the control group. Macrophage depletion significantly reduced M1 and M2 macrophage number in the depletion group 2 weeks postgrafting as compared to the control group. These findings suggest that systemic macrophage depletion in subacute phase of wound healing reduces scar formation, which provides evidence for the pro-fibrotic role of macrophages in fibrosis of human skin as well as insight into the potential benefits of specifically depleting M2 macrophages in vivo. PMID:27169512

  13. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy preceding canine juvenile cellulitis in an Australian shepherd puppy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzell, Meaghan L.

    2011-01-01

    A 10-week-old intact female Australian shepherd dog was presented sternally recumbent, mildly pyrexic, and painful on long bone palpation of both forelimbs. Based on radiographs she was diagnosed with hypertrophic osteodystrophy. Analgesia was provided with intravenous, oral, and topical medications. Approximately 2 wk later she was presented for facial swelling, regional dermatitis, and lymphadenopathy. Canine juvenile cellulitis was diagnosed and successfully treated. PMID:21731101

  14. Titin: central player of hypertrophic signaling and sarcomeric protein quality control.

    PubMed

    Kötter, Sebastian; Andresen, Christian; Krüger, Martina

    2014-11-01

    The giant sarcomeric protein titin has multiple important functions in striated muscle cells. Due to its gigantic size, its central position in the sarcomere and its elastic I-band domains, titin is a scaffold protein that is important for sarcomere assembly, and serves as a molecular spring that defines myofilament distensibility. This review focuses on the emerging role of titin in mechanosensing and hypertrophic signaling, and further highlights recent evidence that links titin to sarcomeric protein turnover. PMID:25205716

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a litter of five mixed-breed cats.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M S; Calvert, C A; Jacobs, G J

    1999-01-01

    A litter of five, 18-month-old, mixed-breed cats were determined to have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although no overt clinical signs were present in any cat, systolic heart murmurs were present in each. Electrocardiograms were normal, while subjective interpretations of heart enlargement on radiographs were made on four cats. Echocardiographic analyses indicated abnormalities consistent with HCM. Overt clinical signs are absent two years following diagnosis. PMID:10416772

  16. Anesthetic Management Guided by Transthoracic Echocardiography During Cesarean Delivery Complicated by Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Jaclyn M; McKeen, Dolores Madeline; Warren, Andrew; Allen, Victoria M; George, Ronald B; Kells, Catherine; Shukla, Romesh

    2016-03-15

    We describe the management of a parturient woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed a symptomatic accelerated idioventricular rhythm who required an urgent cesarean delivery at 32 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiography helped guide anesthetic management, including epidural dosing, fluid management, and phenylephrine infusion rates. This case demonstrates the application of transthoracic echocardiography to guide anesthetic management in a parturient woman at risk for cardiovascular compromise. PMID:26720049

  17. [Case of cerebral venous thrombosis caused by MPO-ANCA associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu; Fujimori, Juichi; Yoshida, Shun; Kaneko, Kimihiko; Kodera, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 72-year-old woman presenting MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis and venous thrombosis. Five years prior, positive MPO-ANCA and renal dysfunction had been indicated. At that time, oral steroids and tacrolimus were given to treat systemic vasculitis. During the course of the disease, she repeated otitis media. Saddle nose appeared. She was suspected of having localized type granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). She was hospitalized because of consciousness disturbance and was diagnosed as having MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymenigitis and venous thrombosis. Brain MRI detected thick dura mater with abnormal enhancement, predominantly on the right cerebral hemisphere, and tentorium cerebella partially along with the cerebral sulci. MRI revealed vasogenic brain edema lesions in the right occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes and cytotoxic edema lesions in the right parietal lobe and centrum semiovale. MR venography revealed stenosis of the venous sinus including confluence of sinuses, straight sinus, and right transverse sinus. Subsequent treatment with corticosteroids, an immunosuppressant, and an anticoagulant led to recovery. No patient with MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymenigitis and venous thrombosis that developed alternation of consciousness has ever been reported. This is therefore regarded as a rare case. PMID:25342019

  18. Effects of cerivastatin on adrenergic pathways, hypertrophic growth and TGFbeta expression in adult ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Maxeiner, Hagen; Abdallah, Yaser; Kuhlmann, Christoph Rüdiger Wolfram; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Wenzel, Sibylle

    2012-05-01

    The effects of statin treatment in the setting of heart failure have already been shown. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about its influence on adrenergic pathways in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, this study investigated the impact of cerivastatin on adrenoceptor-mediated signalling pathways in isolated adult ventricular cardiomyocytes. It focused on two endpoints: hypertrophic growth and TGFbeta expression. Cultured cardiomyocytes were used to study rac activation (analysed by its translocation into the membrane fraction), ROS formation (H(2)DCF fluorescence) and hypertrophic growth ((14)C-phenylalanine incorporation). Alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulation showed significant differences regarding rac activation, ROS formation, and p38 MAP kinase activation. Both alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulation induced TGFbeta expression. Upon activation of alpha-adrenergic signalling - although ROS formation was not influenced by cerivastatin - TGFbeta expression decreased. Following beta stimulation, TGFbeta expression as well as rac and p38 MAP kinase activation were reduced after pre-treatment with cerivastatin. Statin treatment did not show any influence on hypertrophic growth. In summary, this study clearly demonstrates the ability of adrenoceptor stimulation to increase TGFbeta expression. One component of the beneficial effects of statin therapy on heart failure might therefore be due to a dominant reduction and inhibition of TGFbeta, which is involved in many pathophysiological processes in cardiomyocytes. PMID:22365145

  19. Sox9 Reprogrammed Dermal Fibroblasts Undergo Hypertrophic Differentiation In Vitro and Trigger Endochondral Ossification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Wai Long; O, Dorien F.; Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki; Luyten, Frank P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Strategies for bone regeneration are undergoing a paradigm shift, moving away from the replication of end-stage bone tissue and instead aiming to recapture the initial events of fracture repair. Although this is known to resemble endochondral bone formation, chondrogenic cell types with favorable proliferative and hypertrophic differentiation properties are lacking. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming have allowed the creation of alternative cell populations with specific properties through the forced expression of transcription factors. Herein, we investigated the in vitro hypertrophic differentiation and in vivo tissue formation capacity of induced chondrogenic cells (iChon cells) obtained through direct reprogramming. In vitro hypertrophic differentiation was detected in iChon cells that contained a doxycycline-inducible expression system for Klf4, cMyc, and Sox9. Furthermore, endochondral bone formation was detected after implantation in nude mice. The bone tissue was derived entirely from host origin, whereas cartilage tissue contained cells from both host and donor. The results obtained highlight the promise of cellular reprogramming for the creation of functional skeletal cells that can be used for novel bone healing strategies. PMID:24459991

  20. Cone of skin exists in rat: A "hypertrophic scarring free" animal.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yanhai; Yu, Xiaoping; Lu, Shuliang

    2016-08-01

    Cone of skin is deemed to be related to hypertrophic scarring and absent in such traditionally "hypertrophic scarring and keloid free" animals as rat. The purpose of our study is to determine whether the cone of skin exists in rat. If it was, why it was ignored, and what was the meaning of it. The depilation of left dorsum of 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats was performed using a wax/rosin mixture. Skin samples were harvested on 0 d, 3 d, 9 d, 15 d, 21 d, 27 d, 33 d, and 39 d after depilation and stained by hematoxylin and eosin methods. Light microscopic observation of the dermis-fat interface was studied at 25× magnification. It was observed that, "dome" like fat tissue bulged up into the dermis from 3 d to 27 d and hair follicle bulged down into the "dome" like fat tissue from 15 d to 27 d and a "cone" like structure was seen. Cone of skin exists in rat in certain stages of hair follicle cycle, which is a valuable addition to the scientific literature and might be a challenge to the relation between cone of skin and hypertrophic scarring. Anat Rec, 299:1140-1144, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27125905

  1. Hypertrophic scars in a patient with Turner's syndrome treated with recombinant growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Kędzia, Andrzej; Pawlaczyk, Mariola; Petriczko, Elżbieta

    2014-05-01

    Turner's syndrome is a common genetic disorder of girls and women, for which characteristic clinical symptoms encompass short stature, gonadal dysgenesis, systemic defects, multiple dysmorphic features and skin changes, including an increased number of melanocytic nevi, hypertrophic scars and keloids. The affected girls are treated with recombinant human growth hormone to improve the height. We present a case of a 15-year-old girl with Turner's syndrome, hypertrophic scars and a keloid. At the age of 12 years and 8 months, the girl started recombinant human growth hormone treatment. During the therapy, a surgical excision of 4 out of 42 benign melanocytic nevi was performed. After 2 months the hypertrophic scars as well as a keloid were noted at sites of excision. Parents of girls with Turner's syndrome undertake various attempts to improve not only the height and maturity of their daughters, but also their appearance by commonly performed surgical corrections of the webbed neck and pigmented nevi. The presented case suggests an increased risk of scars hypertrophy and keloid formations after surgical intervention in Turner's syndrome patients who are treated with recombinant human growth hormone at the same time. Due to that it should be advised to postpone all planned surgical procedures until the therapy has been completed. PMID:25097479

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy and impaired cardiac hypertrophic response to angiotensin II in mice lacking FGF-2

    PubMed Central

    Pellieux, Corinne; Foletti, Alessandro; Peduto, Giovanni; Aubert, Jean-François; Nussberger, Jürg; Beermann, Friedrich; Brunner, Hans-R.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    FGF-2 has been implicated in the cardiac response to hypertrophic stimuli. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to maintain elevated blood pressure in hypertensive individuals and exerts direct trophic effects on cardiac cells. However, the role of FGF-2 in Ang II–induced cardiac hypertrophy has not been established. Therefore, mice deficient in FGF-2 expression were studied using a model of Ang II–dependent hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic measurements show the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy in normotensive mice lacking FGF-2. Moreover, hypertensive mice without FGF-2 developed no compensatory cardiac hypertrophy. In wild-type mice, hypertrophy was associated with a stimulation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase, the extracellular signal regulated kinase, and the p38 kinase pathways. In contrast, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was markedly attenuated in FGF-2–deficient mice. In vitro, FGF-2 of fibroblast origin was demonstrated to be essential in the paracrine stimulation of MAPK activation in cardiomyocytes. Indeed, fibroblasts lacking FGF-2 expression have a defective capacity for releasing growth factors to induce hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, these results identify the cardiac fibroblast population as a primary integrator of hypertrophic stimuli in the heart, and suggest that FGF-2 is a crucial mediator of cardiac hypertrophy via autocrine/paracrine actions on cardiac cells. PMID:11748268

  3. Influence of free residual chlorine on cultured human epidermal keratinocytes from normal skin and hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Mori, H; Hayakawa, A; Ohashi, M

    1995-07-01

    In Japan, public health regulations state that the water in rinsing pools used before swimming should contain 50-100 mg/l of chlorine. We examined the influence of chlorination at high concentrations in rinsing pools on the skin using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes from normal skin and hypertrophic scars. Chlorination of cell culture for 15 min with 200 mg/l of free residual chlorine proved cytotoxic to both types of keratinocytes as did 100 mg/l of free residual chlorine for 1 or 3 consecutive days. Keratinocytes from hypertrophic scars, when cultivated in 100 mg/l of free residual chlorine, were more vulnerable to chlorine than those from normal skin. Cell characteristics of cultured keratinocytes from hypertrophic scars may be somewhat different from those of normal skin. The phenomena observed in this experimental model of the skin suggest that people exposed to chlorine in rinsing pools at concentrations in excess of 200 mg/l for about 15 min before swimming are at risk of developing cutaneous disorders, especially at sites of injury, e.g. scars. PMID:7577833

  4. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 impacts chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Welting, T J M; Caron, M M J; Emans, P J; Janssen, M P F; Sanen, K; Coolsen, M M E; Voss, L; Surtel, D A M; Cremers, A; Voncken, J W; van Rhijn, L W

    2011-01-01

    Skeletogenesis and bone fracture healing involve endochondral ossification, a process during which cartilaginous primordia are gradually replaced by bone tissue. In line with a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the endochondral ossification process, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were reported to negatively affect bone fracture healing due to impaired osteogenesis. However, a role for COX-2 activity in the chondrogenic phase of endochondral ossification has not been addressed before. We show that COX-2 activity fulfils an important regulatory function in chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Our data reveal essential cross-talk between COX-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. BMP-2 mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy is associated with increased COX-2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity by NSAIDs (e.g., Celecoxib) decreases hypertrophic differentiation in various chondrogenic models in vitro and in vivo, while leaving early chondrogenic development unaltered. Our findings demonstrate that COX-2 activity is a novel factor partaking in chondrocyte hypertrophy in the context of endochondral ossification and these observations provide a novel etiological perspective on the adverse effects of NSAIDs on bone fracture healing and have important implications for the use of NSAIDs during endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22183916

  5. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma. PMID:27468364

  6. [Acupoint Selection Laws for Massage Therapy of Infantile Anorexia: an Analysis Based on Data Mining].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang Jie; Wang, Yan-guo

    2016-06-01

    Massage prescriptions for treating infantile anorexia in Chinese Academic Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, 1979-2012), Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal Full-Text Database (VIP, 1989-2012) and Wanfang Database (1990-2012) were collected. By using Chinese Medicine Inheritance Auxiliary Platform (Version 2.0) Software, 286 massage prescriptions for treatment of infantile anorexia were screened involved 76 acupoints, 20 commonly used acupoints, and 57 core acupoint combinations. Infantile Tuina specific points were used as main acupoints in massage therapy for infantile anorexia, and core acupoints covered Jizhu, Pi meridian, abdomen, Nei-Bagua, Zusanli (ST36), and Ban-men. PMID:27491238

  7. Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Deficiency Presenting as Infantile Pustulosis Mimicking Infantile Pustular Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Minkis, Kira; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Magro, Cynthia; Scott, Rachelle; Davis, Jessica G.; Sardana, Niti; Herzog, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Background Deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome of skin and bone caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist. Few studies have been published about this debilitating condition. Early identification is critical for targeted lifesaving intervention. Observations A male infant, born to nonconsanguineous Puerto Rican parents, was referred for management of a pustular eruption diagnosed as pustular psoriasis. At 2 months of age, the infant developed a pustular eruption. After extensive evaluation, he was confirmed to be homozygous for a 175-kb genomic deletion on chromosome 2 that includes the IL1RN gene, commonly found in Puerto Ricans. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, with rapid clearance of skin lesions and resolution of systemic inflammation. Conclusions Recent identification of DIRA as a disease entity, compounded by the limited number of reported cases, makes early identification difficult. It is critical to consider this entity in the differential diagnosis of infantile pustulosis. Targeted therapy with the recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist anakinra can be lifesaving if initiated early. A high carrier frequency of the 175-kb DIRA-associated genomic deletion in the Puerto Rican population strongly supports testing infants presenting with unexplained pustulosis in patients from this geographic region. PMID:22431714

  8. Infantile Marfan syndrome in a Korean tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yeon Jeong; Lee, Ko-Eun; Kwon, Bo Sang; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infantile Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare congenital inheritable connective tissue disorder with poor prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the cardiovascular manifestations and overall prognosis of infantile MFS diagnosed in a tertiary referral center in Korea. Methods Eight patients diagnosed with infantile MFS between 2004 and 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Results Their median age at the time of diagnosis was 2.5 months (range, 0–20 months). The median follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 0–94 months). The median length at birth was 50.0 cm (range, 48–53 cm); however, height became more prominent over time, and the patients were taller than the 97th percentile at the time of the study. None of the patients had any relevant family history. Four of the 5 patients who underwent DNA sequencing had a fibrillin 1 gene mutation. All the patients with echocardiographic data of the aortic root had a z score of >2. All had mitral and tricuspid valve prolapse, and various degrees of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation. Five patients underwent open-heart surgery, including mitral valve replacement, of whom two required multiple operations. The median age at mitral valve replacement was 28.5 months (range, 5–69 months). Seven patients showed congestive heart failure before surgery or during follow-up, and required multiple anti-heart failure medications. Four patients died of heart failure at a median age of 12 months. Conclusion The prognosis of infantile MFS is poor; thus, early diagnosis and timely cautious treatment are essential to prevent further morbidity and mortality. PMID:26958064

  9. Infantile myofibroma: a firm, round plaque in an infant.

    PubMed

    Amano, Shinya; Halsey, Mark; Yasuda, Mariko; O'Donnell, Patrick; Csikesz, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Infantile myofibroma is a rare fibromatous tumor that is variable in presentation and is frequently mistaken for hemangioma or rhabdomyosarcoma. We describe a 14-month-old boy who presented with multiple, enlarging, firm lesions on the shoulder. Biopsy revealed a proliferation of small spindle cells with myxoid and hyalinized stroma infiltrating into the superficial adipose tissue. We provide a brief review of the clinical presentation, histopathologic features, management, and recent advances in our understanding of this rare condition. PMID:27617527

  10. Validation of the rat model of cryptogenic infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    Chachua, Tamar; Yum, Mi-Sun; Velíšková, Jana; Velíšek, Libor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a new model of cryptogenic infantile spasms consisting of prenatal priming with betamethasone and postnatal trigger of spasms by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid responds to chronic ACTH treatment, and has similar EEG signature, efficacy of treatments, and behavioral impairments as human infantile spasms. Methods Rats prenatally primed with betamethasone on gestational day 15 were used. Spasms were triggered with N-methyl-D-aspartic acid between postnatal days (P) 10-15 in a single session or in multiple sessions in one subject. The expression of spasms was compared to prenatally saline-injected controls. Effects of relevant treatments (ACTH, vigabatrin, methylprednisolone, rapamycin) were determined in betamethasone-primed rats. In the rats after spasms, behavioral evaluation was performed in the open field and and elevated plus maze on P20-22. Key Findings NMDA at P10-15 (the rat “infant” period) triggers the spasms significantly earlier and in greater numbers in the prenatal betamethasone-exposed brain compared to controls. Similar to human condition, the spasms occur in clusters. Repeated trigger of spasms is associated with ictal EEG electrodecrements and interictal large-amplitude waves, a possible rat variant of hypsarrhythmia. Chronic ACTH treatment in a randomized experiment, and chronic pretreatment with methylprednisolone significantly suppress number of spasms similar to human condition. Pretreatment with vigabatrin, but not rapamycin, suppressed the spasms. Significant behavioral changes occurred following multiple bouts of spasms. Significance The model of infantile spasms has remarkable similarities with the human condition in semiology, EEG, pharmacological response, and long-term outcome. Thus, the model can be used for search of novel and more effective treatments for infantile spasms. PMID:21854372

  11. Infantile desmoid-type fibromatosis in an Akita puppy.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Turk, J R; Pope, E R; Jordan, R C

    1998-01-01

    A 10-week-old Akita puppy was evaluated for a reported umbilical hernia. Repair of the hernia had been attempted three times prior to referral. A defect in the ventral abdominal wall with an associated soft-tissue mass was identified on abdominal radiographs. Exploratory surgery was performed; the mass was resected and the abdominal wall defect was repaired. Histopathological evaluation of the mass was consistent with infantile desmoid-type fibromatosis. PMID:9657161

  12. Infantile-onset glaucoma and anterior megalophthalmos in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited condition in which defects in type 1 collagen cause abnormalities in many tissues and organs, including bone, teeth, heart valves, and eyes. We describe a 6-month-old boy with OI who presented with anterior megalophthalmos of the right eye and infantile-onset glaucoma of the left eye. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of these types of congenital eye anomalies in an infant with OI. PMID:26994503

  13. Acupuncture in Practice: Investigating Acupuncturists' Approach to Treating Infantile Colic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infantile colic is common, but no safe and effective conventional treatment exists. The use of acupuncture has increased despite weak evidence. This practitioner survey explores and discusses how infantile colic is regarded and treated in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The study is based on personal communication with 24 acupuncturists from nine countries. These acupuncturists specialize in pediatric acupuncture and represent different styles of acupuncture. Their experiences are discussed and related to relevant books and articles. Informants claimed good results when treating infants with colic. The TCM patterns commonly described by informants matched the textbooks to a great extent. The most common syndromes were “stagnation of food” and “Spleen Qi Xu.” Regarding treatment, some informants followed the teachers' and the textbook authors' advice on differentiated treatment according to syndrome. The points used most often were LI4, ST36, and Sifeng. Other informants treated all infants alike in one single point, LI4. The results demonstrate the diversity of TCM. The use of acupuncture for infantile colic presents an interesting option, but further research is needed in order to optimize the effects and protect infants from unnecessary or less effective treatment. PMID:24324513

  14. Infantile amnesia reconsidered: a cross-cultural analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi

    2003-01-01

    A number of theories have been offered over the past hundred years to explain the phenomenon of infantile amnesia, the common inability to remember autobiographical experiences from the first years of life. Recent comparative studies that examine autobiographical memories in different populations, particularly populations in North America and East Asia, have yielded intriguing findings that provide a unique opportunity to revisit some of the major theoretical views and to propose new accounts. In light of these findings, this article discusses five theoretical explanations for infantile amnesia, including cognitive and social discontinuity, the emergence of the self, early parent-child memory sharing, functions of autobiographical memory, and the complexity of life experience. The reconsideration of infantile amnesia from a cross-cultural perspective suggests that while the basic mechanisms and contributing factors may be universal, the specific ways in which these mechanisms and factors are manifested differ qualitatively across cultures. A theoretical approach that takes the larger cultural context into account can help us understand this long-standing puzzle. PMID:12653489

  15. Stereoacuity Outcomes Following Treatment of Infantile and Accommodative Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Eileen E.; Wang, Jingyun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To review what is known about the normal maturation of stereoacuity, the stereoacuity deficits associated with infantile and accommodative esotropia, the rationale for making improved stereoacuity a goal of treatment, and strategies for improving stereoacuity outcomes. Methods Studies of stereoacuity maturation during normal development, studies of stereoacuity outcomes following treatment for infantile and accommodative esotropia, and studies of primate models of esotropia are reviewed. Results Stereoacuity maturation normally proceeds rapidly during the first year of life. Infantile and accommodative esotropia are associated with profound and permanent disruption of stereopsis. While rehabilitation of stereoacuity following treatment of esotropia remains a challenge, even the achievement of subnormal stereoacuity may have real benefits to the child. Conclusions Some abnormalities in stereoacuity may exist before the onset of esotropia, but others may result directly from abnormal binocular experience. Several strategies for improving stereoacuity outcomes in esotropia are currently under active investigation. Improved stereoacuity outcomes are associated with better long term stability of alignment, reduced risk for and/or severity of amblyopia, improved achievement of sensorimotor developmental milestones, better reading ability, and improved long-term quality of life. PMID:19390468

  16. Mitochondrial ND5 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong; Song, Yanrui; Gu, Shulian; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Wu, Bifeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Shishi; Jiang, Pingping; Lu, Jianhua; Huang, Wendong; Yan, Qingfeng

    2012-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary disorder characterized by asymmetric thickening of the septum and left ventricular wall, which affects 1 in 500 individuals in the general population. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA have been found to be one of the most important causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we report the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of a Han Chinese family with a likely maternally transmitted hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Four (2 men/2 women) of 5 matrilineal relatives in this 3-generation family exhibited the variable severity and age at onset of 44 to 79 years old. Sequence analysis of the entire mitochondrial DNA in this pedigree identified the known homoplasmic ND5 12338T>C variant. This mitochondrial DNA haplogroup belongs to the Eastern Asian F2a. The 12338T>C variant, highly evolutionarily conserved, resulted in the replacement of the translation initiating methionine with a threonine, shortening the ND5 polypeptide by 2 amino acids. The occurrence of ND5 12338T>C variant exclusively in maternal members of this Chinese family suggested that the 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Our findings will provide theoretical basis for genetic counseling of maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:22759514

  17. Effect of HMME-PDT with different parameters in rabbit ear model: a possible way for hypertrophic scarring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Gu, Ying; Zeng, Jing; Li, Shao-ran; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Ying; Shi, Dong-wen; Zhang, Lu-yong

    2007-11-01

    Background and Objective: Hypertrophic scar is a pathological scar that grows aberrantly by excessive deposition of collagens in the dermis. It is known that photodynamic therapy (PDT) contributes to a variety of diseases, however, the use of inhibiting scar formation has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of HMME-PDT (Photodynamic therapy induced by Hematoporphyrin Monomethyl Ether) with different parameters on hypertrophic scar in rabbit ear. Materials and Methods: After the placement of 7-mm diameter dermal wounds on each ear, the acute model of dermal hypertrophic scar in the New Zealand white rabbits was established. Scar wounds were randomly separated into 2 groups: the experimental group received HMME-PDT with different parameters, and the control group received no special treatment. Specimens were harvested from scar wounds on postoperative day 28. Scar and hypertrophic index (HI) were observed by haematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: Compared with the control group, scar formation was inhibited by HMME-PDT in the experimental group with parameters as follows: photosensitizer dose 10mg/kg, power density 20mw/cm2, fluence 5J/cm2, meanwhile, HI was decreased significantly. Conclusion: HMME-PDT may play a role in inhibiting hypertrophic scarring in rabbit ear. The biological effect is determined by the dose of photosensitizer, interval between the injection of photosensitizer and irradiation, power density and energy fluence.

  18. A case of hypertrophic olivary degeneration after resection of cavernomas of the brain stem and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Ye, Gengfan; Deng, Lin; Xu, Shuo; Wang, Yunyan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a transsynaptic form of degeneration, which is also a result of primary or secondary lesion and can damage the dento-rubro-olivary pathway. The dento-rubro-olivary pathway was first described by Guillain and Mollaret and is referred to as “the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret”. Multiple factors can destroy the dento-rubro-olivary pathway, such as surgical operation, hemorrhage, tumor, trauma, inflammation, demyelination, degeneration, and radiation damage. All of the above factors can result in delayed hypertrophic olivary degeneration. Articles related to this disease cover etiology, clinical presentation, pathology changes, etc. However, to our knowledge, there has been no literature reporting the use of diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion tensor tractography to improve the diagnosis of hypertrophic olivary degeneration following resection of cavernomas in the brain stem. Herein, we report a case who was diagnosed with hypertrophic olivary degeneration following resection of cavernomas of the brain stem, verify the significance of diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion tensor tractography, and review previous literature. The development of imageology promotes and improves hypertrophic olivary degeneration diagnosis and differential diagnosis. PMID:26504394

  19. Extensive facial and orbital infantile hemangiomas associated with high intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Shatriah, Ismail; Norazizah, Mohd-Amin; Wan-Hitam, Wan-Hazabbah; Wong, Abd-Rahim; Yunus, Rohaizan; Leo, Seo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    High intraocular pressure is a rare ophthalmic condition associated with infantile hemangiomas that involves the orbit, eyelid, or both. Here, we describe a patient with extensive facial and orbital infantile hemangiomas associated with high intraocular pressure in the affected eye. The prompt management of this challenging condition is essential. PMID:22329437

  20. [A case of MPO-ANCA positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with vascular inflammation in the kidney biopsy].

    PubMed

    Takewaki, Daiki; Tsuji, Yukiko; Kasai, Takashi; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    We report a 76-year-old male with ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis, who presented with crescentic glomerulonephritis. At the initial visit, he had episodic frontal headache and multiple cranial nerve palsy, including double vision, right deafness, hoarseness, and dysphagia. Because proteinuria and hematuria were detected on urinalysis, we performed a kidney biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. The presence of vascular inflammation in the kidney biopsy led us to consider that this patient may show progression to the systemic type of MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis. This proved useful for prognostic and treatment determination. Based on the results of laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies of the dura mater and kidney, the patient was diagnosed with ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis. PMID:26458570

  1. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies. PMID:25939875

  2. The Dynamic Nature of Hypertrophic and Fibrotic Remodeling of the Fish Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Adam N.; Fenna, Andrew J.; McConnell, James C.; Sherratt, Michael J.; Gardner, Peter; Shiels, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pressure or volume overload can cause the vertebrate heart to remodel. The hearts of fish remodel in response to seasonal temperature change. Here we focus on the passive properties of the fish heart. Building upon our previous work on thermal-remodeling of the rainbow trout ventricle, we hypothesized that chronic cooling would initiate fibrotic cardiac remodeling, with increased myocardial stiffness, similar to that seen with pathological hypertrophy in mammals. We hypothesized that, in contrast to pathological hypertrophy in mammals, the remodeling response in fish would be plastic and the opposite response would occur following chronic warming. Rainbow trout held at 10°C (control group) were chronically (>8 weeks) exposed to cooling (5°C) or warming (18°C). Chronic cold induced hypertrophy in the highly trabeculated inner layer of the fish heart, with a 41% increase in myocyte bundle cross-sectional area, and an up-regulation of hypertrophic marker genes. Cold acclimation also increased collagen deposition by 1.7-fold and caused an up-regulation of collagen promoting genes. In contrast, chronic warming reduced myocyte bundle cross-sectional area, expression of hypertrophic markers and collagen deposition. Functionally, the cold-induced fibrosis and hypertrophy were associated with increased passive stiffness of the whole ventricle and with increased micromechanical stiffness of tissue sections. The opposite occurred with chronic warming. These findings suggest chronic cooling in the trout heart invokes a hypertrophic phenotype with increased cardiac stiffness and fibrosis that are associated with pathological hypertrophy in the mammalian heart. The loss of collagen and increased compliance following warming is particularly interesting as it suggests fibrosis may oscillate seasonally in the fish heart, revealing a more dynamic nature than the fibrosis associated with dysfunction in mammals. PMID:26834645

  3. Differential Expression of Cell Cycle Regulators During Hyperplastic and Hypertrophic Growth of Broiler Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Suh, Y; Choi, Y M; Chen, P R; Davis, M E; Lee, K

    2015-10-01

    Hyperplastic growth and hypertrophic growth within adipose tissue is tightly associated with cell cycle activity. In this study, CCNG2 and CDKN2C were found to be correlated with cell cycle inhibition during fat cell differentiation, whereas CCND3, CCNA1, and ANAPC5 were positively associated with cell cycle activity during fat cell proliferation after selection based on GEO datasets available on the NCBI website. The findings were validated through comparison of expressions of these genes among different tissues/fractions in broiler chickens and time points during primary cell culture using quantitative real-time PCR. Development of broiler subcutaneous adipose tissue was investigated on embryonic days 15 and 17 and on post-hatch days 0, 5, 11, and 33 using H&E staining and PCNA immunostaining with DAPI counter stain. In addition, mRNA expressions of five cell cycle regulators as well as precursor cell and adipocyte markers were measured at those time points. The results suggest that cellular proliferation activity decreased as the fat pad grows, but a population of precursor cells seemed to be maintained until post-hatch day 5 despite increasing differentiation activity. Hypertrophic growth gradually intensified despite a slight cessation on post-hatch day 0 due to increased energy expenditure during hatching and delayed food access. From post-hatch day 5 to day 11, most of the precursor cells may become differentiated. After post-hatch day 11, hyperplastic growth seemed to slow, while hypertrophic growth may become dominant. This study provides further understanding about broiler fat tissue development which is imperative for effective control of fat deposition. PMID:26017028

  4. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  5. High Sensitivity of Late Gadolinium Enhancement for Predicting Microscopic Myocardial Scarring in Biopsied Specimens in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Kenshi; Fujino, Noboru; Nagata, Yoji; Hodatsu, Akihiko; Masuta, Eiichi; Sakata, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial scarring can be assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and by endomyocardial biopsy. However, accuracy of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens remains unknown in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart reflects microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Twenty-one consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who were examined both by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by endomyocardial biopsy were retrospectively studied. The right interventricular septum was the target site for endomyocardial biopsy in all patients. Late gadolinium enhancement in the ventricular septum had an excellent sensitivity (100%) with a low specificity (40%) for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. The sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart remained 100% with a specificity of 27% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. Quantitative assessments of fibrosis revealed that the extent of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart was the only independent variable related to the microscopic collagen fraction in biopsied specimens (β  =  0.59, 95% confident interval: 0.15 – 1.0, p  =  0.012). Conclusions Although there was a compromise in the specificity, the sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement was excellent for prediction of microscopic myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the severity of late gadolinium enhancement was independently associated with the quantitative collagen fraction in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These findings indicate that late gadolinium enhancement can reflect both the presence and the extent of microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in

  6. Therapeutic Effects of Liposome-Enveloped Ligusticum chuanxiong Essential Oil on Hypertrophic Scars in the Rabbit Ear Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chang-Ling; Qin, Lu-Ping; Lu, Ying; Peng, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring, a common proliferative disorder of dermal fibroblasts, results from an overproduction of fibroblasts and excessive deposition of collagen. Although treatment with surgical excision or steroid hormones can modify the symptoms, numerous treatment-related complications have been described. In view of this, we investigated the therapeutic effects of essential oil (EO) from rhizomes of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. (Umbelliferae) on formed hypertrophic scars in a rabbit ear model. EO was prepared as a liposomal formulation (liposome-enveloped essential oil, LEO) and a rabbit ear model with hypertrophic scars was established. LEO (2.5, 5, and 10%) was applied once daily to the scars for 28 days. On postoperative day 56, the scar tissue was excised for masson's trichrome staining, detection of fibroblast apoptosis, assays of the levels of collagens I and III, and analysis of the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), caspase-3 and -9, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In addition, the scar elevation index (SEI) was also determined. As a result, LEO treatment significantly alleviated formed hypertrophic scars on rabbit ears. The levels of TGF-β1, MMP-1, collagen I, and collagen III were evidently decreased, and caspase -3 and -9 levels and apoptosis cells were markedly increased in the scar tissue. SEI was also significantly reduced. Histological findings exhibited significant amelioration of the collagen tissue. These results suggest that LEO possesses the favorable therapeutic effects on formed hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model and may be an effective cure for human hypertrophic scars. PMID:22363569

  7. The search of 'novel' mtDNA mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: MITOMAPping as a risk factor.

    PubMed

    Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Yao, Yong-Gang; Salas, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    MITOMAP is by far the most frequently cited Web resource that is referred to in substantiating novelty of an mtDNA mutation. This database, as is now known, has quite an incomplete coverage of the mtDNA mutations from the literature. This circumstance has seduced many scholars of medical genetics in the past to claim novelty of rather 'worn-out' mtDNA mutations. What is, however, really novel in the field is that researchers take advantage of this situation and deliberately suppress information from other sources, as it appears to have occurred in two recently published cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:17482693

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Correlates With Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rotas, Ioannis; Cito, Giovanni; Letovanec, Igor; Christodoulou, Michel; Perentes, Jean Y

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic osteoarthrpathy (HO) is a rare paraneoplasic syndrome associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The pathophysiology of HO is unknown but was recently related to enhanced levels of urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Here, we report the case of a patient that presented HO in association with a resectable left upper lobe NSCLC. Following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, HO resolved and did not recur with development of a brain metastasis 1 year later. Interestingly, tumor cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme responsible the synthesis of PGE2, was expressed in the primary tumor but not in the resected metastasis. PMID:26777972

  9. Mastoiditis complicated with Gradenigo syndrome and a hypertrophic pachymeningitis with consequent communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Dina; Machová, Hana; Hahn, Ales; Marková, Hana; Otruba, Lukás; Mandys, Václav; Houstava, Ladislav; Kalvach, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    We present the clinical, radiological and pathological features of a case of a cranial hypertrophic pachymeningitis that developed in the course of mastoiditis and petrous apex inflammation and responded to immunosuppressive therapy only. Documented by the development of clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid changes, histopathology findings, by otosurgical intervention and finally by the insertion of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, the case illustrates a gradual development of pachymeningitis with consequent hydrocephalus and intracranial hypertension. We consider this disease development an example of immune-induced proliferative fibrotic changes in meninges. PMID:17364337

  10. Trileaflet Mitral Valve with Three Papillary Muscles Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Novel Case.

    PubMed

    Rosanio, Salvatore; Simonsen, Cameron J; Starwalt, John; Keylani, Abdul M; Vitarelli, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) malformations are uncommon, except for MV prolapse. Despite their infrequency, most of them are well-known and defined entities, such as congenital MV stenosis with two papillary muscles, parachute MV, supravalvular mitral ring, hypoplastic MV, isolated cleft in the anterior and/or posterior leaflets, and double-orifice MV. A trileaflet MV with three separate papillary muscles with concordant atrioventricular and ventricle-arterial connections is exceptionally rare. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it has been reported only once in association with subaortic valvular stenosis. We hereby describe a novel case associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25809503

  11. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia in a Red Pigment Tattoo: A Separate Entity or Hypertrophic Lichen Planus-like Reaction?

    PubMed

    Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M

    2015-12-01

    Red pigment tattoos are known to cause pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in the skin, frequently simulating squamous cell carcinoma or keratoacanthoma. Herein, the authors present two additional cases of red pigment tattoo pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in which they noted a lichenoid tissue reaction. They reviewed the previously published cases and observed a lichenoid reaction in the histopathological images similar to hypertrophic lichen planus. The authors suggest that these reactions might best be referred to as "lichenoid reaction with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia" or "hypertrophic lichen planus-like reaction." Accordingly, recognition of an inflammatory component may allow additional treatment options. PMID:26705448

  12. Spectrum of Infantile Esotropia in Primates: Behavior, Brains and Orbits

    PubMed Central

    Tychsen, Lawrence; Richards, Michael; Wong, Agnes; Foeller, Paul; Burhkalter, Andreas; Narasimhan, Anita; Demer, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies of human infants have described a spectrum of early-onset esotropia, from small-variable-angle to large heterotropias.1 We report here a similar spectrum of early-onset esotropia in infant monkeys, with emphasis on the relationship between visuomotor deficits, central nervous system (CNS) circuitry and orbital anatomy. Methods Eye movements were recorded in macaque monkeys with natural, infantile-onset esotropia (n=7) and in control monkeys (n=2) to assess alignment, latent nystagmus, dissociated vertical deviation (DVD), and pursuit/optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) asymmetries. Acuity was measured by preferential-looking technique or spatial sweep VEP (SSVEP). Geniculo-striate pathways were then analyzed with neuroanatomic tracers and metabolic labels. Extraocular muscles were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and anatomic sectioning of whole orbits. Results Esotropia ranged from 4-13.5° (7-24 prism diopters [PD]) with fixation preference (if any) varying idiosyncratically (as in human). Severity of ocular motor dysfunction (i.e. nystagmus velocity, DVD amplitude, pursuit-OKN nasal bias index), increased as the magnitude of esotropia angle. Animals with greater ocular motor deficits tended to have greater visual area V1 (striate cortex) neuroanatomic deficits, evident as fewer binocular horizontal connections in V1. Orbital MRI/anatomic analysis showed no difference in horizontal rectus cross sectional areas, muscle paths, innervation densities or cytoarchitecture compared to normal animals. Conclusion The infantile esotropia spectrum in non-human primates is remarkably similar to that reported in human infants. Concomitant esotropia in these primates cannot be ascribed to abnormalities of the extraocular muscles or orbit. These findings, combined with epidemiologic studies of human, suggest that perturbations of CNS binocular pathways in early development are the primary cause of the infantile esotropia syndrome

  13. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  14. Asfotase Alfa Treatment Improves Survival for Perinatal and Infantile Hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Ozono, Keiichi; Riese, Richard; Moseley, Scott; Melian, Agustin; Thompson, David D.; Bishop, Nicholas; Hofmann, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism that, in its most severe perinatal and infantile forms, results in 50–100% mortality, typically from respiratory complications. Objectives: Our objective was to better understand the effect of treatment with asfotase alfa, a first-in-class enzyme replacement therapy, on mortality in neonates and infants with severe HPP. Design/Setting: Data from patients with the perinatal and infantile forms of HPP in two ongoing, multicenter, multinational, open-label, phase 2 interventional studies of asfotase alfa treatment were compared with data from similar patients from a retrospective natural history study. Patients: Thirty-seven treated patients (median treatment duration, 2.7 years) and 48 historical controls of similar chronological age and HPP characteristics. Interventions: Treated patients received asfotase alfa as sc injections either 1 mg/kg six times per week or 2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Main Outcome Measures: Survival, skeletal health quantified radiographically on treatment, and ventilatory status were the main outcome measures for this study. Results: Asfotase alfa was associated with improved survival in treated patients vs historical controls: 95% vs 42% at age 1 year and 84% vs 27% at age 5 years, respectively (P < .0001, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Whereas 5% (1/20) of the historical controls who required ventilatory assistance survived, 76% (16/21) of the ventilated and treated patients survived, among whom 75% (12/16) were weaned from ventilatory support. This better respiratory outcome accompanied radiographic improvements in skeletal mineralization and health. Conclusions: Asfotase alfa mineralizes the HPP skeleton, including the ribs, and improves respiratory function and survival in life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP. PMID:26529632

  15. [Unusual visual impairments in a case of MPO-ANCA associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Seiya; Sugeno, Naoto; Nishiyama, Syuhei; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Aoki, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    We report a 79-year-old man presenting MPO-ANCA associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis and bilateral visual impairment. Two years before, microscopic hematuria and positive MPO-ANCA were indicated, then oral steroids and cyclophosphamide were given as systemic vasculitis. On admission, lateral hemianopsia in the right visual field was documented. Some weeks after admission, he complained of a left-hand side headache, and the visual impairment of a right eye. Brain MRI detected thick dura matter with abnormal enhancement predominantly on the left side of the basal temporal lobe and a tumor-like lesion at the sphenoid sinus near the right cavernous sinus. Multiple scotomas in the left visual field were compatible with ischemic changes caused by MPO-ANCA related vasculitis. On the other hand, the hemianopsia in his right eye was related with a tumor-like lesion. The visual problems showed a favorable response to the steroid pulse therapy. ANCA-positive cases can demonstrate various symptoms including intra-/extra-cranial involvement. Thus, thorough clinical workup is needed to determine the actual site of the lesion when cranial nerve involvement is observed in MPO-ANCA positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis. PMID:22453038

  16. Comparison between Stromal Vascular Fraction and Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Remodeling Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Frouin, Eric; Rigau, Valérie; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Magalon, Guy; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are characterized by excessive amount of collagen deposition and principally occur following burn injuries or surgeries. In absence of effective treatments, the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, which have been shown to attenuate fibrosis in various applications, seems of interest. The objectives of the present study were therefore to evaluate the effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) on a pre-existing HTS in a humanized skin graft model in Nude mice and to compare the efficacy of hASCs versus stromal vascular fraction (SVF). We found that injection of SVF or hASCs resulted in an attenuation of HTS as noticed after clinical evaluation of skin thickness, which was associated with lower total collagen contents in the skins of treated mice and a reduced dermis thickness after histological analysis. Although both SVF and hASCs were able to significantly reduce the clinical and histological parameters of HTS, hASCs appeared to be more efficient than SVF. The therapeutic effect of hASCs was attributed to higher expression of TGFβ3 and HGF, which are important anti-fibrotic mediators, and to higher levels of MMP-2 and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio, which reflect the remodelling activity responsible for fibrosis resorption. These results demonstrated the therapeutic potential of hASCs for clinical applications of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:27227960

  17. Sex dimorphisms of crossbridge cycling kinetics in transgenic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mice.

    PubMed

    Birch, Camille L; Behunin, Samantha M; Lopez-Pier, Marissa A; Danilo, Christiane; Lipovka, Yulia; Saripalli, Chandra; Granzier, Henk; Konhilas, John P

    2016-07-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the sarcomere and may lead to hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and/or arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, or sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that hearts from transgenic HCM mice harboring a mutant myosin heavy chain increase the energetic cost of contraction in a sex-specific manner. To do this, we assessed Ca(2+) sensitivity of tension and crossbridge kinetics in demembranated cardiac trabeculas from male and female wild-type (WT) and HCM hearts at an early time point (2 mo of age). We found a significant effect of sex on Ca(2+) sensitivity such that male, but not female, HCM mice displayed a decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity compared with WT counterparts. The HCM transgene and sex significantly impacted the rate of force redevelopment by a rapid release-restretch protocol and tension cost by the ATPase-tension relationship. In each of these measures, HCM male trabeculas displayed a gain-of-function when compared with WT counterparts. In addition, cardiac remodeling measured by echocardiography, histology, morphometry, and posttranslational modifications demonstrated sex- and HCM-specific effects. In conclusion, female and male HCM mice display sex dimorphic crossbridge kinetics accompanied by sex- and HCM-dependent cardiac remodeling at the morphometric, histological, and cellular level. PMID:27199124

  18. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy from A to Z: Genetics, Pathophysiology, Imaging, and Management.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Restrepo, Carlos S; Vargas, Daniel; Marmol-Velez, Alejandro; Ocazionez, Daniel; Murillo, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous group of diseases related to sarcomere gene mutations exhibiting heterogeneous phenotypes with an autosomal dominant mendelian pattern of inheritance. The disorder is characterized by diverse phenotypic expressions and variable natural progression, which may range from dyspnea and/or syncope to sudden cardiac death. It is found across all racial groups and is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in the absence of another systemic or cardiac disease. The management of HCM is based on a thorough understanding of the underlying morphology, pathophysiology, and clinical course. Imaging findings of HCM mirror the variable expressivity and penetrance heterogeneity, with the added advantage of diagnosis even in cases where a specific mutation may not yet be found. The diagnostic information obtained from imaging varies depending on the specific stage of HCM-phenotype manifestation, including the prehypertrophic, hypertrophic, and later stages of adverse remodeling into the burned-out phase of overt heart failure. However, subtle or obvious, these imaging findings become critical components in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of HCM patients. Although diagnosis of HCM traditionally relies on clinical assessment and transthoracic echocardiography, recent studies have demonstrated increased utility of multidetector computed tomography (CT) and particularly cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in diagnosis, phenotype differentiation, therapeutic planning, and prognostication. In this article, we provide an overview of the genetics, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of HCM, with the spectrum of imaging findings at MR imaging and CT and their contribution in diagnosis, risk stratification, and therapy. PMID:26963450

  19. Fibroproliferative effect of microRNA-21 in hypertrophic scar derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangzao; Zhou, Renpeng; Zhang, Qi; Jiang, Banghong; Wu, Qingkai; Wang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a fibroproliferative disorder caused by abnormal wound healing, which is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) secreted by fibroblasts. We previous have found that expression of microRNA-21(miR-21) was increased in tissues and fibroblasts of HS. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be further elucidated. In this study, we identified the miR-21 was a marker for the phenotype of HS fibroblasts, as anti-miR-21 reduced expression of fibrosis markers such as Col1A1, Col3A1, Fn and α-SMA in fibroblasts and overexpression of miR-21 promoted fibroproliferative expression in fibroblasts. Furthermore, we also found that miR-21 promoted TGF-β1 induced fibroproliferative expression by repressing Smad7 expression in vitro. In addition, the miR-21 inhibitor inhibited the growth of hypertrophic scar tissue in vivo (nude mice experimental model). These results indicated that miR-21 was a critical regulator for HS formation and TGF- β1/miR-21/Smad7 pathway could be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of HS. PMID:27207585

  20. [Functional regulation of genome with peptide bioregulators by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (by patients and relatives)].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaĭozishvili, M N; Rogava, M A; Lazhava, T A

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a comparative study of the functional genome indicators using lymphocyte cultures of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and their first relatives. Studies conducted both in intact cultures and cultures exposed to the influence of peptide - bioregulators Epithalon, Vilon and Livagen. Last (Livagen) tested at separate and joint application with cobalt chloride salt. As indicated according to the results of the analysis, the cells of the individuals with HCM and their first relatives were characterized by higher frequency of spontaneous quantitative - structural disorders in comparison with the cells of healthy individuals. The findings suggest a different effect of bioregulators. The most effective protective action in relation normalization of functional parameters of the genome shows Epithalon for lowering the level of chromosomal instability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and relatives of patients with HCM. On the basis of identified protective action Epithalon concludes prospects of its application in the development of preventive measures for individuals at increased risk of morbidity HCM. PMID:24423684

  1. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits collagen synthesis in dermal fibroblasts and prevents hypertrophic scar formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Chen, Lei; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a common dermal fibroproliferative disorder characterized by excessive collagen deposition. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an important inflammatory product synthesized via the arachidonic acid cascade, has been shown to act as a fibroblast modulator and to possess antifibroblastic activity. However, the mechanism underlying the antifibrotic effect of PGE2 remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effects of PGE2 on TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts in terms of collagen production and to determine the regulatory pathways involved, as well as understand the antiscarring function of PGE2 in vivo. We found that PGE2 inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by regulating the balance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). It did so by upregulating cAMP through the E prostanoid (EP)2 receptor. We determined that inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad pathway by PGE2 is associated with its ability to inhibit collagen synthesis. An in vivo study further confirmed that PGE2 inhibits hypertrophic scar formation by decreasing collagen production. Our results demonstrate that the novel anti-scarring function of PGE2 is achieved by balancing MMPs/TIMP expression and decreasing collagen production. PMID:26997546

  2. Tetrandrine induces microRNA differential expression in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ning, P; Peng, Y; Liu, D W; Hu, Y H; Liu, Y; Liu, D M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been shown to play a role in normal wound healing process. miRNAs may be linked to pathologic wound healing and closely related to the formation of hypertrophic scars. This study aimed to explore the effects of tetrandrine on the miRNA expression profile in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs) in vitro. HSFs were randomly divided into two groups: the tetrandrine treatment group and the control group. The experimental and control groups were collected and analyzed by miRNA array after a 48-h culture. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to confirm the array results. The targets of differentially expressed miRNA were functionally annotated using bioinformatic approaches. miRNA microarray analysis identified 193 differentially expressed miRNAs and the expression of 186 miRNAs in the experimental group decreased while that of 7 miRNAs increased compared to the control group. The most significantly downregulated miRNA was hsa-miR-1246, and hsa-miR-27b had the highest expression level. Significant differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted to be related to several important signaling pathways related to scar wound healing. The differential miRNA expression identified in this study provides the experimental basis for further understanding the anti-fibrosis effect of tetrandrine. PMID:26909951

  3. Virtual Cardiac Surgery Using CFD: Application to Septal Myectomy in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is characterized by ventricular wall thickening, diastolic dysfunction, and dynamic outflow tract obstruction, all of which strongly influence the vortex dynamics and pressure distribution in the left ventricle (LV). Severe cases of HCM are usually managed through septal myectomy where the surgeon resects the hypertrophic mass. Surgeons currently try to remove as much tissue as possible in order to optimize the post surgical result. However, excessive debulking increases the chance of ventricular septal defects, bundle branch block or complete heart block, and aneurysmal septal thinning. On the other hand, insufficient tissue removal also leads to unsatisfactory outcomes in terms of reduction of outflow tract pressure gradient. Knowing how much muscle to remove and where to remove it from could reduce the likelihood of complications and suboptimal outcomes. In the present study, we employ an immersed boundary solver to model the effect of septal myectomy for ventricles with HOCM and demonstrate the potential of such an approach for surgical planning. Computational resources were provided by the National Institute of Computational Science under Tergrid grant number TG-CTS100002.

  4. Effects of verapamil on left ventricular diastolic filling in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, E.M.; Rocchini, A.P.; Spicer, R.L.; Juni, J.; Snider, R.; Crowley, D.C.; Rosenthal, A.

    1988-02-15

    The effects of oral verapamil on resting left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling were examined in 10 children and adolescents with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Measurements of diastolic filling were made from gated technetium-99m radionuclide angiograms with postbeat rejection of data outside a 5% RR-interval window. LV time-activity curves were generated and the rapid-filling phase fit with a 3 degrees polynomial to calculate the peak filling rate and the time from end-systole to the point of peak filling. All patients had a radionuclide angiogram performed before and after 0.25 to 3 years of oral verapamil therapy. Verapamil did not change the LV ejection fraction but increased the peak filling rate (3.24 +/- 0.15 to 4.62 +/- 1.05 end-diastolic volume/s,p less than 0.01) and reduced the time to peak filling (217 +/- 57 to 168 +/- 63 ms, p less than 0.01). An increase in exercise endurance as measured by exercise treadmill test and subjective symptomatic improvement were also seen after verapamil therapy. Thus, in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, symptomatic improvement and LV diastolic filling parameters improved with long-term oral verapamil.

  5. Loss of primary cilia upregulates renal hypertrophic signaling and promotes cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bell, P Darwin; Fitzgibbon, Wayne; Sas, Kelli; Stenbit, Antine E; Amria, May; Houston, Amber; Reichert, Ryan; Gilley, Sandra; Siegal, Gene P; Bissler, John; Bilgen, Mehmet; Chou, Peter Cheng-te; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Yoder, Brad; Haycraft, Courtney J; Siroky, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Primary cilia dysfunction alters renal tubular cell proliferation and differentiation and associates with accelerated cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. However, the mechanism leading from primary ciliary dysfunction to renal cyst formation is unknown. We hypothesize that primary cilia prevent renal cyst formation by suppressing pathologic tubular cell hypertrophy and proliferation. Unilateral nephrectomy initiates tubular cell hypertrophy and proliferation in the contralateral kidney and provides a tool to examine primary cilia regulation of renal hypertrophy. Conditional knockout of the primary cilia ift88 gene leads to delayed, adult-onset renal cystic disease, which provides a window of opportunity to conduct unilateral nephrectomy and examine downstream kinetics of renal hypertrophy and cyst formation. In wild-type animals, unilateral nephrectomy activated the mTOR pathway and produced appropriate structural and functional hypertrophy without renal cyst formation. However, in ift88 conditional knockout animals, unilateral nephrectomy triggered increased renal hypertrophy and accelerated renal cyst formation, leading to renal dysfunction. mTOR signaling also increased compared with wild-type animals, suggesting a mechanistic cascade starting with primary ciliary dysfunction, leading to excessive mTOR signaling and renal hypertrophic signaling and culminating in cyst formation. These data suggest that events initiating hypertrophic signaling, such as structural or functional loss of renal mass, may accelerate progression of adult polycystic kidney disease toward end-stage renal disease. PMID:21493775

  6. TGF-β1 mediates the hypertrophic cardiomyocyte growth induced by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Jo El J.; Witt, Sandra A.; Glascock, Betty J.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Reiser, Peter J.; Nix, Stacey L.; Kimball, Thomas R.; Doetschman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent hypertrophic stimulus, causes significant increases in TGFb1 gene expression. However, it is not known whether there is a causal relationship between increased levels of TGF-β1 and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic analysis revealed that TGF-β1–deficient mice subjected to chronic subpressor doses of Ang II had no significant change in left ventricular (LV) mass and percent fractional shortening during Ang IItreatment. In contrast, Ang II–treated wild-type mice showed a >20% increase in LV mass and impaired cardiac function. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was also markedly increased in Ang II–treated wild-type mice but unchanged in Ang II–treated TGF-β1–deficient mice. No significant levels of fibrosis, mitotic growth, or cytokine infiltration were detected in Ang II–treated mice. Atrial natriuretic factor expression was ∼6-fold elevated in Ang II–treated wild-type, but not TGF-β1–deficient mice. However, the α- to β-myosin heavy chain switch did not occur in Ang II–treated mice, indicating that isoform switching is not obligatorily coupled with hypertrophy or TGF-β1. The Ang IIeffect on hypertrophy was shown not to result from stimulation of the endogenous renin-angiotensis system. These results indicate that TGF-β1 is an important mediator of the hypertrophic growth response of the heart to Ang II. PMID:11901187

  7. Hypoxia-driven glycolytic and fructolytic metabolic programs: Pivotal to hypertrophic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mirtschink, Peter; Krek, Wilhelm

    2016-07-01

    Pathologic cardiac growth is an adaptive response of the myocardium to various forms of systemic (e.g. pressure overload) or genetically-based (e. g. mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins) stress. It represents a key aspect of different types of heart disease including aortic stenosis (AS) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). While many of the pathophysiological and hemodynamical aspects of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy have been uncovered during the last decades, its underlying metabolic determinants are only beginning to come into focus. Here, we review the epidemiological evidence and pathological features of hypertrophic heart disease in AS and HCM and consider in this context the development of microenvironmental tissue hypoxia as a key component of the heart's growth response to pathologic stress. We particularly reflect on recent evidence illustrating how activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) drives glycolytic and fructolytic metabolic programs to maintain ATP generation and support anabolic growth of the pathologically-stressed heart. Finally we discuss how this metabolic programs, when protracted, deprive the heart of energy leading ultimately to heart failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26896647

  8. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first

  9. [Motor-coordination disorders in patients with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Aslanov, A M; Avakian, G N; Bulaeva, N V; Kovaleva, N I

    1984-01-01

    A clinico-electrophysiological study of motor-coordinatory impairments was carried out in 117 patients with infantile cerebral paralysis. The results obtained suggest a possibility of a slow rate of myelinization, inadequate development of the coordinatory systems due to early damage to the brain associated with the systemic localization of the defect, and the obligatory involvement of extrapyramidal impairments in the realization of pathological dyskinesias. The clinical and electrophysiological examination made it possible to sum up all clinical manifestations of the pathology under a heading "discoordinatory extrapyramidal dyskinesias". PMID:6506951

  10. Review of topical beta blockers as treatment for infantile hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Painter, Sally L; Hildebrand, Göran Darius

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of infantile hemangiomas changed from the use of oral corticosteroids to oral propranolol on the serendipitous discovery of propanolol's clinical effectiveness in 2008. Since then, clinicians have begun to use topical beta blockers--in particular, timolol maleate 0.5% gel forming solution--with good effect. Topical beta blockers are now used for lesions with both deep and superficial components and those that are amblyogenic. When initiated in the proliferative phase of the lesion, the effectiveness of the treatment can be seen within days. There is no consensus on dosing, treatment bioavailability, or clinical assessment of lesions, but these are topics for future research. PMID:26408055

  11. Is infantile autism a universal phenomenon? An open question.

    PubMed

    Sanua, V D

    1984-01-01

    What we have tried to do in this paper is to question the universality of Infantile Autism as implied by the various definitions which have been provided. Our research of the literature has convinced us that infantile autism appears to be an illness of Western Civilization, and appears in countries of high technology, where the nuclear family dominates. We indicated that no research studies were located in the U.S.A. on Hispanics, in spite of their large number. Furthermore, it was found to be quite rare among Black families. We also saw that the illness seems to be quite infrequent in Latin American countries, Africa, and India, while the rate is high in Japan, but only in westernized families. Tinbergen (1974) likewise feels that infantile autism is "actually on the increase in a number of Western and westernized societies". Two major variables which are interconnected seem to be responsible for the confusion in the findings. One of them is the problem of diagnosis. It would seem that many researchers have extended the definition of infantile autism to include other seriously afflicted children, including those who are brain-damaged. This is no surprise, since such conflicts exist as Ritvo (1981) estimating that there are 300,000 autistic children in the U.S., while a report by the National Institute for Handicapped Research estimates the number of autistic children to be 71,000 (1981). Another aspect of the findings which has been contradictory is that some investigators have found that parents of autistic children tend to be of higher S.E.S., particularly in European studies, while some studies in the U.S.A. did not find such a difference among the parents of autistic and non-autistic children. We have provided some illustrations to indicate that studies which have found no differences were not dealing exclusively with autistic children as defined by Kanner, and often used childhood schizophrenia and autism interchangeably. Cantwell, Baker, and Rutter (1978

  12. [Clinical guidelines for infantile-onset Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Pascual, S I; Nascimento, A; Fernandez-Llamazares, C M; Medrano-Lopez, C; Villalobos-Pinto, E; Martinez-Moreno, M; Ley, M; Manrique-Rodriguez, S; Blasco-Alonso, J

    2016-09-16

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease has a fatal prognosis in the short term unless it is diagnosed at an early stage and enzyme replacement therapy is not started as soon as possible. A group of specialists from different disciplines involved in this disease have reviewed the current scientific evidence and have drawn up an agreed series of recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. We recommend establishing enzyme treatment in any patient with symptomatic Pompe disease with onset within the first year of life, with a clinical and enzymatic diagnosis, and once the CRIM (cross-reactive immunological material) status is known. PMID:27600742

  13. Laparoscopic Pyloromyotomy: A Modified Simple Technique

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Mohammed Omer; Omran, Yasser Al; Al-Hindi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: A modified laparoscopic pyloromyotomy (LP) technique may provide an alternative to treating infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) by improving operative timing with reduction of postoperative complication rates, compared with a three-port trocar system. Methods: Thirty-three infants were treated with IHPS at a single-centre between January 2002 and December 2011. The local surgical incision to the pylorus was performed according to Ramstedt’s pyloromyotomy; but with a two-port trocar system (umbilical and right lower abdominal crease ports), following a controlled stab wound into the epigastric region and a 3mm incision to allow introduction of ophthalmic knife. With the aid of atraumatic forceps and camera guidance, the ophthalmic knife was used to carefully incise the seromuscular layer, which allows improved manual tactile sensation compared to ergonomic laparoscopic spreaders. A Benson pyloric spreader was then used to further separate the pyloric muscle layer to complete the procedure. Results: In all 33 infants treated, LP was safely performed with no evidence of duodenal or mucosal perforation with complete pyloromyotomy achieved in each case. The postoperative course was rather uneventful apart from an umbilical wound infection. Conclusion: This modified approach is simple, safe and allows improved operative timing, whilst increasing surgeon’s confidence by tactile sensation. PMID:26793595

  14. 18F-Fluoride bone positron emission tomography demonstrating changes related to finger clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Raghava; Ali, Mirza Athar; Nagaraju, Madhusudhan; Muntimadugu, Babaiah

    2014-04-01

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy is manifested by clubbing and periostitis of bones. We present a very rare documentation of increased F18-sodium fluoride uptake in the distal phalanges of both hands correlating to clubbing of the fingers in a 55-year-old female patient with carcinoma of lung in whom bone positron emission tomography was performed for metastatic work-up. PMID:24761070

  15. In-the-bag decentration of an intraocular lens in a patient with a tendency to hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajesh Subhash

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of rapid anterior lens capsular contraction leading to decentration of a hydrophilic acrylic lens with stiff haptics (Rayner design). To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate early capsular contraction with folding of the haptic over the optic in a patient with a tendency toward hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:27330480

  16. In-the-bag decentration of an intraocular lens in a patient with a tendency to hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajesh Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report a case of rapid anterior lens capsular contraction leading to decentration of a hydrophilic acrylic lens with stiff haptics (Rayner design). To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate early capsular contraction with folding of the haptic over the optic in a patient with a tendency toward hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:27330480

  17. A case of asymmetrical apical hypertrophy which is a form of hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy with giant negative T-waves.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, A; Ghabussi, P

    1982-09-01

    Clinical, hemodynamic, electrocardiographic (ECG), echocardiographic, left ventricular (LV), and coronary angiographic (CA) findings are reported in a case with apical hypertrophy (AH), a form of hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HNCM). The most striking symptom was chest pain and the most conspicuous electrocardiographic finding consisted of giant negative T waves, reaching an amplitude of 4.0 mV. Echocardiography revealed an apical thickness of the septum and posterior wall of 40 mm; this was significantly greater than septal and posterior free wall thickening in the LV outflow area. The anterior motion (SAM) of the anterior mitral leaflet, was present, and, in hemodymic investigation, the isoproterenol test was negative. The left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and the EF were elevated. In the LV angiogram from the right anterior oblique position (RAO), the LV free wall thickness at the apex was significantly thicker than at the outflow tract level. The patient had dilated coronary arteries. We conclude that these findings are typical for AH (HNCM) and it seems that hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (IHSS, MO), and hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy (ASH, AH) are different manifestations of a wide spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:6217360

  18. The paradoxes of the infantile sexual: A case of extemporal temporality.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laurence

    2014-10-18

    The theoretical tension raised by the concept of infantile neurosis is featured all through the Freudian corpus - caught at the crossroads between the psychic facts of the child's development (infantile history and clinical study of pathologies) and the universal structure of unconscious complexes, including the Oedipus complex (the model of intrapsychic conflicts and of the process of "civilisation" undergone by the child). Inscribed in diachronic "temporality" like every individual lived experience and its vicissitudes, or "extemporal" like every organising schema and the structuring of repressions that it elicits, infantile neurosis leads us to examine the metapsychological status of defence mechanisms. PMID:25327258

  19. Infantile fibrosarcoma of ethmoid sinus, misdiagnosed as an adenoid in a 5-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Khademi, Bijan; Karimi, Mehran; Shekarkhar, Golsa

    2015-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma of head and neck is rare and the presence of this tumor in ethmoid sinus is even more uncommon. To the best of our knowledge, <5 cases have been reported in the last 20 years in the English literature, so far, only one of which has been infantile type in a 15 months old girl. In this case report, we will explain our experience with a rare case of infantile fibrosarcoma originating from ethmoid sinus in a 5-year-old boy who presented with dyspnea and epistaxis. After biopsy, it was diagnosed as fibrosarcoma of sinus origin. PMID:26604519

  20. Infantile anorexia nervosa: a developmental disorder or separation and individuation.

    PubMed

    Chatoor, I

    1989-01-01

    Infantile anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that has its onset during the early developmental stage of separation and individuation between the ages of six months and three years. Infantile anorexia nervosa is characterized by food refusal and leads to failure to thrive. The infant refuses to eat in an attempt to achieve autonomy and control with regard to the mother, a maneuver that serves to involve the mother more deeply in the infant's eating behavior and to meet the infant's need for attention. Mother and infant become embroiled in a battle of wills over the infant's food intake. The infant's feeding is directed by his emotional needs instead of physiological sensations of hunger and satiety, and he fails to develop somatopsychological differentiation. The infant's temperament and maternal conflicts over control, autonomy, and dependency appear to contribute to this eating disorder. Treatment is aimed toward helping the parents understand and promote the developmental process of somatopsychological differentiation. Initially, a behavioral-cognitive approach is used; however, parents who struggle with unresolved issues around dependency and control require further psychotherapy. PMID:2470708

  1. Astrocytosis in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Shyng, Charles; Sands, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL; infantile Batten disease) is an inherited paediatric neurodegenerative disease. INCL is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and is thus classified as a lysosomal storage disease. Pathological examination of both human and murine INCL brains reveals progressive, widespread neuroinflammation. In fact, astrocyte activation appears to be the first histological sign of disease. However, the role of astrocytosis in INCL was poorly understood. The hallmark of astrocyte activation is the up-regulation of intermediate filaments, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. The role of astrocytosis in INCL was studied in a murine model lacking PPT1 and the intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin (triple-knockout). This murine model of INCL with attenuated astrocytosis had an exacerbated pathological and clinical phenotype. The triple-knockout mouse had a significantly shortened lifespan, and accelerated cellular and humoural neuroinflammatory response compared with the parental PPT1(-/-) mouse. The data obtained from the triple-knockout mouse strongly suggest that astrocyte activation plays a beneficial role in early INCL disease progression. A more thorough understanding of the glial responses to lysosomal enzyme deficiencies and the accumulation of undergraded substrates will be crucial to developing effective therapeutics. PMID:25233404

  2. Early vs. late refeeding in acute infantile diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gazala, E; Weitzman, S; Weizman, Z; Gross, J; Bearman, J E; Gorodischer, R

    1988-03-01

    A randomized ambulatory trial was performed to compare early (6-h) vs. late (24-h) refeeding in acute infantile diarrhea. Ninety infants with mild dehydration were enrolled in the study. Following an initial oral rehydration period (WHO formula), refeeding was introduced using a diet based on either breast milk or cow's milk. Early (n = 53) and late (n = 37) refeeding groups were similar in ethnic background, socioeconomic level, relevant past history, nutritional and clinical state, and stool pathogens. Infants were assessed upon their initial visit, at 24 and 48 h, and at 7 and 14 days thereafter for evaluation of weight, hydration state, stool frequency and need of hospitalization. No significant differences in the above parameters were observed between the two groups. Different patterns of refeeding (breast milk vs. cow's milk) in both early and late refeeding groups showed no significant differences in the features studied. Since the short-term clinical outcome following early refeeding in acute infantile diarrhea is not different from late refeeding, we suggest that early refeeding should be preferred, particularly in developing populations, in order to minimize the adverse nutritional effects of prolonged fasting during recurrent bouts of gastroenteritis. PMID:3286579

  3. Polygraphic study during whole night sleep in infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Y; Shionaga, A; Iida, Y

    1979-01-01

    The whole night EEG were polygraphically recorded and analyzed in 9 patients with infantile spasms prior to ACTH therapy. The subjects were divided into two groups, favorable and unfavorable, depending upon the response to the ACTH therapy. (1) Among the unfavorable group, the deep sleep stage was not observed; while the light sleep stage tended to dominate. (2) REM sleep period was noted less among the unfavorable than among the favorable group. REM density also tended to be lower among the unfavorable group. (3) Of the 4 unfavorable cases, 2 did not manifest REM sleep at all. Of the remaining 2, 1 had a remarkably long REM interval period. Even among the favorable cases, REM sleep tended to be short and appear frequently. (4) The period of muscle atonia during NREM sleep was markedly prolonged in all cases. (5) Body movements of both types (gross and twitch) were less frequent comparing to those of normal younger children, more remarkably in unfavorable cases. From the above findings, a disorder of the pontine reticular formation would be suggested in cases of infantile spasms. Reduction of body movements at each sleep stage might indicate abnormalities of monoamine metabolism in the brain stem of patients with this condition. PMID:230967

  4. Infantile spasms associated with proximal duplication of chromosome 15q.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P M; Spinner, N B; Sovinsky, L; Zackai, E H; Chance, P F

    1996-09-01

    We describe a case of infantile spasms associated with a chromosome abnormality (supernumerary inverted duplication of chromosome 15 [47,XX,+inv dup(15)]). The patient was nondysmorphic and presented with mild hypotonia and delay in acquisition of gross motor milestones before the diagnosis of seizures at age 7 months. Additional features included unilateral sensorineural deafness and torticollis. Molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed that the patient has a large inv dup(15). Inv dup(15) chromosomes are variable with respect to the size and genetic composition of the chromosome and in their phenotypic effects. Patients with small inv dup(15s) may have no phenotypic abnormalities, whereas patients with large inv dup(15s) may have multiple abnormalities. ACTH therapy resulted in prompt remission of seizures and resolution of EEG abnormalities. This is the second report of a patient with IS and a supernumerary inv dup(15). Several genes code for neurotransmitter receptor subunits located in the duplicated region of chromosome 15, and abnormal dosage of these genes may be involved in the genesis of seizure activity in carriers of the inv dup(15). Chromosome analysis may lead to a specific diagnosis in infants with unexplained infantile spasms. PMID:8888053

  5. Stem hypertrophic lenticels and secondary aerenchyma enable oxygen transport to roots of soybean in flooded soil

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Ryo; Nakamura, Takuji; Shimada, Shinji; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Aerenchyma provides a low-resistance O2 transport pathway that enhances plant survival during soil flooding. When in flooded soil, soybean produces aerenchyma and hypertrophic stem lenticels. The aims of this study were to investigate O2 dynamics in stem aerenchyma and evaluate O2 supply via stem lenticels to the roots of soybean during soil flooding. Methods Oxygen dynamics in aerenchymatous stems were investigated using Clark-type O2 microelectrodes, and O2 transport to roots was evaluated using stable-isotope 18O2 as a tracer, for plants with shoots in air and roots in flooded sand or soil. Short-term experiments also assessed venting of CO2 via the stem lenticels. Key Results The radial distribution of the O2 partial pressure (pO2) was stable at 17 kPa in the stem aerenchyma 15 mm below the water level, but rapidly declined to 8 kPa at 200–300 µm inside the stele. Complete submergence of the hypertrophic lenticels at the stem base, with the remainder of the shoot still in air, resulted in gradual declines in pO2 in stem aerenchyma from 17·5 to 7·6 kPa at 13 mm below the water level, and from 14·7 to 6·1 kPa at 51 mm below the water level. Subsequently, re-exposure of the lenticels to air caused pO2 to increase again to 14–17 kPa at both positions within 10 min. After introducing 18O2 gas via the stem lenticels, significant 18O2 enrichment in water extracted from roots after 3 h was confirmed, suggesting that transported O2 sustained root respiration. In contrast, slight 18O2 enrichment was detected 3 h after treatment of stems that lacked aerenchyma and lenticels. Moreover, aerenchyma accelerated venting of CO2 from submerged tissues to the atmosphere. Conclusions Hypertrophic lenticels on the stem of soybean, just above the water surface, are entry points for O2, and these connect to aerenchyma and enable O2 transport into roots in flooded soil. Stems that develop aerenchyma thus serve as a ‘snorkel’ that enables O2 movement

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the interrelation of disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Varnava, A; Elliott, P; Sharma, S; McKenna, W; Davies, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To make a quantitative assessment of the relation between disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
DESIGN—Detailed macroscopic and histological examination at 19 segments of the left and right ventricle and the left atrial free wall.
PATIENTS—72 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had suffered sudden death or progression to end stage cardiac failure (resulting in death or heart transplantation).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The presence of scarring, atrial dilatation, and a mitral valve impact lesion were noted, and heart weight, wall thickness, per cent disarray, per cent fibrosis, and per cent small vessel disease quantitated for each heart.
RESULTS—Within an individual heart the magnitude of hypertrophy correlated with the severity of fibrosis (p = 0.006) and disarray (p = 0.0002). Overall, however, total heart weight related weakly but significantly to fibrosis (r = 0.4, p = 0.0001) and small vessel disease (r = 0.3, p = 0.03), but not to disarray. Disarray was greater in hearts with mild left ventricular hypertrophy (maximum wall thickness < 20 mm) and preserved systolic function (60.9 (26)% v 43 (20.4)% respectively, p = 0.02) and hearts without a mitral valve impact lesion (26.3% v 18.9%, p = 0.04), but was uninfluenced by sex. Fibrosis was influenced by sex (7% in male patients and 4% in female, p = 0.04), but not by the presence of an impact lesion. No relation was found between disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Myocyte disarray is probably a direct response to functional or structural abnormalities of the mutated sarcomeric protein, while fibrosis and small vessel disease are secondary phenomena unrelated to disarray, but modified by factors such as left ventricular mass, sex, and perhaps local autocrine factors.


Keywords: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; histopathology; small vessel disease PMID:11040002

  7. Cyclic GMP protein kinase activity is reduced in thyroxine-induced hypertrophic cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Qihang; Scholz, Peter M; Weiss, Harvey R

    2003-12-01

    1. We tested the hypothesis that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase has major negative functional effects in cardiac myocytes and that the importance of this pathway is reduced in thyroxine (T4; 0.5 mg/kg per day for 16 days) hypertrophic myocytes. 2. Using isolated ventricular myocytes from control (n = 7) and T4-treated (n = 9) rabbit hypertrophic hearts, myocyte shortening was studied with a video edge detector. Oxygen consumption was measured using O2 electrodes. Protein phosphorylation was measured autoradiographically. 3. Data were collected following treatment with: (i) 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (PCPT; 10-7 or 10-5 mol/L); (ii) 8-bromo-cAMP (10-5 mol/L) followed by PCPT; (iii) beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-monophosphorothioate, SP-isomer (SP; 10-7 or 10-5 mol/L); or (iv) 8-bromo-cAMP (10-5 mol/L) followed by SP. 4. There were no significant differences between groups in baseline percentage shortening (Pcs; 4.9 +/- 0.2 vs 5.6 +/- 0.4% for control and T4 groups, respectively) and maximal rate of shortening (Rs; 64.8 +/- 5.9 vs 79.9 +/- 7.1 micro m/ s for control and T4 groups, respectively). Both SP and PCPT decreased Pcs (-43 vs-21% for control and T4 groups, respectively) and Rs (-36 vs-22% for control and T4 groups, respectively), but the effect was significantly reduced in T4 myocytes. 8-Bromo-cAMP similarly increased Pcs (28 vs 23% for control and T4 groups, respectively) and Rs (20 vs 19% for control and T4 groups, respectively). After 8-bromo-cAMP, SP and PCPT decreased Pcs (-34%) and Rs (-29%) less in the control group. However, the effects of these drugs were not altered in T4 myocytes (Pcs -24%; Rs -22%). Both PCPT and cAMP phosphorylated the same five protein bands. In T4 myocytes, these five bands were enhanced less. 5. We conclude that, in control ventricular myocytes, the cGMP-dependent protein kinase exerted major negative functional effects but, in T4-induced hypertrophic myocytes, the importance of

  8. Pre- and postnatal enzyme analysis for infantile, late infantile and adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN1 and CLN2).

    PubMed

    Van Diggelen, O P; Keulemans, J L; Kleijer, W J; Thobois, S; Tilikete, C; Voznyi, Y V

    2001-01-01

    The recent development of simple, fluorogenic enzyme assays for infantile and late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL and LINCL; CLN1 and CLN2) has greatly facilitated the diagnostic process for these diseases. In leucocytes and fibroblasts from INCL (n = 38) patients we found profound deficiencies of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase I (PPT1), the residual activity was < 5% of mean control activity. In fibroblasts from LINCL patients we found a similar deficiency of tripeptidyl-peptidase I activity (TPP-I), with < 2% activity in 16 patients. The residual TPP-I activity in leucocytes from LINCL patients seemed substantially higher. We also showed the feasibility of reliable prenatal enzyme analysis. In five first-trimester and two second-trimester prenatal analyses for INCL, four affected foetuses were detected (PPT activity 3-6%). Two first trimester pregnancies at risk for LINCL were analysed and a clear TPP-I deficiency was detected in both cases (TPP-I activity 3-4%). The first patient with adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) due to a deficiency of PPT is presented; her present age is 53 years and the onset of the disease was at 38 years with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:11588995

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... permanent pacemaker to control the heartbeat An implanted defibrillator that recognizes life-threatening heart rhythms and sends an electrical pulse to stop them. Sometimes a defibrillator is placed, even if the patient has not ...

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves ( mitral valve regurgitation ) may include: Echocardiography ECG 24-hour Holter ... You may need surgery to repair the heart's mitral valve if it is leaking.

  11. [Acupuncture and Vojta therapy in infantile cerebral palsy--a comparison of the effects].

    PubMed

    Stockert, K

    1998-01-01

    Acupuncture and Vojta therapy are using more or less identical points and identical muscle chains for the treatment of infantile cerebral palsy. Therefore a common utilization seems to be sensible. PMID:10025039

  12. Contemporary techniques for catheter-based intervention for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cuisset, Thomas; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-05-17

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiovascular affection and is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Invasive treatment of symptomatic patients with HOCM refractory to drug therapy was limited to surgical myomectomy for years. In the mid 1990s, alcohol septal ablation (ASA) emerged as a new and less invasive option for septal ablation (SA) and is now considered a good alternative with excellent short- and long-term outcomes. Besides ASA, other techniques have been promoted to treat HOCM. The present review aims to summarise current practice and evidence of catheter-based techniques from the treatment of HOCM. We also detail technical points to achieve a safe and effective procedure. PMID:27174111

  13. [Recommendations for the prevention and therapy of hypertrophic scars and keloids].

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, G G; Kunte, C

    2011-05-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids form due to aberrations in the physiologic wound healing cascade characterized by greater and more sustained ECM deposition. Both entities are frequently associated with pain, pruritus and contractures, and are thus significantly affecting the patient's quality of life. Genetic susceptibility, specific anatomic locations, prolonged inflammation and delayed epithelialization significantly contribute to excessive scar formation. However, despite intensive scientific work in this field the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction remain poorly understood and most therapeutic approaches are clinically unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, based on a rising number of clinical studies next to well-known therapeutic concepts including cryotherapy and intralesional triamcinolone, recent techniques extend the spectrum for treating excessive scars. Nonetheless, prevention of pathologic scarring is undoubtedly more effective than to later attempts to treat it. PMID:21468729

  14. A familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy locus maps to chromosome 15q2.

    PubMed Central

    Thierfelder, L; MacRae, C; Watkins, H; Tomfohrde, J; Williams, M; McKenna, W; Bohm, K; Noeske, G; Schlepper, M; Bowcock, A

    1993-01-01

    We report that a gene responsible for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) in a kindred with a mild degree of cardiac hypertrophy maps to chromosome 15q2. The gene encoding cardiac actin, located on chromosome 15q, was analyzed and excluded as a candidate for FHC at this locus. Two additional families with typical FHC were studied and the disorder in one also maps to the chromosome 15q2 locus. The maximum combined multipoint logarithm of odds score in the two linked families is 6.02. Although these two kindreds reside in the same country, we believe that their disorder is caused by independent mutations in the 15q2 locus because of the clinical and genotypic differences between affected individuals. Mutations in at least four loci can cause FHC: chromosomes 14q1 (beta cardiac myosin heavy chain gene), 1q3, and 15q2 and another unidentified locus, suggesting substantial genetic heterogeneity. PMID:8327508

  15. Microvascular flow vectors in normal and hypertrophic myocardium as determined by the method of colored microspheres.

    PubMed

    Cicutti, N; Rakusan, K

    1992-05-01

    Sequential in vivo infusion of two differently colored microsphere suspensions into the left atrium of normal and hypertrophic rat myocardium revealed that certain coronary capillaries contained microsphere aggregates of both colors. A capillary flow vector was established based on the sequence of colors embolized within each aggregate. Critical examination of flow vectors among neighboring capillaries enabled the characterization of capillary flow direction. Results indicated a predominance in concurrent flow direction, which decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) with capillaries further removed from an individual reference capillary. The percentage of concurrent flow was also found to be significantly lower in subendocardium (P less than 0.001) than in midmyocardium. Cardiac hypertrophy was not a contributing factor to the above findings. This study provides previously unattainable data regarding transmural capillary flow direction and suggests regional adaptations in coronary microvascular flow. PMID:1386134

  16. Titin, a Central Mediator for Hypertrophic Signaling, Exercise-Induced Mechanosignaling and Skeletal Muscle Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Martina; Kötter, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant scaffold protein with multiple functions in striated muscle physiology. Due to the elastic I-band domains and the filament-like integration in the half-sarcomere titin is an important factor for sarcomere assembly and serves as an adaptable molecular spring that determines myofilament distensibility. Protein-interactions e.g., with muscle ankyrin repeat proteins or muscle LIM-protein link titin to hypertrophic signaling and via p62 and Muscle Ring Finger proteins to mechanisms that control protein quality control. This review summarizes our current knowledge on titin as a central node for exercise-induced mechanosignaling and remodeling and further highlights the pathophysiological implications. PMID:26973541

  17. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  18. MicroRNAs Based Therapy of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: The Road Traveled So Far

    PubMed Central

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R.; Fernandes, Alexandra R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by variable expressivity, age penetrance, and a high heterogeneity. The transcriptional profile (miRNAs, mRNAs), epigenetic modifications, and posttranslational modifications seem to be highly relevant for the onset of the disease. miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs with 22 nucleotides, have been implicated in the regulation of cardiomyocyte function, being differentially expressed in several heart diseases, including HCM. Moreover, a different miRNA expression profile in the various stages of HCM development is also observed. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the profile of miRNAs characteristic of asymptomatic to overt HCM patients, discussing alongside their potential use for diagnosis and therapy. Indeed, the stability and specificity of miRNAs make them suitable targets for use as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis and as therapeutical targets. PMID:26504850

  19. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration with gadolinium enhancement after posterior fossa surgery in a child with medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Johannes; Alkonyi, Balint; Rutkowski, Stefan; Homola, György A; Warmuth-Metz, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is a rare transsynaptic form of degeneration occurring secondary to the disruption of the dentato-rubro-olivary pathway ("Guillain-Mollaret triangle"). HOD can be caused by ischemic, hemorrhagic, traumatic, or neoplastic lesions, and it can also occur following posterior fossa surgery. MRI characteristics of HOD include T2 signal increase and hypertrophy. To date, blood–brain barrier disruption has not been reported in HOD. Here, we present the first case of HOD with temporary gadolinium enhancement in a 10-year-old child 7 months after resection of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma. The recognition of gadolinium enhancement as a radiological feature of HOD may help to distinguish between this benign secondary condition and tumor recurrence. PMID:24122017

  20. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration resulting from posterior fossa masses and their treatments☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Miki; Hatzoglou, Vaios; Karimi, Sasan; Young, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Characterize hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) that develops from posterior fossa masses and their treatments. Methods Retrospectively reviewed MR images and clinical data of 10 patients with posterior fossa masses and HOD. Results Eight patients had cerebellar lesions, and two patients had pontine lesions. Lesions consisted of tumors, demyelination, and nonspecific necrosis. MRI showed T2 hyperintense signal in the inferior olive a median 86 days after the diagnosis of a posterior fossa lesion. HOD presented prior to surgery (n=2), after surgery (n=3), after surgery/radiation therapy (n=4), or without treatment (n=1). Conclusions HOD may develop from posterior fossa masses and surgical and/or radiation therapy. PMID:26104225

  1. [The 2014 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : what is new?].

    PubMed

    Maisch, B; Mahrholdt, H

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) comprise 133 recommendations with 506 references. In comparison to the last 10-year-old American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF)/ESC guidelines new data have been added, such as recent studies on genetics, updated recommendations for family and genetic screening, a special emphasis on red flags in clinical symptomatology and diagnostic features for the identification of non-obstructive variants of HCM, on multimodality non-invasive imaging by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a HCM risk formula for the assessment of sudden cardiac death within 5 years. Nevertheless, it should not be forgotten that the majority of patients with HCM lead a normal life. This detailed update and the structured recommendations are an excellent summary of the current knowledge on HCM for the cardiomyopathy specialist and also for internists and general physicians. PMID:25410471

  2. [Incidence of conduction disorders in patients who underwent surgery for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Martini, B; Buja, G F; Bassan, L; Rizzardo, P; Canciani, B; Nava, A

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen non-consecutive patients, aging 7 to 61 (average 27) years, underwent left ventricular myotomy-myectomy for a severely symptomatic idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS). In all patients the resting ECG before surgery showed P-R less than 0.18 sec, QRS duration less than 0.11 sec, QRS axis ranging from +10 to +80 degrees. In the immediate post-surgical period 3 patients has complete heart block and 1 had 2nd degree type 2 atrio ventricular block. Lesion was infra-Hisian in 3 patients and intra-Hisian in 1 patient. In the remaining 9 patients an immediate post-surgical left bundle branch block appeared; in 3 out of these patients ECG and an electrophysiologic study documented severe infra-Hisian conduction impairments after an average period of 4 years from surgery. During follow-up 3 patients died suddenly. PMID:2747944

  3. Bilateral Hypertrophic Olivary Degeneration and Holmes Tremor without Palatal Tremor: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Carlos; Velez, Miriam; Nuñez, Yesenia; Palomino, Henry; Quispe, Darko; Flores, Martha; Torres, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Lesions in the Guillain–Mollaret triangle or dentate-rubro-olivary pathway may lead to hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD), a secondary trans-synaptic degeneration of the inferior olivary nucleus. HOD is usually associated with palatal tremor and rarely with Holmes tremor. Bilateral HOD is a very unusual condition and very few cases are reported. Case Report We report here two cases of bilateral HOD after two different vascular lesions located at the decussation of superior cerebellar peduncles, thus impairing both central tegmental tracts and interrupting bilaterally the dentate-rubral-olivary pathway. Interestingly, both developed bilateral Holmes tremor but not palatal tremor. Discussion Lesions in some of the components in the Guillain–Mollaret triangle may develop Holmes tremor with HOD and without palatal tremor. Magnetic resonance imaging is an invaluable tool in these cases. Better understanding of the pathways in this loop is needed. PMID:27536461

  4. [Assessment of risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Philipp; Blaschke, Florian; Pieske, Burkert; Tschöpe, Carsten; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a hereditary disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy with or without concomitant outflow tract obstruction. Identification of patients with HCM who are at high risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is crucial as those patients are likely to benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Based on the HCM Risk-SCD study published in 2013, that included 3675 HCM patients with 24 313 years of follow up, a new clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death was developed. This model was included in the recently released 2014 ESC guidelines. This review summarizes the changes in the prediction model and the resulting recommendations and discusses potential risks and limitations of the new score. PMID:27404936

  5. Comparison of different laser systems in the treatment of hypertrophic and atrophic scars and keloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharschmidt, D.; Algermissen, Bernd; Willms-Jones, J.-C.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1997-12-01

    Different laser systems and techniques are used for the treatment of hypertrophic scars, keloids and acne scars. Significant criteria in selecting a suitable laser system are the scar's vascularization, age and diameter. Flashlamp- pumped dye-lasers, CO2-lasers with scanner, Argon and Nd:YAG-lasers are used. Telangiectatic scars respond well to argon lasers, erythematous scars and keloids to dye-laser treatment. Using interstitial Nd:YAG-laser vaporization, scars with a cross-section over 1 cm can generally be reduced. For the treatment of atrophic and acne scars good cosmetic results are achieved with a CO2-laser/scanner system, which allows a precise ablation of the upper dermis with low risk of side-effects.

  6. Titin, a Central Mediator for Hypertrophic Signaling, Exercise-Induced Mechanosignaling and Skeletal Muscle Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Martina; Kötter, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant scaffold protein with multiple functions in striated muscle physiology. Due to the elastic I-band domains and the filament-like integration in the half-sarcomere titin is an important factor for sarcomere assembly and serves as an adaptable molecular spring that determines myofilament distensibility. Protein-interactions e.g., with muscle ankyrin repeat proteins or muscle LIM-protein link titin to hypertrophic signaling and via p62 and Muscle Ring Finger proteins to mechanisms that control protein quality control. This review summarizes our current knowledge on titin as a central node for exercise-induced mechanosignaling and remodeling and further highlights the pathophysiological implications. PMID:26973541

  7. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder.Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing.A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNAWe describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  8. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: The Ace-of-Spades as the Disease Card

    PubMed Central

    Diaconu, Camelia C.; Dumitru, Nicoleta; Fruntelata, Ana G.; Lacau, Smarandita; Bartos, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Apical cardiac hypertrophy (Yamaguchi syndrome) is a relatively rare form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A 67-year-old woman presented with exertional angina and moderate dyspnea. Her electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, flattened T waves in the limb leads and a strain pattern in the V2-V6 leads. Echocardiographic examination showed that apical wall thickness of the left ventricle (LV) was 19 mm. Coronary angiography was normal, but left ventriculography revealed a spade-like shaped LV cavity, typical for apical cardiac hypertrophy. The diagnostic criteria for apical cardiac hypertrophy are: 1) asymmetric LV hypertrophy - predominantly at the apex of the ventricle; 2) LV wall thickness of 15 mm or more during diastole; and 3) apical to posterior wall thickness ratio of 1.5 or more determined by 2-dimensional echocardiography or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Although relatively rare, Yamaguchi syndrome must enter into the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with exertional angina pectoris. PMID:27122852

  9. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27590646

  10. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27591441

  11. [Athlete's heart and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: contribution on clinical and morphologic differentiation].

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, Edda; Kuck, Karl Heinz; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2015-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex genetic disorder usually diagnosed in a young adult population. The diagnosis is based on echocardiographic identification of left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with a non-dilated hyperdynamic chamber in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disorder. The differentiation between HCM and physiological left ventricular hypertrophy (athlete`s heart) is essential: HCM is the main cause of exercise-induced sudden cardiac death in the young and especially in young athletes with overlapping features in Athlete's Heart or HCM. Differentiation between physiological left ventricular hypertrophy and HCM is challenging. Echocardiography allows detailed assessment of left ventricular structure and function which is fundamental. Additional genetic studies for identification of the broad HCM phenotype can be necessary to differentiate between Athlete's Heart and HCM. PMID:26230069

  12. Pregnancy in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Severe Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeouk; Kim, Minsu; Lee, Junsoo; Kim, Sihun; Kim, Myeonggun; Hwang, Hyunjung; Moon, Jeonggeun; Shin, Mi-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) patients with severe left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (those with a gradient of > 100 mm Hg) are at the highest risk of hemodynamic deterioration during pregnancy. Complications of HOCM include sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Physiological changes during pregnancy may induce these complications, affecting maternal and fetal health conditions. Therefore, close monitoring with appropriate management is essential for the well-being of both mother and fetus. We report on the case of a 27-year-old female patient with severe LVOT obstruction HOCM, pressure gradient (PG) of 125 mm Hg at resting, and 152 mm Hg induced by the Valsalva maneuver at 34 weeks gestation. This case showed how close monitoring using echocardiography and proper management during the course of pregnancy resulted in successful delivery in the patient with extremely high PG HOCM. PMID:27358709

  13. Rising CO2 Levels Will Intensify Phytoplankton Blooms in Eutrophic and Hypertrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Finke, Jan F.; Visser, Petra M.; Van Donk, Ellen; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aquatic ecosystems has received surprisingly little attention. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict dynamic changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH and alkalinity during phytoplankton bloom development. We tested the model in chemostat experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at different CO2 levels. The experiments showed that dense blooms sequestered large amounts of atmospheric CO2, not only by their own biomass production but also by inducing a high pH and alkalinity that enhanced the capacity for DIC storage in the system. We used the model to explore how phytoplankton blooms of eutrophic waters will respond to rising CO2 levels. The model predicts that (1) dense phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters can deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration to limiting levels and raise the pH over a relatively wide range of atmospheric CO2 conditions, (2) rising atmospheric CO2 levels will enhance phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters with high nutrient loads, and (3) above some threshold, rising atmospheric CO2 will alleviate phytoplankton blooms from carbon limitation, resulting in less intense CO2 depletion and a lesser increase in pH. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model predictions were qualitatively robust. Quantitatively, the predictions were sensitive to variation in lake depth, DIC input and CO2 gas transfer across the air-water interface, but relatively robust to variation in the carbon uptake mechanisms of phytoplankton. In total, these findings warn that rising CO2 levels may result in a marked intensification of

  14. Alcohol septal ablation in obstructive acromegalic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - a first case report.

    PubMed

    Viveiros Monteiro, André; Fiarresga, António; Cacela, Duarte; de Sousa, Lídia; Ramos, Ruben; Galrinho, Ana; Branco, Luísa; Cruz Ferreira, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease, mostly caused by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting benign pituitary tumor, with an increased production of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Cardiovascular complications are common and are associated with cardiomyocyte apoptosis and concentric cardiac hypertrophy. Suppression of GH and IGF-1 appears to improve cardiac function only in the short term, with little or no decrease in left ventricular mass or improvement in cardiac function after prolonged treatment. Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to septal myectomy, with significant improvement in symptoms, gradients and left ventricular remodeling. In this report, we describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with acromegaly due to a pituitary adenoma diagnosed and treated surgically at the age of 38 but with recurrence and reoperation at the age of 50. She was referred to our cardiology department due to a three-month history of progressively worsening exercise-induced dyspnea and orthopnea under optimal medical therapy. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe basal hypertrophy of the interventricular septum (19 mm), dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction with a gradient of 70 mmHg at rest and 120 mmHg with Valsalva maneuver, and systolic anterior movement (SAM). Genetic testing excluded the most frequent forms of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ASA was performed with injection of 2 cc of alcohol in the first septal branch of the left coronary artery, without complications. At one-year reassessment, significant clinical and echocardiographic improvement was noted, with disappearance of SAM. To our knowledge, there have been no previously reported cases of ASA in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to acromegaly. We report a case of successful ASA in acromegalic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27503591

  15. An In-Situ Forming Skin Substitute Improves Healing Outcome in a Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Hartwell, Ryan; Poormasjedi-Meibod, Malihe-Sadat; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Jalili, Reza B.; Hossenini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Wound repair requires a sequential series of biological events that begins with the deposition of a temporary scaffold within which cells can repair the skin. Without a scaffold, repair is essentially impossible. Aberrant wound healing, such as hypertrophic scarring or nonhealing, has a tremendous burden on healthcare and quality of life. Timely wound closure dramatically reduces the risk of infection and scarring. Cellular skin substitutes are opportune to meet this need. Our goal was to create an in-situ forming scaffold that can be easily combined with cells to rapidly form a dermal substitute within the wound bed. In this study, we evaluated the application of a polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-glycosaminoglycan-based biohybrid scaffold system in full-thickness wounds on a rabbit fibrotic ear model. Punch wounds (6 mm) were either untreated or filled with an acellular scaffold, a scaffold containing xenofibroblasts, or a scaffold containing xenofibroblasts expressing indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Results demonstrated that (1) both acellular and IDO-expressing fibroblast in-situ forming scaffolds significantly reduced scar elevation index (1.24±0.05 and 1.25±0.03; p<0.05) and improved overall healing quality compared with xenofibroblast scaffolds and untreated wounds; (2) IDO-expressing fibroblast scaffolds significantly reduced T-cell infiltration into the scaffold-engrafted area (p<0.05); and (3) both IDO-expressing and acellular in-situ forming scaffolds demonstrated increased vessel-like and nerve-like structures (p<0.05). The results demonstrated that the use of the in-situ forming scaffold, and even more so when delivering IDO-expressing cells, improved healing outcome in full-thickness hypertrophic rabbit ear wounds. PMID:25412924

  16. Relationship between impaired adipogenesis of retroperitoneal adipose tissue and hypertrophic obesity: role of endogenous glucocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Zubiría, María G; Vidal-Bravo, Juana; Spinedi, Eduardo; Giovambattista, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    Although the pro-adipogenic effect of glucocorticoid (GC) on adipose tissue (AT) precursor cell differentiation is openly accepted, the effect of chronically high peripheral levels of GC on AT mass expansion is not fully understood. In the present study, we aim to assess the in vitro adipogenic capacity of AT precursor cells isolated from retroperitoneal (RP) AT pads of the hypercorticosteronaemic, adult neonatally treated monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) male rat. To ascertain this issue, we explored the in vitro adipogenic process of stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells isolated from RPAT pads of 60-day-old MSG rats. The data recorded indicated that RPAT-SVF cells from hypercorticosteronaemic MSG rats, although displaying an enhanced proliferation capacity, differentiated slower than normal cells. This dysfunction was associated with a reduction in key parameters indicative of precursor cell commitment, differentiation capacity and the percentage of fully differentiated adipocytes, with a retarded maturation process. The distorted adipogenic capacity was highly conditioned by RPAT-SVF cells displaying a low committed population and both excessive and reduced expression of anti- (Pref-1 and Wnt-10b) and pro-adipogenic (mineralocorticoid receptor) signals respectively. Notably, the normalization of peripheral corticosterone levels in MSG rats, as a result of bilateral adrenalectomy combined with GC replacement therapy, fully prevented reduced RPAT precursor cell commitment and overall impaired adipogenesis. Our study strongly supports that the impaired adipogenic process observed in the adult hypertrophic obese MSG male rat is a GC-dependent mechanism, thus explaining the unhealthy RPAT expansion observed in human hypertrophic obese phenotypes, such as in the Cushing's syndrome. PMID:24913911

  17. Attenuated brain-derived neurotrophic factor and hypertrophic remodelling: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Malan, L; Uys, A S; Malan, N T; Harvey, B H; Ziemssen, T

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been linked to neurological pathologies, but its role in cardiometabolic disturbances is limited. We aimed to assess the association between serum BDNF levels and structural endothelial dysfunction (ED) as determined by cross-sectional wall area (CSWA) and albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) in black Africans. Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and ultrasound CSWA values were obtained from 82 males and 90 females. Fasting blood and 8 h overnight urine samples were collected to determine serum BDNF and cardiometabolic risk markers, that is, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), lipids, inflammation and ACR. BDNF median split × gender interaction effects for structural ED justified stratification of BDNF into low and high (⩽/>1.37 ng ml(-1)) gender groups. BDNF values (0.86-1.98 ng ml(-1)) were substantially lower than reference ranges (6.97-42.6 ng ml(-1)) in the African gender cohort, independent of age and body mass index. No relationship was revealed between BDNF and renal function and was opposed by an inverse relationship between BDNF and CSWA (r=-0.17; P=0.03) in the African cohort. Linear regression analyses revealed a positive relationship between systolic BP and structural remodelling in the total cohort and low-BDNF gender groups. In the high-BDNF females, HbA1C was associated with structural remodelling. Attenuated or possible downregulated BDNF levels were associated with hypertrophic remodelling, and may be a compensatory mechanism for the higher BP in Africans. In addition, metabolic risk and hypertrophic remodelling in women with high BDNF underpin different underlying mechanisms for impaired neurotrophin homeostasis in men and women. PMID:24898921

  18. Proteasome inhibition slightly improves cardiac function in mice with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Singh, Sonia R.; Geertz, Birgit; Schulz, Herbert; Reischmann, Silke; Hübner, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    A growing line of evidence indicates a dysfunctional ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac diseases. Anti-hypertrophic effects and improved cardiac function have been reported after treatment with proteasome inhibitors in experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy. Here we tested whether proteasome inhibition could also reverse the disease phenotype in a genetically-modified mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which carries a mutation in Mybpc3, encoding the myofilament protein cardiac myosin-binding protein C. At 7 weeks of age, homozygous mutant mice (KI) have 39% higher left ventricular mass-to-body-weight ratio and 29% lower fractional area shortening (FAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups were treated with epoxomicin (0.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 1 week via osmotic minipumps. Epoxomicin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity by ~50% in both groups. All parameters of cardiac hypertrophy (including the fetal gene program) were not affected by epoxomicin treatment in both groups. In contrast, FAS was 12% and 35% higher in epoxomicin-treated than vehicle-treated WT and KI mice, respectively. To identify which genes or pathways could be involved in this positive effect, we performed a transcriptome analysis in KI and WT neonatal cardiac myocytes, treated or not with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (1 μM, 24 h). This revealed 103 genes (four-fold difference; 5% FDR) which are commonly regulated in both KI and WT cardiac myocytes. Thus, even in genetically-modified mice with manifest HCM, proteasome inhibition showed beneficial effects, at least with regard to cardiac function. Targeting the UPS in cardiac diseases remains therefore a therapeutic option. PMID:25566086

  19. Annexin A7 deficiency potentiates cardiac NFAT activity promoting hypertrophic signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Viereck, Robert; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Schönberger, Tanja; Noegel, Angelika A.; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Cardiac Anxa7 expression was up-regulated following TAC. • The hypertrophic response following TAC was augmented in Anxa7-deficient mice. • Silencing of Anxa7 increased indicators of HL-1 cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. • Silencing of Anxa7 induced Nfatc1 nuclear translocation. • Silencing of Anxa7 enhanced NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity. - Abstract: Annexin A7 (Anxa7) is a cytoskeletal protein interacting with Ca{sup 2+} signaling which in turn is a crucial factor for cardiac remodeling following cardiac injury. The present study explored whether Anxa7 participates in the regulation of cardiac stress signaling. To this end, mice lacking functional Anxa7 (anxa7{sup −/−}) and wild-type mice (anxa7{sup +/+}) were investigated following pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In addition, HL-1 cardiomyocytes were silenced with Anxa7 siRNA and treated with isoproterenol. Transcript levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter assay and protein abundance by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. As a result, TAC treatment increased the mRNA and protein levels of Anxa7 in wild-type mice. Moreover, TAC increased heart weight to body weight ratio and the cardiac mRNA levels of αSka, Nppb, Col1a1, Col3a1 and Rcan1, effects more pronounced in anxa7{sup −/−} mice than in anxa7{sup +/+} mice. Silencing of Anxa7 in HL-1 cardiomyocytes significantly increased nuclear localization of Nfatc1. Furthermore, Anxa7 silencing increased NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity as well as αSka, Nppb, and Rcan1 mRNA levels both, under control conditions and following β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. These observations point to an important role of annexin A7 in the regulation of cardiac NFAT activity and hypertrophic response following cardiac stress conditions.

  20. Cardiomyocytes hypertrophic status after myocardial infarction determines distinct types of arrhythmia: role of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Fauconnier, Jérémy; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Bideaux, Patrice; Lacampagne, Alain; Richard, Sylvain

    2010-09-01

    The mechanisms responsible for sudden cardiac death in heart failure (HF) are unclear. We investigated early and delayed afterdepolarizations (EADs, DADs) in HF. Cardiomyocytes were enzymatically isolated from the right ventricle (RV) and the septum of rats 8 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) and sham-operated animals. Membrane capacitance, action potentials (AP) and ionic currents were measured by whole-cell patch-clamp. The [Ca(2+)](i) transients and Ca(2+) sparks were recorded with Fluo-4 during fluorescence measurements. Arrhythmia was triggered in 40% of MI cells (not in sham) using trains of 5 stimulations at 2.0 Hz. EADs and DADs occurred in distinct cell populations both in the RV and the septum. EADs occurred in normal-sized PMI cells (<230 pF), whereas DADs occurred in hypertrophic PMI cells (>230 pF). All cells exhibited prolonged APs due to reduced I(to) current. However, additional modifications in Ca(2+)-dependent ionic currents occurred in hypertrophic cells: a decrease in the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1), and a slowing of L-type Ca(2+) current inactivation which was responsible for the lack of adaptation of APs to abrupt changes in the pacing rate. The occurrence of spontaneous Ca(2+) sparks, reflecting ryanodine receptor (RyR2) diastolic activity, increased with hypertrophy. The [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitude, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and Ca(2+) sparks amplitude were all inversely correlated with cell size. We conclude that the trophic status of cardiomyocytes determines the type of cellular arrhythmia in MI rats, based on differential electrophysiological remodeling which may reflect early-mild and late-severe or differential modifications in the RyR2 function. PMID:20109482

  1. Effectiveness of Mentha piperita in the Treatment of Infantile Colic: A Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; de Brito, Rita de Cássia Coelho Moraes; Cavalcanti, Telma Samila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Infantile colic is a distressing and common condition for which there is no proven standard treatment. Objective. To compare the efficacy of Mentha piperita with simethicone in treatment for infantile colic. Methods. A double-blind crossover study was performed with 30 infants attending IMIP, Recife, Brazil. They were randomized to use Mentha piperita or simethicone in the treatment of infantile colic during 7 days with each drug. Primary outcomes were mother_s opinion about responses to the treatment, number of daily episodes of colic, and time spent crying, measured by a chronometer. Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used to compare the results. This study was previously approved by the Ethical Committee in Research at IMIP. Results. At baseline daily episodes of infantile colic was 3.9 (±1.1) and the mean crying time per day was 192 minutes (±51.6). At the end of the study daily episodes of colic fell to 1.6 (±0.6) and the crying duration decreased to 111 (±28) minutes. All mothers reported decrease of frequency and duration of the episodes of infantile colic and there were no differences between responses to Mentha piperita and simethicone. Conclusions. These findings suggest that Mentha piperita may be used to help control infantile colic. However, these results must be repeated by others studies. PMID:22844342

  2. Effectiveness of Mentha piperita in the Treatment of Infantile Colic: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; de Brito, Rita de Cássia Coelho Moraes; Cavalcanti, Telma Samila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Infantile colic is a distressing and common condition for which there is no proven standard treatment. Objective. To compare the efficacy of Mentha piperita with simethicone in treatment for infantile colic. Methods. A double-blind crossover study was performed with 30 infants attending IMIP, Recife, Brazil. They were randomized to use Mentha piperita or simethicone in the treatment of infantile colic during 7 days with each drug. Primary outcomes were mother_s opinion about responses to the treatment, number of daily episodes of colic, and time spent crying, measured by a chronometer. Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used to compare the results. This study was previously approved by the Ethical Committee in Research at IMIP. Results. At baseline daily episodes of infantile colic was 3.9 (±1.1) and the mean crying time per day was 192 minutes (±51.6). At the end of the study daily episodes of colic fell to 1.6 (±0.6) and the crying duration decreased to 111 (±28) minutes. All mothers reported decrease of frequency and duration of the episodes of infantile colic and there were no differences between responses to Mentha piperita and simethicone. Conclusions. These findings suggest that Mentha piperita may be used to help control infantile colic. However, these results must be repeated by others studies. PMID:22844342

  3. Development of a Best Evidence Statement for the Use of Pressure Therapy for Management of Hypertrophic Scarring.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Patricia A; Pan, Brian; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Rothchild, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Pressure therapy has been considered standard, first-line intervention for the treatment of hypertrophic scars since its introduction in the 1960s. Although widely used, this scar management technique has historically been based on a wide array of anecdotal evidence as opposed to strong scientific support. Evidence has become more prevalent in recent years, necessitating a synthesis to develop an evidence-based clinical guideline. The clinical question was asked, "Among individuals with or at risk to develop active hypertrophic scars, does treatment with pressure therapy improve aesthetic and functional outcomes?" An evidence-based practice project was completed with aims to synthesize relevant literature to determine recommendations for the use of pressure therapy in individuals at risk for hypertrophic scars. A systematic search of the literature was conducted for the dates January 1950 to February 2014 of the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews, Burntherapist.com, Cochrane Libraries, Ebsco, Google Scholar, OT Seeker, Ovid, MedLine, PEDro.org, Pubmed.gov, Pubmed Clinical Queries, and hand search of relevant articles through use of reference lists. Search terms included scar, hypertroph*, pressure therapy, compression therapy, pressure garment, burn, scald, trauma as well as MeSH terms cicatrix and hypertrophic. Articles were reviewed in terms of ability to answer the clinical question as well as strength of conclusions. A total of 45 articles were found and critiqued, 28 of which were relevant to the clinical question. Evidence strength ranged from level 1 to level 5. Results from the studies were synthesized to create clinical recommendations to guide treatment. Based on best available evidence, it is recommended that pressure therapy is utilized to decrease scar height and erythema that it is used for grafts and wounds requiring 14 to 21 days to heal, for 23 hours/day for 12 months, fit to achieve 20 to 30 mm Hg of

  4. Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay (congenital ocular motor apraxia).

    PubMed

    Salman, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay, also known as congenital ocular motor apraxia, typically presents in early infancy with horizontal head thrusts once head control is achieved. Defective initiation of horizontal saccades and saccade hypometria with normal saccadic velocity are characteristic findings. Isolated impairment of vertical saccades is rare. Impaired smooth ocular pursuit may be seen. Other relatively common features include developmental delay, hypotonia, ataxia, or clumsiness. Brain MRI may be normal or show a diverse range of abnormalities, most commonly involving the cerebellum. Defective slow phases of the optokinetic response are commonly associated with brain MRI abnormalities. Isolated defect of vertical saccade initiation may indicate supratentorial brain abnormalities on MRI. Joubert syndrome, a developmental midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and ataxia telangiectasia are both commonly associated with defective volitional and reflexive saccade initiation, saccade hypometria, and head thrusts. Both horizontal and vertical saccades are impaired in these two disorders. PMID:25783597

  5. [Neurovegetative and hypothalamic syndromes in children with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Maslova, O I; Lebedev, B V

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the neuropsychic and vegetative status of 108 children aged 3 months to 7 years suffering from infantile cerebral paralysis has shown that in a great part of the patients a neurovegetative or hypothalamic syndrome can be additionally specified. An analysis of the totality of the background vegetative characteristics shows that the effection of this division of the nervous system is of a mixed character. Different direction of the vegetative reactions, i.e. sympathetic or parasympathetic, can be noted in different forms of the paralysis. The neurovegetative syndrome can be discerned in children with a noticeable psychic defect, while the hypothalamic one in children with a good psychic development. PMID:7435028

  6. Rare association of central pontine myelinolysis with infantile tremor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kalpana; Datta, Supratim; Dutta, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is an acute demyelination within the central basis pontis. Though exact mechanism is not known it is seen commonly with rapid correction of hyponatremia and also with pontine ischemia or infarction, demyelinating diseases, pontine neoplasm and different metabolic diseases. We report a rare association of CPM in a patient of Infantile Tremor Syndrom (ITS). ITS is a syndrome of tremor, mental and physical retardation, pigmentary changes of hair and skin and anemia in malnourished children. Though first reported in Indian subcontinent many identical cases were reported from around the world. Our case is a 15 month old child with generalized tremor, mild hepatosplenomegaly with features of grade II malnutrition including skin and hair changes. All the signs and symtoms of tremor improved after treatment with the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol for protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and administration of propranolol without any side effects. PMID:22412274

  7. [The infantile sexual seduction: revolution and aftermath of Freud's theory].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    There is no question about the negative effects of child sexual abuse. Freud's seduction theory asserts that psychoneuroses in adults are caused by reactivation of forgotten recollections of gross sexual abuse (involving the genitals) that had taken place prior to the age of 8 to 10 years. His contribution consisted in the discovery of specific events, prior to puberty, which were indispensable to the formation of psychoneuroses. If an adult patient recalled an infantile sexual experience, Freud assumed the interference of a pervert: a child was sexually innocent unless it had been traumatized. But Freud's technique of clinical exploration had not attained adequate reliability and was not immune to prejudices. Freud himself dropped his mechanical, static theory that presupposed a single type of accidentally occurring trauma prior to puberty, allowing him to develop his new drive and fantasy theory. PMID:24861119

  8. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, John P.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K. N.; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C.; Çoku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M.; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as ‘benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy’ is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNAGlu mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNAGlu may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis. PMID:19720722

  9. Infantile cortical hyperostosis – a report of Saudi family

    PubMed Central

    ALBagshi, Muneer H; ALZoayed, Heji I

    2015-01-01

    A 2-weeks-old Saudi neonate was apparently well till the 10th day of life when a swelling of the right groin was noted accompanied by irritability and fever, without history of trauma. On examination: the girl was irritable and febrile, the mass was firm, ill defined, fixed and tender. The state of the underlying skin was normal. There was family history of 3 siblings with similar swellings in the neonatal period and one of them had recurrence of the condition till the age of 7 year. The radiological findings indicated diaphysis hyperostosis, sparring of the epiphysis and the benign course of the disease. With exclusion of syphilis, osteomyelitis and trauma, the likely diagnosis would be infantile cortical hyperostosis. Such diagnosis should not be overlooked when faced by bony swellings in neonates. PMID:27493423

  10. Phenotypes and PRRT2 mutations in Chinese families with benign familial infantile epilepsy and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the PRRT2 gene have been identified as the major cause of benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis/dyskinesias (ICCA). Here, we analyzed the phenotypes and PRRT2 mutations in Chinese families with BFIE and ICCA. Methods Clinical data were collected from 22 families with BFIE and eight families with ICCA. PRRT2 mutations were screened using PCR and direct sequencing. Results Ninety-five family members were clinically affected in the 22 BFIE families. During follow-up, two probands had one seizure induced by diarrhea at the age of two years. Thirty-one family members were affected in the eight ICCA families, including 11 individuals with benign infantile epilepsy, nine with PKD, and 11 with benign infantile epilepsy followed by PKD. Two individuals in one ICCA family had PKD or ICCA co-existing with migraine. One affected member in another ICCA family had experienced a fever-induced seizure at 7 years old. PRRT2 mutations were detected in 13 of the 22 BFIE families. The mutation c.649_650insC (p.R217PfsX8) was found in nine families. The mutations c.649delC (p.R217EfsX12) and c.904_905insG (p.D302GfsX39) were identified in three families and one family, respectively. PRRT2 mutations were identified in all eight ICCA families, including c.649_650insC (p.R217PfsX8), c.649delC (p.R217EfsX12), c.514_517delTCTG (p.S172RfsX3) and c.1023A > T (X341C). c.1023A > T is a novel mutation predicted to elongate the C-terminus of the protein by 28 residues. Conclusions Our data demonstrated that PRRT2 is the major causative gene of BFIE and ICCA in Chinese families. Site c.649 is a mutation hotspot: c.649_650insC is the most common mutation, and c.649delC is the second most common mutation in Chinese families with BFIE and ICCA. As far as we know, c.1023A > T is the first reported mutation in exon 4 of PRRT2. c.649delC was previously reported in

  11. Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis and Skull Base Osteomyelitis by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Ana Rita; Brandao, Mariana; Paula, Filipe Seguro; Castro, Elsa; Farinha, Fatima; Marinho, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) is an uncommon disorder characterized by localized or diffuse thickening of the dura mater, and it usually presents with multiple cranial neurophaties. It has been associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, traumatic, toxic and neoplasic diseases, when no specific cause is found the process is called idiopathic. The infectious cases occur in patients under systemic immunosuppression, which have an evident contiguous source or those who have undergone neurosurgical procedures. We describe a case of a 62-year-old immunosuppressed woman with diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, which had HCP and osteomyelitis of the skull base caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa, presenting with headache and diplopia. We believe this is the second documented case of pachymeningitis secondary to this microorganism. As a multifactorial disease, it is essencial to determine the specific causative agent of HCP before making treatment decisions, and great care is needed with immunocompromised patients. Keywords Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Hypertrophic pachymeningitis; Ophtalmoplegia, optical neuropathy; Osteomyelitis; Skull base PMID:22505989

  12. Conservative approach to mitral valve replacement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with systolic anterior motion – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Suder, Bogdan; Szymoński, Krzysztof; Wasilewski, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Kapelak, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 60-year-old patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), systolic anterior motion (SAM), and high gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) who underwent surgical treatment. During the surgery, myomectomy of the septum was performed using the Morrow method: despite the persisting SAM and increased LVOT gradients, the mitral valve was not replaced. The case study presents a conservative approach to mitral valve replacement during HCM surgery. PMID:26855652

  13. Continuous infusion of angiotensin II modulates hypertrophic differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in cartilage formation in a fracture model mouse.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Hirohisa; Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Aoki, Motokuni; Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-06-01

    Although components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are reported to be expressed in cultured chondrocytes and cartilage, little is known about the precise function of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in chondrocytes. In this study, we employed a rib fracture model mouse to investigate the effect of Ang II on chondrocytes. Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was expressed in chondrocytes in the growth plate of mouse tibia. Continuous infusion of Ang II to rib-fractured mice resulted in a significant increase in the volume of cartilage, suggesting Ang II-induced hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. It was also confirmed by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Sox9 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which are genes related to chondrocyte differentiation, and type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which are hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific molecular markers. Chondrocyte hypertrophy with upregulation of these genes was attenuated by administration of olmesartan, an AT1R blocker, but not by hydralazine. Moreover, Ang II infusion significantly suppressed apoptosis of chondrocytes, accompanied by significant induction of mRNA expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL. Olmesartan, but not hydralazine, significantly attenuated the reduction of apoptotic cells and the increase in anti-apoptotic genes induced by Ang II infusion. Overall, the present study demonstrated that Ang II promoted hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and reduced apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes independently of high blood pressure. The present data indicate the role of Ang II in cartilage, and might provide a new concept for treatment of cartilage diseases. PMID:25693858

  14. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R.; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26957702

  15. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Karolak, Matthew R.; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  16. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Matthew R; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  17. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SHAOWEI; SUN, YEXIAO; GENG, ZHIJUN; MA, KUI; SUN, XIAOYAN; FU, XIAOBING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26986690

  18. Species-specific differences in adaptive phenotypic plasticity in an ecologically relevant trophic trait: hypertrophic lips in Midas cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    The spectacular species richness of cichlids and their diversity in morphology, coloration, and behavior have made them an ideal model for the study of speciation and adaptive evolution. Hypertrophic lips evolved repeatedly and independently in African and Neotropical cichlid radiations. Cichlids with hypertrophic lips forage predominantly in rocky crevices and it has been hypothesized that mechanical stress caused by friction could result in larger lips through phenotypic plasticity. To test the influence of the environment on the size and development of lips, we conducted a series of breeding and feeding experiments on Midas cichlids. Full-sibs of Amphilophus labiatus (thick-lipped) and Amphilophus citrinellus (thin-lipped) each were split into a control group which was fed food from the water column and a treatment group whose food was fixed to substrates. We found strong evidence for phenotypic plasticity on lip area in the thick-lipped species, but not in the thin-lipped species. Intermediate phenotypic values were observed in hybrids from thick- and thin-lipped species reared under "control" conditions. Thus, both a genetic, but also a phenotypic plastic component is involved in the development of hypertrophic lips in Neotropical cichlids. Moreover, species-specific adaptive phenotypic plasticity was found, suggesting that plasticity is selected for in recent thick-lipped species. PMID:24475874

  19. Ménétrier's disease-like hypertrophic gastritis in two red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus).

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jessica A; Adkesson, Michael J; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Burdick, Stacy K; Langan, Jennifer N

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphoplasmacytic gastritis in two red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) at a zoological facility progressed to severe hypertrophic gastropathy similar to Ménétrier's disease that affects humans. Clinical signs included emesis, diarrhea, hunched posture consistent with abdominal pain, anemia, and hypoproteinemia. Large gastric masses were present and in one case created a gastric outflow obstruction. Both cases were positive for simian immunodeficiency virus and Helicobacter spp. were variably isolated, although the association with the hypertrophic gastropathy is unclear. Medical treatment had varying success and included sucralfate, H2 receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, diet manipulations, and antibiotic therapies targeting Helicobacter spp. Surgical resection of a large portion of the stomach resulted in some palliative improvement in one case. Overall, this disease presented many challenges regarding identification, confirmation of diagnosis, and clinical management. Both aggressive medical and surgical treatments were unrewarding for long-term management of hypertrophic gastropathy in this pair of red-capped mangabeys and resulted in a poor prognosis in these cases. PMID:24625015

  20. Role of silicone derivative plus onion extract gel in presternal hypertrophic scar protection: a prospective randomized, double blinded, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jenwitheesuk, Kamonwan; Surakunprapha, Palakorn; Jenwitheesuk, Kriangsak; Kuptarnond, Chusak; Prathanee, Sompop; Intanoo, Worawit

    2012-08-01

    Use of silicone derivative and onion extract had been reported in the prevention of hypertrophic scarring. Our experience showed the preventive use of silicone derivative plus onion extract gel on hypertrophic scars after median sternotomy. In a randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled study, 60 patients after median sternotomy incisions were separated into two groups. All patients were treated either with silicone derivative plus onion extract gel (Cybele(®) scagel) or placebo gel twice daily for a total treatment period of 12 weeks. During each visit, pain and itching scores were graded by the patients and scar characteristics were observed by surgeons using the Vancouver scar scale. Pain and itch score values from patients' who applied silicone derivative plus onion extract gel was less than another group (P < 0·05). Pigmentation was significantly different between two groups (P < 0·05) and the reduction of scores on vascularity, pliability, height in treated group was not superior to the untreated group. No adverse events were reported by any of the patients. A silicone derivative plus onion extract gel is safe and effective for the preventing the hypertrophic scarring after median sternotomy. PMID:22168750

  1. Benign infantile convulsion as a diagnostic clue of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia is characterized by sudden attacks of involuntary movements. It is often misdiagnosed clinically as psychogenic illness, which distresses the patients to a great extent. A correct diagnosis will improve the quality of life in patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia because treatment with low doses of anticonvulsants is effective for eliminating the clinical manifestations. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia can occur independently of or concurrently with benign infantile convulsion. Identification of PRRT2 as the causative gene of benign infantile convulsion and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia allows genetic confirmation of the clinical diagnosis. Case presentation We describe the clinical features of a Japanese family with either paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia or benign infantile convulsion. A PRRT2 missense mutation (c.981C > G, p.Ile327Met) was identified in two patients with benign infantile convulsion and three patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia as well as in two unaffected individuals. Allowing incomplete penetrance in the mutation carriers, this mutation co-segregated completely with the phenotype. The patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia had been misdiagnosed with psychogenic illness for many years. They were correctly diagnosed with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia when their children visited a pediatrician for benign infantile convulsion. Treatment with carbamazepine controlled their involuntary movements completely. Conclusions Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia is a treatable movement disorder that is often misdiagnosed clinically as psychogenic illness. It is important to note that two clinically distinct disorders, benign infantile convulsion and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, are allelic conditions caused by PRRT2 mutations. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia should be suspected in families with a child with benign infantile convulsion. PMID:24886244

  2. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  3. Evaluation of clinical course and neurocognition in children with self-limited infantile epilepsy in a Turkish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Abdulkadir; Aksoy, Halil Ural; Sezer, Rabia Gönül; Polat, Muzaffer

    2015-03-01

    The outcome of children with self-limited infantile epilepsy was reported to be normal psychosocial and cognitive development as a characteristic criterion. We aimed to investigate the clinical course and neurocognitive outcome in children with self-limited infantile epilepsy in a Turkish cohort. The clinical course, electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics, neuroimaging, treatment, and outcome of children with self-limited infantile epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All infants were reevaluated with the Denver Developmental Screening Test in addition to neurologic examination. Of 44 patients, self-limited familial infantile epilepsy was diagnosed in 8 infants (18.2%) and self-limited nonfamilial infantile epilepsy in 28 (63.6%). Interictal EEGs and neurologic examinations were normal in all cases. Fine motor and gross motor skills, language, adaptive personal/social skills were near-normal in all patients with self-limited familial infantile epilepsy. Delay in language parameters was observed in 2 infants with self-limited nonfamilial infantile epilepsy. Language skills should be thoroughly evaluated with detailed neurocognitive screening tests in patients with self-limited infantile epilepsy. PMID:24958006

  4. YouTube videos as a teaching tool and patient resource for infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Fat, Mary Jane Lim; Doja, Asif; Barrowman, Nick; Sell, Erick

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess YouTube videos for their efficacy as a patient resource for infantile spasms. Videos were searched using the terms infantile spasm, spasm, epileptic spasm, and West syndrome. The top 25 videos under each term were selected according to set criteria. Technical quality, diagnosis of infantile spasms, and suitability as a teaching resource were assessed by 2 neurologists using the Medical Video Rating Scale. There were 5858 videos found. Of the 100 top videos, 46% did not meet selection criteria. Mean rating for technical quality was 4.0 of 5 for rater 1 and 3.9 of 5 for rater 2. Raters found 60% and 64% of videos to accurately portray infantile spasms, respectively, with significant agreement (Cohen κ coefficient = 0.75, P < .001). Ten videos were considered excellent examples (grading of 5 of 5) by at least 1 rater. YouTube may be used as an excellent patient resource for infantile spasms if guided search practices are followed. PMID:21551373

  5. The Controversial Role of Food Allergy in Infantile Colic: Evidence and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Nocerino, Rita; Pezzella, Vincenza; Cosenza, Linda; Amoroso, Antonio; Di Scala, Carmen; Amato, Francesco; Iacono, Giuseppe; Berni Canani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Food allergies (FAs) are an increasing problem in Western countries, affecting up to 10% of young children. FAs are frequently associated with gastrointestinal manifestations. The role of FAs as a potential causative factor for infantile colic (IC) is still controversial. We report the most recent evidence on the pathogenesis, clinical and diagnostic aspects of FA-induced infantile colic (IC) and suggest a stepwise diagnostic approach. We selected articles on clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis and management of FAs and IC from of 1981 to 2015. Original and review articles were identified through selective searches performed on PubMed, using the following terms: colic, infantile colic, food allergy and infantile colic, infantile colic treatment. The possible relationship between FAs and IC derives from the presence of dysmotility with visceral hypersensitivity and dysbiosis, demonstrated in both conditions, and the clinical response to dietary interventions. Unfortunately, the design of the studies, poor characterization of atopy and different dietary approaches limit the understanding of the importance of FAs in subjects with IC. The role of FAs in IC subjects without other symptoms of atopy remains controversial. However, where there is a suspicion of FAs, a short trial with an extensively hydrolyzed cow’s proteins formula or, if breast fed, with maternal elimination diet may be considered a reasonable option. PMID:25808260

  6. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Facilitating Surgical Resection of Infantile Massive Intracranial Immature Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Takahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihito; Shirase, Tomoyuki; Yukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeichi, Yasuhiro; Yamazoe, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Immature teratoma (IMT) is the most frequent histological subtype of infantile intracranial teratoma, the most common congenital brain tumor. IMT contains incompletely differentiated components resembling fetal tissues. Infantile intracranial IMT has a dismal prognosis, because it is often inoperable due to its massive size and high vascularity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to be effective in decreasing tumor volume and vascularity to facilitate surgical resection in other types of infantile brain tumors. However, only one recent case report described the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for infantile intracranial IMT in the literature, even though it is common entity with a poor prognosis in infants. Here, we describe the case of a 2-month-old male infant with a very large intracranial IMT. Maximal surgical resection was first attempted but was unsuccessful because of severe intraoperative hemorrhage. Neoadjuvant carboplatin and etoposide (CARE) chemotherapy was then administered with the aim of shrinking and devascularizing the tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size did not decrease, but intraoperative blood loss significantly decreased and near-total resection was achieved by the second and third surgery. The patient underwent adjuvant CARE chemotherapy and has been alive for 3 years after surgery without tumor regrowth. Even when neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not decrease tumor volume of infantile intracranial IMT, surgical resection should be tried because chemotherapy can facilitate surgical resection and improve clinical outcome by reducing tumor vascularity. PMID:27039944

  7. Girl with a PRRT2 mutation and infantile focal epilepsy with bilateral spikes.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimojima, Keiko; Sugawara, Midori; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sakai, Yasunari; Yamashita, Hironori; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-04-01

    This paper documents the case of a female Japanese patient with infantile focal epilepsy, which was different from benign infantile seizures, and a family history of infantile convulsion and paroxysmal choreoathetosis. The patient developed partial seizures (e.g., psychomotor arrest) at age 14 months. At the time of onset, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) showed bilateral parietotemporal spikes, but the results of neurologic examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Her seizures were well controlled with carbamazepine, and she had a normal developmental outcome. EEG abnormalities, however, persisted for more than 6 years, and the spikes moved transiently to the occipital area and began to resemble the rolandic spikes recognized in benign childhood epilepsy. Her father had paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, with an onset age of 6 years, and her youngest sister had typical benign infantile seizures. Genetic analysis demonstrated that all affected members had a heterozygous mutation of c.649_650insC in the proline-rich transmembrane protein-2 (PRRT2) gene. This case indicates that the phenotypic spectrum of infantile seizures or epilepsy with PRRT2-related pathology may be larger than previously expected, and that genetic investigation of the effect of PRRT2 mutations on idiopathic seizures or epilepsy in childhood may help elucidate the pathological backgrounds of benign childhood epilepsy. PMID:23768507

  8. Decreased contractility due to energy deprivation in a transgenic rat model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Mark; Flögel, Ulrich; Knorr, Maike; Grundt, Christina; Hippe, Hans-Joerg; Brors, Benedikt; Frank, Derk; Haselmann, Uta; Antony, Claude; Voelkers, Mirko; Schrader, Juergen; Most, Patrick; Lemmer, Bjoern; Katus, Hugo A; Frey, Norbert

    2009-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and sudden death. Recently, it has been suggested that inefficient energy utilization could be a common molecular pathway of HCM-related mutations. We have previously generated transgenic Sprague-Dawley rats overexpressing a truncated cardiac troponin T (DEL-TNT) molecule, displaying typical features of HCM such as diastolic dysfunction and an increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We now studied these rats using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRS demonstrated that cardiac energy metabolism was markedly impaired, as indicated by a decreased phosphocreatine to ATP ratio (-31%, p < 0.05). In addition, we assessed contractility of isolated cardiomyocytes. While DEL-TNT and control cardiomyocytes showed no difference under baseline conditions, DEL-TNT cardiomyocytes selectively exhibited a decrease in fractional shortening by 28% after 1 h in glucose-deprived medium (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant decreases in contraction velocity and relaxation velocity were observed. To identify the underlying molecular pathways, we performed transcriptional profiling using real-time PCR. DEL-TNT hearts exhibited induction of several genes critical for cardiac energy supply, including CD36, CPT-1/-2, and PGC-1alpha. Finally, DEL-TNT rats and controls were studied by radiotelemetry after being stressed by isoproterenol, revealing a significantly increased frequency of arrhythmias in transgenic animals. In summary, we demonstrate profound energetic alterations in DEL-TNT hearts, supporting the notion that inefficient cellular ATP utilization contributes to the pathogenesis of HCM. PMID:19189074

  9. Effect of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction on Left Atrial Mechanics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynne K.; Chan, Raymond H.; Carasso, Shemy; Durand, Miranda; Misurka, Jimmy; Crean, Andrew M.; Ralph-Edwards, Anthony; Gruner, Christiane; Woo, Anna; Lesser, John R.; Maron, Barry J.; Maron, Martin S.; Rakowski, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) volumes are known to be increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and are a predictor of adverse outcome. In addition, LA function is impaired and is presumed to be due to left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction as a result of hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. In the current study, we assess the incremental effect of outflow tract obstruction (and concomitant mitral regurgitation) on LA function as assessed by LA strain. Patients with HCM (50 obstructive, 50 nonobstructive) were compared to 50 normal controls. A subset of obstructive patients who had undergone septal myectomy was also studied. Utilising feature-tracking software applied to cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, LA volumes and functional parameters were calculated. LA volumes were significantly elevated and LA ejection fraction and strain were significantly reduced in patients with HCM compared with controls and were significantly more affected in patients with obstruction. LA volumes and function were significantly improved after septal myectomy. LVOT obstruction and mitral regurgitation appear to further impair LA mechanics. Septal myectomy results in a significant reduction in LA volumes, paralleled by an improvement in function. PMID:26788503

  10. Hypertrophic response of the Association of Thyroid Hormone and Exercise in the Heart of Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Rodrigues; Resende, Elmiro Santos; Lopes, Leandro; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chagas, Rafaella; Fidale, Thiago; Rodrigues, Poliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is a component of cardiac remodeling occurring in response to an increase of the activity or functional overload of the heart. Objective Assess hypertrophic response of the association of thyroid hormone and exercise in the rat heart. Methods We used 37 Wistar rats, male, adults were randomly divided into four groups: control, hormone (TH), exercise (E), thyroid hormone and exercise (H + E); the group received daily hormone levothyroxine sodium by gavage at a dose of 20 μg thyroid hormone/100g body weight, the exercise group took swimming five times a week, with additional weight corresponding to 20% of body weight for six weeks; in group H + E were applied simultaneously TH treatment groups and E. The statistics used was analysis of variance, where appropriate, by Tukey test and Pearson correlation test. Results The T4 was greater in groups TH and H + E. The total weight of the heart was greater in patients who received thyroid hormone and left ventricular weight was greater in the TH group. The transverse diameter of cardiomyocytes increased in groups TH, E and H + E. The percentage of collagen was greater in groups E and H + E Correlation analysis between variables showed distinct responses. Conclusion The association of thyroid hormone with high-intensity exercise produced cardiac hypertrophy, and generated a standard hypertrophy not directly correlated to the degree of fibrosis. PMID:24676374

  11. Constructing "best interests": genetic testing of children in families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Geelen, Els; Van Hoyweghen, Ine; Doevendans, Pieter A; Marcelis, Carlo L M; Horstman, Klasien

    2011-08-01

    Professional guidelines on genetic testing of children have recently shifted their focus from protecting the child's autonomous choice to professionals, together with parents, striving to work in the child's "best interest." This notion of "best interest" allows room for therapeutical as well as psychological and social considerations, and gives rise to the question how parents and professionals weigh up the child's best interest in practice. In this qualitative study, we followed six extended families involved in genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Netherlands for 3½ years. In total 57 members of these families were interviewed in depth; many of them more than once. Our empirical analysis shows that the best interest of a child is constructed via long-term processes in the broader context of family and kin. In this context, "best interests" are considered and reconsidered. We conclude that a child's best interest should not be framed as the result of an instantaneous agreement between parents and professionals. In dealing with genetic testing of children, parents as well as professionals reflect on and learn from the processes of generating new meanings of "best interest." To enable professionals to deal with the variety in family life, these learning processes should be documented closely. PMID:21739592

  12. Upregulation of cardiac matrix Gla protein expression in response to hypertrophic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Erja; Pohjolainen, Virva; Aro, Jani; Pikkarainen, Sampsa; Leskinen, Hanna; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Rysä, Jaana

    2009-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) expression is increased in cardiac hypertrophy, but the precise mechanisms regulating its expression are unknown. Here we characterized the effect of pressure overload and myocardial infarction in vivo as well as mechanical stretch and hypertrophic agonists in vitro on MGP expression. When angiotensin II (Ang II) was administered by osmotic minipumps, left ventricular (LV) MGP mRNA levels increased significantly from 6 h to 2 weeks, whereas intravenous arginine(8)-vasopressin increased LV MGP mRNA levels within 4 h. During post-infarction remodeling process, MGP mRNA levels were elevated at 24 h (1.3-fold, p<0.05) and the maximal increase was observed at 4 weeks (2.8-fold, p<0.01). Ang II increased MGP mRNA levels 20% (p<0.05) in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and 40% (p<0.05) in cardiac fibroblasts, whereas endothelin-1 decreased MGP mRNA levels 30% (p<0.01) in myocytes and had no effect in fibroblasts. Cyclic mechanical stretch resulted in reduction of MGP gene expression in both cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that MGP is rapidly upregulated in response to cardiac overload well before the development of LV hypertrophy and post-infarction remodeling process. Our results also suggest that Ang II may be involved in mediating load-induced activation of MGP expression. PMID:19919401

  13. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow and Valve Dynamics in Hearts with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Pinheiro, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease manifested by the thickening of the ventricular wall and often leads to a partial obstruction to the blood flow out of the left ventricle. HCM is recognized as one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes. In a heart with HCM, the hypertrophy usually narrows the blood flow pathway to the aorta and produces a low pressure zone between the mitral valve and the hypertrophy during systole. This low pressure can suck the mitral valve leaflet back and completely block the blood flow into the aorta. In the current study, a sharp interface immersed boundary method flow solver is employed to study the hemodynamics and valve dynamics inside a heart with HCM. The three-dimensional motion and configuration of the left ventricle including mitral valve leaflets and aortic valves are reconstructed based on echo-cardio data sets. The mechanisms of aortic obstruction associated with HCM are investigated. The long term objective of this study is to develop a computational tool to aid in the assessment and surgical management of HCM.

  14. Protective effects of Astragalus polysaccharides against endothelial dysfunction in hypertrophic rats induced by isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Han, Ronghui; Tang, Futian; Lu, Meili; Xu, Chonghua; Hu, Jin; Mei, Meng; Wang, Hongxin

    2016-09-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) is an important bioactive component extracted from Chinese herb Astragalus membranaceus. It has been widely used in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that APS could inhibit isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of APS on vascular endothelia in cardiac hypertrophy rats induced by isoproterenol (ISO). ISO (10mg×kg(-1)) was intraperitoneally injected once daily for 2weeks to induce cardiac hypertrophy. APS (400 and 800mg×kg(-1)) was intragastrically injected once daily along with ISO. The results showed that combination with APS significantly ameliorates the endothelial dysfunction while attenuates cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO. We found that administration with APS could attenuate the increase in number of circulating endothelial cell (CEC). APS also decreases the superoxide anion generation and the protein expression of p65 and the levels of TNF-α and IL-6; while increases the cGMP levels, an activity marker for nitric oxide (NO) in aortas. In addition, APS improves the relaxation dysfunction in isolated aortic rings and increases the protein expression of IκBα and Cu/Zn-SOD in aortas. In conclusion, our results suggested that APS had a protective effect against endothelial dysfunction in hypertrophic rats induced by ISO. The underlining mechanisms may be contributed to the anti-inflammatory effects and the improvement of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO. PMID:27344039

  15. Outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant mitral valve procedure for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Song, Yunhu; Gao, Ge; Ran, Jun; Su, Wenjun; Li, Haojie; Tang, Yajie; Duan, Fujian; Sun, Hansong

    2016-01-01

    The indications for a concomitant mitral valve (MV) procedure remain controversial for patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). According to previous studies, a concomitant MV surgery was required in 11-20% of inpatient operations. Thus, we aimed to study the outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant MV procedure for HOCM patients who had no intrinsic abnormalities of the MV apparatus. We retrospectively reviewed 232 consecutive HOCM patients who underwent extended Morrow procedures from January 2010 to October 2014. Only 10 (4.31%) patients with intrinsic MV diseases underwent concomitant MV procedures. Of the 232 patients, 230 had no to mild mitral regurgitation (MR) postoperatively. We separated the 232 patients into two groups according to preoperative MR degree. One group is mild MR, and the other is moderate or severe MR. The three-month, one-year, and three-year composite end-point event-free survival rates had no difference between two groups (p = 0.820). When we separated the patients to postoperative no or trace MR group and mild MR group, there was also no difference on survival rates (p = 0.830). In conclusion, concomitant mitral valve procedures are not necessary for HOCM patients with MR caused by systolic anterior motion, even moderate to severe extent. PMID:27357867

  16. Comparison of the hypertrophic effect of phorbol ester, norepinephrine, angiotensin II and contraction on cultured cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Allo, S.N.; Carl, L.L.; Morgan, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), norepinephrine (NE), angiotensin II (AII) and contraction stimulate cardiomyocyte growth. Differences exist in the time course and extent of protein and RNA accumulation. Cells plated at 4 {times} 10{sup 6} cells/60mm dish and arrested with 50 mM KCl demonstrated no significant growth. Treatment with PMA stimulated growth to a maximum of 17% at 48 h. In contrast, maximal stimulation of growth was 36% at 48 h and 31% at 72 h for contracting and NE treated cells, respectively. Maximal stimulation of the capacity for protein synthesis was 32% for PMA treated cells at 24 h as compared to 59% and 77% for NE treated and contracting cells respectively at 72 h. In support of a primary role for altered capacity in the regulation of protein synthesis, there was a significant correlation between RNA and protein content independent of the stimulus used. AII increased RNA content by 28% at 48h, but had no effect on growth up to 72h. Treatment with staurosporine blocked the stimulation of growth, suggestive of a role for protein kinase C (PKC). However, the inhibition of contraction-induced growth was due in part to a reduction in the rate of contraction. It was concluded that: significant differences existed in the time course of growth stimulation and RNA accumulation, depending on the stimulus; and growth inhibition by staurosporine is suggestive of an important role of PKC in hypertrophic growth induced by these stimuli.

  17. Prognostic implications of novel beta cardiac myosin heavy chain gene mutations that cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Anan, R; Greve, G; Thierfelder, L; Watkins, H; McKenna, W J; Solomon, S; Vecchio, C; Shono, H; Nakao, S; Tanaka, H

    1994-01-01

    Three novel beta cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene missense mutations, Phe513Cys, Gly716Arg, and Arg719Trp, which cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) are described. One mutation in exon 15 (Phe513Cys) does not alter the charge of the encoded amino acid, and affected family members have a near normal life expectancy. The Gly716Arg mutation (exon 19; charge change of +1) causes FHC in three family members, one of whom underwent transplantation for heart failure. The Arg719Trp mutation (exon 19; charge change of -1) was found in four unrelated FHC families with a high incidence of premature death and an average life expectancy in affected individuals of 38 yr. A comparable high frequency of disease-related deaths in four families with the Arg719Trp mutation suggests that this specific gene defect directly accounts for the observed malignant phenotype. Further, the significantly different life expectancies associated with the Arg719Trp vs. Phe513Cys mutation (P < 0.001) support the hypothesis that mutations which alter the charge of the encoded amino acid affect survival more significantly than those that produce a conservative amino acid change. Images PMID:8282798

  18. A Delta-Sarcoglycan Gene Polymorphism as a Risk Factor for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Garduño, Martín H.; Pérez-Martínez, Ramón A.; Ruiz, Victor M.; Herrera-Tepatlán, Esteban; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Jiménez-Vaca, Ana L.; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The C allele of c.−94C>G polymorphism of the delta-sarcoglycan gene was associated as a risk factor for coronary spasm in Japanese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim: We evaluated whether the c.−94C>G polymorphism can be a risk factor for HCM in Mexican patients. Methods: The polymorphism was genotyped and the risk was estimated in 35 HCM patients and 145 healthy unrelated individuals. Data of this polymorphism reported in Mexican Amerindian populations were included. Results: The C allele frequency in HCM patients was higher with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.37, and the risk for the CC genotype increased to 5.0. The analysis with Mexican Amerindian populations showed that the C allele frequency was significantly higher in HCM patients with an OR of 2.96 and for CC genotype the risk increased to 7.60. Conclusions: The C allele of the c.−94C>G polymorphism is a risk factor for HCM, which is increased by the Amerindian component and can play an important role in the etiology and progression of disease in Mexican patients. PMID:22524166

  19. 5-Fluorouracil in the Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vidhi V; Aldahan, Adam S; Mlacker, Stephanie; Alsaidan, Mohammed; Samarkandy, Sahal; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-06-01

    Hypertrophic (HTSs) and keloid scars are common dermatological complaints produced by disruption of the normal wound-healing process. Despite a wide array of therapeutic options available to treat these lesions, HTSs and keloids continue to pose a significant challenge to clinicians in everyday practice. The chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a well-known treatment option reserved for recalcitrant HTSs and keloid lesions. We present clinicians with a comprehensive review of the published data concerning the use of 5-FU in the treatment of HTSs and keloids. The current evidence suggests that 5-FU is a safe and practical alternative for the treatment of HTSs and keloids as it may substantially improve the appearance of proliferative scars and reduce the chance of recurrence. This therapeutic option is most effective in conjunction with adjuvant therapy such as corticosteroids. Additional randomized controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes should be conducted to corroborate the existing efficacy and safety data in patients with HTSs and keloids. PMID:27105629

  20. Annexin A7 deficiency potentiates cardiac NFAT activity promoting hypertrophic signaling.

    PubMed

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Viereck, Robert; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Schönberger, Tanja; Noegel, Angelika A; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2014-02-28

    Annexin A7 (Anxa7) is a cytoskeletal protein interacting with Ca(2+) signaling which in turn is a crucial factor for cardiac remodeling following cardiac injury. The present study explored whether Anxa7 participates in the regulation of cardiac stress signaling. To this end, mice lacking functional Anxa7 (anxa7(-/-)) and wild-type mice (anxa7(+/+)) were investigated following pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In addition, HL-1 cardiomyocytes were silenced with Anxa7 siRNA and treated with isoproterenol. Transcript levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter assay and protein abundance by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. As a result, TAC treatment increased the mRNA and protein levels of Anxa7 in wild-type mice. Moreover, TAC increased heart weight to body weight ratio and the cardiac mRNA levels of αSka, Nppb, Col1a1, Col3a1 and Rcan1, effects more pronounced in anxa7(-/-) mice than in anxa7(+/+) mice. Silencing of Anxa7 in HL-1 cardiomyocytes significantly increased nuclear localization of Nfatc1. Furthermore, Anxa7 silencing increased NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity as well as αSka, Nppb, and Rcan1 mRNA levels both, under control conditions and following β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. These observations point to an important role of annexin A7 in the regulation of cardiac NFAT activity and hypertrophic response following cardiac stress conditions. PMID:24508799

  1. Stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Taugner, F M

    2001-01-01

    Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the ventricular myocardium, which may cause sudden death in cats, but neither the aetiology nor the effect on the circulation are well understood. Fourteen cats of either sex with naturally occurring HCM were studied post mortem. Their ages ranged from 9 months to 10 years with an average age of 4.9 years. Heart weights and heart weight expressed as a percentage of body weight were elevated (27.9 g and 0.65%, respectively) as compared with normal values obtained in previous studies. Myocardial disarray was evident in nine of the 14 cats and moderate to severe fibrosis was present in six animals. To evaluate the renal renin-angiotensin system, semiquantitative morphometric data were obtained by means of renin immunohistochemistry and compared with results from an earlier study of 10 healthy cats by the author. The juxtaglomerular index was 36.8% in the cats with HCM as compared with 30.6% in healthy cats. The renin-positive portion of the afferent arteriole was increased in cats affected by HCM to 86.0 microm as compared with 49.9 microm in normal cats. The increase in kidney renin values in cats with HCM may have been due to decreased blood pressure and reduced renal perfusion resulting from impaired cardiac output. PMID:11578127

  2. Transient hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the newborn following multiple doses of antenatal corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Yunis, K A; Bitar, F F; Hayek, P; Mroueh, S M; Mikati, M

    1999-01-01

    Postnatal exposure to steroids has been associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in the newborn. Such an effect has not been described in infants born to mothers who received antenatal steroids. We report three newborns whose mothers were treated with betamethasone prenatally in different doses, duration of time, and who developed various degrees of HCM diagnosed by echocardiography. There was no maternal evidence of diabetes except for one infant whose mother had a normal fasting and post-prandial blood glucose prior to steroid therapy, but an abnormal one hour postprandial glucose after 8 weeks of betamethasone therapy, with a normal HbA1 C level. There was no family history of HCM, no history of maternal intake of other relevant medications, and no hypertension in all three newborns. Follow-up echocardiography revealed complete resolution of the HCM changes in all infants. We suggest that repeated antenatal maternal steroid intake may cause changes of HCM in the newborn. These changes appear to be dose- and duration-related and are mostly reversible. Further prospective controlled studies to evaluate these observations and to investigate potential mechanisms are warranted. PMID:10362077

  3. Setting up Multiplex Panels for Genetic Testing of Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Based on Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    SAGHAFI, Hoorieh; HAGHJOO, Majid; SABBAGH, Sima; SAMIEE, Niloofar; VAKILIAN, Farve; SALEHI OMRAN, Mohammad Taghi; DADASHI, Masoomeh; AMIN, Ahmad; KERAMATIPOUR, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomere proteins. Nowadays genetic testing of HCM plays an important role in clinical practice by contributing to the diagnosis, prognosis, and screening of high-risk individuals. The aim of this study was developing a reliable testing strategy for HCM based on linkage analysis and appropriate for Iranian population. Methods: Six panels of four microsatellite markers surrounding MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, and MYL2 genes (24 markers in total) were selected for multiplex PCR and fragment length analysis. Characteristics of markers and informativeness of the panels were evaluated in 50 unrelated Iranians. The efficacy of the strategy was verified in a family with HCM. Results: All markers were highly polymorphic. The panels were informative in 96–100% of samples. Multipoint linkage analysis excluded the linkage between the disease and all six genes by obtaining maximum LOD score ≤−2. Conclusion: This study suggests a reliable genetic testing method based on linkage analysis between 6 sarcomere genes and familial HCM. It could be applied for diagnostic, predictive, or screening testing in clinical setting. PMID:27141495

  4. Robotic Septal Myectomy and Mitral Valve Repair for Idiopathic Hypertrophic Subaortic Stenosis With Systolic Anterior Motion.

    PubMed

    Bayburt, Selin; Senay, Sahin; Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Kocyigit, Muharrem; Karakus, Gultekin; Batur, Mustafa Kemal; Alhan, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Combined therapeutic approach with performing mitral valve repair may be necessitated for the treatment of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) with systolic anterior motion. This report includes operative technique for combined robotic septal myectomy and mitral valve repair. A 45-year-old man with IHSS was admitted to our center for surgical intervention. The transthoracic echocardiography showed typical asymmetric ventricular hypertrophy. Left ventricle posterior wall thickness was 11 mm, and interventricular septum thickness was 21 mm. Mitral valve leaflets were found to be elongated. Mild-to-severe mitral regurgitation was detected with eccentric mitral jet. Aortic peak gradient was 128 mm Hg. Robotic mitral repair and septal myectomy through left atrial exposure was performed. The anterior leaflet was detached, and the septal muscle in a mass of 1 × 0.7 × 0.5 cm was resected. Next, the anterior leaflet was reattached with continuous suture. The plication of the posterior leaflet with transverse incision was performed to diminish the length of posterior leaflet. After the magic suture for posteromedial commissure was performed, a 34 Medtronic Future ring was implanted for mitral annuloplasty. Postoperative course was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day. Combined robotic septal myectomy and mitral valve repair for IHSS with systolic anterior motion may be feasible. PMID:27115534

  5. Electric cardioversion of atrial fibrillation resulting in pulmonary oedema in patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Izabela; Kaczyńska, Anna; Abramczyk, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    The direct-current electric shock is considered to be safe treatment of arrhythmias and rarely leads to serious hemodynamic complications. A 62-year-old patient was admitted to the hospital due to a first symptomatic episode of atrial fibrillation. Patient was diagnosed with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 20 years ago. Transoesophageal echocardiography was performed to exclude an atrial thrombus followed by electrical cardioversion with restoration of sinus rhythm. After 6 hours symptoms of pulmonary oedema developed. The patient's condition improved after furosemide administration. As the possible cause of the oedema, inotropic effect of administered propafenone and atrial stunning were considered. The atria seem to be responsible for important part of forward cardiac output even during AF, especially in cardiomyopathies. Contractility deterioration of the left atrium (stunning) along with earlier resumption of the right atrium contractile function could be associated with hemodynamic instability causing pulmonary oedema in subjects with hypertrophied myocardium. It is necessary to take into consideration the atrial function while administrating antiarrhythmic drugs, especially those with negative inotropic effect. PMID:26039023

  6. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with cerebral spinal fluid hypovolemia as initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematous.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Me; Gomez-Delgado, F; Gomez-Garduño, A; Blanco-Molina, A; Puebla, Ra Fernandez de la

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man with thickening of the dura mater associated with the presence of subdural collections as a consequence of cerebral spinal fluid hypovolemia (CSFH) and hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) as presentation of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). The patient complained about fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, headache and skin lesions. In the laboratory tests minimal normocytic anemia, mild leukopenia, polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies (dsDNA), antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) type SSA-Ro, anti-Smith antigen antibodies (anti-Sm) and anti-ribonucleoprotein antibodies (anti-RNP) were detected. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with and without gadolinium enhancement, revealed generalized thickening of the dura mater more severe at the right parieto-occipital lobes with the presence of subdural collections. The patient was diagnosed with SLE associated both with CSFH and HP. A conservative treatment with prednisone 60 mg daily, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 1 g daily and hydroxychloroquine 200 mg twice a day was started with significant clinical and radiological improvement (almost complete resolution of the subdural collections and clear decrease of meningeal thickness). The authors emphasize that HP associated with CSFH in the context of SLE is a rare entity, which makes this case unique. PMID:24351279

  7. Cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: clinical utility of radionuclide imaging for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Y; Isobe, M; Hayasaka, M; Tanaka, M; Fujii, T; Sekiguchi, M

    1998-06-01

    A 62-year-old woman with skin sarcoidosis was admitted to our hospital to ascertain whether she had cardiac involvement. Although she displayed no cardiac signs or symptoms, the electrocardiogram showed first-degree atrioventricular block, right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block, and giant negative T waves in the V3 lead. Echocardiography revealed marked hypertrophy localized in the basal portion of the interventricular septum (IVS) without systolic dysfunction, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging revealed redistribution in the anteroseptal region. Both gallium-67 (67Ga) and technetium-99m pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) scintigraphy revealed abnormal uptake in the myocardium. These findings disappeared after 2 months of steroid treatment. Reports of cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking HCM are rare. However, hypertrophy in the basal portion of the IVS is an important sign of early cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis. 67Ga and 99mTc-PYP scintigraphy were useful and necessary to differentiate this type of cardiac sarcoidosis from HCM. PMID:9652326

  8. Pedobacter roseus sp. nov., isolated from a hypertrophic pond, and emended description of the genus Pedobacter.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chung Yeon; Choi, Dong Han; Cho, Byung Cheol

    2006-08-01

    A Gram-negative, pink-coloured, rod-shaped, non-flagellated bacterium, designated CL-GP80(T), was isolated from a hypertrophic pond located within the campus of Seoul National University, Korea. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CL-GP80(T) belongs to the family Sphingobacteriaceae and is closely related to Pedobacter heparinus ATCC 13125(T) (95.8 % sequence similarity) and to other members of the genus Pedobacter (90.8-95.3 % similarity). Temperature and pH ranges for growth were 5-33 degrees C and pH 6-8, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 41.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (37.0 %), iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c (24.5 %), and iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH (11.3 %). Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses indicated that strain CL-GP80(T) could be assigned to the genus Pedobacter, but distinguished from recognized species of the genus. Strain CL-GP80(T) (=KCCM 42272(T)=JCM 13399(T)) is therefore proposed as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Pedobacter roseus sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:16902016

  9. Myocarditis caused by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Five Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rolim, V Machado; Casagrande, R Assis; Wouters, A Terezinha Barth; Driemeier, D; Pavarini, S Petinatti

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have been implicated as the cause of cardiomyopathy in several mammalian species. This study describes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and myocarditis associated with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in five cats aged between 1 and 4 years. Clinical manifestations included dyspnoea in four animals, one of which also exhibited restlessness. One animal showed only lethargy, anorexia and vomiting. Necropsy examination revealed marked cardiomegaly, marked left ventricular hypertrophy and pallor of the myocardium and epicardium in all animals. Microscopical and immunohistochemical examination showed multifocal infiltration of the myocardium with T lymphocytes and fewer macrophages, neutrophils and plasma cells. An intense immunoreaction for FIV antigen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of lymphocytes and the cytoplasm of some macrophages was observed via immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC did not reveal the presence of antigen from feline calicivirus, coronavirus, feline leukaemia virus, feline parvovirus, Chlamydia spp. or Toxoplasma gondii. The results demonstrate the occurrence of FIV infection in inflammatory cells in the myocardium of five cats with myocarditis and HCM. PMID:26797583

  10. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative maneuvers (n = 23). Dynamic ventricular emptying during rest was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). Left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: (I) intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9), (II) intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12), and (III) no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). During rest, the percentage of the total systolic ejection period during which forward aortic flow existed was as follows (mean +/- 1 SD): group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow), 86 +/- 9% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the HCM subgroups, but compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. These results suggest that "outflow obstruction," as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left ventricular outflow in HCM. PMID:6449522

  11. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative maneuvers (n = 23). Dynamic ventricular emptying during rest was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). Left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: (I) intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9), (II) intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12), and (III) no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). During rest, the percentage of the total systolic ejection period during which forward aortic flow existed was as follows (mean +/- 1 SD): group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow), 86 +/- 9% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the HCM subgroups, but compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. These results suggest that "outflow obstruction," as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left ventricular outflow in HCM. PMID:6449522

  12. Comparison of Modified With Classic Morrow Septal Myectomy in Treating Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bangrong; Dong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of the classic Morrow septal myectomy with the modified procedure in treating hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). A retrospective study was conducted to compare the outcomes of classic with modified Morrow septal myectomy in 42 patients treated from January 2005 to July 2011. Preoperative and postoperative ventricular septal thickness, left ventricular (LV) outflow tract velocity and gradient were measured echocardiographically. In both groups, the ventricular septal thickness, LV outflow tract velocity, and LV outflow tract gradient were significantly decreased after the operation. The modified Morrow procedure group, however, showed significantly greater reduction in these echocardiographic parameters than the classic procedure group. All patients in the modified procedure group were asymptomatic postoperatively with a postoperative transvalvular pressure gradient <30 mm Hg. In the classic procedure group, only 14 (87.5%) patients, however, were asymptomatic postoperatively with a postoperative transvalvular pressure gradient <30 mm Hg, and 2 patients still had severe LV outflow obstruction postoperatively. The modified Morrow septal myectomy is safe and effective in treating HOCM patients, and is superior to the classic procedure in reducing the LV outflow tract gradient and velocity, restoring normal anatomic atrioventricular size, and alleviating symptoms associated with HOCM. PMID:26765408

  13. Slowed atrial and atrioventricular conduction and depressed HRV in a murine model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei-Wen; Baumert, Mathias; Neo, Melissa; Kuklik, Pawel; Ganesan, Anand N; Lau, Dennis H; Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Semsarian, Christopher; Sanders, Prashanthan; Saint, David A

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common heritable cardiac disorder with diverse clinical outcomes including sudden death, heart failure, and stroke. Depressed heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic regulation, has been shown to predict mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Cardiac autonomic remodelling in animal models of HCM are not well characterised. This study analysed Gly203Ser cardiac troponin-I transgenic (TG) male mice previously demonstrated to develop hallmarks of HCM by age 21 weeks. 33 mice aged 30 and 50 weeks underwent continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recording for 30 min under anaesthesia. TG mice demonstrated prolonged P-wave duration (P < 0.001) and PR intervals (P < 0.001) compared to controls. Additionally, TG mice demonstrated depressed standard deviation of RR intervals (SDRR; P < 0.01), coefficient of variation of RR intervals (CVRR; P < 0.001) and standard deviation of heart rate (SDHR; P < 0.001) compared to controls. Additionally, total power was significantly reduced in TG mice (P < 0.05). No significant age-related difference in either strain was observed in ECG or HRV parameters. Mice with HCM developed slowed atrial and atrioventricular conduction and depressed HRV. These changes were conserved with increasing age. This finding may be indicative of atrial and ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, and perhaps an indication of worse clinical outcome in heart failure progression in HCM patients. PMID:26444142

  14. Outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant mitral valve procedure for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Song, Yunhu; Gao, Ge; Ran, Jun; Su, Wenjun; Li, Haojie; Tang, Yajie; Duan, Fujian; Sun, Hansong

    2016-01-01

    The indications for a concomitant mitral valve (MV) procedure remain controversial for patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). According to previous studies, a concomitant MV surgery was required in 11–20% of inpatient operations. Thus, we aimed to study the outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant MV procedure for HOCM patients who had no intrinsic abnormalities of the MV apparatus. We retrospectively reviewed 232 consecutive HOCM patients who underwent extended Morrow procedures from January 2010 to October 2014. Only 10 (4.31%) patients with intrinsic MV diseases underwent concomitant MV procedures. Of the 232 patients, 230 had no to mild mitral regurgitation (MR) postoperatively. We separated the 232 patients into two groups according to preoperative MR degree. One group is mild MR, and the other is moderate or severe MR. The three-month, one-year, and three-year composite end-point event-free survival rates had no difference between two groups (p = 0.820). When we separated the patients to postoperative no or trace MR group and mild MR group, there was also no difference on survival rates (p = 0.830). In conclusion, concomitant mitral valve procedures are not necessary for HOCM patients with MR caused by systolic anterior motion, even moderate to severe extent. PMID:27357867

  15. In vivo natriuretic peptide reporter assay identifies chemical modifiers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy signalling

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jason R.; Robinson, Tamara Y.; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Kelly, Amy E.; Coy, Shannon; Peterson, Randall T.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Despite increased understanding of the fundamental biology regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, it has been challenging to find novel chemical or genetic modifiers of these pathways. Traditional cell-based methods do not model the complexity of an intact cardiovascular system and mammalian models are not readily adaptable to chemical or genetic screens. Our objective was to create an in vivo model suitable for chemical and genetic screens for hypertrophy and heart failure modifiers Methods and results Using the developing zebrafish, we established that the cardiac natriuretic peptide genes (nppa and nppb), known markers of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, were induced in the embryonic heart by pathological cardiac stimuli. This pathological induction was distinct from the developmental regulation of these genes. We created a luciferase-based transgenic reporter line that accurately modelled the pathological induction patterns of the zebrafish nppb gene. Utilizing this reporter line, we were able to show remarkable conservation of pharmacological responses between the larval zebrafish heart and adult mammalian models. Conclusion By performing a focused screen of chemical agents, we were able to show a distinct response of a genetic model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, U0126. We believe this in vivo reporter line will offer a unique approach to the identification of novel chemical or genetic regulators of myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:22198505

  16. Surface biofunctional drug-loaded electrospun fibrous scaffolds for comprehensive repairing hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liying; Sun, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Lan; Yu, Jia; Pan, Guoqing; Li, Bin; Yang, Huilin; Zhang, Yuguang; Cui, Wenguo

    2016-03-01

    Incorporation of bioactive drugs and biofunctionalization of polyester fibrous scaffolds are essential means to improve their bio-functions and histocompatibility for regenerative medicine. However, it is still a challenge to biofunctionalize such drug carriers via traditional biochemical methods while maintaining their properties without changes in drug activity and loading ratio. Here, we demonstrated a facile approach for biofunctionalization of PLGA fibrous scaffolds with various molecules (i.e., PEG polymer, RGD peptide and bFGF growth factor for cell repellent, adhesion and proliferation, respectively) via mussel-Inspired poly(dopamine) (PDA) coating in aqueous solution. By virtue of the mild and efficient nature of this approach, the drug-loaded PLGA fibers could be easily biofunctionalized and showed negligible effects on the scaffold properties, especially drug activity and loading ratio. Further, in vivo study showed that, a ginsenoside-Rg3-loaded fibrous scaffold functionalized with bFGF growth factor could not only promote the early-stage wound healing in rabbit ear wounds (bio-signal from bFGF), but also inhibit later-stage hypertrophic scars formation (release of Rg3 drug). Therefore, the mussel-inspired method for bio-modification provides a facile and effective strategy to combine drug and bio-function in one system, thus facilitating a synergistic effect of drug-therapy and bio-signal when such biomaterial is used for regenerative medicine. PMID:26774564

  17. High resolution melting: improvements in the genetic diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Portuguese cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex myocardial disorder with a recognized genetic heterogeneity. The elevated number of genes and mutations involved in HCM limits a gene-based diagnosis that should be considered of most importance for basic research and clinical medicine. Methodology In this report, we evaluated High Resolution Melting (HRM) robustness, regarding HCM genetic testing, by means of analyzing 28 HCM-associated genes, including the most frequent 4 HCM-associated sarcomere genes, as well as 24 genes with lower reported HCM-phenotype association. We analyzed 80 Portuguese individuals with clinical phenotype of HCM allowing simultaneously a better characterization of this disease in the Portuguese population. Results HRM technology allowed us to identify 60 mutated alleles in 72 HCM patients: 49 missense mutations, 3 nonsense mutations, one 1-bp deletion, one 5-bp deletion, one in frame 3-bp deletion, one insertion/deletion, 3 splice mutations, one 5'UTR mutation in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, CSRP3, MYH6 and MYL2 genes. Significantly 22 are novel gene mutations. Conclusions HRM was proven to be a technique with high sensitivity and a low false positive ratio allowing a rapid, innovative and low cost genotyping of HCM. In a short return, HRM as a gene scanning technique could be a cost-effective gene-based diagnosis for an accurate HCM genetic diagnosis and hopefully providing new insights into genotype/phenotype correlations. PMID:22429680

  18. [CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HYPERTROPHIC GINGIVITIS: CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Shinkevich, V; Udaltsova, K; Pisarenko, E; Kolomiets, S; Khmil, T

    2015-12-01

    Gingivitis in traditional national dentistry referred to independent diseases or symptomatic condition in periodontitis and classified morphologically. The diagnostic features of the diseases are characteristic, but the clinical presentation of symptomatic gingivitis and patterns of bone destructions may vary between patients. Successful treatment of the disease depends from proper diagnosis and advanced disease stages, but for symptomatic gingivitis that accompanying chronic periodontitis, protocols include surgical excision. Despite of the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis, its active treatment often start in severe destruction and bone loss (2-3 stage severity). Today etiotropic antimicrobial therapy is real way to control microbial biofilm and has solid evidence base. Applying of etiotropic antimicrobial therapy as systemic azithromycin with timely treatment of mild to moderate periodontal and bone destruction may reduce severe periodontitis incidence of and treatment-related complications in the future. This paper attempts to describe the clinical diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of chronic generalized periodontitis and hypertrophic gingivitis patient with case reports and a brief review. PMID:26719550

  19. Inhibition of mechanical stress-induced hypertrophic scar inflammation by emodin

    PubMed Central

    LIU, CHENG

    2015-01-01

    At least 50% of hypertrophic scarring (HS) is characterized by inflammation, for which there is currently no effective treatment available. Emodin is a major component of the widely used Chinese herb, rhubarb, which has been used to treat inflammation in several types of disease. However, few studies have investigated the efficacy of emodin in the treatment of HS. In the present study, a mouse model with mechanical stress-induced HS was used to investigate the effects of emodin (20, 40, 80, or 120 mg/ml) on HS, and to determine the potential underlying mechanisms. Treatment with emodin significantly attenuated HS inflammation, as determined by histopathological assessment of the scar elevation index, collagen structure and inflammation (P<0.05). Furthermore, treatment with emodin (40 mg/ml) markedly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt activity (P<0.01) and this attenuation was associated with reduced expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (P<0.05) in the HS tissue. The results of the present study indicated that administration of emodin had therapeutic effects on the progression of HS and the underlying mechanism of this may be due to inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:25634255

  20. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Chinese sporadic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients by Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Li, Zhongshan; Ren, Xianguo; Dong, Ming; Li, Jinxin; Shi, Xingjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Wei; Sun, Zhongsheng; Liu, Xiangdong; Dai, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease with high heterogeneity. Limited knowledge concerning the genetic background of nearly 40% HCM cases indicates there is a clear need for further investigation to explore the genetic pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we undertook a whole exome sequencing (WES) approach to identify novel candidate genes and mutations associated with HCM. The cohort consisted of 74 unrelated patients with sporadic HCM (sHCM) previously determined to be negative for mutations in eight sarcomere genes. The results showed that 7 of 74 patients (9.5%) had damaging mutations in 43 known HCM disease genes. Furthermore, after analysis combining the Transmission and De novo Association (TADA) program and the ToppGene program, 10 putative genes gained priority. A thorough review of public databases and related literature revealed that there is strong supporting evidence for most of the genes playing roles in various aspects of heart development. Findings from recent studies suggest that the putative and known disease genes converge on three functional pathways: sarcomere function, calcium signaling and metabolism pathway. This study illustrates the benefit of WES, in combination with rare variant analysis tools, in providing valuable insight into the genetic etiology of a heterogeneous sporadic disease. PMID:26573135