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Sample records for infarction complicating subarachnoid

  1. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  2. Acute headache at emergency department: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome complicated by subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yger, M; Zavanone, C; Abdennour, L; Koubaa, W; Clarençon, F; Dupont, S; Samson, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  3. Cardiovascular and pulmonary complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Nicolas; Rabinstein, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage negatively affect overall morbidity and mortality. An electronic literature search was performed for English-language articles focused on cardiopulmonary complications with subarachnoid hemorrhage published through October 2010. A total of 278 citations were identified, including 72 clinical studies. In most cases, study quality was low or very low. Cardiac injury, evidenced by an elevation in troponin levels, is reported in about one-third of patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Arrhythmias also occur in about one-third of patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence of pulmonary complications, especially neurogenic pulmonary edema, is more difficult to establish from available literature. Cardiopulmonary complications have been linked to worsened clinical outcome, suggesting a role for cardiac monitoring and interventions. PMID:21761273

  4. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  5. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery presenting subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, K; Sakata, K; Gondo, G; Kanno, H; Yamamoto, I

    2001-04-01

    A case is reported of anterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. A 50-year-old man presented with sudden onset of weakness of the left lower limb was admitted to our hospital. CT scan on admission showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and CT on the 6th day demonstrated a cerebral infarction on the right medial frontal lobe. A carotid angiogram 12 hours after the onset showed no aneurysmal lesion, but, the angiogram repeated 11 days after the onset revealed an aneurysmal dilatation with distal narrowing at the right A2-A3 segment. To prevent rebleeding, we performed a wrapping procedure through the interhemispheric route on the 18th day after onset. The postoperative course was uneventful. We reviewed 27 previously reported cases with symptomatic dissecting aneurysm confined to the anterior cerebral artery.

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction after return of spontaneous circulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Injune; Kim, Youn Jung; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram changes in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been described as ST-T changes that mimic acute coronary syndrome and even acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Elevation of cardiac enzymes and abnormality of regional myocardial wall motion have been reported frequently for SAH. We report a case of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivor with high suspicion of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction based on the electrocardiogram and bedside echocardiography, who had normal coronary arteries on emergent coronary angiography. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with SAH as a cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:27752607

  7. [Systemic complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage from spontaneous rupture of a cerebral aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, P; Fàbregas Julià, N; Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Hernández-Palazón, J

    2010-12-01

    Systemic complications secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm are common (40%) and the mortality attributable to them (23%) is comparable to mortality from the primary lesion, rebleeding, or vasospasm. Although nonneurologic medical complications are avoidable, they worsen the prognosis, lengthen the hospital stay, and generate additional costs. The prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment of systemic complications will be essential for managing the individual patient's case. Treatment should cover major symptoms (headache, nausea, and dizziness) and ambient noise should be reduced, all with the aim of achieving excellence and improving the patient's perception of quality of care.

  8. [Anterior Communicating Artery Dissection Presenting with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Cerebral Infarction].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takahiro; Sato, Yuiko; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-03-01

    We describe the case of subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction that developed simultaneously and was caused by suspected dissection of the anterior communicating artery. A 65-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of headache and nausea. Head computed tomography(CT)and magnetic resonance imaging revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and a spotty ischemic lesion in the right frontal cortex. Both, CT angiography and angiography with arterial catheterization showed an aneurysmal dilatation of the anterior communicating artery. A repeated CT angiography nine days later demonstrated enlargement of the aneurysmal dilatation. The patient underwent craniotomy under general anesthesia. Under the microscope, a thick hematoma was seen infero-dorsally from the anterior communicating artery. Two fenestrations of the anterior communicating artery were identified. After removal of the hematoma, a fusiform dilatation of the anterior communicating artery with a firm and reddish wall was confirmed. The lesion was coated with a teflon sponge and fibrin glue. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. A follow-up CT angiography two months after surgery revealed shrinkage of the lesion, when compared with preoperative images.

  9. Myocardial abscess complicating healed myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, S.; Young, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    An isolated myocardial abscess due to Bacteroides fragilis developed in the scar of a myocardial infarction. Fever, chills and signs of pericarditis were the main clinical features. Mild enteritis 1 week prior to the onset of symptoms related to the abscess was the most likely cause of the bacteremia. The diagnosis was established at thoracotomy, performed because of cardiac tamponade. Thirteen other cases of isolated bacterial myocardial abscess accompanying myocardial infarction have been reported, but all the infarctions were recent. Surgical resection for a suspected myocardial abscess should be considered in view of the high mortality, largely from cardiac rupture. Images FIG. 1 PMID:861868

  10. An Unusual Complication Following Transarterial Chemoembolization: Acute Myocardial Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Yiliang; Chang Weichou; Kuo Wuhsien; Huang Tienyu; Chu Hengcheng; Hsieh Tsaiyuan; Chang Weikuo

    2010-02-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization has been widely used to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Various complications have been reported, but they have not included acute myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction results mainly from coronary artery occlusion by plaques that are vulnerable to rupture or from coronary spasm, embolization, or dissection of the coronary artery. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case report that describes a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent transarterial chemoembolization and died subsequently of acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this complication induced by transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to be aware of acute myocardial infarction when transarterial chemoembolization is planned for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in patients with underlying coronary artery disease.

  11. From multidimensional neuropsychological outcomes to a cognitive complication rate: The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Richard B; Eccles, Fiona; Lloyd, Andrew; Carpenter, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Background The neuropsychological arm of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (N-ISAT) evaluated the cognitive outcome of 573 patients at 12 months following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The assessment included 29 psychometric measures, yielding a substantial and complex body of data. We have explored alternative and optimal methodologies for analysing and summarising these data to enable the estimation of a cognitive complication rate (CCR). Any differences in cognitive outcome between the two arms of the trial are not however reported here. Methods All individual test scores were transformed into z-scores and a 5th percentile cut-off for impairment was established. A principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to these data to mathematically transform correlated test scores into a smaller number of uncorrelated principal components, or cognitive 'domains'. These domains formed the basis for grouping and weighting individual patients' impaired scores on individual measures. In order to increase the sample size, a series of methods for handling missing data were applied. Results We estimated a 34.1% CCR in all those patients seen face-to-face, rising to 37.4% CCR with the inclusion of patients who were unable to attend assessment for reason related to the index SAH. This group demonstrated significantly more self and carer/relative rated disability on a Health Related Quality of Life questionnaire, than patients classified as having no functionally significant cognitive deficits. Conclusion Evaluating neuropsychological outcome in a large RCT involves unique methodological and organizational challenges. We have demonstrated how these problems may be addressed by re-classifying interval data from 29 measures into a dichotomous CCR. We have presented a 'sliding scale' of undifferentiated individual cognitive impairments, and then on the basis of PCA-derived cognitive 'domains', included consideration of the distribution of impairments in these terms

  12. Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Delayed Cerebral Infarction after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ivanidze, J.; Kesavabhotla, K.; Kallas, O.N.; Mir, D.; Baradaran, H.; Gupta, A.; Segal, A.Z.; Claassen, J.; Sanelli, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Patients with SAH are at increased risk of delayed infarction. Early detection and treatment of delayed infarction remain challenging. We assessed blood-brain barrier permeability, measured as permeability surface area product, by using CTP in patients with SAH with delayed infarction. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a retrospective study of patients with SAH with delayed infarction on follow-up NCCT. CTP was performed before the development of delayed infarction. CTP data were postprocessed into permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT maps. Coregistration was performed to align the infarcted region on the follow-up NCCT with the corresponding location on the CTP maps obtained before infarction. Permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT values were then obtained in the location of the subsequent infarction. The contralateral noninfarcted region was compared with the affected side in each patient. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine statistical significance. Clinical data were collected at the time of CTP and at the time of follow-up NCCT. RESULTS Twenty-one patients with SAH were included in the study. There was a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product in the regions of subsequent infarction compared with the contralateral control regions (P < .0001). However, CBF and MTT values were not significantly different in these 2 regions. Subsequent follow-up NCCT demonstrated new delayed infarction in all 21 patients, at which time 38% of patients had new focal neurologic deficits. CONCLUSIONS Our study reveals a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product preceding delayed infarction in patients with SAH. Further investigation of early permeability changes in SAH may provide new insights into the prediction of delayed infarction. PMID:25572949

  13. Management of cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Van Herck, Jozef L; Claeys, Marc J; De Paep, Rudi; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Jorens, Philippe G

    2015-06-01

    Cardiogenic shock complicates approximately 5-10% of cases with acute myocardial infarction and carries a poor prognosis. Early revascularization remains the cornerstone treatment of cardiogenic shock complicating myocardial infarction. Inotropic and/or vasopressor agents can be used for haemodynamic stabilization, although this comes at the expense of increased myocardial oxygen consumption and extended myocardial ischaemia. In recent years, the use of mechanical circulatory support has significantly increased. However, there is only limited data available from randomized trials evaluating the different percutaneous support systems. This review summarizes the available literature concerning the management of cardiogenic shock and gives an overview of the recommendations of the European and German-Austrian guidelines on cardiogenic shock.

  14. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery that simultaneously presented with cerebral infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage, successfully treated with conservative management: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nanbara, Sho; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Takahata, Hideaki; Fujimoto, Takashi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Ono, Tomonori; Toda, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2012-07-01

    We recently encountered a rare case of anterior cerebral artery dissection (ACAD) that accompanied fresh cerebral infarction (CI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). An initial head CT showed a thin SAH in the interhemispheric cistern and cortical sulcus of the left frontal surface. Subsequent MRI performed 10 min after head CT scan revealed a fresh infarction in the left ACA region. MR-and digital subtraction angiograms demonstrated a dissection in the A2 portion of the left ACA with a leak of contrast media around the left A3 portion, suggesting that the bleeding occurred in a distal portion of the main dilation. Without anti-thrombotic therapy, the patient recovered without complications by blood pressure control and administration of brain-function protection therapies. We found 11 cases similar to the present case in the literature. All cases presented with lower-extremity dominant hemiparesis; however, sudden onset headache was rare. Blood pressure was not well-controlled in 4 out of the 6 known hypertensive cases. Main sites of dissection were located at the A2 portion in all cases except one A3 lesion, and extended to A3 in 2 cases. Conservative therapy led to favorable outcome in 8 cases, while 4 cases underwent surgical interventions for increasing risk of aneurysm rupture after initial observational therapies. Re-bleeding did not occur in any of the 12 cases reviewed. These data suggest that conservative treatment can be considered for an initial management of ACAD with simultaneous CI and SAH. More evidence needs to be accumulated to establish the optimal therapeutic approach for ACAD associated with CI and SAH.

  15. Spontaneous renal artery dissection complicating with renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Su, Jung-Tsung; Hu, Sung-Yuan; Chao, Chih-Chung; Tsan, Yu-Tse; Lin, Tzu-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare entity. We reported a 30-year-old healthy man presenting with sudden onset of left flank pain. Abdominal plain film and sonography were unremarkable. The contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scan demonstrated a dissecting intimal flap of the left distal renal artery (RA) complicating infarction. Selective angiography of the renal artery disclosed a long dissection of left distal RA with a patent true lumen and occlusion of left accessory RA. Conservative treatment with control of blood pressure and antiplatelet agent was prescribed. The patient was discharged with an uneventful condition on day 5.

  16. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  17. [Pulmonary complications of acute myocardial infarct. Therapeutic orientation].

    PubMed

    Cano, A E; Meaney, E

    1975-01-01

    The heart and the lung make up an inseparable anatomic and functional unit. The changes in one affect the other and vice versa. In acute myocardial infarction a heart failure syndrome develops. This syndrome is characterized by passive pulmonary congestion, which leads to hypoxemia. This hypoxemia indicate the functional disturbance of the lung, and the hemodinamic evolution of the disease. Arterial gases determination is the best way to assess the sickness progression. A certain paralelism exists among the central venous saturation, cardiac insufficiency and the degree of pulmonary disfunction. Such a procedure is not very appreciable and does not substitute the direct analysis of the arterial PO2. The pulmonary complications in the myocardial infarction shock are directly responsable of death in 50% of the patients. To heart failure and shock, hipperfusion and hypoxia are added. Many vessels close due to the decrease in the pulmonary flow. This brings about the release of substances that are toxic to the vessel causing an inflammatory vascular reaction. The decrease in the flow harms the lung cell and for this reason atelectasia or alveolar colapse occur; besides inducing the formation of shunts. Under these conditions the lung compliance decreases. The areas that are badly ventilated and hypoperfused can easily become infected and pneumonitis and abscesses cause even more harm to the tissue. The decrease in the speed of circulation and hematologic changes of shock, induce a diseminated intravascular coagulation. What was stated before leads to an important reduction of the lung as a depurating organ and makes the shock irreversible. As far as therapy is concerned in the prevention of vascular colaps and the improvement of the oxemia, oxygen is very useful when there is a venous congestion (clinically, X rays, and oxemia). When the concentration of O2 is lower than 50% in the cases with slight cardiac failure; do not use oxygen in higher concentrations unless the

  18. Cerebellar Infarction in Childhood: Delayed-Onset Complication of Mild Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ilker OZ, Ibrahim; BOZAY OZ, Evrim; ŞERIFOĞLU, Ismail; KAYA, Nurullah; ERDEM, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebellar ischemic infarction is a rare complication of minor head trauma. Vertebral artery dissection, vasospasm or systemic hypo perfusion can cause infarct. However, underlying causes of the ischemic infarct cannot be explained in nearly half of cases. The accurate diagnosis is essential to ensure appropriate treatment. Here we report a five yr old boy patient of cerebellar infraction after minor head trauma, admitted to emergency serves of BulentEcevit University, Turkey in 2013. We aimed to remind minor head trauma that causes cerebellar infarction during childhood, and to review the important points of the diagnosis, which should be keep in mind. PMID:27375760

  19. Spinal cord infarction is an unusual complication of intracranial neuroendovascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Noriaki; Miyachi, Shigeru; Okamaoto, Takeshi; Izumi, Takashi; Asai, Takumi; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Ota, Keisuke; Oda, Keiko; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    Spinal cord infarction is an unusual complication of intracranial neuroendovascular intervention. The authors report on two cases involving spinal cord infarction after endovascular coil embolization for large basilar-tip aneurysms. Each aneurysm was sufficiently embolized by the stent/balloon combination-assisted technique or double catheter technique. However, postoperatively, patients presented neurological symptoms without cranial nerve manifestation. MRI revealed multiple infarctions at the cervical spinal cord. In both cases, larger-sized guiding catheters were used for an adjunctive technique. Therefore, guiding catheters had been wedged in the vertebral artery (VA). The wedge of the VA and flow restriction may have caused thromboemboli and/or hemodynamic insufficiency of the spinal branches from the VA (radiculomedullary artery), resulting in spinal cord infarction. Spinal cord infarction should be taken into consideration as a complication of endovascular intervention for lesions of the posterior circulation.

  20. Multifocal diabetic muscle infarction: a rare complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Wafa; Jerbi, Saida; Klii, Rym; Alaya, Wafa; Mestiri, Sarra; Zantour, Baha; Sfar, Mohamed Habib

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction (DMI) is a rare complication of long-standing poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old man with a 10-year history of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus with multiple microvascular and macrovascular complications who presented with the sudden onset of left thigh pain and swelling. MRI suggested muscle infarction. A muscle biopsy demonstrated coagulation necrosis in the skeletal muscle with inflammation and infarction in the walls of small blood vessels. Physicians should consider DMI in the differential diagnosis of patients with diabetes who present with painful, swollen muscles without systemic signs of infection.

  1. Thrombolytic therapy in acute cerebral infarction complicating diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Sim, Ming-Ming; Smith, Eric E

    2006-10-01

    Diagnostic and interventional percutaneous coronary catheterization is associated with stroke. Many of such strokes are asymptomatic, but some are devastating. Once the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction is confirmed, thrombolytic therapy should be administrated within the time window of 3 hours. We report a 61-year-old woman who suffered from an acute cerebral infarction during diagnostic cardiac catheterization for unstable angina, which manifested as sudden onset of global aphasia, right hemiplegia and gaze preponderance to the left side. Computed tomography of the head performed immediately after recognition of the symptoms showed a hyperdense middle cerebral artery (MCA) sign. Following prompt recognition and diagnosis, intravenous thrombolytic therapy was administered 2 hours after symptom onset. The patient had a favorable outcome. Initially, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 21, and 24 hours later it improved to 9. The hyperdense MCA lesion had resolved on the 24-hour follow-up scan. This case illustrates the clinical benefit of thrombolytic therapy in the setting of acute stroke associated with cardiac catheterization.

  2. [The application of hemoreologic indicators in prognosis of complications of acute myocardium infarction].

    PubMed

    Pakhrova, O A; Kudriashova, M V; Grineva, M R; Mishina, I E

    2015-02-01

    The sampling of 60 patients with acute myocardium infarction underwent a complex study of hemoreologic indicators with purpose to establish predictors of development of early complications of diseases to substantiate additions to algorithm of examination and to differentiate treatment regimens. It is established that under acute myocardium infarction the blood viscosity increases on low velocity of shifting and plasma. Also, the process of aggregation of erythrocytes increases and number of normocytes decreases without significant alterations of blood viscosity on high velocity of shift and capacity of erythrocytes to be distorted. At the same time, the mentioned above alterations in patients with acute myocardium infarction does not result in decreasing of effectiveness oftransportation of oxygen to tissues. Against the background of development the hemoreologic disorders have more apparent character and result in progressive decreasing of tissue perfusion. The most significant prognostic indicator concerning complications of acute myocardium infarction is a time parameter of increment of aggregation of erythrocytes surpassing 2.80 in 89% of patients with complications. The expedience of inclusion of detection of reologic blood indicators fir their subsequent correction in the complex of examination ofpatients with acute myocardium infarction.

  3. [Renal vein infarction, a complication of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria].

    PubMed

    de Charry, Charlotte; de Charry, Félicité; Lemoigne, François; Lamboley, Jean-Laurent; Pasquet, Florian; Pavic, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (Marchiafava-Micheli disease) is a rare acquired clonal disorder of the hematopoietic cell, to a somatic mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glycan (PIG-A). The most frequent clinical manifestations are hemolytic crisis and venous thrombosis of the mesenteric, hepatic, portal or cerebral territories. We report a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with renal vein thrombosis, a rare complication of this disease.

  4. Successful treatment of a young woman with acute complicated myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Serpytis, Pranas; Kibarskis, Aleksandras; Katkus, Rimgaudas; Samalavicius, Robertas; Glaveskaite, Sigita; Rackauskas, Gediminas

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is method used to improve the neurological status of patients who are at risk of ischaemia after myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 28-year-old woman who suffered acute myocardial infarction complicated by ventricular fibrillation. The patient was successfully resuscitated. Invasive and non-invasive medical treatment was applied including therapeutic hypothermia. Success was achieved due to adequate public reaction, fast transportation, blood vessel revascularization and application of therapeutic hypothermia. The patient was successfully discharged after one week of treatment, and just minor changes in heart function were present. PMID:24570755

  5. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  6. Case report: necrosis of the anterolateral papillary muscle--an unusual mechanical complication of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Aljabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Ramchandani, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with no significant past medical history who presented to the Emergency Department at Houston Methodist Hospital with 24 hours of chest pain. An electrocardiogram was done, an electrocardiogram confirmed a posterolateral ST elevation myocardial infarction. An immediate and successful percutaneous coronary intervention of a totally occluded ramus intermedius was performed. Six hours later she developed pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, severe acidosis, and anuria. Echocardiography showed severe mitral regurgitation due to a ruptured anterolateral papillary muscle, and emergency surgery revealed necrosis of this muscle. A bioprosthetic mitral valve was placed, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was needed for 3 days. This is a rare mechanical complication of myocardial infarction, which usually affects the posteromedial papillary muscle. The patient subsequently made a good recovery. One month later, just prior to discharge home, the patient developed pneumonia and sepsis, and she expired from multiorgan failure. PMID:25793030

  7. Acute myocardial infarction in a young man complicated with left ventricular thrombi.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Pin; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Jung, Shih-Ming; Lim, Kun-Eng; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Lee, Ying-Shiung

    2004-11-01

    Premature coronary artery disease is very rare and complication with thrombus formation in the left ventricle is rarer still. A 23-year-old man was admitted to hospital for recent acute myocardial infarction after being struck by a basketball eight days previously. Echocardiography identified two peduncle thrombi at the apex of the left ventricle, which were confirmed with computed tomography. The proximal left anterior descending coronary artery was totally occluded. Following two weeks of treatment with heparin and warfarin, the patient agreed to undergo a coronary artery bypass graft and thrombectomy. The ecchymosed tissue around the coronary artery implied that a trauma injury might have been the cause of the coronary artery disease in this case. This work reviews the pathophysiology and natural history of coronary artery disease in a case of very young myocardial infarction.

  8. Late prognostic value of scintigraphic parameters of acute myocardial infarction size in complicated myocardial infarction without heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Perez-Gonzalez, J.F.; Dunn, R.; Ports, T.; Chatterjee, K.; Parmley, W.

    1983-04-01

    Perfusion scintigraphy with thallium-201, infarct scintigraphy with technetium-99m pyrophosphate (TcPYP), and equilibrium blood pool scintigraphy were performed during the initial hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (MI) in 25 patients without evidence of heart failure who presented with advanced electrocardiographic rhythm and conduction disturbances requiring treatment. Scintigraphic findings during short-term hospitalization were related to the late clinical follow-up performed an average of 14 months later, where patients were grouped as asymptomatic, 8 patients; symptomatic, 9 patients; and deceased, 8 patients. Quantitation of perfusion abnormalities, TcPYP image abnormalities, and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) revealed that the deceased group had significantly larger TcPYP abnormalities (36 +/- 20 cm2), absolute perfusion abnormalities (32 +/- 16 cm2), and perfusion abnormalities expressed as a percentage of the projected left ventricular area (42 +/- 8%) than the asymptomatic group (13 +/- 8 cm2, 14 +/- 6 cm2, and 20 +/- 9%; p less than 0.05, p greater than 0.05, and p less than 0.01, respectively). The percent perfusion abnormality was significantly larger in the deceased group (42 +/- 8%, p less than 0.01) than in either the symptomatic group (35 +/- 13%, p less than 0.01) or the asymptomatic group (20 +/- 9%), and this parameter in the symptomatic group also differed from that in the asymptomatic group (p less than 0.01). The study indicates that patients with rhythm and conduction disturbances and without congestive heart failure during acute MI may follow an uncomplicated or a complicated late clinical course. Early scintigraphic measurements of MI and perfusion correlate well with this outcome; however, EF could not differentiate among prognostic subgroups.

  9. Myocardial infarction complicated by left ventricular thrombus and fatal thromboembolism following abrupt cessation of dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Bethany; Marciniak, Ellen T; Reed, Robert M; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-07-04

    Novel anticoagulants are increasingly utilised in lieu of warfarin to treat non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Their clinical use in other non-FDA approved settings is also increasing. We present a case in which a patient abruptly stopped taking dabigatran due to a small bowel obstruction and shortly thereafter suffered a myocardial infarction complicated by left ventricular thrombosis with fatal embolisation to the superior mesenteric artery. In this context, we discuss the possibility of a rebound phenomenon of hypercoagulability with abrupt cessation of novel anticoagulants.

  10. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Aimee E.; Cahill, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  11. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Aimee E.; Cahill, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography.

  12. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Moores, Aimee E; Cahill, Michael S; Villines, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  13. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF HESPERIDIN ON CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATION IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN DIABETES IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Kakadiya, Jagdish; Mulani, Haresh; Shah, Nehal

    2010-01-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate effect Hesperidin on Cardiovascular Complication in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in normal and Streptozotocin-Nicotinamide induced in diabetic rats. Hesperidin (100 mg/kg, p.o) was administered for 28 days in rats injected with single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg, i.p, STZ) and Nicotinamide (110 mg/kg, i.p, NIC) and after isoproterenol (200 mg/kg, s.c.) induced myocardial infarction in rats on 29th and 30th day. At the end of experimental period (i.e. on the day 31) serum and heart tissues sample were collected, and glucose, HbA1c and Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and High density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesterol ester synthetase (CES), lecithin Cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), systolic and diastolic blood pressure were find out. Administration of STZ–NIC in rats showed a significant (p<0.001) increased in the levels of serum glucose, glycosylated heamoglobin (HbA1c), Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and Low density lipoprotein (LDL) whereas the levels of High density lipoprotein (HDL) were found to be non significant but significant (p<0.001) increased in the level of heart tissues CES and significant (p<0.001, p<0.01) decreased LCAT and LPL, significantly (p<0.01) increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure as compared to respective control groups. Treatment with Hesperidin significantly (P<0.05) decreased HbA1c, glucose, CES level and significantly (P<0.01) decreased LDL, TC, TG, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significant (P<0.01) increased LCAT and LPL level but no significantly change HDL in compared to diabetic control group. We concluded that HES (100 mg/kg) is effective in controlling blood glucose levels and reduced cardiac complication in experimentally induced myocardial infarction diabetic rats. PMID:24825971

  14. Protective effect of hesperidin on cardiovascular complication in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakadiya, Jagdish; Mulani, Haresh; Shah, Nehal

    2010-03-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate effect Hesperidin on Cardiovascular Complication in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in normal and Streptozotocin-Nicotinamide induced in diabetic rats. Hesperidin (100 mg/kg, p.o) was administered for 28 days in rats injected with single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg, i.p, STZ) and Nicotinamide (110 mg/kg, i.p, NIC) and after isoproterenol (200 mg/kg, s.c.) induced myocardial infarction in rats on 29(th) and 30(th) day. At the end of experimental period (i.e. on the day 31) serum and heart tissues sample were collected, and glucose, HbA1c and Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and High density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesterol ester synthetase (CES), lecithin Cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), systolic and diastolic blood pressure were find out. Administration of STZ-NIC in rats showed a significant (p<0.001) increased in the levels of serum glucose, glycosylated heamoglobin (HbA1c), Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and Low density lipoprotein (LDL) whereas the levels of High density lipoprotein (HDL) were found to be non significant but significant (p<0.001) increased in the level of heart tissues CES and significant (p<0.001, p<0.01) decreased LCAT and LPL, significantly (p<0.01) increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure as compared to respective control groups. Treatment with Hesperidin significantly (P<0.05) decreased HbA1c, glucose, CES level and significantly (P<0.01) decreased LDL, TC, TG, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significant (P<0.01) increased LCAT and LPL level but no significantly change HDL in compared to diabetic control group. We concluded that HES (100 mg/kg) is effective in controlling blood glucose levels and reduced cardiac complication in experimentally induced myocardial infarction diabetic rats.

  15. [Effect of complications in the acute period of myocardial infarction on physical exertion tolerance at the hospital stage of rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Al'khimovich, V M; Golubev, V G; Rudina, M D; Rusetskaia, V G

    1988-11-01

    Physical stress tolerance and its hemodynamic support were examined in 95 patients with early myocardial infarction, 50 normal subjects and 25 coronary patients. It is suggested that the stress tolerance test is advisable at an early stage of complicated macrofocal myocardial infarction. The safety of the test improves considerably where it is performed under continuous electrocardiographic and chest-rheographic control. An abnormal diastolic impedance wave, emerging during exercise, may serve an additional diagnostic indicator of stress intolerance.

  16. Non-aneurysmal spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage: perimesencephalic versus non-perimesencephalic

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Luís Guilherme Bastos Silva Aguiar; Costa, José Manuel Dias; Silva, Elsa Irene Peixoto Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical evolution of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods The study was conducted retrospectively in a tertiary hospital center in the north region of Portugal. Included patients had no identifiable cause for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several epidemiologic, clinical and imaging aspects were statistically analyzed, taking into account the differences in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results Sixty-two patients met the inclusion criteria (46.8% - perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage; 53.2% - non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage). Demographic and clinical background characteristics were similar in both groups. Complications were more frequent in patients with non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage - 84.8% of the patients had at least one complication versus 48.3% in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm, infection and hydrocephaly were the most common complications (each was detected more frequently in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group than in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group). Two patients died, both had a non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. The median inpatient time was longer in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group (21 versus 14 days). No incidents of rebleeding were reported during the follow-up period (mean time of 15 ± 10.3 months). Conclusion Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage are two different entities that have different clinical outcomes, namely in terms of complication rate and median inpatient time. The management of these patients should respect this difference to improve treatment and optimize health care resources. PMID:27410409

  17. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    PubMed Central

    von der Brelie, Christian; Meier, Ullrich; Gräwe, Alexander; Lemcke, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%). 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS). IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD), before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the later course of

  18. [IMPROVING THE EFFICACY OF THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION COMPLICATED BY CIRCULATORY FAILURE].

    PubMed

    Zhenilo, V M; Avsaragova, A Z; Astakhova, Z T

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of drug remaxol inclusion in the scheme of treatment of patients with myocardial infarction on the background of degree III - III acute cardiac insufficiency was evaluated by the analysis of clinical and laboratory data of 126 patients with newly diagnosed acute myocardial infarction including ST-segment elevation on the background of acute cardiac insufficiency. Depending on the regimen, patients were divided into two groups. The first (control) group included 60 patients who received conventional thrombolytic therapy; the second (main) group included 66 patients which, after thrombolytic therapy, received remaxol (single daily intravenous administration, 400 mL at 3 - 4 mL/min rate) with controlled central venous pressure, arterial pressure, and diuresis. The course lasted for 3 - 5 days, depending on the severity of condition. A high efficiency of the treatment regimen including remaxol was established as characterized by more rapid (in comparison to conventional therapy) stabilization of disturbed systemic hemodynamics and recovery of weakened myocardial contractility, decreased risk of cardiac arrhythmias, and relieved hyperhomocysteinemia that, in turn, reduced the risk of complications such as thrombosis and thromboembolism. PMID:27455573

  19. Effect of Coronary Thrombectomy in Cardiogenic Shock Complicating ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Miyachi, Hideki; Yamashita, Jun; Yamasaki, Masao; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Nagao, Ken; Tomoike, Hitonobu; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-06-15

    Optimal coronary reflow is the critical key issue to ameliorate clinical outcomes in patients with cardiogenic shock complicating ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (Shock-STEMI). We investigated our hypothesis that pre-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedural coronary thrombectomy may provide clinical advantages to attempt optimal coronary reflow in patients with Shock-STEMI. Of 7,650 patients with acute myocardial infarction registered in the Tokyo CCU Network Scientific Council from January 2009 to December 2011, a total of 180 consecutive patients (144 men, 68 ± 13 years) with Shock-STEMI who showed pre-PCI procedural Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 0 (absent initial coronary flow) were recruited. Achievements of post-PCI procedural Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3 (optimal coronary reflow) and also in-hospital mortality were evaluated in those in accordance with and without coronary thrombectomy. Coronary thrombectomy was performed in 128 patients with Shock-STEMI (71% of all). Overall in-hospital mortality was 41% and that in anterior Shock-STEMI with a necessity of mechanical circulatory support increased by 59% (i.e., profound shock). Coronary thrombectomy did not affect any improvements in the achievement of optimal coronary reflow (65% vs 58%, p = 0.368) and in-hospital mortality (42% vs 37%, p = 0.484) in these patients. Even when focused on 76 patients with profound shock, neither an achievement of optimal coronary reflow (56% vs 47%, p = 0.518) nor in-hospital mortality (58% vs 65%, p = 0.601) were different between with and without coronary thrombectomy. Multivariate logistic analysis did not demonstrate any association of coronary thrombectomy (p = 0.798), left main Shock-STEMI (p = 0.258), and use of mechanical circulatory support (p = 0.119) except a concentration of hemoglobin (for each 1 g/dl increase, odds ratio 1.247, 95% confidence interval 1.035 to 1.531, p = 0.019) with optimal

  20. Molsidomine for the prevention of vasospasm-related delayed ischemic neurological deficits and delayed brain infarction and the improvement of clinical outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center clinical observational study.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Angelika; Schmidt, Christoph; Wölfer, Johannes; Manthei, Gerd; Jacobs, Andreas H; Brüning, Roland; Heindel, Walter; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Stummer, Walter; Pluta, Ryszard M; Hesselmann, Volker

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs) and cerebral vasospasm (CVS) are responsible fora poor outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), most likely because of a decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the cerebral microcirculation. In this study, the authors examined the effects of treatment with the NO donor molsidomine with regard to decreasing the incidence of spasm-related delayed brain infarctions and improving clinical outcome in patients with SAH. METHODS Seventy-four patients with spontaneous aneurysmal SAH were included in this post hoc analysis. Twenty-nine patients with SAH and proven CVS received molsidomine in addition to oral or intravenous nimodipine. Control groups consisted of 25 SAH patients with proven vasospasm and 20 SAH patients without. These patients received nimodipine therapy alone. Cranial computed tomography (CCT) before and after treatment was analyzed for CVS-related infarcts. A modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (mNIHSS) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were used to assess outcomes at a 3-month clinical follow-up. RESULTS Four of the 29 (13.8%) patients receiving molsidomine plus nimodipine and 22 of the 45 (48%) patients receiving nimodipine therapy alone developed vasospasm-associated brain infarcts (p < 0.01). Follow-up revealed a median mNIHSS score of 3.0 and a median mRS score of 2.5 in the molsidomine group compared with scores of 11.5 and 5.0, respectively, in the nimodipine group with CVS (p < 0.001). One patient in the molsidomine treatment group died, and 12 patients in the standard care group died (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In this post hoc analysis, patients with CVS who were treated with intravenous molsidomine had a significant improvement in clinical outcome and less cerebral infarction. Molsidomine offers a promising therapeutic option in patients with severe SAH and CVS and should be assessed in a prospective study.

  1. Spinal cord infarction as a rare complication of fat embolism syndrome following bilateral intramedullary nailing of femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Kearsley, RoseMarie; Galbraith, John; Dalton, David; Motherway, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a rare and potentially fatal complication occurring most often after long bone or pelvic fractures and orthopaedic procedures. It can consist of pulmonary, central nervous system and cutaneous manifestations. The exact pathophysiology of emboli reaching the arterial circulation is poorly understood.1 It is suggested that this may occur by either 'paradoxical' embolism or microembolism.2 3 Its true incidence is unknown but increases in the presence of multiple closed fractures. It can be a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians and if suspected diffusion-weighted MRI is the modality of choice for the investigation of the central nervous system.4 We present the case of a 22-year-old man who developed multifocal cerebral infarcts, a right-sided cerebellar infarct and an infarct in the anterior cord bilaterally at the level of C5-C6 as a result of FES. PMID:27624445

  2. Testicular infarction and rupture: an uncommon complication of epididymo-orchitis

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Daniel; Penkoff, Peter; Stanowski, Matthew; Beattie, Kieran; Wang, Audrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Epididymo-orchitis is a common diagnosis in men presenting with unilateral testicular pain. It can be of an infectious or non-infectious aetiology. Clinical examination and laboratory investigations do not reliably differentiate testicular infarction secondary to epididymo-orchitis from uncomplicated epididymo-orchitis. Definitive diagnosis is usually made by ultrasound. Misdiagnosis and under-treatment can lead to poor outcome, such as infarction and loss of the affected testis. We present an uncommon case of epididymo-orchitis resulting in testicular infarction and rupture despite normal initial investigations. PMID:27165751

  3. Effect of Streptokinase on Reperfusion After Acute Myocardial Infarction and Its Complications: An Ex-Post Facto Study

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Charkhandaz, Maryam; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Emergency treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction is very important. Streptokinase in Iran is often as the only clot-busting medication is used. The purpose of using streptokinase medication is to revive the ischemic heart tissue, although has dangerous complications too. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of streptokinase on reperfusion after acute myocardial infarction and its complications, has been designed and conducted. Materials and Methods: This is an Ex-post facto study. The study population included patients who suffer from acute myocardial infarction. The sample size was 300 patients, and 2 groups were matched, in variables of age, sex, underlying disease, frequencies and area of MI. Data collection did by researcher making questionnaire, that accept face and content validity by 10 expert researcher, the reliability was conducted with Spearman’s test (r=0.85) by Test-retest method. Data analysis did by SPSS software: V 12. Findings: Mean of EF in SK group was (46.15±8.11) and in control group was (43.11±12.57). Significant relationship was seen between SK, arrhythmia occurring and improve EF reperfusion by chi-square test (p=0.028), (p=0.020). The most arrhythmia in SK group was Ventricular Tachycardia (20.7%). Significant statistical relation between SK and mortality were found by Chi-square test (p=0.001). But a meaningful statistical relation was not found between SK and pulmonary edema incidence (p=0.071). Conclusions: Nurses of CCU should be aware about SK complications such as hypotension, bleeding and arrhythmias. Proposed compare SK and tissue plasminogen drug in reperfusion and complications effect. PMID:25946921

  4. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy for Sustained Ventricular Arrhythmias Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Pieper, Karen S.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; White, Harvey D.; Van de Werf, Frans; Ardissino, Diego; Califf, Robert M.; Granger, Christopher B.; Ohman, E. Magnus; Alexander, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few data exist to guide antiarrhythmic drug therapy for sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) after acute myocardial infarction (MI). The objective of this analysis was to describe survival of patients with sustained VT/VF post-MI according to antiarrhythmic drug treatment. Design & Setting We conducted a retrospective analysis of ST-segment elevation MI patients with sustained VT/VF in GUSTO IIB and III and compared all-cause death in patients receiving amiodarone, lidocaine, or no antiarrhythmic. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling and inverse weighted estimators to adjust for baseline characteristics, beta-blocker use, and propensity to receive antiarrhythmics. Due to non-proportional hazards for death in early follow-up (0–3 hours after sustained VT/VF) compared with later follow-up (>3 hours), we analyzed all-cause mortality using time-specific hazards. Patients & Interventions Among 19,190 acute MI patients, 1126 (5.9%) developed sustained VT/VF and met the inclusion criteria. Patients received lidocaine (n=664, 59.0%), amiodarone (n=50, 4.4%), both (n=110, 9.8%), or no antiarrhythmic (n=302, 26.8%). Results In the first 3 hours after VT/VF, amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.39, 95% CI 0.21–0.71) and lidocaine (adjusted HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.53–0.96) were associated with a lower hazard of death—likely evidence of survivor bias. Among patients who survived 3 hours, amiodarone was associated with increased mortality at 30 days (adjusted HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.02–2.86) and 6 months (adjusted HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.21–3.16) but lidocaine was not at 30 days (adjusted HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.77–1.82) and 6 months (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.73–1.66). Conclusion Among patients with acute MI complicated by sustained VT/VF who survive 3 hours, amiodarone, but not lidocaine, is associated with an increased risk of death; reinforcing the need for randomized trials in this population. PMID:20959785

  5. Influence of renal dysfunction on clinical outcomes in patients with congestive heart failure complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Seong; Kim, Min Jee; Kang, Yong Un; Choi, Joon Seok; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Ahn, Young-Keun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Soo Wan

    2013-01-01

    The clinical course and medical treatment of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) complicating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are not well established, especially in patients with concomitant renal dysfunction. We performed a retrospective analysis of the prospective Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry to assess the medical treatments and clinical outcomes of patients with CHF (Killip classes II or III) complicated by AMI, in the presence or absence of renal dysfunction. Of 13,498 patients with AMI, 2769 (20.5%) had CHF on admission. Compared to CHF patients with preserved renal function, in-hospital mortality and major adverse cardiac events were increased both at 1 month and at 1 year after discharge in patients with renal dysfunction (1154; 41.7%). Postdischarge use of aspirin, betablockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin II receptor blockers and statins significantly reduced the 1-year mortality rate for CHF patients with renal dysfunction; such reduction was not observed for those without renal dysfunction, except in the case of aspirin. Patients with CHF complicating AMI, which is accompanied by renal dysfunction, are at higher risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes than patients without renal dysfunction. However, they receive fewer medications proven to reduce mortality rates.

  6. Spinal cord infarction complicating acute hydrocephalus secondary to a colloid cyst of the third ventricle. Case report.

    PubMed

    Siu, Timothy L T; Bannan, Paul; Stokes, Bryant A R

    2005-07-01

    Occipital lobe infarction secondary to tentorial herniation is a rare but well-recognized complication of posterior cerebral artery interruption during acute hydrocephalus; however, a similar event in which tonsillar herniation leads to symptomatic occlusion of the anterior spinal arteries (ASAs) has not been reported. The authors present the case of a third ventricular colloid cyst in a previously healthy 24-year-old man who presented with symptoms and signs of critically raised intracranial pressure. He subsequently survived the ictus of insults following emergency external cerebrospinal fluid drainage and definitive resection of the colloid cyst, but he sustained occipital lobe and spinal cord infarction despite the absence of systematic hypotension. The presence of watershed cervicothoracic cord infarction on magnetic resonance imaging suggested that the most likely causes were compromise of ASAs during the period of acute hydrocephalus and the accompanying downward brain herniation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to provide evidence that acute hydrocephalus may lead to ASA syndrome.

  7. Differential Clinical Implications of High-Degree Atrioventricular Block Complicating ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction according to the Location of Infarction in the Era of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The clinical implication of high-degree (second- and third-degree) atrioventricular block (HAVB) complicating ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is ripe for investigation in this era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We sought to address the incidence, predictors and prognosis of HAVB according to the location of infarct in STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. Subjects and Methods A total of 16536 STEMI patients (anterior infarction: n=9354, inferior infarction: n=7692) treated with primary PCI were enrolled from a multicenter registry. We compared in-hospital mortality between patients with HAVB and those without HAVB with anterior or inferior infarction, separately. Multivariate analyses were performed to unearth predictors of HAVB and to identify whether HAVB is independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Results STEMI patients with HAVB showed higher in-hospital mortality than those without HAVB in both anterior (hazard ratio [HR]=9.821, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.946-19.503, p<0.001) and inferior infarction (HR=2.819, 95% CI: 2.076-3.827, p<0.001). In multivariate analyses, HAVB was associated with increased in-hospital mortality in anterior myocardial infarction (HR=19.264, 95% CI: 5.804-63.936, p<0.001). However, HAVB in inferior infarction was not an independent predictor of increased in-hospital mortality (HR=1.014, 95% CI: 0.547-1.985, p=0.901). Conclusion In this era of primary PCI, the prognostic impact of HAVB is different according to the location of infarction. Because of recent improvements in reperfusion strategy, the negative prognostic impact of HAVB in inferior STEMI is no longer prominent. PMID:27275168

  8. [Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) complicated by bilateral occipital lobe infarction: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kanae; Naraoka, Masato; Shimamura, Norihito; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a common disease that is treated with burr hole drainage by neurosurgeons. The outcome of CSH is mostly favorable. We treated 2 cases with bilateral occipital lobe infarction due to CSH. A 57-year-old woman was ambulatory when she visited a clinic for evaluation of headache. One hour after the CT was taken, she developed acute impairment of consciousness, so that she was referred to our hospital. The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with a history of depression who was involved in a traffic accident 5 weeks before admission to our hospital. She was at first admitted to a psychiatric hospital for evaluation of gait disturbance. Three weeks after she was admitted to the psychiatric hospital, she fell into a coma. She was referred to our hospital. Their brain CT on admission revealed compressed ambient and interpeduncular cistern and bilateral CSH. Although burr hole drainage surgery was performed, the 2 patients developed severe sequelae due to occipital lobe infarction caused by central transtentorial herniation.

  9. Trends in Coronary Angiography, Revascularization, and Outcomes of Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Dabhadkar, Kaustubh C; Agarwal, Shikhar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Timmermans, Robert; Jain, Diwakar; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Menon, Venu; Bhatt, Deepak L; Abbott, J Dawn; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    Early revascularization is the mainstay of treatment for cardiogenic shock (CS) complicating acute myocardial infarction. However, data on the contemporary trends in management and outcomes of CS complicating non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are limited. We used the 2006 to 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify patients aged ≥ 18 years with NSTEMI with or without CS. Temporal trends and differences in coronary angiography, revascularization, and outcomes were analyzed. Of 2,191,772 patients with NSTEMI, 53,800 (2.5%) had a diagnosis of CS. From 2006 to 2012, coronary angiography rates increased from 53.6% to 60.4% in patients with NSTEMI with CS (ptrend <0.001). Among patients who underwent coronary angiography, revascularization rates were significantly higher in patients with CS versus without CS (72.5% vs 62.6%, p <0.001). Patients with NSTEMI with CS had significantly higher risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 10.09, 95% confidence interval 9.88 to 10.32) as compared to those without CS. In patients with CS, an invasive strategy was associated with lower risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.45). Risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total hospital costs decreased over the study period in patients with and without CS (ptrend <0.001). In conclusion, we observed an increasing trend in coronary angiography and decreasing trend in in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total hospital costs in patients with NSTEMI with and without CS. Despite these positive trends, overall coronary angiography and revascularization rates remain less than optimal and in-hospital mortality unacceptably high in patients with NSTEMI and CS.

  10. Acute Pre-operative Infarcts and Poor Cerebrovascular Reserve are Independent Risk Factors for Severe Ischemic Complications Following Direct Extracranial-Intracranial Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulling, T. Michael; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Marks, Michael P.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe ischemic changes are a rare but devastating complication following direct superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA MCA) bypass in Moyamoya patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether pre-operative MR imaging and/or cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) assessment using reference standard stable xenon enhanced computed tomography (xeCT) could predict such complications. Materials and Methods Among all adult patients receiving direct bypass at our institution between 2005 and 2010 who received a clinically interpretable xeCT examination, we identified index cases (patients with >15 ml post-operative infarcts) and control cases (patients without post-operative infarcts and without transient or permanent ischemic symptoms). Differences between groups were evaluated using the Mann Whitney test. Univariate and multivariate generalized linear model regression were employed to test predictors of post-operative infarct. Results Six index cases were identified and compared with 25 controls. Infarct size in the index cases was 95±55 ml. Four of six index cases (67%), but no control patients, had pre-operative acute infarcts. Baseline CBF was similar, but CVR was significantly lower in the index cases compared with control cases. For example, in the anterior circulation, median CVR was 0.4% (range: −38.0% to 16.6%) in index vs. 26.3% (range: −8.2% to 60.5%) in control patients (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a small pre-operative infarct (regardless of location) and impaired CVR were independent, significant predictors of severe post-operative ischemic injury. Conclusion Acute infarcts and impaired CVR on pre operative imaging are independent risk factors for severe ischemic complications following STA MCA bypass in Moyamoya disease. PMID:26564435

  11. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Rajayer, Salil; Gurung, Vikash; Tam, Eric; Morante, Joaquin; Shamian, Ben; Malik, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:27609717

  12. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Rajayer, Salil; Gurung, Vikash; Tam, Eric; Morante, Joaquin; Shamian, Ben; Malik, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:27609717

  13. Uncommon Complication of Uterine Artery Embolization: Expulsion of Infarcted Myoma and Uterine Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Juliana G; Gaudenti, Dawn; Crespo, Frank; Ganesh, Dervi; Verma, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign tumors in young females and leading cause of hysterectomy. Uterine artery embolization is a safe option for women who wish to retain their uterus. Several complications have been reported including expulsion and sepsis. MRI is a useful pretreatment tool to predict results and outcomes. We report a case of a 44-year-old female with a history of uterine fibroids with the largest one being intracavitary. Patient underwent uterine artery embolization that was complicated by endomyometritis that failed antibiotics, leading to sepsis and hysterectomy. PMID:27073705

  14. Uncommon Complication of Uterine Artery Embolization: Expulsion of Infarcted Myoma and Uterine Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Juliana G.; Gaudenti, Dawn; Crespo, Frank; Ganesh, Dervi; Verma, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign tumors in young females and leading cause of hysterectomy. Uterine artery embolization is a safe option for women who wish to retain their uterus. Several complications have been reported including expulsion and sepsis. MRI is a useful pretreatment tool to predict results and outcomes. We report a case of a 44-year-old female with a history of uterine fibroids with the largest one being intracavitary. Patient underwent uterine artery embolization that was complicated by endomyometritis that failed antibiotics, leading to sepsis and hysterectomy. PMID:27073705

  15. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  16. New insights into symptomatic or silent atrial fibrillation complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Stamboul, Karim; Fauchier, Laurent; Gudjoncik, Aurelie; Buffet, Philippe; Garnier, Fabien; Lorgis, Luc; Beer, Jean Claude; Touzery, Claude; Cottin, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in the general population and contributes not only to a major deterioration in quality of life but also to an increase in cardiovascular morbimortality. The onset of AF in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI) is a major event that can jeopardize the prognosis of patients in the short-, medium- and long-term, and is a powerful predictor of a poor prognosis after MI. The suspected mechanism underlying the excess mortality is the drop in coronary flow linked to the acceleration and arrhythmic nature of the left ventricular contractions, which reduce the left ventricular ejection fraction. The principal causes of AF-associated death after MI are linked to heart failure. Moreover, the excess risk of death in these heart failure patients has also been associated with the onset of sudden death. Whatever its form, AF has a major negative effect on patient prognosis. In recent studies, symptomatic AF was associated with inhospital mortality of 17.8%, to which can be added mortality at 1year of 18.8%. Surprisingly, silent AF also has a negative effect on the prognosis, as it is associated with an inhospital mortality rate of 10.4%, which remains high at 5.7% at 1year. Moreover, both forms of AF are independent predictors of mortality beyond traditional risk factors. The frequency and seriousness of silent AF in the short- and long-term, which were until recently rarely studied, raises the question of systematically screening for it in the acute phase of MI. Consequently, the use of continuous ECG monitoring could be a simple, effective and inexpensive solution to improve screening for AF, even though studies are still necessary to validate this strategy. Finally, complementary studies also effect of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, which seem to play a major role in triggering this rhythm disorder. PMID:26525569

  17. New insights into symptomatic or silent atrial fibrillation complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Stamboul, Karim; Fauchier, Laurent; Gudjoncik, Aurelie; Buffet, Philippe; Garnier, Fabien; Lorgis, Luc; Beer, Jean Claude; Touzery, Claude; Cottin, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in the general population and contributes not only to a major deterioration in quality of life but also to an increase in cardiovascular morbimortality. The onset of AF in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI) is a major event that can jeopardize the prognosis of patients in the short-, medium- and long-term, and is a powerful predictor of a poor prognosis after MI. The suspected mechanism underlying the excess mortality is the drop in coronary flow linked to the acceleration and arrhythmic nature of the left ventricular contractions, which reduce the left ventricular ejection fraction. The principal causes of AF-associated death after MI are linked to heart failure. Moreover, the excess risk of death in these heart failure patients has also been associated with the onset of sudden death. Whatever its form, AF has a major negative effect on patient prognosis. In recent studies, symptomatic AF was associated with inhospital mortality of 17.8%, to which can be added mortality at 1year of 18.8%. Surprisingly, silent AF also has a negative effect on the prognosis, as it is associated with an inhospital mortality rate of 10.4%, which remains high at 5.7% at 1year. Moreover, both forms of AF are independent predictors of mortality beyond traditional risk factors. The frequency and seriousness of silent AF in the short- and long-term, which were until recently rarely studied, raises the question of systematically screening for it in the acute phase of MI. Consequently, the use of continuous ECG monitoring could be a simple, effective and inexpensive solution to improve screening for AF, even though studies are still necessary to validate this strategy. Finally, complementary studies also effect of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, which seem to play a major role in triggering this rhythm disorder.

  18. Association of Interleukin 8 and Myocardial Recovery in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Husebye, Trygve; Eritsland, Jan; Arnesen, Harald; Bjørnerheim, Reidar; Mangschau, Arild; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Andersen, Geir Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Background No data from controlled trials exists regarding the inflammatory response in patients with de novo heart failure (HF) complicating ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and a possible role in the recovery of contractile function. We therefore explored the time course and possible associations between levels of inflammatory markers and recovery of impaired left ventricular function as well as levosimendan treatment in STEMI patients in a substudy of the LEvosimendan in Acute heart Failure following myocardial infarction (LEAF) trial. Methods A total of 61 patients developing HF within 48 hours after a primary PCI-treated STEMI were randomised double-blind to a 25 hours infusion of levosimendan or placebo. Levels of IL-6, CRP, sIL-6R, sgp130, MCP-1, IL-8, MMP-9, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and TNF-α were measured at inclusion (median 22 h, interquartile range (IQR) 14, 29 after PCI), on day 1, day 2, day 5 and 6 weeks. Improvement in left ventricular function was evaluated as change in wall motion score index (WMSI) by echocardiography. Results Only circulating levels of IL-8 at inclusion were associated with change in WMSI from baseline to 6 weeks, r = ÷0.41 (p = 0.002). No association, however, was found between IL-8 and WMSI at inclusion or peak troponin T. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in change in WMSI from inclusion to 6 weeks between patients with IL-8 levels below, compared to above median value, ÷0.44 (IQR÷0.57, ÷0.19) vs. ÷0.07 (IQR÷0.27, 0.07), respectively (p<0.0001). Levosimendan did not affect the levels of inflammary markers compared to control. Conclusion High levels of IL-8 in STEMI patients complicated with HF were associated with less improvement in left ventricular function during the first 6 weeks after PCI, suggesting a possible role of IL-8 in the reperfusion-related injury of post-ischemic myocardium. Further studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00324766

  19. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  20. Activities of daily living as an additional predictor of complications and outcomes in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Jiro; Totsuka, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Izumi; Usui, Tatsuya; Urasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Mochidome, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Age is an important determinant of outcome in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, in clinical settings, there is an occasional mismatch between chronological age and physical age. We evaluated whether activities of daily living (ADL), which reflect physical age, also predict complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI. Design Single-center, observational, and retrospective cohort study. Methods Preserved ADL and low ADL were defined according to the scale for independence degree of daily living for the disabled elderly by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. We examined 82 consecutive patients aged ≥75 years with AMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were divided into preserved ADL (n=52; mean age, 81.8±4.8 years; male, 59.6%) and low ADL (n=30; mean age, 85.8±4.7 years; male, 40.0%) groups according to prehospital ADL. Results The prevalence of Killip class II–IV and in-hospital mortality rate were significantly higher with low ADL compared to that with preserved ADL (23.1% vs 60.0%, P=0.0019; 5.8% vs 30.0%, P=0.0068, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that ADL was an independent predictor of Killip class II–IV and 1-year mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and other possible confounders (odds ratio 5.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–17.2, P=0.0083; hazard ratio 4.32, 95% CI 1.31–14.3, P=0.017, respectively). Conclusion Prehospital ADL is a significant predictor of heart failure complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of age and sex. PMID:27601890

  1. Activities of daily living as an additional predictor of complications and outcomes in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Jiro; Totsuka, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Izumi; Usui, Tatsuya; Urasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Mochidome, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Age is an important determinant of outcome in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, in clinical settings, there is an occasional mismatch between chronological age and physical age. We evaluated whether activities of daily living (ADL), which reflect physical age, also predict complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI. Design Single-center, observational, and retrospective cohort study. Methods Preserved ADL and low ADL were defined according to the scale for independence degree of daily living for the disabled elderly by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. We examined 82 consecutive patients aged ≥75 years with AMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were divided into preserved ADL (n=52; mean age, 81.8±4.8 years; male, 59.6%) and low ADL (n=30; mean age, 85.8±4.7 years; male, 40.0%) groups according to prehospital ADL. Results The prevalence of Killip class II–IV and in-hospital mortality rate were significantly higher with low ADL compared to that with preserved ADL (23.1% vs 60.0%, P=0.0019; 5.8% vs 30.0%, P=0.0068, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that ADL was an independent predictor of Killip class II–IV and 1-year mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and other possible confounders (odds ratio 5.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–17.2, P=0.0083; hazard ratio 4.32, 95% CI 1.31–14.3, P=0.017, respectively). Conclusion Prehospital ADL is a significant predictor of heart failure complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of age and sex.

  2. The serum levels of MMP-9, MMP-2 and vWF in patients with low doses of urokinase peritoneal dialysis decreased uremia complicated with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Jin; Qu, Zhong-Sen; Zhang, Qing-De; Li, Liang; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Bang-Li; Zhao, Yu-Wu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of MMP-9, MMP-2 and vWF in patients with low doses of urokinase peritoneal dialysis decreased uremia complicated with cerebral infarction. 112 cases of uremia complicated with cerebral infarction were randomly divided into the peritoneal dialysate with urokinase treatment group (66 cases) and the conventional treatment group (46 cases). At the same time, 50 cases of healthy people who were more than 45 years old were enrolled in the control group. The basic treatment in both treatment groups was the same. In urokinase therapy group based on the conventional treatment, urokinase was added into peritoneal dialysis fluid, and changes of serum MMP-9, MMP-2 and vWF were observed by drawing blood at different time points within 8 weeks. The changes of serum MMP-2, MMP-9 and vWF were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At the time of the onset of uremia complicated with cerebral infarction patients the serum MMP-9, MMP-2, vWF were significantly higher (P<0.05, P<0.05, P<0.01). Conventional antiplatelet therapy in brain protection only reduce MMP-9 to the normal range (P>0.05) within 8 weeks. But the MMP-2 and vWF cannot be reduced to the normal range (P<0.01, P<0.01). Low doses of urokinase can reduce MMP-9 (7 d) and MMP-2 (14 d) to the normal range (P>0.05, P>0.05) at the early stage and decrease the vWF to a normal range within 8 weeks (P>0.05). At the time of the onset of uremia complicated with cerebral infarction patients the serum MMP-9, MMP-2 and vWF increased significantly. Low doses of urokinase dialysis can reduce serum MMP-9, MMP-2, and vWF in acute uremia complicated with cerebral infarction without recurrence of cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhagic transformation, indicating that low dose of urokinase peritoneal dialysis may have a certain effect on the early treatment of this disease. PMID:26550224

  3. [Apixaban-Related Convexal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Sadatomo, Takashi; Hara, Takeshi; Ohba, Hideo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    The risk of anticoagulant-associated intracranial hemorrhage(ICH)is relatively low in patients treated with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants(NOAC). The anticoagulant-associated ICH comprises mainly intraparenchimal hemorrhage. Subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH)are rare complications after treatment with NOAC, trauma being the most common cause for these two types of ICH. We report a case of non-traumatic convexal SAH(cSAH)associated with Apixavan. A 68-year-old man with repeated history of cerebral embolism with cardiogenic cause presented with weakness of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed infarctions, and treatment with apixaban(5 mg twice per day)was administered. Three days later, SAH in the right superior frontal sulcus was discovered incidentally on computed tomography(CT). NOAC-associated SAH is a rare manifestation. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy(CAA)is the most common cause of cSAH in the elderly, and cSAH is supposed to be a warning sign of cerebral hemorrhage in CAA. Patients with CAA started on NOAC require careful monitoring.

  4. Pneumocephalus and Pneumorrhachis due to a Subarachnoid Pleural Fistula That Developed after Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Ki; Kim, Woo-Jae; Kim, Ho-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Yun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Development of a communication between the spinal subarachnoid space and the pleural space after thoracic spine surgery is uncommon. Subarachnoid pleural fistula (SAPF), a distressing condition, involves cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Here we report an unusual case of SAPF, occurring after thoracic spine surgery, that was further complicated by pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis postthoracentesis, which was performed for unilateral pleural effusion. PMID:27799999

  5. Current concepts of pathophysiology and management of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Findlay, J M; Macdonald, R L; Weir, B K

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 10 in 100,000 persons suffer rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm annually, and roughly 60% of these will survive the initial catastrophe in reasonable neurological condition. Of the many ensuing complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most frustrating continues to be a form of delayed-onset cerebral arterial narrowing known as vasospasm. Because it is caused by thick subarachnoid blood clots coating the adventitial surface of cerebral arteries, the distribution and severity of vasospasm correlates closely with location and volume of subarachnoid hematoma as visualized on computed tomography (CT). Critical vasospasm causes cerebral ischemia and infarction: the "second stroke." It is now know that vasospasm represents sustained arterial contraction rather than structural thickening of the vessel wall with lumen encroachment. A large body of evidence points to oxyhemoglobin, released from lysing erythrocytes, as the principal component of blood clot responsible for this contraction. The precise mechanism by which oxyhemoglobin causes prolonged vascular smooth muscle cell constriction has not yet been established, but possibilities include secondary generation of vasoactive free radicals, lipid peroxides, eicosanoids, bilirubin, and endothelin. Vasospasm treatments are directed at preventing or reversing arterial narrowing, or at preventing or reversing cerebral ischemia. Several treatments from the latter category, namely, hypertensive, hypervolemic hemodilutional therapy and the calcium channel blocker nimodipine, have proven moderately effective and are in widespread clinical use. It has also been possible to mechanically dilate vasospastic vessels with transluminal angioplasty improving cerebral blood flow to ischemic brain. However we are still in need of an effective agent to prevent arterial narrowing, and several hopeful candidates in this category of treatment are clot lytic agent tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and

  6. Dual antiplatelet compared to triple antithrombotic therapy in anterior wall acute myocardial infarction complicated by depressed left ventricular ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Oyetayo, Ola O.; Slicker, Kipp; De La Rosa, Lisa; Lane, Wesley; Langsjoen, Dane; Patel, Chhaya; Brough, Kevin; Chiles, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) consisting of warfarin, aspirin, and a P2Y12 inhibitor following an anterior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) complicated by extensive wall motion abnormalities. This recommendation, however, is based on data collected before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) became the standard of care for the treatment of STEMI. We designed a retrospective study of patients who received PCI for anterior STEMI over an 8-year period to compare rates of thromboembolic and bleeding events between patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and those receiving TT, including warfarin. Patients were included if the predischarge echocardiogram showed extensive wall motion abnormality and an ejection fraction ≤35%. Patients with known left ventricular thrombus were excluded. A total of 124 patients met the criteria, with 80 patients in the DAPT group and 44 in the TT group. The median age was 58 years in the TT group and 64 years in the DAPT group (P < 0.04), with an average ejection fraction of 31%. Thromboembolic events occurred in 4 patients (5%) in the DAPT group compared with 3 patients (6.8%) in the TT group (P = 0.70). Bleeding occurred in 2 patients in the DAPT group and 4 patients in the TT group (2.5% in DAPT vs. 9.1% in TT group, P = 0.18). No differences in rates of clinical embolism or left ventricular thrombus were found. Our data support recent findings that warfarin may not be indicated for patients following PCI for anterior STEMI, even when significant wall motion abnormalities and reduced ejection fraction ≤35% are present. PMID:26424937

  7. Factors affecting outcome in poor grade subarachnoid haemorrhage: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Kranthi, Sannepaneni; Sahu, Barada P.; Aniruddh, Purohit

    2016-01-01

    Context: Poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually associated with unfavorable outcomes and optimal management is deemed complicated. Most centres follow an expectant management strategy or a less aggressive approach till patients improve to good clinical grades. This approach has been associated with higher mortality and morbidity. However, not all patients with poor clinical condition fare badly. Identification and early aggressive management of this select group of patients may lead to favorable outcomes. Settings and Design: Prospective non-randomized study. Materials and Methods: We prospectively analyzed 19 cases presented in WFNS grade 4 and 5 and factors affecting their outcome at a tertiary care centre in south India. This study was aimed at identifying those few poor grade patients who are probable candidates for a good outcome. Statistical Analysis Used: All the variables were analyzed for possible correlations with the SPSS version 13 software. The Chi-square test with a P < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Of 19 cases, 13 were operated and good outcome was seen in 53.8% of the patients who underwent surgery and aggressive management. All 7 patients who were managed conservatively died. 15.8% of the patients had low density changes (P = 0.625). Absence of such changes was associated with a good long term outcome (P = 0.004). 9 patients had intraventricular hemorrhage at presentation and 5 patients having hydrocephalus underwent extra-ventricular drainage. Statistically significant factors precluding good outcome were the presence of infarcts and thick SAH in the cisterns. Conclusions: Poor grade (WFNS 4 and 5) SAH patients with or without ICH, IVH, if operated within 3 days can give rise to favorable outcome in around 50%. However, presence of patchy infarcts associated with thick subarachnoid blood (Fisher grade 3) precludes long term survival or meaningful recovery. Hence, aggressive management is unlikely to alter the

  8. Factors affecting outcome in poor grade subarachnoid haemorrhage: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Kranthi, Sannepaneni; Sahu, Barada P.; Aniruddh, Purohit

    2016-01-01

    Context: Poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually associated with unfavorable outcomes and optimal management is deemed complicated. Most centres follow an expectant management strategy or a less aggressive approach till patients improve to good clinical grades. This approach has been associated with higher mortality and morbidity. However, not all patients with poor clinical condition fare badly. Identification and early aggressive management of this select group of patients may lead to favorable outcomes. Settings and Design: Prospective non-randomized study. Materials and Methods: We prospectively analyzed 19 cases presented in WFNS grade 4 and 5 and factors affecting their outcome at a tertiary care centre in south India. This study was aimed at identifying those few poor grade patients who are probable candidates for a good outcome. Statistical Analysis Used: All the variables were analyzed for possible correlations with the SPSS version 13 software. The Chi-square test with a P < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Of 19 cases, 13 were operated and good outcome was seen in 53.8% of the patients who underwent surgery and aggressive management. All 7 patients who were managed conservatively died. 15.8% of the patients had low density changes (P = 0.625). Absence of such changes was associated with a good long term outcome (P = 0.004). 9 patients had intraventricular hemorrhage at presentation and 5 patients having hydrocephalus underwent extra-ventricular drainage. Statistically significant factors precluding good outcome were the presence of infarcts and thick SAH in the cisterns. Conclusions: Poor grade (WFNS 4 and 5) SAH patients with or without ICH, IVH, if operated within 3 days can give rise to favorable outcome in around 50%. However, presence of patchy infarcts associated with thick subarachnoid blood (Fisher grade 3) precludes long term survival or meaningful recovery. Hence, aggressive management is unlikely to alter the

  9. One-year clinical outcomes in invasive treatment strategies for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Pyo; Kang, Ki-Woon; Yoon, Hyeon Soo; Myung, Jin Cheol; Choi, Yu Jeong; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyung Tae; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical outcomes of an invasive strategy for elderly (aged ≥ 75 years) patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock (CS). Methods Data on 366 of 409 elderly CS patients from a total of 6,132 acute STEMI cases enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry between January 2008 and June 2011, were collected and analyzed. In-hospital deaths and the 1-month and 1-year survival rates free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as all cause death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization) were reported for the patients who had undergone invasive (n = 310) and conservative (n = 56) treatment strategies. Results The baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. There were fewer in-hospital deaths in the invasive treatment strategy group (23.5% vs. 46.4%, P < 0.001). In addition, the 1-year MACE-free survival rate after invasive treatment was significantly lower compared with the conservative treatment (51% vs. 66%, P = 0.001). Conclusions In elderly patients with acute STEMI complicated by CS, the outcomes of invasive strategy are similar to those in younger patients at the 1-year follow-up. PMID:24133510

  10. Intramyocardial dissection with concomitant left ventricular aneurysm as a rare complication of myocardial infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Wang, Liang-Shan; Su, Zhao-Ping; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 60-year-old woman suffering from intramyocardial dissection and left ventricular aneurysm secondary to acute myocardial infarction. A rare form of ventricular septal rupture resulted from intramyocardial dissection deterioration, which was identified during echocardiographic follow-up. Surgical repair under beating-heart cardiopulmonary bypass was successful.

  11. Intramyocardial dissection with concomitant left ventricular aneurysm as a rare complication of myocardial infarction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Wang, Liang-Shan; Su, Zhao-Ping; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    We describe a rare case of a 60-year-old woman suffering from intramyocardial dissection and left ventricular aneurysm secondary to acute myocardial infarction. A rare form of ventricular septal rupture resulted from intramyocardial dissection deterioration, which was identified during echocardiographic follow-up. Surgical repair under beating-heart cardiopulmonary bypass was successful. PMID:27605945

  12. Guillain-Barré syndrome as first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare manifestation complicated by IVIg-induced splenic infarct.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Richard M; Chen, Ioana; Somal, Navjot

    2015-11-25

    A 44-year-old woman presented with progressively worsening neurological symptoms of 1 week duration. Physical examination revealed absent reflexes of the lower extremities and proximal muscle weakness, bilaterally. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrophysiological studies were consistent with the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and the patient was started on intravenous immunoglobulin infusion. Along with positive neurological findings, rheumatological work up revealed elevated antinuclear antibody titres, positive double-stranded DNA and anti-Smith antibodies. These results, in conjunction with positive clinical findings, confirmed an underlying diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient's hospital course was complicated by an episode of severe left upper quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tachycardia and elevated inflammatory markers. CT scan of the abdomen revealed a splenic infarct following completion of IVIg infusion, making this a contributor to thrombus formation in the setting of an already thrombophilic state, and a rare complication of an approved method of treatment.

  13. Acute intraventricular thrombosis of an impella LP 5.0 device in an ST-elevated myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Ranc, Sylvain; Sibellas, Franck; Green, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old male patient, suffering from an acute anterior ST-elevated myocardial infarction, developed cardiogenic shock, despite an optimal revascularization and hemodynamic support through the use of an intra-aortic balloon pump and inotropic pharmacological agents. Additional support was provided by a left ventricular assistance device Impella LP 5.0 (Abiomed, Europe GmbH). Device failure occurred 27 hours after implantation due to an acute thrombosis of the Impella inflow portion. This major adverse event might have occurred due to an inflammatory status in the cardiogenic shock context, a pre-existing intraventricular thrombus that could have been sucked up inside the Impella, and/or a subtherapeutic anticoagulation. There are very few data regarding this type of complication. Further studies are therefore needed to assess the frequency of such a complication and the means to avoid it.

  14. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  15. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  16. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging.

  17. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27442399

  18. Clinical impact of intra-aortic balloon pump during extracorporeal life support in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no available data on clinical outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock who are supported by an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in combination with extracorporeal life support (ECLS). Methods We analysed 96 consecutive patients with AMI and complicating cardiogenic shock who were assisted by an ECLS system between January 2004 and December 2011. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes were the success rate of weaning from ECLS and the lactate clearance for 48 hours (%). Results A combination of IABP and ECLS was used in 41 (42.7%) patients. In-hospital mortality occurred for 51 patients (ECLS with IABP versus ECLS alone; 51.2% vs. 54.5%, p = 0.747). The success rate of weaning from ECLS was similar between the two groups (63.4% vs. 58.2%, p = 0.604). Complications such as ischemia of a lower extremity or bleeding at the ECLS insertion site (p = 0.521 and p = 0.667, respectively) did not increase when ECLS was combined with IABP. Among patients who survived for 24 hours after intervention, lactate clearance was not significantly different between patients who received ECLS alone and those who received ECLS with IABP (p = 0.918). Conclusions The combined use of ECLS and IABP did not improve in-hospital survival in patients with AMI complicated by cardiogenic shock. PMID:24725532

  19. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed.

  20. Rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm and renal infarction: 2 complications of fibromuscular dysplasia that mimic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, H J; Staud, R; Williams, R C

    1998-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is one of the most important mimics of vasculitis. FMD is more prevalent in women and may cause infarcts of organ systems including the brain, intestines, and extremities. These acute clinical presentations often raise the suspicion of vasculitis and therefore rheumatologists will be asked to evaluate these patients. One of the frequent manifestations of FMD is renal artery involvement. Angiographic evaluation often shows a "string of beads" appearance of the renal arteries but sometimes only tapering of the vascular lumen or cutoffs may be seen. In contrast, hepatic artery involvement with FMD occurs much less frequently and may initially present with life threatening intraabdominal bleeding. Celiac angiograms of these patients often show aneurysms, a presentation similar to vasculitis. Only a high level of suspicion for FMD and careful evaluation of clinical facts will lead to correct diagnosis. This will prevent the wrong diagnosis of vasculitis and subsequent treatment with potentially toxic medications. We present 2 cases of FMD involving the renal and hepatic arteries that illustrate this diagnostic challenge.

  1. Effects of lumbar drainage on CSF dynamics in subarachnoid hemorrhage condition: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Abolfazli, Ehsan; Fatouraee, Nasser; Seddighi, Amir Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar drainage is considered a therapeutic measure in treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the evidence on the effectiveness of this method is still inconclusive. In this study, a subject-specific three dimensional model of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways and compartments was developed. The ventricular and the cranial and spinal subarachnoid spaces were reconstructed using magnetic resonance images. Occurrence of subarachnoid hemorrhage was modeled. Since the presence of blood in the CSF spaces is known to be the cause of complications such as cerebral vasospasm, concentration of blood in these spaces was investigated. Two cases of lumbar drains that were different in the drainage rate were studied. Temporal variations of concentration of blood in CSF spaces were calculated. It was observed that lumbar drainage accelerates the clearance of blood and, thereby, the spasmogens present in the cranial and spinal subarachnoid space. Higher clearance rates were observed at higher drainage rates. PMID:27518326

  2. The Harmful Effects of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Extracerebral Organs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Qian; Wu, Haijian; Krafft, Paul R.; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating neurological disorder. Patients with aneurysmal SAH develop secondary complications that are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Aside from secondary neurological injuries, SAH has been associated with nonneurologic medical complications, such as neurocardiogenic injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, hyperglycemia, and electrolyte imbalance, of which cardiac and pulmonary complications are most common. The related mechanisms include activation of the sympathetic nervous system, release of catecholamines and other hormones, and inflammatory responses. Extracerebral complications are directly related to the severity of SAH-induced brain injury and indicate the clinical outcome in patients. This review provides an overview of the extracerebral complications after SAH. We also aim to describe the manifestations, underlying mechanisms, and the effects of those extracerebral complications on outcome following SAH. PMID:25110700

  3. Subarachnoid block for caesarean section in severe preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sujata; Salhotra, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension constitutes a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations and it complicates about 6–8% of pregnancies. Severe preeclampsia poses a dilemma for the anesthesiologist especially in emergency situations where caesarean deliveries are planned for uninvestigated or partially investigated parturients. This article is aimed to review the literature with regards to the type of anesthesia for such situations. A thorough search of literature was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Google to retrieve the articles. Studies on parturients with severe preeclampsia, undergoing caesarean section, were included in this article. There is growing evidence to support the use of subarachnoid block in such situations when the platelet counts are >80,000 mm-3. Better hemodynamic stability with the use of low-dose local anesthetic along with additives and better neonatal outcomes has been found with the use of subarachnoid block when compared to general anesthesia. PMID:21772674

  4. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm - literature review.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, A V; Palade, C; Voinescu, D; Nica, D A

    2013-06-15

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage represents a serious disease with high mortality and morbidity. Two important areas are becoming the central research interest of subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury. The authors have reviewed the major contributions in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage documented in the medical literature in the past 5 years. Treatments interfering with nitric oxide - or endothelin-pathways continue to show antispasmotic effects in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Inflammation and oxidative stress play a vital role in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm. Apoptosis, a relevant cause of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, also underline the etiology of cerebral vasospasm. Future research studies will continue to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and treatment modalities targeting cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury, enabling an improvement in outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:23904869

  5. Myocardial infarction determined by technetium-99m pyrophosphate single-photon tomography complicating elective coronary artery bypass grafting for angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.J.; Gladstone, P.J.; Tremblay, P.C.; Feindel, C.M.; Salter, D.R.; Lipton, I.H.; Ogilvie, R.R.; David, T.E.

    1989-06-15

    The incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicating coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has previously been based on concordance of electrocardiographic, enzymatic and scintigraphic criteria. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PPi) single-photon emission computed tomography now enables detection of AMI with high sensitivity and specificity. Using this technique, perioperative AMI was detected in 12 of 58 patients (21%) undergoing successful elective CABG for stable angina pectoris. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the predictive value of preoperative (New York Heart Association class, left ventricular ejection fraction and use of beta blockers) and intraoperative (number of grafts constructed, use of internal mammary anastomoses, use of sequential saphenous vein grafts, smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber and aortic cross-clamp time) variables. Preoperative New York Association class (p = 0.04) and smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber (p = 0.03) were significant multivariate predictors of perioperative AMI. Only 1 perioperative patient with AMI (and 1 pyrophosphate-negative patient) developed new Q waves. Serum creatine kinase-MB was higher in patients with AMI by repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.0003). Five AMIs occurred in myocardial segments revascularized using sequential saphenous vein grafts, and 7 in segments perfused by significantly stenosed epicardial vessels with distal lumen diameter and perfusion territory considered too small to warrant CABG. At 6-month follow-up, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 0.61 to 0.65 in Tc-PPI-negative patients (p = 0.01), but not in perioperative patients with AMI.

  6. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Joydip; Chatterjee, Apratim; Sarkar, Anup; Roy, Koushik; Agarwal, Rakhesh; Lahiri, Durjoy; Biswas, Amrito; Mondal, Anupam; Maity, Pranab; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2015-01-01

    Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS) along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review. PMID:26425018

  7. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Joydip; Chatterjee, Apratim; Sarkar, Anup; Roy, Koushik; Agarwal, Rakhesh; Lahiri, Durjoy; Biswas, Amrito; Mondal, Anupam; Maity, Pranab; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2015-01-01

    Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS) along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review. PMID:26425018

  8. [Subarachnoid hematoma and spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Dupeyrat, A; Dequiré, P M; Mérouani, A; Moullier, P; Eid, G

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of spinal subarachnoid haematoma occurring after spinal anaesthesia are reported. In the first case, lumbar puncture was attempted three times in a 81-year-old man; spinal anaesthesia trial was than abandoned, and the patient given a general anaesthetic. He was given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth day, the patient became paraparetic. Radioculography revealed a blockage between T10 and L3. Laminectomy was performed to remove the haematoma, but the patient recovered motor activity only very partially. The second case was a 67-year-old man, in whom spinal anaesthesia was easily carried out. He was also given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth postoperative day, pulmonary embolism was suspected. Heparin treatment was then started. Twelve hours later, lumbar and bilateral buttock pain occurred, which later spread to the neck. On the eighth day, the patient had neck stiffness and two seizures. Emergency laminectomy was carried out, which revealed a subarachnoid haematoma spreading to a level higher than T6 and below L1, with no flow of cerebrospinal fluid, and a non pulsatile spinal cord. Surgery was stopped. The patient died on the following day. Both these cases are similar to those previously reported and point out the role played by anticoagulants. Because early diagnosis of spinal cord compression is difficult, the prognosis is poor, especially in case of paraplegia. PMID:2278424

  9. Haemoglobin scavenging after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Durnford, A; Dunbar, J; Galea, J; Bulters, D; Nicoll, J A R; Boche, D; Galea, I

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and effective clearance of cell-free haemoglobin after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is important to prevent vasospasm and neurotoxicity and improve long-term outcome. Haemoglobin is avidly bound by haptoglobin, and the complex is cleared by CD163 expressed on the membrane surface of macrophages. We studied the kinetics of haemoglobin and haptoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid after SAH. We show that haemoglobin levels rise gradually after SAH. Haptoglobin levels rise acutely with aneurysmal rupture as a result of injection of blood into the subarachnoid space. Although levels decline as haemoglobin scavenging occurs, complete depletion of haptoglobin does not occur and levels start rising again, indicating saturation of CD163 sites available for haptoglobin-haemoglobin clearance. In a preliminary neuropathological study we demonstrate that meningeal CD163 expression is upregulated after SAH, in keeping with a proinflammatory state. However, loss of CD163 occurs in meningeal areas with overlying blood compared with areas without overlying blood. Becauses ADAM17 is the enzyme responsible for shedding membrane-bound CD163, its inhibition may be a potential therapeutic strategy after SAH.

  10. Anemia and transfusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter D

    2011-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be affected by a number of factors, including cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Anemia affects about half of patients with SAH and is associated with worse outcome. Anemia also may contribute to the development of or exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia. This review was designed to examine the prevalence and impact of anemia in patients with SAH and to evaluate the effects of transfusion. A literature search was made to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in SAH patients. A total of 27 articles were identified that addressed the effects of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) on brain physiology, anemia in SAH, and clinical management with RBCT or erythropoietin. Most studies provided retrospectively analyzed data of very low-quality according to the GRADE criteria. While RBCT can have beneficial effects on brain physiology, RBCT may be associated with medical complications, infection, vasospasm, and poor outcome after SAH. The effects may vary with disease severity or the presence of vasospasm, but it remains unclear whether RBCTs are a marker of disease severity or a cause of worse outcome. Erythropoietin data are limited. The literature review further suggests that the results of the Transfusion Requirements in Critical Care Trial and subsequent observational studies on RBCT in general critical care do not apply to SAH patients and that randomized trials to address the role of RBCT in SAH are required. PMID:21769459

  11. High frequency of spinal involvement in patients with basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Callacondo, D.; Garcia, H.H.; Gonzales, I.; Escalante, D.; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Gonzalez, Armando; Lopez, Maria T.; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Martinez, Manuel; Alvarado, Manuel; Porras, Miguel; Saavedra, Herbert; Rodriguez, Silvia; Verastegui, Manuela; Mayta, Holger; Herrera, Genaro; Lescano, Andres G.; Zimic, Mirko; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Moyano, Luz M.; Ayvar, Viterbo; Diaz, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of spinal neurocysticercosis (NCC) in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC compared with that in individuals with viable limited intraparenchymal NCC (≤20 live cysts in the brain). Methods: We performed a prospective observational case-control study of patients with NCC involving the basal cisterns or patients with only limited intraparenchymal NCC. All patients underwent MRI examinations of the brain and the entire spinal cord to assess spinal involvement. Results: Twenty-seven patients with limited intraparenchymal NCC, and 28 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC were included in the study. Spinal involvement was found in 17 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC and in only one patient with limited intraparenchymal NCC (odds ratio 40.18, 95% confidence interval 4.74–340.31; p < 0.0001). All patients had extramedullary (intradural) spinal NCC, and the lumbosacral region was the most frequently involved (89%). Patients with extensive spinal NCC more frequently had ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement (7 of 7 vs 3 of 11; p = 0.004) and tended to have a longer duration of neurologic symptoms than those with regional involvement (72 months vs 24 months; p = 0.062). Conclusions: The spinal subarachnoid space is commonly involved in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC, compared with those with only intraparenchymal brain cysts. Spinal cord involvement probably explains serious late complications including chronic meningitis and gait disorders that were described before the introduction of antiparasitic therapy. MRI of the spine should be performed in basal subarachnoid disease to document spinal involvement, prevent complications, and monitor for recurrent disease. PMID:22517102

  12. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome due to hemorrhagic brain infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is a condition featuring hyponatremia and dehydration caused by head injury, operation on the brain, subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor and so on. However, there are a few reports of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by cerebral infarction. We describe a patient with cerebral infarction who developed cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. Case presentation A 79-year-old Japanese woman with hypertension and arrhythmia was admitted to our hospital for mild consciousness disturbance, conjugate deviation to right, left unilateral spatial neglect and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a broad ischemic change in right middle cerebral arterial territory. She was diagnosed as cardiogenic cerebral embolism because atrial fibrillation was detected on electrocardiogram on admission. She showed hyponatremia accompanied by polyuria complicated at the same time with the development of hemorrhagic transformation on day 14 after admission. Based on her hypovolemic hyponatremia, she was evaluated as not having syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone but cerebral salt-wasting syndrome. She fortunately recovered with proper fluid replacement and electrolyte management. Conclusions This is a rare case of cerebral infarction and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. It may be difficult to distinguish cerebral salt-wasting syndrome from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, however, an accurate assessment is needed to reveal the diagnosis of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome because the recommended fluid management is opposite in the two conditions. PMID:25055823

  13. A Case of Lateral Medullary Infarction after Endovascular Trapping of the Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In Yong

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of lateral medullary infarction after successful embolization of the vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm (VADA). A 49-year-old man who had no noteworthy previous medical history was admitted to our hospital with a severe headache. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, located in the basal cistern and posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography showed a VADA, that did not involve the origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated this aneurysm via endovascular trapping of the vertebral artery distal to the PICA. After operation, CT revealed post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, which we resolved with a permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedure. Postoperatively, the patient experienced transient mild hoarsness and dysphagia. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed a small infarction in the right side of the medulla. The patient recovered well, though he still had some residual symptom of dysphagia at discharge. Such an event is uncommon but can be a major clinical concern. Further investigation to reveal risk factors and/or causative mechanisms for the medullary infarction after successful endovascular trapping of the VADA are sorely needed, to minimize such a complication. PMID:22639714

  14. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and glucose management.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, Erich; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2011-09-01

    Although metabolic abnormalities have been linked with poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are limited data addressing the impact of glycemic control or benefits of glucose management after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A systematic literature search was conducted of English-language articles describing original research on glycemic control in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case reports and case series were excluded. A total of 22 publications were selected for this review. Among the 17 studies investigating glucose as an outcome predictor, glucose levels during hospitalization were more likely to predict outcome than admission glucose. In general, hyperglycemia was linked to worse outcome. While insulin therapy in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was shown to effectively control plasma glucose levels, plasma glucose control was not necessarily reflective of cerebral glucose such that very tight glucose control may lead to neuroglycopenia. Furthermore, tight glycemic control was associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia which was linked to worse outcome. PMID:21850563

  15. Hemodynamic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Treggiari, Miriam M

    2011-09-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation therapy is considered standard treatment to help prevent and treat vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Standard triple-H therapy combines volume expansion (hypervolemia), blood pressure augmentation (hypertension), and hemodilution. An electronic literature search was conducted of English-language papers published between 2000 and October 2010 that focused on hemodynamic augmentation therapies in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the eligible reports identified, 11 addressed volume expansion, 10 blood pressure management, 4 inotropic therapy, and 12 hemodynamic augmentation in patients with unsecured aneurysms. While hypovolemia should be avoided, hypervolemia did not appear to confer additional benefits over normovolemic therapy, with an excess of side effects occurring in patients treated with hypervolemic targets. Overall, hypertension was associated with higher cerebral blood flow, regardless of volume status (normo- or hypervolemia), with neurological symptom reversal seen in two-thirds of treated patients. Limited data were available for evaluating inotropic agents or hemodynamic augmentation in patients with additional unsecured aneurysms. In the context of sparse data, no incremental risk of aneurysmal rupture has been reported with the induction of hemodynamic augmentation. PMID:21786046

  16. Rebleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Starke, R M; Connolly, E S

    2011-09-01

    Rebleeding after initial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can have substantial impact on overall patient outcome. While older studies have suggested rebleeding occurs in about 4% of patients during the first day after initial aneurysmal bleed, these studies may have failed to capture very early rebleeds and, consequently, underestimated the impact of rebleeding. An electronic literature search was performed to identify English-language articles published or available for review from February 1975 through October 2010. A total of 43 articles (40 original research and 3 review articles) focused on rebleeding after initial aneurysmal SAH in humans were selected for review. Although most studies supported an incidence of rebleeding ≤4%, studies investigating ultra-early rebleeding reported bleeding within the first 24 h following aneurysmal SAH in as many as 9-17% of patients, with most cases occurring within 6 h of initial hemorrhage. Overall, studies investigating antifibrinolytic therapy to reduce rebleeding have failed to clearly demonstrate overall therapeutic benefit. Short-course antifibrinolytic therapy may have a role prior to initial aneurysm repair, although insufficient data are currently available. PMID:21761274

  17. Splenic infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Splenic infarction is the death of tissue (necrosis) in the spleen due to a blockage in blood flow. ... Common causes of splenic infarction include: Blood clots Blood diseases such as sickle cell anemia Infections such as endocarditis

  18. An unusual case of fulminant myocarditis closely mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and presenting as refractory cardiogenic shock complicated by multiple life-threatening arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-quan; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of severe fulminant myocarditis that closely mimicked acute inferior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and presented with refractory cardiogenic shock, multiple life-threatening arrhythmias and rapidly progressive liver failure. This case was successfully differentiated from STEMI by emergency coronary angiography. Recurrent cardiogenic shock was reversed by intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP). Life-threatening arrhythmias including ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and high-degree atrioventricular block (AVB) were terminated by immediate cardioversion and temporary pacemaker. High-dose hydrocortisone effectively attenuated the inflammatory injury to the myocardium. The patient recovered and was well at the follow-up visit four months after discharge.

  19. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the African-American population: a cooperative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, G. C.; Welch, B.; Cole, A. N.; Mendoza, R.; Morgan, J.; Epps, J.; Bernard, E.; St Louis, P.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage is complicated by delayed cerebral ischemia and contributing factors such as hypertension. To observe the impact of hypertension and delayed cerebral ischemia on the outcome of a predominantly African-American cohort following subarachnoid hemorrhage, both retrospective (n = 42) and prospective (n = 21) studies were conducted. In the total pool (n = 63), the mean age was 49.7 years (range: 17 to 80) with a preponderance of female patients (70%). Aneurysm formation was significant in the region of the posterior communicating artery. Of the patients reviewed, 73.8% had preexisting hypertension and 45.9% developed delayed cerebral ischemia. Approximately 89% of the patients who suffered from delayed cerebral ischemia had hypertension. Results failed to display any significant beneficial association between the use of the calcium channel blocker nimodipine and delayed cerebral ischemia. Use of the antifibrinolytic drug aminocaproic acid demonstrated a worse patient outcome. It is not recommended that aminocaproic acid be used in this population. Subsequently, due to the proportional occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia in hypertensive patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage, it is suggested that prophylactic surgical management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms be considered in hypertensive patients. Further study is needed to discern the association between hypertension, delayed cerebral ischemia, and stroke in patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:9046763

  20. [Cerebellar infarctions and their mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Amarenco, P

    1993-01-01

    Cerebellar infarcts have been neglected for a long time and are now shown well by CT and especially MRI. Some infarcts involve the full territory supplied by a cerebellar artery. They are frequently complicated by edema with brain stem compression and supratentorial hydrocephalus, requiring at times emergency surgery, and are often accompanied by other medullary, medial pontine, mesencephalic, thalamic and occipital infarcts. On the other hand, partial territory infarcts are usually confined to the cerebellum and have a benign outcome with total recovery or minimal disability. They are more common than full territory infarcts. However, clinical presentations are similar to those full territory infarcts, differing mainly by the lack of drowsiness or unconsciousness. The main symptoms are vertigo, headache, vomiting, unsteadiness of gait and dysarthria. Signs include ipsilateral limb dysmetria, ipsilateral axial lateropulsion, ataxia and dysarthria. Vertigo is more severe and rotary in posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarcts, whereas dysarthria and ataxia are prominent in superior cerebellar artery territory infarcts. A few brain stem signs are sometimes added. In these territorial cerebellar infarcts, cardioembolism is the most common cause. Atherosclerotic occlusion comes next, involving the intracranial part of the vertebral artery and, less frequently, the lower basilar artery, both locations inaccessible to surgery. Other causes are artery to artery embolism from a vertebral artery origin stenosis, or the aortic arch, in situ intracranial branch atherosclerotic occlusion, and vertebral artery dissection. Border zone cerebellar infarcts occur in one third of the cases. They are small cortical or deep infarcts. They have the same symptoms and signs as territorial infarcts except for more frequent postural symptoms occurring over days, weeks or months after the ischemic event. The infarcts mainly have a thromboembolic mechanism, and sometimes have a

  1. Bilateral thalamic infarct as a diagnosed conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Lok, Ugur; Yalin, Oner; Odes, Ramazan; Bozkurt, Selim; Gulacti, Umut

    2013-05-01

    Bilateral thalamic infarcts are an uncommon type of cerebral infarct. Bilateral paramedian thalamic infarctions may lead to a severe impairment of consciousness. The sudden onset of a lethargy or comatose state, in the absence of motor deficits, easily evokes the idea of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Other patients present with behavior changes, disorientation in space and time, memory loss, or thought disorders. We believe that bilateral thalamic infarction is often missed in emergency department (ED) in relatively young patients, especially when magnetic resonance imaging is not performed. In these cases, the patient can be discharged with various psychiatric diagnoses. We suggest that bilateral thalamic infarct should be considered in patients in the ED with new diagnoses of conversion disorder.

  2. Subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral vasculopathy in a child with sickle cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inusa, Baba; Casale, Maddalena; Booth, Caroline; Lucas, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Stroke in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is either infarctive or haemorrhagic in nature. In childhood, over 75% of strokes in SCA are infarctive. We present an adolescent with SCA who developed hypertension at the age of 13, and was treated with lisinopril. Sixteen months later she was found in cardiorespiratory arrest and died on arrival in hospital. The last transcranial Doppler scan performed 6 months before her death and a brain MRI were reported normal. The autopsy discovered massive subarachnoid haemorrhage in association with vascular damage in the circle of Willis arteries. The case highlights a cause of haemorrhagic stroke, the first reported association between hypertension, SCA and a histopathologically proven cerebral vasculopathy. The difficulties in the management of haemorrhagic stroke and the poor outcome in SCA are discussed. PMID:25336550

  3. Microsurgical anatomy of the infratentorial trabecular membranes and subarachnoid cisterns.

    PubMed

    Vinas, F C; Dujovny, M; Fandino, R; Chavez, V

    1996-04-01

    The understanding of the anatomy of the subarachnoid cisterns and trabecular membranes is of paramount importance in the surgical treatment of pathology of the posterior fossa. Aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and some tumors should be approached through the subarachnoid space. The subarachnoid cisterns provide natural pathways to approach neurovascular and cranial nerve structures. The microsurgical anatomy of the infratentorial subarachnoid cisterns was studied in twenty adult brains, using the 'immersion technique'. Air was injected into the subarachnoid cisterns and brains were dissected under the operative microscope. Six main compartmental trabecular membranes were identified in the infratentorial level. They divide the subarachnoid space into six cisterns. Cisternal divisions and the disposition of the trabecular membranes were closely related to the vascular divisional patterns of the principal arteries. Thorough knowledge of the microsurgical anatomy of the subarachnoid space will aid neurosurgeons during the surgical approach of many vascular and tumoral lesions located in the posterior fossa.

  4. [Giant racemose subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis: A case report].

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Larsen, Alvaro; Monteagudo, Maria; Lozano-Setien, Elena; Garcia-Garcia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic disease of the central nervous system. It is caused by the larvae of Taenia solium, which can affect different anatomical sites. In Spain there is an increasing prevalence mainly due to immigration from endemic areas. The extraparenchymal forms are less common, but more serious because they usually develop complications. Neuroimaging plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease, supported by serology and a compatible clinical and epidemiological context. First-line treatments are cysticidal drugs such as albendazole and praziquantel, usually coadministered with corticosteroids, and in some cases surgery is indicated. We here report a case of neurocysticercosis with simultaneous intraventricular and giant racemose subarachnoid involvement.

  5. [Impact of renal dysfunction on clinical course of myocardial infarction complicated by acute heart failure in patients with preserved systolic function].

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, O M; Hur"ieva, O S; Kornatskyĭ, Iu V; Kozhukhov, S M; Sopko, O O

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to assess the relationships between renal function and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) clinical course and remote outcomes in patients with preserved systolic left ventricular (LV) function (LV ejection fraction > 40%) estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were evaluated on 1st and 3rd -10th MI day (n = 491). On 3rd-10th day of MI in patients with acute heart failure (HF) symptoms on admission day (1st group, n = 153) eGFR < 70 ml/min x per body surface unit was independent marker of re-infarction (Hazzard Ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) = 4,08 [1,72 -11,73], P < 0,01) and cardiovascular death (CVD) (HR [95% CI] = 3,61 [1,09 - 11,99], P = <0,05) during three years of follow-up. In patient without acute HF (2nd group, n = 338) eGFR < 68 ml/min was predictive of CVD within three years post-MI (HR [95% CI] = 7,13 [2,06 - 24,74], P = 0,002). eGFR did not correlate with myocardial damage markers. In the 1st group eGFR on the 3rd MI day was negatively correlated with tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. There were no correlation between systemic inflammation activation with eGFR in 2nd study group indicating different mechanisms of renal dysfucntion in patients with and without acute HF and preserved LV function.

  6. In Vitro Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in a Shaken Basal Cistern after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kertzscher, Ulrich; Schneider, Torsten; Goubergrits, Leonid; Affeld, Klaus; Hänggi, Daniel; Spuler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral arterial vasospasm leads to delayed cerebral ischemia and constitutes the major delayed complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral vasospasm can be reduced by increased blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. Clinical pilot studies allow the hypothesis that the clearance of subarachnoid blood is facilitated by means of head shaking. A major obstacle for meaningful clinical studies is the lack of data on appropriate parameters of head shaking. Our in vitro study aims to provide these essential parameters. Methodology/Principal Findings A model of the basal cerebral cistern was derived from human magnetic resonance imaging data. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was simulated by addition of dyed experimental blood to transparent experimental cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) filling the model of the basal cerebral cistern. Effects of various head positions and head motion settings (shaking angle amplitudes and shaking frequencies) on blood clearance were investigated using the quantitative dye washout method. Blood washout can be divided into two phases: Blood/CSF mixing and clearance. The major effect of shaking consists in better mixing of blood and CSF thereby increasing clearance rate. Without shaking, blood/CSF mixing and blood clearance in the basal cerebral cistern are hampered by differences in density and viscosity of blood and CSF. Blood clearance increases with decreased shaking frequency and with increased shaking angle amplitude. Head shaking facilitates clearance by varying the direction of gravitational force. Conclusions/Significance From this in vitro study can be inferred that patient or head shaking with large shaking angles at low frequency is a promising therapeutic strategy to increase blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. PMID:22870243

  7. The adjuvant use of lansoprazole, clonazepam and dimenhydrinate for treating intractable hiccups in a patient with gastritis and reflux esophagitis complicated with myocardial infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hiccup (Singultus) is a sudden and involuntary contraction of the diaphragm followed by a sharp closure of the epiglottis which results in the production of a specific “hic” sound. Normally, hiccups are treated without intervention. Intractable hiccups occur rarely but are a disturbing symptom underlying other health related disorders. Case presentation We report the clinical case of a 67-year-old male patient with myocardial infarction accompanied by intractable hiccups during the course of 8 months, and who was non-responsive to chlorpromazine or metoclopramide, and baclofen; drugs routinely used to treat this condition. This sustained hiccup had severely restricted the patient's ability to intake food and sleep. To explore alternative treatments, we investigated the adjuvant administration of lansoprazole, dimenhydrinate and clonazepam in this patient. We discovered that this drug combination was capable of successfully terminating his intractable hiccups, with no further evidence of recurrence. No similar treatment is previously reported for intractable hiccups. We further suggest a hypothesis concerning a potential mechanism on the anti-hiccup effect of dimenhydrinate. Conclusion We identified that the adjuvant use of lansoprazole, clonazepam and dimenhydrinate was capable of attenuating the symptoms of our patient with intractable hiccups. PMID:23954069

  8. Effect of the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cong; Yu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyin; Gu, Chi; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Vasospasm-related injury such as delayed ischemic neurological defect (DIND) or cerebral infarction is an important prognostic factor for aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage can achieve a better outcome in aneurismal SAH patients after coiling or clipping remains the subject of debate. Here, we report a meta-analysis of the related available literature to assess the effect of continuous CSF drainage on clinical outcomes in patients with aneurismal SAH. Methods: Case-control studies regarding the association between aneurismal SAH and CSF drainage were systematically identified through online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, and Springer Link). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for the eligible studies. The fixed-effects model was performed when homogeneity was indicated. Alternatively, the random-effects model was utilized. Results: This meta-analysis included 11 studies. Continuous CSF drainage obviously improved patients’ long-term outcome (odds ratio [OR] of 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–5.98, P < 0.01). CSF drainage also reduced angiographic vasospasm (OR of 0.35, 95% CI, 0.23–0.51, P < 0.01), symptomatic vasospasm (OR of 0.32, 95% CI, 0.32–0.43, P < 0.01), and DIND (OR of 0.48, 95% CI, 0.25–0.91, P = 0.03), but there was no significant difference between the CSF drainage group and the no CSF drainage group on shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) prevention (OR of 1.04, 95% CI, 0.52–2.07, P = 0.91). Further analysis on lumbar drainage (LD) and external ventricular drainage (EVD) indicated that LD had a better outcome (OR of 3.11, 95% CI, 1.18–8.23, P = 0.02), whereas no significant difference in vasospasm-related injury was detected between the groups (OR of 1.13, 95% CI, 0.54–2.37, P = 0.75). Conclusion: Continuous CSF drainage is an effective treatment for aneurismal SAH patients; lumbar drainage

  9. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  10. [The latest treatments for myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic heart disease and its main complication, myocardial infarction, remain the leading cause of death after the age of forty in developed countries. Myocardial infarction is the consequence of a sudden obstruction of a coronary artery by a thrombus. Thrombolysis and coronary angioplasty are the two emergency coronary artery revascularisation techniques. A medication-based treatment and adapted lifestyle aim to prevent repeat infarction. PMID:26040139

  11. Spontaneous Hepatic Infarction in a Patient with Gallbladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Min; Joung, Hannah; Heo, Jung Won; Woo, Seo Kyung; Woo, In Sook; Jung, Yun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarction is known as a rare disease entity in nontransplant patients. Although a few cases of hepatic infarction have been reported to be linked with invasive procedures, trauma, and hypercoagulability, a case of spontaneous hepatic infarction in a nontransplanted patient has hardly ever been reported. However, many clinical situations of patients with cancer, in particular biliary cancer, can predispose nontransplant patients to hepatic infarction. Besides, the clinical outcome of hepatic infarction in patients with cancer can be worse than in patients with other etiologies. As for treatment, anticoagulation treatment is usually recommended. However, because of its multifactorial etiology and combined complications, treatment of hepatic infarction is difficult and not simple. Herein, we report a case of fatal hepatic infarction that occurred spontaneously during the course of treatment in a patient with gallbladder cancer. Hepatic infarction should be considered as a possible fatal complication in patients during treatment of biliary malignancies. PMID:27462232

  12. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  13. Restricted Diffusion of Pus in the Subarachnoid Space: MRSA Meningo-Vasculitis and Progressive Brainstem Ischemic Strokes – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rose, David Z.; Parra-Herran, Carlos; Petito, Carol K.; Post, M. Judith D.

    2010-01-01

    Extra-axial restriction on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is an unusual finding on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Intra-axial restriction on DWI, however, is common, and can represent brain parenchymal infarction, tumor, abscess, or toxic-metabolic process. The infrequency of extra-axial DWI restriction and the paucity of clinico-pathological correlation in the literature limit its differential diagnosis. Scant case reports suggest that extra-axial DWI restriction could be a lymphoma, neurenteric cyst, or, in one patient, subdural empyema [1,2,3]. We postulate that pus formation must be excluded first, because it can provoke an aggressive meningo-vasculitis with rapidly fatal, intra-axial infarctions. Our patient was a 45-year-old man, presenting to our hospital with left facial droop and right (contralateral) arm and leg weakness. Initial MRI revealed DWI restriction in the left lateral pons, consistent with a classic Millard-Gubler stroke. Also noted was a subtle, extra-axial area of curvilinear diffusion restriction in the left cerebellar-pontine angle's subarachnoid space. Days later, the patient had a headache, and repeat MRI revealed extension of the two DWI lesions – both the intra-axial pontine infarction and the extra-axial area of restricted diffusion in the subarachnoid space. The patient became comatose, a third MRI revealed more extensive DWI restrictions, and he expired despite aggressive care. Autopsy revealed massive brainstem infarcts, a thick lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, copious Gram-Positive cocci (likely MRSA) and arteries partially occluded with fibrointimal proliferation. This emphasizes the concept that extra-axial DWI restriction can represent pus development in the subarachnoid space – a radiographic marker to identify a patient at risk for demise due to septic, meningo-vasculitic infarctions. PMID:21045937

  14. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following hemodynamic treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Awori, Jonathan; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Thompson, B Gregory; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an uncommon but significant complication of hemodynamic therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH)-induced vasospasm. We performed a PubMed literature search for the period January 1999 to January 2015 using the search terms "posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome", "subarachnoid hemorrhage", "vasospasm", and "hypertensive encephalopathy", and identified nine cases of PRES after aSAH-induced vasospasm in the literature. We also present a 63-year-old man with aSAH complicated by vasospasm treated with hemodynamic augmentation who subsequently developed PRES. Imaging following development of PRES symptoms shows vasogenic edema in the white matter of the parietal and occipital lobes. Age, sex, history of hypertension, and baseline blood pressure were variable among patients in the literature review. In all cases, patients improved both from a radiological and clinical perspective following blood pressure reduction. To summarize, PRES is a rare complication of hemodynamic therapy for vasospasm following aSAH. The literature at the time of writing demonstrates no common pattern with regard to patient demographics, medical history, or mode of treatment for symptomatic vasospasm. Given its sporadic and unpredictable nature, considering PRES in the differential diagnosis is important when addressing neurological decline following hemodynamic treatment of vasospasm related to aSAH. PMID:26755456

  15. [The clinical grading of subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ducati, A

    1998-04-01

    Clinical grading scales for subarachnoid haemorrhages are exposed and discussed. These have been introduced by Botterell, in the middle fifties, to allow a better clinical evaluation, a more correct prognosis and, as a consequence, a more effective therapy. The most popular grading scale is, up to now, the one proposed by Hunt and Hess in 1968. The H-H scale divides patients in 5 groups or levels, whose severity is progressively increasing. A clinical study based on the H-H scale demonstrated that low grade patients (I-II) take advantage from early surgery; at the opposite, high grade patients (III-IV-V) achieve better results when treated with late surgery. To leave behind several difficulties in interpreting the clinical signs and therefore in using the H-H scale, in 1988 Drake, on behalf of the World Federation of Neuro-logical Surgeons, published an "universal" grading scale for subarachnoid haemorrhage, based upon the well known Glasgow Come Scale score and on the finding of a motor focal deficit. The WFNS Scale is nowadays recommended for universal use, being easy and compatible with formerly employed scales.

  16. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy and the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroharu; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Neki, Reiko; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Iihara, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy and is responsible for important morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. This study reviewed reports of ruptured IA during pregnancy and the puerperium, and our own cases of ruptured IA in pregnant women. Hemorrhage occurred predominantly during the third trimester of pregnancy, when maternal cardiac output and blood volume increase and reach maximum. Physiological and hormonal changes in pregnancy are likely to affect the risk of IA rupture. Ruptured IAs during pregnancy should be managed based on neurosurgical considerations, and the obstetrical management of women with ruptured IAs should be decided according to the severity of SAH and the gestational age. Emergent cesarean section followed by clipping or coiling of aneurysms is indicated if the maternal condition and the gestational age allow such interventions. Although SAH during pregnancy can result in disastrous outcomes, the necessity of intracranial screening for high-risk pregnant women is still controversial. PMID:23979051

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  19. Prediction of outcomes in young adults with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Ahn, Sung-Yong; Moon, Hong-Joo; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Heung-Seob; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kwon, Taek-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is rare in young adults and little is known about aneurysms in this subgroup. The effect of clinical and prognostic factors on the outcome based on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores and the predictors of unfavorable outcomes were analyzed in young adults with aneurysmal SAH. A retrospective review of the clinical parameters, including age, sex, hypertension, smoking status, hyperlipidemia, location of the cerebral aneurysm, size of the aneurysm, multiplicity, perioperative complication such as hydrocephalus, vasospasm, and hematoma, and Hunt and Hess and Fisher grading on presentation, was conducted in 108 young adults (mean age 34.8 years) managed at our institute. The outcome was classified based on GOS grading into unfavorable (GOS scores 1-3) or favorable (GOS scores 4 or 5). The overall mortality rate was 3.7% (4/108 patients). Univariate regression analysis for the outcomes at discharge found that age at the time of presentation, male sex, size of aneurysm, multiple aneurysms, hyperlipidemia, and poor Hunt and Hess and Fischer grades were associated with unfavorable outcome. Multivariate regression analysis found independent effects of sex, multiple aneurysms, size of aneurysm, and Hunt and Hess grade on the outcome at discharge. Size of aneurysm, presence of multiple aneurysms, Hunt and Hess grade, and hypertension were the predictors of outcome at mean 2-year follow up based on multivariate exact regression analysis. The multimodal approach with aggressive medical management, early intervention, and surgical treatment might contribute to favorable long-term outcomes in patients with poor expected outcomes.

  20. Corticosteroid therapy of experimental hydrocephalus after intraventricular-subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, H. A.; Wilson, Rene B.; Patel, P. P.; Esmaili, M.

    1974-01-01

    Symptomatic hydrocephalus after subarachnoid haemorrhage seems to result both from mechanical obstruction of arachnoid villi and basilar cisterns and from an inflammatory cellular reaction in the villi. Subarachnoid haemorrhage was induced in rabbits using whole blood injected through an implanted intraventricular needle. Control rabbits receiving intraventricular methyl prednisolone acetate but no blood, developed ventricular dilation significantly more often than untreated controls. Eighty-three per cent of rabbits with untreated experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage developed moderate to severe hydrocephalus. Intramuscular steroid therapy significantly reduced the incidence of hydrocephalus. Images PMID:4406223

  1. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage: epidemiology, social impact and a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Fàbregas Julià, N; Rama-Maceiras, P; Hernández-Palazón, J; Rubio Romero, R; Carmona Aurioles, J

    2010-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, is a worldwide problem, representing personal tragedy, great social and economic consequences, and a heavy burden on the health care system. Estimated to be responsible for up to 10% of mortality in industrialized countries, cerebrovascular disease also affects individuals who are still in the workforce, with consequent loss of productive years. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a type of cerebrovascular accident that leads to around 5% of all strokes. SAH is most often due to trauma but may also be spontaneous, in which case the cause may be a ruptured intracranial aneurysm (80%) or arteriovenous malformation or any other abnormality of the blood or vessels (20%). Although both the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal SAH has improved in recent years, related morbidity and mortality remains high: 50% of patients die from the initial hemorrhage or later complications. If patients whose brain function is permanently damaged are added to the count, the percentage of cases leading to severe consequences rises to 70%. The burden of care of patients who are left incapacitated by SAH falls to the family or to private and public institutions. The economic cost is considerable and the loss of quality of life for both the patient and the family is great. Given the magnitude of this problem, the provision of adequate prophylaxis is essential; also needed are organizational models that aim to reduce mortality as well as related complications. Aneurysmal SAH is a condition which must be approached in a coordinated, multidisciplinary way both during the acute phase and throughout rehabilitation in order to lower the risk of unwanted outcomes.

  2. A case of right renal infarction and subcapsular hematoma that simultaneously developed after cardiac angiography.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S H; Cho, H C; Lee, S W; Kim, D Y; Joo, W C; Lee, W H; Song, J H; Kim, M-J

    2009-01-01

    Of the several complications known to develop after cardiac catheterization, simultaneous acute renal infarction and renal subcapsular hematoma is rare. Here, the authors report a case of acute renal infarction with subcapsular hematoma that developed 4 hours after cardiac catheterization.

  3. Magnesium sulfate administration in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Jose I

    2011-09-01

    Magnesium offers theoretic vascular and neuroprotective benefits for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify original research studies describing intravenous magnesium treatment in patients with SAH published in English between January 1990 and October 2010. Seventeen articles were identified and reviewed, including one phase III randomized-controlled clinical trial and six phase II randomized-controlled trials. Study quality was low for most of the included studies, with the phase III trial considered to be of moderate quality. Due to inconsistently reported benefits and the occurrence of side effects, phase II data suggested that intravenous magnesium for SAH provided either no overall net benefit or uncertain trade-offs. Benefit was likewise not supported in the single phase III clinical trial. PMID:21748496

  4. Sonographic findings in an isolated widened fetal subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Tongsong, Theera; Puntachai, Pongsun; Tongprasert, Fuanglada; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Luewan, Suchaya; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this series was to describe sonographic features of an isolated widened fetal subarachnoid space with a thin cerebral mantle and possible associations. Between January 2004 and December 2013, fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of a widened subarachnoid space were prospectively recruited and followed. Histories of medical and familial diseases, as well as other demographic data such as drug exposure and lifestyles, were assessed and prospectively recorded. The women were investigated for possible associated factors. Ten pregnant women were recruited. Their fetuses showed various degrees of a widened subarachnoid space, ranging from 5 to 20 mm. Nearly all were diagnosed in the second half of pregnancy. Four cases had normal brain structures documented at midpregnancy anomaly screening. Only 1 case had a prenatal diagnosis of a widened subarachnoid space at 20 weeks' gestation. Two fetuses had exposure to alcohol in utero; 2 were proven to have cytomegalovirus infection; 1 had subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to maternal use of warfarin; and 1 had a diagnosis of lissencephaly. Only 1 case in this series had normal postnatal development. A prenatal series of fetal widened subarachnoid spaces with possible associated factors is described. Although such relationships were not fully proven, they should be index cases for future studies.

  5. Bilateral renal infarction: an uncommon presentation of fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Kazory, Amir

    2013-12-01

    While fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an established cause of secondary hypertension, its association with renal infarction is less well recognized. We report a middle-aged man who presented with complaints of loin pain and severe hypertension. Computed tomography angiography of the abdomen revealed bilateral renal infarction with multiple short-segment arterial dissection compatible with FMD in the absence of systemic vasculitis and other risk factors for thromboembolic events. Bilateral renal infarction complicating FMD is extremely rare and has so far been reported only in a handful of cases. Physicians encountering cases of otherwise unexplained renal infarction/ischemia need to be aware of this complication.

  6. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  7. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Replacement Reduces Delayed Cerebral Vasospasm After Embolization of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Liming; Ma, Fei; Liu, Yun; Mu, Yanchun; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a leading cause of poor prognosis and death in SAH patients. Effective management to reduce DCVS is needed. A prospective controlled trial was conducted to determine if massive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement (CR) could reduce DCVS occurrence and improve the clinical outcome after aneurysmal SAH treated with endovascular coiling. Material/Methods Patients treated with endovascular coiling after aneurysmal SAH were randomly divided into a control group receiving regular therapy alone (C group, n=42) and a CSF replacement group receiving an additional massive CSF replacement with saline (CR group, n=45). CSF examination, head CT, DCVS occurrence, cerebral infarction incidence, Glasgow Outcome Scale prognostic score, and 1-month mortality were recorded. Results The occurrence of DCVS was 30.9% in the C group and 4.4% in the CR group (P<0.005). The cerebral infarction incidences in the C and CR groups were 19.0% and 2.2% (P<0.05), respectively, 1 month after the treatments. Mortality was not significantly different between the 2 groups during the follow-up period. Conclusions Massive CR after embolization surgery for aneurysmal SAH can significantly reduce DCVS occurrence and effectively improve the outcomes. PMID:27394187

  8. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness. PMID:27411424

  9. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness.

  10. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  11. Tombstoning ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Bahattin

    2009-01-01

    Tombstoning ST elevation myocardial infarction can be described as a STEMI characterized by tombstoning ST-segment elevation. This myocardial infarction is associated with extensive myocardial damage, reduced left ventricle function, serious hospital complications and poor prognosis. Tombstoning ECG pattern is a notion beyond morphological difference and is associated with more serious clinical results. Despite the presence of a few reports on tombstoning ST elevation, there is no report which reviews STEMI demonstrating this electrocardiographic pattern. PMID:21037844

  12. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Patients who sustain complicated acute myocardial infarction in whom thrombolytic agents either fail or are contraindicated often need mechanical revascularization other than PTCA. In 24 patients with acute infarction complicated by continuous chest pain and ischemia who either received lytics or with contraindication to lytics, a holmium:YAG laser (Eclipse Surgical Technologies, Palo Alto, CA) was utilized for thrombolysis and plaque ablation. Clinical success was achieved in 23/24 patients, with 23 patients (94%) surviving the acute infarction. Holmium:YAG laser is very effective and safe in thrombolysis and revascularization in this complicated clinical setting.

  13. Multimodal MRI characterization of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Shen, Q; Watts, L T; Muir, E R; Huang, S; Yang, G-Y; Suarez, J I; Duong, T Q

    2016-03-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We implemented an in-scanner rat model of mild SAH in which blood or vehicle was injected into the cistern magna, and applied multimodal MRI to study the brain prior to, immediately after (5min to 4h), and upto 7days after SAH. Vehicle injection did not change arterial lumen diameter, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), T2, venous signal, vascular reactivity to hypercapnia, or foot-fault scores, but mildly reduce cerebral blood flow (CBF) up to 4h, and open-field activity up to 7days post injection. By contrast, blood injection caused: (i) vasospasm 30min after SAH but not thereafter, (ii) venous abnormalities at 3h and 2days, delayed relative to vasospasm, (iii) reduced basal CBF and to hypercapnia 1-4h but not thereafter, (iv) reduced ADC immediately after SAH but no ADC and T2 changes on days 2 and 7, and (v) reduced open-field activities in both SAH and vehicle animals, but no significant differences in open-field activities and foot-fault tests between groups. Mild SAH exhibited transient and mild hemodynamic disturbances and diffusion changes, but did not show apparent ischemic brain injury nor functional deficits. PMID:26708744

  14. Impact of Comorbidity on Early Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Cerebral Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Selma Sijercic; Brkic, Harun; Avdagic, Harun; Smajic, Jasmina; Hodzic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the complications aneurysms subarachnoid hemorrhage is the development of vasospasm, which is the leading cause of disability and death from ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Aim: To evaluate the significance of previous comorbidities on early outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm in the prevention of vasospasm. Patients and methods: The study had prospective character in which included 50 patients, whose diagnosed with SAH caused by the rupture of a brain aneurysm in the period from 2011to 2013. Two groups of patients were formed. Group I: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered nimodipine at a dose of 15-30 mg / kg bw / h (3-10 ml) for the duration of the initial treatment. Group II: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered with MgSO4 at a dose of 12 grams in 500 ml of 0.9% NaCl / 24 h during the initial treatment. Results: Two-thirds of the patients (68%) from both groups had a good outcome measured with values according to GOS scales, GOS IV and V. The poorer outcome, GOS III had 20% patients, the GOS II was at 2% and GOS I within 10% of patients. If we analyze the impact of comorbidity on the outcome, it shows that there is a significant relationship between the presence of comorbidity and outcomes. The patients without comorbidity (83.30%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), the same outcome was observed (59.4%) with comorbidities, which has a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04). Patients without diabetes (32%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), while the percentage of patients with diabetes less frequent (2%) with a good outcome, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.009). Conclusion: The outcome of treatment 30 days after the subarachnoid hemorrhage analyzed values WFNS and GOS, is not dependent on the method of prevention and treatment of vasospasm. Most concomitant diseases in

  15. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in Posterior Circulation Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Holger; Böhme, Johannes; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of blood brain barrier injury in posterior circulation infarction as demonstrated by the hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR). Methods From a MRI report database we identified patients with posterior circulation infarction who underwent MRI, including perfusion-weighted images (PWI), within 12 hours after onset and follow-up MRI within 24 hours and analyzed diffusion-weighted images (DWI), PWI, FLAIR, and MR angiography (MRA). On FLAIR images, the presence of HARM was noted by using pre-specified criteria (focal enhancement in the subarachnoid space and/or the ventricles). Results Overall 16 patients (median age of patients 68.5 (IQR 55.5–82.75) years) with posterior circulation infarction were included. Of these, 13 (81.3%) demonstrated PCA occlusion, and 3 (18.7%) patients BA occlusion on MRA. Initial DWI demonstrated ischemic lesions in the thalamus (68.8%), splenium (18.8%), hippocampus (75%), occipital lobe (81.3%), mesencephalon (18.8%), pons (18.8%), and cerebellum (50%). On follow-up MRA recanalization was noted in 10 (62.5%) patients. On follow-up FLAIR images, HARM was observed in 8 (50%) patients. In all of these, HARM was detected remote from the acute ischemic lesion. HARM was more frequently observed in patients with vessel recanalization (p = 0.04), minor infarction growth (p = 0.01), and smaller ischemic lesions on follow-up DWI (p = 0.05). Conclusions HARM is a frequent finding in posterior circulation infarction and associated with vessel recanalization, minor infarction growth as well as smaller infarction volumes in the course. Neuroradiologists should be cognizant of the fact that HARM may be present on short interval follow-up FLAIR images in patients with acute ischemic infarction who initially underwent MRI and received intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents. PMID:27326459

  16. AANA journal course: update for nurse anesthetists-improving the safety of subarachnoid and epidural blocks--Part A.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, M A

    1997-08-01

    Hypotension caused by reduced venous return to the heart is a common hazard during subarachnoid and epidural anesthesia. Reduced venous return can also cause severe bradycardia and even cardiac arrest. The infusion of a crystalloid intravenous preload prior to the injection of local anesthetic helps prevent these complications. Unfortunately, intravenous fluid preloading prior to subarachnoid or epidural block is neither appropriate for all patients nor is it always effective. Vasopressor infusions and lower extremity compression, though not completely studied, may allow for further decreases in the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia. When dosing an epidural catheter, making each dose a test dose and observing for signs of subarachnoid or intravascular injection decreases the incidence of hypotension, seizure, and cardiotoxicity. The pathophysiology of cardiac arrest and resuscitation is different during major conduction block due primarily to changes in peripheral vascular tone and venous return to the heart. Neural injury associated with regional anesthesia is due to needle trauma, hematoma, injectate toxicity, ischemia, and compression. Though neural injury is rare, it is more commonly associated with blocks performed in the lumbar region (spinals and epidurals) than in other types of blocks. PMID:9281920

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by an undifferentiated sarcoma of the sellar region

    PubMed Central

    Ganaha, Tsukasa; Inamasu, Joji; Oheda, Motoki; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi; Abe, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is rare for patients with pituitary apoplexy to exhibit concomitant subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Only a handful of patients with pituitary apoplexy have developed such hemorrhagic complications, and histopathological examination revealed pituitary adenoma as the cause of SAH. Case Report: A previously healthy 35-year-old woman was brought to our institution after complaining of severe headache and left monocular blindness. Brain computed tomography showed a diffuse SAH with a central low density. Subsequently, the brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intrasellar mass with heterogeneous contrast enhancement. The patient was presumptively diagnosed with SAH secondary to hemorrhagic pituitary adenoma and underwent transcranial surgery to remove both the tumor and subarachnoid clot. A histological evaluation of the surgical specimen revealed malignant cells with strong predilection for vascular invasion. Following immunohistochemical evaluation, the tumor was negative for the majority of tumor markers and was positive only for vimentin and p53; thus, a diagnosis of undifferentiated sarcoma was established. Conclusions: This case was informative in the respect that tumors other than pituitary adenoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with pituitary apoplexy. PMID:27500006

  18. [Exertion tolerance in the early period after myocardial infarction, the results of echocardiographic examination and the clinical course of infarction].

    PubMed

    Straburzyńska-Migaj, E

    1992-01-01

    The relation between exercise test, echocardiography and clinical course of acute myocardial infarction was investigated. 17-34 days after an acute myocardial infarction, before hospital discharge, 58 patients underwent exercise test and 17-28 days- echocardiography. Low exercise capacity was significant related to angina before infarction, maximal CKNAC and complications during clinical course. There was inverted correlation of asynergy index calculated from echocardiography with maximal workload achieved during exercise test.

  19. Decorin alleviated chronic hydrocephalus via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Chen, Yujie; Li, Lingyong; Jiang, Jiaode; Wu, Guangyong; Zuo, Yuchun; Zhang, John H; Feng, Hua; Yan, Xiaoxin; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus is one of the severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, there is no efficient treatment for the prevention of chronic hydrocephalus, partially due to poor understanding of underlying pathogenesis, subarachnoid fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) is a potent fibrogenic factor implicated in wide range of fibrotic diseases. To investigate whether decorin, a natural antagonist for TGF-β1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and chronic hydrocephalus after SAH, two-hemorrhage-injection SAH model was conducted in 6-week-old rats. Recombinant human decorin(rhDecorin) (30ug/2ul) was administered before blood injection and on the 10th day after SAH. TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide were assessed via western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence. And neurobehavioral tests and Morris water maze were employed to evaluate long-term neurological functions after SAH. We found that SAH induced heightened activation of TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF axis, presenting as a two peak response of TGF-β1 in cerebrospinal fluid, elevation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I in brain parenchyma and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide in cerebrospinal fluid, and increased lateral ventricle index. rhDecorin treatment effectively inhibited up-regulation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide after SAH. Moreover, rhDecorin treatment significantly reduced lateral ventricular index and incidence of chronic hydrocephalus after SAH. Importantly, rhDecorin improved neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, rhDecorin suppresses extracellular matrix accumulation and following subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway, preventing development of hydrocephalus and attenuating long-term neurocognitive defects after SAH.

  20. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT. In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824–0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were

  1. Isolated spinal artery aneurysm: a rare culprit of subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tony H T; Leung, Warren K W; Lai, Bill M H; Khoo, Jennifer L S

    2015-04-01

    Isolated spinal artery aneurysm is a rare lesion which could be accountable for spontaneous spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man presenting with sudden onset of chest pain radiating to the neck and back, with subsequent headache and confusion. Initial computed tomography aortogram revealed incidental finding of subtle acute spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. A set of computed tomography scans of the brain showed further acute intracranial subarachnoid haemorrhage with posterior predominance, small amount of intraventricular haemorrhage, and absence of intracranial vascular lesions. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a thrombosed intradural spinal aneurysm with surrounding sentinel clot, which was trapped and excised during surgical exploration. High level of clinical alertness is required in order not to miss this rare but detrimental entity. Its relevant aetiopathological features and implications for clinical management are discussed.

  2. Continuous Monitoring of Spreading Depolarization and Cerebrovascular Autoregulation after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Shirao, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Takao; Oka, Fumiaki; Maruta, Yuichi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Oku, Takayuki; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-10-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a prominent complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Although vasospasm of proximal cerebral arteries has been regarded as the main cause of DCI, vasospasm of distal arteries, microthrombosis, impaired autoregulation, cortical spreading depolarization (CSD), and spreading ischemia are thought to be involved in DCI after aSAH. Here, we describe a patient with aSAH in whom CSD and cerebrovascular autoregulation were evaluated using simultaneous electrocorticography and monitoring of the pressure reactivity index (PRx) after surgical clipping of a ruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm. In this patient, a prolonged duration of CSD and elevation of PRx preceded delayed neurological deficit. Based on this observation, we propose a relationship between these factors and DCI. Assessment of cerebrovascular autoregulation may permit detection of the inverse hemodynamic response to cortical depolarization. Detection of DCI may be achieved through simultaneous monitoring of CSD and PRx in patients with aSAH. PMID:27492947

  3. Continuous Monitoring of Spreading Depolarization and Cerebrovascular Autoregulation after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Shirao, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Takao; Oka, Fumiaki; Maruta, Yuichi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Oku, Takayuki; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-10-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a prominent complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Although vasospasm of proximal cerebral arteries has been regarded as the main cause of DCI, vasospasm of distal arteries, microthrombosis, impaired autoregulation, cortical spreading depolarization (CSD), and spreading ischemia are thought to be involved in DCI after aSAH. Here, we describe a patient with aSAH in whom CSD and cerebrovascular autoregulation were evaluated using simultaneous electrocorticography and monitoring of the pressure reactivity index (PRx) after surgical clipping of a ruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm. In this patient, a prolonged duration of CSD and elevation of PRx preceded delayed neurological deficit. Based on this observation, we propose a relationship between these factors and DCI. Assessment of cerebrovascular autoregulation may permit detection of the inverse hemodynamic response to cortical depolarization. Detection of DCI may be achieved through simultaneous monitoring of CSD and PRx in patients with aSAH.

  4. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neuroinflammation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Manoranjan, Branavan; Turner, Ryan C.; McConnell, Evan; Vates, George Edward; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simard, J. Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating outcomes including vasospasm, cognitive decline, and even death. Currently, treatment options are limited for this potentially life threatening injury. Recent evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in injury expansion and brain damage. Red blood cell breakdown products can lead to the release of inflammatory cytokines that trigger vasospasm and tissue injury. Preclinical models have been used successfully to improve understanding about neuroinflammation following aneurysmal rupture. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of how neuroinflammation relates to secondary outcomes such as vasospasm after aneurysmal rupture and to critically discuss pharmaceutical agents that warrant further investigation for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. We provide a concise overview of the neuroinflammatory pathways that are upregulated following aneurysmal rupture and how these pathways correlate to long-term outcomes. Treatment of aneurysm rupture is limited and few pharmaceutical drugs are available. Through improved understanding of biochemical mechanisms of injury, novel treatment solutions are being developed that target neuroinflammation. In the final sections of this review, we highlight a few of these novel treatment approaches and emphasize why targeting neuroinflammation following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may improve patient care. We encourage ongoing research into the pathophysiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in regards to neuroinflammatory cascades and the translation to randomized clinical trials. PMID:27049383

  5. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Days 1 through 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Brice, Roanne G.; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) are a serious medical emergency, as 30% to 50% of all SAHs can result in death. Personal accounts and case studies are an important aspect of evidence-based practice. This first article of two presents a review of AB's (patient) condition immediately following an SAH in the intensive care and immediately post…

  6. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising

  7. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L.; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury—axonal injury—is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage

  8. Primary and Secondary Drug Treatment of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Warnica, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The management of myocardial infarction has been revolutionized during the last few years. Based on a better understanding of the physiopathology of infarction, aggressive intervention with drug therapy has made great reductions in both mortality and morbidity possible. Early reperfusion of the infarct-related artery with such thrombolytic agents as streptokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may decrease acute mortality by up to 50%. New uses for older drugs, such as acetylsalicylic acid and nitroglycerin, give them a primary role in acute myocardial infarction. β-Blocking drugs, when given in the early and later phases of myocardial infarction, also clearly reduce mortality and morbidity. Combining early reperfusion and adjunctive therapy with ASA, nitrates, and β-blockers will surely become accepted as the most effective method of treating the pain, limiting the damage, and preventing the complications of myocardial infarction. PMID:21249088

  9. Determining rural risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: A structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Linda Jayne; Gall, Seana; Stirling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) carries a high disability burden. The true impact of rurality as a predictor of outcome severity is unknown. Our aim is to clarify the relationship between the proposed explanations of regional and rural health disparities linked to severity of outcome following an aSAH. An initial literature search identified limited data directly linking geographical location, rurality, rural vulnerability, and aSAH. A further search noting parallels with ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct literature presented a number of diverse and interrelated predictors. This a priori knowledge informed the development of a conceptual framework that proposes the relationship between rurality and severity of outcome following an aSAH utilizing structural equation modeling. The presented conceptual framework explores a number of system, environmental, and modifiable risk factors. Socioeconomic characteristics, modifiable risk factors, and timely treatment that were identified as predictors of severity of outcome following an aSAH and within each of these defined predictors a number of contributing specific individual predictors are proposed. There are considerable gaps in the current knowledge pertaining to the impact of rurality on the severity of outcome following an aSAH. Absent from the literature is any investigation of the cumulative impact and multiplicity of risk factors associated with rurality. The proposed conceptual framework hypothesizes a number of relationships between both individual level and system level predictors, acknowledging that intervening predictors may mediate the effect of one variable on another. PMID:27695237

  10. Determining rural risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: A structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Linda Jayne; Gall, Seana; Stirling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) carries a high disability burden. The true impact of rurality as a predictor of outcome severity is unknown. Our aim is to clarify the relationship between the proposed explanations of regional and rural health disparities linked to severity of outcome following an aSAH. An initial literature search identified limited data directly linking geographical location, rurality, rural vulnerability, and aSAH. A further search noting parallels with ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct literature presented a number of diverse and interrelated predictors. This a priori knowledge informed the development of a conceptual framework that proposes the relationship between rurality and severity of outcome following an aSAH utilizing structural equation modeling. The presented conceptual framework explores a number of system, environmental, and modifiable risk factors. Socioeconomic characteristics, modifiable risk factors, and timely treatment that were identified as predictors of severity of outcome following an aSAH and within each of these defined predictors a number of contributing specific individual predictors are proposed. There are considerable gaps in the current knowledge pertaining to the impact of rurality on the severity of outcome following an aSAH. Absent from the literature is any investigation of the cumulative impact and multiplicity of risk factors associated with rurality. The proposed conceptual framework hypothesizes a number of relationships between both individual level and system level predictors, acknowledging that intervening predictors may mediate the effect of one variable on another.

  11. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the

  12. Association between S100B Levels and Long-Term Outcome after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pui Man Rosalind; Du, Rose

    2016-01-01

    S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B), a well-studied marker for neurologic injury, has been suggested as a candidate for predicting outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. We performed a pooled analysis summarizing the associations between S100B protein in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with radiographic vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurologic deficit (DIND), delayed cerebral infarction, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) outcome. A literature search using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the EMBASE databases was performed to identify relevant studies published up to May 2015. The weighted Stouffer's Z method was used to perform a pooled analysis of outcome measures with greater than three studies. A total of 13 studies were included in this review. Higher serum S100B level was found to be associated with cerebral infarction as diagnosed by CT (padj = 3.1 x 10(-4)) and worse GOS outcome (padj = 5.5 x 10(-11)). There was no association found between serum and CSF S100B with radiographic vasospasm or DIND. S100B is a potential prognostic marker for aSAH outcome.

  13. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast.

  14. MR imaging findings in diabetic muscle infarction.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Gitanjali; Nicholas, Richard; Pandey, Tarun; Montgomery, Corey; Jambhekar, Kedar; Ram, Roopa

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, often unrecognized complication seen in patients with poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus. The diagnosis is often missed and leads to unnecessary invasive investigations and inappropriate treatment. The patients usually present with unilateral thigh pain and swelling. MRI typically demonstrates diffuse swelling and increased T2 signal intensity within the affected muscles. The condition is self-limiting and is treated conservatively with bed rest and analgesics. Recurrences have been reported in the same or contralateral limb. We report a case of diabetic muscle infarction with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and imaging abnormality with recurrence on the contralateral side.

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Karakama, Jun; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Maehara, Taketoshi; Ohno, Kikuo

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with an extremely rare case of intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of an anterior spinal artery aneurysm manifesting as disturbance of consciousness following sudden onset of neck pain and numbness of the extremities. Cranial computed tomography revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage, mainly in the posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography studies on admission and on the 4th day demonstrated no definite abnormality as a bleeding source. A ventricular catheter was inserted to treat the acute hydrocephalus, and conservative management was continued during the acute period. Third angiography on the 18th day demonstrated an anterior spinal artery aneurysm at the C1 level which was considered to be the bleeding site. After conservative treatment, the patient was discharged without neurological deficits. Fourth angiography on the 108 th day disclosed spontaneous disappearance of the aneurysm, which was confirmed by the fifth angiography on the 269 th day. If subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown etiology is encountered, spinal artery aneurysm should be considered as the bleeding source. Despite the controversy concerning the treatment strategy, ruptured spinal artery aneurysms can be treated conservatively because of the possibility of spontaneous regression. Follow-up angiography is required to evaluate the natural course of the lesion.

  16. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  17. Predictors of Pulmonary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Bottai, Matteo; Ciccotosto, Cesario; Roberto, Luca; Monti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), pulmonary infarction is deemed to occur primarily in individuals with compromised cardiac function. The current study was undertaken to establish the prevalence of pulmonary infarction in patients with acute PE, and the relationship between infarction and: age, body height, body mass index (BMI), smoking habits, clot burden, and comorbidities. The authors studied prospectively 335 patients with acute PE diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CT) in 18 hospitals throughout central Italy. The diagnosis of pulmonary infarction on CT was based on Hampton and Castleman's criteria (cushion-like or hemispherical consolidation lying along the visceral pleura). Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the relationship between covariates and the probability of pulmonary infarction. The prevalence of pulmonary infarction was 31%. Patients with infarction were significantly younger and with significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease than those without (P < 0.001). The frequency of infarction increased linearly with increasing height, and decreased with increasing BMI. In logistic regression, the covariates significantly associated with the probability of infarction were age, body height, BMI, and current smoking. The risk of infarction grew with age, peaked at approximately age 40, and decreased afterwards. Increasing body height and current smoking were significant amplifiers of the risk of infarction, whereas increasing BMI appeared to confer some protection. Our data indicate that pulmonary infarction occurs in nearly one-third of the patients with acute PE. Those with infarction are often young and otherwise healthy. Increasing body height and active smoking are predisposing risk factors. PMID:26469892

  18. [Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Takayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Endo, Shin; Kato, Syunichi

    2016-06-01

    The patient, a 79-year-old man, experienced a Hunt & Kosnik grade IV subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting with sudden-onset coma and severe left hemiplegia. We performed cranial clipping surgery for a ruptured aneurysm on the right middle cerebral artery the same day. Post-operative recovery proceeded smoothly, with gradual improvements in disturbed consciousness and left hemiplegia. Three weeks post-operation, CT revealed low-density areas in the right frontal and temporal lobe, believed to be due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as hydrocephaly. We then performed a lumbo-peritoneal (L-P) shunt for the hydrocephaly. Two months later, the patient experienced shunt occlusion, and we performed a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt revision (pressure: 6 cm H(2)O). Headaches, severe decline in cognitive function, and worsened left hemiplegia were observed seven weeks post-shunt revision. Cranial CT revealed widespread low-density areas in right posterior cerebral white matter. We suspected unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after performing cranial MRI and cerebral angiography. Increasing the set pressure of the shunt improved the symptoms and radiographic findings. PRES is typically bilateral, and unilateral incidents are rare. This is the first report of unilateral PRES secondary to shunt operation. Its unilaterality appears to have been caused by unilateral brain damage or adhesions to the brain surface from the subarachnoid cerebral hemorrhage. Overdrainage post-shunt can also induce PRES. Diagnosis of PRES is more difficult in unilateral cases;practitioners must keep PRES in mind as a rare complication post-shunt operation. PMID:27270150

  19. Artery of Percheron Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, K.V.; Kaaviya, R.; Arpita, Bhaumik

    2016-01-01

    Artery of Percheron (AOP) occlusion is a rare cause of ischemic stroke characterized by bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts, with or without mesencephalic infarction. Clinically it presents with mental state disturbances, hypersomnolence, aphasia/dysarthria, amnesia and ocular movement disorders, including vertical gaze palsy. Here, we report a case of cardioembolic AOP infarction in a 37-year-old woman with rheumatic mitral valvular stenosis. This case is being reported to highlight the interesting clinical and neuroimaging features of this rare condition, and the differential diagnosis of AOP infarction on imaging have been discussed. PMID:27647964

  20. Artery of Percheron Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, K.V.; Kaaviya, R.; Arpita, Bhaumik

    2016-01-01

    Artery of Percheron (AOP) occlusion is a rare cause of ischemic stroke characterized by bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts, with or without mesencephalic infarction. Clinically it presents with mental state disturbances, hypersomnolence, aphasia/dysarthria, amnesia and ocular movement disorders, including vertical gaze palsy. Here, we report a case of cardioembolic AOP infarction in a 37-year-old woman with rheumatic mitral valvular stenosis. This case is being reported to highlight the interesting clinical and neuroimaging features of this rare condition, and the differential diagnosis of AOP infarction on imaging have been discussed.

  1. Artery of Percheron Infarction.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K V; Kaaviya, R; Arpita, Bhaumik

    2016-07-01

    Artery of Percheron (AOP) occlusion is a rare cause of ischemic stroke characterized by bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts, with or without mesencephalic infarction. Clinically it presents with mental state disturbances, hypersomnolence, aphasia/dysarthria, amnesia and ocular movement disorders, including vertical gaze palsy. Here, we report a case of cardioembolic AOP infarction in a 37-year-old woman with rheumatic mitral valvular stenosis. This case is being reported to highlight the interesting clinical and neuroimaging features of this rare condition, and the differential diagnosis of AOP infarction on imaging have been discussed. PMID:27647964

  2. Laparoscopic excision of infarcted accessory spleen.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Yasmin; Cameron, Brian H; Maizlin, Zeev V; Boutross-Tadross, Odette

    2010-04-01

    An accessory spleen is present in about 10-30% of the population and, usually, does not cause symptoms. We present a case report of an unusual presentation of accessory spleen infarction, with a literature review. A 12-year old male presented with acute left-upper quadrant pain that slowly resolved. An ultrasound and computed tomography scan showed a 3.5 x 2.5 x 2 cm solid mass abutting and displacing the splenic flexure of the colon, with surrounding inflammatory changes. This was interpreted as a colonic duplication cyst, and the boy was treated with antibiotics and underwent elective laparoscopic exploration. It was removed laparoscopically without complication and, on pathologic examination, proved to be consistent with an infarcted accessory spleen. Less than two dozen similar cases of accessory spleen infarction have been reported in the literature, most presenting with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnoses included appendicitis, ovarian torsion, neoplasm, and, in our case, colonic duplication. The natural course of infarcted accessory spleen would be to atrophy, but, even with advanced imaging techniques, it may be impossible to diagnose infarcted accessory spleen with enough confidence to avoid surgery.

  3. Effect of dietary β carotene on cerebral aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage in the brain apo E-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Gopal, K; Nagarajan, P; Raj, T Avinash; Jahan, P; Ganapathy, H S; Mahesh Kumar, M J

    2011-10-01

    Atherosclerosis will lead to stenosis/occlusion in the lumen of various arteries of living body. This can lead various conditions including myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction/aneurysm and peripheral artery disease. Ang II is believed to be an important regulatory peptide involved in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. Matrix metalloproteinase's (MMPs), adhesion molecules and plasminogen systems are involved in the inflammatory reaction of various blood vessels as well as pathogenesis of cerebro vasuclar disease in apo E(-/-) mice during angiotensin II injection. The present study analyses the role of ang II in development of cerebral aneurysm and also evaluated the mRNA levels of MMPs, adhesion molecules, plasminogen systems and peroxisome proliferators-associated receptors in the brain of apo E(-/-) mouse during the progression of cerebral aneurysm and ischemic conditions. Also, this study evaluates the role of dietary β carotene on cerebrovascular disease. Serum total cholesterol (TC), Low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly increased in angiotensin II treated animals and further β carotene supplementation reduces TC but does not affect the triglyceride and LDL levels. Circulating levels of macrophages were significantly increased in angiotensin treated animals and further beta carotene supplementation significantly reduced the circulating macrophages. Cerebro meningeous aneurysm, subarachnoid haemorrhage, multiple foci of infarction, necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed in the cerebral hemispheres of ang II treated animals, however, infarction size were reduced and no aneurysm, inflammatory foci was observed in β carotene treated animals. Real time analysis showed down regulation of mRNA levels of MMP 2, uPA, PAI, PPAR-A, MCSF1 and up regulation of tPA and MCP-1 in the brain during the progression of cerebral aneurysm and β carotene

  4. Encephalic hemodynamic phases in subarachnoid hemorrhage: how to improve the protective effect in patient prognoses

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; de Azevedo, Daniel Silva; de Azevedo, Milena Krajnyk; de Carvalho Nogueira, Ricardo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently associated with poor prognoses. Three different hemodynamic phases were identified during subarachnoid hemorrhage: oligemia, hyperemia, and vasospasm. Each phase is associated with brain metabolic changes. In this review, we correlated the hemodynamic phases with brain metabolism and potential treatment options in the hopes of improving patient prognoses. PMID:26109948

  5. Management of acute perioperative myocardial infarction: a case report of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and tumor bleeding in the transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qian; Li, Yuan-Xin; Feng, Quan-Zhou; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction complicated by bleeding colon tumor is problematic with regard to management, and appropriate balance of antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis or surgery is crucial for effective treatment. Here, we present a case of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and bleeding tumor in the transverse colon, and share our experience of successfully balancing anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis. PMID:26937182

  6. Hemihyperhidrosis in cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Redmond, Gemma; Ram, Pusbar; Owens, Val B; Sangster, Graeme; Barrett, James A

    2004-09-01

    Increased sweating on the hemiparetic side in cerebral infarcts is not a common clinical finding. The onset, severity and duration of symptoms can vary. The structural lesion responsible for this is a subject of conjecture. We present the case of a 66-year-old man who developed hemihyperhidrosis secondary to a cerebral infarct. PMID:15315923

  7. Perioperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Pericles; Martins, Gerez Fernandes; Biscaro, Andressa; Kruczan, Dany David; Jessen, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative myocardial infarction adversely affects the prognosis of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft and its diagnosis was hampered by numerous difficulties, because the pathophysiology is different from the traditional instability atherosclerotic and the clinical difficulty to be characterized. Objective To identify the frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction and its outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Methods Retrospective cohort study performed in a tertiary hospital specialized in cardiology, from May 01, 2011 to April 30, 2012, which included all records containing coronary artery bypass graft records. To confirm the diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction criteria, the Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction was used. Results We analyzed 116 cases. Perioperative myocardial infarction was diagnosed in 28 patients (24.1%). Number of grafts and use and cardiopulmonary bypass time were associated with this diagnosis and the mean age was significantly higher in this group. The diagnostic criteria elevated troponin I, which was positive in 99.1% of cases regardless of diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction. No significant difference was found between length of hospital stay and intensive care unit in patients with and without this complication, however patients with perioperative myocardial infarction progressed with worse left ventricular function and more death cases. Conclusion The frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction found in this study was considered high and as a consequence the same observed average higher troponin I, more cases of worsening left ventricular function and death. PMID:25859867

  8. Prognosis after myocardial infarction: results of 15 year follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, M A; Scott, P J; Norris, R M

    1984-01-01

    A total of 271 out of 757 patients who had suffered a myocardial infarction during 1966-7 were still alive after six years; these patients were subsequently followed up 15 years after the infarction. Two hundred and sixty eight (99%) of the patients alive at six years and 519 (95%) of the 549 originally discharged from hospital were traced. A coronary prognostic index, which had predicted survival both to three years and from three to six years after recovery from the infarct also predicted survival from six to 15 years after recovery. The major factor affecting survival to 15 years was age at the time of the original infarct. Among patients aged under 60 at the time of infarction women fared better than men (p = 0.027). Factors in the coronary prognostic index that were associated with impairment of left ventricular function at the time of infarction and that had predicted mortality to three years and from three to six years also predicted mortality from six to 15 years. These factors were cardiac enlargement, pulmonary venous congestion, and the presence of infarction before the index infarct. The dominant cause of death remained coronary heart disease and its complications. PMID:6229313

  9. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  10. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation.

  11. [Spinal cord infarction].

    PubMed

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  12. Current strategies for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R A; Fink, M E

    1987-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm represents a major health issue. Although most people who experience an aneurysmal SAH survive to be admitted to a hospital, less than one third of these patients ever return to their premorbid status. Clearly, morbidity of this magnitude demands reevaluation of the clinical approach to this problem. This article reviews the natural history of aneurysmal SAH, and examines the current therapeutic strategies that have been suggested to improve the outcome. Careful evaluation of the existing data suggests that early aneurysm surgery and aggressive postoperative volume expansion therapy constitute the best presently available approach to patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. PMID:3297009

  13. Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Behcet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hak; Lee, Si-Un; Huh, Choonwoong; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-01-01

    A man visited the emergency room with a headache. Brain computed tomography showed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multiple aneurysms. After aneurysm clipping surgery, the patient was discharged. After 5 days, he was admitted to the hospital with skin ulceration and was diagnosed with Behcet syndrome. An angiogram taken 7 weeks after aneurysmal SAH showed intracranial vasospasm. Because inflammation in Behcet syndrome may aggravate intracranial vasospasm, intracranial vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH in Behcet syndrome should be monitored for longer compared to general aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27114963

  14. [Seizures caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Shim, Susy; Christiansen, Ulla Birgitte; Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard

    2016-07-25

    This case report describes a pregnant woman of gestational week 37 + 2 days who was admitted to the hospital with first-time seizures. The patient was stabilized, and an acute caesarian section was performed due to the possible aetiology of eclampsia and the advanced gestational age. Because of the atypical clinical history and normal maternal blood samples a computed tomography of the cerebrum was performed demonstrating a subarachnoid haemorrhage. A computed tomography-angiography revealed an aneurism at the anterior communicating artery. The aneurism was coiled the following day to reduce the risk of rebleeding. PMID:27460576

  15. Myocardial infarction due to lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Vuruskan, Ertan; Dursun, Recep; Sincer, Isa; Gonullu, Hayriye; Akkaya, Emre

    2013-09-01

    Cardiac events due to lightning strike and their severity vary according to the strength of the electric current and the duration of exposure. The electrophysiological effects of lightning on the heart can result in ventricular fibrillation, asystole, QT prolongation, supraventricular tachycardia, and non-specific ST-T wave changes. In this report, a case of a patient who suffered myocardial infarction due to lightning strike is presented, which is a rare complication. PMID:24601203

  16. Myocardial infarction due to lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Vuruskan, Ertan; Dursun, Recep; Sincer, Isa; Gonullu, Hayriye; Akkaya, Emre

    2013-09-01

    Cardiac events due to lightning strike and their severity vary according to the strength of the electric current and the duration of exposure. The electrophysiological effects of lightning on the heart can result in ventricular fibrillation, asystole, QT prolongation, supraventricular tachycardia, and non-specific ST-T wave changes. In this report, a case of a patient who suffered myocardial infarction due to lightning strike is presented, which is a rare complication.

  17. Prognostic implications of cardiac scintigraphic parameters obtained in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, A.; Matsushima, H.; Satoh, A.; Hayashi, H.; Sotobata, I.

    1988-06-01

    A cohort of 76 patients with acute myocardial infarction was studied with infarct-avid scan, radionuclide ventriculography, and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Infarct area, left ventricular ejection fraction, and defect score were calculated as radionuclide indices of the extent of myocardial infarction. The correlation was studied between these indices and cardiac events (death, congestive heart failure, postinfarction angina, and recurrence of myocardial infarction) in the first postinfarction year. High-risk patients (nonsurvivors and patients who developed heart failure) had a larger infarct area, a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and a larger defect score than the others. Univariate linear discriminant analysis was done to determine the optimal threshold of these parameters for distinguishing high-risk patients from others. Radionuclide parameters obtained in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction were useful for detecting both patients with grave complications and those with poor late prognosis during a mean follow-up period of 2.6 years.

  18. [Intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages after administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemicstroke due to anterior cerebral artery dissection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Ken; Koyama, Seigo; Nakamura, Ryoichi

    2011-06-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of right hemiparesis. At admission, he was alert and well oriented. His verbal comprehension seemed good, but his speech was not fluent. He could not stand or walk owing to the right hemiparesis, which was severe in the lower extremity. Computed tomographic (CT) scans on admission showed no abnormality. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging performed after the CT showed a high-intensity lesion in the left cingulate gyrus. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed occlusion and irregularity of the left A2 portion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). At 1 h 50 min after the onset of the hemiparesis, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; 0.6 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. At 1 h after the administration of rt-PA, he became drowsy and his right hemiparesis deteriorated. CT scans performed again showed a hematoma in the left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the anterior interhemispheric fissure. He was treated conservatively. MRA performed on the 18th day after admission showed recanalization of the left ACA and abnormal dilatation of the left A2 segment. The abnormal dilatation was also depicted by 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) performed on the 26th day after admission and even on the 33rd and 77th days. As seen in our case, the definite diagnosis of dissection confined to the ACA frequently needs serial angiographies; therefore, its diagnosis immediately after the onset is often difficult. Thrombolytic therapy by intravenous administration of rt-PA for cerebral infarction caused by dissection of the ACA may recanalize the occluded site and facilitate the progression of the dissection, resulting in intracerebral and/or subarachnoid hemorrhages. In patients with cerebral infarction due to ACA dissection, strict control of blood pressure and careful observation are necessary after thrombolytic therapy by rt-PA.

  19. Pontine infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Pontine infarcts are often part of a large ischemia involving the brainstem, although infarcts may be restricted to the pons. In both cases, infarcts in the pons are characterized by interesting clinical patterns resulting from a variety of cranial nerve dysfunctions, eye movement disorders and motor, sensory and cerebellar manifestations, either isolated or in combination. The anteromedial and anterolateral territories are the most commonly involved. Penetrating branch artery disease is the most common etiology. Ten percent of all intracerebral hemorrhages are located in the pons, and small hemorrhages in this brainstem structure may, in some instances, give rise to unusual clinical manifestations. PMID:22377887

  20. Renal infarction after aerobics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J H; Moinuddin, M; Buchignani, J S; Rockett, J F; Callison, M K

    1984-11-01

    Renal infarction is most frequently due to emboli from the heart or aorta. Other causes include atheromatous disease, renal artery aneurysm, vasculitis, hypotension, hypercoagulable states, aortic dissection, and major trauma. Most renal infarctions are segmental. The extent of disease is dependent upon the size and number of renal vessels involved, coexistent renal disease, and collateral circulation. Flank pain, fever, leukocytosis, hematuria, renal failure, or hypertension may suggest the diagnosis, but these findings are nonspecific and diagnosis will depend not only on history and physical examination, but also on the appropriate imaging tests. The type of treatment is dictated by the etiology of the infarction.

  1. Digital infarction in a hemodialysis patient due to embolism from a thrombosed brachial arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Yj, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Acute onset of digital ischemia and infarction is an unusual complication in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a report of a patient on regular hemodialysis who presented with acute distal extremity ischemia, progressing to digital infarction and on evaluation was found to have thrombosis of brachial arteriovenous fistula with embolization to the distal arteries causing digital artery occlusion.

  2. Metamorphosis of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Research: from Delayed Vasospasm to Early Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Delayed vasospasm that develops 3–7 days after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has traditionally been considered the most important determinant of delayed ischemic injury and poor outcome. Consequently, most therapies against delayed ischemic injury are directed towards reducing the incidence of vasospasm. The clinical trials based on this strategy, however, have so far claimed limited success; the incidence of vasospasm is reduced without reduction in delayed ischemic injury or improvement in the long-term outcome. This fact has shifted research interest to the early brain injury (first 72 h) evoked by SAH. In recent years, several pathological mechanisms that activate within minutes after the initial bleed and lead to early brain injury are identified. In addition, it is found that many of these mechanisms evolve with time and participate in the pathogenesis of delayed ischemic injury and poor outcome. Therefore, a therapy or therapies focused on these early mechanisms may not only prevent the early brain injury but may also help reduce the intensity of later developing neurological complications. This manuscript reviews the pathological mechanisms of early brain injury after SAH and summarizes the status of current therapies. PMID:21161614

  3. Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage with a positive angiographic finding: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Ahmad; Numminen, Jussi; Rahul, Raj; Järveläinen, Juha; Niemelä, Mika

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage cases are reported as negative-finding etiologies. Recently, high-resolution images allowed us to overcome the previous difficulty of finding the source of bleeding, which underlies the concept of a "negative finding". We discovered a venous etiology, hidden behind the tip of the basilar artery; namely, the lateral pontine vein. Here, we review the literature on perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and on venous aneurysm. We highlight this type of aneurysm as a candidate source of perimesencephalic hemorrhage. This case may change our way of dealing with what we have termed a negative finding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27106848

  4. Complications of flow-directed balloon-tipped catheters.

    PubMed

    Smart, F W; Husserl, F E

    1990-01-01

    Acute or short-term complications following the use of flow-directed balloon-tipped catheters are well recognized. Long-term sequelae are rarely reported. We report herein an early complication of pulmonary arterial rupture with infarction followed by the delayed development of a pulmonary arterial aneurysm.

  5. Multi-Infarct Dementia

    MedlinePlus

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  6. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  7. Preventive effect of continuous cisternal irrigation with magnesium sulfate solution on angiographic cerebral vasospasms associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro; Esaki, Takanori; Nakao, Yasuaki; Tokugawa, Joji; Watanabe, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    cardiovascular complications such as bradycardia or hypotension were observed in any of the patients. However, bradypnea was noted among patients in the Mg group. The Mg group had a significantly better CV grade than the control group (p < 0.05). Compared with the patients in the Mg group, those in the control group had a significantly elevated blood flow velocity in the MCA. Both groups were similar in the incidences of cerebral infarction, and the 2 groups also did not significantly differ in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Continuous cisternal irrigation with MgSO4 solution starting on Day 4 and continuing to Day 14 significantly inhibited CV in patients with aneurysmal SAH without severe cardiovascular complications. However, this improvement in CV neither reduced the incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia nor improved the functional outcomes in patients with SAH.

  8. Long-term assessment of motor and cognitive behaviours in the intraluminal perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Gergely; Colbourne, Frederick

    2009-03-17

    The endovascular perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a commonly used model in rats as it is performed without a craniotomy and accurately mimics the physiological effects of SAH in humans. The long-term behavioural profile of the model, however, has not been characterized. Given that humans often have cognitive deficits following SAH, we set out to characterize the behavioural profile as well as the spontaneous temperature changes of rats following intraluminal perforation. Rats were pre-trained on three motor tasks (tapered beam, limb-use asymmetry and the horizontal ladder tasks) prior to receiving a SAH. The animals were then assessed on post-surgical days 3, 7, 14 and 21 on these tasks. At the completion of motor testing, the rats were assessed on a moving platform version of the Morris water task. Despite significant mortality (33%), SAH did not result in lasting motor deficits on any of the tasks examined. However, the SAH group did show a minor cognitive impairment in the Morris water task. In addition, SAH produced a slight, but significant elevation in body temperature (vs. sham operated rats) despite an acute decrease in general home cage activity. The majority of the animals did not have any observable infarcts and the SAH did not significantly affect cortical thickness. In summary, the endovascular perforation model of SAH results in no lasting motor deficits and only minor cognitive impairment in survivors, which alone would be difficult to evaluate in neuroprotection or rehabilitation studies. PMID:19059287

  9. Acute myocardial infarction and sudden death in Sioux Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Hrabovsky, S L; Welty, T K; Coulehan, J L

    1989-01-01

    While some Indian tribes have low rates of acute myocardial infarction, Northern Plains Indians, including the Sioux, have rates of morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction higher than those reported for the United States population in general. In a review of diagnosed cases of acute myocardial infarction over a 3-year period in 2 hospitals serving predominantly Sioux Indians, 8% of cases were found misclassified, and 22% failed to meet rigorous diagnostic criteria, although the patients did indeed have ischemic heart disease. Patients had high frequencies of complications and risk factors and a fatality rate of 16% within a month of admission. Sudden deaths likely due to ischemic heart disease but in persons not diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction by chart review occurred 3 times more frequently than deaths occurring within a month of clinical diagnosis. PMID:2735047

  10. Massive splenic infarction and portal vein thrombosis in children with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Tekin; Erdem, Arzu Y; Fettah, Ali; Kaçar, Dilek; Avci, Zekai; Yarali, Nese; Tunc, Bahattin

    2014-10-01

    Massive splenic infarction and portal vein thrombosis (PVT) due to chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is extremely rare. We describe 2 children who were presented with massive splenic infarction and PVT in the course of CML. Massive splenic infarction and PVT treated with splenectomy in one and with medical treatment in another in whom PVT resolved by cytoreductive treatment, led to downsizing of spleen or splenectomy. Splenic infarct and PVT should be considered in CML patients with long-lasting severe abdominal pain despite appropriate medical attempts. Splenectomy should be spared for persistent symptoms and complications.

  11. Diabetic Muscle Infarction (Myonecrosis): Underdiagnosed or Underreported?

    PubMed

    Madhuvan, H S; Krishnamurthy, Ajoy; Prakash, P; Shariff, Shameem

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes. It is seen more in Type 1 DM than Type 2 DM, but in both it is associated with longer duration of diabetes, poor glycemic control with or without microvascular complications. We present a case report of a 47 year diabetic male, who presented with sudden onset of painful swelling of the left thigh muscles (vastus group). The patient had microvascular complications of diabetes. Apart for mild elevation of CPK and LDH other investigations were normal. MRI findings of left thigh showed T2 hyperintensities in the involved muscles which established the diagnosis. Muscle biopsy revealed necrosis of the muscle fibres, presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates and hyalinization of the blood vessels with luminal narrowing which is characteristic of diabetic muscle infarction. The patient was treated with immobilization, analgesics and adequate blood sugar control. This case highlights the rarity of finding vascular changes as well as the poor prognosis and the occurrence of fatal complications in near future.

  12. A Case of Cerebral Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Fabry's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Youn Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrage (SAH) with Fabry's disease. A 42-year-old woman presented with aneurysmal SAH originated from a saccular aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. The patient was treated by an endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm. Postoperatively the patient recovered favorably without any neurological deficit. During her admission, the patient had a sign of proteinuria in urine analysis. The pathologic findings of kidney needle biopsy implied nephrosialidosis (mucolipidosis of lysosomal stroage disease), which is consistent with a Fabry's disease. It is uncommon that Fabry's disease is presented with aneurysmal SAH, especially in middle-aged patients, but could be a clinical concern. Further investigations are needed to reveal risk factors, vascular anatomy, and causative mechanisms of Fabry's disease with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:23634271

  13. Multimodality Monitoring, Inflammation, and Neuroregeneration in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Ariel B.; Esteves Veiga, José C.; Teixeira, Manoel J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The mortality rate of poor-grade SAH ranges from 34% to 52%. In an attempt to improve SAH outcomes, clinical research on multimodality monitoring has been performed, as has basic science research on inflammation and neuroregeneration (which can occur due to injury-induced neurogenesis). Nevertheless, the current literature does not focus on the integrated study of these fields. Multimodality monitoring corresponds to physiological data obtained during clinical management by both noninvasive and invasive methods. Regarding inflammation and neuroregeneration, evidence suggests that, in all types of stroke, a proinflammatory phase and an anti-inflammatory phase occur consecutively; these phases affect neurogenesis, which is also influenced by other pathophysiological features of stroke, such as ischemia, seizures, and spreading depression. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether injury-induced neurogenesis is a prognostic factor in poor-grade SAH that can be monitored and modulated. METHODS: We propose a protocol for multimodality monitoring-guided hypothermia in poor-grade SAH in which cellular and molecular markers of inflammation and neuroregeneration can be monitored in parallel with clinical and multimodal data. EXPECTED OUTCOMES: This study may reveal correlations between markers of inflammation and neurogenesis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, based on clinical and multimodality monitoring parameters. DISCUSSION: This protocol has the potential to lead to new therapies for acute, diffuse, and severe brain diseases. ABBREVIATIONS: BBB, blood-brain barrier CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure EEG, electroencephalography ICP, intracranial pressure IL, interleukin MCA, middle cerebral artery SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage SD, spreading depression SGZ, subgranular zone SVZ, subventricular zone TCD, transcranial Doppler PMID:25050583

  14. Arachnoid cell involvement in the mechanism of coagulation-initiated inflammation in the subarachnoid space after subarachnoid hemorrhage*

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhao-liang; Wu, Xiao-kang; Xu, Jian-rong; Li, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess if arachnoid cells have the capability to present antigen and activate T-lymphocytes after stimulation by bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and to illuminate the mechanism of coagulation-initiated inflammation in the subarachnoid space after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: Arachnoid cells were cultured, characterized, and examined by immunofluorescence for the basal expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR). Expression of HLA-DR, after co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, was investigated by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry (FCM). The variation of arachnoid cells’ ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Arachnoid cells were co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The content of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2r) in culture medium was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: (1) Arachnoid cells were successfully cultured for many passages. The immunofluorescent staining was positive for HLA-DR in over 95% of the human arachnoid cells. The punctate HLA-DR was distributed in cytoplasm and not in the karyon. (2) After co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, numerous particles with strong fluorescence appeared in the cytoplasm on Day 6. On Day 8, the quantity of particles and fluorescent intensity were maximal. FCM showed that the percentage of HLA-DR expressing cells was (2.5±0.4)% at the first 5 d, increasing to (60.8±3.6)% on Day 7. (3) After co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, many lysosome and secondary lysosome particles were present in the cytoplasm. Hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and enlarged cysts were observed, with numerous phagocytizing vesicles also observed at the edge of the arachnoid cells. (4) Arachnoid cells stimulated by bloody CSF were co-cultured in vitro with PBMCs. The content of sIL-2r in the culture medium, having been maintained at around 1.30 ng/ml during

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common, clinically-significant electrolyte abnormality seen in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controversy continues to exist regarding both the cause and treatment of hyponatremia in this patient population. Lack of timely diagnosis and/or providing inadequate or inappropriate treatment can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. We review recent literature on hyponatremia in subarachnoid hemorrhage and present currently recommended protocols for diagnosis and management. PMID:25937938

  16. A Case of Post Myocardial Infarction Papillary Muscle Rupture.

    PubMed

    Anuwatworn, Amornpol; Milnes, Christopher; Kumar, Vishesh; Raizada, Amol; Nykamp, Verlyn; Stys, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Papillary muscle rupture is a rare, life-threatening post myocardial infarction mechanical complication. Without surgical intervention, prognosis is very poor. Clinicians need to recognize this complication early, as prompt therapy is crucial. We present a case of inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction complicated by posteromedial papillary muscle rupture resulting in severe acute mitral regurgitation (flail anterior mitral leaflet), acute pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock. In our patient, a new mitral regurgitation murmur suggested this mechanical complication. Complete disruption of papillary muscle was visualized by transesophageal echocardiography. This case illustrates the importance of good physical examination for early diagnosis of papillary muscle rupture, so that life-saving treatment can be administered without delay. PMID:27443107

  17. [The perioperative myocardial infarction - an interdisciplinary task].

    PubMed

    Karatolios, Konstantinos; Rolfes, Caroline; Wulf, Hinnerk; Schieffer, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular complications, particularly perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI), are major contributors to mortaliyt after noncardiac surgery. PMI often occurs unnoticed without symptoms or ECG changes. Despite ist silent presentation, PMI is associated with increased mortality. The combination of high associated mortality and diagnostic challenges mandates increased awareness of PMI. Perioperative myocardial infarction may result from plaque rupture (PMI type I) or be caused by a myocardial supply-demand imbalance of oxygen without plaque rupture (PMI type II). Most PMIs occur within the first 3 days after surgery, highlighting the need for clinical monitoring in order to allow fast diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy. Measurement of cardiac troponin and 12-lead ECG are the diagnostic cornerstone. Therapy of PMI represents a challenge for physicians and requires a collaboration of surgeons, anesthesiologists and cardiologists. PMID:27631445

  18. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary. PMID:26998366

  19. Clinical Neurochemistry of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Toward Predicting Individual Outcomes via Biomarkers of Brain Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tholance, Yannick; Barcelos, Gleicy; Dailler, Frederic; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Renaud, Bernard

    2015-12-16

    The functional outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage is difficult to predict at the individual level. The monitoring of brain energy metabolism has proven to be useful in improving the pathophysiological understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Nonetheless, brain energy monitoring has not yet clearly been included in official guidelines for the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, likely because previous studies compared only biological data between two groups of patients (unfavorable vs favorable outcomes) and did not determine decision thresholds that could be useful in clinical practice. Therefore, this Viewpoint discusses recent findings suggesting that monitoring biomarkers of brain energy metabolism at the level of individuals can be used to predict the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Indeed, by taking into account specific neurochemical patterns obtained by local or global monitoring of brain energy metabolism, it may become possible to predict routinely, and with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, the individual outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Moreover, combining both local and global monitoring improves the overall performance of individual outcome prediction. Such a combined neurochemical monitoring approach may become, after prospective clinical validation, an important component in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to adapt individualized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26595414

  20. Innovative approach for prevention and treatment of post subarachnoid hemorrhage vasospasm: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Venkataramana, Neelam K; Rao, Shailesh A V; Naik, Arun L; Shetty, Kishore; Murthy, Paparaja; Bansal, Abhilash; Panotopoulos, Christos

    2012-04-01

    More than one third of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) develop clinically significant vasospasm, as a leading morbidity and mortality factor for these patients. It is widely accepted that a) Degradation products of blood are the causative factors of vasospasm b) The amount of subarachnoid blood seen on admission CT is correlated to the risk of vasospasm c) Reducing the subarachnoid clot burden at the time of surgery reduces the risk of vasospasm. But there is no existing method to clear the blood from subarachnoid spaces satisfactorily. We have evaluated safety and feasibility of fluid exchange catheter system in SAH, to achieve this goal. We were successful in clearing cisternal blood in three patients with aneurysmal rupture with fluid exchange catheter system. Baseline CT scan of brain was performed immediately after the surgery and then at the end of irrigation. The amount of subarachnoid blood was evaluated. This innovative, fluid exchange catheter system infuses and aspirates micro volumes of drug solution in a cyclic mode, ensuring isobaric exchange of fluids. The result is good clearance of blood in subarachnoid spaces were seen in all the patients. Also, significant improvement in neurological deficits secondary to vasospasm was seen. We conclude that the fluid exchange catheter system is safe and adoptable in neurosurgical practice. PMID:22870156

  1. Addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture effect on quality of subarachnoid block and postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Marilyn; Ghoshal, Pabitra; Namshikar, Viraj; Gaude, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was undertaken in 100 patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgeries. Aim: The objective of this study was to study the effect of addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture on the quality of subarachnoid block and compare it with intrathecal bupivacaine clonidine mixture without fentanyl. Settings and Design: In this prospective and double blind randomized controlled study, one hundred patients, between 20-40 years of age, of either sex, weighing between 40-65 Kg, measuring more than 150 cm in height, of ASA Grade I and II who were undergoing orthopaedic lower limb surgeries were selected in order to study the quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia produced by a combination of bupivacaine clonidine and fentanyl in comparison with bupivacaine clonidine. Materials and Methods: The patients were randomly divided in two groups of 50 each: Group BC: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml of 0.9% NaCl. Group BCF: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml (20 μg) of fentanyl. The total volume of solution in both the groups was 3.0 ml. The quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The data thus obtained was statistically analysed using the following tests: Unpaired student's t-test. Average % change in data over baseline values to detect trends. A ‘P’ value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of sensory and motor blockade in group BCF compared to BC. The duration of analgesia as assessed by, either VAS score of >5 or demand of additional analgesia was > 524.6 ± 32.21 mins in group BC and > 774.4 ± 59.59 mins in group BCF. This prolongation of duration of analgesia in group BCF compared to group BC has statistical significance. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not

  2. LSKL peptide alleviates subarachnoid fibrosis and hydrocephalus by inhibiting TSP1-mediated TGF-β1 signaling activity following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Li, Gaofeng; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Yujie; Zuo, Yuchun; Rashid, Kauthar; Zhang, John H.; Feng, Hua; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus has been demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for poor outcomes in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and drainage is widely considered to play a vital role in communicating hydrocephalus, possibly due to subarachnoid fibrosis. A previous study indicated that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), a key fibrogenic factor, is significantly increased in the CSF following SAH, implying a pivotal role in the development of chronic hydrocephalus. To investigate whether LSKL peptide, a small molecular peptide and competitive antagonist for TGF-β1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and hydrocephalus after SAH, a two-hemorrhage injection model of SAH was created in Sprague-Dawley rats. LSKL (1 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally immediately following the first intravenous injection of blood in the SAH model, with repeated injections of LSKL every 12 h until sacrifice. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide levels were assessed via western blotting and ELISA. Lateral ventricular index, Masson staining and Morris water maze tests were employed to evaluate subarachnoid fibrosis, hydrocephalus and long-term neurological function following SAH. It was found that the LKSL peptide readily crossed the blood brain barrier, was protective against subarachnoid fibrosis, attenuated ventriculomegaly and effectively suppressed hydrocephalus. In addition, the results indicated that the protective effects of the LSKL peptide were achieved via the inhibition of TGF-β1 activity and subsequent Smad2/3 signaling. Importantly, the LSKL peptide may improve long-term neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, the LSKL peptide suppresses subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibition of TSP1-mediated TGF-β1 activity, prevents the development of chronic hydrocephalus and improves long-term neurocognitive defects following SAH.

  3. LSKL peptide alleviates subarachnoid fibrosis and hydrocephalus by inhibiting TSP1-mediated TGF-β1 signaling activity following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Li, Gaofeng; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Yujie; Zuo, Yuchun; Rashid, Kauthar; Zhang, John H.; Feng, Hua; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus has been demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for poor outcomes in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and drainage is widely considered to play a vital role in communicating hydrocephalus, possibly due to subarachnoid fibrosis. A previous study indicated that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), a key fibrogenic factor, is significantly increased in the CSF following SAH, implying a pivotal role in the development of chronic hydrocephalus. To investigate whether LSKL peptide, a small molecular peptide and competitive antagonist for TGF-β1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and hydrocephalus after SAH, a two-hemorrhage injection model of SAH was created in Sprague-Dawley rats. LSKL (1 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally immediately following the first intravenous injection of blood in the SAH model, with repeated injections of LSKL every 12 h until sacrifice. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide levels were assessed via western blotting and ELISA. Lateral ventricular index, Masson staining and Morris water maze tests were employed to evaluate subarachnoid fibrosis, hydrocephalus and long-term neurological function following SAH. It was found that the LKSL peptide readily crossed the blood brain barrier, was protective against subarachnoid fibrosis, attenuated ventriculomegaly and effectively suppressed hydrocephalus. In addition, the results indicated that the protective effects of the LSKL peptide were achieved via the inhibition of TGF-β1 activity and subsequent Smad2/3 signaling. Importantly, the LSKL peptide may improve long-term neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, the LSKL peptide suppresses subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibition of TSP1-mediated TGF-β1 activity, prevents the development of chronic hydrocephalus and improves long-term neurocognitive defects following SAH. PMID:27698755

  4. [Aortic thrombus and splenic infarcts indicating essential thrombocythemia].

    PubMed

    Bachmeyer, C; Elalamy, I

    2011-09-01

    Essential thrombocythemia is a myeloproliferative disorder responsible for both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications mostly venous but also arterial, especially of the microcirculation. We report a 64-year-old female who presented with an aortic thrombus and splenic infarcts indicating essential thrombocythemia. Outcome was favourable with medical treatment combining low-molecular-weight heparin secondarily switched to warfarin, associated with aspirin and hydroxyurea.

  5. Confusional state and cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    García-Albea, E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients with confusional state and cerebral infarction were studied. Seven patients had optic pathway alterations. On computed tomographic scan, 2 patients had multiple infarctions and 10 had single infarctions, predominantly located in the temporo-occipital associative cortex. One patient had a normal scan. Reduction of 'selective attention', 'release' hallucinations, amnesic syndrome and secondary individual adjustment could explain the confusional state. PMID:2608563

  6. Clinical predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct is poorly characterised. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct and to identify clinical predictors of this variant of lacunar stroke. Methods A total of 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct were compared with those of the 733 patients with lacunar infarction. Results Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct accounted for 16.6% (146/879) of all cases of lacunar stroke. Subtypes of lacunar syndromes included pure motor stroke in 63 patients, sensorimotor stroke in 51, pure sensory stroke in 14, atypical lacunar syndrome in 9, ataxic hemiparesis in 5 and dysarthria-clumsy hand in 4. Valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation, sudden onset, limb weakness and sensory symptoms were significantly more frequent among patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct than in those with lacunar infarction, whereas diabetes was less frequent. In the multivariate analysis, atrial fibrillation (OR = 4.62), sensorimotor stroke (OR = 4.05), limb weakness (OR = 2.09), sudden onset (OR = 2.06) and age (OR = 0.96) were independent predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct. Conclusions Although lacunar syndromes are highly suggestive of small deep cerebral infarctions, lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts are found in 16.6% of cases. The presence of sensorimotor stroke, limb weakness and sudden onset in a patient with atrial

  7. [Pott's puffy tumor: a rare complication of frontal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Aínsa Laguna, D; Pons Morales, S; Muñoz Tormo-Figueres, A; Vega Senra, M I; Otero Reigada, M C

    2014-05-01

    Pott's puffy tumor is a rare complication of frontal sinusitis characterized by swelling and edema in the brow due to a subperiosteal abscess associated with frontal osteomyelitis. Added complications are cellulitis by extension to the orbit and intracranial infection by posterior extension, with high risk of meningitis, intracranial abscess, and venous sinus thrombosis. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical or surgical treatment are essential for optimal recovery of affected patients. In the antibiotic age it is extremely rare, with very few cases described in the recent literature. A case is presented of a Pott inflammatory tumor in a 7 year-old boy, as a complication of acute pansinusitis who presented with front preseptal swelling and intracranial involvement with thrombosis of ophthalmic and superior orbital veins and frontal epidural abscess extending to the subarachnoid space.

  8. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  9. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in Kashmir: Causes, risk factors, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; AfzalWani, Mohammed; Kirmani, Altaf R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Kashmir, a snow bound and mountain locked valley, is populated by about 7 million ethnic and non-migratory Kashmiris who have specific dietary and social habits than rest of the world. The neurological disorders are common in Kashmiri population. Aims: To study the prevalence and outcome of spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Kashmir compared withother parts of the world. Settings and Design: A retrospective and hospital based study from 1982 to 2010 in the single and only Neurosurgical Centre of the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Materials and Methods: A hospital based study, in which, information concerning all Kashmiri patients was collected from the case sheets, patient files, discharge certificates, death certificates, and telephonic conversations with the help of Medical Records Department and Central Admission Register of Sher–i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir India. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance and students T-test were used at occasions. Results: Incidence of SAH in Kashmiris is about 13/100,000 persons per year. SAH comprises 31.02% of total strokes and aneurysmal ruptures are cause of 54.35% SAHs. The female suffers 1.78 times more than the male. Total mortality of 36.60% was recorded against a good recovery of 14.99%. The familial SAHs and multiple aneurysms were also common. Intra-operative finding of larger aneurysmal size than recorded on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) angiogram of same patients was noteworthy. In 493 patients of SAH, the angiography revealed 705 aneurysms. Conclusion: Spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, due to aneurysmal rupture, is common in Kashmir, with worst outcome. Food habits like “salt-tea twice a day”, group-smoking of wet tobacco like “Jejeer”, winter season, female gender, hypertension, and inhalation of “Kangri” smoke are special risk factorsof SAH, in Kashmiris. The plain CT brain and CT angiography are best diagnostic tools. The

  10. Urea for treatment of acute SIADH in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia occurring as a result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The efficacy and safety of urea as treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia has not been reported in this population. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to our department for nontraumatic SAH between January 2003 and December 2008 (n = 368). All patients with SIADH-induced hyponatremia (plasma sodium < 135 mEq/L, urine sodium > 20 mEq/L, and osmolality > 200 mOsm/kg; absence of overt dehydration or hypovolemia; no peripheral edema or renal failure; no history of adrenal or thyroid disease) routinely received urea per os when hyponatremia was associated with clinical deterioration or remained less than 130 mEq/L despite saline solution administration. Results Forty-two patients developed SIADH and were treated with urea. Urea was started after a median of 7 (IQR, 5–10) days and given orally at doses of 15–30 g tid or qid for a median of 5 (IQR, 3–7) days. The median plasma sodium increase over the first day of treatment was 3 (IQR, 1–6) mEq/L. Hyponatremia was corrected in all patients, with median times to Na+ >130 and >135 mEq/L of 1 (IQR, 1–2) and 3 (IQR, 2–4) days, respectively. Urea was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were reported. Conclusions Oral urea is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia in SAH patients. PMID:22647340

  11. Association of early post-procedure hemodynamic management with the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Matsuda, Shinya; Ishikawa, Koichi B; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fujimori, Kenji

    2013-03-01

    Post-procedure hemodynamic management for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is controversial because of the paucity of studied patients. Using a Japanese administrative database, we tested whether increased albumin, catecholamine, and volumes of fluid administered between the procedure and the 4th post-procedure day would be associated with outcomes of mortality, consciousness deterioration at discharge and re-intubation between the 5th and 14th post-procedure days. Across 550 hospitals, 5,400 patients were identified who received clipping, wrapping and endovascular coiling within 48 h after admission in 2010. Patient characteristics and the administration of albumin, catecholamine, and volume of fluid normalized by body weight were analyzed among the groups and categorized according to the presence of albumin and catecholamine administered between the procedure and the 4th post-procedure day. The association of early hemodynamic management with outcomes was measured using logistic regression models, through controlling for the preference of early administration of albumin and catecholamine. For the patients, 9.3 % received albumin only, 14.4 % catecholamine only, and 4.9 % both between the procedure and the 4th post-procedure day, while 16.5 % received albumin or catecholamine on other days. Variation in albumin and catecholamine administration was observed. Higher normalized fluid volume, commenced before the 4th post-procedure day, was associated with increased mortality and re-intubation (although with decreased complications), and vice versa between the 4th and 14th post-procedure days. Catecholamine administration was associated with worsened outcomes. Hypervolemic and hypertensive therapies commenced before the 4th post-procedure day require further research to determine whether their associations with outcomes in this administrative data base are causal or not.

  12. Kallikrein 6 as a Serum Prognostic Marker in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Diamandis, Anastasia; Romaschin, Alexander D.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating condition that frequently causes death or significant disabilities. Blood tests to predict possible early complications could be very useful aids for therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze serum levels of kallikrein 6 (KLK6) in individuals with aSAH to determine the relevance of this protease with the outcome of these patients. Methodology/Principal Findings A reference interval for KLK6 was established by using serum samples (n = 136) from an adult population. Additionally, serum samples (n = 326) from patients with aSAH (n = 13) were collected for 5 to 14 days, to study the concentration of KLK6 in this disease. The correlation between KLK6 and S100B, an existing brain damage biomarker, was analyzed in 8 of 13 patients. The reference interval for KLK6 was established to be 1.04 to 3.93 ng/mL. The mean levels in patients with aSAH within the first 56 hours ranged from 0.27 to 1.44 ng/mL, with lowest levels found in patients with worse outcome. There were significant differences between patients with good recovery or moderate disability (n = 8) and patients with severe disability or death (n = 5) (mean values of 1.03 ng/mL versus 0.47 ng/mL, respectively) (p<0.01). There was no significant correlation between KLK6 and S100B. Conclusions/Significance Decreased serum concentrations of KLK6 are found in patients with aSAH, with the lowest levels in patients who died. PMID:23049835

  13. Old drugs: new complications

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Sandeep; Wadhwa, Jyoti; Vaid, Ashok K; Sharma, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    This is a case of acute splenic and bilateral renal infarction in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma during chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin. Till date, bilateral renal infarction following gemcitabine and cisplatin has been reported only once in the past. The case that is being reported has had acute splenic and bilateral renal infarct and has not been reported previously. Splenic and renal infarction should be considered in the differential diagnosis of excruciating abdominal pain and backache in a patient on gemcitabine-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:23345497

  14. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  15. Cardioembolic Stroke and Postmyocardial Infarction Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marius; Franke, Jennifer; Gafoor, Sameer; Sievert, Horst

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a rare but serious complication due to left ventricular thrombus formation and atrial fibrillation. Early revascularization of the culprit coronary lesion is essential. Treatment trends may affect the risk. Conversely, the greater use of antiplatelet agents to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke could increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of stroke after AMI has decreased significantly with more use of percutaneous coronary intervention and antithrombotic therapies in the acute setting, and statins, antihypertensive medications, and dual antiplatelet therapy as secondary prevention strategies. PMID:27150168

  16. Intracranial venous sinus thrombosis complicating AIDS-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Afsari, Khosrow; Frank, Jeffrey; Vaksman, Yulia; Nguyen, Thanhan V

    2003-03-01

    An alert and oriented 27-year-old African American woman with AIDS presented with a 10-day history of fever, cough productive of yellow sputum, nausea, and vomiting and a 1-day history of excruciating headache and photophobia. Her condition rapidly deteriorated into a coma with decorticate and then decerebrate posture, and she died 3 weeks later. There was evidence of extensive intracranial venous sinus thrombosis (ICVST), renal vein thrombosis (RVT), and multiple cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts due to a hypercoagulable state complicating AIDS-associated nephrotic syndrome. This is the first reported case of fatal ICVST and RVT with extensive cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts complicating nephrotic syndrome in a patient with AIDS.

  17. Use of Intra-aortic- Balloon Pump Counterpulsation in Patients with Symptomatic Vasospasm Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neurogenic Stress Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mufti, Fawaz; Morris, Nicholas; Lahiri, Shouri; Roth, William; Witsch, Jens; Machado, Iona; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Meyers, Philip M.; Connolly, E. Sander; Claassen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intra-aortic counterpulsation balloon pumps (IABPs) have been widely used to augment hemodynamics in critically ill patients with cardiogenic shock and have recently been proposed as a management strategy for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients with neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy (NSC). Prior case series have described the use of IABP as a means to manage cardiogenic shock in this patient population; however, we sought to describe our experience with IABP as a means to wean vasopressor requirement while augmenting hemodynamics and maintaining pressures at goal. Methods Five patients were identified from a single center, prospective, observational cohort study that received an IABP for the management of ischemia related to cerebral vasospasm in the setting of NSC. We evaluated all cases for efficacy of IABP in reducing vasopressor requirement, and complications. Results Vasopressor requirements were reduced by a mean of 50% (range 25–65%) following IABPs placement within 24–48 h. There were no significant complications from IABPs. Out of the five patients, the outcome in three cases was favorable (mRS≤1). Two patients suffered delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), one patient passed away due to severe sepsis, and one patient was left with severe disability. Only one patient required anticoagulation and that was for a preexisting deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion The use of IABPs may be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy in SAH patients with concomitant symptomatic vasospasm and NSC. PMID:27403221

  18. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-01

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors. PMID:7638144

  19. Subarachnoid space of the CNS, nasal mucosa, and lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R T; Tigges, J; Arnold, W

    1979-04-01

    We have briefly reviewed the literature pertaining to the movement of tracer molecules and infectious organisms within the olfactory nerve. There is a body of evidence indicating that tracers placed in the CSF will quickly move via the olfactory nerve to the nasal mucosa and then to the cervical lymph nodes. Organic and inorganic tracer materials and organisms as diverse as viruses, a bacillus, and an amoeba, when placed in the nasal cavity, have been shown to move from the nasal mucosa via the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb and the CSF. We think that a portion of the data on tracer movement is due to incorporation of tracer materials and organisms into the axoplasm of the olfactory neurons with subsequent anterograde or retrograde axoplasmic transport. However, some of the movement of tracers may occur within the olfactory perineural space. This space may be continuous with a subarachnoid extension that surrounds the olfactory nerve as it penetrates the cribriform plate. To our knowledge, no one has yet followed the perineural space to determine if it is continuous from olfactory receptor to olfactory bulb. The consideration of this space and its role is the main reason for this review. PMID:85446

  20. Subarachnoid hemorrhage admissions retrospectively identified using a prediction model

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Fergusson, Dean; Turgeon, Alexis; dos Santos, Marlise P.; Lum, Cheemun; Chassé, Michaël; Sinclair, John; Forster, Alan; van Walraven, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To create an accurate prediction model using variables collected in widely available health administrative data records to identify hospitalizations for primary subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: A previously established complete cohort of consecutive primary SAH patients was combined with a random sample of control hospitalizations. Chi-square recursive partitioning was used to derive and internally validate a model to predict the probability that a patient had primary SAH (due to aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation) using health administrative data. Results: A total of 10,322 hospitalizations with 631 having primary SAH (6.1%) were included in the study (5,122 derivation, 5,200 validation). In the validation patients, our recursive partitioning algorithm had a sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 93.9–98.0), a specificity of 99.8% (95% CI 99.6–99.9), and a positive likelihood ratio of 483 (95% CI 254–879). In this population, patients meeting criteria for the algorithm had a probability of 45% of truly having primary SAH. Conclusions: Routinely collected health administrative data can be used to accurately identify hospitalized patients with a high probability of having a primary SAH. This algorithm may allow, upon validation, an easy and accurate method to create validated cohorts of primary SAH from either ruptured aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27629096

  1. Histology and Morphology of the Brain Subarachnoid Trabeculae

    PubMed Central

    Saboori, Parisa; Sadegh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the brain and the skull consists of three fibrous tissue layers, dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater, known as the meninges, and strands of collagen tissues connecting the arachnoid to the pia mater, known as trabeculae. The space between the arachnoid and the pia mater is filled with cerebrospinal fluid which stabilizes the shape and position of the brain during head movements or impacts. The histology and architecture of the subarachnoid space trabeculae in the brain are not well established in the literature. The only recognized fact about the trabeculae is that they are made of collagen fibers surrounded by fibroblast cells and they have pillar- and veil-like structures. In this work the histology and the architecture of the brain trabeculae were studied, via a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using cadaveric and animal tissue. In the cadaveric study fluorescence and bright field microscopy were employed while scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used for the animal studies. The results of this study reveal that the trabeculae are collagen based type I, and their architecture is in the form of tree-shaped rods, pillars, and plates and, in some regions, they have a complex network morphology. PMID:26090230

  2. Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis combined with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Juk-Dong; Suh, Bumn-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Song, Chang-June; Shin, Dae-Whan; Lee, Young-Ha

    2003-11-01

    A 67-year-old Korean woman attended our hospital complaining of a severe headache. A brain computed tomography scan showed conglomerated, high-density, calcified nodules in the left temporo-occipito-parietal area and high-density subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows multiple conglomerated iso- or low-signal intensity round nodules with peripheral rim enhancement. She underwent craniotomies to clip the aneurysm and remove the calcified masses. Paragonimus westermani eggs were identified in the calcified necrotic lesions. Results of parasitic examinations on the sputum and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for P. westermani were all negative. The patient presented with headache and dizziness that had occurred for more than 30 years. She had not eaten freshwater crayfish or crabs. However, she had sometimes prepared raw crabs for several decades. Overall, this case was diagnosed as chronic cerebral paragonimiasis, in which she may have been infected through the contamination of utensils during the preparation of the second intermediate hosts, combined with a cerebral hemorrhage.

  3. Traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage: a clinicoradiological and TCD correlation.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R; Sharma, B S; Gupta, S K; Khandelwal, N; Tiwari, M K; Khosla, V K

    2001-06-01

    Twenty five consecutive patients with CT proven pure traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (tSAH) were studied, prospectively over a 6 month period. They constituted 2% of all head injuries. Most of the patients (88%) had a mild or moderate head injury at the time of admission, with a mean glasgow comma scale (GCS) of 10.68. The CT scan findings were divided into 3 grades. Grade 1 - blood in hemispheric region only (n=4), grade 2 - blood in basal region only (n=11), grade 3 - blood in both hemispheric as well as basal region (n=10). Transcranial doppler ultrasound (TCD) velocities were recorded in all patients by insonating the middle cerebral artery, internal carotid artery and anterior cerebral artery on both sides. All patients were also subjected to digital substraction angiography (DSA). All patients with mild head injury had normal TCD velocity (<100 cm/sec), while TCD velocities of more than 150 cm/sec were seen only in one patient with severe head injury. Patients with severe head injury were found to have grade 3 tSAH on CT. No statistically significant correlation was found between the CT grade and TCD velocities. Angiographic vasospasm was found in 2 patients with severe head injury only. 90.2% of patients had good outcome at discharge. PMID:11447432

  4. To Look Beyond Vasospasm in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Messerer, Mahmoud; Oddo, Mauro; Daniel, Roy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm has classically been considered the most important and treatable cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Secondary ischemia (or delayed ischemic neurological deficit, DIND) has been shown to be the leading determinant of poor clinical outcome in patients with aSAH surviving the early phase and cerebral vasospasm has been attributed to being primarily responsible. Recently, various clinical trials aimed at treating vasospasm have produced disappointing results. DIND seems to have a multifactorial etiology and vasospasm may simply represent one contributing factor and not the major determinant. Increasing evidence shows that a series of early secondary cerebral insults may occur following aneurysm rupture (the so-called early brain injury). This further aggravates the initial insult and actually determines the functional outcome. A better understanding of these mechanisms and their prevention in the very early phase is needed to improve the prognosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing literature on this topic and so to illustrate how the presence of cerebral vasospasm may not necessarily be a prerequisite for DIND development. The various factors determining DIND that worsen functional outcome and prognosis are then discussed. PMID:24967389

  5. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  6. Pituitary hormone level changes and hypxonatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MAIMAITILI, AISHA; MAIMAITILI, MIJITI; REXIDAN, AIKEREMU; LU, JUNYI; AJIMU, KUERBAN; CHENG, XIAOJIANG; LUO, KUN; SAILIKE, DUISHANBAI; LIU, YUAN; KAHEERMAN, KADEER; TANG, CHANGJIU; ZHANG, TINGRONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in serum pituitary hormone levels and the mechanism of hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear medical tests and serum electrolyte monitoring were performed in 49 aneurysmal SAH cases and 10 healthy volunteers. The levels of serum pituitary hormones were significantly higher in the SAH patients compared with the control group on days 1–3 and 7–9 after SAH onset (P<0.05). The peak value occurred on days 7–9. The rate of hyponatremia was 49.0% in the 49 SAH patients. The incidence of severe hyponatremia was significantly higher in Fisher grades III–IV and Hunt-Hess grades III–IV compared with Fisher grades I–II and Hunt-Hess grades I–II, respectively (P<0.05). There was no correlation between the site of aneurysm and the rate of hyponatremia. The incidence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm was significantly higher in the hyponatremia group and Fisher grades III–IV compared with the normal serum sodium group and Fisher grades I–II, respectively. Serum pituitary hormone levels were positively correlated with blood loss and disease severity in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Hyponatremia may be considered an important indicator of SAH. SAH patients are likely to benefit from intense monitoring and regulation of serum sodium. PMID:23837049

  7. Free recall memory performance after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Signy; Macdonald, R Loch; Schweizer, Tom A

    2012-03-01

    Memory deficits for survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common, however, the nature of these deficits is not well understood. In this study, 24 patients with SAH and matched control participants were asked to study six lists containing words from four different categories. For half the lists, the categories were presented together (organized lists). For the remaining lists, the related words were presented randomly to maximize the use of executive processes such as strategy and organization (unorganized lists). Across adjoining lists, there was overlap in the types of categories given, done to promote intrusions. Compared to control participants, SAH patients recalled a similar number of words for the organized lists, but significantly fewer words for the unorganized lists. SAH patients also reported more intrusions than their matched counterparts. Separating patients into anterior communicating artery ruptures (ACoA) and ruptures in other regions, there was a recall deficit only for the unorganized list for those with ACoA ruptures and deficits across both list types for other rupture locations. These results suggest that memory impairment following SAH is likely driven by impairment in the executive components of memory, particularly for those with ACoA ruptures. Such findings may help direct future cognitive-therapeutic programs.

  8. Quality of life and cognitive deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hütter, B O; Gilsbach, J M; Kreitschmann, I

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 58 patients after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with a late result either good (GOS = I) or fair (GOS = II), patients were examined 1-5 years after the acute event for their quality of life including a neuropsychological examination. Cognitive deficits were found in visual short-term memory (46%) and in the three parameters of a reaction-time task ranging from 31 to 65%. Further deficits were found in verbal long-term memory (28%), concentration (5-13%) and language (11%). The quality of life was reduced in the SAH patients according to a self-rating scale in motivation (50%), interests (47%), mental capacity (47%), free-time activities (52%), social relationships (39%), concentration (70%), fine motor co-ordination (25%) and sleep (47%). A further 77% of the patients reported more frequent headaches since their SAH. Depression was found in 30% of the SAH patients. Life-satisfaction was significantly reduced in 37%, whereas 48% of the SAH patients suffered from increased emotional lability and in 41% motivation was significantly reduced. Negative job consequences like loss of job or demotion were reported by 16% of the patients investigated and an additional 15% had been retired. PMID:7576273

  9. Neurovascular Events After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Focusing on Subcellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Wu, Haijian; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality rates due to the lack of effective therapy. Early brain injury (EBI) and cerebral vasospasm (CVS) are the two most important pathophysiological mechanisms for brain injury and poor outcomes for patients with SAH. CVS has traditionally been considered the sole cause of delayed ischemic neurological deficits after SAH. However, the failure of antivasospastic therapy in patients with SAH supported changing the research target from CVS to other mechanisms. Currently, more attention has been focused on global brain injury within 3 days after ictus, designated as EBI. The dysfunction of subcellular organelles, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial failure, and autophagy–lysosomal system activation, has developed during EBI and delayed brain injury after SAH. To our knowledge, there is a lack of review articles addressing the direction of organelle dysfunction after SAH. In this review, we discuss the roles of organelle dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SAH and present the opportunity to develop novel therapeutic strategies of SAH via modulating the functions of organelles. PMID:25366597

  10. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  11. Original surgical treatment of thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts in six chondrodystrophic dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid cysts are rare conditions in veterinary medicine, associated with spinal cord dysfunction. Most of the 100 cases of subarachnoid cysts described since the first report in 1968 were apparently not true cysts. Reported cysts are usually situated in the cervical area and occur in predisposed breeds such as the Rottweiler. The purpose of this retrospective study, from May 2003 to April 2012, was to describe the distinctive features of thoracolumbar spinal subarachnoid cysts, together with their surgical treatment and outcome in 6 chondrodystrophic dogs. Results Five Pugs and 1 French Bulldog were examined. Images suggestive of a subarachnoid cyst were obtained by myelography (2/6) and computed tomography myelography (4/6), and associated disc herniation was observed in 3/6 dogs. A hemilaminectomy was performed. The protruding disc eventually found in 5/6 dogs was treated by lateral corpectomy. The ventral leptomeningeal adhesions observed in all dogs after durotomy were dissected. No or only mild post-operative neurological degradation was observed. Follow-up studies (7 months to 4 years) indicated good outcome and no recurrence. Conclusions All the thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts described in these 6 chondrodystrophic dogs were associated with leptomeningeal adhesions. Good results seemed to be obtained by dissecting and removing these adhesions. A protruding disc, found here in 5/6 dogs, needs to be ruled out and can be treated by lateral corpectomy. PMID:24884635

  12. Multiorgan with renal infarction following treatment of cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hee; Kang, Chung; Moon, Hyo Jeong; Joo, Min Cheol

    2013-08-01

    Acute renal infarction is a rare disease and it is often difficult to make a clinical diagnosis due to the non-specific clinical presentations and lack of the physicians' awarenesses. We experienced a case of a 72-year-old man who was diagnosed as multiorgan with renal infarction during the bridge therapy of cerebral infarction with atrial fibrillation. Computed tomogram (CT) with intravenous contrast of the abdomen and pelvis revealed left renal infarction with renal artery occlusion, multifocal splenic infarction, and ischemic colitis on rectum and sigmoid colon. The patient was treated with low molecular weight heparin for 10 days, his symptoms were improved and laboratory findings were normalized. Follow-up CT was performed on the 43th day, there were persisted left renal infarction with atrophic change shown and the splenic perfusion was improved.

  13. Infarction in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery: clinical study of 51 patients

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; García-Eroles, Luis; Sellarés, Núria; Raga, Agnès; Oliveres, Montserrat; Massons, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about clinical features and prognosis of patients with ischaemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the clinical characteristics and short-term outcome of stroke patients with ACA infarction as compared with that of patients with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) infarctions, and b) to identify predictors of ACA stroke. Methods Fifty-one patients with ACA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986–2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 51 patients with ACA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 232 patients with PCA infarctions included in the registry. Results Infarctions of the ACA accounted for 1.3% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 1.8% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Stroke subtypes included cardioembolic infarction in 45.1% of patients, atherothrombotic infarction in 29.4%, lacunar infarct in 11.8%, infarct of unknown cause in 11.8% and infarction of unusual aetiology in 2%. In-hospital mortality was 7.8% (n = 4). Only 5 (9.8%) patients were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Speech disturbances (odds ratio [OR] = 0.48) and altered consciousness (OR = 0.31) were independent variables of ACA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas limb weakness (OR = 9.11), cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 2.49) and sensory deficit (OR = 0.35) were independent variables associated with ACA stroke in comparison with PCA infarction. Conclusion Cardioembolism is the main cause of brain infarction

  14. Recurrent myocardial infarction secondary to Prinzmetal’s variant angina

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Dale; Dhillon, Priyanka; Niranjan, Selvanayagam

    2015-01-01

    Prinzmetal’s variant angina describes chest pain secondary to reversible coronary artery vasospasm in the context of both diseased and non-diseased coronary arteries. Symptoms typically occur when the patient is at rest and are associated with transient ST-segment elevation. Acute episodes respond to glyceryl trinitrate, but myocardial infarction and other potentially fatal complications can occur, and long-term management can be challenging. Although it is not well understood, the underlying mechanism appears to involve a combination of endothelial damage and vasoactive mediators. In this case, a 35-year-old woman with myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery vasospasm experienced recurrent chest pain. Coronary angiography revealed severe focal stenosis in the mid left anterior descending artery, which completely resolved after administration of intracoronary glyceryl trinitrate. The patient was discharged on nitrates and calcium channel blockers. The patient re-presented with another myocardial infarction, requiring up-titration of medical therapy. PMID:26034323

  15. Early whole-brain CT perfusion for detection of patients at risk for delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Vesna; Dolatowski, Karoline; Schramm, Peter; Moerer, Onnen; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This prospective study investigated the role of whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) studies in the identification of patients at risk for delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) and of tissue at risk for delayed cerebral infarction (DCI). METHODS Forty-three patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were included in this study. A CTP study was routinely performed in the early phase (Day 3). The CTP study was repeated in cases of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD)-measured blood flow velocity (BFV) increase of > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours and/or on Day 7 in patients who were intubated/sedated. RESULTS Early CTP studies revealed perfusion deficits in 14 patients, of whom 10 patients (72%) developed DIND, and 6 of these 10 patients (60%) had DCI. Three of the 14 patients (21%) with early perfusion deficits developed DCI without having had DIND, and the remaining patient (7%) had neither DIND nor DCI. There was a statistically significant correlation between early perfusion deficits and occurrence of DIND and DCI (p < 0.0001). A repeated CTP was performed in 8 patients with a TCD-measured BFV increase > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours, revealing a perfusion deficit in 3 of them (38%). Two of the 3 patients (67%) developed DCI without preceding DIND and 1 patient (33%) had DIND without DCI. In 4 of the 7 patients (57%) who were sedated and/or comatose, additional CTP studies on Day 7 showed perfusion deficits. All 4 patients developed DCI. CONCLUSIONS Whole-brain CTP on Day 3 after aSAH allows early and reliable identification of patients at risk for DIND and tissue at risk for DCI. Additional CTP investigations, guided by TCD-measured BFV increase or persisting coma, do not contribute to information gain.

  16. Physical activity and subarachnoid haemorrhage: a population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Fann, J; Kukull, W; Katon, W; Longstreth, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate physical activity as a risk factor for subarachnoid haemorrhage.
METHODS—A population based case-control study in King County, Washington. A standardised, personal interview was used to determine physical activity during the past year and at the onset of the bleed for case patients and a similar reference time for control subjects. Conditional logistic regression and a case cross over analysis were performed in which each case patient served as his or her own control. Subjects were 149 men and women with incident, spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage and two control subjects per case patient. Control subjects were identified through random digit dialing and matched on age, sex, and respondent type.
RESULTS—Four of the 149 (2.7%) case patients were engaged in vigorous physical activity at the time of their subarachnoid haemorrhage. With those who were engaged in non-vigorous or no physical activity serving as the reference group, the relative risk of sustaining a subarachnoid haemorrhage for those engaged in vigorous physical activity was 11.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2-113.2). In the case cross over analysis, the relative risk was 15.0 (95% CI 4.3-52.2). Higher levels of long term regular physical activity over the past year were associated with a lower, but not statistically significant, risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (test for trend, p=0.3).
CONCLUSION—The risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage is increased during vigorous physical activity, although only a few result from this mechanism.

 PMID:11080229

  17. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES IN SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE LINK INFLAMMATION AND OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Albers, David; Schmidt, J. Michael; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Falo, Christina Maria; Mayer, Stephan A.; Cremers, Serge; Agarwal, Sachin; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Connolly, E. Sander; Dukic, Vanja; Hripcsak, George; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonconvulsive seizures (NCSz) are frequent following acute brain injury and have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury but mechanisms that cause NCSz are controversial. Pro-inflammatory states are common after many brain injuries and inflammatory mediated changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability have experimentally been linked to seizures. Methods In this prospective observational study of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients we explored the link between the inflammatory response following SAH and in-hospital NCSz studying clinical (systemic inflammatory response syndrome,SIRS) and laboratory markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1,TNF-R1; high sensitivity C-reactive protein,hsCRP). Logistic regression, cox proportional hazards regression, and mediation analyses were performed to investigate temporal and causal relationships. Results Among 479 SAH patients, 53(11%) had in-hospital NCSz. Patients with in-hospital NCSz had a more pronounced SIRS response (OR1.9 per point increase in SIRS; 95%-CI1.3-2.9), inflammatory surges were more likely immediately preceding NCSz onset, and the negative impact of SIRS on functional outcome at 3 months was mediated in part through in-hospital NCSz. In a subset with inflammatory serum biomarkers we confirmed these findings linking higher serum TNF-R1 and hsCRP to in-hospital NCSz (OR1.2 per 20 point hsCRP increase [95%-CI1.1-1.4]; OR2.5 per 100 point TNF-R1 increase [95%-CI2.1-2.9]). The association of inflammatory biomarkers with poor outcome was mediated in part through NCSz. Interpretation In-hospital NCSz were independently associated with a pro-inflammatory state following SAH reflected in clinical symptoms and serum biomarkers of inflammation. Our findings suggest that inflammation following SAH is associated with poor outcome and this effect is at least in part mediated through in-hospital NCSz. PMID:24771589

  18. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  19. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study. PMID:27660569

  20. Disproportionate subarachnoid space hydrocephalus—outcome and perivascular space

    PubMed Central

    Akiguchi, Ichiro; Shirakashi, Yoshitomo; Budka, Herbert; Watanabe, Yuko; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Shiino, Akihiko; Ogita, Mihoko; Kawamoto, Yasuhiro; Jungwirth, Susanne; Krampla, Wolfgang; Fischer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify the prevalence of MRI features of disproportionately enlarged subarachnoid space hydrocephalus in possible idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (DESH-iNPH) and to describe the clinico-radiological features and outcomes of a community-based investigation (The Vienna Trans-Danube Aging study). Methods Of the 697 inhabitants (all 75 years old), 503 completed extensive neurological examinations at baseline and were followed up every 30 months thereafter with MRIs, mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale-Motor Section (UPDRSM). The DESH-iNPH participant data were compared with the data from participants with Evans index ratios >0.3 (ex vacuo hydrocephalus), cerebral small-vessel diseases, and normal MRIs. The widening of perivascular space was also evaluated by MRI in these groups. Results Eight participants with DESH-iNPH (1.6%) and 76 with ex vacuo hydrocephalus (16.1%) at baseline were identified. The mean MMSE in DESH-iNPH, ex vacuo hydrocephalus, and normal MRIs was 26.4, 27.9, and 28.3, respectively, and the mean UPDRSM was 9.75, 2.96, and 1.87, respectively. After a 90-month follow-up, the mortality rates for DESH-iNPH, ex vacuo hydrocephalus, and normal MRIs were 25.0%, 21.3%, and 10.9%, respectively. The perivascular-space widening scores were significantly smaller in the DESH-iNPH cases, particularly at the centrum semiovale, compared to cerebral small-vessel disease and ex vacuo hydrocephalus cases. Interpretation The prevalence of DESH-iNPH was 1.6% for participants aged 75 years and revealed significantly lower MMSE and higher UPDRSM scores compared to the ex vacuo hydrocephalus and controls. Moreover, it is suggested that perivascular-space narrowing is a morphological and pathophysiological marker of DESH-iNPH. PMID:25356428

  1. The neuro-behavioral profile in rats after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Azab, Abed N; Kuts, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin Fredrick; Gruenbaum, Shaun Evan; Melamed, Israel; Brotfain, Evgeny; Shapira, Yoram; Cesnulis, Evaldas; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-01-23

    Despite significant advancements in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), little is known about the emotional consequences. The primary goal of this study was to describe the locomotor and behavioral patterns in rats following both a single-injection and double-injection model of SAH. In 48 rats, SAH was induced by injecting 0.3 ml of autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magnum (single-hemorrhagic model). In 24 of these rats, post-SAH vasospasm was induced by a repeated injection of blood into the cisterna magnum 24h later (double-hemorrhagic model). In 24 additional rats, 0.3 ml of saline was injected into the cisterna magnum (sham group). Neurological performance was assessed at 24, 48 h, 1, 2 and 3 weeks after SAH. Four behavioral tests were performed for 3 weeks after SAH for the duration of 6 consequent days, in the following order: open field test, sucrose preference test, elevated plus maze test and forced swimming test. Following both, a single and double-hemorrhagic models of SAH, rats were found to have significant behavioral abnormalities on the open field test, sucrose preference test, elevated plus maze test, and forced swimming test. A more prominent disability was found in rats that underwent the double-hemorrhagic model of SAH than rats that underwent the single-hemorrhagic model. Both a single and double injection model of rats SAH are associated with significant behavioral disturbances including locomotor abnormalities, depressive behavior and increased anxiety, even as early as 3 weeks after SAH. PMID:23123210

  2. Life satisfaction and return to work after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Passier, Patricia E C A; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141) living at home 2-4 years after the SAH responded to a mailed questionnaire. Outcomes were life satisfaction, as measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire 9 (LiSat-9), and employment status. Determinants in multiple regression analysis were demographic and SAH characteristics, subjective complaints (eg, mood disorder, fatigue, cognitive complaints), and personality characteristics (eg, neuroticism, passive coping style). Of the 141 subjects, 64 (46.7%) had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of V (good outcome) at discharge. Mean subject age was 51.4 ± 12.3 years, and mean time after SAH was 36.1 ± 7.9 months. Of the 88 subjects who were working at the time of the SAH, 54 (61.4%) returned to work, but only 31 (35.2%) resumed their work completely. The subjects were least satisfied with their vocational situation (51.9% satisfied) and sexual life (51.7%) and were most satisfied with their relationships (75.2%-88.7%) and self-care ability (88.6%). Age (β value = 0.17), return to work after SAH (0.19), disability at hospital discharge (0.25), worsened mood (-0.37), and passive coping (-0.25) together accounted for 47.2% of the life satisfaction scores. Our data indicate that return to work is a major issue for individuals who survive an SAH. Not returning to work, disability, depression, and passive coping are associated with reduced life satisfaction. Thus, vocational reintegration after SAH merits more attention during rehabilitation. PMID:20656515

  3. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study.

  4. The Role of Matricellular Proteins in Brain Edema after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Ichikawa, Naoki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that blood-brain barrier disruption or brain edema is an important pathologic manifestation for poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Many molecules may be involved, acting simultaneously or at different stages during blood-brain barrier disruption via multiple independent or interconnected signaling pathways. Matricellular protein is a class of nonstructural, secreted, and multifunctional extracellular matrix proteins, which potentially mediates brain edema formation. This study reviews the role of osteopontin and tenascin-C, representatives of matricellular proteins, in the context of brain edema formation after subarachnoid hemorrhage in both clinical and experimental settings.

  5. [Pathology of the cerebrospinal fluid tract after subarachnoid hemorrhages (the x-ray and radiological aspect)].

    PubMed

    Filatov, Iu M; Torbotrias, N L; Shcherbakova, E Ia; Snigirev, V S; Kulakova, S V

    1993-01-01

    The authors examined the semiotics of hydrocephalus occurring after subarachnoidal hemorrhages (SAH) from arterial aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations to provide pathogenetic evidence for surgical or conservative hydrocephalus. The spinal fluid tract was examined in 44 patients after SAH by computed tomography and radionuclide cysternomyelography using 99mTc. Variability was found in the radiological semiotics of open internal hydrocephalus. Radiological studies revealed frequently open internal hydrocephalus in patients with arterial aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations without subarachnoidal hemorrhages. The radiological semiotics of open hydrocephalus after SAH determines both morphological changes of the spinal fluid tract and liquorodynamic disturbances.

  6. Posterior cerebral artery territory infarctions.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Carlo; Carrera, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Infarctions in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) occur in about 5-10% of all ischemic strokes. The PCA can be divided into 'deep' (P1 and P2 segments) and 'superficial' (P3 and P4) segments. Occlusion of paramedian perforating arteries arising from P1 causes rostral midbrain infarction with or without thalamic lesion. The classical clinical triad after thalamomesencephalic infarcts is hypersomnolence, cognitive deficits and vertical oculomotor paresis. Two main arterial groups arise from P2: infarction in the territory of the thalamogeniculate arteries causes severe contralateral hypesthesia and ataxia, whereas infarction in the territory of the posterior choroidal arteries results in sectoranopia with involvement of the lateral geniculate body. After superficial PCA infarcts, visual field defects and somatosensory deficits are the most frequent signs. Additionally, disorders of reading may be seen after unilateral left infarction and disorientation for place and visual neglect after right lesion. After bilateral PCA infarcts, amnesia, cortical blindness (the patient cannot see but pretend he can) may occur. Acute thrombolysis is as useful after PCA infarctions as after anterior circulation strokes. Mortality after PCA strokes is low, but long-term behavioral and cognitive deficits are underestimated.

  7. Intracranial hemorrhage from undetected aneurysmal rupture complicating transphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Uy, Edilfavia Mae; Rai, Mridula; Kannan, Subramanian; Senatus, Patrick

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old man who presented with a nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma which extended into the suprasellar region. He underwent a transcranial resection of the tumor followed eight months later by transsphenoidal surgery for the residual tumor. Postoperatively he developed massive subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. A cerebral angiogram revealed a leaking anterior communicating artery aneurysm which was not seen on the computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography before the surgery. Complications of transsphenoidal surgery, particularly vascular hemorrhagic complications, and risk of rupture of undetected aneurysms are discussed.

  8. [Hemorrhagic Cerebral Infarction after Right Segmental Lung Resection;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Kazuki; Shiono, Satoshi; Katahira, Masato; Yarimizu, Kei; Abiko, Masami; Sato, Toru

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative hemorrhagic cerebral infarction is rare but fatal complication. We report a case of hemorrhagic cerebral infarction after lung cancer surgery without a history of atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular disease. A 58-year-old man who have a history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia underwent right segmental lung resection. During surgery, he had no atrial fibrillation episode. On postoperative day 1, he presented a slight consciousness disturbance. On the day 2, he suffered from a headache and nausea. Brain computed tomography demonstrated a hemorrhagic infarction at the right posterior cerebral artery territory. Transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance angiography did not show the thrombus. The symptoms were gradually improved with intensive medical therapy, and he was discharged with a left homonymous hemianopsia. Although a diagnosis of the consciousness disturbance in the early-phase postoperative period is difficult, perioperative cerebral infarction should be recognized as a postoperative complication. PMID:26759957

  9. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms. PMID:27384117

  10. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  11. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  12. Severe visual loss and cerebral infarction after injection of hyaluronic acid gel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Gyu; Eom, Tae Kyung; Kang, Seok Joo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 23-year-old man with cerebral infarction and permanent visual loss after injection of a hyaluronic acid gel filler for augmentation rhinoplasty. The patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of loss of vision in the right eye, facial paralysis on the right side, and paralysis of the left limbs with severe pain during augmentation rhinoplasty with filler injection. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography showed ophthalmic artery obstruction and right middle cerebral artery infarction. Acute thrombolysis was performed to treat the infarction; however, the patient's condition did not improve. Intracerebral hemorrhage in the right temporal/frontal/occipital/parietal lobe, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and midline shifting were observed on brain computed tomography after 24 hours after thrombolysis. Emergency decompressive craniectomy was performed. After the surgery, the patient continued to experience drowsiness, with no improvement in visual loss and motor weakness. Three months later, he could walk with cane. This case indicates that surgeons who administer filler injections should be familiar with the possibility of accidental intravascular injection and should explain the adverse effects of fillers to patients before surgery.

  13. Severe visual loss and cerebral infarction after injection of hyaluronic acid gel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Gyu; Eom, Tae Kyung; Kang, Seok Joo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 23-year-old man with cerebral infarction and permanent visual loss after injection of a hyaluronic acid gel filler for augmentation rhinoplasty. The patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of loss of vision in the right eye, facial paralysis on the right side, and paralysis of the left limbs with severe pain during augmentation rhinoplasty with filler injection. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography showed ophthalmic artery obstruction and right middle cerebral artery infarction. Acute thrombolysis was performed to treat the infarction; however, the patient's condition did not improve. Intracerebral hemorrhage in the right temporal/frontal/occipital/parietal lobe, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and midline shifting were observed on brain computed tomography after 24 hours after thrombolysis. Emergency decompressive craniectomy was performed. After the surgery, the patient continued to experience drowsiness, with no improvement in visual loss and motor weakness. Three months later, he could walk with cane. This case indicates that surgeons who administer filler injections should be familiar with the possibility of accidental intravascular injection and should explain the adverse effects of fillers to patients before surgery. PMID:24621723

  14. [Left-ventricular function and physical exertion tolerance in patients with myocardial infarction with isolated lesion of the coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Golikov, A P; Levshunov, S P; Belozerov, G E

    1989-01-01

    Myocardial infarction area and left-ventricular myocardial contractility, determined by sectoral scanning, and exercise tolerance were assessed in 47 myocardial infarction patients with isolated coronary arterial lesions. The area under myocardial infarction was shown to be dependent on the site of the atherosclerotic process rather than the degree of stenosis in patients with isolated coronary arterial lesions. A relationship was established between the incidence of complications developing in the acute phase of infarction and the degree of stenosis. The disease was complicated more frequently in patients with coronary arterial occlusion as compared to those with severe coronary-arterial stenosis. High stress tolerance, irrespective of the site of myocardial infarction, is an evidence of great functional potentials in this category of patients.

  15. Renal Infarction Caused by Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection: Treatment with Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yong Sun Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Ki Cheon

    2009-03-15

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is rare and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who had an SRAD-complicated renal infarction. The patient experienced severe unilateral flank pain. Enhanced abdominal computed axial tomography scan showed renal infarction, and urinalysis showed no hematuria. Selective renal angiography was essential to evaluate the extent of dissection and suitability for repair. The patient was treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and frenal artery stenting.

  16. Renal infarction caused by spontaneous renal artery dissection: treatment with catheter-directed thrombolysis and stenting.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Ki Cheon

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is rare and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who had an SRAD-complicated renal infarction. The patient experienced severe unilateral flank pain. Enhanced abdominal computed axial tomography scan showed renal infarction, and urinalysis showed no hematuria. Selective renal angiography was essential to evaluate the extent of dissection and suitability for repair. The patient was treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and frenal artery stenting.

  17. Localisation of C reactive protein in infarcted tissue sites of multiple organs during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Baidoshvili, A; Nijmeijer, R; Lagrand, W K; Hack, C E; Niessen, H W M

    2002-02-01

    This report hypothesises an active role for the acute phase protein, C reactive protein (CRP), in local inflammatory reactions. This was studied in infarction sites from liver and kidney in a patient who died as a result of multiple complications after cholecystectomy. In this patient, a general acute phase protein reaction was induced, with an increase in plasma CRP. In infarction sites of kidney and liver, colocalisation of CRP and activated complement were found, whereas non-infarct sites were negative for CRP and complement. These results suggest that CRP directly participates in local inflammatory processes, possibly via complement activation, after binding of a suitable ligand.

  18. Infarctions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery: clinical features in 232 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been studied as extensively as infarctions in other vascular territories. This single centre, retrospective clinical study was conducted a) to describe salient characteristics of stroke patients with PCA infarction, b) to compare data of these patients with those with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infarctions, and c) to identify predictors of PCA stroke. Findings A total of 232 patients with PCA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 232 patients with PCA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 51 patients with ACA infarctions included in the registry. Infarctions of the PCA accounted for 6.8% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 9.6% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Lacunar infarction was the most frequent stroke subtype (34.5%) followed by atherothrombotic infarction (29.3%) and cardioembolic infarction (21.6%). In-hospital mortality was 3.9% (n = 9). Forty-five patients (19.4%) were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Hemianopia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.43), lacunar stroke subtype (OR = 2.18), symptom-free at discharge (OR = 1.92), limb weakness (OR = 0.10), speech disorders (OR = 0.33) and cardioembolism (OR = 0.65) were independent variables of PCA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas sensory deficit (OR = 2.36), limb weakness (OR = 0.11) and cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 0.43) were independent variables associated with PCA stroke in comparison with ACA infarction. Conclusions Lacunar stroke is the

  19. Chasing myocardial outcomes: perioperative myocardial infarction and cardiac troponin.

    PubMed

    Royo, Marc B; Fleisher, Lee A

    2016-02-01

    Perioperative myocardial infarction represents the most common cardiovascular complication following non-cardiac surgery, but frequently presents without the usual clinical signs and symptoms consistent with acute coronary syndrome. Given the silent nature of this event, a clinician's reliance on risk stratification tools and cardiac specific biomarkers to assist in the identification of at-risk individuals is heightened in the perioperative setting. Although cardiac troponin elevations following non-cardiac surgery have been consistently linked to increased mortality, uncertainty remains over how to clinically intervene to prevent harm. This decision is further complicated by the increasing sensitivity of the newest generation of cardiac biomarker immunoassays. In this narrative review, the growing body of evidence surrounding cardiac troponin elevations in the perioperative setting, how the evidence has been integrated into recent clinical practice guidelines, and its implications for the detection of perioperative myocardial infarction are discussed. PMID:26634279

  20. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value.

  1. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  2. Brain parenchymal, subarachnoid racemose, and intraventricular cysticercosis in an Indian man

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, D; Dubey, T; Prabhakar, S

    1999-01-01

    The coexistence of brain parenchymal cysts at various stages of evolution, both intraventricular and subarachnoid racemose, is reported in a patient with neurocysticercosis. The condition has a variety of presentations, depending on the location of the cyst. This case is of particular interest because of the rarity of this condition in India.


Keywords: brain parenchymal cyst; cysticercosis; albendazole PMID:10448497

  3. [A case of subacute subarachnoid hemorrhage without xanthochromic cerebrospinal fluid--usefulness of emergent MRI].

    PubMed

    Ogami, Ryo; Ikawa, Fusao; Ohbayashi, Naohiko; Imada, Yasutaka; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Inagawa, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    We reported a case of subacute subarachnoid hemorrhage with watery clear cerebrospinal fluid. Emergent magnetic resonance image was useful not only for diagnosis by fluid attenuated inversion recovery image but also for evaluation of cerebral ischemia and vasospasm by magnetic resonance angiography, diffusion weighted image and perfusion weighted image. A 50-year-old man presented disturbance of consciousness and dysarthria. Neither computed tomographic scan nor cerebrospinal fluid study could diagnose subarachnoid hemorrhage clearly. However, emergent fluid attenuated inversion recovery image showed the show subarachnoid hemorrhage as high signal intensity. Diffusion weighted image showed multiple, round hypersignals both in the white and gray matter. In the area with diffusion hypersignal, the apparent diffusion coefficient value was 0.57 x 10(3) mm2/sec. Perfusion weighted image showed normal cerebral blood volume but prolonged mean transit time in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed an aneurysm at the anterior communicating artery and severe vasospasm on the bilateral anterior cerebral artery, the right middle cerebral artery. Thus we are able to diagnose subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The hyperintensity of the diffusion weighted image and the fluid attenuated inversion recovery image was caused by cerebral ischemia from vasospasm. After conservative therapy during the period of vasospasm, successful surgical clipping was performed with full clinical recovery. PMID:12833876

  4. Incidence and outcome of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a retrospective population based study

    PubMed Central

    Pobereskin, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The purpose was to define the incidence and case fatality rates of subarachnoid haemorrhage in the population of Devon and Cornwall.
METHODS—A retrospective population based design was employed with multiple overlapping methods of case ascertainment. A strict definition of subarachnoid haemorrhage was used. Age and sex specific incidence rates and relative risks for death at different time intervals are calculated.
RESULTS—Eight hundred cases of first ever subarachnoid haemorrhage were identified; 77% of cases were verified by CT, 22% by necropsy, and 1% by lumbar puncture. The incidence rates are higher than those previously reported in the United Kingdom. The age standardised incidence rate (/100 000 person-years) for females was 11.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.5-15.0), for males 7.4 (5.4-10.0), and the total rate was 9.7 (7.5-12.6). The case fatality rates at 24 hours, 1 week, and 30 days were 21 (18-24)%, 37 (33-41)%, and 44 (40-49)% respectively. The relative risk for death at 30days for those over 60 years:under 60 years was 2.95 (2.18-3.97).
CONCLUSION—The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in the United Kingdom is higher than previously reported. Three quarters of the mortality occurs within 3days.

 PMID:11181855

  5. The effect of subarachnoid erythrocyte lysate on brain injury: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Huan; Han, Yan-Ling; Wang, Chun-Xi; Zhou, Chen-Hui; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Hua-Sheng; Chen, Qiang; Fan, Jie-Mei; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abundant erythrocytes remain and lyse partially in the subarachnoid space after severe subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). But the effect of subarachnoid erythrocyte lysate on brain injury is still not completely clear. In this study, autologous erythrocytes (the non-lysate group) and their lysate (the lysate group) were injected separately into the cistern magna of rabbits to induce a model of experimental SAH, although the control group received isotonic sodium chloride solution instead of erythrocyte solution. Results showed that vasospasm of the basilar artery was observed at 72 h after experimental SAH, but there was no significant difference between the non-lysate group and the lysate group. Brain injury was more severe in the lysate group than in the non-lysate group. Meanwhile, the levels of peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), IL-6 and TNF-α in brain cortex and in CSF were significantly higher in the lysate group than those in the non-lysate group. These results demonstrated that brain injury was more likely to be caused by erythrocyte lysate than by intact erythrocytes in subarachnoid space, and inflammation response positively correlated with Prx2 expression might be involved in mechanism of brain injury after SAH. PMID:27279653

  6. Changes in the Metabolism of Sphingolipids after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously described that ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigated the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Methods Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Results Compared to controls (n=8), SAH patients (n=26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0±3.5 IF/µl.min vs. 15.0±4.6 IF/µl.min; p=0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4±8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3±48.3 pmol/ml; p=0.001) and DHC (1.3±1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8±3.4 pmol/ml; p=0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7±1.2 IF/µg.min; SAH: 16.8±1.6 IF/µg.min; p<0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3422±26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7073±2467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; p<0.05) compared to controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a 2-fold increase in the activity of GCS but similar NSMase and SMS activities than controls. Conclusions Our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways here described in the outcome of SAH. PMID:25597763

  7. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects.

  8. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  9. Valsartan after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Sadi

    2014-12-01

    One of the important problems of the patients undergoing acute myocardial infarction (MI) is early development of heart failure. It has been revealed in various studies that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has a significant role in this process. The studies conducted with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have resulted in decreased mortality rate. Another RAAS blocker which was discovered about ten years later than other ACE inhibitors in historical process is angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) inhibiting the efficiency of angiotensin 2 by binding to angiotensin 1 receptor. Valsartan is one of the molecules of this group, which has higher number of large-scale randomized clinical studies. In this review, following presentation of a general overview on heart failure after acute MI, the efficiency of ARBs in this patient group will be discussed. This discussion will mostly emphasize the construction, outcomes and clinical importance of VALIANT (VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion), which is the study on valsartan after acute MI heart failure. PMID:25604205

  10. Trauma induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lolay, Georges A; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed K

    2016-01-15

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction.

  11. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in elderly patients: long-term outcome and prognostic factors in an interdisciplinary treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Schöller, Karsten; Massmann, Maike; Markl, Gertraud; Kunz, Mathias; Fesl, Gunther; Brückmann, Hartmut; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The number of elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is increasing with the aging of the population. However, management recommendations based on long-term outcome data and analyses of prognostic factors are scarce. Our study focused exclusively on elderly patients aged ≥ 60 years at the onset of SAH. Patients were selected from an in-house database and compared in cohorts of age 60-69, 70-79, and ≥ 80, regarding pre-existing medical conditions, treatment, clinical course including complications, and outcome. A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify prognostic factors for death and disability. A total of 256 patients (138 aged 60-69, 93 aged 70-79, 25 aged ≥ 80) with putative aneurysmal SAH who had been admitted to our hospital between January 1, 1996 and June 30, 2007 were extracted. The median follow-up of our total cohort was 35.5 months (range <1-154 months). Endovascular or conservative aneurysm treatment was applied more often with increasing age (p < 0.006). The 1-year survival rate was 78, 65, and 38 % in the three age groups, respectively (p = 0.0002); most of the patients died from the initial hemorrhage or from medical complications. Patients aged <70 with an initial World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) score of I-III showed the best clinical recovery. WFNS score, age, and clipping/coiling were extracted as prognostic factors from the Cox model. Elderly patients who get admitted with a good WFNS score (I-III) seem to benefit from aggressive treatment whereas caution seems to be warranted particularly in patients ≥ 70 years of age who get admitted in a WFNS score of IV and V because of their limited short- and long-term prognosis.

  12. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  13. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  14. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  15. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  16. Recurrent coronary stent thromboses and myocardial infarctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jack; Rajeev, Angampally

    2007-11-01

    Although stent thrombosis is a recognized complication of coronary intervention, recurrent stent thrombosis is rarely reported. We present a patient who suffered 3 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions associated with repeated stent thromboses within a month and a half. Although a potentially mechanical cause of thrombosis was identified in the only baremetal stent implanted in this case, no predisposing factors were seen for the 2 drug-eluting stents (DES). While recent worrisome data have suggested a slight increase in the incidence of late angiographic stent thrombosis (defined as occurring beyond 30 days) with drug-eluting stents (DES), their risk of subacute thrombosis (from 1 to 30 days) is reported to be equivalent to that of BMS. Therefore, this rare occurrence serves as a sobering reminder of the risks of subacute thrombosis with both BMS and DES. Marked neointimal inhibition, allergic reactions, as well as thienopyridine resistance, may all contribute to the pathophysiology of DES thrombosis. The Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has concluded that when these devices are used for "on-label" indications, the counterbalance of dramatic target lesion revascularization reduction versus rare incidence of late angiographic stent thrombosis results in no overall increase in DES myocardial infarction or mortality risk. Furthermore, a minimum of 1 year of dual antiplatelet therapy is recommended for all recipients of DES at low risk of bleeding.

  17. [A case of rupture of the left ventricle free wall with papillary muscle dysfunction following acute myocardial infarction, operated on successfully].

    PubMed

    de Lima, R; Perdigão, C; Neves, L; Cravino, J; Dantas, M; Bordalo, A; Pais, F; Diogo, A N; Ferreira, R; Ribeiro, C

    1990-09-01

    The authors present a case of left ventricular free wall rupture post acute myocardial infarction, associated with mitral papillary posterior muscle necrosis, operated by infartectomy and mitral valvular protesis replacement. They refer the various complications occurred during the hospital staying, and discuss its medical and surgical approach. The patient was discharged alive and six months after the infarction keeps a moderate activity. PMID:2257157

  18. [A case of rupture of the left ventricle free wall with papillary muscle dysfunction following acute myocardial infarction, operated on successfully].

    PubMed

    de Lima, R; Perdigão, C; Neves, L; Cravino, J; Dantas, M; Bordalo, A; Pais, F; Diogo, A N; Ferreira, R; Ribeiro, C

    1990-09-01

    The authors present a case of left ventricular free wall rupture post acute myocardial infarction, associated with mitral papillary posterior muscle necrosis, operated by infartectomy and mitral valvular protesis replacement. They refer the various complications occurred during the hospital staying, and discuss its medical and surgical approach. The patient was discharged alive and six months after the infarction keeps a moderate activity.

  19. Electromechanical analysis of infarct border zone in chronic myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Mickelsen, Steven R.; Ennis, Daniel B.; Rodriguez, Ignacio; Kellman, Peter; Wen, Han; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that alterations in electrical activation sequence contribute to depressed systolic function in the infarct border zone, we examined the anatomic correlation of abnormal electromechanics and infarct geometry in the canine post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart, using a high-resolution MR-based cardiac electromechanical mapping technique. Three to eight weeks after an MI was created in six dogs, a 247-electrode epicardial sock was placed over the ventricular epicardium under thoracotomy. MI location and geometry were evaluated with delayed hyperenhancement MRI. Three-dimensional systolic strains in epicardial and endocardial layers were measured in five short-axis slices with motion-tracking MRI (displacement encoding with stimulated echoes). Epicardial electrical activation was determined from sock recordings immediately before and after the MR scans. The electrodes and MR images were spatially registered to create a total of 160 nodes per heart that contained mechanical, transmural infarct extent, and electrical data. The average depth of the infarct was 55% (SD 11), and the infarct covered 28% (SD 6) of the left ventricular mass. Significantly delayed activation (>mean + 2SD) was observed within the infarct zone. The strain map showed abnormal mechanics, including abnormal stretch and loss of the transmural gradient of radial, circumferential, and longitudinal strains, in the region extending far beyond the infarct zone. We conclude that the border zone is characterized by abnormal mechanics directly coupled with normal electrical depolarization. This indicates that impaired function in the border zone is not contributed by electrical factors but results from mechanical interaction between ischemic and normal myocardium. PMID:15908463

  20. Multiple large and small cerebellar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Canaple, S.; Bogousslavsky, J.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the clinical, topographical, and aetiological features of multiple cerebellar infarcts,18 patients (16.5% of patients with cerebellar infarction) were collected from a prospective acute stroke registry, using a standard investigation protocol including MRI and magnetic resonance angiography. Infarcts in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA)+superior cerebellar artery (SCA) territory were most common (9/18; 50%), followed by PICA+anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)+SCA territory infarcts (6/18; 33%). One patient had bilateral AICA infarcts. No infarct involved the PICA+AICA combined territory. Other infarcts in the posterior circulation were present in half of the patients and the clinical presentation largely depended on them. Large artery disease was the main aetiology. Our findings emphasised the common occurrence of very small multiple cerebellar infarcts (<2 cm diameter).These very small multiple cerebellar infarcts may occur with (13 patients/18; 72%) or without (3/18; 22%) territorial cerebellar infarcts. Unlike previous series, they could not all be considered junctional infarcts (between two main cerebellar artery territories: 51/91), but also small territorial infarcts (40/91). It is suggested that these very small territorial infarcts may be endzone infarcts, due to the involvement of small distal arterial branches. It is possible that some very small territorial infarcts may be due to a microembolic process, but this hypothesis needs pathological confirmation.

 PMID:10329747

  1. Modifying the mechanics of healing infarcts: Is better the enemy of good?

    PubMed

    Clarke, Samantha A; Richardson, William J; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with over 7 million people suffering infarctions each year. Heart muscle damaged during MI is replaced by a collagenous scar over a period of several weeks, and the mechanical properties of that scar tissue are a key determinant of serious post-MI complications such as infarct rupture, depression of heart function, and progression to heart failure. Thus, there is increasing interest in developing therapies that modify the structure and mechanics of healing infarct scar. Yet most prior attempts at therapeutic scar modification have failed, some catastrophically. This article reviews available information about the mechanics of healing infarct scar and the functional impact of scar mechanical properties, and attempts to infer principles that can better guide future attempts to modify scar. One important conclusion is that collagen structure, mechanics, and remodeling of healing infarct scar vary so widely among experimental models that any novel therapy should be tested across a range of species, infarct locations, and reperfusion protocols. Another lesson from past work is that the biology and mechanics of healing infarcts are sufficiently complex that the effects of interventions are often counterintuitive; for example, increasing infarct stiffness has little effect on heart function, and inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) has little effect on scar collagen content. Computational models can help explain such counterintuitive results, and are becoming an increasingly important tool for integrating known information to better identify promising therapies and design experiments to test them. Moving forward, potentially exciting new opportunities for therapeutic modification of infarct mechanics include modulating anisotropy and promoting scar compaction.

  2. Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Sophie; Leray-Moraguès, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Canaud, Ludovic; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Canaud, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare entity, which often presents diagnostic difficulties because of its non-specific clinical presentation. We report six cases complicated with renal infarction, occurring in middle-aged male patients without risk factors, illustrating the difficulty and delay for diagnosing SRAD. Ultrasound and Doppler imaging were not sensitive enough to confirm the diagnosis, and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography was used to correct the diagnosis and allow the clinicians to propose appropriate treatment. We conclude that considering the urgency in diagnosing and treating SRAD, contrast enhanced abdominal tomography and/or abdominal magnetic resonance imaging should be proposed as soon as a suspicion of SRAD is evoked by the clinical presentation.

  3. Occipital lobe infarction after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Cross, S A

    1983-03-01

    The most common permanent neuro-ophthalmologic complication of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery is visual loss. Bilateral lower altitudinal visual field defects were documented in a patient who noted blurred vision following open heart surgery. A difference of opinion existed as to whether the field defects were due to retina-optic nerve or occipital lobe lesions. Two points are emphasized in this report: 1) the field defects were much easier to define on the tangent screen than on Goldman perimetry, and 2) occipital coronal high resolution CT scan confirmed bilateral upper bank calcarine cortex infarctions in this patient. Occipital coronal, thin-section, high-resolution computed tomographic scans are helpful in studying patients with occipital lobe visual field defects.

  4. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-ning; Liu, Zun-wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-fei; Zhao, Yong-lin; Ma, Xu-dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27651776

  5. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Ning; Liu, Zun-Wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-Fei; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27651776

  6. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-ning; Liu, Zun-wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-fei; Zhao, Yong-lin; Ma, Xu-dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  7. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in

  8. Psychological rehabilitation after myocardial infarction: multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D. A.; West, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation in unselected myocardial infarction patients in six centres, baseline data being collected on admission and by structured interview (of patients and spouses) shortly after discharge and outcome being assessed by structured interview at six months and clinical examination at 12 months. SETTING: Six district general hospitals. SUBJECTS: All 2328 eligible patients admitted over two years with confirmed myocardial infarction and discharged home within 28 days. INTERVENTIONS: Rehabilitation programmes comprising psychological therapy, counselling, relaxation training, and stress management training over seven weekly group outpatient sessions for patients and spouses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anxiety, depression, quality of life, morbidity, use of medication, and mortality. RESULTS: At six months there were no significant differences between rehabilitation patients and controls in reported anxiety (prevalence 33%) or depression (19%). Rehabilitation patients reported a lower frequency of angina (median three versus four episodes a week), medication, and physical activity. At 12 months there were no differences in clinical complications, clinical sequelae, or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Rehabilitation programmes based on psychological therapy, counselling, relaxation training, and stress management seem to offer little objective benefit to patients who have experienced myocardial infarction compared with previous reports of smaller trials. PMID:8978226

  9. Asymptomatic Partial Splenic Infarction In Laparoscopic Floppy Nissen Fundoplication And Brief Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Arslan, Cem; Gunay, Emre; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Ozkan, Erkan; Aktekin, Ali; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Short gastric vessels are divided during the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication resulting in splenic infarct in some cases. We report a case of laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication with splenic infarct that was recognized during the procedure and provide a brief literature review. The patient underwent a laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication. We observed a partial infarction of the spleen. She reported no pain. A follow-up computed tomography scan showed an infarct, and a 3-month abdominal ultrasound showed complete resolution. Peripheral splenic arterial branches have very little collateral circulation. When these vessels are occluded or injured, an area of infarction will occur immediately. Management strategies included a trial of conservative management and splenectomy for persistent symptoms or complications resulting from splenic infarct. In conclusion, we believe that the real incidence is probably much higher because many cases of SI may have gone undiagnosed during or following an operation, because some patients are asymptomatic. We propose to check spleen carefully for the possibility of splenic infarct. PMID:24833155

  10. Interrater reliability of a national acute myocardial infarction register

    PubMed Central

    Govatsmark, Ragna Elise Støre; Sneeggen, Sylvi; Karlsaune, Hanne; Slørdahl, Stig Arild; Bønaa, Kaare Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-specific registers may be used for measuring and improving healthcare and patient outcomes, and for disease surveillance and research, provided they contain valid and reliable data. The aim of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of all variables in a national myocardial infarction register. Methods We randomly selected 280 patients who had been enrolled from 14 hospitals to the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register during the year 2013. Experienced audit nurses, who were blinded to the data about the 280 patients already in the register, completed the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction paper forms for 240 patients by review of medical records. We then extracted all registered data on the same patients from the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register. To compare the interrater reliability between the register and the audit nurses, we calculated intraclass correlations coefficient for continuous variables, Cohen’s kappa and Gwet’s first agreement coefficient (AC1) for nominal variables, and quadratic weighted Cohen’s kappa and Gwet’s second AC for ordinal variables. Results We found excellent (AC1 >0.80) or good (AC1 0.61–0.80) agreement for most variables, including date and time variables, medical history, investigations and treatments during hospitalization, medication at discharge, and ST-segment elevation or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. However, only moderate agreement (AC1 0.41–0.60) was found for family history of coronary heart disease, diagnostic electrocardiography, and complications during hospitalization, whereas fair agreement (AC1 0.21–0.40) was found for acute myocardial infarction location. A high percentage of missing data was found for symptom onset, family history, body mass index, infarction location, and new Q-wave. Conclusion Most variables in Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register had excellent or good reliability. However, some important variables had lower

  11. Trans aqueductal, third ventricle – Cervical subarachnoid stenting: An adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid diversion procedure in midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus: The technical note and case series

    PubMed Central

    Teegala, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent or progressive hydrocephalus is one of the complex problems of posterior fossa tumors associated with hydrocephalus. The author evaluated the effectiveness of single-stage tumor decompression associated with a stent technique (trans aqueductal third ventricle – Cervical subarachnoid stenting) as an adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid (CSF) diversion procedure in controlling the midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus. Materials and Methods: Prospective clinical case series of 15 patients was evaluated from July 2006 to April 2012. Fifteen clinicoradiological diagnosed cases of midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus were included in this study. All the tumors were approached through the cerebello medullary (telo velo tonsilar) fissure technique. Following the excision of the posterior fossa tumor, a sizable stent was placed across the aqueduct from the third ventricle to the cervical subarachnoid space. Results: There were nine male and six female patients with an average age of 23 years. Complete tumor excision could be achieved in 12 patients and subtotal excision with clearance of aqueduct in remaining three patients. Hydrocephalus was controlled effectively in all the patients. There were no stent-related complications. Conclusions: This study showed the reliability of single-stage tumor excision followed by placement of aqueductal stent. The success rate of this technique is comparable to those of conventional CSF diversion procedures. This is a simple, safe, and effective procedure for the management of persistent and or progressive hydrocephalus. This technique may be very useful in situations where the patient's follow-up is compromised and the patients who are from a poor economic background. Long-term results need further evaluation to assess the overall functioning of this stent technique. PMID:27366254

  12. Summary of evidence on immediate statins therapy following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tseng, M Y

    2011-09-01

    Statins were shown to have neuroprotective effects, with reduced vasospasm and delayed ischemic deficits in statin-treated patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in two small, randomized, controlled clinical trials published in 2005. This review consolidated data from available published studies evaluating statin treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhage. A literature search was conducted to identify original research studies published through October 2010 testing immediate treatment with a statin in statin-naïve patients following aneurysmal SAH. Six randomized controlled clinical trials and four observational studies were identified. Despite inconsistent results among studies, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled data showed a significant reduction in delayed ischemic deficits with statins. Effect on vasospasm was more difficult to determine, due to differences in definitions used among studies. Interpretations from observational studies were limited by the use of relatively small sample sizes, historical controls, and treatment variability. PMID:21826581

  13. Multimodal endovascular treatment of a vertebrovertebral fistula presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Chandra, Ronil V; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Yoo, Albert J

    2013-09-01

    Vertebrovertebral fistulae are rare vascular malformations that uncommonly can rupture to present clinically as intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage. We report a 69-year-old man presenting following spontaneous apoplectic collapse. Initial workup revealed diffuse, intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. However, the etiology was not apparent on CT angiography of the head. Catheter-based angiography was performed, demonstrating a single-hole, high-flow vertebrovertebral fistula, arising from the V2 segment and decompressing into both cervical and skull base venous structures. Definitive treatment consisted of endovascular fistula obliteration with a combination of coil and liquid embolic material. The patient made a full neurological recovery. High cervical and skull base fistulae are rare causes of intracranial hemorrhage; endovascular treatment is effective at disconnection of the arteriovenous shunt.

  14. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus. PMID:27277584

  15. Global testicular infarction in the presence of epididymitis: clinical features, appearances on grayscale, color Doppler, and contrast-enhanced sonography, and histologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Gibran; Sellars, Maria E; Kooiman, Gordon G; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Sidhu, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Epididymitis is common, presenting indolently with unilateral scrotal pain and swelling. Diagnosis is based on clinical assessment and resolves with antibiotic therapy. Recognized complications are abscess formation and segmental infarction. Global testicular infarction is rare. Diagnosis is important and requires surgical management. On grayscale sonography, global infarction may be difficult to establish. The addition of color Doppler imaging is useful but is observer experience dependent with limitations in the presence of low flow. Contrast-enhanced sonography is useful for unequivocally establishing the diagnosis. We report global testicular infarction in 2 patients with epididymitis clearly depicted on contrast-enhanced sonography, allowing immediate surgical management.

  16. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia: rare consequence of sexual stimulation in a paraplegic].

    PubMed

    Galiart, E; Baumberger, M; Pannek, J

    2013-11-01

    Nearly all men with spinal cord injury suffer from neurogenic sexual dysfunction which is often treated with phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors. We describe a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia (AD) caused by sexual stimulation. Nitrates are frequently used for acute treatment of AD; however, the use of these drugs in combination with PDE5 inhibitors is contraindicated. Therefore, meticulous information from patients and relatives on the risk of AD and possible drug interactions is of vital importance. PMID:23784679

  17. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  18. Magnesium sulfate reverses experimental delayed cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ram, Z; Sadeh, M; Shacked, I; Sahar, A; Hadani, M

    1991-07-01

    We induced experimental delayed cerebral vasospasm by the intracisternal injection of greater than 0.5 ml blood in 30 rats. Seventy-two hours later the basilar artery was exposed via the transclival approach and photographed at high-power magnification through an operating microscope. We then evaluated the effect of topical (n = 30) and intravenous (n = 20) magnesium sulfate on the spastic artery by computerized image analysis. A greater than 50% reduction in baseline diameter of the basilar artery was observed in the rats subjected to subarachnoid hemorrhage compared with the 10 controls (p less than 0.0001). Intravenous magnesium sulfate dilated the spastic artery to approximately 75% of the baseline diameter in control rats (p less than 0.0001). Topical magnesium sulfate caused dramatic dilation of the basilar artery in both the control and the subarachnoid hemorrhage groups to near 150% of the baseline diameter in the controls (p less than 0.001). All rats receiving intravenous magnesium sulfate reached therapeutic plasma levels of the ion. Hemodynamic effects were mild and immediately reversible upon cessation of magnesium sulfate administration. We suggest that magnesium has a role in the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm in humans.

  19. Infarction of middle third posterior cortex of kidney: a complication of extended pyelolithotomy, intra-operative electrohydraulic lithotripsy and extraction of calyceal stones under vision using stone basket and flexible cystoscope in a spinal cord injury patient – a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury produces multiple systemic and metabolic alterations. A decrease in micro vascular blood flow to liver, spleen and muscle has been described following spinal cord injury. Case presentation We present a 46-year-old male patient with C-4 complete tetraplegia, who developed a large stag horn calculus with branches in upper, middle and lower calyces of left kidney. This patient underwent Gil-Vernet extended pyelolithotomy and required intra-operative electrohydraulic lithotripsy and retrieval of stones from upper, middle and lower calyces using flexible cystoscope and stone basket. Computed tomography, performed eighteen days after surgery, showed multiple areas of non-enhancing cortex posteriorly and in the upper pole, suggestive of focal infarction. Magnetic resonance imaging of left kidney confirmed the presence of an area of infarction in middle third of posterior cortex, but there was no evidence of trauma to posterior division of renal artery. Therefore, we postulate that compression of renal parenchyma by Gil-Vernet retractors during surgery, and firm pressure that was applied over the middle of kidney for prolonged periods while several attempts were being made to retrieve fragments of calculi from renal calyces, led to ischaemia and subsequently, infarction of mid-third posterior cortex of left kidney. Conclusion This case illustrates importance of gentle handling of kidney during extended pyelolithotomy in order to prevent subtle renal trauma, which may be detected only by advanced imaging studies. Further, spinal cord physicians should take a pragmatic approach to management of stones located inside renal calyces. Both spinal cord injury patients and their physicians should remember that in our enthusiasm to achieve complete clearance of stones embedded deeply within renal calyces, we could produce irreversible injury to kidney, as indeed happened in this patient. Therefore, emphasis should be placed on prevention of struvite

  20. Postrenal transplant urinary leakage caused by segmental infarction of a renal allograft treated by partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Eshraghian, Ahad; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Bahador, Ali; Malek-hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2011-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the final treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Urinary leakage is the most-common surgical complication early after transplant. Another complication in the early posttransplant period is segmental allograft infarction. We report a kidney recipient who developed urinary leakage secondary to a segmental infarction of the upper pole of the transplanted kidney 2 months after transplant. The patient was treated successfully by a partial nephrectomy of the infracted upper lobe of the kidney. Three months after the partial nephrectomy of the allograft, serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were normal, and the patient was able to partake in her daily activities. Partial nephrectomy in the context of infarction of a kidney allograft is safe and can be used in similar cases.

  1. Thalamic amnesia after infarct

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, Emmanuel J.; Eustache, Pierre; Planton, Mélanie; Raposo, Nicolas; Sibon, Igor; Albucher, Jean-François; Bonneville, Fabrice; Peran, Patrice; Pariente, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To improve current understanding of the mechanisms behind thalamic amnesia, as it is unclear whether it is directly related to damage to specific nuclei, in particular to the anterior or mediodorsal nuclei, or indirectly related to lesions of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT). Methods: We recruited 12 patients with a left thalamic infarction and 25 healthy matched controls. All underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of verbal and visual memory, executive functions, language, and affect, and a high-resolution structural volumetric MRI scan. Thalamic lesions were manually segmented and automatically localized with a computerized thalamic atlas. As well as comparing patients with controls, we divided patients into subgroups with intact or damaged MTT. Results: Only one patient had a small lesion of the anterior nucleus. Most of the lesions included the mediodorsal (n = 11) and intralaminar nuclei (n = 12). Patients performed worse than controls on the verbal memory tasks, but the 5 patients with intact MTT who showed isolated lesions of the mediodorsal nucleus (MD) only displayed moderate memory impairment. The 7 patients with a damaged MTT performed worse on the verbal memory tasks than those whose MTT was intact. Conclusions: Lesions in the MTT and in the MD result in memory impairment, severely in the case of MTT and to a lesser extent in the case of MD, thus highlighting the roles played by these 2 structures in memory circuits. PMID:26567269

  2. Comprehensive analysis of myocardial infarction due to left circumflex artery occlusion: comparison with infarction due to right coronary artery and left anterior descending artery occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, B.L.; Beller, G.A.; Kaiser, D.L.; Gibson, R.S.

    1988-11-01

    Forty consecutive patients with creatine kinase-MB confirmed myocardial infarction due to circumflex artery occlusion (Group 1) were prospectively evaluated and compared with 107 patients with infarction due to right coronary artery occlusion (Group 2) and 94 with left anterior descending artery occlusion (Group 3). All 241 patients underwent exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy, radionuclide ventriculography, 24 h Holter electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring and coronary arteriography before hospital discharge and were followed up for 39 +/- 18 months. There were no significant differences among the three infarct groups in age, gender, number of risk factors, prevalence and type of prior infarction, Norris index, Killip class and frequency of in-hospital complications. Acute ST segment elevation was present in only 48% of patients in Group 1 versus 71 and 72% in Groups 2 and 3, respectively (p = 0.012), and 38% of patients with a circumflex artery-related infarct had no significant ST changes (that is, elevation or depression) on admission (versus 21 and 20% for patients in Groups 2 and 3, respectively) (p = 0.001). Abnormal R waves in lead V1 were more common in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p less than 0.003) as was ST elevation in leads I, aVL and V4 to V6 (p less than or equal to 0.048). These differences in ECG findings between Group 1 and 2 patients correlated with a significantly higher prevalence of posterior and lateral wall asynergy in the group with a circumflex artery-related infarct. Infarct size based on peak creatine kinase levels and multiple radionuclide variables was intermediate in Group 1 compared with that in Group 2 (smallest) and Group 3 (largest). During long-term follow-up, the probability of recurrent cardiac events was similar in the three infarct groups.

  3. Cerebral infarction due to Aspergillus arteritis following glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Gurusinghe, N T; Lynch, P G

    1992-01-01

    Cerebral infarction due to fungal arteritis is an uncommon complication of neurosurgical operations and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy, including long-term steroids. If unrecognized, the neurological deterioration which ensues may be mistreated by increasing the dose of steroids. A case of a 38-year-old Caucasian male who had no obvious immune deficiency or fungal infection prior to a craniotomy for cerebral tumour is described in whom perioperative aspergillus infection resulted in cerebral arteritis and extensive cerebral infarction with a fatal outcome. Long-term steroid therapy used in the management of cerebral tumours may carry an increased risk of systemic or cerebral fungal infection. The possibility of cerebral mycosis (arteritis) and dangers of its non-recognition are highlighted.

  4. Acute Anteroseptal Myocardial Infarction after a Negative Exercise Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Al-Alawi, Abdullah M; Janardan, Jyotsna; Peck, Kah Y; Soward, Alan

    2016-05-01

    A myocardial infarction is a rare complication which can occur after an exercise stress test. We report a 48-year-old male who was referred to the Mildura Cardiology Practice, Victoria, Australia, in August 2014 with left-sided chest pain. He underwent an exercise stress test which was negative for myocardial ischaemia. However, the patient presented to the Emergency Department of the Mildura Base Hospital 30 minutes after the test with severe retrosternal chest pain. An acute anteroseptal ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was observed on electrocardiography. After thrombolysis, he was transferred to a tertiary hospital where coronary angiography subsequently revealed significant left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis. Thrombus aspiration and a balloon angioplasty were performed. The patient was discharged three days after the surgical procedure in good health.

  5. Psychosis post corona radiata and lentiform nucleus infarction.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Khadijah Hasanah Abang; Saini, Suriati Mohamed; Sharip, Shalisah; Rahman, Abdul Hamid Abdul

    2015-04-02

    Complications of stroke can include neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, post-stroke psychosis is rare. We report a case where an acute presentation of psychosis, depression and fluctuating cognitive impairment in a middle-aged man turned out to be related to a silent brain infarction. The patient had a background of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus with glycated haemoglobin level of 9.0-11.0%, hypertension and ischaemic heart disease. His CT brain results showed multifocal infarct with hypodensities at bilateral lentiform nucleus and bilateral corona radiata. His strong genetic predisposition of psychosis and a history of brief psychotic disorder with complete remission 3 years prior to the current presentation might possibly contribute to his post-stroke atypical neuropsychiatric presentation, and posed diagnostic challenges. He showed marked improvement with risperidone 6 mg nocte, chlorpromazine 50 mg nocte and fluvoxamine of 200 mg nocte. The need of comprehensive treatments to modify his stroke risk factors was addressed.

  6. Scorpion envenomation-induced acute thrombotic inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Baykan, Ahmet Oytun; Gür, Mustafa; Acele, Armağan; Şeker, Taner; Çaylı, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a serious cardiac emergency following scorpion envenomation has rarely been reported and, when so, mostly presented as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or myocarditis. Possible mechanisms include imbalance in blood pressure and coronary vasospasm caused by the combination of sympathetic excitation, scorpion venom-induced release of catecholamines, and the direct effect of the toxin on the myocardium. We report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI) within 2 h of being stung by a scorpion. Coronary angiogram revealed total thrombotic occlusion of the left circumflex artery, which was treated successfully with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, thrombus aspiration, antivenom serum, and supportive therapy. Therefore, life-threatening MI can complicate the clinical course during some types of scorpion envenomation and should be managed as an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26875137

  7. An Unusual Presentation of Opioid Induced Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Butt, Mujeeb-Ur-Rehman Abid; Nadir, Reeja

    2016-06-01

    Opioid induced cerebral infarction is one of the most dreadful complications encountered in clinical practice. A30-year known hypertensive male presented to the emergency department of Shalamar Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan, with altered state of consciousness. He had been in his usual state of health a day before the presentation. On examination he was afebrile, his GCS was 3/15 having pinpoint pupils with absent doll's eye movements. His blood pressure was 90/60 mmHg, pulse rate was 62/minute, and respiratory rate was 10/minute. His right plantar was upgoing. He was resuscitated in emergency and was placed on ventilator due to hypoxemia. Computed tomography (CT) of brain revealed bilateral internal capsule hypolucencies and bilateral frontal lobe infarction. His urinary toxicological screening revealed extremely high concentrations of opioids and benzodiazepine. Patient made an uneventful recovery with antidote and supportive care. PMID:27376233

  8. Diabetic muscle infarction: two cases: one with recurrent and bilateral lesions and one with usual unilateral involvement.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jorge A; Aljure, Dahyana Cadavid; Cañas, Carlos A; Vélez, Juan D; Abadía, Fabio Bonilla

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes. We describe 2 cases of diabetic muscle infarction, each one of them with a particular form of clinical presentation: recurrence, bilateral engagement, and unilateral compromise. Both cases had history of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. The diagnosis was based on clinical, imaging, and anatomopathological features. The treatment was with a close control of diabetes mellitus, analgesics, short-term immobilization, and physical therapy.

  9. 18F-FDG PET imaging in a patient with late omental infarction after treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chassagnon, Guillaume; Metrard, Gilles; Besse, Hélène; Gauvain, Sabine

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of late omental infarction visualized by F-FDG PET/CT during follow-up for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The 65-year-old patient was referred for imaging 8 months after pancreaticoduodenectomy and 2 months after completion of a course of chemotherapy. PET/CT showed an FDG-avid omental lesion that suggested peritoneal carcinomatosis. The appearance and evolution at follow-up studies confirmed the diagnosis of omental infarction, a rare complication of pancreatic surgery. This case revealed the possibility of late FDG uptake in omental infarction.

  10. Physiological Correlates of Intellectual Function in Children with Sickle Cell Disease: Hypoxaemia, Hyperaemia and Brain Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Alexandra M.; Pit-ten Cate, Ineke M.; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Prengler, Mara; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2006-01-01

    Lowered intelligence relative to controls is evident by mid-childhood in children with sickle cell disease. There is consensus that brain infarct contributes to this deficit, but the subtle lowering of IQ in children with normal MRI scans might be accounted for by chronic systemic complications leading to insufficient oxygen delivery to the brain.…

  11. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Hasbini, Dana; Younis, Muhammad H; Bhatti, M Tariq

    2015-01-01

    A 2½-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela.

  12. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Hasbini, Dana; Younis, Muhammad H.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2015-01-01

    A 2½-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela. PMID:25960732

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  14. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  16. [Trans and postoperative myocardial infarct in heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Rotberg, T; Macías, R; Correa-Suárez, R; Luna, P; Malo, R

    1976-01-01

    1. A study was made of 34 cases (33%) of myocardial infarction trans and immediately postoperative which occurred in 11,210 surgical interventions with and without extracorporeal circulation. 2. This presents a statistical relation of the frequency of myocardial infarction in realtion to the heart disease acquired with or without extracorporeal circulation with the mitral, aortic, and double prosthesis of the mitral and aortic valves. A correlation was also made with the ischemic heart disease subjected to revascularization. The same analysis was carried out in the congenital heart disease with or without extracorporeal circulation. 3. In all cases the antecedents, precipitating factors, and the clinical picture were studied and in 12 cases the necropsy was analized. The principal finding was transmural myocardial infarction with electrocardiographic proof and serial enzymes. 4. The group was divided into two sub-groups; Group "A" with acute myocardial infarction transoperative, and Group "B" with acute myocardial infarction in the first eight postoperative days. The electrical and mechanical complications were analized. 5. A correlation was made of the causes of mortality related to the type of congenital or acquired heart disease with or without extracorporeal circulation. 6. The frequency of this entity was studied with the total time of aortic clamping, and the complications such as the low cardiac output syndrome, rupture of the wall, aneurysms, acute pulmonary edema, and with the disturbances of rhythm and conduction. 7. The presence of 33.3% of normal coronaries in these of necropsy was emphasized. 8. The importance of the coronary profile of this group in relation to the consequences of a stress from anesthesia, surgery, extracorporeal circulation, and aortic clamping is mentioned. 9. The diagnostic parameters such as arterial hypotension with or without the low cardiac output syndrome, enzyme levels, and the action of the potassium ion are mentioned. 10

  17. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and size of infarct, left ventricular function, and survival in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Werf, F.; Arnold, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To assess effect of intravenous recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator on size of infarct, left ventricular function, and survival in acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Double blind, randomised, placebo controlled prospective trial of patients with acute myocardial infarction within five hours after onset of symptoms. SETTING--Twenty six referral centres participating in European cooperative study for recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator. PATIENTS--Treatment group of 355 patients with acute myocardial infarction allocated to receive intravenous recombinant plasminogen activator. Controls comprised 366 similar patients allocated to receive placebo. INTERVENTION--All patients were given aspirin 250 mg and bolus injection of 5000 IU heparin immediately before start of trial. Patients in treatment group were given 100 mg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator over three hours (10 mg intravenous bolus, 50 mg during one hour, and 40 mg during next two hours) by infusion. Controls were given placebo by same method. Full anticoagulation treatment and aspirin were given to both groups until angiography (10-22 days after admission). beta Blockers were given at discharge. END POINT--Left ventricular function at 10-22 days, enzymatic infarct size, clinical course, and survival to three month follow up. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Mortality was reduced by 51% (95% confidence interval -76 to 1) in treated patients at 14 days after start of treatment and by 36% (-63 to 13) at three months. For treatment within three hours after myocardial infarction mortality was reduced by 82% (-95 to -31) at 14 days and by 59% (-83 to -2) at three months. During 14 days in hospital incidence of cardiac complications was lower in treated patients than controls (cardiogenic shock, 2.5% v 6.0%; ventricular fibrillation, 3.4% v 6.3%; and pericarditis, 6.2% v 11.0% respectively), but that of angioplasty or artery bypass, or both was higher (15.8% v 9

  18. [Myocardial infarction caused by exertion].

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Weber, S

    1997-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the main cause of sudden death during physical exercise, particularly in subjects over 40 and may even occur in high-performance young athletes. Sports and physical activity have a beneficial effect in preventing cardiovascular diseases, but certain rules of prudence must be followed to avoid the risk of a severe coronary event. Myocardial infarction always occurs in particularly susceptible subjects with several risk factors, predominantly smoking, hypercholesterolemia, family history of atherosclerosis. Dietary factors, either before, during or after the exercise, are always found. Distribution of coronary lesions differs with age. Before 40 years, the coronary network is normal in 40% of the cases. The infarction is partially explained by platelet hyperaggregahility and coronary spasms at exercise or in the post-exercise period.

  19. [Complications associated with inguinal orchiectomy and scrotal orchiectomy].

    PubMed

    Anheuser, P; Kranz, J; Will, J; Dieckmann, K P

    2014-05-01

    Inguinal excision of testis is technically an elementary surgical procedure. According to the indication (e.g., malignant tumors, infarction, inflammation), an inguinal or alternatively a transcrotal approach is possible. Despite its straightforwardness, surgery of the scrotum includes remarkable risks and complications such as postoperative hemorrhage, hematoma formation, infections, and disturbances of wound healing followed by insufficient unfavorable cosmetic results. Nerve injury may be accompanied by temporary or persistent paresthesias which have been documented in our patients undergoing orchiectomy. PMID:24744108

  20. Myocardial infarction with an initially normal electrocardiogram--angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Caceres, L; Cooke, D; Zalenski, R; Rydman, R; Lakier, J B

    1995-10-01

    To analyze the paradox of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with an initially normal electrocardiogram (ECG), we reviewed the records of 732 patients discharged with a final diagnosis of AMI over a 2-year period. Twenty-one patient were identified whose initial ECG was normal and who underwent coronary arteriography during the index hospitalization. According to the ECG evolution, three distinct groups were identified: Group 1: those who subsequently developed ST elevation or Q waves (n = 7), Group 2: those who developed ST depression or T-wave inversion (n = 8), and Group 3: those whose ECG remained normal ( n = 6). Peak creatine kinase (CK), timing of the first ECG change, life-threatening complications, and location of the infarct-related coronary lesion were recorded. Infarct-related coronary lesions were also classified into those in a major coronary trunk versus those in secondary branches. The incidence of AMI with a normal ECG was 3.7%. There was no difference in the frequency of coronary artery involvement in the groups studied: left anterior descending (33%), right coronary artery (38%), and circumflex (28%). All ECG changes developed within the first 48 h of hospitalization; 17 +/- 15 in Group 1, and 24 +/- 12 h in Group 2. All six patients who had a persistently normal ECG (Group 3) had lesions in branch vessels (p < 0.05 when compared with Group 1 plus Group 2). Patients who developed ST elevation or Q waves (Group 1) always had a major artery trunk involved (p < 0.05 when compared with Group 2 plus Group 3). Patients in Group 3 had less myocardial damage and fewer complications compared with the other two groups. Myocardial infarction with an initial normal ECG is uncommon and may result from involvement of any of the three coronary arteries. Electrocardiographic evolution usually occurs within the first 48 h of hospitalization. Patients whose ECGs remain normal appear to have culprit lesions in coronary branches, smaller infarctions, and fewer in

  1. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  2. Macrophage Roles Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jessica M.; Lopez, Elizabeth F.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2010-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), circulating blood monocytes respond to chemotactic factors, migrate into the infarcted myocardium, and differentiate into macrophages. At the injury site, macrophages remove necrotic cardiac myocytes and apoptotic neutrophils; secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors; and modulate phases of the angiogenic response. As such, the macrophage is a primary responder cell type that is involved in the regulation of post-MI wound healing at multiple levels. This review summarizes what is currently known about macrophage functions post-MI and borrows literature from other injury and inflammatory models to speculate on additional roles. Basic science and clinical avenues that remain to be explored are also discussed. PMID:18656272

  3. Acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yewen; Yin, Xing; Wijaya, Cori; Huang, Ming-He; McConnell, Bradley K

    2011-01-01

    With heart failure leading the cause of death in the USA (Hunt), biomedical research is fundamental to advance medical treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Animal models that mimic human cardiac disease, such as myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-reperfusion (IR) that induces heart failure as well as pressure-overload (transverse aortic constriction) that induces cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (Goldman and Tarnavski), are useful models to study cardiovascular disease. In particular, myocardial ischemia (MI) is a leading cause for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality despite controlling certain risk factors such as arteriosclerosis and treatments via surgical intervention (Thygesen). Furthermore, an acute loss of the myocardium following myocardial ischemia (MI) results in increased loading conditions that induces ventricular remodeling of the infarcted border zone and the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Myocyte apoptosis, necrosis and the resultant increased hemodynamic load activate multiple biochemical intracellular signaling that initiates LV dilatation, hypertrophy, ventricular shape distortion, and collagen scar formation. This pathological remodeling and failure to normalize the increased wall stresses results in progressive dilatation, recruitment of the border zone myocardium into the scar, and eventually deterioration in myocardial contractile function (i.e. heart failure). The progression of LV dysfunction and heart failure in rats is similar to that observed in patients who sustain a large myocardial infarction, survive and subsequently develops heart failure (Goldman). The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in rats has been used to mimic human cardiovascular disease; specifically used to study cardiac signaling mechanisms associated with heart failure as well as to assess the contribution of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure. The method described in this report is the rat model of acute myocardial

  4. Solar activity and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, E; Mergentaler, J; Kotlarek-Haus, S; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, M; Kucharczyk, J; Janus, W

    1983-01-01

    The correlation between the incidence of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, the solar activity and geomagnetism in the period 1969-1976 was studied, basing on Wrocław hospitals material registered according to WHO standards; sudden death was assumed when a person died within 24 hours after the onset of the disease. The highest number of infarctions and sudden deaths was detected for 1975, which coincided with the lowest solar activity, and the lowest one for the years 1969-1970 coinciding with the highest solar activity. Such an inverse, statistically significant correlation was not found to exist between the studied biological phenomena and geomagnetism. PMID:6851574

  5. Idiopathic subarachnoid hemorrhage: a multicentre series of 220 patients.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, R; Lagares, A; Fernández-Alén, J A; Arikan, F; Vilalta, J; Ibáñez, J; Maillo, A; Gabarros, A; Domínguez, J; Horcajadas, A; Ballenilla, F; Rodríguez-Boto, G; Llacer, J L; Arrese, I; de la Lama, A; Santamarta, D; Delgado, P; Muñoz, M F

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND. The Spanish neurosurgical society created a multicentre data base on spontaneous SAH to analyze the real problematic of this disease in our country. This paper focuses on the group of patients with idiopathic SAH (ISAH). METHODS. 16 participant hospitals collect their spontaneous SAH cases in a common data base shared in the internet through a secured web page, considering clinical, radiological, evolution and outcome variables. The 220 ISAH cases collected from November 2004 to November 2007 were statistically analyzed as a whole and divided into 3 subgroups depending on the CT blood pattern (aneurysmal, perimesencephalic, or normal). RESULTS. The 220 ISAH patients constitute 19% of all 1149 spontaneous SAH collected in the study period. In 46,8% of ISAH the blood CT pattern was aneurysmal, which was related to older age, worse clinical condition, higher Fisher grade, more hydrocephalus and worse outcome, compared to perimesencephalic (42.7%) or normal CT (10.4%) pattern. Once surpassed the acute phase, outcome of ISAH patients is similarly good in all 3 ISAH subgroups, significantly better as a whole compared to aneurysmal SAH patients. The only variable related to outcome in ISAH after a logistic regression analysis was the admission clinical grade. CONCLUSIONS. ISAH percentage of spontaneous SAH is diminishing in Spain. Classification of ISAH cases depending on the blood CT pattern is important to differentiate higher risk groups although complications are not negligible in any of the ISAH subgroups. Neurological status on admission is the single most valuable prognostic factor for outcome in ISAH patients.

  6. Renal infarction secondary to ketamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Li; Chen, Jin-Li; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Tang, Shou-Hung; Tsao, Chih-Wei; Meng, En

    2013-07-01

    Renal infarction is an uncommon condition that resulted from inadequate perfusion of the kidney and is easily missed diagnosed due to its nonspecific clinical presentations. Major risk factors for renal infarction are atrial fibrillation, previous embolism, and ischemic and valvular heart disease. Progressive decrease in renal function or even death can occur if renal infarction is not diagnosed accurately and promptly. Ketamine abuse may cause variable urinary tract injury. However, renal infarction caused by ketamine abuse has never been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of renal infarction following nasal insufflation of ketamine.

  7. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Risk Modeling Study for Individual Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-02-01

    The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT.In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824-0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were independent risk

  8. Toxocariasis: A Rare Cause of Multiple Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Hee

    2015-06-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, mostly due to accidental ingestion of embryonated eggs. Clinical manifestations vary and are classified as visceral larva migrans or ocular larva migrans according to the organs affected. Central nervous system involvement is an unusual complication. Here, we report a case of multiple cerebral infarction and concurrent multi-organ involvement due to T. canis infestation of a previous healthy 39-year-old male who was admitted for right leg weakness. After treatment with albendazole, the patient's clinical and laboratory results improved markedly. PMID:26157596

  9. Noncompaction and embolic myocardial infarction: the importance of oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Pulignano, Giovanni; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Tolone, Stefano; Musto, Carmine; De Lio, Lucia; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni; Violini, Roberto; Uguccioni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrabeculations and is associated with heart failure, arrhythmias and embolism. We report the case of a 67-year-old LVNC patient, under oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy for apical thrombosis. After she discontinued OAC, the thrombus involved almost the whole of the left ventricle; in a few months her condition worsened, requiring hospitalization, and despite heparin infusion she experienced myocardial infarction (MI), caused by embolic occlusion of the left anterior descending artery. Although infrequent as a complication of LVNC, and usually attributable to microvascular dysfunction, in this case MI seems due to coronary thromboembolism from dislodged thrombotic material in the left ventricle.

  10. [Myocardial infarction in young population].

    PubMed

    Shklovskii, B L; Prokhorchik, A A; Koltunov, A N; Lishchuk, A N; Ryzhman, N N; Ivanov, A V; Navaznov, V V; Baksheev, V I

    2015-03-01

    Description of clinical observation and literature review. Myocardial infarction in patients younger than 45 years is rare, but it is an important clinical, organizational and psychological problem. A case of myocardial infarction in 19-years old patient, who suffered since 6 years from kidney disease, is described. Transmural left-ventricular myocardial infarction has developed on the background of chronic glomerulonephritis, excessive exercise, and traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Coronary venous bypass with the benefit-pleasing outcome is performed. When analysing the literature, the authors emphasize that in comparison with elderly patients, young people have different profiles of risk factors, clinical manfestations and prognosis of myocardial infarction. It is emphasized that kidney chronic disease, regardless the stage, worsen short-term and long-term outcomes of cardiovascular disease. Early stabilization is possible under the condition of risk stratification and-early revascularization, which leads to better clinical outcomes. Particular attention should be given to a comprehensive assessment, it prognostic criteria, risk factor modification, secondary prevention of major and associated diseases, clinical- and -dynamic observation, including patients with asymptomatic course of the disease.

  11. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  12. [Acute myocardial infarction during sport].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Asakuma, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Yasutomi, N; Iwasaki, T

    1995-10-01

    Thirty patients with acute myocardial infarction which occurred during sport were investigated to identify the type of sport, prodromata, situations at the onset of disease, habit of exercise, preceding medical evaluation, coronary risk factors, and coronary angiographic findings. Infarction occurred during golf in 12 patients, bowling in 4, gateball in 4, jogging or running in 5, baseball in 2, and tennis or table tennis in 3. The majority of the patients were playing ball games. Twenty-seven patients were men (90%) and 3 were women (10%). All patients had played the same kind of sport for several years. Twenty-four patients had one or more coronary risk factors, and especially 18 patients smoked cigarettes. Nine patients had experienced anterior chest pain but only two patients had received medical evaluation. Coronary angiography was performed in 25 patients (83.3%), revealing single-vessel disease in 14, two-vessel disease in 6, three-vessel disease in 4, and disease of all left main coronary trunks in 1. The acute episode of infarction occurred mainly in spring or fall. Many patients with acute myocardial infarction occurring during sport participate in sports of low or moderate dynamic and low static exercises which are generally regarded safe. Many patients had enjoyed their sports regularly for a long time. Though many patients had coronary risk factors, only a few had received a medical check before their heart attack.

  13. Myocardial infarction following sternal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, R. K.; Morrison, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of myocardial infarction in a 32-year-old man undergoing sternal surgery. Thrombotic occlusion of the right coronary artery with no underlying atheromatous disease was demonstrated angiographically and successfully treated with intracoronary thrombolysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8796219

  14. Influence of infarct artery patency on the relation between initial ST segment elevation and final infarct size.

    PubMed Central

    Hackworthy, R A; Vogel, M B; Harris, P J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty seven patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied to determine the effect of perfusion of the infarct artery on the relation between the extent of initial ST segment elevation and final electrocardiographic infarct size. The sum of the initial peak ST elevations in all leads correlated with electrocardiographic infarct size in patients with anterior infarction and total occlusion of the infarct artery without collaterals. In patients with anterior infarction and subtotal occlusion of the infarct artery and in all patients with inferior infarction, infarct size was smaller than predicted from the extent of initial ST segment elevation. Collaterals to the infarct artery were present in eight of the 10 patients with inferior infarction and total occlusion. In patients with a persistently occluded infarct artery without collaterals the final infarct size correlated with the extent of initial peak ST segment elevation. This study provides further evidence that spontaneous reperfusion by anterograde flow or via collaterals may salvage jeopardized myocardium. PMID:3756039

  15. Mouse model of intraluminal MCAO: cerebral infarct evaluation by cresyl violet staining.

    PubMed

    Rousselet, Estelle; Kriz, Jasna; Seidah, Nabil G

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality and the leading cause of disability in the World. Ischemic stroke accounts for approximately 80% of all strokes. However, the thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only treatment of acute ischemic stroke that exists. This led researchers to develop several ischemic stroke models in a variety of species. Two major types of rodent models have been developed: models of global cerebral ischemia or focal cerebral ischemia. To mimic ischemic stroke in patients, in whom approximately 80% thrombotic or embolic strokes occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), the intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model is quite relevant for stroke studies. This model was first developed in rats by Koizumi et al. in 1986 (1). Because of the ease of genetic manipulation in mice, these models have also been developed in this species (2-3). Herein, we present the transient MCA occlusion procedure in C57/Bl6 mice. Previous studies have reported that physical properties of the occluder such as tip diameter, length, shape, and flexibility are critical for the reproducibility of the infarct volume (4). Herein, a commercial silicon coated monofilaments (Doccol Corporation) have been used. Another great advantage is that this monofilament reduces the risk to induce subarachnoid hemorrhages. Using the Zeiss stereo-microscope Stemi 2000, the silicon coated monofilament was introduced into the internal carotid artery (ICA) via a cut in the external carotid artery (ECA) until the monofilament occludes the base of the MCA. Blood flow was restored 1 hour later by removal of the monofilament to mimic the restoration of blood flow after lysis of a thromboembolic clot in humans. The extent of cerebral infarct may be evaluated first by a neurologic score and by the measurement of the infarct volume. Ischemic mice were thus analyzed for their neurologic score at different post-reperfusion times. To evaluate the infarct

  16. Relevance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging sequences in diagnosing basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Mezo, Roger; Lara García, Javier; Arroyo, Mariana; Fleury, Agnès

    2015-12-01

    Imagenological diagnosis of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis is usually difficult when classical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of 3D MRI sequences (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition (FIESTA) and Spoiled Gradient Recalled Echo (SPGR)) with respect to classical sequences (Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and T1) in visualizing Taenia solium cyst in these locations. Forty-seven T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space were diagnosed in eighteen Mexican patients. A pre-treatment MRI was performed on all patients, and all four sequences (FIESTA, FLAIR, T1 SPGR, and T2) were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. The sensitivity of each sequence to detect the parasite membrane and scolex was evaluated, along with its capacity to detect differences in signal intensity between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cysts. FIESTA sequences allowed the visualization of cyst membrane in 87.2% of the parasites evaluated, FLAIR in 38.3%, SPGR in 23.4%, and T2 in 17.0%. The superiority of FIESTA sequences over the other three imaging methods was statistically significant (P<0.001). Scolices were detected by FIESTA twice as much as the other sequences did, although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Differences in signal intensity between CSF and parasite cysts were significant in FIESTA (P<0.0001), SPGR (P<0.0001), and FLAIR (P=0.005) sequences. For the first time, the usefulness of 3D MRI sequences to diagnose T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space was demonstrated. The routine use of these sequences could favor an earlier diagnosis and greatly improve the prognosis of patients affected by this severe form of the disease.

  17. Evaluation of prostaglandin biosynthetic activity in canine basilar artery following subarachnoid injection of blood.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Murota, S I; Wakai, S; Asano, T; Sano, K

    1981-11-01

    Transformation of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins was investigated in the basilar artery by incubating sections of artery with carbon-14-labeled arachidonic acid. Thin-layer radiochromatography revealed that, in normal canine basilar arteries, 14C-arachidonic acid was transformed mainly to 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha, a spontaneous metabolite of prostacyclin (PGI2). Among other prostaglandins, only a small amount of PGF2 alpha was detected, whereas PGD2, PGE2, and thromboxane B2 were not. Arteries removed on Days 3 and 8 after subarachnoid blood injection showed a prostaglandin synthesis profile similar to that in the normal cerebral artery. In borate-buffered saline (0.1M borate buffer, pH 9.0/0.15M NaCl = 1:9, vol/vol), canine basilar artery produced a PGI2-like substance that inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. Its anti-aggregatory activity was completely abolished by acidification. Aspirin likewise inhibited production of the anti-aggregatory substance. From these results, it was concluded that the anti-aggregatory activity was due solely to the production of PGI2 by the arterial specimen. Based on the above results, PGI2 biosynthetic activity in the cerebral artery exposed to subarachnoid blood injection was bioassayed by measuring the inhibitory activity of the incubation product upon ADP-induced platelet aggregation following incubation of the arteries in borate-buffered saline for 5 to 30 minutes at 20 degrees C, using synthetic PGI2-Na as a standard. The synthetic activity of PGI2 in the artery exposed to subarachnoid blood injection had diminished remarkably by Days 3 and 8. This diminution of PGI2 synthesis in the cerebral artery may be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm.

  18. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  19. Erythropoietin for the Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Feasible Ingredient for a Successful Medical Recipe

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Tomasello, Giovanni; Noto, Marcello; Alafaci, Concetta; Cappello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following aneurysm bleeding accounts for 6% to 8% of all cerebrovascular accidents. Although an aneurysm can be effectively managed by surgery or endovascular therapy, delayed cerebral ischemia is diagnosed in a high percentage of patients resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Cerebral vasospasm occurs in more than half of all patients after aneurysm rupture and is recognized as the leading cause of delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. Hemodynamic strategies and endovascular procedures may be considered for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm. In recent years, the mechanisms contributing to the development of vasospasm, abnormal reactivity of cerebral arteries and cerebral ischemia following SAH, have been investigated intensively. A number of pathological processes have been identified in the pathogenesis of vasospasm, including endothelial injury, smooth muscle cell contraction from spasmogenic substances produced by the subarachnoid blood clots, changes in vascular responsiveness and inflammatory response of the vascular endothelium. To date, the current therapeutic interventions remain ineffective as they are limited to the manipulation of systemic blood pressure, variation of blood volume and viscosity and control of arterial carbon dioxide tension. In this scenario, the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) has been found to exert neuroprotective action during experimental SAH when its recombinant form (rHuEPO) is administered systemically. However, recent translation of experimental data into clinical trials has suggested an unclear role of recombinant human EPO in the setting of SAH. In this context, the aim of the current review is to present current evidence on the potential role of EPO in cerebrovascular dysfunction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26581085

  20. Incidence and prognostic significance of atrial fibrillation in acute myocardial infarction: the GISSI-3 data

    PubMed Central

    Pizzetti, F; Turazza, F; Franzosi, M; Barlera, S; Ledda, A; Maggioni, A; Santoro, L; Tognoni, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Atrial fibrillation is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of myocardial infarction may have changed the impact of this arrhythmia.
OBJECTIVE—To assess the incidence and prognosis of atrial fibrillation complicating myocardial infarction in a large population of patients receiving optimal treatment, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.
METHODS—Data were derived from the GISSI-3 trial, which included 17 944 patients within the first 24 hours after acute myocardial infarction. Atrial fibrillation was recorded during the hospital stay, and follow up visits were planned at six weeks and six months. Survival of the patients at four years was assessed through census offices.
RESULTS—The incidence of in-hospital atrial fibrillation or flutter was 7.8%. Atrial fibrillation was associated with indicators of a worse prognosis (age > 70 years, female sex, higher Killip class, previous myocardial infarction, treated hypertension, high systolic blood pressure at entry, insulin dependent diabetes, signs or symptoms of heart failure) and with some adverse clinical events (reinfarction, sustained ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation). After adjustment for other prognostic factors, atrial fibrillation remained an independent predictor of increased in-hospital mortality: 12.6% v 5%, adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.67 to 2.34. Data on long term mortality (four years after acute myocardial infarction) confirmed the persistent negative influence of atrial fibrillation (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.99).
CONCLUSIONS—Atrial fibrillation is an indicator of worse prognosis after acute myocardial infarction, both in the short term and in the long term, even in an unselected population.


Keywords: atrial fibrillation; acute myocardial infarction; prognosis PMID:11602545

  1. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes.

  2. Postoperative subarachnoid hemorrhage from an intracranial aneurysm after craniotomy for astrocytoma--case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Taomoto, K

    1989-09-01

    The authors present the first reported case of a glioma associated with a right posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. A 37-year-old male underwent craniotomy and total removal of the glioma, which appeared, according to encephalographic findings, to be responsible for the initial symptom of loss of consciousness. The risk of craniotomy-induced bleeding from the aneurysm was thought to be low, since it was unruptured and was packed with coagulum. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of the PCA aneurysm occurred just after craniotomy, and clipping was performed 15 days after the first operation. PMID:2480546

  3. Neurosurgical versus endovascular treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm: comparison of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this critical review is to determine whether endovascular treatment (EVT) of a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has better patient outcomes than neurosurgical treatment (NST). A review of six cohort studies (listed in Table 1) was carried out and the main findings were summarised in the conclusion. In addition the list of author's recommendations is included at the end of the paper. Theatre practitioners involved in neurosurgery might find this review useful in enhancing their understanding of how SAH is currently treated. It could also bring some insights about the reasons why a particular modality of the treatment was chosen for their patient. PMID:26016283

  4. Subarachnoidal Neurocysticercosis non-responsive to cysticidal drugs: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurocysticercosis (NC) is one of the most frequent parasitic diseases of the central nervous system. Cysticidal drugs, albendazole and praziquantel, are generally effective when parasites localize in the parenchyma. In contrast, parasites lodged in the subarachnoid basal cisterns are less responsive to treatment. Case Presentation The clinical and radiological pictures of six Mexican patients non-respondent to cysticidal treatment are presented. Conclusions The possible factors involved in the cysticidal non-response are discussed and hints are provided of potentially useful changes to therapeutic protocols. PMID:20202200

  5. Intracranial angiolipoma as cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Saraiva, P; Goulão, A

    2005-02-01

    A 33-year-old female with a longstanding history of seizures was admitted to our hospital with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) depicted a vascular fat-containing lesion overlying a right frontal cortical polymicrogyria. The diagnosis of angiolipoma was established. Conservatory management was undertaken with full recovery. She has been followed for 5 years since, with neither re-bleeding nor morphologic change of the lesion. This is a rare intracranial lesion, with only 11 intracranial angiolipomas published in the literature, and is the first case reported which is associated with SAH caused by this lesion.

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused by polyarteritis nodosa. Case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun C; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Iihara, Koji; Sakai, Hideki; Higashi, Toshio; Kogure, Shuji; Taniguchi, Ayumi; Ueda, Hatsue I; Nagata, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotizing arteritis that involves small- and medium-sized arteries in various organs. Although aneurysm formation in visceral arteries is a typical finding in PAN, intracranial aneurysms are much less common, and only a few cases of aneurysm rupture associated with this disease have been documented. In this paper, the authors report on a ruptured PAN aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery; the lesion was trapped and resected. On histological examination, extensive fibrinoid necrosis and an inflammatory infiltration of leukocytes were seen in the aneurysm wall. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of subarachnoid hemorrhage from a histologically confirmed PAN aneurysm.

  7. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  8. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock: pharmacologic and mechanical hemodynamic support pathways.

    PubMed

    Graf, Tobias; Desch, Steffen; Eitel, Ingo; Thiele, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the predominant cause of in-hospital death in patients with acute myocardial infarction, although mortality has been reduced in recent years. Early percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting are causal therapies implemented in CS, supported by catecholamines, fluids, intra-aortic balloon pumping, and also active percutaneous assist devices. There is only limited evidence from randomized studies of any of these treatments in CS, except for early revascularization and the relative ineffectiveness of intra-aortic balloon pumping. This review will present treatment pathways of CS complicating acute myocardial infarction, with a major focus on revascularization, intensive care unit treatment, and mechanical support devices.

  9. Symptom-limited maximal treadmill testing after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K C; Logan, R L

    1980-11-12

    In this paper we report our experience of routine symptom limited maximal treadmill assessment, and the methodology used with patients at the end of their convalescence after myocardial infarction. Sixty-one of 68 (90 percent) consecutive patients, mean age 55.7 years (21 to 69 years), were studied at the median time after infarction of six weeks (three to 16 weeks). No complications occurred during or after the tests. Fifty-six percent of the patients studied achieved a work capacity which was within the average range reported for healthy people of the smae age. Thirty-two percent experienced chest pain thought to be angina and 31 percent developed ST segment depression of at least 1 mm without chest pain. Although ventricular premature beats occurred in half the tests the only arrhythmia requiring any treatment was a supraventricular tachycardia. The assessment of work capacity and limiting symptoms in this way after myocardial infarction is safe and is of considerable help in patient management.

  10. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment. PMID:26790559

  11. Silent cerebral infarct in child patients with beta thalassaemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Leblebisatan, Göksel; Bay, Ali; Sirikci, Akif; Kilincaslan, Huseyin; Sonmezisik, Serdar; Leblebisatan, Serife; Baspinar, Osman; Dogan, Mustafa; Yis, Uluc

    2012-10-01

    There are numerous reports that patients with thalassemia are faced with hypercoagulability leading to vascular disorders. One of these complications is known as a silent infarct, defined as a small infarct detected by cerebral imaging but without any neurological symptoms. Since it has a progressive nature, it is of vital importance because it may lead to symptomatic cerebrovascular accidents in the future. Twenty-two children with thalassemia intermedia were enrolled into the study and MRI scans were performed. All demographic data and clinical features of the patients were obtained during the follow-up period. In addition to the patients, 13 healthy controls were included to compare serum anticoagulant levels with those of the thalassemia intermedia patients. Four of the patients were found to have silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs). The lesions involved varying amounts of the deep cerebral white matter and sub-cortical areas. One patient showed 'net line' filling defects within the ambient cistern on MRI images corresponding to moyamoya vessels. Three patients had undergone splenectomy, and three were transfused irregularly and had less than six transfusions per year. More importantly, protein C levels were lower and platelet levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared with controls. We were not able to find any association between SCI and transfusion number or splenectomy. However, of the total patients four thalassemia intermedia patients had SCI in early childhood and this is an unusual finding. In order to verify the findings, further studies must be conducted involving larger numbers of patients.

  12. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment.

  13. Unusual Complication of Pituitary Macroadenoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mohamed Said; AlBerawi, Mohamad Najm; Bozom, Issam Al; Shaikh, Nissar F.; Salem, Khalid Yacout

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: Pituitary apoplexy complicated by cerebral infarction Symptoms: Disturbed conscious level • loss of vision Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pituitary macroadenoma is a common benign tumor that usually presents with visual field defects or hormonal abnormalities. Cerebral infarction can be a complication of a large pituitary adenoma. We report a rare case of bilateral anterior cerebral arteries infarcts by a large pituitary macroadenoma with apoplexy. Case Report: A 48-year-old male patient presented with altered conscious level and sudden loss of vision for one-day duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large seller and suprasellar hemorrhagic mass of pituitary origin, with associated bilateral areas of diffusion restriction in the frontal parasagittal regions, consistent with infarctions. Magnetic resonance angiography showed elevation and compression of A1 segment of both anterior cerebral arteries by the hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenoma. The patient underwent trans-sphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma, but unfortunately, ischemia was irreversible. Computed tomography (CT) done post-operatively showed hypodensity in the frontal and parietal parasagittal areas, which was also persistent in the follow up CT scans. The patient’s neurological function remained poor, with GCS of 8/15, in vegetative state. Conclusions: Vascular complications of the pituitary apoplexy, although uncommon, can be very severe and life threatening. Early detection of vascular compromise caused by hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenoma can prevent delay in intervention. Clinicians should also consider pituitary adenoma as a possible cause of stroke. PMID:27708253

  14. Emergency surgical revascularisation for coronary angioplasty complications.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J A; Davies, S W; Balcon, R; Layton, C; Magee, P; Rothman, M T; Timmis, A D; Wright, J E; Walesby, R K

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate trends in referrals for emergency operations after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) complications; to analyse morbidity and mortality and assess the influence of PTCA backup on elective surgery. DESIGN--A retrospective analysis of patients requiring emergency surgical revascularisation within 24 hours of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. PATIENTS--Between January 1980 and December 1990, 75 patients requiring emergency surgery within 24 hours of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre and postgraduate teaching hospital. RESULTS--57 patients (76%) were men, the mean age was 55 (range 29-73) years, and 30 (40%) had had a previous myocardial infarction. Before PTCA, 68 (91%) had severe angina, 59 (79%) had multivessel disease, and six (8%) had a left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 40%. A mean of 2.1 grafts (range one to five) were performed; the internal mammary artery was used in only one patient. The operative mortality was 9% and inhospital mortality was 17%. There was a need for cardiac massage until bypass was established in 19 patients (25%): this was the most important outcome determinant (P = 0.0051) and was more common in those patients with multivessel disease (P = 0.0449) and in women (P = 0.0388). In 10 of the 19 cases a vacant operating theatre was unavailable, the operation being performed in the catheter laboratory or anaesthetic room. These 19 patients had an operative mortality of 32% and inhospital mortality of 47%, compared with 2% and 7% respectively for the 56 patients who awaited the next available operating theatre. Complications included myocardial infarction, 19 patients (25%); arrhythmias, 10 patients (3%); and gross neurological event, two patients (3%). The mean intensive care unit stay was 2.6 days (range 1 to 33 days) and the mean duration of hospital admission was 13 days (range 5-40 days). CONCLUSIONS--Patients undergoing

  15. Superior Vena Cava Stent Migration into the Pulmonary Artery Causing Fatal Pulmonary Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Girija Lewanski, Conrad R.; Cowman, Steven A.; Jackson, James E.

    2011-02-15

    Migration of superior vena cava (SVC) stents is a well-recognised complication of their deployment, and numerous strategies exist for their retrieval. To our knowledge, only three cases of migration of an SVC stent to the pulmonary vasculature have previously been reported. None of these patients developed complications that resulted in death. We report a case of SVC stent migration to the pulmonary vasculature with delayed pulmonary artery thrombosis and death from pulmonary infarction. We conclude that early retrieval of migrated stents should be performed to decrease the risk of serious complications.

  16. [Complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Ramadan, E; Chaimoff, C

    1992-04-15

    92% of our first 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were successful. Postoperative complications included fever in 10 cases (17%), urinary retention in 5 (8%), intraabdominal abscess in 2 (3%), biliary leakage in 1 (2%) and unexplained abdominal pain in 10 (17%). Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has obvious advantages, it also has major as well as minor complications. PMID:1398315

  17. Facial flap complications.

    PubMed

    Zoumalan, Richard A; Murakami, Craig S

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of fundamental concepts can help decrease the chance of complications in plastic surgery. Local flap reconstruction for facial defects has many pitfalls. This article describes common complications in local flap reconstruction of the face and describes strategies that prevent problems.

  18. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  19. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner.

  20. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

  1. Complications of severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the course of dementia with Lewy bodies. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Tadeusz; Bertrand, Ewa; Szpak, Grażyna M; Stępień, Tomasz; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    A 68-year-old male who suffered from dementia, progressing for four months without Parkinson's symptoms, was admitted to the Department of Neurology because of vertigo, slight left hand paresis and positive Romberg test. During hospitalization the patient's status deteriorated. The intracerebral lobar haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage and ischaemic lesions observed on CT scans suggested the clinical diagnosis of CAA. He died after 53 days due to pneumonia. On macroscopic examination, the brain showed general cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation. Frontal lobar haemorrhage and focal subarachnoid haemorrhage were seen on the brain autopsy. Microscopic observation demonstrated neuronal loss and microspongiosis in the hippocampus, severe neuronal loss and depigmentation in the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus coeruleus. Lewy bodies were visible in the substantia nigra and amyloid angiopathy, predominantly severe CAA according to the Vonsattel scale, in the meningeal and cortical vessels. In the presented case, the microscopic findings were typical for DLB with concomitant severe CAA. In progressive dementia, neurological deterioration, presence of lobar hemorrhagic infarcts and ischaemic lesions suggest CAA coexistent with DLB and/or AD.

  2. Complications of Austin Moore arthroplasty. Their incidence and relationship to potential predisposing factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, D M; Oliver, C H; Ryder, C T; Stinchfield, F E

    1975-01-01

    In a retrospective computerized study of 451 Austin Moore arthroplasties (211 for acute hip fractures and 240 for hip reconstruction), the operative and general complications were correlated with the historical, preoperative, operative, and early and late postoperative factors usually thought to influence the results. Wound complications were significantly associated with diabetes and fracture, obesity and fracture, and procedures lasting two hours or more. General complications showing significant associations were: death or pneumonia with fractures, phlebitis with obesity, and myocardial infarction with fracture. Factors not significantly associated with complications included age, previous hip surgery, time of day of the operation, surgical approach, wound irrigation, use of drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and reaming of the acetabulum.

  3. [Complications of blepharoplasty].

    PubMed

    Morax, S

    2004-06-01

    Blepharoplasty complications are infrequent, most often minor and transitory, rarely major and permanent with functional or esthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive: screening at risk patients with a history of ophthalmic problems, but also general illnesses that would contraindicate blepharoplasty. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets with the most important points underlined. Complications can be purely ophthalmological, the more serious sequelae being partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optical neuropathy, with very poor prognosis, or more rarely compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, which has a better prognosis provided the origins are quickly recognized and treated immediately. Other visual complications include oculomotor problems, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis on the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring and eyelid fold anomalies. The most serious esthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid, which can manifest as retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are quite often minor, sometimes reversible, but at times major, with psychological, esthetic and functional consequences that are difficult for the patient. Other local complications also arise: enophthalmia with a sunken lid, as well as under- and overcorrection. General complications can include scarring related to pigmentation problems and residual hematomas, and exceptionally infections going as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, other complications are related to new laser surgical techniques that are responsible for ectropion of the lower eyelid and even burns or residual redness, or complications related to periocular injections of filling material. A comprehensive review of

  4. Cytokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid and delayed ischemic deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, K. Y.; Jeon, B. C.

    2001-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) induces an inflammatory reaction and may lead to ischemic brain damage. The pathogenesis of brain dysfunction and delayed ischemic symptoms remain difficult to understand despite extensive surveys of such reactions. Cytokine production in the central nervous system following SAH and its relation with clinical outcome have hardly been studied. This study was aimed to determine whether the levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the initial cerebrospinal fluid would increase following aneurysmal SAH, and be related with development of delayed ischemic deficit and clinical outcome. Nineteen patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH and 12 control volunteers were the subjects in this study. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained on admission and the levels of each cytokine were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage showed elevated levels of IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha on admission. The patients with poor neurological status showed high levels of IL-1 beta, and IL-6. The patients who developed delayed ischemic deficit had high level of IL-6. We suggest that elevated level of IL-6 in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal SAH on admission can predict the high risk of delayed ischemic deficit. PMID:11748361

  5. Assessment of Basilar Artery Reactivity in Stroke and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Wire Myograph.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Crystal M; Azrak, Zeina; Rahman, Farah Abdel; Itani, Hana A; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulation of normal cerebral arteries is a critical and important factor to supply the brain tissue with nutrients and oxygen. Stroke insult results in a disruption or reduction in cerebral arteries' blood flow with subsequent brain tissue damage. Hemorrhagic stroke is one type of stroke and accounts for about 13 % of all of stroke insults. In this type of stroke, the cerebral artery breaks open and causes bleeding in or surrounding the brain. Subsequently, this bleeding causes blood vessels to constrict in a process called vasospasm, in which the vessels narrow and impede the blood flow to brain tissue. Hemorrhagic stroke is the major cause of prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries. This leads to partial brain damage and sometimes death in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the key delicate techniques to assess small blood vessel functionality is the wire myograph, which can be utilized in several cerebral injury models including stroke. The wire myograph is a device that provides information about the reactivity, stiffness, and elasticity of small blood vessels under isometric conditions. In this book chapter, we describe the techniques involved in wire myography assessment and the different measures and parameters recorded; we describe the utility of this technique in evaluating the effects of subarachnoid hemorrhage on basilar artery sensitivity to different agonists. PMID:27604742

  6. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  7. Developmental prognosis for infants with benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces.

    PubMed

    Nickel, R E; Gallenstein, J S

    1987-04-01

    The development of nine infants with enlarged subarachnoid spaces identified by specific CT-scan criteria was prospectively followed to two to three years of age. Infants with intracranial hemorrhage, CNS anomaly, microcephaly or other factors of potentially major negative impact on their development were excluded. All study infants had normal or only minimally increased ventricular size and none developed hydrocephalus. Head circumference was greater than or equal to 90th percentile in all cases, and six fathers also had a head circumference greater than or equal to 90th percentile. Six infants had gross motor delay and mild hypotonia in the first year. One, born at 30 weeks gestational age, had transient dystonia. At follow-up all the infants were developing normally, apart from four with minor concerns. Infants with macrocephaly or rapid head-growth, CT-scan findings of enlarged subarachnoid spaces and normal to minimally increased ventricular size, and who have a parent with macrocephaly, have a good developmental prognosis and a characteristic pattern of neuromotor development in the first year.

  8. Successfully Treated Isolated Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HORIO, Yoshinobu; KATSUTA, Toshiro; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; WAKUTA, Naoki; FUKUDA, Kenji; HIGASHI, Toshio; INOUE, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of rupture of an isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysm, and consequently the optimal therapeutic strategy is debatable. An 84-year-old man presented with sudden onset of restlessness and disorientation. Neuroradiological imaging showed an intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with no visible intracranial vascular lesion. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a localized subarachnoid hematoma at Th10–11. Both contrast-enhanced spinal computed tomography and enhanced MRI and magnetic resonance angiography revealed an area of enhancement within the hematoma. Superselective angiography of the left Th12 intercostal artery demonstrated a faintly enhanced spot in the venous phase. Thirteen days after the onset of symptoms, a small fusiform aneurysm situated on the radiculopial artery was resected. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was eventually discharged in an ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this 84-year-old man is the oldest reported case of surgical management of a ruptured isolated PSA aneurysm. This case illustrates both the validity and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. PMID:26522607

  9. Reversible and Asymptomatic Gyral and Subarachnoid Contrast Enhancement after Carotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Vangosa, Alessandra Briatico; Tortora, Domenico; Modestino, Francesco; Cotroneo, Antonio R

    2015-01-01

    The presence of sulcal hyperdensity in patients after endovascular procedures is not necessarily attributable to hemorrhage. It may frequently indicate the absolute or concomitant extravasation of contrast material into the subarachnoid spaces. This case report describes the clinical case of an 84-year-old patient with 90% stenosis of the right internal carotid who presented with a diffuse gyral and sulcal hyperdensity in the right temporal-occipital and frontal lobes at routine post-carotid stenting (CAS) brain CT scan. The patient was asymptomatic and CT findings were interpreted as contrast enhancement hyperattenuation and no therapeutic decisions were made. A 24-hour follow-up brain CT demonstrated the complete resolution of the hyperdensity, confirming the diagnosis. In this patient we considered the concomitant presence of gyral and sulcal hyperdensity as the consequence of reversible damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) determining a transitory extravasation of contrast material. Asymptomatic gyral and subarachnoid contrast enhancement following CAS is generally indicative of benign and transitory damage to the BBB and is not to be misinterpreted as hemorrhage. PMID:25923674

  10. Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to a ruptured inflammatory aneurysm: a possible manifestation of neurocysticercosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Soto-Hernandez, J L; Gomez-Llata Andrade, S; Rojas-Echeverri, L A; Texeira, F; Romero, V

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. As revealed by lumbar puncture, the cerebrospinal fluid had low glucose, high protein levels, and pleocytosis with 5% of eosinophils. Cultures were negative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and complement fixation reactions for cysticercosis in cerebrospinal fluid were positive. An angiogram revealed an aneurysm of the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by thickened leptomeninges, which histologically presented dense inflammation and remains of Cysticercus. The aneurysm could not be clipped, and it was wrapped. Postoperatively, the patient had dizziness and right ear tinnitus. He received prednisone therapy on alternate days and subsequently received albendazole for subarachnoid cysticerci. At the 4-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Although we cannot rule out a congenital aneurysm, its location inside an area of severe arachnoiditis around a cysticercus suggests an inflammatory origin. This type of vascular lesion not reported before should be suspected in patients with chronic cysticercotic meningitis.

  11. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a thoracic radicular artery pseudoaneurysm after methamphetamine and synthetic cannabinoid abuse: case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Krisht, Khaled M; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid "Spice." He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2-3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH.

  12. [HYPOTHERMIA INFLUENCES ON OXYGEN TENSION IN THE BRAIN PARENCHYMA IN PATIENTS WITH ANEURYSMAL SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Abudeev, S A; Popugaev, K A; Kruglyakov, N M; Belousova, K A; Terekhov, D A; Leushin, K Yu; Aronov, M S; Karpova, O V; Zelenkov, A V; Kiselev, K V; Fedin, A B; Zabelin, M V; Samoylov, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a serious medical and social problem. The main physiological mechanisms that determine secondary brain damage in this patients are intracranial hypertension, cerebral vasospasm, dysfunction of autoregulation mechanisms, violation of liquorodynamics and delayed cerebral ischemia. The multimodal neuromonitoring for prevention and timely correction ofsecondary brain injury factors has become routine practice in neuroICU. Measurement of oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma is one of neuromonitoring options. During the years of intensive use of this method in clinical practice the reasons for reducing the oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma were revealed, as well as developed and clinically validated algorithms for correction of such conditions. However, there are clinical situations that are difficult to interpret and even more difficult to make the right tactical and therapeutic solutions. We present the clinical observation of the patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, who had dramatically reduced brain intraparenchymal oxygen pressure although prolonged hypothermia were used. Despite this, the outcome was favorable. The analysis allowed to assume that the reason for this decrease in oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma could be hypothermia itself PMID:27468510

  13. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552–632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500–2,500 m (5,000–8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient’s acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  14. Spreading Depolarizations: A Therapeutic Target Against Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chung, David Y; Oka, Fumiaki; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-06-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia is the most feared cause of secondary injury progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initially thought to be a direct consequence of large artery spasm and territorial ischemia, recent data suggests that delayed cerebral ischemia represents multiple concurrent and synergistic mechanisms, including microcirculatory dysfunction, inflammation, and microthrombosis. Among these mechanisms, spreading depolarizations (SDs) are arguably the most elusive and underappreciated in the clinical setting. Although SDs have been experimentally detected and examined since the late 1970s, their widespread occurrence in human brain was not unequivocally demonstrated until relatively recently. We now know that SDs occur with very high incidence in human brain after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and trauma, and worsen outcomes by increasing metabolic demand, decreasing blood supply, predisposing to seizure activity, and possibly worsening brain edema. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of SDs in injured brain. Although much of our mechanistic knowledge comes from experimental models of focal cerebral ischemia, clinical data suggest that the same principles apply regardless of the mode of injury (i.e., ischemia, hemorrhage, or trauma). The hope is that a better fundamental understanding of SDs will lead to novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SD occurrence and its adverse consequences contributing to injury progression in subarachnoid hemorrhage and other forms of acute brain injury. PMID:27258442

  15. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel.

    PubMed

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552-632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500-2,500 m (5,000-8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient's acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  16. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from a Thoracic Radicular Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Methamphetamine and Synthetic Cannabinoid Abuse: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Krisht, Khaled M.; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid “Spice.” He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2–3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH. PMID:24436861

  17. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yan; Zeng, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ying; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Current evidences suggest that revascularization of the culprit vessels with percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting can be beneficial for relieving IMR. A 2.5-year follow-up data of a 61-year-old male patient with ST-segment elevation AMI complicated with IMR showed that mitral regurgitation area increased five days after PCI, and decreased to lower steady level three months after PCI. This finding suggest that three months after PCI might be a suitable time point for evaluating the possibility of IMR recovery and the necessity of surgical intervention of the mitral valve for AMI patient. PMID:27582769

  18. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yan; Zeng, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ying; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Current evidences suggest that revascularization of the culprit vessels with percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting can be beneficial for relieving IMR. A 2.5-year follow-up data of a 61-year-old male patient with ST-segment elevation AMI complicated with IMR showed that mitral regurgitation area increased five days after PCI, and decreased to lower steady level three months after PCI. This finding suggest that three months after PCI might be a suitable time point for evaluating the possibility of IMR recovery and the necessity of surgical intervention of the mitral valve for AMI patient. PMID:27582769

  19. Hypertension and acute myocardial infarction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pedrinelli, Roberto; Ballo, Piercarlo; Fiorentini, Cesare; Denti, Silvia; Galderisi, Maurizio; Ganau, Antonello; Germanò, Giuseppe; Innelli, Pasquale; Paini, Anna; Perlini, Stefano; Salvetti, Massimo; Zacà, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    History of hypertension is a frequent finding in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its recurring association with female sex, diabetes, older age, less frequent smoking and more frequent vascular comorbidities composes a risk profile quite distinctive from the normotensive ischemic counterpart.Antecedent hypertension associates with higher rates of death and morbid events both during the early and long-term course of AMI, particularly if complicated by left ventricular dysfunction and/or congestive heart failure. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, through either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, angiotensin II receptor blockade or aldosterone antagonism, exerts particular benefits in that high-risk hypertensive subgroup.In contrast to the negative implications carried by antecedent hypertension, higher systolic pressure at the onset of chest pain associates with lower mortality within 1 year from coronary occlusion, whereas increased blood pressure recorded after hemodynamic stabilization from the acute ischemic event bears inconsistent relationships with recurring coronary events in the long-term follow-up.Whether antihypertensive treatment in post-AMI hypertensive patients prevents ischemic relapses is uncertain. As a matter of fact, excessive diastolic pressure drops may jeopardize coronary perfusion and predispose to new acute coronary events, although the precise cause-effect mechanisms underlying this phenomenon need further evaluation. PMID:22317927

  20. Caudal Cingulate Infarction Manifesting Astasia

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Takeshi; Komuro, Taro; Kobayashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Astasia is a rare presenting symptom of stroke, usually known as ‘thalamic astasia’, induced by a lesion in the ventrolateral thalamus. We report a case of caudal cingulate infarction manifesting astasia. Case Presentation A 58-year-old male presented with inability to sit, stand and walk (astasia). No apparent motor weakness was noticed in the extremities. MRI revealed cerebral infarction in the caudal cingulate gyrus, which was located between the vertical commissure anterior (VCA) line and vertical commissure posterior (VPC) line. His symptoms persisted for 1 year to a lesser degree. Conclusion Lesions in the caudal cingulate gyrus can present with astasia. The responsible lesion is located in the cingulate gyrus between the VCA and VPC line, which might correspond to the caudal cingulate zone in humans. We should keep in mind that astasia can be a presenting symptom of stroke. PMID:24575027

  1. Acute hydrocephalus following cerebellar infarct

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Elliot; Naqvi, Huma

    2010-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted with a diagnosis of acute cerebellar infarct. The next day his level of consciousness deteriorated (Glasgow Coma Score 5) and repeat computed tomography (CT) brain scan showed subtle signs of hydrocephalus. Following neurosurgical intervention, he recovered and is now walking with a frame and assistance. The CT changes of hydrocephalus were subtle and difficult to spot. Recognition of these signs of hydrocephalus and prompt neurosurgical intervention were lifesaving. PMID:22355298

  2. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events.

  3. Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease

    SciTech Connect

    Giebfried, J.W.; Lawson, W.; Biller, H.F.

    1986-04-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of these patients demonstrated that 11 patients treated for radiation-induced necrosis had an undiagnosed recurrence of cancer.

  4. Follow-up of Large Aneurysms Treated with Coil Embolization at an Acute Stage in Patients with Poor-Grade Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, S.; Tanaka, N.; Tani, S.; Nakamura, S.; Ohbuchi, H.; Hirota, K.; Iwabuchi, S.; Kasuya, H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated the clinical and angiographic outcome of large aneurysms treated with coil embolization at an acute stage in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2004, eight consecutive WFNS grade 5 patients with large aneurysms (15~23mm) were treated with endovascular coil embolization within two days and followed for at least 30 months. There were three middle cerebral and five internal carotid artery aneurysms. No patients were treated by craniotomy and none survived without treatment. Two patients died of primary brain damage or cerebral vasospasm within one month. One patient died of pneumonia at 24 months. Four patients were alive with good recovery or moderate disability at the time of final follow-up (30~66 months). Angiography immediately after the procedure showed complete occlusion in three, neck remnant in four, and body filling in one patient. No complication was seen related to the procedure. Three aneurysms that were initially neck remnant developed body filling due to coil compaction. Two were re-treated with coils at six and 12 months and resulted in neck remnant. One patient refused re-treatment and died of re-bleeding. Endovascular coil embolization can be selected at an acute stage for the treatment of aneurysms in patients with poor-grade SAH without intraparenchymal hematoma even if the aneurysm is large. Serial follow up by MRA/angiography is necessary for at least 12 months. PMID:20465928

  5. Rare complication of anterior communicating artery aneurysm coiling: Transient retrograde amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Jayaraman, Anand; Chandramouli, BA

    2015-01-01

    Amnesia is an unusual and rare complication following endovascular coiling of intracranial aneurysms. We present a case of anterior communicating artery (ACOM) aneurysm in which the patient developed retrograde amnesia following endovascular coiling of the aneurysm. On imaging there was infarct involving bilateral fornices. The patient showed significant clinical improvement on follow up. PMID:26246104

  6. Intercellular channels in the pars tuberalis of the rat hypophysis and their relationship to the subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Aguado, L I; Schoebitz, K; Rodríguez, E M

    1981-01-01

    A system of intercellular channels is described in the pars tuberalis (PT) of the female rat. These spaces are lined by all types of cells found in the PT and are not sealed off by tight junctions. Ventrally and dorsally, the intercellular spaces open toward the basement membranes separating the PT from (i) the subarachnoid space, and (ii) the perivascular space of the portal capillaries, respectively. These intercellular channels differ from the follicles, which are also found in the PT, being lined by a particular type of cell. In a second group of female rats an epoxy mixture was injected into the third ventricle; 10 min thereafter horseradish peroxidase was infused into the cisterna magna. After processing the brain for the demonstration of exogenous peroxidase, it was found that the tracer had reached the subarachnoid space adjacent to the hypothalamus and entered into all ventricular cavities with the exception of the infundibular recess. Under these experimental conditions it was found that the tracer fills all intercullular channels of the PT, thus indicating that there is no barrier between the subarachnoid space and the PT. It is suggested that the subarachnoid space should be regarded as a probable route for the transport of trophic factor(s) and/or secretory product(s) of the PT.

  7. [Holiday effect in myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Otto, W; Hempel, W E; Goebel, H; Erkens, R

    1975-03-15

    Aimed measures of the organisation of the combat against infarction demand also the observation of temporary frequencies. On the basis of the evaluation of certificates of death of the month December of the years 1969 to 1973 of the GDR with differentiation according to so-called prehospital dead (persons who died at home and on the way to the hospital) and patients who died in the hospital with high significance an unwarrantedly high prehospital mortality during the period from Christmas to the end of the year (25th to 31st December) was established compared with the preceding week (18th to 24th December). Since in contrast to this the hospital cases and the cases "on the way" do not show any significant differences main tasks for the beginning of improvements concerning health policy may be deduced, all the more since the so-called holiday effect, expressed by a high home/clinic-relation of patients who died of myocardial infarction, could be restricted to 6 counties of the GDR on account of the analysis of further localities. From the results the tendency of a retrogression of the holiday effect is to be read off in the course of years. In the discussion an explantation of this peculiarity is attempted, and practicable conclusions for the removal and thus for the improvement the infarct situation are formulated.

  8. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  9. [The method for the postmortem verification of ventricular fibrillation as a mechanism of death from myocardial infarction and post-infarction cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Korneva, Yu S; Dorosevich, A E

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the objective method for the verification of death from ventricular fibrillation (VF) as a complication of myocardial infarction and post-infarction cardiosclerosis (PICS). A total of 20 cases of death during different periods after myocardial infarction and PICS were available for the analysis in which EGC-confirmed ventricular fibrillation was the immediate cause of the fatal outcome. The control group was comprised of 29 cases of death from other complications. The special emphasis was laid on the investigation of the affected region, the boundary areas, and intact zones of the heart. The size of cardiac cell populations surrounding capillaries was determined. The statistical treatment of the results of the study revealed the difference in the cellular infiltrate composition between the groups of patients who had died from ventricular fibrillation and other causes. The differences were largely reduced to the number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and leukocytes. The data thus obtained provided a basis for the development of the method for the objective postmortem verification of the complication being considered.

  10. Occipital lobe infarction caused by tentorial herniation.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Tanaka, S; Kohama, A; Fujii, C

    1986-03-01

    Occipital lobe infarction caused by tentorial herniation was described based on computed tomography findings in nine patients. The whole area of the occipital lobe was involved in five patients; some areas were spared in the others. Infarction other than the ipsilateral occipital lobe was seen in four areas of nine patients: the ispsilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, contralateral Ammon's horn, and two contralateral occipital lobes. Hemorrhagic infarction was seen in two patients.

  11. [Technical difficulties in epidural blocks and spinal bleeding complications].

    PubMed

    Nava, S; Rossignoli, L; Tagariello, V; Bertini, L

    2001-12-01

    The clinical cases of two patients with neurological complications following neuroaxial blocks are reported. The events took place in different institutions where thousands of central blocks were yearly performed. In both instances the blocking procedures presented technical difficulties needing repeated lumbar punctures. The first case concerns a patient receiving anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy for vascular pathology. This 89 year-old female experienced severe cord compression requiring surgical decompression and laminectomy. The second case regards a patient with previous minor surgical procedure requiring postoperative antiinflammatory treatment. This 74 year-old male experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal/epidural hematoma as shown by NMR. The symptoms regressed with steroid therapy. The authors emphasise the risks of mechanical trauma of epidural or spinal anesthesia both during positioning or removal of an epidural catheter. The problem related to the compatibility between central blocks and antithrombotic/anticoagulant prophylaxis/therapy is now of primary concern and has led to publications about guide lines on this topic. If central block is carried out in patients with bleeding diathesis it is mandatory to co-ordinate multidisciplinary assistance for early detection of significant symptoms of the above described complications and subsequent treatment.

  12. A Comparative Study of Peripheral Immune Responses to Taenia solium in Individuals with Parenchymal and Subarachnoid Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuero, Iskra; Palma, Sandra; Cabeza, Franco; Saleemi, Sarah; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzales, Isidro; Mayta, Holger; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability of Taenia solium to modulate the immune system likely contributes to their longevity in the human host. We tested the hypothesis that the nature of the immune response is related to the location of parasite and clinical manifestations of infection. Methodology Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from untreated patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC), categorized as having parenchymal or subarachnoid infection by the presence of cysts exclusively within the parenchyma or in subarachnoid spaces of the brain, and from uninfected (control) individuals matched by age and gender to each patient. Using multiplex detection technology, sera from NCC patients and controls and cytokine production by PBMC after T. solium antigen (TsAg) stimulation were assayed for levels of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. PBMC were phenotyped by flow cytometry ex vivo and following in vitro stimulation with TsAg. Principal Findings Sera from patients with parenchymal NCC demonstrated significantly higher Th1 (IFN-γ/IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4/IL-13) cytokine responses and trends towards higher levels of IL-1β/IL-8/IL-5 than those obtained from patients with subarachnoid NCC. Also higher in vitro antigen-driven TNF-β secretion was detected in PBMC supernatants from parenchymal than in subarachnoid NCC. In contrast, there was a significantly higher IL-10 response to TsAg stimulation in patients with subarachnoid NCC compared to parenchymal NCC. Although no differences in regulatory T cells (Tregs) frequencies were found ex vivo, there was a trend towards greater expansion of Tregs upon TsAg stimulation in subarachnoid than in parenchymal NCC when data were normalized for the corresponding controls. Conclusions/Significance T. solium infection of the subarachnoid space is associated with an enhanced regulatory immune response compared to infection in the parenchyma. The resulting anti-inflammatory milieu may represent a parasite strategy to maintain a

  13. Beta-blocker therapy after myocardial infarction: secondary prevention in all patients?

    PubMed

    Griggs, T; Adams, K; Narvarte, H; Sheps, D

    1985-01-01

    The ability of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs to prevent death in patients after myocardial infarction has been demonstrated by several large trials. However, the need to treat patients at low risk has been challenged. Retrospective analysis of the data from one of these studies plus results from many additional studies have shown that electrical, mechanical and ischemic complications after myocardial infarction imply a high risk of subsequent death or recurrent infarction. On the other hand, absence of complications with a negative exercise tolerance test, good exercise tolerance, absence of arrhythmias and normal increase of ejection fraction with exercise documents a very low risk. These considerations lead to the following practical implications: The physician should watch for any evidence of left ventricular dysfunction or arrhythmia. Any such complication justifies treatment or more intensive study. Patients without complications can be further characterized with exercise testing, exercise radionuclide blood pool ventriculography, and Holter monitoring. If these tests expose risk indicators, treatment or more study should again be recommended. Because the beta-blockers are probably life-saving in a considerable portion of the patients with moderate and high risk, the decision to treat or not to treat should be made with due, affirmative consideration. In those patients with a carefully documented uncomplicated course and who have a normal exercise test and appropriate increase in ventricular ejection fraction with stress, beta-blockade is probably of no benefit. Under these conditions, a physician and patient might logically decide not to use the drug.

  14. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size. PMID:26583449

  15. Postmortem detection of inapparent myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    McVie, J. G.

    1970-01-01

    Two methods of detecting early inapparent myocardial infarcts have been studied and their value in diagnostic practice compared. The better method proved to be the determination of the potassium to sodium ratio (ionic ratio) which falls in infarcted tissue within minutes of the onset of anoxia. The second method was nitro blue tetrazolium staining of gross sections of myocardium which revealed any infarct older than three and a half hours. As staining is dependent upon enzyme activity, the latter method is disturbed by autolysis. It was shown, on the other hand, that the ionic ratio (K+/Na+) was not affected by autolysis and was therefore well suited to forensic practice. Sixteen non-infarcted control hearts, plus the nine from cases of sudden death due to causes other than myocardial infarction, all yielded high ionic ratios (K+/Na+), average 1·4, and stained normally with tetrazolium (the normal controls). Positive control was provided by 20 histologically proven infarcts of which the ionic ratios (K+/Na+) were all low (average 0·7). Histochemical staining with tetrazolium delineated infarcted areas in each case. In a series of 29 sudden deaths, a cause of death other than myocardial infarction was found at necropsy in nine, mentioned above as normal controls. The remaining 20 hearts were not infarcted histologically, but were shown to be infarcted by examination of the ionic ratios (K+/Na+). These ratios were low (average 0·8) including three borderline ratios. Confirmatory evidence of infarction included nitro blue tetrazolium staining which revealed infarcts in 10 of the 20 cases, and clinical and necropsy observations. The ionic ratio (K+/Na+) decreases as the age of the infarct increases for at least 24 hours. Thereafter as healing proceeds, the ratio gradually reverts to normal. Thus, previous infarction and replacement fibrosis do not significantly alter the ionic ratio (K+/Na+). Nor is it changed by left ventricular hypertrophy, the presence of

  16. Cocaine, a risk factor for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Galasko, G I

    1997-06-01

    Cocaine usage goes back thousands of years, to the times of the Incas. Over the past 20 years, its use has increased dramatically, especially in America, and adverse cardiovascular reactions to the drug have begun to be reported. The first report of myocardial infarction temporally related to the recreational use of cocaine appeared in 1982. Since then, myocardial infarction has become recognized as the drug's most common cardiovascular consequence, with over 250 cases now documented in the literature. This review discusses the history of cocaine use, its pharmacology, the possible pathological mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of myocardial ischaemia and infarction, and current ideas on the management of cocaine-induced myocardial infarction.

  17. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  18. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  19. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  20. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  1. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  2. A case of expressive-vocal amusia in a right-handed patient with left hemispheric cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Uetsuki, Shizuka; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Obata, Satoshi; Kakigi, Tatsuya; Wada, Yoshiko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa

    2016-03-01

    A 53-year-old right-handed woman had an extensive lesion in the left hemisphere due to an infarction caused by vasospasm secondary to subarachnoid bleeding. She exhibited persistent expressive-vocal amusia with no symptoms of aphasia. Evaluation of the patient's musical competence using the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusia, rhythm reproduction tests, acoustic analysis of pitch upon singing familiar music, Japanese standard language tests, and other detailed clinical examinations revealed that her amusia was more dominantly related to pitch production. The intactness of her speech provided strong evidence that the right hemisphere played a major role in her linguistic processing. Data from functional magnetic resonance imaging while she was singing a familiar song, a scale, and reciting lyrics indicated that perilesional residual activation in the left hemisphere was associated with poor pitch production, while right hemispheric activation was involved in linguistic processing. The localization of infarction more anterior to the left Sylvian fissure might be related to the dominant deficits in expressive aspects of the singing of the patient. Compromised motor programming producing a single tone may have made a major contribution to her poor singing. Imperfect auditory feedback due to borderline perceptual ability or improper audio-motor associations might also have played a role. PMID:26808450

  3. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  4. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  5. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  6. Complications of auricular correction.

    PubMed

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  7. Macrocephaly in infancy: benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jacqueline; Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Piatt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces (BESS) is a common finding on imaging studies indicated by macrocephaly in infancy. This finding has been associated with the presence of subdural fluid collections that are sometimes construed as suggestive of abusive head injury. The prevalence of BESS among infants with macrocephaly and the prevalence of subdural collections among infants with BESS are both poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the relative frequencies of BESS, hydrocephalus, and subdural collections in a large consecutive series of imaging studies performed for macrocephaly and to determine the prevalence of subdural fluid collections among patients with BESS. METHODS A text search of radiology requisitions identified studies performed for macrocephaly in patients ≤ 2 years of age. Studies of patients with hydrocephalus or acute trauma were excluded. Studies that demonstrated hydrocephalus or chronic subdural hematoma not previously recognized but responsible for macrocephaly were noted but not investigated further. The remaining studies were reviewed for the presence of incidental subdural collections and for measurement of the depth of the subarachnoid space. A 3-point scale was used to grade BESS: Grade 0, < 5 mm; Grade 1, 5-9 mm; and Grade 2, ≥ 10 mm. RESULTS After exclusions, there were 538 studies, including 7 cases of hydrocephalus (1.3%) and 1 large, bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (0.2%). There were incidental subdural collections in 21 cases (3.9%). Two hundred sixty-five studies (49.2%) exhibited Grade 1 BESS, and 46 studies (8.6%) exhibited Grade 2 BESS. The prevalence of incidental subdural collections among studies with BESS was 18 of 311 (5.8%). The presence of BESS was associated with a greater prevalence of subdural collections, and higher grades of BESS were associated with increasing prevalence of subdural collections. After controlling for imaging modality, the odds ratio of the association of

  8. Successful device closure of a post-infarction ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Si-Wan; Han, Ji Hye; Jin, Seon-Ah; Kim, Mijoo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a lethal complication of myocardial infarction. The event occurs 2–8 days after an infarction and patients should undergo emergency surgical treatment. We report on successful device closure of post-infarction VSD. A previously healthy 66-year-old male was admitted with aggravated dyspnea. Echocardiography showed moderate left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with akinesia of the left anterior descending (LAD) territory and muscular VSD size approximately 2 cm. Coronary angiography showed mid-LAD total occlusion without collaterals. Without percutaneous coronary intervention due to time delay, VSD repair was performed. However, a murmur was heard again and pulmonary edema was not controlled 3 days after the operation. Echocardiography showed remnant VSD, and medical treatment failed. Percutaneous treatment using a septal occluder device was decided on. After the procedure, heart failure was controlled and the patient was discharged without complications. This is the first report on device closure of post-infarction VSD in Korea. PMID:27462148

  9. Silent ST segment elevation myocardial infarction with multi-segmental renal infarction: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Yang, Yung-Nien

    2011-01-01

    A 36-year-old diabetic man came to our institution presenting with constant left flank pain. Left renal embolic infarction was found by abdominal computed tomography. Silent ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was noted on 12-lead electrocardiogram. Emergent coronary angiography revealed large thrombus burdens with complete occlusion at the left anterior descending artery ostium, which may be the embolic origin. Silent ST segment elevation myocardial infarction with acute flank pain and multiple segmental renal infarction is an unusual presentation. High vigilance may prevent delay of the "golden hour" to treat acute myocardial infarction.

  10. [Myocardial infarct during pregnancy. Treatment of the acute phase and of labor. Apropos a case and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bayón, J; Fidalgo, M L; Calabozo, R; Alonso-Orcajo, N; Porrero, E; Rodríguez, M A; Suárez, G; Santos, I; Ramos, G; González, C

    1994-03-01

    An acute myocardial infarction, is an infrequent complication in pregnant women. We present the case of a 29-years-old patient who suffered 2 acute myocardial infarction in relation with her two pregnancies. The first acute myocardial infarction occurred the third day after delivery, and the second, during the seventh month of the second pregnancy. In the latter, delivery was vaginal, with epidural anaesthesia. A coronary angiogram showed coronary arteries without significant narrowings, as well as an aneurysm of the left ventricle. A review of the literature published so far is made in the discussion.

  11. Successful treatment of post-exertion acute myocardial infarction by primary angioplasty and stenting in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Musuraca, Gerardo; Imperadore, Ferdinando; Terraneo, Clotilde; De Girolamo, Piergiuseppe; Cemin, Claudio; Bonmassari, Roberto; Vergara, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a disorder characterized by arterial and venous thromboses, thrombocytopaenia and stroke. Acute myocardial infarction is rarely associated with this syndrome. The treatment of these patients is a clinical challenge. This report is about a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome presenting with an acute myocardial infarction after an exercise test. The infarct-related coronary artery was successfully revascularized by primary angioplasty and stenting without any major bleeding complications. We think that the physical exertion could have favoured acute coronary thrombosis in this particular setting.

  12. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  13. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  14. Causal Structure of Brain Physiology after Brain Injury from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Frey, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, J. Michael; Albers, David; Falo, Cristina Maria; Park, Soojin; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E. Sander; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High frequency physiologic data are routinely generated for intensive care patients. While massive amounts of data make it difficult for clinicians to extract meaningful signals, these data could provide insight into the state of critically ill patients and guide interventions. We develop uniquely customized computational methods to uncover the causal structure within systemic and brain physiologic measures recorded in a neurological intensive care unit after subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the data have many missing values, poor signal-to-noise ratio, and are composed from a heterogeneous patient population, our advanced imputation and causal inference techniques enable physiologic models to be learned for individuals. Our analyses confirm that complex physiologic relationships including demand and supply of oxygen underlie brain oxygen measurements and that mechanisms for brain swelling early after injury may differ from those that develop in a delayed fashion. These inference methods will enable wider use of ICU data to understand patient physiology. PMID:27123582

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  16. Early Embolization for Ruptured Aneurysm in Acute Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Rada, K. TE; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.; Asano, T.; Manabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Four cases of ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). On admission, two patients were grade IV and two were grade V according to Hunt and Hess grading. All patients needed respiratory management with the assistance of a ventilator. Three of them underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within three days from onset after ensuring hemodynamic stability. Immediately after the endovascular treatment, lumbar spinal drainage was inserted in all the patients. The pulmonary edema findings disappeared rapidly after the respiratory management. The results were good recovery in two, and moderate disability in two. We concluded that early embolization of ruptured aneurysm and placement of spinal drainage is a satisfactory option for severe SAH with NPE. PMID:20566097

  17. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage from the anterior communication artery in a sex offender. Considerations regarding liability].

    PubMed

    Mielke, U; Donauer, E; Luthe, R

    1996-09-01

    A 32-year-old man was accused of attempted rape. While urinating at the side of the road he felt an erection. He approached a 9-year-old girl who happened to be coming along and pressed his penis between her legs until ejaculation. Shortly afterwards he was arrested. He confessed, but claimed partial amnesia and had no explanation for the offence, which he normally would never have thought of. Shortly before the event a witness had seen him nearby in a poor state of orientation. Three months later in prison he suffered massive subarachnoidal hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The evaluation of his legal responsibility must take account of a putative psychomotor seizure at the time of the offence. With regard to the aneurysm diagnosed later, a pathogenetic connection, in terms of a preceding warning leak, might be assumed.

  18. [Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015: overview of the chapter on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    After an interval of 6 years, the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke were revised in 2015 in accordance with recent advances in clinical knowledge. The chapter on subarachnoid hemorrhage includes new and revised recommendations for diagnosis, treatment selection, and management of vasospasm. The chapter on diagnosis recommends re-examination of vascular images at regular intervals in cases in which cerebral aneurysm was not detected on the first examination. The section dealing with treatment selection for cerebral aneurysmal emphasizes that the method for aneurysm obliteration should be selected based on consultation with both surgical and endovascular specialists. The role of triple-H therapy(i.e., induced hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) has changed from a preventive measure to a treatment option for symptomatic cerebral vasospasm.

  19. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage from the anterior communication artery in a sex offender. Considerations regarding liability].

    PubMed

    Mielke, U; Donauer, E; Luthe, R

    1996-09-01

    A 32-year-old man was accused of attempted rape. While urinating at the side of the road he felt an erection. He approached a 9-year-old girl who happened to be coming along and pressed his penis between her legs until ejaculation. Shortly afterwards he was arrested. He confessed, but claimed partial amnesia and had no explanation for the offence, which he normally would never have thought of. Shortly before the event a witness had seen him nearby in a poor state of orientation. Three months later in prison he suffered massive subarachnoidal hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The evaluation of his legal responsibility must take account of a putative psychomotor seizure at the time of the offence. With regard to the aneurysm diagnosed later, a pathogenetic connection, in terms of a preceding warning leak, might be assumed. PMID:8992376

  20. Memantine Attenuates Delayed Vasospasm after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage via Modulating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Liang-Chao; Shan, Yan-Shen; Pan, Chia-Hsin; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-06-23

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm is an important pathological feature of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The cause of vasospasm is multifactorial. Impairs nitric oxide availability and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction has been reported to underlie vasospasm. Memantine, a low-affinity uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) blocker has been proven to reduce early brain injury after SAH. This study investigated the effect of memantine on attenuation of vasospasm and restoring eNOS functionality. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-450 g were randomly divided into three weight-matched groups, sham surgery, SAH + vehicle, and SAH + memantine groups. The effects of memantine on SAH were evaluated by assessing the severity of vasospasm and the expression of eNOS. Memantine effectively ameliorated cerebral vasospasm by restoring eNOS functionality. Memantine can prevent vasospasm in experimental SAH. Treatment strategies may help combat SAH-induced vasospasm in the future.

  1. Transpulmonary Thermodilution-Based Management of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Kazumata, Ken; Ueyama-Mutoh, Tomoko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a potentially catastrophic but treatable systemic event after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The development of NPE most frequently occurs immediately after SAH, and the severity is usually self-limiting. Despite extensive research efforts and a breadth of collective clinical experience, accurate diagnosis of NPE can be difficult, and effective hemodynamic treatment options are limited. Recently, a bedside transpulmonary thermodilution device has been introduced that traces physiological patterns consistent with current theories regarding the mechanism (hydrostatic or permeability PE) of NPE. This article provides an overview of the clinical usefulness of the advanced technique for use in the neurointensive care unit for the diagnosis and management of post-SAH NPE.

  2. A Hypothesis: Hydrogen Sulfide Might Be Neuroprotective against Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Peng; Chi, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gases such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) play important roles both in normal physiology and in disease. Recent studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects neurons against oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury and attenuates lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induced neuroinflammation in microglia, exhibiting anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. The gas H2S is emerging as a novel regulator of important physiologic functions such as arterial diameter, blood flow, and leukocyte adhesion. It has been known that multiple factors, including oxidative stress, free radicals, and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis as well as abnormal inflammatory responses, are involved in the mechanism underlying the brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the multiple physiologic functions of H2S, we speculate that it might be a promising, effective, and specific therapy for brain injury after SAH. PMID:24707204

  3. [Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015: overview of the chapter on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    After an interval of 6 years, the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke were revised in 2015 in accordance with recent advances in clinical knowledge. The chapter on subarachnoid hemorrhage includes new and revised recommendations for diagnosis, treatment selection, and management of vasospasm. The chapter on diagnosis recommends re-examination of vascular images at regular intervals in cases in which cerebral aneurysm was not detected on the first examination. The section dealing with treatment selection for cerebral aneurysmal emphasizes that the method for aneurysm obliteration should be selected based on consultation with both surgical and endovascular specialists. The role of triple-H therapy(i.e., induced hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) has changed from a preventive measure to a treatment option for symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. PMID:27333759

  4. Causal Structure of Brain Physiology after Brain Injury from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jan; Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Frey, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, J Michael; Albers, David; Falo, Cristina Maria; Park, Soojin; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E Sander; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High frequency physiologic data are routinely generated for intensive care patients. While massive amounts of data make it difficult for clinicians to extract meaningful signals, these data could provide insight into the state of critically ill patients and guide interventions. We develop uniquely customized computational methods to uncover the causal structure within systemic and brain physiologic measures recorded in a neurological intensive care unit after subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the data have many missing values, poor signal-to-noise ratio, and are composed from a heterogeneous patient population, our advanced imputation and causal inference techniques enable physiologic models to be learned for individuals. Our analyses confirm that complex physiologic relationships including demand and supply of oxygen underlie brain oxygen measurements and that mechanisms for brain swelling early after injury may differ from those that develop in a delayed fashion. These inference methods will enable wider use of ICU data to understand patient physiology. PMID:27123582

  5. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research The Karen ... The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research The Karen ...

  6. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  7. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by injury is often seen in the elderly who have fallen and hit their head. Among ... to control blood pressure Nimodipine to prevent artery spasms Painkillers and anti-anxiety medicines to relieve headache ...

  9. Apoptosis in myocardial ischaemia and infarction.

    PubMed

    Krijnen, P A J; Nijmeijer, R; Meijer, C J L M; Visser, C A; Hack, C E; Niessen, H W M

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that, in addition to necrosis, apoptosis also plays a role in the process of tissue damage after myocardial infarction, which has pathological and therapeutic implications. This review article will discuss studies in which the role and mechanisms of apoptosis in myocardial infarction were analysed in vivo and in vitro in humans and in animals.

  10. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  11. [Contralateral hyperhidrosis secondary to the pontine infarct].

    PubMed

    Rey, A; Martí-Vilalta, J L; Abellán, M T

    1996-04-01

    Unilateral hyperhydrosis due to a cerebral infarct is a clinical sign rarely described in the literature, the significance of which is unknown and may be due to a lesion of the crossed sympathetic inhibitory tract. We describe the case of a patient with contralateral hyperhydrosis due to a hemipontine infarct. PMID:8721928

  12. Cortical venous infarcts and acute limb ischaemia in acute carbon monoxide poisoning: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad Farooq; Iqbal, Beenish; Gilani, Nooman

    2016-06-01

    A case of carbon monoxide poisoning is presented with unusual complications; some of which have not been reported previously. A 48-years-old Asian male presented to the emergency department with dyspnoea, altered state of consciousness and pale discolouration of skin after being locked inside a factory room with burning coal. Patient was in acute respiratory distress. Arterial blood gas analysis showed respiratory acidosis with hypoxaemia. On 3rd day, patient developed dark coloured urine and right upper limb ischaemia. Acute renal failure was diagnosed. A doppler ultrasound showed stenosis of radial and ulnar arteries. 0n 8th day, patient regained consciousness and complained of loss of vision. An MRI of the brain revealed bilateral occipital venous infarcts. Cortical venous infarcts and arterial stenosis are rare complications of acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

  13. The effect of age on systemic absorption and systemic disposition of bupivacaine after subarachnoid administration

    SciTech Connect

    Veering, B.T.; Burm, A.G.; Vletter, A.A.; van den Hoeven, R.A.; Spierdijk, J. )

    1991-02-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the pharmacokinetics of the age-related changes in the clinical profile of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine, we studied the influence of age on the systemic absorption and systemic disposition of bupivacaine after subarachnoid administration in 20 male patients (22-81 yr), ASA Physical Status 1 or 2, by a stable isotope method. After subarachnoid administration of 3 ml 0.5% bupivacaine in 8% glucose, a deuterium-labeled analog (13.4 mg) was administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected for 24 h. Plasma concentrations of unlabeled and deuterium-labeled bupivacaine were determined with a combination of gas chromatography and mass fragmentography. Biexponential functions were fitted to the plasma concentration-time data of the deuterium-labeled bupivacaine. The systemic absorption was evaluated by means of deconvolution. Mono- and biexponential functions were fitted to the data of fraction absorbed versus time. The maximal height of analgesia and the duration of analgesia at T12 increased with age (r = 0.715, P less than 0.001; r = 0.640, P less than 0.01, respectively). In 18 patients the systemic absorption of bupivacaine was best described by a biexponential equation. The half-life of the slow systemic absorption process (r = -0.478; P less than 0.05) and the mean absorption time (r = -0.551; P less than 0.02) decreased with age. The total plasma clearance decreased with age (r = -0.650, P less than 0.002), whereas the mean residence time and terminal half-life increased with age (r = 0.597, P less than 0.01; r = 0.503, P less than 0.05).

  14. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Dustin G.; Kene, Mamata V.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT) performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT), may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED) patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age ≥40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset) were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6–100.0]). Conclusion Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease. PMID:26587089

  15. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  16. Ophthalmic complications of dengue.

    PubMed

    Chan, David P L; Teoh, Stephen C B; Tan, Colin S H; Nah, Gerard K M; Rajagopalan, Rajesh; Prabhakaragupta, Manjunath K; Chee, Caroline K L; Lim, Tock H; Goh, Kong Y

    2006-02-01

    We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.

  17. Action of acetylstrophanthidin on experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, G. T.; Pope, S. E.; Harrison, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental animal model with acute myocardial infarction of a size insufficient to produce profound heart failure or shock was used to study the effects of acute infarction on digitalis tolerance and the hemodynamic changes produced by moderate and large doses of acetylstrophanthidin. With acute myocardial infarction, digitalis toxic arrhythmias could be precipitated with significantly lower doses of digitalis than in animals without myocardial infarction. There was no precise correlation between the size of infarction and the toxic dose of glycoside. Coronary artery ligation produced a stable but relatively depressed circulatory state, as evidenced by lowered cardiac output and stroke volume and elevated systemic vascular resistance and left atrial mean pressure. When digitalis was infused, the following significant changes were observed at nontoxic doses: (1) elevation of aortic and left ventricular pressures; (2) further decline in cardiac output; and (3) decreased left atrial mean pressure.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. However, new imaging methods can be used to assess biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. We review molecular imaging techniques for evaluating the biology of infarct healing and repair. Specifically, we cover recent advances in imaging the various phases of MI and infarct healing such as apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition, and scar formation. Significant progress has been made in preclinical molecular imaging, and future challenges include translation of these methods to clinical practice. PMID:21869911

  19. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  20. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise.

  1. Spontaneous gastric ulcer perforation and acute spleen infarction caused by invasive gastric and splenic mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Enani, Mushira Abdulaziz; Alharthi, Bandar N; Dewanjee, Nancy; Bhat, Nadeem A; Fagih, Mosa

    2014-07-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare life-threatening fungal infection mostly affecting immunocompromised hosts. The main categories of human disease with the Mucorales are sinusitis/rhinocerebral, pulmonary, cutaneous/subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and disseminated disease. Other disease states occur with a much lower frequency and include cystitis, vaginitis; external otitis and allergic disease. We report a diabetic patient with comorbidities, who developed gastric perforation clinically indistinguishable from perforated peptic ulcer due to invasive gastric mucormycosis complicated by spleen infarction.

  2. Anterior ST depression with acute transmural inferior infarction due to posterior infarction. A vectorcardiographic and scintigraphic study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukharji, J.; Murray, S.; Lewis, S.E.; Croft, C.H.; Corbett, J.R.; Willerson, J.T.; Rude, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The hypothesis that anterior ST segment depression represents concomitant posterior infarction was tested in 49 patients admitted with a first transmural inferior myocardial infarction. Anterior ST depression was defined as 0.1 mV or more ST depression in leads V1, V2 or V3 on an electrocardiogram recorded within 18 hours of infarction. Serial vectorcardiograms and technetium pyrophosphate scans were obtained. Eighty percent of the patients (39 of 49) had anterior ST depression. Of these 39 patients, 34% fulfilled vectorcardiographic criteria for posterior infarction, and 60% had pyrophosphate scanning evidence of posterior infarction. Early anterior ST depression was neither highly sensitive (84%) nor specific (20%) for the detection of posterior infarction as defined by pyrophosphate imaging. Of patients with persistent anterior ST depression (greater than 72 hours), 87% had posterior infarction detected by pyrophosphate scan. In patients with inferior myocardial infarction, vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction correlated poorly with pyrophosphate imaging data. Right ventricular infarction was present on pyrophosphate imaging in 40% of patients with pyrophosphate changes of posterior infarction but without vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction. It is concluded that: 1) the majority of patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction have anterior ST segment depression; 2) early anterior ST segment depression in such patients is not a specific marker for posterior infarction; and 3) standard vectorcardiographic criteria for transmural posterior infarction may be inaccurate in patients with concomitant transmural inferior myocardial infarction or right ventricular infarction, or both.

  3. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  4. Long term complications following 54 consecutive lung transplants

    PubMed Central

    Tabarelli, Walther; Bonatti, Hugo; Tabarelli, Dominique; Eller, Miriam; Müller, Ludwig; Ruttmann, Elfriede; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Larcher, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the complex therapy and the required high level of immunosuppression, lung recipients are at high risk to develop many different long term complications. Methods From 1993–2000, a total of 54 lung transplantation (LuTx) were performed at our center. Complications, graft and patient survival of this cohort was retrospectively analyzed. Results One/five and ten-year patient survival was 71.4%, 41.2% and 25.4%; at last follow up (4/2010), twelve patients were alive. Of the 39 deceased patients, 26 died from infectious complications. Other causes of death were myocardial infarction (n=1), progressive graft failure (n=1), intracerebral bleeding (n=2), basilary vein thrombosis (n=1), pulmonary emboli (n=1), others (n=7). Surgical complication rate was 27.7% during the first year and 25% for the 12 long term survivors. Perioperative rejection rate was 35%, and 91.6% for the 12 patients currently alive. Infection incidence during first hospitalization was 79.6% (1.3 episodes per transplant) and 100% for long term survivors. Commonly isolated pathogens were cytomegalovirus (56.8%), Aspergillus (29.4%), RSV (13.7%). Other common complications were renal failure (56.8%), osteoporosis (54.9%), hypertension (45%), diabetes mellitus (19.6%). Conclusions Infection and rejection remain the most common complications following LuTx with many other events to be considered. PMID:27293842

  5. Thrombo-embolic renal infarction in a case of mid-ventricular takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Shahgaldi, Kambiz

    2011-01-01

    Thrombo-embolism is one of the serious complications of takotsubo syndrome (TS). It typically occurs in the classical mid-apical left ventricular ballooning form of TS. This complication has not been reported in cases of left mid-ventricular ballooning type of TS. We describe a 67-year-old woman who presented with 2-3 days of increasing signs and symptoms of heart failure. Echocardiography showed marked hypokinesia/akinesia in the mid-anterior, mid-anterolateral, and mid-inferior wall of the left ventricle and mild hypokinesia in the apical region. There was also hypokinesia of the mid and apical parts of the right ventricle. One day after admission, she developed acute left-sided renal infarction. Left ventriculography and coronary angiography 3 days after admission showed typical left mid-ventricular ballooning with no identifiable coronary lesion. Follow-up echocardiography showed complete resolution of left and right ventricular dysfunction. Takotsubo syndrome with right ventricular involvement complicated with heart failure and left renal embolic infarction was diagnosed. The mechanism of left renal embolic infarction is discussed.

  6. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  7. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  8. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  9. Complications from radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhermain, Frédéric; Barani, Igor J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) of the brain is associated with significant stigma in the neuro-oncology community. This is primarily because of the potentially severe complications with which it may be associated. These complications, especially in subacute and latent settings, are often unpredictable, potentially progressive, and irreversible. The onset of complications may start from the first fraction of 2 Gy, continuing over several months after end of RT with persistent drowsiness and apathy. It may also extend over many years with progressive onset of neurocognitive impairments such as memory decline, and diminished focus/attention. For long-term survivors, such as young patients irradiated for a favorable low-grade glioma, quality of life can be seriously impacted by RT. It is essential, as in the pediatric field, to propose patient-specific regimens from the very outset of therapy. The use of molecular biomarkers to better predict survival, control of comorbidities along with judicious use of medications such as steroids and antiepileptics, improved targeting with the help of modern imaging and RT techniques, modulation of the dose, and fractionation aimed at limiting integral dose to the healthy brain all have the potential to minimize treatment-related complications while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy for which RT is known. Sparing "radiosensitive" areas such as hippocampi could have a modest but measurable impact with regard to cognitive preservation, an effect that can possibly be enhanced when used in conjunction with memantine and/or donepezil. PMID:26948357

  10. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  11. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  12. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  13. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  14. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  15. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections. PMID:27703619

  16. Neurologic complication after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Sa Leitao, Davi; Mendonca, Dercio; Iyer, Harish; Kao, Cheng-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications after roller coaster rides are uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate investigation. A 22-year-old healthy African American man presented with a 2-day history of constant occipital headache associated with vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and ambulatory dysfunction. Physical examination showed gait ataxia, slight dysmetria, and vertical nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed early subacute ischemic infarct in the right cerebellum in the distribution of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck showed focal dissection of the right vertebral artery at C1 through C2 level. On subsequent questioning, the patient recollected riding a roller coaster 2 weeks before the onset of symptoms. Anticoagulation with heparin was started, and the patient was bridged to oral warfarin. After a 5-day uneventful hospital course, symptoms improved and patient was discharged on oral anticoagulation. Cervicocephalic arterial dissections after roller coaster rides are rarely described in literature. The acceleration and abrupt changes of direction might lead to indirect trauma that is applied to mobile portions of the cervicocephalic arteries leading to intimal tears. Magnetic resonance angiography combined with axial T1-weighted cervical MRI is preferred because it is a high-sensitive, noninvasive test. The rationale for the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelets in patients with cervicocephalic arterial dissection is to prevent early recurrence and infarction. However, a meta-analysis failed to show significant difference in the rates of disability or death between both groups. Therefore, the decision for medical treatment should be made in a case-by-case basis. PMID:20980120

  17. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  18. Deaths from cerebrovascular diseases correlated to month of birth: elevated risk of death from subarachnoid hemorrhage among summer-born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, K.; Imaizumi, Y.

    It has been suggested that maternal nutrition, and fetal and infant growth have an important effect on the risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. We investigated the population-based distribution of deaths from cerebrovascular diseases (ICD9 codes 430, 431, or 434) in Japan in 1986-1994 as a function of birth month, by examining death-certificate records. For a total of 853 981 people born in the years 1900-1959, the distribution of the number of deaths according to the month of birth was compared with the distribution expected from the monthly numbers of all births for each sex and for the corresponding birth decade. For those born between 1920 and 1949, there were significant discrepancies between the actual numbers of deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (ICD9 430) and the numbers expected, and these differences were related to the month of birth. Those born in summer, June-September, consistently had an elevated risk of death, particularly men, where the excess risk was 8%-23%. This tendency was also observed, less distinctly but significantly, for deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICD9 431), but was not observed for those dying from occlusion of the cerebral arteries (ICD9 434). The observation that the risk of dying from subarachnoid hemorrhage was more than 10% higher among those born in the summer implies that at least one in ten deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage has its origin at a perinatal stage. Although variations in hypertension in later life, which could possibly be ''programmed'' during the intra-uterine stages, could be an explanation for this observation, the disease-specific nature of the observation suggests the involvement of aneurysm formation, which is a predominant cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  19. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma. PMID:27175338

  20. Visual localisation in patients with occipital infarction.

    PubMed

    Ross Russell, R W; Bharucha, N

    1984-02-01

    Visually directed pointing has been examined in a group of patients with occipital lobe infarction and in an age-matched control group. The visual field ipsilateral to the infarct showed normal localisation; there was no evidence that right sided infarction produced a bilateral disturbance. In quadrantanopia the spared quadrant on the affected side showed abnormal localisation in a few patients but this was not consistently associated with right or left sided defects. The majority of patients were able to detect a flashing light within the blind portion of the field although the same stimulus could not be seen during conventional perimetry. Some patients could localise the stimulus normally.

  1. Serum nickle estimation in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Narang, N K; Goyal, R K; Gupta, A K; Balwani, S

    1989-11-01

    Serum nickle was estimated by atomic absorption spectrometer in 20 healthy controls and in 25 cases of acute myocardial infarction at 12 hourly intervals upto 48 hours, after the onset of chest pain. The mean serum nickel was 0.27 micrograms/dl in healthy controls and 0.40,050,049 and 0.30 micrograms/dl in patients of acute myocardial infarction. The serum nickel values were significantly (P less than 0.001) raised upto 36 hours in acute myocardial infarction when compared with controls.

  2. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-05-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma.

  3. Posttraumatic Cerebellar Infarction after Repeated Sport-related Minor Head Injuries in a Young Adult: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMOTO, Hiroaki; YOSHIDA, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 23-year-old man suffered helmet-to-helmet collisions with an opponent during American football game twice within 3 days. He then experienced continuous vomiting and dizziness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography revealed transient stenosis of the right superior cerebellar artery. Although minor head injury is not usually accompanied by complications, posttraumatic ischemic stroke has been reported on rare occasions. We report a case of cerebellar infarction after repeated sports-related minor head injuries in a young adult and discuss the etiology. PMID:25746313

  4. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  5. Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction by Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI); Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS); ST Elevation (STEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Reperfusion Injury; Non-ST Elevation (NSTEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Angina, Unstable

  6. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  7. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future.

  8. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  9. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  10. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  11. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  12. Complications of vasectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Awsare, Ninaad S.; Krishnan, Jai; Boustead, Greg B.; Hanbury, Damian C.; McNicholas, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasectomy is a common method of sterilisation. However, it is less popular than tubal ligation world-wide. It is also a frequent cause of litigation relating to its complications. This article reviews the early and late risks associated with the procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data collection was done using the internet to search Medline for obtaining evidence-based medicine reviews. Cross-references were obtained from key articles. Websites of government bodies and medical associations were searched for guidelines relating to vasectomy. DISCUSSION: Early complications include haematoma, wound and genito-urinary infections, and traumatic fistulae. Vasectomy failure occurs in 0-2% of patients. Late recanalisation causes failure in 0.2% of vasectomies. Significant chronic orchalgia may occur in up to 15% of men after vasectomy, and may require epididyectomy or vasectomy reversal. Antisperm antibodies develop in a significant proportion of men post-vasectomy, but do not increase the risk of immune-complex or atherosclerotic heart disease. Similarly, vasectomy does not enhance risk of testicular or prostate cancer. Vasectomy has a lower mortality as compared to tubal occlusion, but is still significantly high in non-industrialised countries because of infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vasectomy, though safe and relatively simple, requires a high level of expertise to minimise complications. Adequate pre-operative counselling is essential to increase patient acceptability of this method of permanent contraception. PMID:16263006

  13. Unusual complication after genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Rafael Linard; Sá, Carlos Diego Lopes; Esses, Diego Felipe Silveira; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; de Oliveira, Rogerio Belle

    2014-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on shape, proportion, and harmony between the facial thirds. The chin is one of the most important components of the inferior third and has an important role on the definition of facial aesthetic and harmony in both frontal and lateral views. There are 2 principal therapeutic approaches that one can choose to treat mental deformities, alloplastic implants, and mental basilar ostectomy, also known as genioplasty. The latest is more commonly used because of great versatility in the correction of three-dimensional deformities of the chin and smaller taxes of postoperative complications. Possible transoperative and postoperative complications of genioplasty include mental nerve lesion, bleeding, damage to tooth roots, bone resorption of the mobilized segment, mandibular fracture, ptosis of the lower lip, and failure to stabilize the ostectomized segment. The study presents 2 cases of displacement of the osteotomized segment after genioplasty associated with facial trauma during postoperative orthognathic surgery followed by rare complications with no reports in the literature. PMID:24621765

  14. Myocardial infarction in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Egred, M; Viswanathan, G; Davis, G

    2005-01-01

    Although myocardial infarction (MI) mainly occurs in patients older than 45, young men or women can suffer MI. Fortunately, its incidence is not common in patients younger than 45 years. However, the disease carries a significant morbidity, psychological effects, and financial constraints for the person and the family when it occurs at a young age. The causes of MI among patients aged less than 45 can be divided into four groups: (1) atheromatous coronary artery disease; (2) non-atheromatous coronary artery disease; (2) hyper-coagulable states; (4) MI related to substance misuse. There is a considerable overlap between all the groups. This article reviews the literature and highlights the practical issues involved in the management of young adults with MI. PMID:16344295

  15. Acute inferior myocardial infarction with right ventricular infarction is more prone to develop cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Bari, M A; Roy, A K; Islam, M Z; Aditya, G; Bhuiyan, A S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is rare in isolated acute inferior myocardial infarction but there is relationship of cardiogenic shock with inferior myocardial infarction if associated with right ventricular infarction. A prospective study was carried out to see the association of cardiogenic shock with inferior myocardial infarction if associated with right ventricular infarction. This study was conducted from January 2011 to November 2011. A total of 100 cases were selected as study population which was taken from the Department of Cardiology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. Among them 50 were in Group A and 50 were in Group B. Group A was the patients of acute myocardial infarction with right ventricular infarction. Group B was the patients of acute myocardial infarction without right ventricular infarction. It revealed that 9(18%) in Group A and 3(6%) in Group B developed cardiogenic shock which is statistically significant (p<0.05). The study concluded that AMI (Inf) with RVI is significantly associated with cardiogenic shock.

  16. Comparison of radionuclide and enzymatic estimate of infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsowitz, G.S.; Lakier, J.B.; Marks, D.S.; Lee, T.G.; Goldberg, A.D.; Goldstein, S.

    1983-06-01

    A comparison was made of the estimated size of the myocardial infarction occurring in 26 patients with a first infarction using creatine kinase (CK) enzyme release between radionuclide gated blood pool measurement of total and regional ventricular function and thallium-201 scintigraphic measurement of myocardial perfusion defects. Creatine kinase estimates of infarct size (enzymatic infarct size) correlated closely with the percent of abnormal contracting regions, left ventricular ejection fraction and thallium-201 estimates of percent of abnormal perfusion area (r . 0.78, 0.69 and 0.74, respectively, p less than 0.01). A close correlation also existed between percent abnormal perfusion area and percent of abnormal contracting regions (r . 0.81, p less than 0.01) and left ventricular ejection fraction (r . 0.69, p less than 0.01). Enzymatic infarct size was larger in anterior (116 +/- 37 CK-g-Eq) than inferior (52 +/- 29 CK-g-Eq) myocardial infarction (p less than 0.01) and was associated with significantly more left ventricular functional impairment as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction (33 +/- 7 versus 60 +/- 10%) (p less than 0.01) and percent abnormal perfusion area (58 +/- 14 versus 13 +/- 12) (p less than 0.01). No significant correlation was observed between enzymatic infarct size and right ventricular ejection fraction. These different methods of estimating infarct size correlated closely with each other in these patients with a first uncomplicated myocardial infarction.

  17. Occipital infarction revealed by quadranopsia following snakebite by Bothrops lanceolatus.

    PubMed

    Merle, Harold; Donnio, Angélique; Ayeboua, Lucas; Plumelle, Yves; Smadja, Didier; Thomas, Laurent

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of snakebite in which envenomation was manifested through impairment of the visual field. The patient, a 46-year-old man, was bitten on the right thumb by Bothrops lanceolatus. Treatment with a specific equine antivenom (Bothrofav) was administered one hour after the bite. With the exception of fang marks, the results of a clinical examination, particularly the neurologic component, were normal. The day after the bite, the patient developed an inferior left lateral homonymous quadranopsia with macular epargne. T2 magnetic resonance imaging showed a right occipital infarction. His condition improved clinically and biologically. This observation of snakebite is the first in which envenomation was accompanied exclusively by an impairment of the visual field. Envenomation by B. lanceolatus is distinct in its incidence of significant thrombotic complications at a distance from the site of the bite. PMID:16172485

  18. Post myocardial infarction cardiogenic shock: a review of current therapies.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ramford; Yeghiazarians, Yerem

    2013-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is often a devastating consequence of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and portends to significant mortality and morbidity. Despite improvements in expediting the time to treatment and enhancements in available medical therapy and reperfusion techniques, cardiogenic shock remains the most common cause of mortality following MI. Post-MI cardiogenic shock most commonly occurs as a consequence of severe left ventricular dysfunction. Right ventricular (RV) MI must also be considered. Mechanical complications including acute mitral regurgitation, ventricular septal rupture, and ventricular free-wall rupture can also lead to cardiogenic shock. Rapid diagnosis of cardiogenic shock and its underlying cause is pivotal to delivering definitive therapy. Intravenous vasoactive agents and mechanical support devices may temporize the patient's hemodynamic status until definitive therapy by percutaneous or surgical intervention can be performed. Despite prompt management, post-MI cardiogenic shock mortality remains high.

  19. Systemic Atherosclerotic Inflammation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Myocardial Infarction Begets Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil V; Toor, Iqbal; Shah, Anoop S V; Carruthers, Kathryn; Vesey, Alex T; Alam, Shirjel R; Sills, Andrew; Hoo, Teng Y; Melville, Adam J; Langlands, Sarah P; Jenkins, William S A; Uren, Neal G; Mills, Nicholas L; Fletcher, Alison M; van Beek, Edwin J R; Rudd, James H F; Fox, Keith A A; Dweck, Marc R; Newby, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that an acute inflammatory response following myocardial infarction (MI) accelerates systemic atherosclerosis. Using combined positron emission and computed tomography, we investigated whether this phenomenon occurs in humans. Methods and Results Overall, 40 patients with MI and 40 with stable angina underwent thoracic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined positron emission and computed tomography scan. Radiotracer uptake was measured in aortic atheroma and nonvascular tissue (paraspinal muscle). In 1003 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, we assessed whether infarct size predicted early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) recurrent coronary events. Compared with patients with stable angina, patients with MI had higher aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (tissue-to-background ratio 2.15±0.30 versus 1.84±0.18, P<0.0001) and plasma C-reactive protein concentrations (6.50 [2.00 to 12.75] versus 2.00 [0.50 to 4.00] mg/dL, P=0.0005) despite having similar aortic (P=0.12) and less coronary (P=0.006) atherosclerotic burden and similar paraspinal muscular 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (P=0.52). Patients with ST-segment elevation MI had larger infarcts (peak plasma troponin 32 300 [10 200 to >50 000] versus 3800 [1000 to 9200] ng/L, P<0.0001) and greater aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (2.24±0.32 versus 2.02±0.21, P=0.03) than those with non–ST-segment elevation MI. Peak plasma troponin concentrations correlated with aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (r=0.43, P=0.01) and, on multivariate analysis, independently predicted early (tertile 3 versus tertile 1: relative risk 4.40 [95% CI 1.90 to 10.19], P=0.001), but not late, recurrent MI. Conclusions The presence and extent of MI is associated with increased aortic atherosclerotic inflammation and early recurrent MI. This finding supports the hypothesis that acute MI exacerbates systemic atherosclerotic inflammation and remote plaque destabilization

  20. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with internal carotid artery dissection resulting from whiplash trauma.

    PubMed

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Freeman, Michael D; Webb, Alexandra L; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2015-12-01

    Spinal injury following inertial loading of the head and neck (whiplash) is a common sequel of low speed traffic crashes. A variety of non-musculoskeletal injuries have been described in association with injury to the spine following whiplash trauma, including traumatic brain injury, vestibular derangement, and cranial nerve injury, among others. Vascular injuries in the head and neck have, however, only rarely been described. We present the case of a middle-aged male who sustained an ultimately fatal injury that resulted from injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intracerebral vascular structures following a hard braking maneuver, with no direct head- or neck contact with the vehicular interior. Based on this unusual mechanism of injury we reviewed hospital data from the United States nationwide inpatient database (NIS) to assess the frequency of similar injuries reportedly resulting from traffic crashes. The post-mortem examination revealed a left internal carotid artery dissection associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the close temporal association, the absent prior history, and the plausibility of the injury mechanism, the injury was attributed to the braking maneuver. An analysis of NIS data demonstrated that the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage is significantly higher when there is a traumatic etiology, and higher yet when the trauma is a traffic crash (odds ratio 3.3 and 4.3, respectively). The presented case, together with the hospital inpatient data analysis, indicate that although SAH in combination with ICA dissection is relatively rare, it is substantially more probable following a traffic crash. In a clinical or forensic setting the inference that magnitude of a trauma was low should not serve as a basis for either excluding a cervical artery dissection from a differential diagnosis, or for excluding the trauma as a cause of a diagnosed dissection. This case report illustrates a rare fatal outcome of inertial load to

  1. SAHIT Investigators--on the outcome of some subarachnoid hemorrhage clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, R Loch; Jaja, Blessing; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Ilodigwe, Don; Lantigua, Hector; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schweizer, Tom A; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C; Singh, Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Outcome of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has improved over the last decades. Yet, case fatality remains nearly 40% and survivors often have permanent neurological, cognitive and/or behavioural sequelae. Other than nimodipine drug or clinical trials have not consistently improved outcome. We formed a collaboration of SAH investigators to create a resource for prognostic analysis and for studies aimed at optimizing the design and analysis of phase 3 trials in aneurysmal SAH. We identified investigators with data from randomized, clinical trials of patients with aneurysmal SAH or prospectively collected single- or multicentre databases of aneurysmal SAH patients. Data are being collected and proposals to use the data and to design future phase 3 clinical trials are being discussed. This paper reviews some issues discussed at the first meeting of the SAH international trialists (SAHIT) repository meeting. Investigators contributed or have agreed to contribute data from several phase 3 trials including the tirilazad trials, intraoperative hypothermia for aneurysmal SAH trial, nicardipine clinical trials, international subarachnoid aneurysm trial, intravenous magnesium sulphate for aneurysmal SAH, magnesium for aneurysmal SAH and from prospectively-collected data from four institutions. The number of patients should reach 15,000. Some industry investigators refused to provide data and others reported that their institutional research ethics boards would not permit even deidentified or anonymized data to be included. Others reported conflict of interest that prevented them from submitting data. The problems with merging data were related to lack of common definitions and coding of variables, differences in outcome scales used, and times of assessment. Some questions for investigation that arose are discussed. SAHIT demonstrates the possibility of SAH investigators to contribute data for collaborative research. The problems are similar to those

  2. [Stem cell perspectives in myocardial infarctions].

    PubMed

    Aceves, José Luis; Archundia, Abel; Díaz, Guillermo; Páez, Araceli; Masso, Felipe; Alvarado, Martha; López, Manuel; Aceves, Rocío; Ixcamparij, Carlos; Puente, Adriana; Vilchis, Rafael; Montaño, Luis Felipe

    2005-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of congestive heart failure and death in industrializated countries. The cellular cardiomyoplasty has emerged as an alternative treatment in the regeneration of infarted myocardial tissue. In animals' models, different cellular lines such as cardiomyocites, skeletal myoblasts, embryonic stem cells and adult mesenchymal stem cells have been used, resulting in an improvement in ventricular function and decrease in amount of infarcted tissue. The first three cells lines have disvantages as they are allogenics and are difficult to obtain. The adult mesenchymal stem cells are autologous and can be obtained throught the aspiration of bone marrow or from peripherical circulation, after stimulating with cytokines (G-CSF). The implantation in humans with recent and old myocardial infarction have shown improvements similar to those shown in animal models. These findings encourage the continued investigation in the mechanism of cellular differentiation and implantation methods in infarcted myocardial tissue.

  3. [ST myocardial infarction with spontaneous coronary reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Uriel, Nir; Moravsky, Gil; Blatt, Alex; Vered, Zvi; Krakover, Ricardo; Kaluski, Edo

    2006-05-01

    ST elevation myocardial infarction continues to be a major medical problem even in the beginning of the 21st century. Treatment guidelines for these patients are based on multiple randomized clinical trials. In order to minimize myocardial damage, early patency of the infarct relating artery must be accomplished. This is the major difference in the treatment strategy between ST elevation myocardial infarction and other acute coronary syndromes. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention and fibrinolysis are the two treatment modalities for achieving myocardial reperfusion. The subgroup of ST elevation myocardial infarction with spontaneous coronary artery reperfusion carries a more favorable prognosis. This review addresses the clinical characteristics, natural history, prognosis and treatment strategies for this group, with special emphasis on the optimal timing for revascularization, and the role of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors.

  4. Dopamine D2-Receptor-Mediated Increase in Vascular and Endothelial NOS Activity Ameliorates Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caudell, Danielle N.; Cooper, Matthew; Clark, Joseph F.; Shutter, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious complication resulting in delayed neurological deficit, increased morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stays, and rehabilitation time. It afflicts approximately 35 per 100,000 Americans per year, and there is currently no effective therapy. We present in vitro data suggesting that increasing intrinsic nitric oxide relaxation pathways in vascular smooth muscle via dopaminergic agonism ameliorates cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with cerebral vasospasm after SAH (CSFV) was used to induce vasospasm in porcine carotid artery in vitro. Dopamine was added to test its ability to reverse spasm, and specific dopamine receptor antagonists were used to determine which receptor mediated the protection. Immunohistochemical techniques confirmed the presence of dopamine receptor subtypes and the involvement of NOS in the mechanism of dopamine protection. Results Dopamine receptor 1, 2, and 3 subtypes are all present in porcine carotid artery. Dopamine significantly reversed spasm in vitro (67% relaxation), and this relaxation was prevented by Haloperidol, a D2R antagonist (10% relaxation, P < 0.05), but not by D1 or D3-receptor antagonism. Both eNOS and iNOS expression were increased significantly in response to CSFV alone, and this was significantly enhanced by addition of dopamine, and blocked by Haloperidol. Conclusion Cerebral vasospasm is significantly reversed in a functional measure of vasospasm in vitro by dopamine, via a D2R-mediated pathway. The increase in NOS protein seen in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle in response to CSFV is enhanced by dopamine, also in a D2R-dependent mechanism. PMID:18807216

  5. Effects of continuous prostacyclin infusion on regional blood flow and cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the main causes of mortality and morbidity following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the development of cerebral vasospasm, a frequent complication arising in the weeks after the initial bleeding. Despite extensive research, no effective treatment of vasospasm exists to date. Prostacyclin is a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation. In vitro models have shown a relaxing effect of prostacyclin after induced contraction in cerebral arteries, and a recent pilot trial showed a positive effect on cerebral vasospasm in a clinical setting. No randomized clinical trials have investigated the possible pharmacodynamic effects of prostacyclin on the human brain following SAH. Methods/Design This trial is a single centre, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, double blinded, clinical pilot trial. A total of 90 patients with SAH will be randomized to one of three intervention arms: epoprostenol at 1 ng/kg/min, epoprostenol at 2 ng/kg/min, or placebo in addition to the standard treatment. Trial medication will start on Day 5 after SAH and continue to Day 10. The primary outcome measure is changes in cerebral blood flow measured by a computed tomography (CT) perfusion scan. The secondary outcomes are vasospasm measured by a CT angiography, regional blood flow, clinical symptoms of cerebral ischemia, and outcome at three months (Glasgow Outcome Scale). Discussion The primary outcome has been altered slightly since the publication of our study protocol. Global cerebral blood flow is now primary outcome, whereas regional blood flow is a secondary outcome. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01447095. Registration date: 11 October 2011. PMID:24929796

  6. Stent-Grafts in the Management of Hemorrhagic Complications Related to Hemostatic Closure Devices: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Giansante Abud, Daniel; Mounayer, Charbel; Saint-Maurice, Jean Pierre; Salles Rezende, Marco Tulio; Houdart, Emmanuel; Moret, Jacques

    2007-02-15

    We report 2 cases of hemorrhagic complications related to use of the Angio-Seal hemostatic closure device that were successfully managed with stent-grafts. Two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage were referred to our departments for endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The treatment was performed through a femoral access; the sheaths were removed immediately after the procedures, and the punctures sites closed by Angio-Seals. Both patients presented clinical signs of hypovolemic shock after treatment. The diagnosis of active bleeding through the puncture site was made by emergency digital subtraction angiography. The lesions were managed with stent-grafts. The use of stent-grafts proved to be efficient in the management of these life-threatening hemorrhagic complications following the use of the Angio-Seal hemostatic closure device.

  7. [Real world study of Dengzhan xixin injection in treatment of cerebral infarction with medication].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Cheng, Hao; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2014-09-01

    To analysis of Dengzhan Xixin injection (DZI) in treatment of cerebral infarction (EBHM) in the real world population characteristics and concomitant medication. By selecting the 20 hospital information system (HIS) used in the database of DZI and primary diagnosis of 2 484 cases of cerebral infarction patients information, use the Apriori algorithm to construct the model, using Clementine 12.0 analysis, cerebral infarction complicating diseases, commonly used drug combination analysis of DZI. The results showed that patients with more males than females (1.63: 1); age > 46 in older persons, treatment 7-14 days accounted for the majority of patients with hypertension, cerebral infarction, diabetes, coronary heart disease and other diseases; common drug combination can be divided into seven categories: medicine of antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel hydrogen), hypolipidemic drugs (atorvastatin, probucol), calcium channel blockers (cinepazide), cerebral protection drugs (laci staw), to improve cerebral circulation drugs (alprostadil), other traditional Chinese medicine injection (Shuxuetong injection, Xueshuantong), treatment with underlying disease: nifedipine, metoprolol, isosorbide dinitrate etc. The clinical cure rate and improvement rate of 97.60%. The next step needs to be combined with clinical practice, carry out analysis of effectiveness and safety of the combination scheme, and provide reference for clinical rational drug use.

  8. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  9. Ventricular function and infarct size: the Western Washington Intravenous Streptokinase in Myocardial Infarction Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Cerqueira, M.; Maynard, C.; Davis, K.; Kennedy, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    The Western Washington Intravenous Streptokinase in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial randomized 368 patients with symptoms and signs of acute myocardial infarction of less than 6 h duration to either conventional care or 1.5 million units of intravenous streptokinase. The mean time to randomization was 209 min and 52% of patients were randomized within 3 h of symptom onset. Quantitative, tomographic thallium-201 infarct size and radionuclide ejection fraction were measured at 8.2 +/- 7.5 weeks in 207 survivors who lived within a 100 mile radius of a centralized laboratory. Overall, infarct size as a percent of the left ventricle was 19 +/- 13% for control subjects and 15 +/- 13% for treatment patients (p = 0.03). For anterior infarction in patients entered within 3 h of symptom onset, infarct size was 28 +/- 13% in the control group versus 19 +/- 15% for the treatment group (p = 0.09). Left ventricular ejection fraction was 47 +/- 15% in the control versus 51 +/- 15% in the treatment group (p = 0.08). For anterior infarction of less than 3 h duration, the ejection fraction was 38 +/- 16% in the control versus 48 +/- 20% in the treatment group (p = 0.13). By statistical analysis incorporating the nonsurvivors, p values for all of these variables were less than or equal to 0.08. There was no benefit for patients with inferior infarction or for anterior infarction of greater than 3 h duration. It is concluded that intravenous streptokinase, when given within 3 h of symptom onset to patients with anterior infarction, reduces infarct size and improves ventricular function.

  10. A somatic component to myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, A S; DeBias, D A; Ehrenfeuchter, W; England, K M; England, R W; Greene, C H; Heilig, D; Kirschbaum, M

    1985-01-01

    Sixty two patients were randomised to be seen by osteopathic physicians for palpation of the thoracic paravertebral soft tissue, T1-T8. Twenty five patients had clinically confirmed acute myocardial infarction. Of the remainder, 22 without known cardiovascular disease served as controls and 15 were placed in an excluded group because of diagnosed cardiovascular disease other than myocardial infarction. Observations were described in predetermined standard terminology. The control group was found to have a low incidence of palpable changes throughout the thoracic dorsum, and these changes were uniformly distributed from T1 to T8. Examination of the group with myocardial infarction disclosed a significantly higher incidence of soft tissue changes (increased firmness, warmth, ropiness, oedematous changes, heavy musculature), confined almost entirely to the upper four thoracic levels. The 15 patients who were excluded from the experimental group because they had various cardiovascular diseases other than myocardial infarction also showed significantly different changes on palpation compared with the group with myocardial infarction. These findings suggest that myocardial infarction is accompanied by characteristic paravertebral soft tissue changes which are readily detected by palpation. PMID:3926040

  11. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  12. Intraoperative anesthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Milam, S B

    1987-01-01

    Intraoperative anesthetic complications can be prevented or minimized if the anesthetist is able to anticipate such problems in the preanesthetic period. Therefore, an adequate preanesthetic medical history that includes previous anesthetic experiences and past and current drug therapy is extremely important. Furthermore, the anesthetist must be properly trained to anticipate undesirable reactions to anesthetic agents. The signs of an impending disaster are subtle and nonspecific in the anesthetized patient. Therefore, continuous vigilance of the patient's physiologic status coupled with a high index of suspicion are essential to safe anesthetic management of dental patients. PMID:3468015

  13. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  14. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  15. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  16. [Acute complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Obel, E

    1976-02-01

    The complications accompanying the various methods of abortion as studied in different surveys are reported. In studies of dilation and curettage (D and C) and vaccuum aspiration (VA), lethality ranges from .5 to 2.9 deaths/100,000 cases. Metrorrhagia occurred in 2.5-6% of the D and C cases studied and in 2.9-3.5% of the VA cases. The bleeding was accompanied by infection in most cases where abortive tissue remained in the uterus, which occured in .4-.8% of the D and C cases and in .6-.9% of the VA cases studied. Postabortive bleeding occurred through the 10th day in up to 25% of the patients and was related to the length of the gestation period before abortion. Pelvic infection, mostly of the endometrium, occurred in about 1.4% of the D and C patients and in .3-1.2% of the VA patients. 1.4% of the D and C patients and .6% of the VA patients experienced a rise in body temperature as the only complication of abortion. Perforation of the uterus occurred in about .8% of the D and C patients and in .1-.6% of VA patients. Lesions of the cervix had to be sutured in .1% of the D and C group and .3% of the VA group. Saline instillation, used for abortions in the second trimest er, had a mortality rate of about 20/100,000 cases. Since the success rate of saline instillation is 90-98%, complications are more frequent, often requiring treatment with oxytocin or curettage. Extensive bleeding occurred in 2.3-4%. Curettage of the placenta was required in about 2.1-16.9% of the cases. Pelvic inflammation occurred in about 2.5% and temperature elevation in 1-3.4%. Abdominal hysterotomies had a lethality of 208/100,000. Pelvic hemorrhage occurred in 31%, inflammation in 4.7%, temperature elevation in 13%, and febrile reactions in 31% of the abdominal hysterotomies studied. It is necessary to establish international definitions of abortion complications for better documentation, and postoperative observations should be recorded more conscientiously. PMID:1251502

  17. Altered Resting-State Connectivity within Executive Networks after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Monica; Churchill, Nathan W.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Graham, Simon J.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with significant mortality rates, and most survivors experience significant cognitive deficits across multiple domains, including executive function. It is critical to determine the neural basis for executive deficits in aSAH, in order to better understand and improve patient outcomes. This study is the first examination of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a group of aSAH patients, used to characterize changes in functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network. We scanned 14 aSAH patients and 14 healthy controls, and divided patients into “impaired” and “unimpaired” groups based on a composite executive function score. Impaired patients exhibited significantly lower quality of life and neuropsychological impairment relative to controls, across multiple domains. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that unimpaired patients were not significantly different from controls, but impaired patients had increased frontoparietal connectivity. Patients evidenced increased frontoparietal connectivity as a function of decreased executive function and decreased mood (i.e. quality of life). In addition, T1 morphometric analysis demonstrated that these changes are not attributable to local cortical atrophy among aSAH patients. These results establish significant, reliable changes in the endogenous brain dynamics of aSAH patients, that are related to cognitive and mood outcomes. PMID:26172281

  18. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS-2) in subarachnoid hemorrhage: Regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sana; Hayman, Erik G; Hong, Caron; Stokum, Jesse A; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) typically carries a poor prognosis. Growing evidence indicates that overabundant production of nitric oxide (NO) may be responsible for a large part of the secondary injury that follows SAH. Although SAH modulates the activity of all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the inducible isoform, NOS-2, accounts for a majority of NO-mediated secondary injuries after SAH. Here, we review the indispensable physiological roles of NO that must be preserved, even while attempting to downmodulate the pathophysiologic effects of NO that are induced by SAH. We examine the effects of SAH on the function of the various NOS isoforms, with a particular focus on the pathological effects of NOS-2 and on the mechanisms responsible for its transcriptional upregulation. Finally, we review interventions to block NOS-2 upregulation or to counteract its effects, with an emphasis on the potential therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes in patients afflicted with SAH. There is still much to be learned regarding the apparently maladaptive response of NOS-2 and its harmful product NO in SAH. However, the available evidence points to crucial effects that, on balance, are adverse, making the NOS-2/NO/peroxynitrite axis an attractive therapeutic target in SAH. PMID:27774520

  20. Protective effect 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol in subarachnoid hemorrhage provoked oxidative neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu-Wen; Wu, Juan; Hu, Hua-Long; Li, Wei-Xin; Zhong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with fatal outcomes. Oxidative stress and brain edema are the characteristic pathological events in occurrence EBI following SAH. The present study aimed to examine the effect of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) against SAH-induced EBI, and to demonstrate whether the effect is associated with its potent free radical scavenging property. SAH was induced in rats using an endovascular perforation technique, and 24 h later the rats displayed diminished neurological scores and brain edema. Furthermore, elevated malondialdehyde (an index of lipid peroxidation) and depleted levels of antioxidants were observed in the rat cerebral cortex tissue. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated the upregulated mRNA expression of the apoptotic markers caspase-3 and −9 in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were significantly upregulated in SAH-induced rats. By constrast, treatment with DOPET significantly attenuated EBI by reducing brain edema, elevation of antioxidant status, inhibition of apoptosis and inflammation. In this context, DOPET may be a potent agent in the treatment of EBI following SAH, as a result of its free radical scavenging capacity. PMID:27588109