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Sample records for infected checken embryo

  1. GROWTH REGULATION IN RSV INFECTED CHECKEN EMBRYO FIBROBLASTS: THE ROLE OF THE src GENE

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Bartholomew, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-03-01

    The relationship between growth regulation and cell transformation has been studied in many cultured cell lines transformed by a range of oncogenic agents. The main conclusion derived from these investigations is that the nature of the growth regulatory lesion in transformed cells is a function of the agent used to induce transformation. For example, when 3T3 fibroblasts are rendered stationary by serum deprivation, normal cells accumulate in G{sub 1} but SV40 transformed cells are arrested at all stages of the cell cycle. In contrast, 3T3 cells transformed with Rous sarcoma virus B77, accumulate in G{sub 1} upon serum deprivation. This is also true when mouse sarcoma virus (MSV) is used as the transforming agent. MSV-transformed cells accumulate in G{sub 1}, just as do normal cells. In this letter we report a detailed study of the mechanisms leading to loss of growth control in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). We have been particularly concerned with the role of the src gene in the process, and have used RSV mutants temperature sensitive (ts) for transformation to investigate the nature of the growth regulatory lesion. Two principal findings have emerged: (a) the stationary phase of the cell cycle (G{sub 1}) in chick embryo fibroblasts has two distinct compartments, (for simplicity referred to as G{sub 1} and G{sub 0} states), (b) when rendered stationary at 41.5{sup o} by serum deprivation, normal cells enter a G{sub 0}-like state, but cells infected with the ts-mutant occupy a G{sub 1} state, even though a known src gene product, a kinase, should be inactive at this temperature. The possibility is discussed that viral factors other than the active src protein kinase influence growth control.

  2. Zebrafish embryo model of Bartonella henselae infection.

    PubMed

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K; Anderson, Burt

    2014-10-01

    Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)(y1) zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis.

  3. Zebrafish Embryo Model of Bartonella henselae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J.; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)y1 zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis. PMID:25026365

  4. Pathology of goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus infection in goose embryos.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, Sándor; Farsang, Attila; Kovács, Andrea; Nagy, Edith; Dobos-Kovács, Mihály

    2006-02-01

    Goose embryos were infected with goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) onto the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in order to examine the effect of GHPV on the embryos and to obtain data on whether embryos could develop into infected, virus-shedding goslings, as well as to present an accurate biological method for virus titration. The reported method of infection could offer a possibility to express the virus titre as the median embryo infective dose (EID(50)). As a special pathological feature of the disease, extensive cerebral haemorrhages were observed, which protruded the skullcap in many cases. Some embryos infected with 10(1.25) or 10(0.25) EID(50)/0.2 ml were able to hatch; however, they were in poor physical condition and died by post-hatching day 4 showing haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of geese. Virus shedding was revealed by polymerase chain reaction. The ability of some of the infected goose embryos to hatch may indicate the potency of GHPV to spread vertically, although this needs further study for confirmation.

  5. INFECTIVITY OF METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE IN GRASS SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing embryos of the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, were exposed to Metarhizium anisopliae conidiospores. Attachment of conidiospores was often followed by germination and outgrowth on embryo surface. Penetration of the embryonic envelopes by M. anisopliae allow...

  6. Kinetic Study of Yellow Fever 17DD Viral Infection in Gallus gallus domesticus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; E. P. Dias de Oliveira, Bárbara Cristina; Carvalho de Sequeira, Patrícia; Rodrigues Maia de Souza, Yuli; dos Santos Ferro, Jessica Maria; da Silva, Igor José; Gonçalves Caputo, Luzia Fátima; Tavares Guedes, Priscila; Araujo Cunha dos Santos, Alexandre; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo Machado, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever continues to be an important epidemiological problem in Africa and South America even though the disease can be controlled by vaccination. The vaccine has been produced since 1937 and is based on YFV 17DD chicken embryo infection. However, little is known about the histopathological background of virus infection and replication in this model. Here we show by morphological and molecular methods (brightfield and confocal microscopies, immunofluorescence, nested-PCR and sequencing) the kinetics of YFV 17DD infection in chicken embryos with 9 days of development, encompassing 24 to 96 hours post infection. Our principal findings indicate that the main cells involved in virus production are myoblasts with a mesenchymal shape, which also are the first cells to express virus proteins in Gallus gallus embryos at 48 hours after infection. At 72 hours post infection, we observed an increase of infected cells in embryos. Many sites are thus affected in the infection sequence, especially the skeletal muscle. We were also able to confirm an increase of nervous system infection at 96 hours post infection. Our data contribute to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of YF 17DD virus infection in Gallus gallus embryos. PMID:27158977

  7. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos.

    PubMed

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C E P; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  8. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  9. Growth and infectivity assays of the Israeli vaccine strain of fowl poxvirus in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hashavya, Saar; Barchichat, Sabrina; Katz, Ehud

    2002-01-01

    The Israeli vaccine strain of fowl poxvirus grows efficiently in chicken embryo fibroblasts but not in cell lines derived from monkey kidney or human fibroblasts. We developed two assays for the titration of the infectivity of this virus in secondary cultures of chicken embryo fibroblasts. The first is a focus assay, in which minimum essential medium and SeaKem ME agarose were used for the overlay media. Under these conditions, clear virus foci appeared after 5 days of incubation at 37 C. The second assay is a semiautomatic colorimetric test based on the ability of live cells in culture to reduce the yellow tetrazolium salt 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT; thiazolyl blue) to its formazan derivative. The reagent was added to infected chicken embryo fibroblasts in 96-well plates 10 days after infection. The formazan formed during 2 hr was extracted with dimethyl sulfoxide, and its absorbance was read by an automatic microplate spectrophotometer. A good correlation of the infectivity titers of the virus was obtained by the two methods.

  10. Micro-Raman spectroscopy study of ALVAC virus infected chicken embryo cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Hu, Ningjie; Dykes, Ava C.; Yu, Qigui; Zinin, Pavel V.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Micro- Raman spectroscopic investigation of ALVAC virus and of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells and the cells infected with ALVAC virus labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) were performed with a 785 nm laser. Good quality Micro-Raman spectra of the Alvac II virus were obtained. These spectra show that the ALVAC II virus contains buried tyrosine residues and the coat protein of the virus has α-helical structure. A comparison of Raman spectra of normal and virus infected chicken embryo fibroblast cells revealed that the virus infected cells show additional bands at 535, 928, and 1091 cm-1, respectively, corresponding to δ(C-O-C) glycosidic ring, protein α-helix, and DNA (O-P-O) modes. In addition, the tyrosine resonance double (833 and 855 cm-1) shows reversal in the intensity of the higher-frequency band as compared to the normal cells that can be used to identify the infected cells. In the C-H stretching region, the infected cells show bands with higher intensity as compared to that of the corresponding bands in the normal cells. We also found that the presence of GFP does not affect the Raman spectra of samples when using a 785 nm micro-Raman system because the green fluorescence wavelength of GFP is well below the Stokes-Raman shifted spectral region.

  11. Microbial Infections Are Associated with Embryo Mortality in Arctic-Nesting Geese

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Cristina M.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Van Hemert, Caroline; Hare, Rebekah F.

    2015-01-01

    To address the role of bacterial infection in hatching failure of wild geese, we monitored embryo development in a breeding population of Greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. During 2013, we observed mortality of normally developing embryos and collected 36 addled eggs for analysis. We also collected 17 infertile eggs for comparison. Using standard culture methods and gene sequencing to identify bacteria within collected eggs, we identified a potentially novel species of Neisseria in 33 eggs, Macrococcus caseolyticus in 6 eggs, and Streptococcus uberis and Rothia nasimurium in 4 eggs each. We detected seven other bacterial species at lower frequencies. Sequences of the 16S rRNA genes from the Neisseria isolates most closely matched sequences from N. animaloris and N. canis (96 to 97% identity), but phylogenetic analysis suggested substantial genetic differentiation between egg isolates and known Neisseria species. Although definitive sources of the bacteria remain unknown, we detected Neisseria DNA from swabs of eggshells, nest contents, and cloacae of nesting females. To assess the pathogenicity of bacteria identified in contents of addled eggs, we inoculated isolates of Neisseria, Macrococcus, Streptococcus, and Rothia at various concentrations into developing chicken eggs. Seven-day mortality rates varied from 70 to 100%, depending on the bacterial species and inoculation dose. Our results suggest that bacterial infections are a source of embryo mortality in wild geese in the Arctic. PMID:26048928

  12. Microsatellite instability in Marek’s Disease Virus infected primary chicken embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Marek’s disease virus (MDV), an oncogenic α-herpes virus, causes a devastating disease in chickens characterized by development of lymphoblastoid tumors in multiple organs. Microsatellite instability (MSI), a symptom of defect in DNA mismatch repair function, is a form of genomic instability frequently detected in many types of tumors. However, the involvement of MSI in MDV-infected cells has not been investigated. In this study, we determined the presence and frequency of MSI in primary chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with or without MDV strain in vitro. Results 118 distinct microsatellite markers were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 21 samples. MSI was found in 91 of 118 markers, and 12 out of 118 demonstrated frequency of MSI at ≥ 40%. 27 of 118 microsatellite loci did not show microsatellite instability. Conclusions These findings showed that MSI was a real event occurring in primary chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with MDV in vitro as evidenced by the high frequency of MSI, and may be specifically associated with genome alteration of host cells during MDV infected. PMID:22967357

  13. GROWTH REGULATION IN ROUS SARCOMA VIRUS INFECTED CHICKEN EMBRYO FIBROBLASTS: THE ROLE OF THE src GENE

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Bartholomew, J.A.; Blssell, M.J.

    1980-07-01

    We report here a study of the mechanisms leading to loss of growth control in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). We have been particularly concerned with the role of the src gene in this process, and have used RSV mutants temperature sensitive (ts) for transformation to investigate the nature of the growth regulatory lesion. The two principal findings were (1) the stationary phase of the cell cycle (G{sub 1}) in chick embryo fibroblasts seems to have two distinct regulatory compartments (using the terminology of Brooks et al. we refer to these as 'Q' and 'A' states). When rendered stationary at 41.5 C by serum deprivation, normal cells enter a Q state, but cells infected with the ts-mutant occupy an A state. (2) Whereas normal cells can occupy either state depending on culture conditions, the ts-infected cells, at 41.5 C, do not seem to enter Q even though a known src gene product, a kinase, is reported to be inactive at this temperature. We discuss the possibility that viral factors other than the active src protein kinase influence growth control in infected cultures.

  14. Microbial infections are associated with embryo mortality in Arctic-nesting geese.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Cristina M.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Hare, Rebekah F.; Hueffer, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    To address the role of bacterial infection in hatching failure of wild geese, we monitored embryo development in a breeding population of Greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. During 2013, we observed mortality of normally developing embryos and collected 36 addled eggs for analysis. We also collected 17 infertile eggs for comparison. Using standard culture methods and gene sequencing to identify bacteria within collected eggs, we identified a potentially novel species of Neisseria in 33 eggs, Macrococcus caseolyticus in 6 eggs, and Streptococcus uberis and Rothia nasimurium in 4 eggs each. We detected seven other bacterial species at lower frequencies. Sequences of the 16S rRNA genes from the Neisseria isolates most closely matched sequences from N. animaloris and N. canis (96 to 97% identity), but phylogenetic analysis suggested substantial genetic differentiation between egg isolates and known Neisseria species. Although definitive sources of the bacteria remain unknown, we detected Neisseria DNA from swabs of eggshells, nest contents, and cloacae of nesting females. To assess the pathogenicity of bacteria identified in contents of addled eggs, we inoculated isolates of Neisseria, Macrococcus, Streptococcus, and Rothia at various concentrations into developing chicken eggs. Seven-day mortality rates varied from 70 to 100%, depending on the bacterial species and inoculation dose. Our results suggest that bacterial infections are a source of embryo mortality in wild geese in the Arctic.    

  15. Failure of in vitro fertilization and embryo replacement following infection with Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Rowland, G F; Forsey, T; Moss, T R; Steptoe, P C; Hewitt, J; Darougar, S

    1985-09-01

    Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis were detected in 54 (47.4%) of 114 infertile women attending Bourn Hall Clinic. Antibodies were solely of the IgG class and mainly of a low titer, suggesting past infection. Antibodies were found in significantly more patients with tubal damage (54.4%) than in women whose infertility was due to other causes (16.6%). Seventy-two women completed in vitro fertilization, with 52 having three embryos replaced. We found that this treatment offered the optimum chance of a pregnancy being established, and 20 (38.5%) of these women became pregnant. Antibodies to C. trachomatis were present in only six (30.0%) of the women becoming pregnant, whereas antibodies were found in 21 (65.6%) of those who failed to become pregnant. Thus past infection with C. trachomatis halved the success rate of in vitro fertilization in these patients. The implications of these findings are relevant to all aspects of infertility from prevention to in vitro fertilization treatment.

  16. Nervous necrosis virus replicates following the embryo development and dual infection with iridovirus at juvenile stage in grouper.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Wang, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Hao-Hsuan; Chen, Peng-Peng; Lee, Szu-Hsien; Chen, Young-Mao; Tsai, Tieh-Jung; Wang, Chien-Kai; Ku, Hsiao-Tung; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2012-01-01

    Infection of virus (such as nodavirus and iridovirus) and bacteria (such as Vibrio anguillarum) in farmed grouper has been widely reported and caused large economic losses to Taiwanese fish aquaculture industry since 1979. The multiplex assay was used to detect dual viral infection and showed that only nervous necrosis virus (NNV) can be detected till the end of experiments (100% mortality) once it appeared. In addition, iridovirus can be detected in a certain period of rearing. The results of real-time PCR and in situ PCR indicated that NNV, in fact, was not on the surface of the eggs but present in the embryo, which can continue to replicate during the embryo development. The virus may be vertically transmitted by packing into eggs during egg development (formation) or delivering into eggs by sperm during fertilization. The ozone treatment of eggs may fail to remove the virus, so a new strategy to prevent NNV is needed. PMID:22563447

  17. Detection of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) glycoprotein D in MDV1-infected chick embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ono, M; Jang, H K; Maeda, K; Kawaguchi, Y; Tohya, Y; Niikura, M; Mikami, T

    1996-08-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) infected with three strains of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1), GA, Md5 and JM, were subjected to indirect immunofluorescence assay with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against MDV1 homolog of glycoprotein D (MDV1 gD) of herpes simplex virus. By the MAbs, a number of MDV1 gD-positive cells were detected in CEFs infected with GA, whereas only a few and no positive cells were detected in CEFs infected with Md5 and JM, respectively. The MDV1 gD in GA-infected CEFs was recognized as the band of 64 kDa in immunoblot analysis using one of the MAbs. This is the first report that the MDV1 gD was detected in MDV1-infected cell cultures.

  18. Reference gene selection for normalization of PCR analysis in chicken embryo fibroblast infected with H5N1 AIV.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hua; Lei, Xiao-wen; Yang, Fa-long; Li, Ming-yi; Tang, Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) are among the most commonly used cells for the study of interactions between chicken hosts and H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV). In this study, the expression of eleven housekeeping genes typically used for the normalization of quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) analysis in mammals were compared in CEFs infected with H5N1 AIV to determine the most reliable reference genes in this system. CEFs cultured from 10-day-old SPF chicken embryos were infected with 100 TCID(50) of H5N1 AIV and harvested at 3, 12, 24 and 30 hours post-infection. The expression levels of the eleven reference genes in infected and uninfected CEFs were determined by real-time PCR. Based on expression stability and expression levels, our data suggest that the ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ) are the best reference genes to use in the study of host cell response to H5N1 AIV infection. However, for the study of replication levels of H5N1 AIV in CEFs, the β-actin gene (ACTB) and the ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) gene are the best references.

  19. Associations of chicken Mx1 polymorphism with antiviral responses in avian influenza virus infected embryos and broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Brahmakshatriya, V; Lupiani, B; Reddy, S; Okimoto, R; Li, X; Chiang, H; Zhou, H

    2012-12-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is a major respiratory disease of poultry that causes catastrophic losses to the poultry industry. The Mx protein has been shown to confer antiviral responses to influenza viruses in mice. One nonsynonymous substitution (S631N) in the chicken Mx protein is reported to be associated with resistance to AIV infection in vitro. The previous studies suggested controversy over whether this substitution in the Mx protein plays an important antiviral role in AIV infection in the chicken. It would be intriguing to investigate if the substitution is associated with resistance to AIV infection both in ovo and in vivo in chickens. In this study, the embryos and young chicks were generated from the cross of Mx1 heterozygous (S631N) parents with an expected segregating ratio of 1:2:1 in the progeny. A PCR length polymorphism was developed to genotype the Mx1 gene from 119 embryos and 48 chickens. The embryonated chicken eggs were inoculated with 10(6) 50% embryo infectious dose (EID(50)) H5N9 AIV on d 13. Hemagglutinating units in allantoic fluid were determined at 48 h postinoculation. For the in vivo study, twenty-four 1-wk-old broilers were inoculated with 10(6) EID(50) H5N3, and virus titers in lungs were evaluated at d 4 postinoculation. This is the first report revealing no significant association between Mx1 genotypes and low pathogenesis AIV infection both in ovo and in vivo in the chicken. Total RNA samples were isolated from chicken lung tissues in the in vivo study, and the Mx1 mRNA expression assay among 3 genotypes also suggested that only heterozygote birds had significantly greater expression with AIV infection than noninfected birds. A recombination breakpoint within Mx1 gene was also first identified, which has laid a solid foundation for further understanding biological function of the Mx1 gene in chickens. The current study provides valuable information on the effect of the Mx1 gene on the genetic resistance to AIV in chickens, and

  20. Effect of road deicing salt on the susceptibility of amphibian embryos to infection by water molds.

    PubMed

    Karraker, Nancy E; Ruthig, Gregory R

    2009-01-01

    Some causative agents of amphibian declines act synergistically to impact individual amphibians and their populations. In particular, pathogenic water molds (aquatic oomycetes) interact with environmental stressors and increase mortality in amphibian embryos. We documented colonization of eggs of three amphibian species, the wood frog (Rana sylvatica), the green frog (Rana clamitans), and the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), by water molds in the field and examined the interactive effects of road deicing salt and water molds, two known sources of mortality for amphibian embryos, on two species, R. clamitans and A. maculatum in the laboratory. We found that exposure to water molds did not affect embryonic survivorship in either A. maculatum or R. clamitans, regardless of the concentration of road salt to which their eggs were exposed. Road salt decreased survivorship of A. maculatum, but not R. clamitans, and frequency of malformations increased significantly in both species at the highest salinity concentration. The lack of an effect of water molds on survival of embryos and no interaction between road salt and water molds indicates that observations of colonization of these eggs by water molds in the field probably represent a secondary invasion of unfertilized eggs or of embryos that had died of other causes. Given increasing salinization of freshwater habitats on several continents and the global distribution of water molds, our results suggest that some amphibian species may not be susceptible to the combined effects of these factors, permitting amphibian decline researchers to devote their attention to other potential causes.

  1. Glycoprotein C plays a role in the adsorption of duck enteritis virus to chicken embryo fibroblasts cells and in infectivity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaokun; Zou, Zhong; Jin, Meilin

    2013-06-01

    Unlike glycoprotein C (gC) of many mammalian herpes viruses, gC of some avian herpes viruses does not play a principle role in the binding of virus to heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface. The roles of duck enteritis virus (DEV) gC on viral attachment remained unclear. In this study, we showed that gC expressed in vitro could bind to chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) cells and inhibit the adsorption of duck enteritis virus (DEV) onto CEF cells effectively and antiserum directed against gC inhibited the infection of DEV. Furthermore, it was confirmed that gC protein expressed in baculovirus system did not bind to heparin-Sepharose beads and virus binding to cells were independent of heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the surface of cells. Therefore, gC contributes to adsorption and infection of DEV.

  2. Epicatechin gallate, a naturally occurring polyphenol, alters the course of infection with β-lactam-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Christina S.; Rosado, Helena; Harvey, Robert J.; Taylor, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg) substantially modifies the properties of Staphylococcus aureus and reversibly abrogates β-lactam resistance in methicillin/oxacillin resistant (MRSA) isolates. We have determined the capacity of ECg to alter the course of infection in zebrafish embryos challenged with epidemic clinical isolate EMRSA-16. At 30 h post fertilization (hpf), embryos were infected by injection of 1–5 × 103 colony forming units (CFU) of EMRSA-16 into the circulation valley or yolk sac. Infection by yolk sac injection was lethal with a challenge dose above 3 × 103 CFU, with no survivors at 70 hpf. In contrast, survival at 70 hpf after injection into the circulation was 83 and 44% following challenge with 3 × 103 and 1–5 × 103 CFU, respectively. No significant increases in survival were noted when infected embryos were maintained in medium containing 12.5–100 μg/mL ECg with or without 4 or 16 μg/mL oxacillin. However, when EMRSA-16 was grown in medium containing 12.5 μg/mL ECg and the bacteria used to infect embryos by either the circulation valley or yolk sac, there were significant increases in embryo survival in both the presence and absence of oxacillin. ECg-modified and unmodified, GFP-transformed EMRSA-16 bacteria were visualized within phagocytic cells in the circulation and yolk sac; pre-treatment with ECg also significantly increased induction of the respiratory burst and suppressed increases in IL-1β expression typical of infection with untreated EMRSA-16. We conclude that exposure to ECg prior to infection reduces the lethality of EMRSA-16, renders cells more susceptible to elimination by immune processes and compromises their capacity to establish an inflammatory response in comparison to non-exposed bacteria. PMID:26441953

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Host Gene Expression in Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Strain HA1101.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Bao, Yanqing; Ye, Jianqiang; Shao, Hongxia; Qian, Kun; Qin, Aijian

    2015-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a member of the Gammaretrovirus genus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic and runting-stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. To better understand the host interactions at the transcriptional level, microarray data analysis was performed in chicken embryo fibroblast cells at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after infection with REV. This study identified 1,785 differentially expressed genes that were classified into several functional groups including signal transduction, immune response, biological adhesion and endocytosis. Significant differences were mainly observed in the expression of genes involved in the immune response, especially during the later post-infection time points. These results revealed that differentially expressed genes IL6, STAT1, MyD88, TLRs, NF-κB, IRF-7, and ISGs play important roles in the pathogenicity of REV infection. Our study is the first to use microarray analysis to investigate REV, and these findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of the host antiviral response and the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis.

  4. Transcriptional Profiling of Host Gene Expression in Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Strain HA1101

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ji; Bao, Yanqing; Ye, Jianqiang; Shao, Hongxia; Qian, Kun; Qin, Aijian

    2015-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a member of the Gammaretrovirus genus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic and runting-stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. To better understand the host interactions at the transcriptional level, microarray data analysis was performed in chicken embryo fibroblast cells at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after infection with REV. This study identified 1,785 differentially expressed genes that were classified into several functional groups including signal transduction, immune response, biological adhesion and endocytosis. Significant differences were mainly observed in the expression of genes involved in the immune response, especially during the later post-infection time points. These results revealed that differentially expressed genes IL6, STAT1, MyD88, TLRs, NF-κB, IRF-7, and ISGs play important roles in the pathogenicity of REV infection. Our study is the first to use microarray analysis to investigate REV, and these findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of the host antiviral response and the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. PMID:25973612

  5. Susceptibility of zona-intact and zona-free in vitro-produced bovine embryos at different stages of development to infection with bovine herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Vanroose, G; Nauwynck, H; Van Soom, A; Vanopdenbosch, E; de Kruif, A

    1997-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if BHV-1 is able to replicate within in vitro produced embryos and to investigate the degree to which the zona pellucida (ZP) is able to protect in vitro produced embryos against infection with BHV-1. Both ZP-intact and ZP-free matured oocytes, zygotes (1 d post insemination; 1dpi), 8-cell stage embryos (3 dpi), morulae (6 dpi) were incubated for 1 h in 1 ml of MEM containing 10(7.7) TCID(50)/ml BHV-1 (Cooper strain). Three titers (10(5.7), 10(6.7) and 10(7.7) TCID(50)/ml) of the Cooper strain were used for incubation of hatched blastocysts (9 dpi). Bovine embryonic lung cells (BEL) on microcarriers were inoculated following the same protocol as for the embryos. At 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h post inoculation (hpi), groups of embryos and BEL cells were collected for virus titration and for the determination of the percentage of viral antigen positive cells by immunofluorescence. For the 3 developmental stages in ZP-free embryos, similar maximal intracellular virus progeny titers were obtained at 24 to 48 hpi ranging from 10(1.32) to 10(1.43) TCID(50)/ 100 embryonic cells. The intracellular virus titer in the BEL cells peaked at 10(3.08) TCID(50)/ 100 BEL cells. The percentage of cells which expressed viral antigens was 13% in ZP-free hatched blastocysts, 17% in ZP-free morulae and 100% in BEL cells. In ZP-intact embryos, no replication of BHV-1 was detected. These results clearly show that only after removal of the zona pellucida, BHV-1 is able to replicate within the in vitro produced embryos, with only a subset of embryonic cells being fully susceptible.

  6. The isolation and culture of DHBV-infected embryo and duckling hepatocytes and the effect of aflatoxin B1 or irradiation on these cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olubuyide, I. O.; Judah, D. J.; Riley, J.; Neal, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The preparation of primary cultures of control and DHBV-infected duck hepatocytes from embryos and young ducklings is described. Cultures of both embryo and duckling hepatocytes secreted duck serum proteins. Cultures of hepatocytes established from ducklings maintained initial morphology for up to 3 weeks in culture and also exhibited high levels of metabolism of aflatoxin B1. Embryonic cell cultures rapidly lost ability to metabolise AFB1 and became overgrown by spindle-shaped cells. Both embryo and duckling cell cultures secreted infective DHBV, and had intracellular replicative forms of the virus. No integration of the virus into the duck genome was observed, and attempts to induce viral integration in the duckling hepatocytes using irradiation and aflatoxin B1 toxicity were unsuccessful. The results of the study lend further support to the suggestion that the rarity of liver cancer in DHBV-infected experimental ducks is related to an innate resistance of the hepatocytes to develop DHBV-DNA integration. Another possibility may be related to the lower oncogenic potential of the DHBV strain used for the study. However DHBV infected duckling hepatocytes would appear to offer a suitable material for studying viral replication and mechanisms of aflatoxin B1 toxicity during prolonged cell culture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1900699

  7. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  8. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  9. Toxoplasma Gondii Infection of Chicken Embryos Causes Retinal Changes and Modulates HSP90B1 Gene Expression: A Promising Ocular Toxoplasmosis Model.

    PubMed

    Nasaré, Alex M; Tedesco, Roberto C; Cristovam, Priscila C; Cenedese, Marcos A; Galisteo, Andrés J; Andrade, Heitor F; Gomes, José Álvaro P; Guimarães, Érik V; Barbosa, Helene S; Alonso, Luis G

    2015-12-01

    HSP90B1 is a gene that codifies heat shock protein 108 (HSP108) that belongs to a group of proteins induced under stress situation, and it has close relation with the nervous system, especially in the retina. Toxoplasma gondii causes ocular toxoplasmosis that has been associated with a late manifestation of the congenital toxoplasmosis although experimental models show that morphological alterations are already present during embryological development. Here, we used 18 eyes of Gallus domesticus embryos in 7th and 20th embryonic days to establish a model of congenital ocular toxoplasmosis, experimentally infected in its fifth day correlating with HSP90B1 gene expression. Embryos' eyes were histologically evaluated, and gene expression was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our data showed parasite present in the choroid, unusual migration of retinal pigment epithelium, and chorioretinal scars, and a tendency to a lower expression of the HSP90B1 gene upon experimental infection. This is a promising model to better understand T. gondii etiopathogeny. PMID:26716020

  10. Cross-talk interactions of exogenous nitric oxide and sucrose modulates phenylpropanoid metabolism in yellow lupine embryo axes infected with Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, Iwona; Formela, Magda; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Nowak, Witold; Bednarski, Waldemar

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine cross-talk of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and sucrose in the mechanisms of synthesis and accumulation of isoflavonoids in embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L. cv. Juno. It was verified whether the interaction of these molecules can modulate the defense response of axes to infection and development of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lupini. Sucrose alone strongly stimulated a high level of genistein glucoside in axes pretreated with exogenous nitric oxide (SNP or GSNO) and non-pretreated axes. As a result of amplification of the signal coming from sucrose and GSNO, high isoflavonoids accumulation was observed (+Sn+GSNO). It needs to be stressed that infection in tissues pretreated with SNP/GSNO and cultured on the medium with sucrose (+Si+SNP/+Si+GSNO) very strongly enhances the accumulation of free isoflavone aglycones. In +Si+SNP axes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was high up to 72h. As early as at 12h in +Si+SNP axes an increase was recorded in gene expression level of the specific isoflavonoid synthesis pathway. At 24h in +Si+SNP axes a very high total antioxidant capacity dependent on the pool of fast antioxidants was noted. Post-infection generation of semiquinone radicals was lower in axes with a high level of sucrose than with a deficit.

  11. Serotyping and virulence genes detection in Escherichia coli isolated from fertile and infertile eggs, dead-in-shell embryos, and chickens with yolk sac infection.

    PubMed

    Rosario, C C; López, A C C; Téllez, I G; Navarro, O A; Anderson, R C; Eslava, C C

    2004-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a common avian pathogen mainly associated with extraintestinal infections such as yolk sac infection (YSI). The aim of this study was to determine the serotypes and the presence of some virulence genes of E. coli strains isolated from different samples in a vertically integrated poultry operation in Mexico. Two hundred sixty-seven E. coli isolates from different samples were serotyped using rabbit serum against the 175 somatic (O) and 56 flagellar (H) antigens of the typing schema. Virulence genes were determined by colony blot hybridization, using DNA probes for st, eae, agg1, agg2, bfp, lt, cdt, slt, and ipaH diarrhea-associated virulence factors. The serogroup of 85% of the strains was determined; O19 (12%), 084 (9%), 08 (6%), and 078 (5%) were the most common. Using the complete antigenic formula (O and H), O19:NM (n = 31) was the serotype most frequently isolated from dead-in-shell embryos and in broilers that had died on the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh days after hatch. One hundred ten strains (41.2%) hybridized with one or more of the used probes. Of these, ipaH (72%), eae (30%), and cdt (27%) were the most common. Considering the origin of the respective isolates, 40% of the broiler farm strains were positive for at least one probe. Results show that some avian E. coli strains isolated in Mexico are included in avian pathogenic E. coli serotypes not previously reported, suggesting that they could be specific for this geographic area. The wide distribution of the ipaH gene among nonmotile strains suggests that this invasiveness trait could be important in YSI pathogenesis. On the other hand, some other genes could contribute to E. coli virulence during YSI. PMID:15666860

  12. Identification of the Zinc Finger Protein ZRANB2 as a Novel Maternal Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protein That Protects Embryos of Zebrafish against Gram-negative Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Du, Xiaoyuan; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-02-19

    Zinc finger ZRANB2 proteins are widespread in animals, but their functions and mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we clearly demonstrate that ZRANB2 is a newly identified LPS-binding protein present abundantly in the eggs/embryos of zebrafish. We also show that recombinant ZRANB2 (rZRANB2) acts as a pattern recognition receptor capable of identifying the bacterial signature molecule LPS as well as binding the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguilarum, and Aeromonas hydrophila and functions as an antibacterial effector molecule capable of directly killing the bacteria. Furthermore, we reveal that N-terminal residues 11-37 consisting of the first ZnF_RBZ domain are indispensable for ZRANB2 antimicrobial activity. Importantly, microinjection of rZRANB2 into early embryos significantly enhanced the resistance of the embryos against pathogenic A. hydrophila challenge, and this enhanced bacterial resistance was markedly reduced by co-injection of anti-ZRANB2 antibody. Moreover, precipitation of ZRANB2 in the embryo extracts by preincubation with anti-ZRANB2 antibody caused a marked decrease in the antibacterial activity of the extracts against the bacteria tested. In addition, the N-terminal peptide Z1/37 or Z11/37 with in vitro antibacterial activity also promoted the resistance of embryos against A. hydrophila, but the peptide Z38/198 without in vitro antibacterial activity did not. Collectively, these results indicate that ZRANB2 is a maternal LPS-binding protein that can protect the early embryos of zebrafish against pathogenic attacks, a novel role ever assigned to ZRANB2 proteins. This work also provides new insights into the immunological function of the zinc finger proteins that are widely distributed in various animals. PMID:26740623

  13. 2006 Guidelines for Gamete and Embryo Donation.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    The 2006 Guidelines for Gamete and Embryo Donation provide the latest recommendations for evaluation of potential sperm, oocyte, and embryo donors, incorporating recent information about optimal screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections, genetic diseases, and psychological assessments. This revised American Society for Reproductive Medicine Practice Committee document incorporates recent information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gamete and embryo donation services must be thoroughly familiar. PMID:17055844

  14. Can Coxiella burnetii be transmitted by embryo transfer in goats?

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, A; Fieni, F; Rodolakis, A; Bruyas, J F; Roux, C; Larrat, M; Chatagnon, G; Pellerin, J L

    2013-10-01

    The detection of significant bacterial loads of Coxiella burnetii in flushing media and tissue samples from the genital tracts of nonpregnant goats represents a risk factor for in utero infection and transmission during embryo transfer. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) whether cells of early goat embryos isolated from in vivo-fertilized goats interact with C. burnetii in vitro, (2) whether the embryonic zona pellucida (ZP) protects early embryo cells from infection, and (3) the efficacy of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) washing protocol for bovine embryos. The study was performed in triple replicate: 12 donor goats, certified negative by ELISA and polymerase chain reaction, were synchronized, superovulated, and subsequently inseminated by Q fever-negative males. Sixty-eight embryos were collected 4 days later by laparotomy. Two-thirds of the resulting ZP-intact and ZP-free 8- to 16-cell embryos (9-9, 11-11, and 4-4 in replicates 1, 2, and 3, respectively) were placed in 1 mL minimum essential medium containing 10(9)C. burnetii CBC1 (IASP, INRA Tours). After overnight incubation at 37 °C and 5% CO2, the embryos were washed according to the IETS procedure. In parallel, the remaining third ZP-intact and ZP-free uninfected embryos (3-3, 5-5, and 2-2 in replicates 1, 2, and 3, respectively) were subjected to the same procedures, but without C. burnetii, thus serving as controls. The 10 washing fluids for all batches of each replicate were collected and centrifuged for 1 hour at 13,000 × g. The washed embryos and pellets were tested by polymerase chain reaction. Coxiella burnetii DNA was found in all batches of ZP-intact and ZP-free infected embryos after 10 successive washes. It was also detected in the first five washing fluids for ZP-intact embryos and in the first eight washing fluids for ZP-free embryos. None of the control batches (embryos and washing fluids) were found to contain bacterial DNA. These results clearly indicate that

  15. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    PubMed

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence.

  16. Culture systems: embryo density.

    PubMed

    Reed, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Embryo density is defined as the embryo-to-volume ratio achieved during in vitro culture; in other words, it is the number of embryos in a defined volume of culture medium. The same density can be achieved by manipulating either the number of embryos in a given volume of medium, or manipulating the volume of the medium for a given number of embryos: for example, a microdrop with five embryos in a 50 μl volume under oil has the same embryo-to-volume ratio (1:10 μl) as a microdrop with one embryo in a 10 μl volume under oil (1:10 μl). Increased embryo density can improve mammalian embryo development in vitro; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect may be different with respect to which method is used to increase embryo density.Standard, flat sterile plastic petri dishes are the most common, traditional platform for embryo culture. Microdrops under a mineral oil overlay can be prepared to control embryo density, but it is critical that dish preparation is consistent, where appropriate techniques are applied to prevent microdrop dehydration during preparation, and results of any data collection are reliable, and repeatable. There are newer dishes available from several manufacturers that are specifically designed for embryo culture; most are readily available for use with human embryos. The concept behind these newer dishes relies on fabrication of conical and smaller volume wells into the dish design, so that embryos rest at the lowest point in the wells, and where putative embryotrophic factors may concentrate.Embryo density is not usually considered by the embryologist as a technique in and of itself; rather, the decision to culture embryos in groups or individually is protocol-driven, and is based more on convenience or the need to collect data on individual embryos. Embryo density can be controlled, and as such, it can be utilized as a simple, yet effective tool to improve in vitro development of human embryos. PMID:22829380

  17. Can Chlamydia abortus be transmitted by embryo transfer in goats?

    PubMed

    Oseikria, M; Pellerin, J L; Rodolakis, A; Vorimore, F; Laroucau, K; Bruyas, J F; Roux, C; Michaud, S; Larrat, M; Fieni, F

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether Chlamydia abortus would adhere to or penetrate the intact zona pellucida (ZP-intact) of early in vivo-derived caprine embryos, after in vitro infection; and (ii) the efficacy of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) washing protocol for bovine embryos. Fifty-two ZP-intact embryos (8-16 cells), obtained from 14 donors were used in this experiment. The embryos were randomly divided into 12 batches. Nine batches (ZP-intact) of five embryos were incubated in a medium containing 4 × 10(7)Chlamydia/mL of AB7 strain. After incubation for 18 hours at 37 °C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2, the embryos were washed in batches in 10 successive baths of a phosphate buffer saline and 5% fetal calf serum solution in accordance with IETS guidelines. In parallel, three batches of ZP-intact embryos were used as controls by being subjected to similar procedures but without exposure to C. abortus. The 10 wash baths were collected separately and centrifuged for 1 hour at 13,000 × g. The washed embryos and the pellets of the 10 centrifuged wash baths were frozen at -20 °C before examination for evidence of C. abortus using polymerase chain reaction. C. abortus DNA was found in all of the infected batches of ZP-intact embryos (9/9) after 10 successive washes. It was also detected in the 10th wash fluid for seven batches of embryos, whereas for the two other batches, the last positive wash bath was the eighth and the ninth, respectively. In contrast, none of the embryos or their washing fluids in the control batches were DNA positive. These results report that C. abortus adheres to and/or penetrates the ZP of in vivo caprine embryos after in vitro infection, and that the standard washing protocol recommended by the IETS for bovine embryos, failed to remove it. The persistence of these bacteria after washing makes the embryo a potential means of transmission of the bacterium during embryo transfer from

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus in embryo and semen production systems.

    PubMed

    Givens, M Daniel; Waldrop, Julie G

    2004-03-01

    Although BVDV-free offspring have been produced from persistently infected bulls and heifers via advanced reproductive techniques, embryos and semen can potentially transmit the virus. Due to this potential for transmission, appropriate testing is necessary to ensure freedom of semen and embryos from BVDV. In the future, less constraining quality control measures may ensure freedom of embryos and semen from BVDV. These quality control measures require additional research to be validated. PMID:15062472

  19. Effect of male hepatitis B virus infection on outcomes of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer treatment: insights from couples undergoing oocyte donation.

    PubMed

    Bu, Zhiqin; Kong, Huijuan; Li, Jing; Wang, Fang; Guo, Yihong; Su, Yingchun; Zhai, Jun; Sun, Yingpu

    2014-01-01

    It is common to see HBV infected couple seeking fertility treatment in reproductive medical centers. However, it is still unclear whether HBV infection has any relationship with IVF outcome. To assess the impact of male HVB infection on the outcomes of IVF, we retrospectively analyzed data from two hundred and seventy-seven subfertile couples undergoing oocyte donation cycles in our center. Twenty men (7.2%) were HBV seropositive in 277 couples. 20 couples with seropositive husbands had similar semen parameters and fertilization rate when compared with their controls. Among the 215 couples undergoing their first oocyte donation cycles, 19 couples with seropositive husbands/seronegative wives had lower implantation rate (26.7% vs. 40.6%; P > 0.05), and lower clinical pregnancy rate (42.1% vs. 63.8%; P > 0.05), but the difference was not statistically significant. In binary regression model, male HBV infection had no association with clinical pregnancy. Our study shows that male HBV infection has little impact on IVF outcomes. PMID:25126191

  20. Effect of male hepatitis B virus infection on outcomes of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer treatment: insights from couples undergoing oocyte donation

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Zhiqin; Kong, Huijuan; Li, Jing; Wang, Fang; Guo, Yihong; Su, Yingchun; Zhai, Jun; Sun, Yingpu

    2014-01-01

    It is common to see HBV infected couple seeking fertility treatment in reproductive medical centers. However, it is still unclear whether HBV infection has any relationship with IVF outcome. To assess the impact of male HVB infection on the outcomes of IVF, we retrospectively analyzed data from two hundred and seventy-seven subfertile couples undergoing oocyte donation cycles in our center. Twenty men (7.2%) were HBV seropositive in 277 couples. 20 couples with seropositive husbands had similar semen parameters and fertilization rate when compared with their controls. Among the 215 couples undergoing their first oocyte donation cycles, 19 couples with seropositive husbands/seronegative wives had lower implantation rate (26.7% vs. 40.6%; P > 0.05), and lower clinical pregnancy rate (42.1% vs. 63.8%; P > 0.05), but the difference was not statistically significant. In binary regression model, male HBV infection had no association with clinical pregnancy. Our study shows that male HBV infection has little impact on IVF outcomes. PMID:25126191

  1. Micromanipulation of mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, S

    1988-11-01

    Micromanipulation of embryos provide a new and valuable biological tool for animal agriculture and medical fields. Current techniques for embryo manipulation are in practice but some of techniques is still way off for application. The present status in new biotechnology applying to animal science and medicine is reviewed and its future is also discussed. PMID:3072425

  2. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  3. Infection.

    PubMed

    Miclau, Theodore; Schmidt, Andrew H; Wenke, Joseph C; Webb, Lawrence X; Harro, Janette M; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-09-01

    Musculoskeletal infection is a clinical problem with significant direct healthcare costs. The prevalence of infection after closed, elective surgery is frequently estimated to be less than 2%, but in severe injuries, posttraumatic infection rates have been reported as 10% or greater. Although clinical infections are found outside the realm of medical devices, it is clear that the enormous increase of infections associated with the use of implants presents a major challenge worldwide. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections.

  4. Embryo loss in cattle between Days 7 and 16 of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berg, D K; van Leeuwen, J; Beaumont, S; Berg, M; Pfeffer, P L

    2010-01-15

    Embryo loss between embryonic Days 7 and 16 (Day 0=day of IVF) in nonlactating cattle, Bos taurus, was analyzed using transfer of 2449 (in groups of 3 to 30) in vitro-produced (IVP) blastocysts. In 152 transfers, pregnancy losses attributable solely to recipient failings amounted to between 6% (beef heifers) and 16% (parous dairy cows), of which 3% were caused by uterine infections. Neither season, year, nor the age of the embryos on retrieval affected pregnancy rates. The latter observation indicated that the reason that a recipient failed to retain embryos was already present at the time of transfer. Notably, the proportion of embryos recovered decreased (P=0.03) as more embryos were transferred, particularly at later stages (Day 14, P<0.01). The average length of embryos decreased by approximately 5% for every additional embryo transferred (P<0.0001). These effects may be linked to embryonic migration. Embryo mortality inherent to the embryo during the second week of pregnancy was 24%. Additionally, 9% of Day 14 embryos were of inferior quality, as they did not contain an epiblast. Combining embryo and recipient causes but excluding infection effects, embryonic loss of IVP embryos during the second week of pregnancy amounted to 26% (heifers) or 34% (parous dairy cows). The length of embryos doubled every day between Days 9 and 16, with a 4.4-fold range in sizes representing two thirds of the variation in length. Embryos retrieved from heifers were twice the size of those incubated in parous cows (P<0.0001), indicating faster embryonic development/trophoblast proliferation in heifers. Whereas season did not affect embryo recoveries, length was lower (50%) in winter (winter-autumn, P<0.05; winter-spring, P<0.001). Lastly, transuterine migration in cattle, when transferring multiple embryos, commenced at Day 14 (4%) and had occurred in all recipients by Day 16 (38% of embryos found contralaterally).

  5. Genetic diagnosis of human embryos.

    PubMed

    Bonnicksen, Andrea

    1992-01-01

    For all the worried talk about genetic engineering over the last two decades, it is surprising how quietly plans for the genetic diagnosis of human embryos have developed. The issues raised warrant careful examination: what needs are met through embryo diagnosis? Who bears responsibility for monitoring this technique? Under what overarching ethic should embryo diagnosis and, eventually, embryo therapy, be applied? What are the broader social implications raised by the genetic diagnosis of human embryos?

  6. Recommendations for gamete and embryo donation: a committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    This document provides the latest recommendations for evaluation of potential sperm, oocyte, and embryo donors, incorporating recent information about optimal screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections, genetic diseases, and psychological assessments. This revised document incorporates recent information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gamete and embryo donation services must be thoroughly familiar, and replaces the document titled, "2008 Guidelines for Gamete and Embryo Donation: A Practice Committee Report," last published in Fertil Steril 2008;90:S30-44. PMID:23095142

  7. Ethics for embryos.

    PubMed

    Parker, C

    2007-10-01

    This paper responds to DW Brock's technically strong case for the use of human embryonic stem cells in medical research. His main issue in this context is the question of whether it is moral to destroy viable human embryos. He offers a number of reasons to support his view that it is moral to destroy them, but his use of conceptual arguments is not adequate to secure his position. The purpose and scope of this paper is wholly concerned with his arguments rather than with the conclusion that it is justifiable to destroy human embryos. The author proceeds through his variety of arguments and offers reasons for rejecting them. The author concludes that Brock has not shown that it is moral to destroy viable human embryos.

  8. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  9. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  10. The Virtual Embryo Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The v-Embryo™ is a far reaching new research program at the US EPA to develop a working computer model of a mammalian embryo that can be used to better understand the prenatal risks posed by environmental chemicals and to eventually predict a chemical’s potential developmental to...

  11. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality.

    PubMed

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming.

  12. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality

    PubMed Central

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  13. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality.

    PubMed

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  14. Immature embryo rescue and culture.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiuli; Gmitter, Fred G; Grosser, Jude W

    2011-01-01

    Embryo culture techniques have many significant applications in plant breeding, as well as basic studies in physiology and biochemistry. Immature embryo rescue and culture is a particularly attractive technique for recovering plants from sexual crosses where the majority of embryos cannot survive in vivo or become dormant for long periods of time. Overcoming embryo inviability is the most common reason for the application of embryo rescue techniques. Recently, fruit breeding programs have greatly increased the interest in exploiting interploid hybridization to combine desirable genetic traits of complementary parents at the triploid level for the purpose of developing improved seedless fruits. However, the success of this approach has only been reported in limited number of species due to various crossing barriers and embryo abortion at very early stages. Thus, immature embryo rescue provides an alternative means to recover triploid hybrids, which usually fail to completely develop in vivo. This chapter will provide a brief discussion of the utilization of interploid crosses between a monoembryonic diploid female with an allotetraploid male in a citrus cultivar improvement program, featuring a clear and comprehensive illustration of successful protocols for immature embryo rescue and culture. The protocols will cover the complete process from embryo excision to recovered plant in the greenhouse and can easily be adapted to other plant commodities. Factors affecting the success and failure of immature embryo rescue to recover triploid progeny from interploid crosses will be discussed.

  15. Real protection for the embryo.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Cosimo Marco

    2005-01-01

    This article fundamentally analyses the current protection that the Italian law offers to the embryo. Likewise, the author, contrary to those who are of the opinion that the embryo is a person subject to law, exposes his polemic theory in which he places the embryo within the scope of things. Specifically, he argues that the embryo has a quasi-personal category. In order to justify this, he analyses the moral and legal history of the statute of the embryo, he makes a difference between the biological life and the legal life. The author establishes that the concept of the person has been and will continue to be a very controversial concept, concluding with a study on the Italian legislation in respect to the protection of the embryo.

  16. Sterilising embryos for transgenic chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Aige-Gil, V; Simkiss, K

    1991-07-01

    1. Experiments were undertaken to attempt to sterilise fowl embryos with ultraviolet light. Such sterilised embryos would be useful as recipients of genetically manipulated germ cells. 2. The germinal crescents of embryos were exposed to a calibrated UV source at stages 4 and 8 to 10 of incubation for 30 s, 3 min and 10 min. Teratological and sterility effects were studied at periods up to 6 d of incubation. 3. Simply exposing embryos by opening the shell produced a number of abnormalities and mortalities. These decreased with the age of the embryo but increased with the dosage of irradiation. 4. Although there was abundant evidence for UV-induced cell damage, the sterility of the embryos was usually less than 75%. PMID:1893258

  17. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  18. Electrothermal branding for embryo labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Beebe, D J; Williams, A R; Easley, K D

    1997-11-01

    A novel embryo labeling technique based on electrothermal branding is developed. Two types of micro branding irons are fabricated and tested. One utilizes 25 microns tungsten wire as the heating element. The other utilizes surface micromachining techniques to fabricate polysilicon branding irons. The thermal behavior of the branding irons and the heat distributions in the embryos are analytically modeled. Micron-scale labels on unfertilized bovine embryos are achieved.

  19. Contour extraction of Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Kambhamettu, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Contour extraction of Drosophila (fruit fly) embryos is an important step to build a computational system for matching expression pattern of embryonic images to assist the discovery of the nature of genes. Automatic contour extraction of embryos is challenging due to severe image variations, including 1) the size, orientation, shape, and appearance of an embryo of interest; 2) the neighboring context of an embryo of interest (such as nontouching and touching neighboring embryos); and 3) illumination circumstance. In this paper, we propose an automatic framework for contour extraction of the embryo of interest in an embryonic image. The proposed framework contains three components. Its first component applies a mixture model of quadratic curves, with statistical features, to initialize the contour of the embryo of interest. An efficient method based on imbalanced image points is proposed to compute model parameters. The second component applies active contour model to refine embryo contours. The third component applies eigen-shape modeling to smooth jaggy contours caused by blurred embryo boundaries. We test the proposed framework on a data set of 8,000 embryonic images, and achieve promising accuracy (88 percent), that is, substantially higher than the-state-of-the-art results.

  20. Electron microscopy of Lednice virus in chick embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Jelínková, A; Málková, D; Holubová, J; Novák, M

    1980-01-01

    Replication of Lednice virus in chick embryo cells was studied for 72 hr after inoculation by infectivity titration and the indirect immunofluorescence technique. At 24 and 48 hr after inoculation, electron microscopy revealed spherical virions of uniform morphology, 80-105 nm in diameter, which were localized mostly extracellularly.

  1. Pollen tubes introduce Raspberry bushy dwarf virus into embryo sacs during fertilization processes.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Masamichi; Yoshida, Tetu; Shimura, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-10-01

    We developed a fertilization method in which pollen tubes entered into embryo sacs without any need to contact surrounding female sporophytic cells by using Torenia fournieri (Torenia) plants under the condition of hindering movement of the virus from a stigma, which is the first infection site leading to systemic infection. When RBDV-infected Torenia pollen grains were used for the developed fertilization method, the virus was transmitted to the seeds by pollen tubes germinating from them. On the other hand, no seeds were infected with the virus when Torenia plants were pollinated with healthy Torenia pollen grains in combination with RBDV-infected raspberry pollen grains, which caused the virus infection in the stigma by penetration of their pollen tubes arrested in its style. Our results indicate that vertical transmission of RBDV by pollen occurs in the transport of the virus into embryo sacs by pollen tubes reaching the embryo sacs.

  2. Pollen tubes introduce Raspberry bushy dwarf virus into embryo sacs during fertilization processes.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Masamichi; Yoshida, Tetu; Shimura, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-10-01

    We developed a fertilization method in which pollen tubes entered into embryo sacs without any need to contact surrounding female sporophytic cells by using Torenia fournieri (Torenia) plants under the condition of hindering movement of the virus from a stigma, which is the first infection site leading to systemic infection. When RBDV-infected Torenia pollen grains were used for the developed fertilization method, the virus was transmitted to the seeds by pollen tubes germinating from them. On the other hand, no seeds were infected with the virus when Torenia plants were pollinated with healthy Torenia pollen grains in combination with RBDV-infected raspberry pollen grains, which caused the virus infection in the stigma by penetration of their pollen tubes arrested in its style. Our results indicate that vertical transmission of RBDV by pollen occurs in the transport of the virus into embryo sacs by pollen tubes reaching the embryo sacs. PMID:26176979

  3. Metabolomic assessment of embryo viability.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Asli; Seli, Emre

    2014-03-01

    Preimplantation embryo metabolism demonstrates distinctive characteristics associated with the developmental potential of embryos. On this basis, metabolite content of culture media was hypothesized to reflect the implantation potential of individual embryos. This hypothesis was tested in consecutive studies reporting a significant association between culture media metabolites and embryo development or clinical pregnancy. The need for a noninvasive, reliable, and rapid embryo assessment strategy promoted metabolomics studies in vitro fertilization (IVF) in an effort to increase success rates of single embryo transfers. With the advance of analytical techniques and bioinformatics, commercial instruments were developed to predict embryo viability using spectroscopic analysis of surplus culture media. However, despite the initial promising results from proof-of-principal studies, recent randomized controlled trials using commercial instruments failed to show a consistent benefit in improving pregnancy rates when metabolomics is used as an adjunct to morphology. At present, the application of metabolomics technology in clinical IVF laboratory requires the elimination of factors underlying inconsistent findings, when possible, and development of reliable predictive models accounting for all possible sources of bias throughout the embryo selection process. PMID:24515909

  4. Intra- and interspecific embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, D C

    1983-11-01

    The procedures that are collectively referred to as embryo transfer (ET) have many uses. They were first used as research tools to study fetal-maternal physiology. Since the first successful mammalian embryo transfer in 1890, ET has been utilized for enhancement of genetic selection; diagnosis and treatment of infertility; control of infectious disease transmission; screening for genetic defects; propagation of rare and endangered species; and the study of developmental biology. Most of the embryo transfers have been intraspecific. A listing of the species includes rabbit, rat, sheep, mouse, goat, cattle, pig, hamster, ferret, mink, horse, baboon, cat, dog, water buffalo. In two species, rhesus monkey and humans, the successful embryo transfers have been limited to within-animal, homologous replacement of the embryos. There have been a few successful interspecific embryo transfers. The most common were between Bos taurus and B. indicus cattle. Other interspecific transfers involved Bos gaurus and B. taurus, cattle; Ovis musimon and O. aries, sheep; Equus asinus and E. caballus, horses. There are several examples of intergeneric embryo transfers in which embryos implanted but did not develop to term: sheep and goat, mouse and rat. The factors that determine the degree of compatibility between embryos and uteri of various species and genera are not clearly understood. The ability to hybridize successfully is probably a dependable indication of compatibility for embryo transfer. The limits of tolerance for differences between the donor and recipient in such factors as placental structure and gestation length have not been defined, but the recently developed technique of inner cell mass transfer will be very useful in such studies.

  5. Response of embryo axes of germinating seeds of yellow lupine to Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, Iwona; Bednarski, Waldemar; Kozłowska, Monika

    2004-06-01

    Defence responses of embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L. cv. Polo were studied 48-96 h after inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht f.sp. lupini. The infection restricted the growth of embryo axes, the lengths of infected embryo axes 72 and 96 h after inoculation were 11 and 12 mm less in the controls, respectively, while their masses c. 0.03 g less than in the controls. The concentration of H2O2 in embryo axes of inoculated germinating seeds was higher than in the control. This was probably a consequence of oxidative burst as well as H2O2 generation by the invading necrotrophic fungal pathogen. EPR-based analyses detected the presence of free radicals with g1 and g2 values of 2.0052 +/- 0.0004 and 2.0031 +/- 0.0005, respectively. Concentrations of the radicals 72 and 96 h after inoculation were 50% higher than in the control. The values of the spectroscopic splitting coefficients suggest that they are quinone radicals. However, inoculated embryo axes possess a number of adaptive mechanisms protecting them from oxidative damage. A twofold increase in catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity was evidenced in embryo axes infected with F. oxysporum Schlecht f. sp. lupini, as compared to the control 48-96 h after inoculation. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) activity 96 h after inoculation was 80% higher than in the control. Furthermore, EPR-based analyses revealed a higher concentration of Mn2+ ions after 72 h for inoculated embryo axes, as compared to the control. On the other hand, no increase was detected in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (products of lipid peroxidation) in infected embryo axes. The protective mechanisms induced in lupine embryo axes in response to F. oxysporum Schlecht f.sp. lupini were compared with responses to infections with pathogenic fungi elicited in other plant families.

  6. Ethics and embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, N; Gillett, G

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the human form should be seen to exist, in a longitudinal way, throughout the continuum of human growth and development. This entails that the moral value of that form, which we link analytically to the adult, interacting, social and rational being, attaches to all phases of human life to some extent. Having established this we discuss the consequences it has for the moral status of the human embryo. We then apply this argument, and the resulting moral status, to the area of reproductive technology. In doing this we show that there are certain regulations and controls which ought to apply to the use of these infertility treatments. PMID:1870084

  7. New techniques on embryo manipulation.

    PubMed

    Escribá, M J; Valbuena, D; Remohí, J; Pellicer, A; Simón, C

    2002-01-01

    For many years, experience has been accumulated on embryo and gamete manipulation in livestock animals. The present work is a review of these techniques and their possible application in human embryology in specific cases. It is possible to manipulate gametes at different levels, producing paternal or maternal haploid embryos (hemicloning), using different techniques including nuclear transfer. At the embryonic stage, considering practical, ethical and legal issues, techniques will be reviewed that include cloning and embryo splitting at the cleavage stage, morula, or blastocyst stage.

  8. Cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Schreuders, P.D.; Cole, K.W.; Hall, J.W. ); Mahowald, A.P. )

    1992-12-18

    The inability to cryobiologically preserve the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has required that fly stocks be maintained by frequent transfer of adults. This method is costly in terms of time and can lead to loss of stocks. Traditional slow freezing methods do not succeed because the embryos are highly sensitive to chilling. With the procedures described here, 68 percent of precisely staged 15-hour Oregon R (wild-type) embryos hatch after vitrification at -205[degree]C, and 40 percent of the resulting larvae develop into normal adult flies. These embryos are among the most complex organisms successfully preserved by cryobiology.

  9. Ion currents in embryo development.

    PubMed

    Tosti, Elisabetta; Boni, Raffaele; Gallo, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    Ion channels are proteins expressed in the plasma membrane of electrogenic cells. In the zygote and blastomeres of the developing embryo, electrical modifications result from ion currents that flow through these channels. This phenomenon implies that ion current activity exerts a specific developmental function, and plays a crucial role in signal transduction and the control of embryogenesis, from the early cleavage stages and during growth and development of the embryo. This review describes the involvement of ion currents in early embryo development, from marine invertebrates to human, focusing on the occurrence, modulation, and dynamic role of ion fluxes taking place on the zygote and blastomere plasma membrane, and at the intercellular communication between embryo cell stages.

  10. Standardization of grading embryo morphology.

    PubMed

    Racowsky, Catherine; Vernon, Michael; Mayer, Jacob; Ball, G David; Behr, Barry; Pomeroy, Kimball O; Wininger, David; Gibbons, William; Conaghan, Joseph; Stern, Judy E

    2010-08-01

    Standardization of morphologic assessment for an embryo grading system was developed and is being implemented by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART). A recent European consensus conference of embryologists from Europe and America is working toward adopting an embryo classification system modeled similarly to that of SART that, if adopted, would produce a de facto international standard to aid cross-border collaboration. PMID:20580357

  11. Distribution of viral antigens and development of lesions in chicken embryos inoculated with nipah virus.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, N; Imada, T; Kashiwazaki, Y; Sharifah, S H

    2006-01-01

    An isolate of Nipah virus was injected into fertile eggs via the allantoic cavity or yolk sac. Allantoic inoculation resulted in considerable pathological variation and only partial mortality. Dead embryos showed severe necrosis in the brain and congestion in the kidney and the subcutis of limbs. In contrast, yolk sac inoculation led to uniform infection and mortality, the dead embryos exhibiting the same lesions as those described above but without the subcutaneous congestion. Histological lesions in dead embryos inoculated by either route were similar and particularly severe in the central nervous system. Viral antigens were detected mainly in the vasculature and neurons. The results indicated that Nipah virus is highly pathogenic to chicken embryos, and that the route of inoculation is an important determinant of the course of disease. The findings also suggested that yolk sac inoculation can be used for viral titration, and that the chicken embryo represents a useful model for studying the vascular and neuronal tropisms of Nipah virus.

  12. Lessons from Embryos: Haeckel's Embryo Drawings, Evolution, and Secondary Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellner, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, developmental biologist Michael Richardson compared his research team's embryo photographs to Ernst Haeckel's 1874 embryo drawings and called Haeckel's work "noncredible". "Science" soon published "Haeckel's Embryos: Fraud Rediscovered," and Richardson's comments further reinvigorated criticism of Haeckel by…

  13. Preimplantation bovine embryos: Pathobiology of Haemophilus somnus exposure and resistance mechanisms to vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Preimplantation bovine embryos were exposed in vitro to H. somnus to determine if the bacteria would adhere to zona pellucida-intact (ZP-I) embryos or adhere to or infect ZP-free embryos. The effect of H. somnus on embryonic development in vitro was also investigated. Electrophoretic comparisons of outer membrane proteins of H. somnus revealed 2 major protein bands common to 10 H. somnus isolates. A monoclonal antibody produced against the outer membrane proteins reacted to one of the major protein bands. The sensitivity of a nucleic acid probe for detection of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was validated in cells in culture and used to determine if the synthetic double-stranded complex of polyriboinosinic and polyribocytidylic acids (poly I:C) would induce viral resistance in cultured bovine embryos. Two {sup 32}P-nick translated probes of high specific activity prepared from plasmids containing nucleic acid sequences of VSV virus were employed for viral mRNA detection in the tissue culture cells using a DNA-hybridization dot-blot technique. Using one of the probes, the technique was applied to detect differences in viral replication between four groups of bovine embryos (nonexposed, exposed to VSV virus, poly I:C-treated, and poly I:C-treated and exposed to VSV). The nucleic acid probe was sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in quantities of VSV mRNA among embryo treatment groups, resulting in the demonstration that resistance to viral infection was induced in day 9 bovine embryos.

  14. 2008 Guidelines for gamete and embryo donation: a Practice Committee report.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    The 2008 Guidelines for Gamete and Embryo Donation provide the latest recommendations for evaluation of potential sperm, oocyte, and embryo donors, incorporating recent information about optimal screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), genetic diseases, and psychological assessments. This revised document incorporates recent information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gamete and embryo donation services must be thoroughly familiar. PMID:19007645

  15. Avian embryos in hypoxic environments.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; Monge-C, C

    2004-08-12

    Avian embryos at high altitude do not benefit of the maternal protection against hypoxia as in mammals. Nevertheless, avian embryos are known to hatch successfully at altitudes between 4,000 and 6,500 m. This review considers some of the processes that bring about the outstanding modifications in the pressure differences between the environment and mitochondria of avian embryos in hypoxic environments. Among species, some maintain normal levels of oxygen consumption ( VO2) have a high oxygen carrying capacity, lower the air cell-arterial pressure difference ( PAO2 - PaO2 ) with a constant pH. Other species decrease VO2, increase only slightly the oxygen carrying capacity, have a higher PAO2 - PaO2 difference than sea-level embryos and lower the PCO2 and pH. High altitude embryos, and those exposed to hypoxia have an accelerated decline of erythrocyte ATP levels during development and an earlier stimulation of 2,3-BPG synthesis. A higher Bohr effect may ensure high tissue PO2 in the presence of the high-affinity hemoglobin. Independently of the strategy used, they serve together to promote suitable rates of development and successful hatching of high altitude birds in hypoxic environments.

  16. Feminists on the inalienability of human embryos.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Carolyn; Baylis, Francoise

    2006-01-01

    The feminist literature against the commodification of embryos in human embryo research includes an argument to the effect that embryos are "intimately connected" to persons, or morally inalienable from them. We explore why embryos might be inalienable to persons and why feminists might find this view appealing. But, ultimately, as feminists, we reject this view because it is inconsistent with full respect for women's reproductive autonomy and with a feminist conception of persons as relational, embodied beings. Overall, feminists should avoid claims about embryos' being inalienable to persons in arguments for or against the commodification of human embryos. PMID:17111554

  17. Risks of transmitting scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy by semen and embryos.

    PubMed

    Wrathall, A E

    1997-04-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge on transmission of scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) by semen and embryos. In sheep, in particular, it is difficult to distinguish between the genetic transmission of susceptibility to scrapie and vertical transmission of the infection. Nevertheless, there is evidence that vertical transmission of infection does occur, probably across the placenta, but none to suggest a significant scrapie risk from semen. Two teams have studied scrapie transmission from experimentally infected sheep using embryo transfer. Whereas one team found no evidence for transmission, the results from the other team suggest that embryos, even after washing, might carry the disease into the offspring. In regard to goats, although genetic differences in susceptibility exist, they are much less obvious than in sheep. There is no evidence for vertical transmission or for transmission through semen and embryos. With regard to BSE, although it appears that genetic differences in susceptibility are absent or unimportant, some recent work does suggest that the disease may be passed from cow to calf. The route of transmission and stage or stages when this takes place are unclear, however. In conclusion, despite growing evidence to indicate that scrapie and BSE are unlikely to be transmitted through semen and embryos, more research is needed to confirm this. Furthermore, until all possibility of risk is ruled out, risk reduction methods must be considered, especially when semen and embryos are being imported into countries where the diseases do not exist. PMID:9329121

  18. Replication-defective vectors of reticuloendotheliosis virus transduce exogenous genes into somatic stem cells of the unincubated chicken embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Bosselman, R.A.; Hsu, R.Y.; Boggs, T.; Hu, S.; Bruszewski, J.; Ou, S.; Souza, L.; Kozar, L.; Martin, F.; Nicolson, M.

    1989-06-01

    Replication-defective vectors derived from reticuloendotheliosis virus were used to transduce exogenous genes into early somatic stem cells of the chicken embryo. One of these vectors transduced and expressed the chicken growth hormone coding sequence. The helper cell line, C3, was used to generate stocks of vector containing about 10/sup 4/ transducing units per ml. Injection of 5- to 20-..mu..l volumes of vector directly beneath the blastoderm of unincubated chicken embryos led to infection of somatic stem cells. Infected embryos and adults contained unrearranged integrated proviral DNAs. Embryos expressed the transduced chicken growth hormone gene and contained high levels of serum growth hormone. Blood, brain, muscle, testis, and semen contained from individuals injected as embryos contained vector DNA. Replication-defective vectors of the reticuloendotheliosis virus transduced exogenous genes into chicken embryonic stem cells in vivo.

  19. Proteomics of early zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Link, Vinzenz; Shevchenko, Andrej; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-01-01

    Background Zebrafish (D. rerio) has become a powerful and widely used model system for the analysis of vertebrate embryogenesis and organ development. While genetic methods are readily available in zebrafish, protocols for two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and proteomics have yet to be developed. Results As a prerequisite to carry out proteomic experiments with early zebrafish embryos, we developed a method to efficiently remove the yolk from large batches of embryos. This method enabled high resolution 2D gel electrophoresis and improved Western blotting considerably. Here, we provide detailed protocols for proteomics in zebrafish from sample preparation to mass spectrometry (MS), including a comparison of databases for MS identification of zebrafish proteins. Conclusion The provided protocols for proteomic analysis of early embryos enable research to be taken in novel directions in embryogenesis. PMID:16412219

  20. Single-embryo transfer versus multiple-embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Gerris, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the progress made in assisted reproductive technology, live birth rates remain disappointingly low. Multiple-embryo transfer has been an accepted practice with which to increase the success rate. This has led to a higher incidence of multiple-order births compared with natural conception, which not only increase the risk of mortality and morbidity to both mother and children but are also associated with social and economic consequences. Elective single-embryo transfer (eSET) was developed in an effort to increase singleton pregnancies in assisted reproduction. Studies comparing eSET with multiple-embryo transfer highlight the benefit of this approach and suggest that, with careful patient selection and the transfer of good-quality embryos, the risk of a multiple-order pregnancy can be reduced without significantly decreasing live birth rates. Although the use of eSET has gradually increased in clinical practice, its acceptance has been limited by factors such as availability of funding and awareness of the procedure. An open discussion of eSET is warranted in an effort to enable a broader understanding by physicians and patients of the merits of this approach. Ultimately, eSET may provide a more cost-effective, potentially safer approach to patients undergoing assisted reproduction technology. PMID:19406034

  1. Single-embryo transfer versus multiple-embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Gerris, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the progress made in assisted reproductive technology, live birth rates remain disappointingly low. Multiple-embryo transfer has been an accepted practice with which to increase the success rate. This has led to a higher incidence of multiple-order births compared with natural conception, which not only increase the risk of mortality and morbidity to both mother and children but are also associated with social and economic consequences. Elective single-embryo transfer (eSET) was developed in an effort to increase singleton pregnancies in assisted reproduction. Studies comparing eSET with multiple-embryo transfer highlight the benefit of this approach and suggest that, with careful patient selection and the transfer of good-quality embryos, the risk of a multiple-order pregnancy can be reduced without significantly decreasing live birth rates. Although the use of eSET has gradually increased in clinical practice, its acceptance has been limited by factors such as availability of funding and awareness of the procedure. An open discussion of eSET is warranted in an effort to enable a broader understanding by physicians and patients of the merits of this approach. Ultimately, eSET may provide a more cost-effective, potentially safer approach to patients undergoing assisted reproduction technology.

  2. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  3. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  4. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  5. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  6. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  7. Embryo splitting: a role in infertility?

    PubMed

    Wood, C

    2001-01-01

    Embryo splitting may be used to increase the potential fertility of couples requiring IVF. Using cattle as a model, it is possible to increase pregnancy rates from 70% per transfer of good quality in-vivo-produced embryos, to 110% by transferring the two demi-embryos resulting from the bisection of one embryo. The 30-40% greater chance of conception would reduce costs for the government, health authorities and patients, and reduce stress, time and complications for women having IVF treatment. Embryo splitting may also provide donor embryos for infertile couples that cannot conceive naturally or with IVF. The shortage of children for adoption and donor embryos may be overcome by the production of demi-embryos.

  8. Risks of transmitting ruminant spongiform encephalopathies (prion diseases) by semen and embryo transfer techniques.

    PubMed

    Wrathall, A E; Holyoak, G R; Parsonson, I M; Simmons, H A

    2008-09-15

    Early experiments suggested that scrapie transmission via sheep embryos was a possibility, and gave rise to much controversy. However, when account is taken of the complex genetic effects on ovine susceptibility to scrapie, and of the several different scrapie strains with different clinical and pathological effects, the overall conclusion now is that transmission of classical scrapie by embryo transfer is very unlikely if appropriate precautions are taken. Recent embryo transfer studies have confirmed this. Other studies in sheep have shown that from about the middle of pregnancy the placental trophoblast is liable to scrapie infection in genetically susceptible ewes if the fetus is also susceptible. Since the contrary is also true, use of resistant ewes as embryo recipients could add to the safety of the embryo transfer, at least for classical scrapie. There has been little recent research on scrapie transmission via semen in sheep, and, with hindsight, the early studies, though negative, were inadequate. There is scant information on scrapie transfer via goat semen or embryos, although one study did find that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was not transmitted via goat embryos. In cattle it has been shown that, if appropriate precautions are taken, the risks of transmitting BSE via semen and in vivo-derived embryos are negligible, and this conclusion has gained worldwide acceptance. Research on TSE transmission via reproductive technologies in deer has not yet been done, but information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, and on transmission risks in other species, provides optimism that transmission of CWD via semen and embryos of deer is unlikely. The presence of TSE infectivity in blood and various other tissues of infected animals, particularly sheep, gives rise to concerns that certain biological products currently used in reproductive technologies, e.g. pituitary gonadotrophins for superovulation, and

  9. Studying bovine early embryo transcriptome by microarray.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays represent a significant advantage when studying gene expression in early embryo because they allow for a speedy study of a large number of genes even if the sample of interest contains small quantities of genetic material. Here we describe the protocols developed by the EmbryoGENE Network to study the bovine transcriptome in early embryo using a microarray experimental design.

  10. Astroviruses associated with stunting and pre-hatching mortality in duck and goose embryos.

    PubMed

    Biđin, M; Lojkić, I; Tišljar, M; Biđin, Z; Majnarić, D

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of avian nephritis virus (ANV) in goose embryos and of turkey astrovirus-1 (TAstV-1) in duck embryos is described. Intestinal samples from duck and goose embryos from five duck and four goose flocks in Croatia were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of ANV, TAstV-1, turkey astrovirus-2, chicken astrovirus, duck astrovirus and also for the presence of avian reovirus, Derzsy's disease virus and duck enteritis virus. The kidneys from duck and goose embryos were also tested for ANV, while liver samples were tested for duck astrovirus. Duck embryos were also tested to detect duck circovirus and goose embryos for the presence of goose circovirus and goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus. All embryos were in the final stage of incubation and were characterized by moderate to markedly retarded growth. ANV was confirmed in the intestines and kidneys of embryos from two duck and two goose flocks and TAstV-1 was found in embryos from two duck flocks. One duck flock was positive for both ANV and TAstV-1. No other viruses were found in tested flocks. Phylogenetic analysis based on the ANV polymerase gene fragment of ANV sequences detected in duck and goose embryos revealed greatest similarity (88.1 to 97.2%) with ANV isolates from chickens. Further, the existence of at least two types of ANV circulating in Croatian duck and goose flocks was confirmed. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the portion of TAstV-1 polymerase gene, two detected TAstV-1 nucleotide sequences were 99.5% similar. Compared with six TAstV-1 sequences, Croatian sequences showed one unique nucleotide change. In addition to other possible causes of stunted growth and late embryonic death, these findings suggest that ANV and/or TAstV-1 infection may be a contributing factor in the pre-hatching mortality of ducklings and goslings.

  11. Embryo adoption: Some further considerations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Colin

    2015-02-01

    Recent discussions of embryo adoption have sought to make sense of the teaching of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae which appeared to provide a negative judgment on such a practice. This article aims to provide a personalist account of the process of fertilization and implantation that might serve as the basis for the negative judgment of the CDF document. In doing so, it relies upon the idea that a person, including an embryo, is not to be considered in isolation, but always in relation to God and to others. This approach extends the substantialist conceptualizations commonly employed in discussions of this issue. More generally, the article seeks to highlight the value of a personalist re-framing for an understanding of the moral questions surrounding the beginning of life. Lay summary: This article seeks to make sense of what appears to be a clear-cut rejection, set out in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae, of the proposal for women to "adopt" surplus frozen embryos. It draws upon more recently developed modes of philosophical/theological reasoning to argue that, in human procreation, both fertilization and implantation represent constitutive dimensions of divine creative activity and so must be protected from manipulative technological intervention. Since embryo adoption requires this kind of technology, it makes sense for the Church document not to approve it. PMID:25698841

  12. Embryo adoption: Some further considerations

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent discussions of embryo adoption have sought to make sense of the teaching of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae which appeared to provide a negative judgment on such a practice. This article aims to provide a personalist account of the process of fertilization and implantation that might serve as the basis for the negative judgment of the CDF document. In doing so, it relies upon the idea that a person, including an embryo, is not to be considered in isolation, but always in relation to God and to others. This approach extends the substantialist conceptualizations commonly employed in discussions of this issue. More generally, the article seeks to highlight the value of a personalist re-framing for an understanding of the moral questions surrounding the beginning of life. Lay summary: This article seeks to make sense of what appears to be a clear-cut rejection, set out in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae, of the proposal for women to “adopt” surplus frozen embryos. It draws upon more recently developed modes of philosophical/theological reasoning to argue that, in human procreation, both fertilization and implantation represent constitutive dimensions of divine creative activity and so must be protected from manipulative technological intervention. Since embryo adoption requires this kind of technology, it makes sense for the Church document not to approve it. PMID:25698841

  13. Embryo Development in Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jerry G.

    1973-01-01

    Endosperm liquid bathes the embryo of Phaseolus vulgaris from the heart stage through the late cotyledon state. This liquid was aspirated from many ovules of the same stage, pooled, and analyzed for the following constituents and parameters: [List: see text] PMID:16658350

  14. Untwisting the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ryan Patrick; Bokinsky, Alexandra; Santella, Anthony; Wu, Yicong; Marquina-Solis, Javier; Guo, Min; Kovacevic, Ismar; Kumar, Abhishek; Winter, Peter W; Tashakkori, Nicole; McCreedy, Evan; Liu, Huafeng; McAuliffe, Matthew; Mohler, William; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Bao, Zhirong; Shroff, Hari

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple embryonic nervous system with few enough neurons that the growth of each cell could be followed to provide a systems-level view of development. However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis. We present open-source untwisting and annotation software (http://mipav.cit.nih.gov/plugin_jws/mipav_worm_plugin.php) that allows the investigation of neurodevelopmental events in late embryogenesis and apply it to track the 3D positions of seam cell nuclei, neurons, and neurites in multiple elongating embryos. We also provide a tutorial describing how to use the software (Supplementary file 1) and a detailed description of the untwisting algorithm (Appendix). The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo. The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10070.001 PMID:26633880

  15. III. Gamete and embryo donation.

    PubMed

    2002-05-01

    Ethical considerations concerning gametes and embryo donation are discussed. Basic principles are outlined, focusing on the issues raised by the meaning of genetic links, regulation and the necessity for taking into account the welfare of the child. Relevant specific aspects concern anonymity, compensation for donation and the consent, screening and assessment of donors and recipients. PMID:11980773

  16. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  17. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  18. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  19. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  20. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  1. Embryo technologies in the horse.

    PubMed

    Squires, E L; Carnevale, E M; McCue, P M; Bruemmer, J E

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that zwitterionic buffers could be used for satisfactory storage of equine embryos at 5 degrees C. The success of freezing embryos is dependent upon size and stage of development. Morulae and blastocysts <300 microm can be slowly cooled or vitrified with acceptable pregnancy rates after transfer. The majority of equine embryos are collected from single ovulating mares, as there is no commercially available product for superovulation in equine. However, pituitary extract, rich in FSH, can be used to increase embryo recovery three- to four-fold. Similar to human medicine, assisted reproductive techniques have been developed for the older, subfertile mare. Transfer of in vivo-matured oocytes from young, healthy mares into a recipient's oviduct results in a 70-80% pregnancy rate compared with a 30-40% pregnancy rate when the oocytes are from older, subfertile mares. This procedure can also be used to evaluate in vitro maturation systems. In vitro production of embryos is still quite difficult in the horse. However, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been used to produce several foals. Cleavage rates of 60% and blastocyst rates of 30% have been reported after ICSI of in vitro-matured oocytes. Gamete intrafallopian tube transfer (GIFT) is a possible treatment for subfertile stallions. Transfer of in vivo-matured oocytes with 200,000 sperm into the oviduct of normal mares resulted in a pregnancy rate of 55-82%. Oocyte freezing is a technique that has proven difficult in most species. However, equine oocytes vitrified in a solution of ethylene glycol, DMSO, and Ficoll and loaded onto a cryoloop resulted in three pregnancies of 26 transfers and two live foals produced. Production of a cloned horse appears to be likely, as several cloned pregnancies have recently been produced. PMID:12499026

  2. Adoption first? The disposition of human embryos.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-06-01

    Anja Karnein has suggested that because of the importance of respect for persons, law and policy should require some human embryos created in vitro to be available for adoption for a period of time. If no one comes forward to adopt the embryos during that time, they may be destroyed (in the case of embryos left over from fertility medicine) or used in research (in the case of embryos created for that purpose or left over from fertility medicine). This adoption option would increase the number of embryos available for couples looking for help in having children, but that effect is less important--Karnein argues--than the observance of respect for human persons. As possible persons, she holds that embryos ought to be treated, as if they will become children, if only for a while. If enacted as a matter of law and policy, an 'adoption option' would wrongly interfere with the dispositional rights women and men ought to have over embryos they create in the course of trying to have children. Karnein's proposal would also deprive researchers of certainty that the embryos they create for research would actually be available that way, leading to increased burdens of time and money and maybe even to more embryos than would otherwise be produced. Karnein's analysis does not show, moreover, that any duty of rescue applies to embryos. No woman is required to adopt any embryo, which significantly undercuts the justification for an obligatory adoption period.

  3. [Medical and ethical basis for embryo cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Crosby, Javier A; Salas, Sofía P

    2014-07-01

    As part of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART), the advent of embryo freezing lowered the number of embryos transferred, decreasing multiple births without jeopardizing pregnancy rates. Using vitrification technology, 90% of embryos survive after thawing, producing clinical pregnancy rates similar to those of fresh embryos (41.6%y 44.3% respectively). Furthermore, cumulative pregnancy rates, obtained after transferring fresh plus frozen/thawed embryos, can reach 70%. Frozen embryo transfers (FET) are reported by six of seven institutions, which are part of the Chilean ART registry, and altogether constitute 22.8% of all ART procedures. Increasing use of cryopreservation lowered overall multiple gestations from 33% in 1995 to 23% in 2011, reducing pre term births and perinatal mortality. For many people, embryo freezing generates ethical dilemmas, due to the potential risks to which embryos are exposed, and the uncontrolled accumulation and disposal of human embryos. Scientific evidence today shows that frozen/thawed embryos are not exposed to disproportionate risks, and by hindering its use, both women and their children are exposed to the risks of multiple gestation, repeated cycles of ovarian hormonal stimulation or the impossibility to afford repeated ART cycles. In this article, we provide biomedical, as well as ethical, arguments to sustain that embryo cryopreservation is not only justified but fundamental when offering infertility treatment with ART.

  4. The effect of thalidomide in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Trent D

    2009-08-01

    Early in the history of the thalidomide disaster, chick embryos were "eliminated" as useful in the study of thalidomide. One reason for that conclusion was that many of the early experiments were flawed. We employed a number of experiments to expose chick embryos to thalidomide. Our data show that thalidomide does cause limb reduction defects in chick embryos as long as the embryos are directly exposed to the drug. The most useful techniques are implanting thalidomide-soaked beads into the embryo immediately adjacent to the limb territory or soaking presumptive chick limb territories in thalidomide and then grafting the explants to a host embryo celom. Thalidomide affects the chick limb grafted to a host embryo in a dose response fashion. Furthermore, S-thalidomide and S-EM12 are more teratogenic than R-thalidomide and R-EM12.

  5. Induction of autophagy improves embryo viability in cloned mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shen, XingHui; Zhang, Na; Wang, ZhenDong; Bai, GuangYu; Zheng, Zhong; Gu, YanLi; Wu, YanShuang; Liu, Hui; Zhou, DongJie; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle their components. Moreover, autophagy is essential for preimplantation development in mammals. Here we show that autophagy is also important for reprogramming in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our data indicate that unlike fertilized oocytes, autophagy is not triggered in SCNT embryos during 6 hours of activation. Mechanistically, the inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation is due to the cytochalasin B (CB) caused depolymerization of actin filaments. In this study, we induced autophagy during SCNT activation by rapamycin and pp242, which could restore the expected level of autophagy and significantly enhance the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when compared with the control (68.5% and 68.7% vs. 41.5%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the treatment of rapamycin and pp242 accelerates active DNA demethylation indicated by the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC, and treatment of rapamycin improves degradation of maternal mRNA as well. Thus, our findings reveal that autophagy is important for development of SCNT embryos and inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation might be one of the serious causes of low efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26643778

  6. The chick embryo in studies of virulence and immunity with Neisseria Gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Diena, B B; Lavergne, G; Ryan, A; Ashton, F E; Wallace, R; Perry, M; Daoust, V

    1975-12-01

    Intravenous inoculation of 11-day old chick embryos with Neisseria gonorrhoeae has confirmed the original observation of Bumgarner and Finkelstein that T1 and T2 gonocci are significantly more virulent than T3 and T4. Pili do not seem to be solely responsible for this virulence, since elimination of pili did not effect either the viability or the virulence of N. gonorrhoeae. In neutralization studies, there was only one log difference between the ability of normal and hyperimmune rabbit serum to protect the embryo against gonoccocal infection. However, when mouse sera were used in the same chick embryo system a clear difference was noted between the protective activity of normal serum and that antisera elicited in mice by purified gonococcal antigens. It is suggested therefore that mouse antisera be used in this chick embryo model for the assay for gonococcal antigens.

  7. Titration of vaccinia virus by intravenous injection of chick embryos.

    PubMed

    KAPLAN, C

    1960-01-01

    The final test of a smallpox vaccine is its capacity to prevent the disease from developing in inoculated individuals. This capacity, however, cannot be measured directly, so that other methods of assessing the efficacy of vaccine have had to be developed. A laboratory method-pock counting on the chorio-allantoic membrane of chick embryos-has recently been shown to provide a reasonably reliable estimate of the number of infective units in a given vaccine. In this paper, the author compares this pock-counting method with another method-titration by intravenous injection of chick embryos. He concludes that, although the reproducibility of titrations by intravenous injection compares very favourably with that obtained by chorio-allantoic inoculation, the former method would not be advantageous for the assay of vaccines, since it is very time-consuming and since differences in virulence might obscure comparisons between the efficacy of vaccines.

  8. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  9. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  10. Genetics of early embryo survival

    SciTech Connect

    Niswander, L.; Edstroem, J.E.; Rinchik, E.M.; Magnuson, T.

    1989-01-01

    The albino-deletion complex represents one of the few regions of the mouse genome where a set of specific developmental defects are associated with a series of overlapping chromosomal deletions. A total of 37 deletions exist, all of which remove the region of mouse chromosome 7 that surrounds and includes the albino coat-color locus. The complementation patterns among these deletion chromosomes indicate that at least 9 distinct functional units exist in this region. Two of these units contain genes whose expression is required around the time the basic body plan is being established in the early postimplantation embryo. Embryos homozygous for the deletions that remove one of these units develop to day 8.5. Extensive development of the extraembryonic structures occurs, and the three primary germ layers form but there is no organization of mesoderm into somites or induction of the neural axis. Embryos homozygous for deletions that remove the second region, as well as the first, do not undergo gastrulation, and there is no development of the extraembryonic structures. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Enhance beef cattle improvement by embryo biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Zan, L

    2012-10-01

    Embryo biotechnology has become one of the prominent high businesses worldwide. This technology has evolved through three major changes, that is, traditional embryo transfer (in vivo embryo production by donor superovulation), in vitro embryo production by ovum pick up with in vitro fertilization and notably current cloning technique by somatic cell nuclear transfer and transgenic animal production. Embryo biotechnology has widely been used in dairy and beef cattle industry and commercial bovine embryo transfer has become a large international business. Currently, many developed biotechnologies during the period from early oocyte stage to pre-implantation embryos can be used to create new animal breeds and accelerate genetic progression. Based on recent advances in embryo biotechnologies and authors current studies, this review will focus on a description of the application of this technology to beef cattle improvement and discuss how to use this technology to accelerate beef cattle breeding and production. The main topics of this presentation include the following: (i) how to increase calf production numbers from gametes including sperm and oocyte; (ii) multiple ovulation and embryo transfer breeding schemes; (iii) in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasm sperm injection in bovine; (iv) pronuclear development and transgenic animals; (v) sex selection from sperm and embryos; (vi) cloning and androgenesis; (vii) blastocyst development and embryonic stem cells; (viii) preservation of beef cattle genetic resources; and (ix) conclusions.

  12. Radioactive labeling of proteins in cultured postimplantation mouse embryos. I. Influence of the embryo preparation method

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Klose, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Conditions for optimum incorporation of radioactive amino acids into proteins of cultured postimplantation mouse embryos were investigated under the aspect of using these proteins for two-dimensional electrophoretic separations followed by fluorography. The aim was to obtain highly radioactive proteins under conditions as physiological as possible. Embryos at Days 10, 11, and 12 of gestation were prepared in different ways and incubated for 4 h in Tyrode's solution containing ({sup 3}H)amino acids (mixture) at a concentration of 27 microCi/ml medium. The preparations were: (a) yolk sac opened, placenta and blood circulation intact; (b) yolk sac and amnion opened, placenta and blood circulation intact (Day 10 embryos only); (c) placenta, yolk sac, and amnion removed (embryo naked); (d) naked embryos cut randomly into pieces (Day 10 embryos only). After incubation whole embryos or certain parts (tail, liver, rest body) were investigated by determining the radioactivity taken up by the protein. The results are given in dpm per mg protein per embryo. Radioactivity of proteins was about 3 times higher in naked embryos than in embryos left in their yolk sacs. This was true for all three stages investigated. However, the degree of radioactivity in the various parts of naked embryos differed by a factor of 15, whereas radioactivity was evenly distributed in embryos incubated in their yolk sacs. Therefore, embryos prepared according to the first method (see above) fulfilled the conditions required at the best.

  13. Palaeontology: pterosaur embryo from the Early Cretaceous.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2004-06-10

    Dinosaur embryos have been discovered all over the world, but so far no pterosaur embryos have been reported. Here we describe a Chinese fossil from the Early Cretaceous period containing an embryo that is unambiguously a pterosaur. The embryonic skeleton, which is exquisitely preserved in its egg, is associated with eggshell fragments, wing membranes and skin imprints. This discovery confirms that pterosaurs were egg-layers and sheds new light on our understanding of pterosaur development.

  14. Vitrification of buffalo oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Parnpai, Rangsun; Liang, Yuanyuan; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Somfai, Tamas; Nagai, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    During the past decade, vitrification has been acknowledged as an efficient alternative to traditional slow-rate freezing in both human and animal embryology. The buffalo is the major milk and meat producing farm animal in many developing countries. Cryopreservation of buffalo oocytes and embryos is very important in preserving this species for future use. This review discusses the recent buffalo oocytes and embryos vitrification procedures, different types of cryoinjuries, and other factors affecting the vitrification of buffalo oocytes and embryos.

  15. Using chicken embryos for teratology studies.

    PubMed

    Henshel, Diane S; DeWitt, Jamie; Troutman, Andrea

    2003-02-01

    This unit describes methods for injecting, incubating, handling and analyzing domestic chicken embryos used in teratology studies. It also includes a discussion of caveats and special handling issues as well as some discussion of statistical analyses that differentiate working with chicken embryos from working with clutches of eggs or litters of pups. As an example of potential data, preliminary data from a study of abnormalities in early embryos and hatchling chicks exposed to chlordane are presented.

  16. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  17. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  18. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  19. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  20. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  1. Experimental risk assessment of bovine viral diarrhea virus transmission via in vitro embryo production using somatic cell nucleus transfer.

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Chen, S H; Sadeghieh, S; Guerra, T; Xiang, T; Meredith, J; Polejaeva, I

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive risk assessment on infectious disease transmission in the system of in vitro embryo production via somatic cell nucleus transfer (SCNT) technology using bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as a model. The risks of BVDV transmission in each step of the SCNT embryo production procedure, from donor cells to preimplantation SCNT embryo culture, were carefully examined using a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The identified primary source of BVDV transmission in SCNT embryo production was donor cell infection, most likely caused by contaminated fetal bovine serum in the culture medium. The risk of disease transmission through contaminated oocytes from an abattoir was relatively low, and it can be greatly minimized by cumulus cell removal and adequate oocyte washing procedures. Of the 200 cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and more than 1500 cumulus cell-free oocyte (CFO) samples collected from multiple sources over a course of 7 months, only 2.5% of the COCs were BVDV positive, and all of the CFOs (100%) were BVDV negative. To evaluate the risk of BVDV introduction during in vitro SCNT embryo culture, 324 SCNT embryos were produced from 18 different cell lines using oocytes from 26 different batches collected over a course of 9 months. The embryos were cultured in vitro for 7 days and then tested for BVDV. All of the 324 SCNT embryos (100%) were negative, indicating that the embryo culture system is virtually risk-free for BVDV transmission. Based on these results, a standard operational protocol (SOP) for SCNT embryo production was proposed to greatly minimize the risk of BVDV transmission through the SCNT embryo production system. This SOP could be a starting point to produce a SCNT system that is virtually risk-free for disease transmission in general.

  2. Cryopreservation of immature embryos of Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Pence, V C

    1991-06-01

    Immature, white zygotic embryos of Theobroma cacao L. (cacao) retained the ability to produce callus and to undergo somatic embryogenesis after slow hydrated freezing and desiccated fast freezing in liquid nitrogen. The highest rate of somatic embryogenesis occurred in embryos which were precultured on a medium containing 3% sucrose, frozen slowly with cryoprotectants before exposure to liquid nitrogen, and recovered on a medium containing 3 mg/liter NAA. Embryos precultured on media containing sucrose increasing to 21% had a higher rate of survival but were less embryogenic after freezing. These results suggest that immature embryos might be used for long-term germplasm storage of T. cacao germplasm.

  3. Risk assessment of transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in abattoir-derived in vitro produced embryos.

    PubMed

    Perry, G H

    2007-07-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pathogen of the bovine reproductive system causing reduced conception rates, abortions and persistently infected calves. Most if not all strains of BVDV are transmissible by natural mating and AI. For international trade, it is recommended that in vitro fertilized embryos be washed according to the IETS Manual. However, BVDV may not be entirely washed out, resulting in possible transmission risks to recipients. Donor cows, donor bulls and biological agents are all possible sources of contamination. The process for producing in vitro produced (IVP) embryos is complex and non-standard, and some procedures can contribute to spread of BVDV to uninfected embryos. The structure of the zone pellucida (ZP) of IVP embryos permits adherence of BVDV to the ZP. To estimate the risk of producing infected recipients and persistently infected calves from abattoir-derived IVP embryos, a quantitative risk assessment model using Microsoft Excel and Palisade @Risk was developed. Assumptions simplified some of the complexities of the IVP process. Uncertainties due to incomplete or variable data were addressed by incorporating probability distributions in the model. Model variables included: disease prevalence; the number of donor cows slaughtered for ovaries; the number of oocytes collected, selected and cultured; the BVDV status of ovaries, semen, biological compounds and its behavior in the IVP embryo process. The model used the Monte Carlo method to simulate the IVP process. When co-culture cells derived from donor cows of unknown health status were used for in vitro culture (IVC), the probability of a recipient cow at risk of infection to BVDV per oocyte selected for IVP processing averaged 0.0006. However, when co-culture free from BVDV was used, the probability was 1.2 x 10(-5). Thus, for safe international trade in bovine IVP embryos (i.e. negligible risks of transmission of BVDV), co-culture cells, if used during IVC for producing IVP

  4. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  5. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment. PMID:27378857

  6. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G.; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment. PMID:27378857

  7. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment.

  8. Embryo development in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Pat; Fair, Trudee; Forde, Niamh; Rizos, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    During the past 50 years, the fertility of high-producing lactating dairy cows has decreased, associated with intensive selection for increased milk production. The physiological and metabolic changes associated with high milk production, including decreased (glucose, insulin, IGF-I) or increased (nonesterified fatty acids, ketone bodies) concentrations of circulating metabolites during nutrient partitioning associated with negative energy balance as well as uterine and nonuterine diseases have been linked with poor reproductive efficiency. Fertilization is typically above 80% and does not seem to be the principal factor responsible for the low fertility in dairy cows. However, early embryonic development is compromised in high-producing dairy cows, as observed by most embryonic losses occurring during the first 2 weeks after fertilization and may be linked to compromised oocyte quality due to a poor follicular microenvironment, suboptimal reproductive tract environment for the embryo, and/or inadequate maternal-embryonic communication. These and other factors related to embryo development will be discussed.

  9. Replication of cytopathic and noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus in zona-free and zona-intact in vitro-produced bovine embryos and the effect on embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Vanroose, G; Nauwynck, H; Van Soom, A; Vanopdenbosch, E; de Kruif, A

    1998-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not cytopathic (CP) and noncytopathic (NCP) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are able to replicate within in vitro-produced embryos and to investigate whether inoculation of embryos with BVDV affects their normal development. Zona pellucida (ZP)-free oocytes, zygotes, 8-cell-stage embryos, morulae, and hatched blastocysts (HB) were incubated for 1 h in 1 ml of Minimal Essential Medium containing 10(6.00) tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)50/ml NCP BVDV isolate 22,146 or 10(6.25) TCID50/ml CP BVDV strain Oregon C24V. At 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h postinoculation (hpi), groups of embryos were collected for virus titration. A small amount of newly produced virus was detected in 8-cell embryos at 60 hpi (10(1.8) TCID50/100 cells), but only for CP BVDV. For ZP-free morulae and HB, maximal intracellular virus titers were, respectively, 10(1.47) and 10(2.33) TCID50/100 cells at 48 hpi for the CP biotype and 10(0.64) and 10(0.84) TCID50/100 cells at 72 hpi for the NCP biotype. Only an infection with CP BVDV had a significant inhibitory effect on further development of ZP-free morulae. It can be concluded that ZP-free in vitro-produced embryos are permissive to an infection with BVDV, with increasing susceptibility of the embryos in accordance with their developmental stage. In contrast to observations in ZP-free in vitro-produced embryos, no virus replication or signs of embryonic degeneration were detected in ZP-intact in vitro-derived embryos.

  10. Neural network classification of sweet potato embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molto, Enrique; Harrell, Roy C.

    1993-05-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a process that allows for the in vitro propagation of thousands of plants in sub-liter size vessels and has been successfully applied to many significant species. The heterogeneity of maturity and quality of embryos produced with this technique requires sorting to obtain a uniform product. An automated harvester is being developed at the University of Florida to sort embryos in vitro at different stages of maturation in a suspension culture. The system utilizes machine vision to characterize embryo morphology and a fluidic based separation device to isolate embryos associated with a pre-defined, targeted morphology. Two different backpropagation neural networks (BNN) were used to classify embryos based on information extracted from the vision system. One network utilized geometric features such as embryo area, length, and symmetry as inputs. The alternative network utilized polar coordinates of an embryo's perimeter with respect to its centroid as inputs. The performances of both techniques were compared with each other and with an embryo classification method based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Similar results were obtained with all three techniques. Classification efficiency was improved by reducing the dimension of the feature vector trough a forward stepwise analysis by LDA. In order to enhance the purity of the sample selected as harvestable, a reject to classify option was introduced in the model and analyzed. The best classifier performances (76% overall correct classifications, 75% harvestable objects properly classified, homogeneity improvement ratio 1.5) were obtained using 8 features in a BNN.

  11. Embryo Disposition Disputes: Controversies and Case Law.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I Glenn; Adashi, Eli Y

    2016-07-01

    When prospective parents use in vitro fertilization, many of them hope to generate more embryos than they intend to implant immediately. The technology often requires multiple attempts to reach a successful pregnancy, and couples can cryopreserve any excess embryos so that they have them on hand for later attempts. As part of obtaining informed consent for IVF or cryopreservation, clinics typically ask patients to specify their preferences for the embryos in the event of divorce or death, offering options such as use of the embryos by a specified partner, donation to research, or discarding the remaining embryos. Still, many courts face a recurring problem: the partners dissolve their relationship (typically through divorce), and one party wants to use the frozen embryos over the objections of the other. Courts and legislatures have struggled with how to handle these cases, which seem to pit one partner's right to procreate against the other's right not to procreate. In this essay, we use one of the most recent decisions in this line of cases-the Appellate Court of Illinois's decision in Szafranski v. Dunston-to explain the current state of the law and make recommendations for changes. The issue is ripe for revisiting because in the last year, embryo disputes have become a battlefront for larger conflagrations over the moral status of embryos. PMID:27417864

  12. The Virtual Embryo Project (v-Embryo™)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The v-Embryo is a far reaching new research program at the US EPA to develop a working computer model of a mammalian embryo that can be used to better understand the prenatal risks posed by environmental chemicals and to eventually predict a chemical's potential developmental tox...

  13. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  14. Intrauterine embryo transfer with canine embryos cryopreserved by the slow freezing and the Cryotop method

    PubMed Central

    HORI, Tatsuya; USHIJIMA, Hitoshi; KIMURA, Taku; KOBAYASHI, Masanori; KAWAKAMI, Eiichi; TSUTSUI, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Canine embryos (8-cell to blastocyst stages) frozen-thawed using the slow-freezing method with glycerol (four recipients) or dimethyl sulfoxide (three recipients) as a cryoprotectant and vitrified-warmed using the Cryotop method (five recipients) were surgically transferred into the unilateral uterine horn of recipient bitches. As a result, the morphology of embryos frozen-thawed using the slow-freezing method was judged to be normal, but no conception occurred in any of the recipient bitches. Two of the five bitches that received transferred embryos (morula to early blastocyst stages) vitrified-warmed using the Cryotop method became pregnant and produced normal pups (1/9 embryos, 11.1% and 1/6 embryos, 17.0%). It was concluded that the Cryotop method was more appropriate for canine embryo cryopreservation than the slow-freezing method, which is used for the cryopreservation of embryos of other mammalian species. PMID:27041356

  15. Development of mouse embryos cryopreserved by vitrification.

    PubMed

    Rall, W F; Wood, M J; Kirby, C; Whittingham, D G

    1987-07-01

    Eight-cell mouse embryos were cryopreserved by vitrification in a concentrated solution of dimethylsulphoxide, acetamide, propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol. This solution (designated VS1) does not crystallize when cooled to subzero temperatures but instead forms a glassy transparent solid. Embryos were exposed in three steps to a stock VS1 solution or a saline solution containing 90% of the cryoprotectants in the stock VS1 (90% VS1) and then the suspensions were vitrified by rapid cooling in liquid nitrogen. Of 568 embryos vitrified in 90% VS1, 80% developed in vitro and 98 normal fetuses or young (17% of the total) were produced after transfer to pseudopregnant recipients. By contrast, 22% of 153 embryos vitrified in the stock VS1 developed in vitro, but only one normal fetus was obtained after transfer. These results demonstrate that normal fetuses and young can be produced from embryos cryopreserved by the simple and rapid method of vitrification.

  16. Physiological and molecular determinants of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Lin, Haiyan; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Haibin; Armant, D. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation involves the intimate interaction between an implantation-competent blastocyst and a receptive uterus, which occurs in a limited time period known as the window of implantation. Emerging evidence shows that defects originating during embryo implantation induce ripple effects with adverse consequences on later gestation events, highlighting the significance of this event for pregnancy success. Although a multitude of cellular events and molecular pathways involved in embryo-uterine crosstalk during implantation have been identified through gene expression studies and genetically engineered mouse models, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of embryo implantation is still missing. This review focuses on recent progress with particular attention to physiological and molecular determinants of blastocyst activation, uterine receptivity, blastocyst attachment and uterine decidualization. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms governing embryo implantation should generate new strategies to rectify implantation failure and improve pregnancy rates in women. PMID:23290997

  17. Embryo research: is disclosing commercial intent enough?

    PubMed

    de Lacey, Sheryl

    2006-07-01

    This article critically reviews legislative and ethical frameworks that regulate embryo research. Australian legislation for embryo research is currently being reviewed. It is a legal mandate that scientists disclose to embryo donors any intent to pursue commercial gain from altruistic donation. But scientists are also required to inform donors that, as donors, they too must not benefit financially. In the same political context, public subsidy for IVF treatment is under review. There is contradiction in values and indication of inequity in the Australian social context. IVF is undervalued, yet products derived from IVF embryos are imbued with public hope. Rather than regulate to balance this inequity, assumptions of altruism and attention to autonomy in legislative framework give it further scope. This article proposes that justice be addressed by acknowledging reproductive effort, and thereby embryo research be considered in terms of reciprocity. It further proposes regulation of commercial profit and the imposition of a redirected tax levy.

  18. Undernutrition affects embryo quality of superovulated ewes.

    PubMed

    Abecia, J A; Forcada, F; Palacín, I; Sánchez-Prieto, L; Sosa, C; Fernández-Foren, A; Meikle, A

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of undernutrition on embryo production and quality in superovulated sheep, 45 ewes were allocated into two groups to be fed diets that provided 1.5 (control, C; n = 20) or 0.5 (low nutrition, L; n = 25) times daily requirements for maintenance, from oestrous synchronization with intravaginal sponges to embryo collection. Embryos were collected 7 days after the onset of oestrus (day 0). Low nutrition resulted in lower live weight and body condition at embryo collection (P < 0.05). Diet (P < 0.01) and day of sampling (P < 0.001) significantly affected plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and insulin concentrations. Plasma leptin concentrations decreased on day 7 only in L ewes. A significant effect of dietary treatment (P < 0.05) and day (P < 0.0001) was observed on plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations. The number of recovered oocytes and embryos did not differ between the groups (L: 15.4 ± 0.4; C: 12.4 ± 0.4). Recovery rate was lower (P < 0.05) in the L (60%) than in the C group (73%). The total number of embryos and number of viable-transferable embryos (5.0 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.3 embryos, respectively) of the L group were lower (P < 0.1) when compared with controls (8.4 ± 0.4 and 6.2 ± 0.4 embryos, respectively). Undernutrition during the period of superovulation and early embryonic development reduced total and viable number of embryos. These effects might be mediated by disruption of endocrine homeostasis, oviduct environment and/or oocyte quality.

  19. Transplacental transmission of rabies virus from a naturally infected skunk.

    PubMed

    Howard, D R

    1981-04-01

    A female skunk (Mephitis mephitis) was submitted to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for routine rabies diagnosis. Rabies infection was confirmed by fluorescent rabies antibody examination on brain tissue. Additional tissues, including uterus, ovaries, and 6 embryos, were collected to study rabies pathogenesis. The fluorescent rabies antibody examination showed rabies virus antigen in 1 embryo, the uterus, and ovaries.

  20. Toxicity of chlorine to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael L; Buchner, Cari; Barton, Carrie; Tanguay, Robert L

    2014-01-16

    Surface disinfection of fertilized fish eggs is widely used in aquaculture to reduce extraovum pathogens that may be released from brood fish during spawning, and this is routinely used in zebrafish Danio rerio research laboratories. Most laboratories use approximately 25 to 50 ppm unbuffered chlorine solution for 5 to 10 min. Treatment of embryos with chlorine has significant germicidal effects for many Gram-negative bacteria, viruses, and trophozoite stages of protozoa, but is less effective against cyst or spore stages of protozoa and certain Mycobacterium spp. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of unbuffered and buffered chlorine solutions to embryos exposed at 6 or 24 h post-fertilization (hpf) to determine whether higher concentrations can be used for treating zebrafish embryos. Most of our experiments entailed using an outbred line (5D), with both mortality and malformations as endpoints. We found that 6 hpf embryos consistently were more resistant than 24 hpf embryos to the toxic effects of chlorine. Chlorine is more toxic and germicidal at lower pH, and chlorine causes elevated pH. Consistent with this, we found that unbuffered chlorine solutions (pH ca. 8-9) were less toxic at corresponding concentrations than solutions buffered to pH 7. Based on our findings here, we recommend treating 6 hpf embryos for 10 min and 24 hpf embryos for 5 min with unbuffered chlorine solution at 100 ppm.

  1. Genetic Analysis of Human Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Herrero, S; Cervero, A; Mateu, E; Mir, P; Póo, M E; Rodrigo, L; Vera, M; Rubio, C

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation development comprises the initial stages of mammalian development, before the embryo implants into the mother's uterus. In normal conditions, after fertilization the embryo grows until reaching blastocyst stage. The blastocyst grows as the cells divide and the cavity expands, until it arrives at the uterus, where it "hatches" from the zona pellucida to implant into the uterine wall. Nevertheless, embryo quality and viability can be affected by chromosomal abnormalities, most of which occur during gametogenesis and early embryo development; human embryos produced in vitro are especially vulnerable. Therefore, the selection of chromosomally normal embryos for transfer in assisted reproduction can improve outcomes in poor-prognosis patients. Additionally, in couples with an inherited disorder, early diagnosis could prevent pregnancy with an affected child and would, thereby, avoid the therapeutic interruption of pregnancy. These concerns have prompted advancements in the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Genetic testing is applied in two different scenarios: in couples with an inherited genetic disorder or carriers of a structural chromosomal abnormality, it is termed PGD; in infertile couples with increased risk of generating embryos with de novo chromosome abnormalities, it is termed preimplantation genetic screening, or PGS. PMID:27475859

  2. Characterization of embryo-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Z.R.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the structure and function of a set of genes whose expression is regulated in embryo development, and that are not expressed in mature tissues -- the embryogenic genes. In order to isolate these genes, we immunized a rabbit with total extracts of somatic embryos of carrot, and enriched the anti-embryo antiserum for antibodies reacting with extracts of carrot somatic embryos. Using this enriched antiserum, we screened a lambda gt11 cDNA library constructed from embryo poly A{sup +} RNA, and isolated 10 cDNA clones that detect embryogenic mRNAs. Monospecific antibodies have been purified for proteins corresponding to each cDNA sequence. Four cDNA clones were further characterized in terms of the expression of their corresponding mRNA and protein in somatic embryos of carrot. In some cases, comparable gene sequences or products have been detected in somatic and zygotic embryos of other plant species. The characteristics of these 4 cDNA clones -- clone Nos. 8, 59, and 66 -- are described in this report. 3 figs.

  3. In-vivo Centrifugation of Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Susan L.; Welte, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, and their outer egg shells are removed by treatment with 50% bleach. Embryos are then transferred to a small agar plate and inserted, posterior end first, into small vertical holes in the agar. The plates containing embedded embryos are centrifuged for 30 min at 3000g. The agar supports the embryos and keeps them in a defined orientation. Afterwards, the embryos are dug out of the agar with a blunt needle. Centrifugation separates major organelles into distinct layers, a stratification easily visible by bright-field microscopy. A number of fluorescent markers are available to confirm successful stratification in living embryos. Proteins associated with certain organelles will be enriched in a particular layer, demonstrating colocalization. Individual layers can be recovered for biochemical analysis or transplantation into donor eggs. This technique is applicable for organelle separation in other large cells, including the eggs and oocytes of diverse species. PMID:20613707

  4. Glassfrog embryos hatch early after parental desertion

    PubMed Central

    Delia, Jesse R. J.; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Summers, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Both parental care and hatching plasticity can improve embryo survival. Research has found that parents can alter hatching time owing to a direct effect of care on embryogenesis or via forms of care that cue the hatching process. Because parental care alters conditions critical for offspring development, hatching plasticity could allow embryos to exploit variation in parental behaviour. However, this interaction of parental care and hatching plasticity remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that embryos hatch early to cope with paternal abandonment in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Centrolenidae). We conducted male-removal experiments in a wild population, and examined embryos' response to conditions with and without fathers. Embryos hatched early when abandoned, but extended development in the egg stage when fathers continued care. Paternal care had no effect on developmental rate. Rather, hatching plasticity was due to embryos actively hatching at different developmental stages, probably in response to deteriorating conditions without fathers. Our experimental results are supported by a significant correlation between the natural timing of abandonment and hatching in an unmanipulated population. This study demonstrates that embryos can respond to conditions resulting from parental abandonment, and provides insights into how variation in care can affect selection on egg-stage adaptations. PMID:24789892

  5. Vitrification-based cryopreservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Schreuders, P.D.; Mazur, P.

    1994-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 strains of Drosophila melanogaster are maintained by geneticists through regular transfer of breeding stocks. A more cost effective solution is to cryopreserve their embryos. Cooling and warming rates >10,000{degrees}C/min. are required to prevent chilling injury. To avoid the lethal intracellular ice normally produced at such high cooling rates, it is necessary to use {ge}50% (w/w) concentrations of glass-inducing solutes to vitrify the embryos. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to develop and evaluate ethylene glycol and polyvinyl pyrrolidone based vitrification solutions. The resulting solution consists of 8.5M ethylene glycol + 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone in D-20 Drosophila culture medium. A two stage method is used for the introduction and concentration of these solutes within the embryo. The method reduces the exposure time to the solution and, consequently, reduces toxicity. Both DSC and freezing experiments suggest that, while twelve-hour embryos will vitrify using cooling rates >200{degrees}C/min., they will devitrify and be killed with even moderately rapid warming rates of {approximately}1,900{degrees}C/min. Very rapid warming ({approximately}100,000{degrees}C/min.) results in variable numbers of successfully cryopreserved embryos. This sensitivity to warming rite is typical of devitrification. The variability in survival is reduced using embryos of a precisely determined embryonic stage. The vitrification of the older, fifteen-hour, embryos yields an optimized hatching rate of 68%, with 35 - 40% of the resulting larvae developing to normal adults. This Success rite in embryos of this age may reflect a reduced sensitivity to limited devitrification or a more even distribution of the ethylene glycol within the embryo.

  6. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  7. Growth, development and pairing of Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae (Trematoda) metacercariae on the chorio-allantois of chick embryos cultivated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fried, B; Fine, R H; Felter, B L

    1980-08-01

    A simple in vitro technique was devised to culture chick embryos in Petri dishes from the 4th to the 21st day of incubation. Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae (Trematoda) metacercariae were placed either singly or multiply (5/embryo) on the chorio-allantois of in vitro grown embryos on day 7 and were removed on day 14. Growth and development studies were also made on worms grown singly or multiply (5/chick) in the bursa of Fabricius of the domestic chick. Worms grown singly or multiply in embryos were sexually mature, although eggs from these worms were abnormal when compared with eggs from worms recovered from chicks. The mean body area of worms from chicks was 2-3 times greater than that of worms from embryos. The mean body area of single worms from embryos was significantly larger than that of worms grown multiply in this site. However, the mean body area of multiple worms from the chick was significantly larger than that of single worms from this site. Worm pairs or clusters were seen in all embryos with the multiple infections. PMID:7422365

  8. Selecting the 'best' embryos: prospects for improvement.

    PubMed

    Braude, Peter

    2013-12-01

    This review considers why and how embryos are selected for transfer and with what consequences. It concludes that: (i) current selection methods are inadequate or at least inadequately subjected to evidential scrutiny; (ii) decisions about number of embryos should be based not solely on input (numbers transferred) but on the likelihood of the transfer resulting in multiple pregnancies - out turn; and (iii) what is needed are better methods not just for selecting better embryos, but also for selecting responsible clinicians who collude less with their patients' demands but advise them more responsibly.

  9. Moral qualms, future persons, and embryo research.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David Martin

    2008-05-01

    Many people have moral qualms about embryo research, feeling that embryos must deserve some kind of protection, if not so much as is afforded to persons. This paper will show that these qualms serve to camouflage motives that are really prudential, at the cost of also obscuring the real ethical issues at play in the debate concerning embryo research and therapeutic cloning. This in turn leads to fallacious use of the Actions/Omissions Distinction and ultimately neglects the duties that we have towards future persons.

  10. Embryo Transfer (Techniques, Donors, and Recipients).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick E; Jahnke, Marianna M

    2016-07-01

    Commercial embryo transfer has evolved as an art and as a science since the early 1970s. Today's multiple ovulation embryo transfer is a widely used reproductive tool on many farms and is performed by veterinarians throughout the world. Propagation of the female genomes of select donors, through embryo transfer, has allowed a rapid progression of genetic gain in many breeds, much like what happened with artificial insemination since the 1940s. Advancement of this technology is migrating to in vitro fertilization technology today, allowing a higher volume of offspring to be produced with sex selection in the laboratory. PMID:27140299

  11. The ART of studying early embryo development: progress and challenges in ruminant embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Pat; Fair, Trudee

    2014-01-01

    The study of preimplantation mammalian embryo development is challenging due to difficulties in accessing in vivo-derived embryos in large numbers at the early stages and the inability to culture embryos in vitro much beyond the blastocyst stage. Nonetheless, embryos exhibit an amazing plasticity and tolerance when it comes to adapting to the environment in which they are cultured. They are capable of developing in media ranging in composition from simple balanced salt solutions to complex systems involving serum and somatic cells. At least a proportion of the blastocysts that develop in culture are developmentally competent as evidenced by the fact that live offspring have resulted following transfer. However, several studies using animal models have shown that such embryos are sensitive to environmental conditions that can affect future pre- and post-natal growth and developmental potential. This review summarises some key aspects of early embryo development and the approaches taken to study this important window in early life.

  12. Splitting and biopsy for bovine embryo sexing under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R F; Forell, F; Oliveira, A T; Rodrigues, J L

    2001-12-01

    Improvements on embryo micromanipulation techniques led to the use of embryo bisection technology in commercial embryo transfer programs, and made possible the direct genetic analysis of preimplantation bovine embryos by biopsy. For example, aspiration and microsection, allow bovine embryos sexing by detection of male-specific Y-chromosome in a sample of embryonic cells. We report on the application of the methodologies of splitting and biopsy of bovine embryos in field conditions, and on the results of embryo sex determination by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pregnancy rates achieved with fresh bisected or biopsied embryos (50 to 60%) were similar to the fresh intact embryos (55 to 61%). The PCR protocol used for embryo sexing showed 92% to 94% of efficiency and 90 to 100% of accuracy. These results demonstrate these procedures are suitable for use in field conditions.

  13. Degradation of some pesticides in avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Várnagy, L

    1999-01-01

    On day 9 or 12 of the hatching period different pesticides (parathion, methyl-parathion, carbendazim, 2,4-D-amine Na, phosmethylane) were applied in ecotoxicological trials. The formulations were either injected into the air space of pheasant, quail or hen eggs or hen eggs were treated by the immersion technique. The residues of pesticides were measured in samples on days 13, 14 and 16 of incubation of chicken and pheasant embryos, while the Japanese quail embryos were analysed on days 10-14 of incubation. Analytical chemistry data showed a varying degradation rate of the compounds in avian embryos of the same species. The residues directly affect the embryos, disturbing their normal development and causing pathophysiological and morphological changes.

  14. Heterotopic pregnancy after a single embryo transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Sun; Cha, Hyun-Hwa; Han, Ae Ra; Lee, Seong Goo

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy is a rare and life-threatening condition which is defined as coexistent intrauterine and ectopic gestation. The risk of ectopic and heterotopic pregnancy is increasing due to the increased risk of multiple pregnancies with the aid of assisted reproductive technologies. However, it hardly happens in the setting of single embryo transfer, since single embryo transfer significantly reduces the incidence of multiple pregnancies. Surprisingly, we experienced a case of heterotopic pregnancy after a single embryo transfer caused by coincidental natural pregnancy during assisted reproductive technologies. An infertile woman who underwent, during her natural cycle, transfer of a single embryo that had been cryopreserved for 3 years was found to be heterotopically pregnant. After an early and successful management with laparoscopic right salpingectomy, she finally reached at full-term vaginal delivery. PMID:27462600

  15. Predator Recognition in Rainbowfish, Melanotaenia duboulayi, Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, Lois Jane; Haviland, Vivian; Brown, Culum

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to olfactory cues during embryonic development can have long term impacts on birds and amphibians behaviour. Despite the vast literature on predator recognition and responses in fishes, few researchers have determined how fish embryos respond to predator cues. Here we exposed four-day-old rainbowfish (Melanotaenia duboulayi) embryos to cues emanating from a novel predator, a native predator and injured conspecifics. Their response was assessed by monitoring heart rate and hatch time. Results showed that embryos have an innate capacity to differentiate between cues as illustrated by faster heart rates relative to controls. The greatest increase in heart rate occurred in response to native predator odour. While we found no significant change in the time taken for eggs to hatch, all treatments experienced slight delays as expected if embryos are attempting to reduce exposure to larval predators. PMID:24146817

  16. Valuing embryos as both commodities and singularities.

    PubMed

    Legge, Michael; Fitzgerald, Ruth

    2016-03-11

    An argument put forward against gamete and embryo donation, sale and research, is that to do so would treat the gametes or embryos as objects with no intrinsic value as human. Instead, gametes and embryos created and used for donation, sale or research, can be considered more like a commodity created and traded for economic exchange--something that is valuable only for the amount of money or other goods and services that others are willing to exchange. While Kant asserts that humans have dignity rather than object worth, the provision of human gametes and embryos are progressively becoming utilities for resolving childlessness and for certain research investigations. In this paper we discuss the commodity market and the relationship to human reproduction material. PMID:27005877

  17. Crazy making: embryos and gestational mothers.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1991-01-01

    Annas discusses the legal and public policy aspects of two 1990 in vitro fertilization cases. In Davis v. Davis, a Tennessee case involving disputed custody of frozen embryos in a divorce, an appellate court reversed a trial judge and ruled that the couple, not just the woman, should decide the disposition of the embryos. In Johnson v. Calvert, a surrogate mother in California failed to gain custody of the child she bore after gestating an embryo from the ovum and sperm of the couple who hired her. The judges in both cases based their decisions on the genetic relationship of the adult parties to the embryos or child. Annas is critical of determining parenthood exclusively on the basis of genes and argues for continuing the current legal presumption that a woman who gives birth to a child should be considered its legal mother. PMID:2004902

  18. Culture systems: embryo culture and monozygotic twinning.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of monozygotic twinning in pregnancies achieved with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) is significantly higher than spontaneously conceived pregnancies. The factors associated with ART that predispose the embryos to splitting are not well-characterized. Assisted hatching and extended embryo culture are two ART laboratory methods that have been risk factors for monozygotic twinning. The methods and strategies that may be employed to avoid monozygotic twinning are discussed in this chapter.

  19. Cryopreservation of embryos and oocytes: an update.

    PubMed

    Gelety, T; Surrey, E

    1993-10-01

    Widespread incorporation of human embryo cryopreservation into IVF programs may reduce the risk of multiple gestation and severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome as well as contributing to an overall increase in pregnancy rates. Slow cooling techniques appropriate to the stage of embryo development are most commonly employed. Growing experience with ultrarapid freezing suggests that this technique may offer similar success rates and has the advantages of simplicity and economy. The developmental stage at cryopreservation has not been conclusively shown to influence successful pregnancy outcome, although several retrospective studies suggest improved embryo survival and pregnancy rate following freezing at the pronuclear stage. Endometrial preparation using a number of different regimens before thawed-embryo transfer appears to confer no advantage over the natural cycle, but may be necessary with ovulatory dysfunction. The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs during ovarian stimulation for IVF has been suggested to decrease subsequent embryo freeze-thaw survival rates. However, increased pregnancy rates have been reported following transfer of previously cryopreserved embryos originating in cycles using GnRH analog (GnRHa), possibly reflecting increased numbers of embryos available for freezing. Cryopreservation of embryos originating from fertile donor oocytes has been very successful and may be used to facilitate synchronization between a donor and one or more recipients. Recent work in oocyte cryopreservation has addressed the problems of meiotic spindle disruption, the risks of aneuploidy, and decreased fertilization associated with zona hardening and polyspermy. Further refinements in technique will be required before widespread oocyte banking becomes feasible. PMID:8241436

  20. RNA Interference in Chicken Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hateren, Nick J.; Jones, Rachel S.; Wilson, Stuart A.

    The chicken has played an important role in biological discoveries since the 17th century (Stern, 2005). Many investigations into vertebrate development have utilized the chicken due to the accessibility of the chick embryo and its ease of manipulation (Brown et al., 2003). However, the lack of genetic resources has often handicapped these studies and so the chick is frequently overlooked as a model organism for the analysis of vertebrate gene function in favor of mice or zebrafish. In the past six years this situation has altered dramatically with the generation of over half a million expressed sequence tags and >20,000 fully sequenced chicken cDNAs (Boardman et al. 2002; Caldwell et al., 2005; Hubbard et al., 2005) together with a 6X coverage genome sequence (Hillier et al., 2004). These resources have created a comprehensive catalogue of chicken genes with readily accessible cDNA and EST resources available via ARK-GENOMICS (www.ark-genomics.org) for the functional analysis of vertebrate gene function.

  1. The use and disposal of stored embryos.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Bernard M

    2016-07-01

    Claims that human embryos are "human beings" or "persons" cannot be agreed, because philosophies and approaches differ, awarding them statuses from full human to property. In 1984, the UK (Warnock) Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilisation and Embryology made recommendations that still offer legal and ethical guidance. It is widely agreed, for instance, that embryos created through in vitro fertilization (IVF) should not be transferred for reproductive purposes without relevant consent, whether for gamete donors' or others' family-building. A consequence of courts enforcing parties' IVF agreements on stored embryo use or balancing parties' competing interests is that one party-usually the male-can veto the other's use of the embryo for reproduction on termination of a partnership. The extent to which surplus IVF embryos can be donated for research ranges from prohibition to infertility treatment and more, but wider needs for embryology research are appearing that, despite prevailing bans, may require embryos for study created to genetic specifications. PMID:27177517

  2. In vitro bovine embryo production in a synthetic medium: embryo development, cryosurvival, and establishment of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, D; Neira, A; Dubreil, L; Liegeois, L; Destrumelle, S; Michaud, S; Thorin, C; Briand-Amirat, L; Bencharif, D; Tainturier, D

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro embryo culture medium without either fetal calf serum or BSA, using various growth factors and cytokines (GFs-CYKs; IGF-I, IGF-II, bFGF, LIF, GM-CSF, TGF-β1, and PDGF-BB), and other molecules with surfactant and embryotrophic properties, such as recombinant albumin (RA) and hyaluronan (HA). The first part of the study was dedicated to define the best combination of GFs-CYKs + RA + HA for optimal embryonic development. Next, we compared development rates and embryo quality (inner cell mass [ICM]-to-total cell number [TCN] ratio), and postthaw survival and hatching rates using this synthetic medium (T1) and a control medium: synthetic oviduct fluid + BSA + ITS (insulin, transferrin, and selenium). The blastocyst rates were significantly higher with T1 than those with the control at 7 and 8 days after fertilization. There was no significant difference in TCN or the ICM/TCN ratio between the two treatments. Survival and hatching rates 48 hours after thawing were similar for both treatments. Finally, nine embryo transfers were conducted using fresh and previously frozen Day-7 blastocysts to evaluate the in vivo viability of embryos produced in this synthetic medium; four gestations were obtained from six fresh embryos and one gestation from three frozen embryos. In conclusion, the fetal calf serum and BSA-free medium, supplemented with GFs-CYKs + RA + HA, improved embryo development and gave comparable ICM/TCN ratios and postthaw survival rates to the control with BSA. Fresh and frozen embryos produced in this medium are viable for embryo transfer. This fully synthetic method of embryo culture is a useful means of reducing the risk of disease transmission via embryo transfer.

  3. [Lentivirus Delivery of the Short Hairpin RNA Targeting NDV P Gene Inhibits Production of the Newcastle Disease Virus in Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts and Chicken Embryos].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaohua; Xu, Chuantian; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Yanyan; Huang, Qinghua; Hu, Beixia; Zhang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA)-induced RNA degradation can inhibit viral infection, and has been investigated extensively for its efficacy as antiviral therapy. The potential therapeutic role of lentiviral-mediated short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) replication in vivo has been explored less often. We constructed two recombinant lentiviral vectors containing shRNA against the phosphoprotein (P) of the NDV, RNAi-341 and RNAi-671. Recombinant shRNA lentivirus vectors were co-transfected into 293T cells, along with helper plasmids, to package the recombinant shRNA lentivirus. Lentivirus-based shRNAs were titrated and transduced into NDV-susceptible chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and chick embryos. Antiviral activity against the NDV strain was evaluated by virus titration and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. RNAi-341 and RNAi-671 strongly suppressed transient expression of a FLAG-tagged P fusion protein in 293T cells. RNAi-341 and RNAi-671 NDV reduced virus titers by 66.6-fold and 30.6-fold, respectively, in CEFs 16 h after infection. RNAi-341 and RNAi-671 reduced virus titers in specific pathogen-free chick embryos by 99% and 98%, respectively, 48 h after infection. Both shRNAs inhibited accumulation of not only P-gene mRNA, but also nucleocapsid, M-, F-, HN-, and L-gene mRNA. RNAi-341 silenced P-gene mRNA more potently than RNAi-671. These results suggest that shRNAs silencing the P gene had substantial antiviral properties and inhibited NDV replication in CEFs and chick embryos. PMID:27295882

  4. [Lentivirus Delivery of the Short Hairpin RNA Targeting NDV P Gene Inhibits Production of the Newcastle Disease Virus in Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts and Chicken Embryos].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaohua; Xu, Chuantian; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Yanyan; Huang, Qinghua; Hu, Beixia; Zhang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA)-induced RNA degradation can inhibit viral infection, and has been investigated extensively for its efficacy as antiviral therapy. The potential therapeutic role of lentiviral-mediated short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) replication in vivo has been explored less often. We constructed two recombinant lentiviral vectors containing shRNA against the phosphoprotein (P) of the NDV, RNAi-341 and RNAi-671. Recombinant shRNA lentivirus vectors were co-transfected into 293T cells, along with helper plasmids, to package the recombinant shRNA lentivirus. Lentivirus-based shRNAs were titrated and transduced into NDV-susceptible chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and chick embryos. Antiviral activity against the NDV strain was evaluated by virus titration and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. RNAi-341 and RNAi-671 strongly suppressed transient expression of a FLAG-tagged P fusion protein in 293T cells. RNAi-341 and RNAi-671 NDV reduced virus titers by 66.6-fold and 30.6-fold, respectively, in CEFs 16 h after infection. RNAi-341 and RNAi-671 reduced virus titers in specific pathogen-free chick embryos by 99% and 98%, respectively, 48 h after infection. Both shRNAs inhibited accumulation of not only P-gene mRNA, but also nucleocapsid, M-, F-, HN-, and L-gene mRNA. RNAi-341 silenced P-gene mRNA more potently than RNAi-671. These results suggest that shRNAs silencing the P gene had substantial antiviral properties and inhibited NDV replication in CEFs and chick embryos.

  5. Sex determination in the chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Smith, C A; Sinclair, A H

    2001-12-01

    The chicken embryo represents a suitable model for studying vertebrate sex determination and gonadal sex differentiation. While the basic mechanism of sex determination in birds is still unknown, gonadal morphogenesis is very similar to that in mammals, and most of the genes implicated in mammalian sex determination have avian homologues. However, in the chicken embryo, these genes show some interesting differences in structure or expression patterns to their mammalian counterparts, broadening our understanding of their functions. The novel candidate testis-determining gene in mammals, DMRT1, is also present in the chicken, and is expressed specifically in the embryonic gonads. In chicken embryos, DMRT1 is more highly expressed in the gonads and Müllerian ducts of male embryos than in those of females. Meanwhile, expression of the orphan nuclear receptor, Steroidogenic Factor 1 (SF1) is up-regulated during ovarian differentiation in the chicken embryo. This contrasts with the expression pattern of SF1 in mouse embryos, in which expression is down-regulated during female differentiation. Another orphan receptor initially implicated in mammalian sex determination, DAX1, is poorly conserved in the chicken. A chicken DAX1 homologue isolated from a urogenital ridge library lacked the unusual DNA-binding motif seen in mammals. Chicken DAX1 is autosomal, and is expressed in the embryonic gonads, showing somewhat higher expression in female compared to male gonads, as in mammals. However, expression is not down-regulated at the onset of testicular differentiation in chicken embryos, as occurs in mice. These comparative data shed light on vertebrate sex determination in general. PMID:11748617

  6. Cryopreservation of manipulated embryos: tackling the double jeopardy.

    PubMed

    Dinnyes, A; Nedambale, T L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide information to researchers and practitioners concerning the reasons for the altered viability and the medium- and long-term consequences of cryopreservation of manipulated mammalian embryos. Embryo manipulation is defined herein as the act or process of manipulating mammalian embryos, including superovulation, AI, IVM, IVF, in vitro culture, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo biopsy or splitting, somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning, the production of sexed embryos (by sperm sexing), embryo cryopreservation, embryo transfer or the creation of genetically modified (transgenic) embryos. With advances in manipulation technologies, the application of embryo manipulation will become more frequent; the proper prevention and management of the resulting alterations will be crucial in establishing an economically viable animal breeding technology.

  7. Arabidopsis mitochondrial protein slow embryo development1 is essential for embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yan; Liu, Chunying; Lu, Wenwen; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2016-05-27

    The plant seeds formation are crucial parts in reproductive process in seed plants as well as food source for humans. Proper embryo development ensure viable seed formation. Here, we showed an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant slow embryo development1 (sed1) which exhibited retarded embryogenesis, led to aborted seeds. Embryo without SED1 developed slower compared to normal one and could be recognized at early globular stage by its white appearance. In later development stage, storage accumulated poorly with less protein and lipid body production. In vitro culture did not rescue albino embryo. SED1 encoded a protein targeted to mitochondria. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that mitochondria developed abnormally, and more strikingly plastid failed to construct grana in time in sed1/sed1 embryo. These data indicated that SED1 is indispensable for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis, and the mitochondria may be involved in the regulation of many aspects of seed development.

  8. Arabidopsis mitochondrial protein slow embryo development1 is essential for embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yan; Liu, Chunying; Lu, Wenwen; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2016-05-27

    The plant seeds formation are crucial parts in reproductive process in seed plants as well as food source for humans. Proper embryo development ensure viable seed formation. Here, we showed an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant slow embryo development1 (sed1) which exhibited retarded embryogenesis, led to aborted seeds. Embryo without SED1 developed slower compared to normal one and could be recognized at early globular stage by its white appearance. In later development stage, storage accumulated poorly with less protein and lipid body production. In vitro culture did not rescue albino embryo. SED1 encoded a protein targeted to mitochondria. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that mitochondria developed abnormally, and more strikingly plastid failed to construct grana in time in sed1/sed1 embryo. These data indicated that SED1 is indispensable for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis, and the mitochondria may be involved in the regulation of many aspects of seed development. PMID:27109472

  9. Metabolite profiling of somatic embryos of Cyclamen persicum in comparison to zygotic embryos, endosperm, and testa.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Traud; Ratjens, Svenja; Bartsch, Melanie; Rode, Christina; Niehaus, Karsten; Bednarz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system for many crops such as the important ornamental plant Cyclamen persicum, for which this regeneration pathway of somatic embryogenesis is of interest for the vegetative propagation of parental lines as well as elite plants. However, somatic embryogenesis is not commercially used in many crops due to several unsolved problems, such as malformations, asynchronous development, deficiencies in maturation and germination of somatic embryos. In contrast, zygotic embryos in seeds develop and germinate without abnormalities in most cases. Instead of time-consuming and labor-intensive experiments involving tests of different in vitro culture conditions and plant growth regulator supplements, we follow a more directed approach. Zygotic embryos served as a reference and were compared to somatic embryos in metabolomic analyses allowing the future optimization of the in vitro system. The aims of this study were to detect differences in the metabolite profiles of torpedo stage somatic and zygotic embryos of C. persicum. Moreover, major metabolites in endosperm and testa were identified and quantified. Two sets of extracts of two to four biological replicates each were analyzed. In total 52 metabolites were identified and quantified in the different tissues. One of the most significant differences between somatic and zygotic embryos was that the proline concentration in the zygotic embryos was about 40 times higher than that found in somatic embryos. Epicatechin, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species, was found in highest abundance in the testa. Sucrose, the most abundant metabolite was detected in significantly higher concentrations in zygotic embryos. Also, a yet unknown trisaccharide, was significantly enriched in zygotic embryos. PMID:26300898

  10. Large scale in vivo risk assessment of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) transmission through transfer of bovine embryos produced via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Gosch, G; Guerra, T; Chen, S H; Xiang, T; Broek, D; Bruner, B; Polejaeva, I

    2010-10-15

    The objective was to use the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as a model to assess the risk of infectious disease transmission in the system of in vitro embryo production and transfer via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. The risks of BVDV transmission in the SCNT embryo production were previously evaluated. In that in vitro study, following standard operating procedures (SOP), including pre-nuclear transfer donor cell testing, oocyte decontamination and virus-free cell and embryo culture conditions, SCNT embryos produced were free of detectable viral RNA. The current study focused on the evaluation of the potential risk of disease transmission from SCNT embryos to recipients, and the risk of producing persistently infected animals via SCNT embryo transfer. Blood samples were collected from 553 recipients of SCNT embryos and 438 cloned calves and tested for the presence of BVDV viral RNA via a sensitive real time PCR method. All samples tested were negative. These results, in conjunction with the previous in vitro study, confirmed that the established SCNT embryo production and transfer system is safe and presents no detectable risk of disease transmission.

  11. A Case Report of Post Rabipur (Purified Chick Embryo Rabies Vaccine) Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, A K Bishorjit; Pradhan, R N; Pathak, Vipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that typically occurs following a viral infection or vaccination. The incidence of ADEM following vaccination has become very low since introduction of non-neural rabies vaccine and only few cases had been reported due to pure chick embryo derived rabies vaccine (PCERV). Here we are reporting a rare case of delayed post vaccinal ADEM. PMID:26591130

  12. Mitochondria and human preimplantation embryo development.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Martin; Coppola, Gianfranco; Dale, Brian; Di Matteo, Loredana

    2009-04-01

    Human reproduction, like all biological systems, is characterised by a large level of variability. In this field, the variability is observed as a large difference in implantation potential of human embryos developing in vitro, despite similarities in observable parameters such as rate of development and morphology of these embryos. One of the underlying factors that determines developmental potential in these embryos is the availability of energy in the form of ATP for development. Here, we suggest that, despite the evidence suggesting that mitochondrial metabolism is relatively inactive during preimplantation embryo development, aerobic (mitochondrial) metabolism contributes a major role in the supply of ATP. A second pathway, anaerobic respiration, is also active and the two pathways work in synchrony to supply all the ATP necessary. We discuss the differences in the two forms of energy production and suggest that, although anaerobic respiration can supplement deficiencies in the energy supply in the short term, this is not sufficient to substitute for aerobic respiration over long periods. Therefore, we suggest that deficiencies in the levels of aerobic respiration can explain variability in the implantation potential of apparently equivalent embryos.

  13. Conflict over moral status of embryos continues.

    PubMed

    Callahan, S

    1988-04-01

    Ethical questions are addressed that have arisen due to the rapid development of new medical technology involving the fertilized human ovum. Moral issues have arisen with the new progesterone antagonist, RU-486, and in vitro fertilization (IVF). 3 different ethical views of the embryo are presented: A permissive pro-choice position states either that the moral value of the fertilized egg depends on each pregnant woman's decision to humanize the embryo in her body or that the moral value of the fertilized egg increases as human development progresses. Some pro-life advocates argue that after implantation an irreversibly developing human being exists who has all the rights of a human being. The author suggests that some medical technological interventions and experimentation on embryos may be morally permissible to these pro-life advocates. The Vatican statement that the human being must be respected--as a person--from the very 1st instant of his existence sums up the 3d, view of an embryo's status. New knowledge of the very complex earliest stages of development, combined with other concepts and worldviews, appear to create honest doubt about the fertilized egg's status. For example, approximately 50% of fertilized ova are naturally lost, and the combination of 1 or more embryos into a mosaic casts doubt on the existence of an irreversible human. Relevant worldviews of postmodern understandings of science, the universe, and a new theology of creation must be considered to solve these ethical dilemmas.

  14. Ancestor embryos: embryonic gametes and genetic parenthood.

    PubMed

    Watt, Helen

    2014-11-01

    The proposal for reproducing human generations in vitro raises the question to what extent parenthood is possible in embryos and to what extent human rights and interests are dependent on conscious awareness. This paper argues that the interest in not being made a parent non-consensually for the benefit of others persists throughout the lifespan of the individual human organism. We do not become genetic parents by learning that we are parents; rather, we discover (or fail to discover) an existing genetic relationship between our offspring and ourselves. The claim to genetic parenthood of an embryo used for reproduction in vitro is, if anything, clearer than the claim of the adult for whom gametes are derived via ips cells, in that an embryo's cells, unlike an adult's somatic cells, are already functionally geared to producing gametes (among other types of cell). An embryo used to make gametes that are used in reproduction is immediately and non-consensually made a genetic parent and to that extent is wronged whether or not the parent embryo survives-as some could survive-the harvesting of cells. All human individuals carry objective interests in benefits appropriate to the kind of being they are; these include the stake in not being made a parent without one's consent, whether posthumously or otherwise.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in periimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Marek; Gye, Myung Chan

    2015-03-01

    Stress coping mechanisms are critical to minimize or overcome damage caused by ever changing environmental conditions. They are designed to promote cell survival. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway is mobilized in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins, ultimately in order to regain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Various elements of coping responses to ER stress including Perk, Ask1, Bip, Chop, Gadd34, Ire1, Atf4, Atf6, and Xbp1 have been identified and were found to be inducible in oocytes and preimplantation embryos, suggesting that, as a normal part of the cellular adaptive mechanism, these coping responses, including the UPR, play a pivotal role in the development of preimplantation embryos. As such, the UPR-associated molecules and pathways may become useful markers for the potential diagnosis of stress conditions for preimplantation embryos. After implantation, ER stress-induced coping responses become physiologically important for a normal decidual response, placentation, and early organogenesis. Attenuation of ER stress coping responses by tauroursodeoxycholate and salubrinal was effective for prevention of cell death of cultured embryos. Further elucidation of new and relevant ER stress coping responses in periimplantation embryos might contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of normal development of embryonic development and potentiation of embryonic development in vitro. PMID:25874167

  16. Assay using embryo aggregation chimeras for the detection of nonlethal changes in X-irradiated mouse preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Miller, L.; Samuels, S.J.; Chang, R.J.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    We have developed a short-term in vitro assay for the detection of sublethal effects produced by very low levels of ionizing radiation. The assay utilizes mouse embryo aggregation chimeras consisting of one irradiated embryo paired with an unirradiated embryo whose blastomeres have been labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). X irradiation (from 0.05 to 2 Gy) and chimera construction were performed with four-cell stage embryos, and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h to the morula stage. The morulae were partially dissociated with calcium-free culture medium and viewed under phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution of irradiated (unlabeled) and control (FITC labeled) embryos per chimera. In chimeras where neither embryo was irradiated, the ratio of the unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.50 (17.8 +/- 5.6 cells per unlabeled embryo and 17.4 +/- 5.5 cells per FITC-labeled partner embryo). However, in chimeras formed after the unlabeled embryos were irradiated with as little as 0.05 Gy, the ratio of unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.43 (P less than 0.01). The apparent decreases in cell proliferation were not observed in irradiated embryos that were merely cocultured with control embryos, regardless of whether the embryos were zona enclosed or zona free. We conclude that very low levels of radiation induce sublethal changes in cleaving embryos that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage within two cell cycles when irradiated embryos are in direct cell-to-cell contact with unirradiated embryos.

  17. Efficacy of in vitro embryo transfer in lactating dairy cows using fresh or vitrified embryos produced in a novel embryo culture medium.

    PubMed

    Block, J; Bonilla, L; Hansen, P J

    2010-11-01

    Objectives were to determine whether pregnancy success could be improved in lactating cows with timed embryo transfer when embryos were produced in vitro using a medium designed to enhance embryo development and survival after cryopreservation. In experiment 1, embryos (n=569 to 922) were cultured in either modified synthetic oviduct fluid or a serum-free medium, Block-Bonilla-Hansen-7 (BBH7). Development to the blastocyst stage was recorded at d 7, and selected blastocysts (n=79 to 114) were vitrified using open pulled straws. Culture of embryos in BBH7 increased development to the blastocyst stage (41.9±2.0 vs. 14.7±2.0%) and advanced blastocyst stages (expanded, hatching, hatched; 31.1±1.3 vs. 6.4±1.3%) at d 7 and resulted in higher hatching rates at 24h postwarming compared with embryos cultured in modified synthetic oviduct fluid (59.0±0.5 vs. 26.7±0.5%). In experiment 2, embryos were produced using X-sorted semen and cultured in BBH7. At d 7 after insemination, embryos were transferred fresh or following vitrification. Lactating Holstein cows were either subjected to timed artificial insemination (TAI) on the day of presumptive ovulation or used as embryo recipients 7 d later. Embryo recipients received an embryo if a corpus luteum was present. The percentage of cows pregnant at d 32, 46, and 76 of gestation was higher among cows that received fresh embryos compared with TAI cows or cows that received vitrified embryos. At d 76, for example, the proportion and percentage pregnant was 47/150 (31.3%) for cows subjected to TAI, 48/95 (50.5%) for cows receiving fresh embryos, and 39/141 (27.7%) for cows receiving a vitrified embryo. No difference was observed in the percentage of cows pregnant among TAI cows and those that received vitrified embryos. There was a service or transfer number × treatment interaction because differences in pregnancy rate between embryo transfer recipients and cows bred by TAI were greater for cows with more than 3 services or

  18. Characterization of embryo-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the structure and function of a set of genes whose expression is regulated in embryo development, and that is not expressed in mature tissues -- the embryonic genes. In the last two years, using cDNA clones, we have isolated 22 cDNA clones, and characterized the expression pattern of their corresponding RNA. At least 4 cDNA clones detect RNAs of embryonic genes. These cDNA clones detect RNAs expressed in somatic as well as zygotic embryos of carrot. Using the cDNA clones, we screened the genomic library of carrot embryo DNA, and isolated genomic clones for three genes. The structure and function of two genes DC 8 and DC 59 have been characterized and are reported in this paper.

  19. [The embryo, the human and the humanized].

    PubMed

    Roa, A

    1992-03-01

    Since the moment of fecundation the human embryo is endowed with the properties of unity and uniqueness and its existence is therefore inviolable. Disputing arguments against this thesis are analyzed. Recent views of some biologists negate the human character to the embryo since the essence of a human being would be its cultural nature and ability to communicate. However, the embryo contains all the genetic information that will allow him to develop the ability to communicate. Any attempt to separate the 3 moments of time, past present and future is a definitive violation of ethics. A basic foundation of ethics is that present and future are implicit in the past and vice-versa. Finally, the idea that the unwanted child is not a cultural being should be discarded.

  20. [Successful pregnancies after oocyte and embryo vitrification].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Francisco Hernández; Loza, Erik Omar Okhuysen; Lucas, Maria Teresa Huerta J; Gutiérrez, Gustavo Romero

    2008-02-01

    Cryopreservation of human oocytes represents a solution for ethic conflict about frozen embryo storage for patients with risk to develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; also is an available technique to preserve fertility in women with cancer under treatment, in poor response patients, in case of premature ovarian failure or aging and for other medical or social conditions that require to delay pregnancies, as well as to make easier oocyte donation programs. This paper reports two cases of successful pregnancies after embryo and oocyte vitrification, as well as their results. The technique of vitrification with the cryotop method is an excellent alternative, efficient, fast and cheap for oocyte and embryo cryopreservation with high ranges of fertilization, cleavage and pregnancies with a normal evolution. PMID:18798404

  1. Human embryos in the original position?

    PubMed

    DiSilvestro, Russell

    2005-06-01

    Two different discussions in John Rawls' A Theory of Justice lead naturally to a rather conservative position on the moral status of the human embryo. When discussing paternalism, he claims that the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves in case they end up as incapacitated or undeveloped human beings when the veil of ignorance is lifted. Since human embryos are examples of such beings, the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves from their embryonic stages onward. When discussing the basis of equality, Rawls claims that the parties in the original position would guarantee basic rights for all those with the capacity to take part in this original position. To guarantee the basic rights of infants and young children, he goes on to interpret this capacity as a "potentiality that is ordinarily realized in due course." Since human embryos have this potentiality, they too should have basic rights.

  2. Embryo aggregation does not improve the development of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Andrés; De Stéfano, Adrián; Jarazo, Javier; Buemo, Carla; Karlanian, Florencia; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-09-01

    The low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) makes it necessary to investigate new strategies to improve embryonic developmental competence. Embryo aggregation has been successfully applied to improve cloning efficiency in mammals, but it remains unclear whether it could also be beneficial for iSCNT. In this study, we first compared the effect of embryo aggregation over in vitro development and blastocyst quality of porcine, bovine, and feline zona-free (ZF) parthenogenetic (PA) embryos to test the effects of embryo aggregation on species that were later used as enucleated oocytes donors in our iSCNT study. We then assessed whether embryo aggregation could improve the in vitro development of ZF equine iSCNT embryos after reconstruction with porcine, bovine, and feline ooplasm. Bovine- and porcine-aggregated PA blastocysts had significantly larger diameters compared with nonaggregated embryos. On the other hand, feline- and bovine-aggregated PA embryos had higher blastocyst cell number. Embryo aggregation of equine-equine SCNT was found to be beneficial for embryo development as we have previously reported, but the aggregation of three ZF reconstructed embryos did not improve embryo developmental rates on iSCNT. In vitro embryo development of nonaggregated iSCNT was predominantly arrested around the stage when transcriptional activation of the embryonic genome is reported to start on the embryo of the donor species. Nevertheless, independent of embryo aggregation, equine blastocyst-like structures could be obtained in our study using domestic feline-enucleated oocytes. Taken together, these results reported that embryo aggregation enhance in vitro PA embryo development and embryo quality but effects vary depending on the species. Embryo aggregation also improves, as expected, the in vitro embryo development of equine-equine SCNT embryos; however, we did not observe positive effects on equine iSCNT embryo development. Among oocytes

  3. Laser confers less embryo exposure than acid tyrode for embryo biopsy in preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We compared two methods of zona pellucida drilling. 213 embryos were biopsied with acid Tyrode. Each biopsy took 3 minutes and the entire procedure ~29 minutes. 5% of blastomeres lysed, 49% of embryos became blastocyst and 36% of patients became pregnant. 229 embryos were biopsied with laser. Each biopsy took 30 seconds and the entire procedure ~7 minutes. 2.5% of blastomeres lysed, 50.6% of embryos became blastocyst and 47% of patients became pregnant. We can conclude that laser can be used for embryo biopsy. Reduction of embryo exposure and of removed blastomeres is associated with increased blastocysts available for transfer and a better clinical outcome. PMID:21527004

  4. Migration and growth of protoplanetary embryos. I. Convergence of embryos in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Liu, Beibei; Li, Hui

    2014-12-10

    According to the core accretion scenario, planets form in protostellar disks through the condensation of dust, coagulation of planetesimals, and emergence of protoplanetary embryos. At a few AU in a minimum mass nebula, embryos' growth is quenched by dynamical isolation due to the depletion of planetesimals in their feeding zone. However, embryos with masses (M{sub p} ) in the range of a few Earth masses (M {sub ⊕}) migrate toward a transition radius between the inner viscously heated and outer irradiated regions of their natal disk. Their limiting isolation mass increases with the planetesimals surface density. When M{sub p} > 10 M {sub ⊕}, embryos efficiently accrete gas and evolve into cores of gas giants. We use a numerical simulation to show that despite stream line interference, convergent embryos essentially retain the strength of non-interacting embryos' Lindblad and corotation torques by their natal disks. In disks with modest surface density (or equivalently accretion rates), embryos capture each other in their mutual mean motion resonances and form a convoy of super-Earths. In more massive disks, they could overcome these resonant barriers to undergo repeated close encounters, including cohesive collisions that enable the formation of massive cores.

  5. Functional characterization of mannose-binding lectin in zebrafish: implication for a lectin-dependent complement system in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Bu, Lingzhen; Sun, Weiwei; Hu, Lili; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lectin pathway involves recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and the subsequent activation of associated enzymes, termed MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). In this study, we demonstrate that the transcript of MBL gene is present in the early embryo of zebrafish, and MBL protein is also present in the embryo. In addition, we show that recombinant zebrafish MBL was able to bind the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and rMBL was able to promote the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by macrophages, indicating that like mammalian MBL, zebrafish MBL performs a dual function in both pattern recognition and opsonization. Importantly, we show that microinjection of anti-MBL antibody into the early developing embryos resulted in a significantly increased mortality in the embryos challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila (pathogenic to zebrafish); and injection of rMBL into the embryos (resulting in increase in MBL in the embryo) markedly promoted their resistance to A. hydrophila; and this promoted bacterial resistance was significantly reduced by the co-injection of anti-MBL antibody with rMBL but not by the injection of anti-actin antibody with rMBL. These suggest that the lectin pathway may be already functional in the early embryos in zebrafish before their immune system is fully matured, protecting the developing embryos from microbial infection. This work provides a new angle to understand the immune role of the lectin pathway in early development of animals.

  6. Somitomeres: mesodermal segments of vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, A G

    1988-01-01

    Well before the somites form, the paraxial mesoderm of vertebrate embryos is segmented into somitomeres. When newly formed, somitomeres are patterned arrays of mesenchymal cells, arranged into squat, bilaminar discs. The dorsal and ventral faces of these discs are composed of concentric rings of cells. Somitomeres are formed along the length of the embryo during gastrulation, and in the segmental plate and tail bud at later stages. They form in strict cranial to caudal order. They appear in bilateral pairs, just lateral to Hensen's node in the chick embryo. When the nervous system begins to form, the brain parts and neuromeres are in a consistent relationship to the somitomeres. Somitomeres first appear in the head, and the cranial somitomeres do not become somites, but disperse to contribute to the head the same cell types contributed by somites in the trunk region. In the trunk and tail, somitomeres gradually condense and epithelialize to become somites. Models of vertebrate segmentation must now take into account the early presence of these new morphological units, the somitomeres. Somitomeres were discovered in the head of the chick embryo (Meier, 1979), with the use of stereo scanning electron microscopy. The old question of whether the heads of the craniates are segmented is now settled, at least for the paraxial mesoderm. Somitomeres have now been identified in the embryos of a chick, quail, mouse, snapping turtle, newt, anuran (Xenopus) and a teleost (the medaka). In all forms studied, the first pair of somitomeres abut the prosencephalon, but caudal to that, for each tandem pair of somitomeres in the amniote and teleost, there is but one somitomere in the amphibia. The mesodermal segments of the shark embryo are arranged like those of the amphibia.

  7. Directed embryo donation: free choice or discrimination?

    PubMed

    de Lacey, Sheryl; Rogers, Wendy; Richards, Bernadette

    2010-09-01

    The issue of whether to allow or prohibit the directed anonymous donation of human embryos for reproductive use has been publicly contentious. The claims that directed donation are a donor's autonomous right contrast with claims that the practice is discriminatory. Recent legislation and legal recommendation on the issue has been inconsistent or contradictory. This article specifically addresses the question as to whether the directed donation of embryos is the exercise of free choice or an act of discrimination. This question is considered from both ethical and legal viewpoints.

  8. Incomplete methylation reprogramming in SCNT embryos.

    PubMed

    Peat, Julian R; Reik, Wolf

    2012-09-01

    The cloning of Dolly the sheep was a remarkable demonstration of the oocyte's ability to reprogram a specialized nucleus. However, embryos derived from such somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) very rarely result in live births-a fate that may be linked to observed epigenetic defects. A new genome-wide study shows that epigenetic reprogramming in SCNT embryos does not fully recapitulate the natural DNA demethylation events occurring at fertilization, resulting in aberrant methylation at some promoters and repetitive elements that may contribute to developmental failure. PMID:22932499

  9. Endoscopic embryo collection and embryo transfer into the oviduct and the uterus of pigs.

    PubMed

    Besenfelder, U; Mödl, J; Müller, M; Brem, G

    1997-04-01

    We describe the first complete embryo transfer program, including flushing of embryos from the oviducts via the uterine horns, transfer of embryos into the Fallopian tubes or the uterine horns and recording of the number of piglets born live. The described procedure is minimally invasive and allows the use of pigs simultaneously for embryo collection and production of normal pregnancies. A 30 degrees forward oblique endoscope provided optimal visualization of the reproductive organs and free access to the organs for embryo flushing and transfer. In contrast to surgical and nonsurgical methods, endoscopy allows to pre-examine the genital tract for reproductive abnormalities and successful ovulation. A total of 95 prepuberal gilts or cyclic sows were used in this trial. Embryos or oocytes were collected from hormonally treated pigs via endoscopy(n = 17) on Day 3 and via laparotomy or post mortem after slaughter (control group, n = 38) on Day 3 and 6 after insemination. One (unilateral collection, n = 7) or both oviducts (bilateral collection, n = 10) were flushed endoscopically. We recovered 114 (average 16/pig) and 279 (average 28/pig) oocytes or embryos with fertilization rates of 89% and 72%, respectively. In the control group 834 oocytes or embryos were collected at Day 3 and 6 after insemination (fertilization rate 64%, total 534 embryos, 33 at 2-, 367 at 4-, 2 at 8-cell stage, 24 morulae and 108 blastocysts). Of 836 embryos recovered by endoscopy, surgery or slaughter 528 Day 3 embryos at 2- to 4-cell stage were transferred into (one) oviducts (n = 27 pigs, about 20/pig) resulting in 9 pregnant pigs diagnosed at Day 28 by sonography. Of the 9, 8 carried a total of 49 piglets to term. A total of 195 Day 6 embryos were transferred into uterine horns (n = 12 pigs, about 16/pig), resulting in 5 pregnant pigs carrying a total of 38 offspring to term. The use of endoscopy in assisted reproduction of pigs has the advantages of allowing easy access to the ovary

  10. Third Party Reproduction: Sperm, Egg, and Embryo Donation and Surrogacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE Third-party Reproduction Sperm, egg, and embryo donation and surrogacy A Guide for ... third-party reproduction” refers to the use of eggs , sperm , or embryos that have been donated by ...

  11. Frozen Embryos May Boost Pregnancy Odds for Some Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... embryos is generally preferred over frozen embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF). But, some evidence has suggested that using ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Assisted Reproductive Technology Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Assisted ...

  12. Applications of embryo transfer and related technologies to cattle.

    PubMed

    Seidel, G E

    1984-11-01

    It is possible to recover embryos from superovulated cows nonsurgically, divide each embryo in half, and routinely obtain pregnancy rates of greater than 50% per half embryo after nonsurgical transfer, which is equivalent to greater than 100% per original embryo. It is also possible to freeze and sex embryos, although the cryopreservation process kills some embryos and the sexing process is so new that efficacy under field conditions is unknown. Embryo transfer techniques are applied to thousands of dairy cows, but in 1982 only about one dairy calf per thousand born in North America was from embryo transfer. Nevertheless, use of this technology is increasing, in part because of simplification of procedures, increased efficacy, and lower costs. It is difficult to predict when additional technologies will become available for commercial use, but it is likely that several additional exciting developments will occur in cattle breeding before the end of the century. PMID:6394629

  13. The dangers of disease transmission by artificial insemination and embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Philpott, M

    1993-01-01

    This review summarizes the major infectious diseases of the three major agricultural species (cattle, sheep and pigs) and horses, and presents the evidence for and against the possibility of infectious agents being transmitted between animals via the venereal route or by the use of semen or early embryos in commercial artificial insemination (AI) or embryo transfer (ET). Cattle feature most prominently in the widespread distribution of frozen semen, and national and international organizations have set out guidelines to work towards disease-free bull studs with semen free from potential pathogens. With the control of major epizootic diseases, attention has been focused on such diseases as IBR, BVD and blue tongue, where clinical signs are rarely evident but the detection of virus in semen is of great importance. New information on the relevance of bacterial disease such as Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, campylobacteriosis and leptospirosis is reviewed, along with details of the mycoplasma and ureaplasma species of the bull's genital tract. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has attracted much research and semen is not regarded as a source of infection. New work on the pathogenesis of a number of diseases and the use of new biotechnology in diagnosis is included. The International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) has encouraged a great deal of experimental work--much originating in Canada--on the risk of transmission of disease from donors to recipients via a 7-day-old blastocyst. There has been much success in demonstrating that with an approved protocol of handling the embryos, to date there is very little danger in disease transmission with both viruses and bacteria. The mycoplasma group appear more intractable and the role of BSE is still being evaluated. In sheep, scrapie, Brucella ovis infection and blue tongue feature in current work. In the pig there is a surge in international movement of pig semen, and Aujeszky's disease and the new so-called Blue Ear

  14. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: Problems & perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rajvi H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC) lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been ‘discarded’ or ‘spare’ fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. In case a couple does not desire to ‘cryopreserve’ their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered ‘spare’ or if a couple is no longer in need of the ‘cryopreserved’ embryos then these also can be considered as ‘spare’. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, “what about ‘slightly’ over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to ‘discarded’ embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of ‘discarding’ embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential ‘use’ of ESC derived from the ‘abnormal appearing’ embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material. PMID:25673530

  15. Zebrafish Embryo Disinfection with Povidone-Iodine: Evaluating an Alternative to Chlorine Bleach.

    PubMed

    Chang, Carolyn T; Amack, Jeffrey D; Whipps, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a common bacterial infection in laboratory zebrafish caused by several different species and strains of Mycobacterium, including both rapid and slow growers. One control measure used to prevent mycobacterial spread within and between facilities is surface disinfection of eggs. Recent studies have highlighted the effectiveness of povidone-iodine (PVPI) on preventing propagation of Mycobacterium spp. found in zebrafish colonies. We evaluated the effect of disinfection using 12.5-50 ppm PVPI (unbuffered and buffered) on zebrafish exposed at 6 or 24 h postfertilization (hpf) to determine if this treatment is suitable for use in research zebrafish. Our results show that 6 hpf embryos are less sensitive to treatment as fewer effects on mortality, developmental delay, and deformity were observed. We also found that buffered PVPI treatment results in a greater knockdown of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium marinum, as well as results in decreased harmful effects on embryos. Treatments of shorter (2 min vs. 5 min) duration were also more effective at killing mycobacteria in addition to resulting in fewer effects on embryo health. In addition, we compared the efficacy of a rinsing regimen to rinsing and disinfecting. Based on the findings of this study, we recommend disinfecting embryos for 2 min with buffered PVPI at 12.5-25 ppm. PMID:27351620

  16. Genetic characterization of hepadnaviruses associated with histopathological changes in the liver of duck and goose embryos.

    PubMed

    Biđin, Marina; Tišljar, Marina; Biđin, Zdenko; Lojkić, Ivana; Majnarić, Darko

    2014-12-01

    Avian hepadnaviruses are etiological agents of hepatitis B, that has been identified primarily in ducks, and more recently in various avian species. In this paper, 16 hepadnaviruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the field samples from dead embryos of commercially reared domestic duck and goose. Based on the molecular analysis of the S-protein gene sequences and phylogenetic Neighbor-joining tree, identified viruses were clustered in the same genetic group, indicating no host-related diversity. Both duck and goose-origin hepadnaviruses were grouped within the cluster consisting of "Western-country" and "Chinese" duck hepatitis B (DHBV) isolates, showing more evolutionary distances with other known avian hepadnaviruses. Histopathologically, the lesions observed in the liver tissue from hepadnavirus positive duck and goose embryos varied from low to mild degree of perivascular mononuclear cells and mixed cell infiltrations, followed by mild vacuolar changes. Small focal necrotic changes in the liver parenchyma, and bile ductular proliferation were also found in examined liver samples. Generally, the microscopic findings resemble those described in experimentally infected ducks, while this was the first description of hepadnavirus associated lesions in domestic goose. Although hepadnaviruses are considered to have a very narrow host range, this study showed that domestic ducks and geese are susceptible to infection with genetically almost identical hepadnaviruses, that were likely to produce similar microscopic changes in the liver of both duck and goose embryos. The impact of naturally occurred hepadnavirus infection and possible synergistic interactions with other infectious or non-infectious agents on embryo viability needs further investigation.

  17. Survival Study of Zebrafish Embryos Under Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Pamela; Allende, Miguel; Morales, José Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Zebrafish embryos have interesting biological properties for the study of human diseases. The present work uses zebrafish embryos in a particular development state, to study biological effects due to gamma radiation, arising from a calibrated 60Co source. Initially, the lethal dose for fish embryos was determined and subsequent irradiations were performed at sub-lethal doses, in order to study more subtle effects.

  18. Surplus embryos, nonreproductive cloning, and the intend/foresee distinction.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, William

    2003-01-01

    There is, as some public figures have asserted, a real moral difference between creating embryos expressly for medical research and conducting research on embryos that are left over from infertility treatments. To create an embryo intending all along to destroy it is worse. But in the end, it isn't so much worse that we should ban all nonreproductive cloning.

  19. Gene transfer techniques in whole embryo cultured post-implantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Trainor, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer techniques such as electroporation and lipofection are powerful systems for investigating gene function. In this chapter we focus on the methods and applications of gene transfer into specific cells and tissues of post-implantation mouse embryos.

  20. The presence of HBV mRNA in the fertilized in vitro embryo of HBV patients confirms vertical transmission of HBV via the ovum.

    PubMed

    Ye, F; Jin, Y; Kong, Y; Shi, J Z; Qiu, H T; Zhang, X; Zhang, S L; Lin, S M

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to confirm that vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur via the infected ovum. Specimens studied were obtained from discarded test-tube embryos from mothers with chronic HBV infection who had received in vitro fertilization treatment. Single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect HBV mRNA in the embryos. HBV mRNA was detected in the cleavage embryos of patients with chronic HBV infection, with a detection rate of 13.2% (5/38). The level of serum HBV DNA was not related to the HBV mRNA positivity rates in embryos. In this study, HBV mRNA was detected in test-tube embryos from HBV-infected mothers who had received in vitro fertilization treatment. This confirms the theory of vertical transmission of HBV via the ovum, thereby providing an important theoretical basis for further study on the mechanism of HBV vertical transmission, influencing factors and blocking measures.

  1. A recombinase from Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, A; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1988-01-01

    We have partially purified a DNA strand-exchange activity (recombinase) from nuclear extracts of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The protein fraction forms a joint molecule between a circular single-strand DNA and a homologous linear duplex DNA that is resolved from the substrates by agarose gel electrophoresis. A strand-exchange activity can be obtained from nuclear extracts from embryos as old as 24 hr. The activity is similar to that partially purified from human cells [Hsieh, P., Meyn, S.M. & Camerini-Otero, R.D. (1986) Cell 44, 885-894]. It is homology-dependent, requires Mg2+, appears to be directional in that it prefers to displace the 3' end of the noncomplementary strand, and does not require exogenous ATP. Forty nanograms of protein in the partially purified DNA strand-exchange fraction from D. melanogaster embryos can completely convert 50 ng of substrate single-strand DNA into joint molecules in 10 min. In the electron microscope, joint molecules are seen to consist of a circular single-strand DNA molecule attached to only one end of a linear duplex DNA molecule; a displaced strand is also seen. The region of heteroduplex formation can be as long as 600 base pairs. The demonstration of a strand-exchange activity from wild-type D. melanogaster embryos invites analysis of recombination-defective mutants to explore the role of DNA strand exchange in homologous recombination. Images PMID:3140242

  2. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  3. Mouse embryo manipulations with OCT guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Monica D.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a three-dimensional, non-invasive optical imaging technique that relies on low-coherence interferometry. OCT has the capability of imaging 2 - 3 mm into tissue, which enables imaging of deeper structures within the embryo with a relatively high spatial resolution (2 - 15μm). Within the past decade, OCT has been increasingly used as a live imaging tool for embryonic cardiovascular research in several animal models. Research in our lab has recently shown that OCT can be used in combination with embryo culture for the visualization of early mammalian cardiovascular development (E7.5 - E10.0). Here, we demonstrate that OCT can be used for the guided microinjection of gold-silica nanoshell suspension into the cardiovascular system in live embryos without deleterious effect. This approach shows a promising application for the OCT guided delivery of contrast agents, viral vectors, therapeutic or pharmacological agents, signaling molecules or dyes to specific organ systems or tissues in live embryos and demonstrates a great potential for gold-silica nanoshells as a contrast agent in embryonic studies.

  4. Facial Transplants in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial birth defects occur in 1 out of every 700 live births, but etiology is rarely known due to limited understanding of craniofacial development. To identify where signaling pathways and tissues act during patterning of the developing face, a 'face transplant' technique has been developed in embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. A region of presumptive facial tissue (the "Extreme Anterior Domain" (EAD)) is removed from a donor embryo at tailbud stage, and transplanted to a host embryo of the same stage, from which the equivalent region has been removed. This can be used to generate a chimeric face where the host or donor tissue has a loss or gain of function in a gene, and/or includes a lineage label. After healing, the outcome of development is monitored, and indicates roles of the signaling pathway within the donor or surrounding host tissues. Xenopus is a valuable model for face development, as the facial region is large and readily accessible for micromanipulation. Many embryos can be assayed, over a short time period since development occurs rapidly. Findings in the frog are relevant to human development, since craniofacial processes appear conserved between Xenopus and mammals. PMID:24748020

  5. Triploid-diploid mosaic chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S E; Buss, E G

    1966-08-12

    Cytological analysis of an underdeveloped chicken embryo at 6 days of incubation revealed a triploid-diploid mosaic condition. Of the 30 metaphases observed, 19 were triploid and 11 diploid. The triploid cells were 3A-ZZZ and diploid cells 2A-ZZ, as determined for the six largest pairs of chromnosomes. PMID:5328678

  6. Transcriptional profiling of the Arabidopsis embryo.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Matthew W B; Casson, Stuart A; Lindsey, Keith

    2007-02-01

    We have used laser-capture microdissection to isolate RNA from discrete tissues of globular, heart, and torpedo stage embryos of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This was amplified and analyzed by DNA microarray using the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip, representing approximately 22,800 Arabidopsis genes. Cluster analysis showed that spatial differences in gene expression were less significant than temporal differences. Time course analysis reveals the dynamics and complexity of gene expression in both apical and basal domains of the developing embryo, with several classes of synexpressed genes identifiable. The transition from globular to heart stage is associated in particular with an up-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation, and energetics and metabolism. The transition from heart to torpedo stage is associated with a repression of cell cycle genes and an up-regulation of genes encoding storage proteins, and pathways of cell growth, energy, and metabolism. The torpedo stage embryo shows strong functional differentiation in the root and cotyledon, as inferred from the classes of genes expressed in these tissues. The time course of expression of the essential EMBRYO-DEFECTIVE genes shows that most are expressed at unchanging levels across all stages of embryogenesis. We show how identified genes can be used to generate cell type-specific markers and promoter activities for future application in cell biology.

  7. Cell communication compartments in molluscan embryos.

    PubMed

    Serras, F; Kühtreiber, W M; Krul, M R; van den Biggelaar, J A

    1985-08-01

    Early embryos of Patella vulgata have been injected with Lucifer Yellow. No restriction of dye spread was found. We show that later in the development, the larval trochophore stage present evidence of compartments of cell communication. These dye compartments coincide with different presumptive regions. PMID:4028198

  8. Lipidome signatures in early bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Sudano, Mateus J; Rascado, Tatiana D S; Tata, Alessandra; Belaz, Katia R A; Santos, Vanessa G; Valente, Roniele S; Mesquita, Fernando S; Ferreira, Christina R; Araújo, João P; Eberlin, Marcos N; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda D C

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian preimplantation embryonic development is a complex, conserved, and well-orchestrated process involving dynamic molecular and structural changes. Understanding membrane lipid profile fluctuation during this crucial period is fundamental to address mechanisms governing embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to perform a comprehensive assessment of stage-specific lipid profiles during early bovine embryonic development and associate with the mRNA abundance of lipid metabolism-related genes (ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6) and with the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Immature oocytes were recovered from slaughterhouse-derived ovaries, two-cell embryos, and eight- to 16-cell embryos, morula, and blastocysts that were in vitro produced under different environmental conditions. Lipid droplets content and mRNA transcript levels for ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6, monitored by lipid staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively, increased at morula followed by a decrease at blastocyst stage. Relative mRNA abundance changes of ACSL3 were closely related to cytoplasmic lipid droplet accumulation. Characteristic dynamic changes of phospholipid profiles were observed during early embryo development and related to unsaturation level, acyl chain length, and class composition. ELOVL5 and ELOVL6 mRNA levels were suggestive of overexpression of membrane phospholipids containing elongated fatty acids with 16, 18, and 20 carbons. In addition, putative biomarkers of key events of embryogenesis, embryo lipid accumulation, and elongation were identified. This study provides a comprehensive description of stage-specific lipidome signatures and proposes a mechanism to explain its potential relationship with the fluctuation of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets content and mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related genes during early bovine embryo development. PMID:27107972

  9. Retarded Embryo Development 1 (RED1) regulates embryo development, seed maturation and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-07-20

    Plant seeds accumulate large amounts of protein and carbohydrate as storage reserves during maturation. Thus, understanding the genetic control of embryo and seed development may provide bioengineering tools for yield improvement. In this study, we report the identification of Retarded Embryo Development 1 (RED1) gene in Arabidopsis, whose two independent T-DNA insertion mutant lines, SALK_085642 (red1-1) and SALK_022583 (red1-2), show a retarded embryo development phenotype. The embryogenesis process ceases at the late heart stage in red1-1 and at the bent-cotyledon stage in red1-2, respectively, resulting in seed abortion in both lines. The retarded embryo development and seed abortion phenotypes reverted to normal when RED1 complementation constructs were introduced into mutant plants. Small red1-2 homozygous plants can be successfully rescued by culturing immature seeds, indicating that seed abortion likely results from compromised tolerance to the desiccation process associated with seed maturation. Consistent with this observation, red1-2 seeds accumulate less protein, and the expression of two late embryo development reporter transgenes, LEA::GUS and β-conglycinin::GUS, was significantly weak and started relatively late in the red1-2 mutant lines compared to the wild type. The RED1 gene encodes a plant specific novel protein that is localized in the nucleus. These results indicate that RED1 plays important roles in embryo development, seed maturation and plant growth. PMID:27477025

  10. Effects of sperm pretreatment and embryo activation methods on the development of bovine embryos produced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jai-Wei; Chang, Hsun-Chung; Wu, Hung-Yi; Liu, Shyh-Shyan; Wang, Chih-Hua; Chu, Chun-Yen; Shen, Perng-Chih

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of different embryo activation methods and sperm pretreatments on the activation and development of bovine embryos produced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Four activation agents, i.e., calcium ionophore (A23187), ionomycin (Ion), electric pulse (EP) and ethanol (Eth) were used in various combinations to activate bovine ICSI embryos. The normal fertilization rate was similar in bovine ICSI embryos activated by A23187+Eth, Ion+Eth, Ion+EP+Eth, and 2-Ion (Ion administered two times)+Eth. Increasing the frequency of ionomycin stimulation from two (2-Ion+Eth) to three times (3-Ion+Eth) significantly (p<0.05) increased the cell number per embryo at the blastocyst stage. In addition, spermatozoa were pretreated with dithiothreitol (DTT), glutathione (GSH) or GSH+lysolecithin (LL) and used for producing bovine ICSI embryos. The blastocyst rate of bovine ICSI embryos produced from sperm pretreated with GSH was significantly (p<0.05) higher than those of embryos produced from sperm pretreated with DTT and GSH+LL. In conclusion, the embryo activation methods and sperm pretreatments examined in the present study did not affect the normal fertilization rate of bovine ICSI embryos. However, activation with 3-Ion+Eth and sperm pretreatment with GSH increased the cell number per embryo at blastocyst stage and the blastocyst rate, respectively, in bovine ICSI embryos.

  11. Clonal propagation of primate offspring by embryo splitting.

    PubMed

    Chan, A W; Dominko, T; Luetjens, C M; Neuber, E; Martinovich, C; Hewitson, L; Simerly, C R; Schatten, G P

    2000-01-14

    Primates that are identical in both nuclear and cytoplasmic components have not been produced by current cloning strategies, yet such identicals represent the ideal model for investigations of human diseases. Here, genetically identical nonhuman embryos were produced as twin and larger sets by separation and reaggregation of blastomeres of cleavage-stage embryos. A total of 368 multiples were created by the splitting of 107 rhesus embryos with four pregnancies established after 13 embryo transfers (31% versus 53% in vitro fertilization controls). The birth of Tetra, a healthy female cloned from a quarter of an embryo, proves that this approach can result in live offspring.

  12. Impact of PCOS on early embryo cleavage kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wissing, M L; Bjerge, M R; Olesen, A I G; Hoest, T; Mikkelsen, A L

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated whether polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affected early embryo development assessed by time-lapse analysis of embryo kinetics from fertilization to the blastocyst stage. This was a prospective cohort study of two pronuclei (2PN) embryos from 25 hyperandrogenic PCOS patients (110 2PN embryos), 26 normoandrogenic PCOS patients (140 2PN embryos) and 20 healthy, regularly cycling women (controls, 97 2PN embryos). Patients underwent the same baseline evaluation and the same ovarian stimulation from April 2010 to February 2013. Oocytes were fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and incubated in an EmbryoScope with pictures taken every 20 min in seven focal planes. Time to 2PN breakdown, first cleavage and cleavage to 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 cells, morula and blastocyst (t₂, t₃, t₄, t₅, t₆, t₇, t₈, t(M), t(B)) were annotated. Differences in embryo kinetics between groups were assessed by mixed modelling. Compared with controls, embryos from hyperandrogenic PCOS patients were significantly delayed at 2PN breakdown, t₂, t₃, t₄ and t₇ but not at t₅, t₆, t₈, t(M) or t(B). Embryos from hyperandrogenic PCOS women had developed slower from fertilization to the 8-cell stage compared with embryos from controls.

  13. Turtle embryos move to optimal thermal environments within the egg.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Teng; Shine, Richard; Du, Wei-Guo

    2013-08-23

    A recent study demonstrated that the embryos of soft-shelled turtles can reposition themselves within their eggs to exploit locally warm conditions. In this paper, we ask whether turtle embryos actively seek out optimal thermal environments for their development, as do post-hatching individuals. Specifically, (i) do reptile embryos move away from dangerously high temperatures as well as towards warm temperatures? and (ii) is such embryonic movement due to active thermoregulation, or (more simply) to passive embryonic repositioning caused by local heat-induced changes in viscosity of fluids within the egg? Our experiments with an emydid turtle (Chinemys reevesii) show that embryos avoid dangerously high temperatures by moving to cooler regions of the egg. The repositioning of embryos is an active rather than passive process: live embryos move towards a heat source, whereas dead ones do not. Overall, our results suggest that behavioural thermoregulation by turtle embryos is genuinely analogous to the thermoregulatory behaviour exhibited by post-hatching ectotherms.

  14. Tissue densities in developing avian embryos. [under acceleration stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.; Morzenti, A.

    1984-01-01

    The density changes in the components of the incubated egg, the embryo, and the embryo's body parts were measured in the course of 21 days of incubation. In the first two-thirds of the incubation period there is a sequence of increasing density among egg contents: amniotic fluid, embryo, yolk, and albumin. As a result, the embryo is located at the bottom of the amniotic fluid, but at the top of the albumin. This position provides the embryo with mechanical protection and a proximity to the egg's air cell. The observed density changes and the asymmetry of these changes among various body parts of the embryo suggest a functional relationship. The density distributions among the body parts are particularly important in gravitational investigations of embryogenesis since they will produce forces tending to dislocate parts of the embryo.

  15. Oxamflatin Treatment Enhances Cloned Porcine Embryo Development and Nuclear Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Spate, Lee D.; Walters, Eric M.; O'Gorman, Chad; Lee, Kiho; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Wells, Kevin; Rivera, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faulty epigenetic reprogramming of somatic nuclei is thought to be the main reason for low cloning efficiency by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), such as Scriptaid, improve developmental competence of SCNT embryos in several species. Another HDACi, Oxamflatin, is about 100 times more potent than Scriptaid in the ability to inhibit nuclear-specific HDACs. The present study determined the effects of Oxamflatin treatment on embryo development, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Oxamflatin treatment enhanced blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos in vitro. Embryo transfer produced more pigs born and fewer mummies from the Oxamflatin-treated group compared to the Scriptaid-treated positive control. Oxamflatin also decreased DNA methylation of POU5F1 regulatory elements and centromeric repeat elements in day-7 blastocysts. When compared to in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos, the methylation status of POU5F1, NANOG, and centromeric repeat was similar in the cloned embryos, indicating these genes were successfully reprogrammed. However, compared to the lack of methylation of XIST in day-7 IVF embryos, a higher methylation level in day-7 cloned embryos was observed, implying that X chromosomes were activated in day-7 IVF blastocysts, but were not fully activated in cloned embryos, i.e., reprogramming of XIST was delayed. A time-course analysis of XIST DNA methylation on day-13, -15, -17, and -19 in vivo embryos revealed that XIST methylation initiated at about day 13 and was not completed by day 19. The methylation of the XIST gene in day-19 control cloned embryos was delayed again when compared to in vivo embryos. However, methylation of XIST in Oxamflatin-treated embryos was comparable with in vivo embryos, which further demonstrated that Oxamflatin could accelerate the delayed reprogramming of XIST gene and thus might improve cloning efficiency. PMID:25548976

  16. Microfluidic EmbryoSort technology: towards in flow analysis, sorting and dispensing of individual vertebrate embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The demand to reduce the numbers of laboratory animals has facilitated the emergence of surrogate models such as tests performed on zebrafish (Danio rerio) or African clawed frog's (Xenopus levis) eggs, embryos and larvae. Those two model organisms are becoming increasingly popular replacements to current adult animal testing in toxicology, ecotoxicology and also in drug discovery. Zebrafish eggs and embryos are particularly attractive for toxicological analysis due their size (diameter 1.6 mm), optical transparency, large numbers generated per fish and very straightforward husbandry. The current bottleneck in using zebrafish embryos for screening purposes is, however, a tedious manual evaluation to confirm the fertilization status and subsequent dispensing of single developing embryos to multitier plates to perform toxicity analysis. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present a proofof- concept design of a continuous flow embryo sorter capable of analyzing, sorting and dispensing objects ranging in size from 1.5 - 2.5 mm. The prototypes were fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. The application of additive manufacturing processes to prototype Lab-on-a-Chip sorters using both fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA) were also explored. The operation of the device was based on a revolving receptacle capable of receiving, holding and positioning single fish embryos for both interrogation and subsequent sorting. The actuation of the revolving receptacle was performed using a DC motor and/or microservo motor. The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers.

  17. Plasminogen-independent fibrinolysis by proteases produced by transformed chick embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L B; Buchanan, J M

    1975-01-01

    The fibrinolytic activity of proteases secreted by chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Rous sarcoma virus was studied by use of a procedure in which a fibrin clot was formed with highly purified fibrinogen and thrombin above the cell layer. This procedure results in the formation of fibrin that is apparently a more suitable substrate for studies on fibrinolysis than is fibrin prepared by other methods. Since neither plasminogen nor serum were included in the assay system in the present studies, the fibrinolytic activity observed cannot be ascribed to the conversion of the plasminogen in serum to plasmin by a plasminogen activator produced by transformed cells. Our procedure, therefore, measures proteolytic activities other than those reported by previous investigators. Maintenance of some of the transformed phenotypes of Rous sarcoma virus transformed chick embryo fibroblasts such as morpholigical change and increased rate of glucose uptake apparently does not depend on the presence of plasminogen in the culture medium. Images PMID:165484

  18. Infectious bursal disease virus changes the potassium current properties of chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Repp, H; Nieper, H; Draheim, H J; Koschinski, A; Müller, H; Dreyer, F

    1998-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of an economically significant poultry disease. IBDV infection leads to apoptosis in chicken embryos and cell cultures. Since changes in cellular ion fluxes during apoptosis have been reported, we investigated the membrane ion currents of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) inoculated with the Cu-1 strain of IBDV using the patch-clamp recording technique. Incubation of CEFs with IBDV led to marked changes in their K+ outward current properties, with respect to both the kinetics of activation and inactivation and the Ca2+ dependence of the activation. The changes occurred in a time-dependent manner and were complete after 8 h. UV-treated noninfectious virions induced the same K+ current changes as live IBDV. When CEFs were inoculated with IBDV after pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody, about 30% of the cells showed a normal K+ current, whereas the rest exhibited K+ current properties identical to or closely resembling those of IBDV-infected cells. Incubation of CEFs with culture supernatant from IBDV-infected cells from which the virus particles were removed had no influence on the K+ current. Our data strongly suggest that the K+ current changes induced by IBDV are not due to virus replication, but are the result of attachment and/or membrane penetration. Possibly, the altered K+ current may delay the apoptotic process in CEFs after IBDV infection. PMID:9657954

  19. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  20. Studies on the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma group. 1. The pattern of multiplication of meningopneumonitis virus in the allantois of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    SIGEL, M M; GIRARDI, A J; ALLEN, E G

    1951-11-01

    Because of the peculiar properties of the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma group of viruses, the pattern of multiplication in the allantois of the chick embryo of one of their number, meningopneumonitis virus, was studied. This was done by determination of the changes in its infectivity for mice and chick embryos. Titration of infectivity in embryos proved to be a more sensitive procedure than titration in mice; the latter procedure however, had the advantage of greater simplicity and gave more clear-cut results. The mouse titration method was used in most of the experiments. Following inoculation of virus into the allantois, there was a slow decrease in infectivity in the allantoic fluids followed by an increase due to appearance of new virus between 24 and 48 hours. The slope of declining infectivity in the allantoic fluids in ovo was similar if not identical with the slope of decreasing infectivity in allantoic fluids in vitro caused by thermal degradation of virus. Multiplication of the virus in allantoic membranes was characterized by the following pattern: (a) Increase in infectivity in the first few hours (exact duration of increase depended on concentration of virus in inoculum) due to adsorption of virus. (b) Decrease in infectivity up to about 20 to 24 hours. (c) Increase in infectivity due to appearance of the new generation of virus. The growth curve of meningopneumonitis is analyzed and the pattern of growth is discussed in the light of the present concepts of viral multiplication.

  1. Human pre-implantation embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Niakan, Kathy K.; Han, Jinnuo; Pedersen, Roger A.; Simon, Carlos; Pera, Renee A. Reijo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding human pre-implantation development has important implications for assisted reproductive technology (ART) and for human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based therapies. Owing to limited resources, the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing this early stage of human development are poorly understood. Nonetheless, recent advances in non-invasive imaging techniques and molecular and genomic technologies have helped to increase our understanding of this fascinating stage of human development. Here, we summarize what is currently known about human pre-implantation embryo development and highlight how further studies of human pre-implantation embryos can be used to improve ART and to fully harness the potential of hESCs for therapeutic goals. PMID:22318624

  2. Vitrification of oocytes, embryos and blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, Tetsunori; Oka, Chikahiro

    2012-12-01

    In assisted reproductive technology, cryopreservation of human oocytes and embryos has been significantly improved by refined slow-cooling and the new vitrification method. The slow-cooling method requires a programmed cryo-machine, and usually takes several hours. It is, however, difficult to eliminate injuries resulting from ice formation completely. Vitrification has become a reliable strategy because it is simple, can lead to high survival rates and viability, and has better clinical outcome. Vitrification transforms cells into an amorphous glassy state inside and outside the vitrified cell with ultra-rapid cooling and warming steps by plunging the oocytes and embryos into liquid nitrogen, instead of ice-crystal formation. Over the past decade, several advances in vitrification technologies have improved clinical efficiency and outcome. In this chapter, we focus on vitrification technologies for cryopreservation in human assisted reproductive technology. PMID:22940094

  3. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Gary F.; Morales, Elvin E.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  4. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Gary F; Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  5. Cells, embryos and development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Work continues to focus on the demonstrable totipotency of cultured somatic cells of various higher plants and has examined the conditions which regulate this propensity to be controllably released. This was done with special reference to cells obtained from cultured explants of daylily and carrot. For purposes of identifying the variables in question, work was carried out almost exclusively in liquid media. The events that intervene between the aseptic isolation of tissue explants, the culture of small derived units and free cells and the propagation in large numbers of adventive or somatic embryos to plantlets were traced and certain definitive stages at which control is exercised were identified. In daylily, morphologically competent units are now propagated with a high degree of precision in rotated liquid cultures in bulk, and under the conditions of continuous neutralized gravity, the development progresses so that embryo-plantlets are obtained.

  6. Surrogate embryo transfer: the perils of patenting.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1984-06-01

    Surrogate embryo transfer (SET) is a new procedure, developed by a research team led by Dr. John Buster of the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, that involves recovery by uterine lavage of an embryo from a donor woman for transfer to the sperm donor's wife. With the concurrence of Dr. Buster, Fertility and Genetics Research, Inc., the company that funded the research, has applied for patents on both the instruments used and the SET process itself. Annas discusses the ethical and legal issues raised by applying the concept of process patenting to a reproductive technology, and contends that such patents should be rejected unless the medical profession and the public can be assured that effective quality controls will be utilized and that reproductive privacy will not be compromised.

  7. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Gary F; Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2015-07-30

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development.

  8. Whole embryo culture and toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Piersma, A H

    1993-11-01

    The use of post-implantation embryo culture in toxicity testing has been the subject of research as well as debate. Advantages of the method include reduced animal use, and reduced cost and time in comparison with in vivo testing. In addition, the method yields many developmental endpoints: it allows the direct and controlled addition of small amounts of compounds, and the incorporation of metabolizing systems is possible. Disadvantages include the technical skill required, the restricted culture duration, the artificial route of administration of test compounds and the absence of the maternal compartment (and hence the absence of a measure for adult toxicity). Several studies using a variety of compounds have shown promising results with respect to correlations between in vivo effects and the outcome of embryo culture. The question of how a meaningful validation study should be designed is still a matter of dispute. Issues under discussion include: the purpose of validation, culture conditions, endpoint definition, choice of compounds to be tested, the status of in vivo data on test compounds, presentation of results, double-blind and interlaboratory design, and the position of the test within a testing strategy. The validity of whole embryo culture as a toxicity screening test is likely to vary considerably between classes of compounds. Therefore, validation studies with larger sets of related compounds may be more meaningful than those with many unrelated compounds. Whole embryo culture may provide a significant contribution to risk assessment by use in screening, and for mechanistic, structure-activity, and dose-response studies. PMID:20732278

  9. Techniques for slow cryopreservation of embryos.

    PubMed

    Gosden, Lucinda Veeck

    2014-01-01

    The slow cryopreservation of embryos has been used for nearly three decades as a means of storing surplus conceptuses from single IVF (in vitro fertilization) cycles. Doing so has allowed caregivers to maximize pregnancy rates without wastage of precious biological materials. Very detailed methods are described here using a popular biological freezing unit manufactured by Planer PLC (Middlesex, UK). Culture media preparation and tranfer protocols, including replacement in both natural and stimulated cycles, are included. PMID:24782021

  10. Human-animal interaction, stress, and embryo production in Bos indicus embryo donors under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Gustavo Guerino; Zúccari, Carmem Estefânia Serra Neto; de Abreu, Urbano Gomes Pinto; Negrão, João Alberto; da Costa e Silva, Eliane Vianna

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of human-animal interaction (HAI) and the stress response on the quality of embryo production in superovulated Nelore (Bos indicus) cattle, under tropical conditions. Thirty-two females underwent a superovulation protocol for 5 days. Cortisol concentrations were determined in blood plasma collected on days 0, 4, and 5. Artificial insemination was performed on days 4 and 5, and nonsurgical embryo flushing on day 11. Embryo production and viability were determined. Human stimulation, animal behaviors, accidents, and handling time were recorded to assess HAI. Cattle age was negatively correlated with accidents, frequency of aversive behaviors, and negative stimuli by stockperson during transit through corral compartments to receive superovulation treatments. The factor analysis revealed two distinct groups. The first group was called stressed and had higher cortisol concentration than the nonstressed group, 16.0 ± 2.1 and 12.5 ± 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. Comparisons between these groups showed that the frequency of voice emissions by the stockperson and the number of accidents were higher in the stressed group, and also, the mean handling time was longer in the stressed group than for the nonstressed. As a result, viability rate of the embryos was 19% lower in the stressed group (P < 0.05). This indicates that intensive negative HAI is likely related to stress, which affects embryo production in a superovulation program.

  11. From Stress to Embryos: Some of the Problems for Induction and Maturation of Somatic Embryos.

    PubMed

    Ochatt, Sergio J; Revilla, Maria Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Although somatic embryogenesis has been successfully achieved in numerous plant species, little is known about the mechanism(s) underlying this process. Changes in the balance of growth regulators of the culture medium, osmolarity, or amino acids as well as the genotype and developmental stage of the tissue used as initial explant may have a pivotal influence on the induction of somatic embryogenic cultures. Moreover, different stress agents (ethylene, activated charcoal, cold or heat or electrical shocks), as well as abscisic acid, can also foster the induction or further development of somatic embryos. In the process, cells first return to a stem cell-like status and then either enter their new program or dye when the stress level exceeds cell tolerance. Recalcitrance to differentiation of somatic cells into embryos is frequently observed, and problems such as secondary or recurrent embryogenesis, embryo growth arrest (at the globular stage or during the transition from torpedo to cotyledonary stage), and development of only the aerial part of somatic embryos can appear, interfering with normal germination and conversion of embryos to plants. Some solutions to solve these problems associated to embryogenesis are proposed and two very efficient somatic embryogenesis protocols for two model plant species are detailed. PMID:26619886

  12. Hydrodynamic simulation of multicellular embryo invagination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouille, Philippe-Alexandre; Farge, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical aspects of embryonic morphogenesis have been widely analysed by numerical simulations of invagination in sea urchins and Drosophila gastrulation. Finite element models, which describe the tissue as a continuous medium, lead to the global invagination morphogenesis observed in vivo. Here we develop a simulation of multicellular embryo invagination that allows access to both cellular and multicellular mechanical behaviours of the embryo. In this model, the tissue is composed of adhesive individual cells, in which shape change dynamics is governed by internal acto-myosin forces and the hydrodynamic flow associated with membrane movements. We investigated the minimal structural and force elements sufficient to phenocopy mesoderm invagination. The minimal structures are cell membranes characterized by an acto-myosin cortical tension and connected by apical and basal junctions and an acto-myosin contractile ring connected to the apical junctions. An increase in the apical-cortical surface tension is the only control parameter change required to phenocopy most known multicellular and cellular shape changes of Drosophila gastrulation. Specifically, behaviours observed in vivo, including apical junction movements at the onset of gastrulation, cell elongation and subsequent shortening during invagination, and the development of a dorso-ventral gradient of thickness of the embryo, are predicted by this model as passive mechanical consequences of the genetically controlled increase in the apical surface tension in invaginating mesoderm cells, thus demonstrating the accurate description of structures at both global and single cell scales.

  13. Characterization of embryo-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.

    1992-06-12

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the function and regulation of a set of embryonic genes which are expressed in the embryos, not in the plants. 22 cDNA clones were isolated from a cDNA library we constructed using mRNAS of -carrot somatic embryos. These cDNA clones identified mRNA species that are present in the somatic and zygotic embryos, but not in adult plants. The sequence of all 22cDNA clones were determined; genomic clones for three cDNA clones, DC8, DC59, and DC49 were isolated and gene sequences determined. DC8, DC49, and several other genes identified by the cDNA sequences belong to the category of late embryogenesis abundant protein genes, Lea. The function of these gens have not yet been determined, but they share common structural features, are regulated by ABA and are speculated to play a role in seed desiccation.

  14. Role of melatonin in embryo fetal development

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, SE; Zygouropoulos, N; Zahiu, CD; Zagrean, AM

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine produced by the pineal gland and secreted in a circadian manner. In the past few decades, research over this topic has been enhanced. Melatonin has many important roles in the human physiology: regulator of the circadian rhythms, sleep inducer, antioxidant, anticarcinogenic. This paper reviews the involvement of melatonin in embryo fetal development. The pineal gland develops completely postpartum, so both the embryo and the fetus are dependent on the maternal melatonin provided transplacentally. Melatonin appears to be involved in the normal outcome of pregnancy beginning with the oocyte quality and finishing with the parturition. Its pregnancy night-time concentrations increase after 24 weeks of gestation, with significantly high levels after 32 weeks. Melatonin receptors are widespread in the embryo and fetus since early stages. There is solid evidence that melatonin is neuroprotective and has a positive effect on the outcome of the compromised pregnancies. In addition, chronodisruption leads to a reproductive dysfunction. Thus, the influence of melatonin on the developing human fetus may not be limited to the entertaining of circadian rhythmicity, but further studies are needed. PMID:25713608

  15. Role of melatonin in embryo fetal development.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, S E; Zygouropoulos, N; Zahiu, C D; Zagrean, A M

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine produced by the pineal gland and secreted in a circadian manner. In the past few decades, research over this topic has been enhanced. Melatonin has many important roles in the human physiology: regulator of the circadian rhythms, sleep inducer, antioxidant, anticarcinogenic. This paper reviews the involvement of melatonin in embryo fetal development. The pineal gland develops completely postpartum, so both the embryo and the fetus are dependent on the maternal melatonin provided transplacentally. Melatonin appears to be involved in the normal outcome of pregnancy beginning with the oocyte quality and finishing with the parturition. Its pregnancy night-time concentrations increase after 24 weeks of gestation, with significantly high levels after 32 weeks. Melatonin receptors are widespread in the embryo and fetus since early stages. There is solid evidence that melatonin is neuroprotective and has a positive effect on the outcome of the compromised pregnancies. In addition, chronodisruption leads to a reproductive dysfunction. Thus, the influence of melatonin on the developing human fetus may not be limited to the entertaining of circadian rhythmicity, but further studies are needed.

  16. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  17. Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galau, G.

    1998-09-01

    Primary dormancy is the inability of mature seed to immediately germinate until specific environmental stimuli are perceived that predict that future conditions will support plant growth and seed set. The analysis of abscisic acid deficient and insensitive mutants, in particular in Arabidopsis, suggests that embryo abscisic acid may be directly involved in the development of primary dormancy. Other studies implicate the continued accumulation of LEA proteins as inhibiting germination in dormant embryos. The results of these physiological, molecular and genetic approaches are complex and equivocal. There is a real need for approaches that test the separate nature of vivipary inhibition and primary dormancy and deliberately seed to decouple and dissect them. These approaches should be of help in understanding both late embryo development and primary dormancy. The approach taken here is to directly isolate mutants of Arabidopsis that appear to be deficient only in primary dormancy, that is fresh seed that germinate rapidly without the normally-required cold-stratification. The authors have isolated at least 8 independent, rapidly germinating RGM mutants of Arabidopsis. All others aspects of plant growth and development appear normal in these lines, suggesting that the rgm mutants are defective only in the establishment or maintenance of primary dormancy. At least one of these may be tagged with T-DNA. In addition, about 50 RGM isolates have been recovered from EMS-treated seed.

  18. Single embryo transfer - state of the art.

    PubMed

    De Neubourg, Diane; Gerris, Jan

    2003-12-01

    Every practitioner active in the field of assisted reproduction treatment is aware of the risks and complications related to twin and higher-order multiple pregnancies. Introduction of single embryo transfer (SET) into IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one of the possible ways of reducing the rate of twin pregnancy. Careful selection of patients, in combination with elective SET, has been shown to decrease the twin pregnancy rate while maintaining a stable ongoing pregnancy rate. The combination of a woman younger than 38 years of age, in her first or second IVF/ICSI cycle and with an embryo with a high implantation potential is the key to successful SET. This article will discuss embryo selection and patient selection and review the data published on SET. In the Centre for Reproductive Medicine at Middelheim Hospital, 39% of all transfers in 2002 were SET; the ongoing pregnancy rate remained stable at 30.6%. The twin (multiple) pregnancy rate declined to 11.7%. Particular attention should be drawn to the augmenting effect of the pregnancy rate of frozen-thawed cycles. Health economic data available so far subscribe the plea for SET.

  19. Inducible gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G N; Hamilton, F S; Hoppler, S

    2000-07-13

    The amphibian Xenopus laevis has been successfully used for many years as a model system for studying vertebrate development. Because of technical limitations, however, molecular investigations have mainly concentrated on early stages. We have developed a straightforward method for stage-specific induction of gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos [1] [2]. This method is based on the Xenopus heat shock protein 70 (Xhsp70 [3]) promoter driving the expression of desired gene products. We found that ubiquitous expression of the transgene is induced upon relatively mild heat treatment. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a marker to monitor successful induction of gene expression in transgenic embryos. We used this method to study the stage specificity of Wnt signalling function. Transient ectopic Wnt-8 expression during early neurulation was sufficient to repress anterior head development and this capacity was restricted to early stages of neurulation. By transient over-expression at different stages of development, we show that frizzled-7 disrupted morphogenesis sequentially from anterior to posterior along the dorsal axis as development proceeds. These results demonstrate that this method for inducible gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos will be a very powerful tool for temporal analysis of gene function and for studying molecular mechanisms of vertebrate organogenesis.

  20. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  1. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area. PMID:16331533

  2. Developmental kinetics of bovine nuclear transfer and parthenogenetic embryos.

    PubMed

    Holm, P; Booth, P J; Callesen, H

    2003-01-01

    Early developmental kinetics of nuclear transfer (NT) embryos reconstituted with blastomeres and parthenogenones produced by ionophore activation followed by either dimethylaminopurine (DMAP) or cycloheximide (CHX) treatment was studied. In vitro produced (IVP) embryos served as controls. Embryos were cultured to the hatched blastocyst stage, and images were recorded every 0.5 h throughout the culture period. The longest cell cycle shifted from 4th to 5th cycle (26 +/- 4 and 44 +/- 5 h) in NT-embryos compared to IVP-embryos (41 +/- 2 and 20 +/- 3 h) and showed greater asynchrony between blastomeres than any other embryo category. Compared to DMAP, CHX prolonged the 1(st) (23 +/- 1 vs. 33 +/- 1 h) and shortened the 3(rd) cell cycle (17 +/- 2 vs. 13 +/- 1 h). Moreover, though cytoskeleton activity was initialised, a larger proportion of CHX embryos was unable to accomplish first cleavage. The parthegenones differed from IVP embryos with respect to the lengths of the 1st, 3rd, and 4th cell cycles and time of hatching. The findings are discussed in relation to known ultrastructural, chromosomal and genomic aberrations found in NT embryos and parthenogenones. We hypothesize that the shift of the longest cell cycle in NT embryos is associated with a shift in the time of major genomic transition.

  3. Preimplantation embryo programming: transcription, epigenetics, and culture environment.

    PubMed

    Duranthon, Veronique; Watson, Andrew J; Lonergan, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Preimplantation development directs the formation of an implantation- or attachment-competent embryo so that metabolic interactions with the uterus can occur, pregnancy can be initiated, and fetal development can be sustained. The preimplantation embryo exhibits a form of autonomous development fueled by products provided by the oocyte and also from activation of the embryo's genome. Despite this autonomy, the preimplantation embryo is highly influenced by factors in the external environment and in extreme situations, such as those presented by embryo culture or nuclear transfer, the ability of the embryo to adapt to the changing environmental conditions or chromatin to become reprogrammed can exceed its own adaptive capacity, resulting in aberrant embryonic development. Nuclear transfer or embryo culture-induced influences not only affect implantation and establishment of pregnancy but also can extend to fetal and postnatal development and affect susceptibility to disease in later life. It is therefore critical to define the basic program controlling preimplantation development, and also to utilize nuclear transfer and embryo culture models so that we may design healthier environments for preimplantation embryos to thrive in and also minimize the potential for negative consequences during pregnancy and post-gestational life. In addition, it is necessary to couple gene expression analysis with the investigation of gene function so that effects on gene expression can be fully understood. The purpose of this short review is to highlight our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling preimplantation development and report how those mechanisms may be influenced by nuclear transfer and embryo culture. PMID:18239045

  4. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo aspiration plus local administration of low-dose methotrexate for caesarean scar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhu, Fufan; Fu, Shuxin; Shi, Xiaobo

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo aspiration plus local administration of low-dose methotrexate (MTX) on caesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). Sixty-eight cases of CSP were randomly grouped for (1) systemic administration of MTX plus curettage with hysteroscopy (control group); and (2) transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo aspiration plus local administration of low-dose MTX (experimental group). Serum β-HCG and transaminase levels, length of hospital stay, occurrence of hypoleukocytosis, vaginal bleeding and genital infection were analyzed. No statistical differences in the duration needed for β-HCG normalization, genital infection and length of hospital stay were observed between the two groups. However, the occurrence of massive vaginal bleeding, hypoleukocytosis and elevated transaminase levels were significantly lower in patients who received transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo aspiration plus local administration of low-dose MTX compared with patients in the control group. Our study suggested that transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo aspiration plus local administration of low-dose MTX should be recommended as a safe and effective treatment of caesarean scar pregnancy.

  5. Propylthiouracil Is Teratogenic in Murine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Valeria C.; Mallela, Murali K.; Booth, Carmen J.; Wendler, Christopher C.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is treated with the antithyroid drugs (ATD) propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI). PTU currently is recommended as the drug of choice during early pregnancy. Yet, despite widespread ATD use in pregnancy, formal studies of ATD teratogenic effects have not been performed. Methods We examined the teratogenic effects of PTU and MMI during embryogenesis in mice. To span different periods of embryogenesis, dams were treated with compounds or vehicle daily from embryonic day (E) 7.5 to 9.5 or from E3.5 to E7.5. Embryos were examined for gross malformations at E10.5 or E18.5 followed by histological and micro-CT analysis. Influences of PTU on gene expression levels were examined by RNA microarray analysis. Results When dams were treated from E7.5 to E9.5 with PTU, neural tube and cardiac abnormalities were observed at E10.5. Cranial neural tube defects were significantly more common among the PTU-exposed embryos than those exposed to MMI or vehicle. Blood in the pericardial sac, which is a feature indicative of abnormal cardiac function and/or abnormal vasculature, was observed more frequently in PTU-treated than MMI-treated or vehicle-treated embryos. Following PTU treatment, a total of 134 differentially expressed genes were identified. Disrupted genetic pathways were those associated with cytoskeleton remodeling and keratin filaments. At E 18.5, no gross malformations were evident in either ATD group, but the number of viable PTU embryos per dam at E18.5 was significantly lower from those at E10.5, indicating loss of malformed embryos. These data show that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with delayed neural tube closure and cardiac abnormalities. In contrast, we did not observe structural or cardiac defects associated with MMI exposure except at the higher dose. We find that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with fetal loss. These observations suggest that PTU has teratogenic potential

  6. Optimizing the culture environment and embryo manipulation to help maintain embryo developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jason E; Carrell, Doug; Cobo, Ana; Meseguer, Marcos; Rubio, Carmen; Smith, Gary D

    2016-03-01

    With increased use of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS), the question remains as to why some practices do not experience the same high levels of clinical success after implementation of the approach. Indeed, the debate surrounding the efficacy and usefulness of blastocyst biopsy and CCS continues. Importantly, several variables impact the success of an assisted reproductive technology cycle. Transfer of a euploid embryo is but one factor in an intricate system that requires numerous steps to occur successfully. Certainly, the culture environment and the manipulations of the embryo during its time in the laboratory can impact its reproductive potential. Environmental stressors ranging from culture media to culture conditions and even culture platform can impact biochemical, metabolic, and epigenetic patterns that can affect the developing cell independent of chromosome number. Furthermore, accompanying procedures, such as biopsy and vitrification, are complex and, when performed improperly, can negatively impact embryo quality. These are areas that likely still carry room for improvement within the IVF laboratory.

  7. Bioeconomic evaluation of embryo transfer in beef production systems: III. Embryo lines for producing bulls.

    PubMed

    Ruvuna, F; Taylor, J F; Walter, J P; Turner, J W; Thallman, R M

    1992-04-01

    A model was developed for the economic evaluation of embryos for producing bull lines for use in commercial beef production. The fundamental concept underlying the model is that a cloned and sexed embryo of known genetic characteristics for beef traits is used to produce a bull. After reaching physiological maturity, the bull is used in natural matings. Equations relating feed energy requirements and growth rates based on NRC requirements and costs and returns discounted to present value allow investigation of expected economic merits of progeny from different embryo bull lines. The model has the flexibility to determine optimal embryo characteristics for different production environments. Model sensitivity to variation in progeny sex ratios, growth rates, yield and quality grades, and herd fertility characteristics was examined. Net present values (NPV) per embryo transferred were determined at the optimal marketing age of progeny produced from mating the bull to 30 cows per year for 5 yr. Relative to the lowest NPV of $18,209 for progeny with an expected quality grade of Select and yield grade of 4 at 400 d, increments in NPV ranged from $329 to $22,708 depending on differences in expected progeny carcass grade characteristics. The difference between NPV for 100% male and 40% male sex ratios was $7,518. The NPV differences between progeny growth rates of 1.6 and .9 kg/d holding herd conception rate constant at .9 and .5 were $8,311 and $4,611, respectively. The model evaluates relative economic values of embryo lines for producing bulls, accommodating interactions among progeny characteristics, and environments.

  8. Embryo collection in prepubertal gilts and attempts to develop an improved embryo transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Wallenhorst, S; Holtz, W

    2002-06-15

    Prepubertal gilts were treated with 1,500 iu equine chorionic gonadotrophin, followed 72 hours later by 500 iu human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), and inseminated 36 and 48 hours later. Embryos were collected at slaughter 168 hours after the hCG treatment. Blastocysts classified as 'good' or 'fair' were transferred to synchronised recipients, either by conventional surgical means or by a 'semi-endoscopic' approach, and the recipients were slaughtered four weeks later. Of 238 donor gilts, 98.4 per cent had responded with a mean (se) 23.5 (1.0) ovulations and 19.1 (1.0) ova or embryos, of which 47 per cent were considered morphologically intact and transferable. The large proportion of non-transferable embryos was not associated with the age or weight of the gilts, the season or with their housing conditions. Conventional surgical transfer of 15 to 20 (mean 17.4) blastocysts to synchronised recipients yielded 88 percent (14 of 16) pregnancies with between seven and 14 (mean 8.2) viable fetuses, and an embryo survival rate of 47 per cent in the pregnant recipients and 41 per cent in all the recipients. The corresponding data for the semi-endoscopic transfers were 16 to 20 (mean 17.7) blastocysts transferred, 47 per cent (eight of 17) pregnancies, four to 12 (mean 7.3) viable fetuses per pregnant recipient and an embryo survival rate of 41 per cent in the pregnant recipients and 19 per cent in all the recipients. Significantly fewer of these recipients became pregnant and a significantly smaller proportion of the embryos survived (P<0.05). PMID:12092622

  9. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  10. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.E.H.

    1998-12-31

    Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.

  11. Electrical polarity in embryos of wild carrot precedes cotyledon differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brawley, S H; Wetherell, D F; Robinson, K R

    1984-10-01

    Endogenous electrical currents traverse embryos of a higher plant, the wild carrot Daucus carota L. Current enters the apical pole and leaves the region near the presumptive radicle in the radially symmetric globular embryo. Current also enters the exposed surfaces of incipient globular embryos. This electrical polarity precedes differentiation of vascular tissue and cotyledon development. Localized current is observed at both growing ends of the embryos in subsequent stages of embryogenesis. Inward current is found at the cotyledons; outward current is found at the radicle/root. Exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (3 muM) reversibly inhibits these currents. Little current traverses the surface of intermediate regions of the embryo. The ionic gradients generated by these currents may be important in accumulation of metabolites and in other developmental processes within the embryo.

  12. [Development of Brassica rapa L. embryos under conditions of microgravity].

    PubMed

    Popova, A F; Musgrave, M; Kuang, A

    2009-01-01

    Results of comparative studies of the embryos of identical age formed under microgravity and ground laboratory control are presented. Significant similarity of a rate of embryo development and degree of their differentiation in both variants has been shown. The single cases of the disturbances in embryo formation, and also a certain acceleration of endosperm development at the early stages of seed formation in microgravity are revealed.

  13. Efficient production and cellular characterization of sheep androgenetic embryos.

    PubMed

    Zacchini, Federica; Czernik, Marta; Iuso, Domenico; Toschi, Paola; di Egidio, Fiorella; Scapolo, Pier Augusto; Loi, Pasqualino; Ptak, Grazyna

    2011-12-01

    The production of androgenetic embryos in large animals is a complex procedure. Androgenetic embryos have been produced so far only in cattle and sheep using pronuclear transfer (PT) between zygotes derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF) of previously enucleated oocytes. PT is required due to the poor developmental potential of androgenotes derived from IVF of enucleated oocytes. Here we compare the developemt to blastocyst of androgenetic embryos produced by the standard pronuclear transfer and by fertilization of oocytes enucleated in Ca2+/Mg2+-free medium, without pronuclear transfer. The enucleation in Ca2+/Mg2+-free medium abolished almost completely the manipulation-induced activation, significantly improving the development to blastocyst of the androgenetic embryos (IVF followed by PT; 18.6%: IVF only; 17.7%, respectively). Karyotype analysis of IVF revealed a similar proportion of diploid embryos in androgenetic and control blastocysts (35% and 36%, respectively), although mixoploid blastocysts were frequently observed in both groups (64%). Androgenotes had lower total cell numbers than control and parthenogenetic embryos, but more cells in ICM cells comparing to parthenogenotes (30.42 vs. 17.15%). Higher expression of the pluripotency-associated gene NANOG, and trophoblastic-specific gene CDX2, were also observed in androgenotes compared to parthenogenotes and controls. The global methytion profile of androgenetic embryos was comparable to controls, but was lower than parthenogenetic embryos. The cell composition and methylation pattern we have detected in monoparental sheep monoparental embryos are unprecedented, and differ considerably from the standard reference mouse embryos. Altogether, these finding indicate significant differences across species in the molecular mechanisms regulating early development of monoparental embryos, and highlights the need to study postimplantation development of androgenetic embryos in sheep.

  14. Efficient Production and Cellular Characterization of Sheep Androgenetic Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zacchini, Federica; Czernik, Marta; Iuso, Domenico; Toschi, Paola; di Egidio, Fiorella; Scapolo, Pier Augusto; Ptak, Grazyna

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The production of androgenetic embryos in large animals is a complex procedure. Androgenetic embryos have been produced so far only in cattle and sheep using pronuclear transfer (PT) between zygotes derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF) of previously enucleated oocytes. PT is required due to the poor developmental potential of androgenotes derived from IVF of enucleated oocytes. Here we compare the developemt to blastocyst of androgenetic embryos produced by the standard pronuclear transfer and by fertilization of oocytes enucleated in Ca2+/Mg2+-free medium, without pronuclear transfer. The enucleation in Ca2+/Mg2+-free medium abolished almost completely the manipulation-induced activation, significantly improving the development to blastocyst of the androgenetic embryos (IVF followed by PT; 18.6%: IVF only; 17.7%, respectively). Karyotype analysis of IVF revealed a similar proportion of diploid embryos in androgenetic and control blastocysts (35% and 36%, respectively), although mixoploid blastocysts were frequently observed in both groups (64%). Androgenotes had lower total cell numbers than control and parthenogenetic embryos, but more cells in ICM cells comparing to parthenogenotes (30.42 vs. 17.15%). Higher expression of the pluripotency-associated gene NANOG, and trophoblastic-specific gene CDX2, were also observed in androgenotes compared to parthenogenotes and controls. The global methytion profile of androgenetic embryos was comparable to controls, but was lower than parthenogenetic embryos. The cell composition and methylation pattern we have detected in monoparental sheep monoparental embryos are unprecedented, and differ considerably from the standard reference mouse embryos. Altogether, these finding indicate significant differences across species in the molecular mechanisms regulating early development of monoparental embryos, and highlights the need to study postimplantation development of androgenetic embryos in sheep. PMID:22043807

  15. Digital Microfluidic Processing of Mammalian Embryos for Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Sun, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation is a key technology in biology and clinical practice. This paper presents a digital microfluidic device that automates sample preparation for mammalian embryo vitrification. Individual micro droplets manipulated on the microfluidic device were used as micro-vessels to transport a single mouse embryo through a complete vitrification procedure. Advantages of this approach, compared to manual operation and channel-based microfluidic vitrification, include automated operation, cryoprotectant concentration gradient generation, and feasibility of loading and retrieval of embryos. PMID:25250666

  16. Fatty acid breakdown in developing embryos of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Chia, T; Rawsthorne, S

    2000-12-01

    Developing Brassica napus embryos are primarily concerned with the accumulation of storage products, namely oil, starch and protein. The presence of fatty acid catabolic pathways in the background of this biosynthetic activity was investigated. Enzymes involved in the process of lipid mobilization, such as malate synthase and isocitrate lyase, are detectable towards the late stages of embryo development. [(14)C]Acetate feeding experiments also reveal that fatty acid catabolism becomes increasingly functional as the embryo matures.

  17. Biosecurity and the various types of embryos transferred.

    PubMed

    Thibier, M

    2006-08-01

    The aim of the present paper was to review some features related to the risk analysis of three types of embryos to be transferred, namely the in vivo derived, the in vitro produced and the cloned ones. For in vivo-collected embryos, a considerable number of experiments and scientific investigations have been performed and hundreds of thousands of embryos are transferred annually with no contamination of associated diseases. Provided that the code of practice such as that published by the International Embryo Transfer Society is strictly followed by the embryo transfer practitioners, the statement made some 17 years ago saying that the in vivo-derived embryo transfer was the safest way of exchanging genes remains entirely true, thanks to the professionalism of the embryo transfer industry. For the in vitro-produced embryos, some particular rules have to be followed because of specific risks for some pathogens to strongly adhere to the zona pellucida of such embryos. There are some means to monitor and control those effects, and the transfer of in vitro-produced embryos can also be a very safe way to exchange genes around the world. The third type of embryos, the cloned ones, is a quite different category and the risk analysis to be soundly made still needs a lot of investigations so as to characterize the potential risks if there are, in terms not only of disease transmission but also in terms of public health, zoonotic risks as well as those related to quality and safety of food. The problem in this regard, is more directly addressed for offspring of clones than to the cloned embryos themselves. Published data on this issue are increasing in numbers so that progress in that area is expected in the few years to come.

  18. Selection of Norway spruce somatic embryos by computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamalainen, Jari J.; Jokinen, Kari J.

    1993-05-01

    A computer vision system was developed for the classification of plant somatic embryos. The embryos are in a Petri dish that is transferred with constant speed and they are recognized as they pass a line scan camera. A classification algorithm needs to be installed for every plant species. This paper describes an algorithm for the recognition of Norway spruce (Picea abies) embryos. A short review of conifer micropropagation by somatic embryogenesis is also given. The recognition algorithm is based on features calculated from the boundary of the object. Only part of the boundary corresponding to the developing cotyledons (2 - 15) and the straight sides of the embryo are used for recognition. An index of the length of the cotyledons describes the developmental stage of the embryo. The testing set for classifier performance consisted of 118 embryos and 478 nonembryos. With the classification tolerances chosen 69% of the objects classified as embryos by a human classifier were selected and 31$% rejected. Less than 1% of the nonembryos were classified as embryos. The basic features developed can probably be easily adapted for the recognition of other conifer somatic embryos.

  19. Embryo fossilization is a biological process mediated by microbial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Elizabeth C.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Nelson, David E.; Donoghue, Philip C. J.; Thomas, Ceri-Wyn; Turner, F. Rudolf; Stein, Barry D.; Dong, Xiping; Bengtson, Stefan; Huldtgren, Therese; Stampanoni, Marco; Chongyu, Yin; Raff, Rudolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Fossilized embryos with extraordinary cellular preservation appear in the Late Neoproterozoic and Cambrian, coincident with the appearance of animal body fossils. It has been hypothesized that microbial processes are responsible for preservation and mineralization of organic tissues. However, the actions of microbes in preservation of embryos have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we show that bacterial biofilms assemble rapidly in dead marine embryos and form remarkable pseudomorphs in which the bacterial biofilm replaces and exquisitely models details of cellular organization and structure. The experimental model was the decay of cleavage stage embryos similar in size and morphology to fossil embryos. The data show that embryo preservation takes place in 3 distinct steps: (i) blockage of autolysis by reducing or anaerobic conditions, (ii) rapid formation of microbial biofilms that consume the embryo but form a replica that retains cell organization and morphology, and (iii) bacterially catalyzed mineralization. Major bacterial taxa in embryo decay biofilms were identified by using 16S rDNA sequencing. Decay processes were similar in different taphonomic conditions, but the composition of bacterial populations depended on specific conditions. Experimental taphonomy generates preservation states similar to those in fossil embryos. The data show how fossilization of soft tissues in sediments can be mediated by bacterial replacement and mineralization, providing a foundation for experimentally creating biofilms from defined microbial species to model fossilization as a biological process. PMID:19047625

  20. [Medical, ethical and legal issues in cryopreservation of human embryos].

    PubMed

    Beca, Juan Pablo; Lecaros, Alberto; González, Patricio; Sanhueza, Pablo; Mandakovic, Borislava

    2014-07-01

    Embryo cryopreservation improves efficiency and security of assisted reproduction techniques. Nonetheless, it can be questionable, so it must be justified from technical, legal and ethical points of view. This article analyses these perspectives. Embryo cryopreservation maximizes the probability of pregnancy, avoids new ovary stimulations and reduces the occurrence of multiple gestations. There is consensus that the in vitro embryo deserves legal protection by its own, although not as a newborn. Very few countries prohibit embryo cryopreservation based on the legal duty to protect human life since fecundation. Those countries that allow it, privilege women's reproductive rights. In Chile and in Latin America, no laws have been promulgated to regulate human assisted reproduction. The moral status of the embryo depends on how it is considered. Some believe it is a potential person while others think it is just a group of cells, but all recognize that it requires some kind of respect and protection. There is lack of information about the number of frozen embryos and their final destination. As a conclusion the authors propose that women or couples should have the right to decide autonomously, while institutions ought to be clear in their regulations. And the legislation must establish the legal status of the embryo before its implantation, the couples' rights and the regulation of the embryo cryopreservation. Personal, institutional or legal decisions must assume a concept about the moral status of the human embryo and try to avoid their destruction or indefinite storage.

  1. [On hybrid embryo culture in vitro of Syringa L].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Luo, Fengxia; Dai, Limin

    2003-03-01

    Syringa L. is the famous ornamental shrub in China, but its embryo always dies before seed mature during cross breeding, and hence, the breeding work is very difficult. The main object of this study is using embryo culture in vitro to get the seedling directly and to improve the succeed rate of cross breeding. The factors that influenced the embryo culture were researched in detail. The results showed that the optimal medium for embryo culture was Monnier, and the second was MS or LS, which meant that the embryo of Syringa needed abundant macroelements and microelements, especially Ca2+ and K+. The optimal sugar concentration was 50 g.L-1. At this level, the sugar could offer enough nutrition and high osmotic pressure for embryo. When the embryo age was 50-60 days, the culture was easy to be succeed. At this time, the cotyledon in ovule began to form, or organ began to differentiation, so, the embryo was very easy to germinate, and the seedling was very easy to form. Proper coconut milk, glutamic acid or glutamine, and activated charcoal could improve the germination and growth of the embryo. When the BA of low concentration (0.01 mg.L-1) was joined in the medium, the germination rate could be improved. The best NAA concentration was 0.01 mg.L-1. PMID:12836546

  2. Leptin expression affects metabolic rate in zebrafish embryos (D. rerio).

    PubMed

    Dalman, Mark R; Liu, Qin; King, Mason D; Bagatto, Brian; Londraville, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    We used antisense morpholino oligonucleotide technology to knockdown leptin-(A) gene expression in developing zebrafish embryos and measured its effects on metabolic rate and cardiovascular function. Using two indicators of metabolic rate, oxygen consumption was significantly lower in leptin morphants early in development [<48 hours post-fertilization (hpf)], while acid production was significantly lower in morphants later in development (>48 hpf). Oxygen utilization rates in <48 hpf embryos and acid production in 72 hpf embryos could be rescued to that of wildtype embryos by recombinant leptin coinjected with antisense morpholino. Leptin is established to influence metabolic rate in mammals, and these data suggest leptin signaling also influences metabolic rate in fishes.

  3. Preimplantation death of xenomitochondrial mouse embryo harbouring bovine mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Manabu; Koyama, Shiori; Iimura, Satomi; Yamazaki, Wataru; Tanaka, Aiko; Kohri, Nanami; Sasaki, Keisuke; Takahashi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria, cellular organelles playing essential roles in eukaryotic cell metabolism, are thought to have evolved from bacteria. The organization of mtDNA is remarkably uniform across species, reflecting its vital and conserved role in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Our objectives were to evaluate the compatibility of xenogeneic mitochondria in the development of preimplantation embryos in mammals. Mouse embryos harbouring bovine mitochondria (mtB-M embryos) were prepared by the cell-fusion technique employing the haemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). The mtB-M embryos showed developmental delay at embryonic days (E) 3.5 after insemination. Furthermore, none of the mtB-M embryos could implant into the maternal uterus after embryo transfer, whereas control mouse embryos into which mitochondria from another mouse had been transferred developed as well as did non-manipulated embryos. When we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) of mouse and bovine ND5, we found that the mtB-M embryos contained 8.3% of bovine mitochondria at the blastocyst stage. Thus, contamination with mitochondria from another species induces embryonic lethality prior to implantation into the maternal uterus. The heteroplasmic state of these xenogeneic mitochondria could have detrimental effects on preimplantation development, leading to preservation of species-specific mitochondrial integrity in mammals. PMID:26416548

  4. Preimplantation death of xenomitochondrial mouse embryo harbouring bovine mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Manabu; Koyama, Shiori; Iimura, Satomi; Yamazaki, Wataru; Tanaka, Aiko; Kohri, Nanami; Sasaki, Keisuke; Takahashi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria, cellular organelles playing essential roles in eukaryotic cell metabolism, are thought to have evolved from bacteria. The organization of mtDNA is remarkably uniform across species, reflecting its vital and conserved role in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Our objectives were to evaluate the compatibility of xenogeneic mitochondria in the development of preimplantation embryos in mammals. Mouse embryos harbouring bovine mitochondria (mtB-M embryos) were prepared by the cell-fusion technique employing the haemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). The mtB-M embryos showed developmental delay at embryonic days (E) 3.5 after insemination. Furthermore, none of the mtB-M embryos could implant into the maternal uterus after embryo transfer, whereas control mouse embryos into which mitochondria from another mouse had been transferred developed as well as did non-manipulated embryos. When we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) of mouse and bovine ND5, we found that the mtB-M embryos contained 8.3% of bovine mitochondria at the blastocyst stage. Thus, contamination with mitochondria from another species induces embryonic lethality prior to implantation into the maternal uterus. The heteroplasmic state of these xenogeneic mitochondria could have detrimental effects on preimplantation development, leading to preservation of species-specific mitochondrial integrity in mammals. PMID:26416548

  5. Myosin II Dynamics during Embryo Morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasza, Karen

    2013-03-01

    During embryonic morphogenesis, the myosin II motor protein generates forces that help to shape tissues, organs, and the overall body form. In one dramatic example in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, the epithelial tissue that will give rise to the body of the adult animal elongates more than two-fold along the head-to-tail axis in less than an hour. This elongation is accomplished primarily through directional rearrangements of cells within the plane of the tissue. Just prior to elongation, polarized assemblies of myosin II accumulate perpendicular to the elongation axis. The contractile forces generated by myosin activity orient cell movements along a common axis, promoting local cell rearrangements that contribute to global tissue elongation. The molecular and mechanical mechanisms by which myosin drives this massive change in embryo shape are poorly understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we generated a collection of transgenic flies expressing variants of myosin II with altered motor function and regulation. We found that variants that are predicted to have increased myosin activity cause defects in tissue elongation. Using biophysical approaches, we found that these myosin variants also have decreased turnover dynamics within cells. To explore the mechanisms by which molecular-level myosin dynamics are translated into tissue-level elongation, we are using time-lapse confocal imaging to observe cell movements in embryos with altered myosin activity. We are utilizing computational approaches to quantify the dynamics and directionality of myosin localization and cell rearrangements. These studies will help elucidate how myosin-generated forces control cell movements within tissues. This work is in collaboration with J. Zallen at the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

  6. (Re)constructing embryos in stem cell research: exploring the meaning of embryos for people involved in fertility treatments.

    PubMed

    Parry, Sarah

    2006-05-01

    The use of human embryos is a key controversy in public debates on stem cell research (SCR), yet little attention has been given to the context or sources from which embryos are obtained: people involved in fertility programmes. How they feel about the use of embryos in SCR, and what may lead them to agree or refuse to donate embryos, remains unexplored. In this paper, I investigate the views of people involved in fertility programmes who may be approached to donate their embryos for SCR, drawing on focus group discussions with two support groups in Scotland. I illustrate how people come to make particular decisions and what factors shape this, and show that participants' views are context-bound, borne out of lived experiences both within the clinic and wider society. In particular, the evidence highlights the importance of understanding their views of what constitutes a 'spare' embryo and what areas of medical research are considered potentially legitimate for using embryos. Peoples' understandings of embryos as potential lives, and the context in which embryos are created, have direct implications for their views about donating embryos for SCR. Attention is paid to how SCR further disrupts the teleology of embryos and undermines the narrative of life that suffuses the hopes of people undergoing fertility treatment. The paper also brings to the fore the sense of moral obligation experienced by participants who feel they have little means or power for influencing the topic and content of SCR. In this context, I suggest there is a need to explore further the views of people involved in fertility treatments in order to identify mechanisms for limiting the potential for coercion when SCR is embedded in and dependent on fertility practices. Debates about using embryos for SCR must, therefore, include the voices of those who thus remain marginalised. PMID:16289740

  7. Tripolar mitosis in human cells and embryos: occurrence, pathophysiology and medical implications.

    PubMed

    Kalatova, Beata; Jesenska, Renata; Hlinka, Daniel; Dudas, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Tripolar mitosis is a specific case of cell division driven by typical molecular mechanisms of mitosis, but resulting in three daughter cells instead of the usual count of two. Other variants of multipolar mitosis show even more mitotic poles and are relatively rare. In nature, this phenomenon was frequently observed or suspected in multiple common cancers, infected cells, the placenta, and in early human embryos with impaired pregnancy-yielding potential. Artificial causes include radiation and various toxins. Here we combine several pieces of the most recent evidence for the existence of different types of multipolar mitosis in preimplantation embryos together with a detailed review of the literature. The related molecular and cellular mechanisms are discussed, including the regulation of centriole duplication, mitotic spindle biology, centromere functions, cell cycle checkpoints, mitotic autocorrection mechanisms, and the related complicating factors in healthy and affected cells, including post-mitotic cell-cell fusion often associated with multipolar cell division. Clinical relevance for oncology and embryo selection in assisted reproduction is also briefly discussed in this context.

  8. Embryo sac formation and early embryo development in Agave tequilana (Asparagaceae).

    PubMed

    González-Gutiérrez, Alejandra G; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín

    2014-01-01

    Agave tequilana is an angiosperm species that belongs to the family Asparagaceae (formerly Agavaceae). Even though there is information regarding to some aspects related to the megagametogenesis of A. tequilana, this is the first report describing the complete process of megasporogenesis, megagametogenesis, the early embryo and endosperm development process in detail. The objective of this work was to study and characterize all the above processes and the distinctive morphological changes of the micropylar and chalazal extremes after fertilization in this species. The agave plant material for the present study was collected from commercial plantations in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Ovules and immature seeds, previously fixed in FAA and kept in ethanol 70%, were stained based on a tissue clarification technique by using a Mayer's-Hematoxylin solution. The tissue clarification technique was successfully used for the characterization of the megasporogenesis, megagametogenesis, mature embryo sac formation, the early embryo and endosperm development processes by studying intact cells. The embryo sac of A. tequilana was confirmed to be of the monosporic Polygonum-type and an helobial endosperm formation. Also, the time-lapse of the developmental processes studied was recorded. PMID:25332875

  9. ABA-Regulation of Two Classes of Embryo-Specific Sequences in Mature Wheat Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, John D.; Quatrano, Ralph S.

    1988-01-01

    We have previously described the isolation and characterization of ABA-enhanced sequences from developing wheat embryos. Here we use in vivo RNA labeling and the inhibitors α-amanitin and cycloheximide to determine the level at which ABA acts to modulate these sequences in cultured mature embryos. Sequences fell into two classes: one, represented by the 7S globulin clone, p511, appears to be regulated at the level of transcription, while the other, represented by the early methionine-labeled polypeptide (Em)-protein clone, p1015, has an additional posttranscriptional component. In mature embryos cultured in the absence of ABA, mRNA levels of p511 and p1015 declined rapidly until neither was detected at 3 days postimbibition. Levels of p511 increased in mature embryos cultured in the presence of ABA, but remained low in the presence of ABA + α-amanitin, suggesting p511 RNA is regulated at the level of transcription. Levels of p1015, in contrast, remained high not only in the presence of ABA, but also in the presence of ABA + α-amanitin or α-amanitin alone. This suggests p1015 regulation might be at the level of selective RNA stability. Cycloheximide had no detectable effect on ABA-mediated stabilization of p1015, suggesting that newly synthesized proteins are not involved. Em-protein synthesis rates closely paralleled Em RNA levels, suggesting Em expression is not controlled at the level of translation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665868

  10. Embryo sac formation and early embryo development in Agave tequilana (Asparagaceae).

    PubMed

    González-Gutiérrez, Alejandra G; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín

    2014-01-01

    Agave tequilana is an angiosperm species that belongs to the family Asparagaceae (formerly Agavaceae). Even though there is information regarding to some aspects related to the megagametogenesis of A. tequilana, this is the first report describing the complete process of megasporogenesis, megagametogenesis, the early embryo and endosperm development process in detail. The objective of this work was to study and characterize all the above processes and the distinctive morphological changes of the micropylar and chalazal extremes after fertilization in this species. The agave plant material for the present study was collected from commercial plantations in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Ovules and immature seeds, previously fixed in FAA and kept in ethanol 70%, were stained based on a tissue clarification technique by using a Mayer's-Hematoxylin solution. The tissue clarification technique was successfully used for the characterization of the megasporogenesis, megagametogenesis, mature embryo sac formation, the early embryo and endosperm development processes by studying intact cells. The embryo sac of A. tequilana was confirmed to be of the monosporic Polygonum-type and an helobial endosperm formation. Also, the time-lapse of the developmental processes studied was recorded.

  11. Molecular analysis of chicken embryo SPARC (osteonectin).

    PubMed

    Bassuk, J A; Iruela-Arispe, M L; Lane, T F; Benson, J M; Berg, R A; Sage, E H

    1993-11-15

    SPARC is a secreted glycoprotein that modulates cell shape and cell-matrix interactions. Levels of SPARC are increased at sites of somitogenesis, osteogenesis, and angiogenesis in the embryo and during wound repair in the adult. We have cloned and characterized SPARC from chicken embryo. A 2.2-kbp cDNA, obtained by a novel use of the polymerase chain reaction, was determined to encode a 298-residue protein that is 85% identical to human SPARC. Antigenic sites in particular appear to be highly conserved, as antibodies against C-terminal sequences of murine and bovine SPARC reacted with a 41-43 kDa protein in chicken embryo extracts. Chicken SPARC can be defined by four sequence signatures: (a) a conserved spacing of 11 cysteine residues in domain II, (b) the pentapeptide KKGHK in domain II, which is contained within a larger region of 31 identical residues, (c) a 100% conserved region of 10 residues in domain III, and (d) a C-terminal, calcium-binding EF-hand motif. SPARC mRNAs in the 10-day-old chicken embryo are represented by three sizes of 1.8, 2.2 and 3.0 kb. The relative steady-state levels for the 2.2-kb mRNA were determined as aorta > or = skeletal muscle > calvarium > vertebra > anterior limb > kidney > heart > brain > skin and lung > liver. The relative abundance of the 1.8-kb and 2.2-kb mRNAs varied among tissues and indicated that differential processing of SPARC mRNAs might occur. All three RNA species were detected by a cDNA probe for the N-terminal part of the coding region. Thus, the three mRNA species appear to arise from differential 3' splicing and/or polyadenylation. Collective evidence demonstrates that SPARC has been well-conserved during vertebrate evolution, a finding that indicates a fundamental role for this protein in development. PMID:7916692

  12. Bilateral Symmetry in Morphogenesis of Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Herbert

    1970-01-01

    It is suggested that differentiated embryonic cells have a high specificity of molecular constitution as regards the surface layers surrounding their cellular membranes. Correspondingly, specific interface energies may characterize the early contacts between different cell types. The question is raised whether the morphology of the developing embryo may be understood in terms of cellular arrangements which minimize the total interface energy. Bilateral symmetry prevalent in early embryonic development of higher animals might be understood on the basis of the adoption of such a minimum energy principle if, in addition, one assumes that embryonic development is uniquely determined for a particular species. PMID:5272310

  13. Crystalline embryos at ice-vapor interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartley, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleation of small monolayer ice-like clusters at the basal and prism ice-vapor interfaces is considered. It is found that the basal surfaces prefer triangular embryos with an orientation that reverses from layer to layer, whereas the most stable clusters on the prism surfaces are rectangular in configuration. At any given saturation ratio, the preferred prism clusters are found to have a critical energy of formation significantly lower than that of the basal clusters, basically because of differences in cluster corner free energies.

  14. Silencing myostatin gene by RNAi in sheep embryos.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dayun; Zhu, Huabin; Wu, Jianmin; Chen, Hanzhong; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Xiaoliang; Du, Weihua; Wang, Dong; Lin, Xiukun

    2012-04-15

    Myostatin (MSTN) gene is described as a negative regulator of the skeletal muscle growth. Controlling MSTN gene expression by genetic manipulation could accelerate the muscle growth and meat production of livestock animals. In the present study, several siRNAs targeting sheep MSTN gene were designed and their interfering efficiency was evaluated in vitro. The present study showed that one of the siRNAs, PSL1, could down-regulate the expression of MSTN significantly. PSL1 was ligated into lentivirus vector, GP-Supersilencing, to construct a siRNA expression lentivirus vector. Fibroblast cells were infected by lentivirus particles and positive cells were isolated by flow cytometry. Nucleus of the positive cell was transferred into enucleated oocytes of sheep. The present study showed that 99.4% of the sorted cells displayed green fluorescence. After enucleation of oocytes with microinjection, about 20% of reconstructed embryos can be developed into morulas, and strong green fluorescence could be observed using a fluorescence microscope. This method can be available to produce transgenic cell line for somatic cell nucleus transfer for transgenic animals.

  15. [Congenital cervical agenesis: pregnancy after transmyometrial embryo transfer].

    PubMed

    Huberlant, S; Tailland, M-L; Poirey, S; Mousty, E; Ripart-Neveu, S; Mares, P; de Tayrac, R

    2014-09-01

    Cervical agenesis is a rare congenital pathology linked to an anomaly of development of the Mullerian system. We described a case report about a 22-year old woman, consulting for infertility, who had a complete cervical agenesis. The first evaluation suggested a 46 XX karyotype and a normal ovarian reserve. The surgical examination confirmed the absence of cervix with impossibility of catheterization. She became pregnant thanks to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) with transmyometrial embryo transfer. Caesarean was decided at 36 weeks of gestation (WG) due to spontaneous uterine contractions. An injection of medroxyprogesterone was made after the placenta delivery in order to warning the partum hemorrhage. The ultrasound examination, realized 15 days after caesarean, underlined a good uterine involution. The surgery by cervico-vaginal anastomosis can be offered to patients because it offers chances of spontaneous pregnancies. But this surgery exposes women to a risk of failure, and of severe complications such as pain or infection, and might end in a hysterectomy. By choosing the transmyometrial transfer by vaginal way, the patient was exposed to the risk of spontaneous miscarriage. It was raising the problem of the uterine evacuation. This delivery after 34 WG is encouraging for the infertility by cervical agenesis.

  16. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  17. Neural Tube Closure in Mouse Whole Embryo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jason; Ross, M. Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Genetic mouse models are an important tool in the study of mammalian neural tube closure (Gray & Ross, 2009; Ross, 2010). However, the study of mouse embryos in utero is limited by our inability to directly pharmacologically manipulate the embryos in isolation from the effects of maternal metabolism on the reagent of interest. Whether using a small molecule, recombinant protein, or siRNA, delivery of these substances to the mother, through the diet or by injection will subject these unstable compounds to a variety of bodily defenses that could prevent them from reaching the embryo. Investigations in cultures of whole embryos can be used to separate maternal from intrinsic fetal effects on development. Here, we present a method for culturing mouse embryos using highly enriched media in a roller incubator apparatus that allows for normal neural tube closure after dissection (Crockett, 1990). Once in culture, embryos can be manipulated using conventional in vitro techniques that would not otherwise be possible if the embryos were still in utero. Embryo siblings can be collected at various time points to study different aspects of neurulation, occurring from E7-7.5 (neural plate formation, just prior to the initiation of neurulation) to E9.5-10 (at the conclusion of cranial fold and caudal neuropore closure, Kaufman, 1992). In this protocol, we demonstrate our method for dissecting embryos at timepoints that are optimal for the study of cranial neurulation. Embryos will be dissected at E8.5 (approx. 10-12 somities), after the initiation of neural tube closure but prior to embryo turning and cranial neural fold closure, and maintained in culture till E10 (26-28 somities), when cranial neurulation should be complete. PMID:22042150

  18. Culture of bovine embryos on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell plate.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Hosoe, Misa; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Ichikawa, Akihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Takahashi, Seiya

    2010-08-01

    We fabricated a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microwell plate (PDMS-MP) containing 100 microwells with a rounded bottom and examined whether it can be used for culture of individual in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos or parthenogenetically activated zona-free embryos in cattle. In Experiment 1, we examined the in vitro developmental ability of IVF embryos cultured individually on PDMS-MP. After IVF, 20 embryos were transferred into 100 microl drops on PDMS-MP and cultured individually in each well of PDMS-MP (PDMS group). After 7 days of culture, the embryos in the PDMS group developed to the blastocyst stage at the same rate of those in the control group cultured in a group of 20 embryos without PDMS-MP. There were no differences in total number of cells and the ratio of inner cell mass to total cells between the PDMS and control groups. In Experiment 2, we examined the in vitro developmental ability of parthenogenetically activated zona-free bovine embryos cultured individually on PDMS-MP. The zona-free embryos were cultured individually in each well of a PDMS-MP or in each well produced by pressing a darning needle onto the bottom of a culture dish (WOW group). After 7 days of culture, the blastocyst formation rate and cell number of blastocysts in the PDMS group did not differ from those of the zona-intact embryos in the control group. Also, there were no differences in the blastocyst formation rate and cell number of blastocysts between the WOW and PDMS groups. These results suggest that the culture system using PDMS-MP is useful for individual embryos or zona-free embryos in cattle. PMID:20484872

  19. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  20. Macroevolutionary developmental biology: Embryos, fossils, and phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Organ, Chris L; Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2015-10-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental biology is broadly focused on identifying the genetic and developmental mechanisms underlying morphological diversity. Connecting the genotype with the phenotype means that evo-devo research often considers a wide range of evidence, from genetics and morphology to fossils. In this commentary, we provide an overview and framework for integrating fossil ontogenetic data with developmental data using phylogenetic comparative methods to test macroevolutionary hypotheses. We survey the vertebrate fossil record of preserved embryos and discuss how phylogenetic comparative methods can integrate data from developmental genetics and paleontology. Fossil embryos provide limited, yet critical, developmental data from deep time. They help constrain when developmental innovations first appeared during the history of life and also reveal the order in which related morphologies evolved. Phylogenetic comparative methods provide a powerful statistical approach that allows evo-devo researchers to infer the presence of nonpreserved developmental traits in fossil species and to detect discordant evolutionary patterns and processes across levels of biological organization.

  1. Macroevolutionary developmental biology: Embryos, fossils, and phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Organ, Chris L; Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2015-10-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental biology is broadly focused on identifying the genetic and developmental mechanisms underlying morphological diversity. Connecting the genotype with the phenotype means that evo-devo research often considers a wide range of evidence, from genetics and morphology to fossils. In this commentary, we provide an overview and framework for integrating fossil ontogenetic data with developmental data using phylogenetic comparative methods to test macroevolutionary hypotheses. We survey the vertebrate fossil record of preserved embryos and discuss how phylogenetic comparative methods can integrate data from developmental genetics and paleontology. Fossil embryos provide limited, yet critical, developmental data from deep time. They help constrain when developmental innovations first appeared during the history of life and also reveal the order in which related morphologies evolved. Phylogenetic comparative methods provide a powerful statistical approach that allows evo-devo researchers to infer the presence of nonpreserved developmental traits in fossil species and to detect discordant evolutionary patterns and processes across levels of biological organization. PMID:26250386

  2. Sex determination: lessons from families and embryos.

    PubMed

    Ostrer, H

    2001-04-01

    Genetic studies in familial cases of sex reversal and in human embryos have contributed to the understanding of human sex determination and its disorders. For some heritable disorders of sex reversal, the gonadal phenotype was frequently overlooked until sex reversal was discovered fortuitously by chromosome analysis, often resulting in preventable complications. Within families, the phenotypes are variable and, in some instances, these can be explained by known genetic mechanisms. When a novel molecular marker is shared by family members affected with sex reversal, the level of confidence is higher that this marker may play a role in the development of the phenotype. The identification of pedigrees with sufficient power to generate significant linkage of disorder (lod) scores from genomewide screens can now lead to the identification of novel sex-determining genes. Studies of the gonads of 46,XY human embryos have shown that SOX9 expression follows a pattern similar to that of SRY and, in both instances, stands in contrast to the expression observed in the mouse. Differences between human and mouse embryonic gonads have also been observed for the temporal expression of DAX1, suggesting that the mechanisms of action of SRY, SOX9, and DAX1 may vary between these and other species. PMID:11298673

  3. Metabolic Profile Analysis of Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Yann; McGee, Sean L.; Ward, Alister C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing goal in the field of metabolism is to determine the impact of genetics on different aspects of mitochondrial function. Understanding these relationships will help to understand the underlying etiology for a range of diseases linked with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as diabetes and obesity. Recent advances in instrumentation, has enabled the monitoring of distinct parameters of mitochondrial function in cell lines or tissue explants. Here we present a method for a rapid and sensitive analysis of mitochondrial function parameters in vivo during zebrafish embryonic development using the Seahorse bioscience XF 24 extracellular flux analyser. This protocol utilizes the Islet Capture microplates where a single embryo is placed in each well, allowing measurement of bioenergetics, including: (i) basal respiration; (ii) basal mitochondrial respiration (iii) mitochondrial respiration due to ATP turnover; (iv) mitochondrial uncoupled respiration or proton leak and (iv) maximum respiration. Using this approach embryonic zebrafish respiration parameters can be compared between wild type and genetically altered embryos (mutant, gene over-expression or gene knockdown) or those manipulated pharmacologically. It is anticipated that dissemination of this protocol will provide researchers with new tools to analyse the genetic basis of metabolic disorders in vivo in this relevant vertebrate animal model. PMID:23353983

  4. Embryo cryopreservation and in vitro culture of preimplantation embryos in Campbell's hamster (Phodopus campbelli).

    PubMed

    Amstislavsky, Sergei; Brusentsev, Eugeny; Kizilova, Elena; Igonina, Tatyana; Abramova, Tatyana; Rozhkova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this study were to compare different protocols of Campbell's hamster (Phodopus campbelli) embryos freezing-thawing and to explore the possibilities of their in vitro culture. First, the embryos were flushed from the reproductive ducts 2 days post coitum at the two-cell stage and cultured in rat one-cell embryo culture medium (R1ECM) for 48 hours. Most (86.7%) of the two-cell embryos developed to blastocysts in R1ECM. Second, the embryos at the two- to eight-cell stages were flushed on the third day post coitum. The eight-cell embryos were frozen in 0.25 mL straws according to standard procedures of slow cooling. Ethylene glycol (EG) was used either as a single cryoprotectant or in a mixture with sucrose. The survival of frozen-thawed embryos was assessed by double staining with fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide. The use of EG as a single cryoprotectant resulted in fewer alive embryos when compared with control (fresh embryos), but combined use of EG and sucrose improved the survival rate after thawing. Furthermore, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor rat (2 ng/mL) improved the rate of the hamster frozen-thawed embryo development in vitro by increasing the final cell number and alleviating nuclear fragmentation. Our data show the first attempt in freezing and thawing Campbell's hamster embryos and report the possibility of successful in vitro culture for this species in R1ECM supplemented with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  5. Transmyometrial versus very difficult transcervical embryo transfer: efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed; Shah, Hany; Rajkhowa, Madhurima

    2016-05-01

    A difficult and traumatic embryo transfer can negatively impact on embryo implantation. This study retrospectively compared the outcomes of "very difficult transcervical embryo transfer" (vdTCET) versus transmyometrial embryo transfer (TMET) in a single centre over 10 years, reporting on 128 patients with vdTCET and 46 patients with TMET. The definition of vdTCET was a procedure rated by an experienced practitioner (with more than 100 transfers per year for >2 years) as very difficult and required two or more of the following: use of tenaculum, change of embryo transfer catheter and use of a stylet, reloading of the embryos or cancelling the procedure and freezing the embryo to transfer after cervical dilatation. The clinical pregnancy rates for TMET and vdTCET were 32.6% and 25%, respectively and the live birth rates were 26.1% and 16.4%, respectively. There was only one case of minor bleeding in the TMET group (2.2%). This study showed that TMET is a good alternative option in cases of vdTCET where it is impossible to achieve transcervical embryo transfer and may benefit cases with repeated failed cycles after vdTCET. Its superiority over vdTCET however could not be demonstrated. PMID:26968927

  6. Permeability barriers to embryo cryopreservation of Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to cryopreserve the embryos of the pink bollworm moth, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders). Previously developed dipteran cryopreservation protocols were not directly adaptable to use with the embryos of this lepidopteran species. Physiochemical and ele...

  7. Cryopreservation of embryos of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Embryos of Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), the green blowfly, were successfully cryopreserved by vitrification in liquid nitrogen and stored for 8 yr. Embryos incubated at 19 deg. C for 17 h after oviposition were found to be the most appropriate stage to cryopreserve...

  8. Early embryo development in Fucus distichus is auxin sensitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Swati; Sun, Haiguo; Brian, Leigh; Quatrano, Ralph L.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2002-01-01

    Auxin and polar auxin transport have been implicated in controlling embryo development in land plants. The goal of these studies was to determine if auxin and auxin transport are also important during the earliest stages of development in embryos of the brown alga Fucus distichus. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was identified in F. distichus embryos and mature tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. F. distichus embryos accumulate [(3)H]IAA and an inhibitor of IAA efflux, naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), elevates IAA accumulation, suggesting the presence of an auxin efflux protein complex similar to that found in land plants. F. distichus embryos normally develop with a single unbranched rhizoid, but growth on IAA leads to formation of multiple rhizoids and growth on NPA leads to formation of embryos with branched rhizoids, at concentrations that are active in auxin accumulation assays. The effects of IAA and NPA are complete before 6 h after fertilization (AF), which is before rhizoid germination and cell division. The maximal effects of IAA and NPA are between 3.5 and 5 h AF and 4 and 5.5 h AF, respectively. Although, the location of the planes of cell division was significantly altered in NPA- and IAA-treated embryos, these abnormal divisions occurred after abnormal rhizoid initiation and branching was observed. The results of this study suggest that auxin acts in the formation of apical basal patterns in F. distichus embryo development.

  9. The gastrocoel roof plate in embryos of different frogs.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Ponce, Natalia; Santillana-Ortiz, Juan-Diego; del Pino, Eugenia M

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of the gastrocoel roof plate and the presence of cilia in this structure were examined in embryos of four species of frogs. Embryos of Ceratophrys stolzmanni (Ceratophryidae) and Engystomops randi (Leiuperidae) develop rapidly, provide comparison for the analysis of gastrocoel roof plate development in the slow-developing embryos of Epipedobates machalilla (Dendrobatidae) and Gastrotheca riobambae (Hemiphractidae). Embryos of the analyzed frogs develop from eggs of different sizes, and display different reproductive and developmental strategies. In particular, dorsal convergence and extension and archenteron elongation begin during gastrulation in embryos of rapidly developing frogs, as in Xenopus laevis. In contrast, cells that involute during gastrulation are stored in the large circumblastoporal collar that develops around the closed blastopore in embryos of slow-developing frogs. Dorsal convergence and extension only start after blastopore closure in slow-developing frog embryos. However, in the neurulae, a gastrocoel roof plate develops, despite the accumulation of superficial mesodermal cells in the circumblastoporal collar. Embryos of all four species develop a ciliated gastrocoel roof plate at the beginning of neurulation. Accordingly, fluid-flow across the gastrocoel roof plate is likely the mechanism of left-right asymmetry patterning in these frogs, as in X. laevis and other vertebrates. A ciliated gastrocoel roof plate, with a likely origin as superficial mesoderm, is conserved in frogs belonging to four different families and with different modes of gastrulation.

  10. Storage oil breakdown during embryo development of Brassica napus (L.).

    PubMed

    Chia, Tansy Y P; Pike, Marilyn J; Rawsthorne, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    In this study it is shown that at least 10% of the major storage product of developing embryos of Brassica napus (L.), triacylglycerol, is lost during the desiccation phase of seed development. The metabolism of this lipid was studied by measurements of the fate of label from [1-(14)C]decanoate supplied to isolated embryos, and by measurements of the activities of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism. Measurements on desiccating embryos have been compared with those made on embryos during lipid accumulation and on germinating seedlings. Enzymes of beta-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present in embryos during oil accumulation, and increased in activity and abundance as the seeds matured and became desiccated. Although the activities were less than those measured during germination, they were at least comparable to the in vivo rate of fatty acid synthesis in the embryo during development. The pattern of labelling, following metabolism of decanoate by isolated embryos, indicated a much greater involvement of the glyoxylate cycle during desiccation than earlier in oil accumulation, and showed that much of the (14)C-label from decanoate was released as CO(2) at both stages. Sucrose was not a product of decanoate metabolism during embryo development, and therefore lipid degradation was not associated with net gluconeogenic activity. These observations are discussed in the context of seed development, oil yield, and the synthesis of novel fatty acids in plants.

  11. Use of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.; O`Malley, K.

    1995-12-31

    After fertilization, blue crab embryos develop in egg sacs attached to the female pleopods, often referred to as the sponge. Lipovitellin and lipid droplets in the egg sacs provide energy and nutrition for the developing embryos. Embryos were removed from the sponge and transferred to 24 well culture plates containing sea water with or without toxicants, Each well contained 10 embryos. After 7 to 10 days, embryos hatched to swimming zoea. The effects of toxicants at various concentrations on hatching were determined and the EC{sub 50} calculated. For example, the EC{sub 50} for tributyltin, fenvalerate and mercuric chloride were 50, 30 and 90 ng/liter, respectively. The hatching success of control embryos ranged from 95 to 98%. Formation of the heart, eyespot formation, appendage formation and utilization rate of lipovitellin were also effected by exposure to toxicants. At a low concentration of mercuric ion (30ng/liter) the heart formed, but there was no heart beat. Eyespot formation was abnormal in the presence of high concentrations of cadmium (2 {micro}g/liter) and zinc (5 {micro}g/liter), Crab embryos offer many advantages for toxicity testing of pure compounds or mixtures in water, including toxicity testing of sediment pore water. The crab embryos may also serve as models to understand the effect of specific toxicants on the heart and eye spots of crustaceans.

  12. Early Embryo Development in Fucus distichus Is Auxin Sensitive1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Swati; Sun, Haiguo; Brian, Leigh; Quatrano, Ralph L.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2002-01-01

    Auxin and polar auxin transport have been implicated in controlling embryo development in land plants. The goal of these studies was to determine if auxin and auxin transport are also important during the earliest stages of development in embryos of the brown alga Fucus distichus. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was identified in F. distichus embryos and mature tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. F. distichus embryos accumulate [3H]IAA and an inhibitor of IAA efflux, naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), elevates IAA accumulation, suggesting the presence of an auxin efflux protein complex similar to that found in land plants. F. distichus embryos normally develop with a single unbranched rhizoid, but growth on IAA leads to formation of multiple rhizoids and growth on NPA leads to formation of embryos with branched rhizoids, at concentrations that are active in auxin accumulation assays. The effects of IAA and NPA are complete before 6 h after fertilization (AF), which is before rhizoid germination and cell division. The maximal effects of IAA and NPA are between 3.5 and 5 h AF and 4 and 5.5 h AF, respectively. Although, the location of the planes of cell division was significantly altered in NPA- and IAA-treated embryos, these abnormal divisions occurred after abnormal rhizoid initiation and branching was observed. The results of this study suggest that auxin acts in the formation of apical basal patterns in F. distichus embryo development. PMID:12226509

  13. The human embryo in the Christian tradition: a reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Jones, D A

    2005-12-01

    Recent claims that the Christian tradition justifies destructive research on human embryos have drawn upon an article by the late Professor Gordon Dunstan which appeared in this journal in 1984. Despite its undoubted influence, this article was flawed and seriously misrepresented the tradition of Christian reflection on the moral status of the human embryo.

  14. Molecular Characterization of the First Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) Strains Isolated from In Vitro Bovine Embryos production in Argentina.

    PubMed

    González Altamiranda, Erika; Manrique, Julieta M; Pérez, Sandra E; Ríos, Glenda L; Odeón, Anselmo C; Leunda, María R; Jones, Leandro R; Verna, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is increasingly considered as responsible for various problems of the reproductive tract. The virus infects mainly blood mononuclear cells and displays specific tropism for vascular endothelia, reproductive and fetal tissues. Epidemiological studies suggest its impact on reproductive performance, and its presence in various sites in the reproductive tract highlights its potential transmission in transfer-stage embryos. This work describes the biological and genetic characterization of BoHV-4 strains isolated from an in vitro bovine embryo production system. BoHV-4 strains were isolated in 2011 and 2013 from granulosa cells and bovine oocytes from ovary batches collected at a local abattoir, used as "starting material" for in vitro production of bovine embryos. Compatible BoHV-4-CPE was observed in the co-culture of granulosa cells and oocytes with MDBK cells. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR assays targeting three ORFs of the viral genome. The phylogenetic analyses of the strains suggest that they were evolutionary unlinked. Therefore it is possible that BoHV-4 ovary infections occurred regularly along the evolution of the virus, at least in Argentina, which can have implications in the systems of in vitro embryo production. Thus, although BoHV-4 does not appear to be a frequent risk factor for in vitro embryo production, data are still limited. This study reveals the potential of BoHV-4 transmission via embryo transfer. Moreover, the high variability among the BoHV-4 strains isolated from aborted cows in Argentina highlights the importance of further research on the role of this virus as an agent with the potential to cause reproductive disease in cattle. The genetic characterization of the isolated strains provides data to better understand the pathogenesis of BoHV-4 infections. Furthermore, it will lead to fundamental insights into the molecular aspects of the virus and the means by which these strains circulate in

  15. State-of-the-art embryo technologies in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, P

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, basic and applied studies on classical and advanced embryo technologies have generated a vast literature on factors regulating oocyte and embryo development and quality. In addition, over this period, commercial bovine embryo transfer has become a large international business. It is well recognised that bovine embryos derived in vivo are of superior quality to those derived from in vitro maturation, fertilization and culture. Relatively little has changed in the techniques of producing embryos in vivo although there is increasing evidence of the importance of, for example, peripheral and follicular endocrine profiles for the subsequent developmental competence of the embryo. The in vitro production of ruminant embryos is a three-step process involving oocyte maturation, oocyte fertilization and in vitro culture. Only 30-40% of such oocytes reach the blastocyst stage, at which they can be transferred to a recipient or frozen for future use. We know now that the quality of the oocyte is crucial in determining the proportion of immature oocytes that form blastocysts while the post-fertilization culture environment has a major influence on the quality of the blastocyst. Use of sexed-sorted sperm in conjunction with in vitro embryo production is a potentially efficient means of obtaining offspring of the desired sex. Concerns regarding the use of sexed semen technology include the apparent lower fertility of sorted sperm, the lower survival of sorted sperm after cryopreservation and the reduced number of sperm that could be separated in a specified time period. Assessment of embryo quality is a challenge. Morphological assessment is at present the most popular method for embryo selection prior to transfer. Other non-invasive assessment methods include the timing of the first cleavage division which has been linked to developmental ability. Quantitative examination of gene expression is an additional valuable tool to assess the viability of

  16. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  17. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J R

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  18. Cryopreservation of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) zygotic embryos by vitrification.

    PubMed

    Sajini, K K; Karun, A; Amamath, C H; Engelmann, F

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of preculture conditions, vitrification and unloading solutions on survival and regeneration of coconut zygotic embryos after cryopreservation. Among the seven plant vitrification solutions tested, PVS3 was found to be the most effective for regeneration of cryopreserved embryos. The optimal protocol involved preculture of embryos for 3 days on medium with 0.6 M sucrose, PVS3 treatment for 16 h, rapid cooling and rewarming and unloading in 1.2 M sucrose liquid medium for 1.5 h. Under these conditions, 70-80 survival (corresponding to size enlargement and weight gain) was observed with cryopreserved embryos and 20-25 percent of the plants regenerated (showing normal shoot and root growth) from cryopreserved embryos were established in pots.

  19. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  20. Splitting embryos on the slippery slope: ethics and public policy.

    PubMed

    Macklin, Ruth

    1994-09-01

    Neither the George Washington University embryo splitting experiment nor the technique of embryo splitting itself has ethical flaws. The experiment harmed or wronged no one, and the investigators followed intramural review procedures for the experiment, although some might fault them for failing to seek extramural consultation or for not waiting until national guidelines for research on preembryos were developed. Ethical objections to such cloning on the basis of possible loss of individuality, possible lessening of individual worth, and concern about potential harm to the resulting children are discussed and challenged, as are objections to the creation of embryos for the purpose of genetic diagnosis. Many of the ethical questions raised by the George Washington experiment are similar to those posed by existing reproductive technologies that allow the simultaneous production of several embryos. A multidisciplinary group should consider whether regulation of cloning is needed, and laws should be enacted to prohibit a commercial market for all frozen embryos.

  1. High incubation temperatures enhance mitochondrial energy metabolism in reptile embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Teng; Gao, Jing; Ma, Liang; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Developmental rate increases exponentially with increasing temperature in ectothermic animals, but the biochemical basis underlying this thermal dependence is largely unexplored. We measured mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities of turtle embryos (Pelodiscus sinensis) incubated at different temperatures to identify the metabolic basis of the rapid development occurring at high temperatures in reptile embryos. Developmental rate increased with increasing incubation temperatures in the embryos of P. sinensis. Correspondingly, in addition to the thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities, high-temperature incubation further enhanced mitochondrial respiration and COX activities in the embryos. This suggests that embryos may adjust mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities in response to developmental temperature to achieve high developmental rates at high temperatures. Our study highlights the importance of biochemical investigations in understanding the proximate mechanisms by which temperature affects embryonic development. PMID:25749301

  2. Redefining parenthood and protecting embryos: why we need new laws.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1984-10-01

    Artificial methods of reproduction have raised profound social and ethical issues touching on the nature of family relationships and the value of the human embryo. Artificial insemination by donor has been handled by presuming the mother's husband to be the legal father of the child; now the technique of surrogate embryo transfer has further complicated the parenthood issue by making it possible to distinguish among the genetic mother, the gestational mother, and the rearing mother. Annas argues that it is in the interest of the family to codify the current legal presumption that the gestational mother is the legal mother, unless she agrees to relinquish parental rights. In the case of embryos that are not replaced in the ovum donor, he maintains that the gamete donors should have decision-making authority over whether the embryos may be frozen and for what purpose, and contends that sales of frozen embryos should be forbidden. PMID:6500920

  3. Sex determination of duck embryos: observations on syrinx development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Franson, J. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Ducks exhibit sexual dimorphism in vocal anatomy. Asymmetrical ossification of the syrinx (bulla syringealis) is discernable at about 10 days of age in male Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) embryos, but information is lacking on the early development of the bulla in wild ducks. To evaluate the reliability of this characteristic for sexing developing embryos, we examined the syrinx of dead embryos and compared results with molecular sexing techniques in high arctic nesting Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). Embryos 8 days or older were accurately (100%) sexed based on the presence/absence of a bulla, 2 days earlier than Pekin duck. The use of the tracheal bulla can be a valuable technique when sex identification of embryos or young ducklings is required.

  4. Effect of Dehydration Prior to Cryopreservation of Large Equine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Barfield, JP; McCue, PM; Squires, EL; Seidel, GE

    2009-01-01

    Cryopreservation of equine embryos > 300 μm in diameter results in low survival rates using protocols that work well for smaller equine embryos. These experiments tested the potential benefit of incorporating a dehydration step prior to standard cryopreservation procedures. Forty-six, d 7–8, grade 1, equine embryos ≥ 400 μm in diameter were subjected to one of the following treatments: (A) 2-min in 0.6 M galactose, 10 min in 1.5 M glycerol, slow freeze (n=21); (B) 10 min in 1.5 M glycerol, slow freeze (n=15); (C) 2 min in 0.6 M galactose, 10 min in 1.5 M glycerol, followed by exposure to thaw solutions, then culture medium (n=5); (D) transferred directly to culture medium (n=5). Frozen embryos were thawed and subjected to a 3-step cryoprotectant removal. Five embryos from each treatment were evaluated morphologically after 24 and 48 h culture (1=excellent, 5=degenerate/dead). All treatments had at least 4/5 embryos with a quality score ≥ 3 at these time points except treatment B (2/5 at 24 h, 1/5 at 48 h). Subsequent embryos from treatment A (n=16) or B (n=10) were matched in sets of two for size and treatment, thawed, and immediately transferred in pairs to 13 recipients. Only two recipient mares were pregnant; one received two 400 μm embryos from treatment A, and the other one 400 μm and one 415 μm embryo from treatment B. There was no advantage of incorporating a 2 min dehydration step into the cryopreservation protocol for large equine embryos. PMID:19375416

  5. Early embryo invasion as a determinant in pea of the seed transmission of pea seed-borne mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Maule, A J

    1992-07-01

    Seed transmission of an isolate of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) in several pea genotypes has been studied. Cross-pollination experiments showed that pollen transmission of PSbMV did not occur and accordingly, virus was not detected in pollen grains by ELISA or electron microscopy. Comparative studies between two pea cultivars, one with a high incidence of seed transmission and one with none, showed that PSbMV infected the floral tissues (sepals, petals, anther and carpel) of both cultivars, but was not detected in ovules prior to fertilization. Virus was detected equally well in seed coats of the progeny in both cultivars. Analysis of virus incidence and concentration in pea seeds of different developmental stages demonstrated that in the cultivar with a high incidence of seed transmission, PSbMV directly invaded immature embryos, multiplied in the embryonic tissues and persisted during seed maturation. In contrast, the cultivar without seed transmission did not show invasion of immature embryos by the virus; there was no evidence for virus multiplication or persistence during embryo development and seed maturation. Hence seed transmission of PSbMV resulted from direct invasion of immature pea embryos by the virus and the block to seed transmission in the non-permissive cultivar probably occurred at this step.

  6. Can artificial techniques supply morally neutral human embryos for research? Part I. Creating novel categories of human embryos.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nancy L; Cheshire, William P

    2005-01-01

    Manipulations of the molecular composition and formation of human embryos are posing vital new challenges to traditional concepts of human identity and procreation. Current trends in embryology in particular are reshaping the ethical question of how scientific research should treat experimentally derived embryos. Some investigators have argued that embryos created through artificial means are technologically novel entities that should be exempt from ethical restraints placed on research involving human embryos that come into being through natural processes. These include uniparental embryos derived through cloning or parthenogenesis, as well as multiparental, hybrid-parental, and xenohybrid-parental embryos. If confined to natural means many of these genetic unions could not occur, but through the intervention of technology, it is becoming possible to design and grow strange and unusual forms of embryos, in some cases using human gametes. Regardless of the genetic contributors or the processes used to fertilize and stimulate egg activation, in each case the new embryo represents an individual organism that begins a process of development. We conclude that the prospect of creating or redesigning new human life should be held to a stringent ethical standard of precaution, even higher than that of deciding to destroy existing embryonic life. Accordingly, we urge cautious ethical reflection and broad public discussion prior to deciding whether to permit embryologic research into novel forms of procreative means in nonhuman animals, to be further extended to humans.

  7. Transcript profiles of maize embryo sacs and preliminary identification of genes involved in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai Shuai; Wang, Fang; Tan, Su Jian; Wang, Ming Xiu; Sui, Na; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The embryo sac, the female gametophyte of flowering plants, plays important roles in the pollination and fertilization process. Maize (Zea mays L.) is a model monocot, but little is known about the interactions between its embryo sac and the pollen tube. In this study, we compared the transcript profiles of mature embryo sacs, mature embryo sacs 14–16 h after pollination, and mature nucelli. Comparing the transcript profiles of the embryo sacs before and after the entry of the pollen tube, we identified 3467 differentially expressed transcripts (3382 differentially expressed genes; DEGs). The DEGs were grouped into 22 functional categories. Among the DEGs, 221 genes were induced upon the entry of the pollen tube, and many of them encoded proteins involved in RNA binding, processing, and transcription, signaling, miscellaneous enzyme family processes, and lipid metabolism processes. Genes in the DEG dataset were grouped into 17 classes in a gene ontology enrichment analysis. The DEGs included many genes encoding proteins involved in protein amino acid phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination, implying that these processes might play important roles in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction. Additionally, our analyses indicate that the expression of 112 genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) is induced during pollination and fertilization. The CRPs likely regulate pollen tube guidance and embryo sac development. These results provide important information on the genes involved in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction in maize. PMID:25566277

  8. PEI1, an embryo-specific zinc finger protein gene required for heart-stage embryo formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Thomas, T L

    1998-01-01

    We used virtual subtraction, a new gene isolation strategy, to isolate several genes of interest that are expressed in Arabidopsis embryos. These genes have demonstrated biological properties or have the potential to be involved in important biological processes. One gene isolated by virtual subtraction is PEI. It encodes a protein containing a Cys3His zinc finger domain associated with a number of animal and fungal transcription factors. In situ hybridization results showed that PEI1 is expressed throughout the embryo from globular to late cotyledon stage. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a PEI1 antisense gene produced white seeds in which embryo development did not progress through heart stage. Aberrant embryos failed to form cotyledons, but the embryonic root appeared to be normal. Aberrant embryos did not turn green, and the expression of genes involved in photomorphogenesis was drastically attenuated. In culture, aberrant embryos did not form true leaves, but root formation was apparently normal. These results suggest that PEI1 is an embryo-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during Arabidopsis embryogenesis, functioning primarily in the apical domain of the embryo. PMID:9501112

  9. Expression and genomic integration of transgenes after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Uçarlı, C; Tufan, F; Gürel, F

    2015-01-01

    Mature embryos in tissue cultures are advantageous because of their abundance and rapid germination, which reduces genomic instability problems. In this study, 2-day-old isolated mature barley embryos were infected with 2 Agrobacterium hypervirulent strains (AGL1 and EHA105), followed by a 3-day period of co-cultivation in the presence of L-cystein amino acid. Chimeric expression of the b-glucuronidase gene (gusA) directed by a viral promoter of strawberry vein banding virus was observed in coleoptile epidermal cells and seminal roots in 5-day-old germinated seedlings. In addition to varying infectivity patterns in different strains, there was a higher ratio of transient b-glucuronidase expression in developing coleoptiles than in embryonic roots, indicating the high competency of shoot apical meristem cells in the mature embryo. A total of 548 explants were transformed and 156 plants developed to maturity on G418 media after 18-25 days. We detected transgenes in 74% of the screened plant leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and 49% of these expressed neomycin phosphotransferase II gene following AGL1 transformation. Ten randomly selected T0 transformants were analyzed using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and 24 fragments ranged between 200-600 base pairs were sequenced. Three of the sequences flanked with transferred-DNA showed high similarity to coding regions of the barley genome, including alpha tubulin5, homeobox 1, and mitochondrial 16S genes. We observed 70-200-base pair filler sequences only in the coding regions of barley in this study. PMID:25730049

  10. Expression and genomic integration of transgenes after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Uçarlı, C; Tufan, F; Gürel, F

    2015-02-06

    Mature embryos in tissue cultures are advantageous because of their abundance and rapid germination, which reduces genomic instability problems. In this study, 2-day-old isolated mature barley embryos were infected with 2 Agrobacterium hypervirulent strains (AGL1 and EHA105), followed by a 3-day period of co-cultivation in the presence of L-cystein amino acid. Chimeric expression of the b-glucuronidase gene (gusA) directed by a viral promoter of strawberry vein banding virus was observed in coleoptile epidermal cells and seminal roots in 5-day-old germinated seedlings. In addition to varying infectivity patterns in different strains, there was a higher ratio of transient b-glucuronidase expression in developing coleoptiles than in embryonic roots, indicating the high competency of shoot apical meristem cells in the mature embryo. A total of 548 explants were transformed and 156 plants developed to maturity on G418 media after 18-25 days. We detected transgenes in 74% of the screened plant leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and 49% of these expressed neomycin phosphotransferase II gene following AGL1 transformation. Ten randomly selected T0 transformants were analyzed using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and 24 fragments ranged between 200-600 base pairs were sequenced. Three of the sequences flanked with transferred-DNA showed high similarity to coding regions of the barley genome, including alpha tubulin5, homeobox 1, and mitochondrial 16S genes. We observed 70-200-base pair filler sequences only in the coding regions of barley in this study.

  11. Accurate and noninvasive embryos screening during in vitro fertilization (IVF) assisted by Raman analysis of embryos culture medium Accurate and noninvasive embryos screening during IVF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. G.; Peng, J.; Zhao, Q. H.; Su, L.; Wang, X. H.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, J.

    2012-04-01

    In combination with morphological evaluation tests, we employ Raman spectroscopy to select higher potential reproductive embryos during in vitro fertilization (IVF) based on chemical composition of embryos culture medium. In this study, 57 Raman spectra are acquired from both higher and lower quality embryos culture medium (ECM) from 10 patients which have been preliminarily confirmed by clinical assay. Data are fit by using a linear combination model of least squares method in which 12 basis spectra represent the chemical features of ECM. The final fitting coefficients provide insight into the chemical compositions of culture medium samples and are subsequently used as criterion to evaluate the quality of embryos. The relative fitting coefficients ratios of sodium pyruvate/albumin and phenylalanine/albumin seem act as key roles in the embryo screening, attaining 85.7% accuracy in comparison with clinical pregnancy. The good results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy therefore is an important candidate for an accurate and noninvasive screening of higher quality embryos, which potentially decrease the time-consuming clinical trials during IVF.

  12. Morphometric study of cartilage dynamics in the chick embryo tibia. II. Dexamethasone-treated embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Ranz, F B; Aceitero, J; Gaytan, F

    1987-01-01

    The cartilage dynamics in the tibia of dexamethasone-treated chick embryos has been studied by means of morphometric methods. Treated embryos showed a delay in the longitudinal growth of the tibia, as well as in the growth of all structures enclosed by the perichondrium-periosteum. The cartilage formation rate remained nearly unchanged (above 1 mm3/day) from Day 12 to Day 14, whereas the cartilage resorption rate was zero up to Day 13, and showed a non-significant increase from Day 13 onwards. This might be related to the scarcity of resorptive cells found in the cartilage-marrow interface. By Day 14 a certain recovery of the growth rhythm was observed. These results indicate that the greatest effect of dexamethasone occurs at the level of cartilage resorption. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3446667

  13. [Evaluation of environmental factors affecting embryo development in vitro].

    PubMed

    Noda, Y

    1992-08-01

    Human in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) became an indispensable modality for treating infertile patients. The principle of this method is simple: that is, recovery of gametes from the gonads of men and women and transfer of the embryos into the uterus. This method can be expected, therefore, to be applied to many patients with a variety of causes of infertility. Unfortunately, the success rates are not satisfactory in the majority of clinics in the 14 years since the first report of a test tube in 1978. In view of improving the success rate, one major issue is the protocol used for ovulation induction, which may influence the quality of eggs as well as the environmental conditions in the endometrium at the time of embryo replacement. Another major issue should be the technique for embryo culture because, in general, mammalian embryos, including humans', are known to exhibit developmental retardation in vitro. In a significant number of embryos, cleavage is arrested at the first or second cell cycle when cultured under the conventional culture conditions. This phenomenon in rodents is known as "block to development in vitro" or "two-cell block in vitro". Recently, the mouse two-cell block was found to be attenuated by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the culture medium. SOD is the enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation reaction of superoxide anion radicals: 2O2- + 2H(+)----H2O2 + O2. This suggests that developmental retardation in vitro may be related to the potential oxygen toxicity that embryos encounter in vitro. Following to this finding, a variety of culture conditions have been found to attenuate blocking phenomenon and to increase blastulation rate in the mouse embryos. By the addition of chemicals to the culture medium such as L-Cysteine, L-Ascorbic acid, EDTA, DTPA or thiredoxine, blastulation rates could be increased overcoming blocking phenomenon. From these findings, it seemed possible to hypothesize that developmental

  14. Directional freezing of spermatozoa and embryos.

    PubMed

    Arav, Amir; Saragusty, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Directional freezing is based on a simple thermodynamic principle whereby the sample is moved through a predetermined temperature gradient at a velocity that determines the cooling rate. Directional freezing permits a precise and uniform cooling rate in small- and large-volume samples. It avoids supercooling and reduces mechanical damage caused by crystallisation. Directional solidification was used to date for slow and rapid freezing, as well as for vitrification of oocytes and embryos by means of the minimum drop size technique: small drops are placed on a microscope slide that is moved at high velocity from the hot base to the cold base. Sperm samples from a wide range of domestic and wild animals were successfully cryopreserved using the directional freezing method. The bovine sexed semen industry may benefit from the increased survival of spermatozoa after directional freezing.

  15. Mammalian diversity: gametes, embryos and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Richard R; Eakin, Guy S; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2006-01-01

    The class Mammalia is composed of approximately 4800 extant species. These mammalian species are divided into three subclasses that include the monotremes, marsupials and eutherians. Monotremes are remarkable because these mammals are born from eggs laid outside of the mother's body. Marsupial mammals have relatively short gestation periods and give birth to highly altricial young that continue a significant amount of 'fetal' development after birth, supported by a highly sophisticated lactation. Less than 10% of mammalian species are monotremes or marsupials, so the great majority of mammals are grouped into the subclass Eutheria, including mouse and human. Mammals exhibit great variety in morphology, physiology and reproduction. In the present article, we highlight some of this remarkable diversity relative to the mouse, one of the most widely used mammalian model organisms, and human. This diversity creates challenges and opportunities for gamete and embryo collection, culture and transfer technologies.

  16. Chemical Genetic Screening in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Charles K.; White, Richard M.; Zon, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Chemical genetic screening can be described as a discovery approach in which chemicals are assayed for their effects on a defined biological system. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a well-characterized and genetically tractable vertebrate model organism that produces large numbers of rapidly developing embryos that develop externally. These characteristics allow for flexible, rapid, and scalable chemical screen design using the zebrafish. We describe a protocol for screening compounds from a chemical library for effects on early zebrafish development using an automated in situ based read-out. Because screens are performed in the context of a complete, developing organism, this approach allows for a more comprehensive analysis of the range of a chemical’s effects than that provided by, for example, a cell culture-based or in vitro biochemical assay. Using a twenty-four hour chemical treatment, one can complete a round of screening in six days. PMID:19745824

  17. Microwave effects on isolated chick embryo hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Caddemi, A.; Tamburello, C.C.; Zanforlin, L.; Torregrossa, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of microwaves on the electric activity of hearts as a means of elucidating interactive mechanisms of nonionizing radiation with cardiac tissue. Experiments were performed on isolated hearts of 9-12-day-old chick embryos placed in small petri dishes. Oxygenated isotonic Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C permitted heart survival. Samples were irradiated at 2.45 GHz with a power density of 3 mW/cm2. The heart signal was detected with a glass micropipet inserted into the sinoatrial node and examined by means of a Berg-Fourier analyzer. Pulsed microwaves caused the locking of the heartbeat to the modulation frequency, whereas continuous wave irradiation might have induced slight bradycardia. Pulsed fields induced stimulation or regularization of the heartbeat in arrhythmia, fibrillation, or arrest of the heart.

  18. Transcriptomic analyses of Hand2 transgenic embryos.

    PubMed

    Funato, Noriko; Kokubo, Hiroki; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we further provide the data generated for the previously published research article "Specification of jaw identity by the Hand2 transcription factor." To better understand the downstream genes of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand2, we generated double-transgenic mice (Hand2 (NC) ) by intercrossing CAG-floxed CAT-Hand2 mice with Wnt1-Cre mice for conditional activation of Hand2 expression in the neural crest. Altered expression of Hand2 induces transformation of the upper jaw to the lower jaw in Hand2 (NC) mutant mice. This data article provides Tables detailing the differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Hand2 (NC) mutant embryos. The raw array data of our transcriptomes as generated using Affymetrix microarrays are available on the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) browser (Reference number GSE75805). PMID:27408813

  19. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in embryo neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Vinod, K Yaragudri; Cao, Jin; Xie, Shan; Hyson, Richard L; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; He, Weimin; Cooper, Thomas B; Hungund, Basalingappa L; Finnell, Richard H

    2012-04-01

    In utero exposure to tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of marijuana, is associated with an increased risk for neurodevelopmental defects in the offspring by interfering with the functioning of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system. At the present time, it is not clearly known whether the eCB system is present before neurogenesis. Using an array of biochemical techniques, we analyzed the levels of CB1 receptors, eCBs (AEA and 2-AG), and the enzymes (NAPE-PLD, DAGLα, DAGLβ, MAGL, and FAAH) involved in the metabolism of the eCBs in chick and mouse models during development. The findings demonstrate the presence of eCB system in early embryo before neurogenesis. The eCB system might play a critical role in early embryogenesis and there might be adverse developmental consequences of in utero exposure to marijuana and other drugs of abuse during this period.

  20. [Cultural diversity in gamete and embryos donation].

    PubMed

    Epelboin, S

    2014-09-01

    Through gamete and embryo donation have successively emerged new ways of designing individuals who, in turn, have generated mutations in the concept of parenthood. A debate is open to the society, which often raises ideological cleavages. Indeed, donation practices mobilize the conflicting interests of donor of gametes, the recipient couple, child, whose origins are complex, although his filiation is legally clear. Its place in the family genealogy can be examined in relation to other societies, which admit plural concepts called "classificatory" kinship. They set up role partition between parents and educators. Setting anthropological perspective provides a broadening of the reflection to answer questions from the donation practices, including genealogical questions of revelation to the child of his conception, his incorporation in family and social group and the importance of compensation of donation. PMID:25153433

  1. Superovulation, collection and transfer of embryos and demi-embryos from Boran(Bos indicus ) cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, T; Lorenzini, E

    1988-08-01

    Twenty-three Boran(Bos indicus ) cows and heifers were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG); a total of four embryos and 4.1 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SEM) ova per ova-producing donor resulted. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH-P) was then used to superovulate 49 Boran cows for a total of 106 superovulations, of which 63 (59.4%) produced an average of 3.7 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SEM) embryos. The embryo production was not influenced by either the season or the number of times(one to five) the cows were superovulated. A higher pregnancy rate was obtained when the selection of Boran recipients was based on their plasma-progesterone values (overall 52.5%, single embryos 63.3%, twin demi-embryos 45.8%) than when they were selected by palpation per rectum only (overall 43.8%, single embryos 50%, twin demi-embryos 36.4%). The twinning rate of twin demiembryos was 62.5%, whereas only single calves were born after transfer of two embryos per recipient. No pregnancies were produced following transfer of twin demi-embryos without zonae pellucidae. Transferring single demi-embryos gave a low pregnancy rate (13.3%). Twelve donor Boran cows (21 superovulations) bred with their fathers resulted in a high rate of early embryonic death; additionally, only 20.9% (overall) of the recipients became pregnant. Estrus synchronization of Boran cows with a progesterone releasing intravaginal device (PRID) for a short period (7 d) combined with one injection of prostaglandin (Day 6) produced a larger number of good quality recipients (70.5%) than using double prostaglandin injections (60%). PMID:16726476

  2. Natural Selection of Human Embryos: Decidualizing Endometrial Stromal Cells Serve as Sensors of Embryo Quality upon Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Teklenburg, Gijs; Salker, Madhuri; Molokhia, Mariam; Lavery, Stuart; Trew, Geoffrey; Aojanepong, Tepchongchit; Mardon, Helen J.; Lokugamage, Amali U.; Rai, Raj; Landles, Christian; Roelen, Bernard A. J.; Quenby, Siobhan; Kuijk, Ewart W.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Regan, Lesley; Brosens, Jan J.; Macklon, Nick S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is widely viewed as dependent upon an intimate dialogue, mediated by locally secreted factors between a developmentally competent embryo and a receptive endometrium. Reproductive success in humans is however limited, largely because of the high prevalence of chromosomally abnormal preimplantation embryos. Moreover, the transient period of endometrial receptivity in humans uniquely coincides with differentiation of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) into highly specialized decidual cells, which in the absence of pregnancy invariably triggers menstruation. The role of cyclic decidualization of the endometrium in the implantation process and the nature of the decidual cytokines and growth factors that mediate the crosstalk with the embryo are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We employed a human co-culture model, consisting of decidualizing ESCs and single hatched blastocysts, to identify the soluble factors involved in implantation. Over the 3-day co-culture period, approximately 75% of embryos arrested whereas the remainder showed normal development. The levels of 14 implantation factors secreted by the stromal cells were determined by multiplex immunoassay. Surprisingly, the presence of a developing embryo had no significant effect on decidual secretions, apart from a modest reduction in IL-5 levels. In contrast, arresting embryos triggered a strong response, characterized by selective inhibition of IL-1β, -6, -10, -17, -18, eotaxin, and HB-EGF secretion. Co-cultures were repeated with undifferentiated ESCs but none of the secreted cytokines were affected by the presence of a developing or arresting embryo. Conclusions Human ESCs become biosensors of embryo quality upon differentiation into decidual cells. In view of the high incidence of gross chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos, cyclic decidualization followed by menstrual shedding may represent a mechanism of natural embryo selection that limits maternal investment in

  3. The mitochondrial genome in embryo technologies.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, S; Wolf, E

    2003-08-01

    The mammalian mitochondrial genome encodes for 37 genes which are involved in a broad range of cellular functions. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule is commonly assumed to be inherited through oocyte cytoplasm in a clonal manner, and apparently species-specific mechanisms have evolved to eliminate the contribution of sperm mitochondria after natural fertilization. However, recent evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance in embryos and offspring questions the general validity of this model, particularly in the context of assisted reproduction and embryo biotechnology. In addition to normal mt DNA haplotype variation, oocytes and spermatozoa show remarkable differences in mtDNA content and may be affected by inherited or acquired mtDNA aberrations. All these parameters have been correlated with gamete quality and reproductive success rates. Nuclear transfer (NT) technology provides experimental models for studying interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Recent studies demonstrated (i) a significant effect of mtDNA haplotype or other maternal cytoplasmic factors on the efficiency of NT; (ii) phenotypic differences between transmitochondrial clones pointing to functionally relevant nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions; and (iii) neutral or non-neutral selection of mtDNA haplotypes in heteroplasmic conditions. Mitochondria form a dynamic reticulum, enabling complementation of mitochondrial components and possibly mixing of different mtDNA populations in heteroplasmic individuals. Future directions of research on mtDNA in the context of reproductive biotechnology range from the elimination of adverse effects of artificial heteroplasmy, e.g. created by ooplasm transfer, to engineering of optimized constellations of nuclear and cytoplasmic genes for the production of superior livestock. PMID:12887568

  4. Cryopreservation of zygotic embryo axes and somatic embryos of European chestnut.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Elena; San-José, M Carmen; Ballester, Antonio; Vieitez, Ana M

    2004-01-01

    This work describes experiments demonstrating the feasibility of long-term conservation of Castanea sativa germplasm through cryopreservation of embryonic axes or somatic embryo clumps. Between 93 % and 100 % of excised embryonic axes of recalcitrant chestnut seeds survived storage in liquid nitrogen (LN) following desiccation in a laminar flow cabinet to moisture contents of 20-24 % (on a fresh weight basis), and some 63 % subsequently developed as whole plants. Desiccation to moisture contents less than 19 % produced damage resulting in loss of organized plant development after cryostorage, allowing only root growth. When 6-8 mg clumps of globular or heart-shaped somatic embryos were precultured for 7 days on high-sucrose medium and then desiccated to a moisture content of 25 % before storage in LN, the embryogenesis resumption level after thawing was 33 %. When the embryo clumps were precultured for 3 days on high-sucrose medium followed by 60 min application of PVS2 vitrification solution before cryostorage, the post-storage embryogenesis resumption level was 68 %.

  5. Embryo afterloading: a refinement in embryo transfer technique that may increase clinical pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Neithardt, Adrienne B.; Segars, James H.; Hennessy, Sasha; James, Aidita N.; McKeeby, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Given the importance of ET technique during assisted reproductive technology cycles, we evaluated the effect of embryo afterloading subsequent to placement of the ET catheter on pregnancy rates vs. a standard direct ET. Design Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting University-based assisted reproductive technology program. Patient(s) Patients undergoing a fresh nondonor day 3 ET by a single provider over a 1-year period. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Clinical pregnancy. Result(s) One hundred twenty-seven patients met inclusion criteria, and the overall pregnancy rate was 46.5%. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to age, basal FSH, or number of embryos transferred. The ET method used was at the discretion of the provider. There was no difference between the two groups in the presence of blood on the transfer catheter. However, there were significantly more transfer catheters with mucus contamination in the direct transfer group (25.58% vs. 5.95%). The clinical pregnancy rate in the group with ET using the afterloading technique was higher than in the direct ET group (52.4% vs. 34.9%). Conclusion(s) There was a trend toward an increase in pregnancy rate when an embryo afterloading technique was used. A prospective randomized trial is needed to examine this issue. PMID:15749502

  6. Selection for rapid embryo development correlates with embryo exposure to maternal androgens among passerine birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwabl, H.; Palacios, M.G.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    Greater offspring predation favors evolution of faster development among species. We hypothesized that greater offspring predation exerts selection on mothers to increase levels of anabolic androgens in egg yolks to achieve faster development. Here, we tested whether (1) concentrations of yolk androgens in passerine species were associated with offspring predation and (2) embryo and nestling development rates were associated with yolk androgen concentrations. We examined three androgens that increase in potency along the synthesis pathway: androstenedione (A4) to testosterone (T) to 5??- dihydrotestosterone (5??-DHT). Concentrations of none of these steroids were related to clutch size; only A4 was allometrically related to egg volume. Species that experience greater predation showed higher yolk concentrations of T and 5??-DHT. Higher concentrations of T and particularly 5??-DHT were strongly correlated with faster development during the embryo period and less so during the nestling period. Development rates were most strongly correlated with 5??-DHT, suggesting that potency increases along the androgen synthesis pathway and that effects are mediated by the androgen receptor pathway. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that selection for faster development by time-dependent offspring mortality may be achieved epigenetically by varying embryo exposure to maternal anabolic steroids. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient reproduction of cynomolgus monkey using pronuclear embryo transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenting; Jin, Yujuan; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Philip L; Hu, Yinghe; Tsien, Joe Z

    2008-09-01

    One of the technical bottlenecks in producing nonhuman primate models is that current assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro culture and frozen conservation of multicell-stage embryos, often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates. We collected 174 metaphase II oocytes by laparoscopy from 22 superovulated mature females and then fertilized these eggs using either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, resulting in a 33.3% and a 50% fertilization rate, respectively. These 66 fertilized pronuclear-stage embryos were then tubally transferred to 30 recipients and led to 7 births and 1 abortion. Importantly, we observed that the highest live birth rate of approximately 64% was obtained when the transfer of pronuclear embryos was performed in the presence of new corpus luteum in the ovary of recipients between 24 h and 36 h after estradiol peak. Therefore, our experiments demonstrate that by matching the critical time window in the recipient's reproductive cycle for achieving optimal embryo-uterine synchrony, pronuclear embryo transfer technology can significantly improve the pregnancy rate and live birth of healthy baby monkeys. This efficient method should be valuable to the systematic efforts in construction of various transgenic primate disease models. PMID:18725640

  8. Cytological and physiological changes in orthodox maize embryos during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Wang, Ruling; Cheng, Hongyan; Song, Songquan

    2010-03-01

    Cytological and physiological changes during cryopreservation were studied in maize embryos at 35 days after pollination (DAP). Both dehydration and freezing caused cytological damage, such as plasmolysis, swelled mitochondria, increased heterochromatin, and nuclear shrinkage. Dehydration alone slightly impaired plasma membrane integrity while a drastic increase in electrolyte leakage was observed after freezing of embryos with moisture content above 23%. Damage to cellular ultrastructure and plasmalemma integrity was negatively related to moisture content in unfrozen embryos and positively related in frozen embryos. The pattern of changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes differed from one another during dehydration and/or freezing-thawing treatment. Dehydration increased activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) but decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR). Freezing further decreased GR and SOD activity and resulted in extremely low DHAR activity. Embryos at intermediate moisture contents had low catalase (CAT) activity before freezing but highest CAT activity after freeze-thaw. Both dehydration and freezing promoted membrane lipid peroxidation which resulted in an approximately threefold increase at most in the malondialdehyde content in postthaw embryos. Changes in viability of postthaw embryos can be closely related to damage in cellular ultrastructure and plasmalemma integrity but directly related neither to antioxidants nor lipid peroxidation levels. PMID:19904484

  9. Efficient reproduction of cynomolgus monkey using pronuclear embryo transfer technique

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenting; Jin, Yujuan; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Philip L.; Hu, Yinghe; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2008-01-01

    One of the technical bottlenecks in producing nonhuman primate models is that current assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro culture and frozen conservation of multicell-stage embryos, often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates. We collected 174 metaphase II oocytes by laparoscopy from 22 superovulated mature females and then fertilized these eggs using either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, resulting in a 33.3% and a 50% fertilization rate, respectively. These 66 fertilized pronuclear-stage embryos were then tubally transferred to 30 recipients and led to 7 births and 1 abortion. Importantly, we observed that the highest live birth rate of ≈64% was obtained when the transfer of pronuclear embryos was performed in the presence of new corpus luteum in the ovary of recipients between 24 h and 36 h after estradiol peak. Therefore, our experiments demonstrate that by matching the critical time window in the recipient's reproductive cycle for achieving optimal embryo-uterine synchrony, pronuclear embryo transfer technology can significantly improve the pregnancy rate and live birth of healthy baby monkeys. This efficient method should be valuable to the systematic efforts in construction of various transgenic primate disease models. PMID:18725640

  10. Ion/water channels for embryo implantation barrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Mei; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Ting-Ting; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Successful implantation involves three distinct processes, namely the embryo apposition, attachment, and penetration through the luminal epithelium of the endometrium to establish a vascular link to the mother. After penetration, stromal cells underlying the epithelium differentiate and surround the embryo to form the embryo implantation barrier, which blocks the passage of harmful substances to the embryo. Many ion/water channel proteins were found to be involved in the process of embryo implantation. First, ion/water channel proteins play their classical role in establishing a resting membrane potential, shaping action potentials and other electrical signals by gating the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Second, most of ion/water channel proteins are regulated by steroid hormone (estrogen or progesterone), which may have important implications to the embryo implantation. Last but not least, these proteins do not limit themselves as pure channels but also function as an initiator of a series of consequences once activated by their ligand/stimulator. Herein, we discuss these new insights in recent years about the contribution of ion/water channels to the embryo implantation barrier construction during early pregnancy. PMID:24789983

  11. Shaping the norms that regulate international commerce of embryos.

    PubMed

    Gard, Julie A; Stringfellow, David A

    2014-01-01

    As various embryo technologies in livestock were developed and evolved to a state of usefulness over the past 40 years, scientists with a specific interest in infectious diseases sought to determine the epidemiologic consequences of movement, especially international movement, of increasing numbers of embryos. Many of the foundational studies in this area were reported in Theriogenology, beginning in the 1970s and especially throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Unquestionably, Theriogenology has been a widely used venue for dissemination of basic information on this subject, which ultimately led to the development of the now universally accepted techniques for certification of embryo health. Today it is well-recognized that movement in commerce of embryos, especially in vivo-derived embryos, is a very low-risk method for exchange of animal germ plasm. This paper chronicles the evolution of strategies for health certification of embryos. An overview is provided of the calculated efforts of practitioners, scientists, and regulators to organize, forge necessary partnerships, stimulate needed research, provide purposeful analysis of the results, and, through these processes, guarantee the universal acceptance of efficient protocols for certifying the health of embryos intended for movement in international commerce.

  12. Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment harms developing chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Maren C; Milz, Stefan; Frank, Hans-Georg; Korbel, Rüdiger; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-02-06

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment (rESWT) has became one of the best investigated treatment modalities for cellulite, including the abdomen as a treatment site. Notably, pregnancy is considered a contraindication for rESWT, and concerns have been raised about possible harm to the embryo when a woman treated with rESWT for cellulite is not aware of her pregnancy. Here we tested the hypothesis that rESWT may cause serious physical harm to embryos. To this end, chicken embryos were exposed in ovo to various doses of radial shock waves on either day 3 or day 4 of development, resembling the developmental stage of four- to six-week-old human embryos. We found a dose-dependent increase in the number of embryos that died after radial shock wave exposure on either day 3 or day 4 of development. Among the embryos that survived the shock wave exposure a few showed severe congenital defects such as missing eyes. Evidently, our data cannot directly be used to draw conclusions about potential harm to the embryo of a pregnant woman treated for cellulite with rESWT. However, to avoid any risks we strongly recommend applying radial shock waves in the treatment of cellulite only if a pregnancy is ruled out.

  13. Turtle embryos move to optimal thermal environments within the egg

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Teng; Shine, Richard; Du, Wei-Guo

    2013-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated that the embryos of soft-shelled turtles can reposition themselves within their eggs to exploit locally warm conditions. In this paper, we ask whether turtle embryos actively seek out optimal thermal environments for their development, as do post-hatching individuals. Specifically, (i) do reptile embryos move away from dangerously high temperatures as well as towards warm temperatures? and (ii) is such embryonic movement due to active thermoregulation, or (more simply) to passive embryonic repositioning caused by local heat-induced changes in viscosity of fluids within the egg? Our experiments with an emydid turtle (Chinemys reevesii) show that embryos avoid dangerously high temperatures by moving to cooler regions of the egg. The repositioning of embryos is an active rather than passive process: live embryos move towards a heat source, whereas dead ones do not. Overall, our results suggest that behavioural thermoregulation by turtle embryos is genuinely analogous to the thermoregulatory behaviour exhibited by post-hatching ectotherms. PMID:23760168

  14. Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment harms developing chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Maren C.; Milz, Stefan; Frank, Hans-Georg; Korbel, Rüdiger; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment (rESWT) has became one of the best investigated treatment modalities for cellulite, including the abdomen as a treatment site. Notably, pregnancy is considered a contraindication for rESWT, and concerns have been raised about possible harm to the embryo when a woman treated with rESWT for cellulite is not aware of her pregnancy. Here we tested the hypothesis that rESWT may cause serious physical harm to embryos. To this end, chicken embryos were exposed in ovo to various doses of radial shock waves on either day 3 or day 4 of development, resembling the developmental stage of four- to six-week-old human embryos. We found a dose-dependent increase in the number of embryos that died after radial shock wave exposure on either day 3 or day 4 of development. Among the embryos that survived the shock wave exposure a few showed severe congenital defects such as missing eyes. Evidently, our data cannot directly be used to draw conclusions about potential harm to the embryo of a pregnant woman treated for cellulite with rESWT. However, to avoid any risks we strongly recommend applying radial shock waves in the treatment of cellulite only if a pregnancy is ruled out. PMID:25655309

  15. A rapid improved method for sexing embryo of water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Zoheir, K M A; Allam, A A

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the experiment of this paper is to develop and improve in the sexing method for preimplantation embryos of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) reaction. Embryo sexing has been recognized to control effectively the sex of offspring in the embryo transfer industry. A rapid and simple detection system was established by adding ethidium bromide (EB) or 5 μl of CuSO4 (3M) to the product of LAMP reaction. The result of these additions after 2 min was a color change and a precipitate. It could be employed as an alternative method in the detection of the reaction products in place of the time consuming electrophoresis or the turbidity meter. The in vitro produced buffalo embryos were divided into one to eight pieces using a microblade attached to a micromanipulator. The cell number in each piece was counted before sexing. Sexing of DNA samples extracted from one to five biopsies cells was performed by LAMP. After biopsy, the remaining part of the embryos was used to confirm the sex by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fifty buffalo embryos were used and the accuracy of sex prediction was 100% when the blastomeres dissociated from a morula exceeds three. In conclusion, the present procedure without turbidity meter and electrophoresis was reliable and applicable for sexing the water buffalo embryos.

  16. Embryo technology in conservation efforts for endangered felids.

    PubMed

    Pope, C E

    2000-01-01

    Most of the 36 species of wild cats are classified as threatened, vulnerable or endangered due to poaching and habitat loss. The important role of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) as part of a multifaceted captive breeding program for selected wild cat species is gradually gaining acceptance. This recognition is a result of the progress made during the last decade in which the feasibility of oocyte recovery from gonadotropin-treated females, in vitro fertilization, embryo cryopreservation and embryo transfer (ET) was demonstrated in the domestic cat (Felis catus). Additionally, embryos have been produced in vitro from oocytes matured in vitro after recovery from ex situ ovaries of both domestic and non-domestic cat species and domestic kittens have been born following transfer of these embryos. In vitro fertilization has been successful in at least one-third of wild cat species and kittens were born after transfer of Indian desert cat (Felis sylvestris ornata) embryos into a domestic cat and con-specific transfer of tiger (Panthera tigris) embryos. The domestic cat is not only a valuable model for development of in vitro techniques but may serve as a recipient of embryos from several species of small wild cats. PMID:10735071

  17. Danio rerio embryos on Prozac - Effects on the detoxification mechanism and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Cunha, V; Rodrigues, P; Santos, M M; Moradas-Ferreira, P; Ferreira, M

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade the presence of psychopharmaceuticals, including fluoxetine (FLU), in the aquatic environment has been associated with the increasing trend in human consumption of these substances. Aquatic organisms are usually exposed to chronic low doses and, therefore, risk assessments should evaluate the effects of these compounds in non-target organisms. Teleost fish possess an array of active defence mechanisms to cope with the deleterious effects of xenobiotics. These include ABC transporters, phase I and II of cellular detoxification and oxidative stress enzymes. Hence, the present study aimed at characterising the effect of FLU on embryo development of the model teleost zebrafish (Danio rerio) concomitantly with changes in the detoxification mechanisms during early developmental phases. Embryos were exposed to different concentrations of FLU (0.0015, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 0.8μM) for 80hours post fertilization. Development was screened and the impact in the transcription of key genes, i.e., abcb4, abcc1, abcc2, abcg2, cyp1a, cyp3a65, gst, sod, cat, ahr, pxr, pparα, pparβ, pparγ, rxraa, rxrab, rxrbb, rxrga, rxrgb, raraa, rarab, rarga evaluated. In addition, accumulation assays were performed to measure the activity of ABC proteins and antioxidant enzymes (CAT and Cu/ZnSOD) after exposure to FLU. Embryo development was disrupted at the lowest FLU concentration tested (0.0015μM), which is in the range of concentrations found in WWTP effluents. Embryos exposed to higher concentrations of FLU decreased Cu/Zn SOD, and increased CAT (0.0015 and 0.5μM) enzymatic activity. Exposure to higher concentrations of FLU decreased the expression of most genes belonging to the detoxification system and upregulated cat at 0.0015μM of FLU. Most of the tested concentrations downregulated pparα, pparβ, pparγ, and raraa, rxraa, rxrab, rxrbb rxrgb and ahr gene expression while pxr was significantly up regulated at all tested concentrations. In conclusion, this study

  18. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Developing Cotton Cotyledons and Embryo Axis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xiaochun; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Green, Allan G.; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei; Singh, Surinder P.; Liu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background As a by product of higher value cotton fibre, cotton seed has been increasingly recognised to have excellent potential as a source of additional food, feed, biofuel stock and even a renewable platform for the production of many diverse biological molecules for agriculture and industrial enterprises. The large size difference between cotyledon and embryo axis that make up a cotton seed results in the under-representation of embryo axis gene transcript levels in whole seed embryo samples. Therefore, the determination of gene transcript levels in the cotyledons and embryo axes separately should lead to a better understanding of metabolism in these two developmentally diverse tissues. Results A comparative study of transcriptome changes between cotton developing cotyledon and embryo axis has been carried out. 17,384 unigenes (20.74% of all the unigenes) were differentially expressed in the two adjacent embryo tissues, and among them, 7,727 unigenes (44.45%) were down-regulated and 9,657 unigenes (55.55%) were up-regulated in cotyledon. Conclusions Our study has provided a comprehensive dataset that documents the dynamics of the transcriptome at the mid-maturity of cotton seed development and in discrete seed tissues, including embryo axis and cotyledon tissues. The results showed that cotton seed is subject to many transcriptome variations in these two tissue types and the differential gene expression between cotton embryo axis and cotyledon uncovered in our study should provide an important starting point for understanding how gene activity is coordinated during seed development to make a seed. Further, the identification of genes involved in rapid metabolite accumulation stage of seed development will extend our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events in these developmental processes and provide a foundation for future studies on the metabolism, embryo differentiation of cotton and other dicot oilseed crops. PMID:23977137

  19. Reproductive outcomes of retransferring retained embryos in blastocyst transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hyun Jeong; Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Park, Chan Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of embryo retention (ER) in the transfer catheter following embryo transfer (ET) in blastocyst transfer and investigate whether retransferring retained embryos has an impact on reproductive outcomes in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization-ET. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,131 blastocyst transfers, which comprised 223 single blastocyst transfer (SBT) and 908 double blastocyst transfer (DBT) cycles. Each SBT and DBT group was classified depending on whether ET was performed without retained embryos in the catheter during the first attempt (without-ER group) or whether any retained embryos were found following ET (ER group) for the purpose of comparing reproductive outcomes in a homogenous population. Results The overall incidence of finding retained embryos was 2.8% (32/1,131). There were no retained embryos in SBT cycles. In DBT cycles, implantation rates (30.0% vs. 26.6%), positive β-hCG rates (57.2% vs. 56.2%), clinical pregnancy rates (45.3% vs. 46.9%), and live birth rates (38.9% vs. 43.8%) were not significantly different between the without-ER and ER groups. There were no significant differences in the mean birth weight (g) 2,928.4±631.8 vs. 2,948.7±497.8 and the mean gestational age at birth (269.3±17.2 days vs. 264.2±25.7 days). A total of nine cases of congenital birth defects were found in this study population. Eight were observed in the without-ER group and one in the ER group. Conclusion Our results suggest that retransfer of retained embryos does not have any adverse impact on reproductive outcomes in blastocyst transfer cycles. Furthermore, our results support finding that SBT might be advantageous for decreasing the incidence of retained embryos in catheters. PMID:27358833

  20. Hookworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... The last 2 types also occur in animals. Hookworm disease is common in the moist tropics and ...

  1. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  2. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including ... Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder ...

  3. Whipworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the large intestine with a type of roundworm. ... Whipworm infection is caused by the roundworm Trichuris trichiura. It is a common infection that mainly affects children. Children may become infected if they swallow soil contaminated with whipworm ...

  4. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  5. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  6. Studies on type C influenza virus in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R; Freeman, M J

    1972-03-01

    The effect of varying conditions of inoculation and incubation on the growth of type C influenza virus in the allantoic cavity of the developing chick embryo were investigated. It was found that the highest yields of both virus haemagglutinin and infectious virus were obtained following the inoculation of chick embryos at 8 days with subsequent incubation at 32 degrees C. Using the chick embryo allantoic cavity for titration of infectious virus, growth curves of allantoically propagated virus under varying inoculation and incubation conditions were determined.

  7. Automatic zebrafish heartbeat detection and analysis for zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Pylatiuk, Christian; Sanchez, Daniela; Mikut, Ralf; Alshut, Rüdiger; Reischl, Markus; Hirth, Sofia; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Just, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    A fully automatic detection and analysis method of heartbeats in videos of nonfixed and nonanesthetized zebrafish embryos is presented. This method reduces the manual workload and time needed for preparation and imaging of the zebrafish embryos, as well as for evaluating heartbeat parameters such as frequency, beat-to-beat intervals, and arrhythmicity. The method is validated by a comparison of the results from automatic and manual detection of the heart rates of wild-type zebrafish embryos 36-120 h postfertilization and of embryonic hearts with bradycardia and pauses in the cardiac contraction.

  8. The avian embryo responding to microgravity of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hullinger, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Of all the many potential and real microenvironmental influences, only gravity would appear to have remained relatively constant and ubiquitous for developing organisms. Histo- and organogenesis as well as differential growth of the embryo and fetus may have evolved with a constant environmental factor of gravity. Chick embryos of 2-day and 9-day stages of incubation were flown in an incubator on the Space Shuttle during a 9-day mission. Significant differences in embryo response to this microgravity environment were observed. This paper offers an analysis and suggests mechanisms which may contribute to these results.

  9. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  10. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  11. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  12. Competing Views of Embryos for the Twenty-First Century: Textbooks and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maienschein, Jane; Wellner, Karen

    2013-01-01

    It might seem that an embryo is an embryo, and that there would be a fact of the matter. That seems especially true with respect to the way embryos are presented in textbooks, including high school biology textbooks. This paper looks at three co-existing, competing, and often conflicting views of embryos. Then with a close study of twentieth…

  13. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  14. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  15. The effect of sevoflurane on developing A/J strain mouse embryos using a whole-embryo culture system--the incidence of cleft lip in culture embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Morimasa; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ohgami, Saori; Kanazawa, Mayuko; Harada, Jun; Ohno, Norikazu; Natsume, Nagato

    2014-03-01

    A/J strain mice have a high spontaneous incidence of cleft lip (ICL) and/or palate. The primary palate-related effects of sevoflurane on developing A/J strain mouse embryos (embryos) were studied using a whole-embryo culture (WEC) system. This system could separate the direct effects of sevoflurane from those that are maternally mediated. A total of 205 10.5-d embryos were cultured for 24 h in either a control group (control gas: 95% O2 and 5% CO2) or sevoflurane-administered groups (1/4, 1/2, and 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) with control gas) for 8 h. After 16 h, 11.5-d culture embryos were examined in terms of crown-rump length, number of somites, and protein content. Crown-rump length in the 1 MAC was significantly shorter than in the control group (p < 0.05). Protein content in the 1/2 MAC (p < 0.05) and 1 MAC (p < 0.001) was significantly lower than in the control group. The ICL showed no significant differences between each group. (The ICL rose with an increase in the sevoflurane concentration, but this was not significant). The positive findings in this study indicate that a WEC system is useful for studying the mechanisms of ICL (teratogenicity) associated with sevoflurane.

  16. A quantitative assessment of the risk of introducing foot and mouth disease virus into the United States via cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Asseged, B; Tameru, B; Nganwa, D; Fite, R; Habtemariam, T

    2012-12-01

    The trade of livestock or their products between nations requires information on the risk of introducing infectious agents such as foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). Although transmission pathways for FMDV vary, a recent concern in the United States (USA) is that it might enter via cloned embryos. A quantitative risk assessment model was developed to determine the scenarios (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of FMDV via the importation of cloned bovine embryos. Using @RISK software with Monte Carlo simulation involving 50,000 iterations, the probability of introducing FMDV via cloned embryos was estimated to be 3.1 x 10(-7). Given the current cloning protocol, and assuming the annual importation of 250 to 1,700 (mean = 520) cloned embryos, the expected number of infected embryos ranges from 1.1 x 10(-7) to 4.4 x 10(-3) (mean = 1.6 x 10(-4)) per year. Critical pathway analysis showed that the risk of FMDV entering the USA by this route is extremely low.

  17. vEmbryo In Silico Models: Predicting Vascular Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cardiovascular system is the first to function in the vertebrate embryo, reflecting the critical need for nutrient delivery and waste removal during organogenesis. Blood vessel development occurs by complex interacting signaling networks, including extra-cellular matrix remod...

  18. Treatments affecting maturation and germination of American chestnut somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Rodney L; Lessard, Veronica C; Merkle, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    The effects of amino acids, abscisic acid (ABA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and elevated sucrose were tested on the maturation and germination of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) somatic embryos. Somatic embryos from three lines were matured over an eight week period through a two-stage process. After maturation, somatic embryos were randomly divided into three groups to measure dry weight/ fresh weight ratios, starch levels, and germination rates. Prior to transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos received a four week cold treatment. While some treatments with amino acids, elevated sucrose, PEG or ABA increased either dry weight/fresh weight ratios, starch content or both, only addition of 25mM L-asparagine significantly increased germination rate and taproot length, and this response was only obtained with one of the three lines tested. Six plants survived the transfer to potting mix, acclimatization to greenhouse conditions and field planting. PMID:15384407

  19. Treatments affecting maturation and germination of American chestnut somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Rodney L; Lessard, Veronica C; Merkle, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    The effects of amino acids, abscisic acid (ABA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and elevated sucrose were tested on the maturation and germination of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) somatic embryos. Somatic embryos from three lines were matured over an eight week period through a two-stage process. After maturation, somatic embryos were randomly divided into three groups to measure dry weight/ fresh weight ratios, starch levels, and germination rates. Prior to transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos received a four week cold treatment. While some treatments with amino acids, elevated sucrose, PEG or ABA increased either dry weight/fresh weight ratios, starch content or both, only addition of 25mM L-asparagine significantly increased germination rate and taproot length, and this response was only obtained with one of the three lines tested. Six plants survived the transfer to potting mix, acclimatization to greenhouse conditions and field planting.

  20. Haeckel's Embryos and Evolution: Setting the Record Straight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Argues that Ernst Haeckel's drawings of vertebrate embryos (1891), which have been widely used in biology textbooks to illustrate his "Biogenetic Law", are factually flawed. Discusses the problems with Haeckel's drawings and his theory. Contains 14 references. (WRM)

  1. Microinjection of A. aegypti embryos to obtain transgenic mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Jasinskiene, Nijole; Juhn, Jennifer; James, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    In this video, Nijole Jasinskiene demonstrates the methodology employed to generate transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which are vectors for dengue fever. The techniques for correctly preparing microinjection needles, desiccating embryos, and performing microinjection are demonstrated.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Assessment to Determine Oocyte and Embryo Viability.

    PubMed

    Fragouli, Elpida; Wells, Dagan

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria are the key regulators of multiple vital cellular processes, including apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, and the generation of ATP via the metabolic pathway known as oxidative phosphorylation. Unlike other cellular organelles, mitochondria contain one or more copies of their own genome (mtDNA). The mtDNA encodes a total of 13 genes with critical functions in cellular metabolism. The energy required to support the normal progress of preimplantation embryo development is provided in the form of ATP generated by the mitochondria. It has been suggested that cellular bioenergetic capacity and suboptimal levels of mitochondria-generated ATP could contribute to a variety of embryo developmental defects, and therefore adversely affect in vitro fertilization success rates. During this review, we discuss the role of mitochondria and their genome during oogenesis and early embryo development. We also assess whether analysis of mitochondria and their genome could be used as biomarkers to determine oocyte quality and embryo viability. PMID:26565384

  3. Embryo research: the ethical geography of the debate.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1997-10-01

    Three basic political positions on embryo research will be identified as libertarian, conservative, and social-democratic. The Human Embryo Research Panel will be regarded as an expression of the social-democratic position. A taxonomy of the ethical issues addressed by the Panel will then be developed at the juncture of political and ethical modes of reflection. Among the arguments considered will be those for the separability of the abortion and embryo research debates; arguments against the possibility of the preembryo being a person, especially arguments associated with totipotency and the significance of the primitive streak; and the various reasons for regulating embryo research, including those associated with respect for the preembryo, the protection of traditional views of human procreation, and the prevention of commercialization.

  4. The moral status of the embryo post-Dolly.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Catherine; Harris, John

    2005-04-01

    Cameron and Williamson have provided a provocative and timely review of the ethical questions prompted by the birth of Dolly. The question Cameron and Williamson seek to address is "In the world of Dolly, when does a human embryo acquire respect?". Their initial discussion sets the scene by providing a valuable overview of attitudes towards the embryo, summarising various religious, scientific, and philosophical viewpoints. They then ask, "What has Dolly changed?" and identify five changes, the first being that fertilisation is no longer required to create an embryo. Following this analysis they then ask when an embryo created other than by fertilisation begins to acquire respect. This paper explores the ethical and legal issues highlighted by Cameron and Williamson's paper.

  5. Environmental influences on the production of pre-implantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Ann-Kathrin; Schwab, Anna; Rittgen, Werner; Kruspel, Andreas; Heuss, Edgar; Schenkel, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    Generation and cryopreservation of transgenic mice depend on reliable and continuous production of pre-implantation embryos. To suppress circannual and circadian rhythms driving the physiological and sexual behaviour of free living animals, laboratory animals are housed under standardized conditions. It remains to be elucidated if the artificial climate can cover all environmental effects. Here, we report that the humidity in an animal facility affects the embryo yield. The weather at the location of the facility, especially the temperature, influences the climate within an animal facility; weather peaks are obviously covered in part only, even if the facility is equipped with a powerful air-conditioning supply. Subsequently, external weather changes interact with the environment within the facility, influencing the production of embryos. Furthermore, noise and/or vibrations as generated by construction works, negatively affect the embryo yield. PMID:20171725

  6. The moral status of the embryo post-Dolly.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Catherine; Harris, John

    2005-04-01

    Cameron and Williamson have provided a provocative and timely review of the ethical questions prompted by the birth of Dolly. The question Cameron and Williamson seek to address is "In the world of Dolly, when does a human embryo acquire respect?". Their initial discussion sets the scene by providing a valuable overview of attitudes towards the embryo, summarising various religious, scientific, and philosophical viewpoints. They then ask, "What has Dolly changed?" and identify five changes, the first being that fertilisation is no longer required to create an embryo. Following this analysis they then ask when an embryo created other than by fertilisation begins to acquire respect. This paper explores the ethical and legal issues highlighted by Cameron and Williamson's paper. PMID:15800363

  7. The risk of introduction of equine infectious anemia virus into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada.

    PubMed

    Asseged, B D; Habtemariam, T; Tameru, B; Nganwa, D

    2012-01-15

    Deriving horse oocytes in the USA is hampered by the lack of abattoirs processing horse carcasses which could provide abundant quantities of ovaries from slaughtered mares. Therefore, several cloning industries in the USA are attempting to import cloned horse embryos from Canada. Like any agricultural commodity, cloned embryos pose a risk of introduction of exotic animal diseases into the importing country. Under such circumstances, risk assessment could provide an objective, transparent, and internationally accepted means for evaluating the risk. This quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was initiated to determine the risk of introduction of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) into the USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada. In assessing the risk, a structured knowledge base regarding cloning in relation to Equine infectious anemia (EIA) was first developed. Based on the knowledge base, a scenario tree was developed to determine conditions (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of EIAV along the cloning pathway. Parameters for the occurrence of the event at each node were estimated using published literature. Using @Risk software and setting Monte Carlo simulation at 50,000 iterations, the probability of importing an EIAV-infected cloned horse embryo was 1.8 × 10(-9) (R = 1.5 × 10(-12) to 2.9 × 10(-8)). Taking into account the current protocol for equine cloning and assuming the yield of 5 to 30 clones per year, the possible number of EIAV-infected cloned horse embryos ranged from 2.0 × 10(-10) to 9.1 × 10(-5) (Mean = 1.4×10(-6)) per year. Consequently, it would take up to 1.5 × 10(7) (R = 1.6 × 10(4) to 5.1 × 10(10)) years for EIAV to be introduced into the USA. Based on the knowledge base and our critical pathway analysis, the biological plausibility of introducing EIAV into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada is extremely low.

  8. The risk of introduction of equine infectious anemia virus into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada

    PubMed Central

    Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Tameru, Berhanu; Nganwa, David

    2011-01-01

    Deriving horse oocytes in the USA is hampered by the lack of abattoirs processing horse carcasses which could provide abundant quantities of ovaries from slaughtered mares. Therefore, several cloning industries in the USA are attempting to import cloned horse embryos from Canada. Like any agricultural commodity, cloned embryos pose a risk of introduction of exotic animal diseases into the importing country. Under such circumstances, risk assessment could provide an objective, transparent, and internationally accepted means for evaluating the risk. This quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was initiated to determine the risk of introduction of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada. In assessing the risk, a structured knowledge base regarding cloning in relation to EIA was first developed. Based on the knowledge base, a scenario tree was developed to determine conditions (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of EIAV along the cloning pathway. Parameters for the occurrence of the event at each node were estimated using published literature. Using @RISK software and setting Monte Carlo simulation at 50 000 iterations, the probability of importing an EIAV-infected cloned horse embryo was 1.8×10−9 (R = 1.5×10−12 to 2.9×10−8). Taking into account the current protocol for equine cloning and assuming the yield of 5 to 30 clones per year, the possible number of EIAV-infected cloned horse embryos ranged from 2.0×10−10 to 9.1×10−5 (Mean = 1.4×10−6) per year. Consequently, it would take up to 1.5×107 (R = 1.6×104 to 5.1×1010) years for EIAV to be introduced into the USA. Based on the knowledge base and our critical pathway analysis, the biological plausibility of introducing EIAV into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada is extremely low. PMID:21958631

  9. Effect of Substrate Stiffness on Early Mouse Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kolahi, Kevin S.; Donjacour, Annemarie; Liu, Xiaowei; Lin, Wingka; Simbulan, Rhodel K.; Bloise, Enrrico; Maltepe, Emin; Rinaudo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that cells are remarkably sensitive to the biophysical cues of their microenvironment and that these cues play a significant role in influencing their behaviors. In this study, we investigated whether the early pre-implantation embryo is sensitive to mechanical cues, i.e. the elasticity of the culture environment. To test this, we have developed a new embryo culture system where the mechanical properties of the embryonic environment can be precisely defined. The contemporary standard environment for embryo culture is the polystyrene petri dish (PD), which has a stiffness (1 GPa) that is six orders of magnitude greater than the uterine epithelium (1 kPa). To approximate more closely the mechanical aspects of the in vivo uterine environment we used polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) or fabricated 3D type I collagen gels (1 kPa stiffness, Col-1k group). Mouse embryo development on alternate substrates was compared to that seen on the petri dish; percent development, hatching frequency, and cell number were observed. Our results indicated that embryos are sensitive to the mechanical environment on which they are cultured. Embryos cultured on Col-1k showed a significantly greater frequency of development to 2-cell (68±15% vs. 59±18%), blastocyst (64±9.1% vs. 50±18%) and hatching blastocyst stages (54±25% vs. 21±16%) and an increase in the number of trophectodermal cell (TE,65±13 vs. 49±12 cells) compared to control embryos cultured in PD (mean±S.D.; p<.01). Embryos cultured on Col-1k and PD were transferred to recipient females and observed on embryonic day 12.5. Both groups had the same number of fetuses, however the placentas of the Col-1k fetuses were larger than controls, suggesting a continued effect of the preimplantation environment. In summary, characteristics of the preimplantation microenvironment affect pre- and post-implantation growth. PMID:22860009

  10. [Research with human embryo stem cells. Foundations and judicial limits].

    PubMed

    Eser, Albin; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2004-01-01

    Research with human embryos, and particularly, the use for scientific purposes of human embryonic stem cells has given raise to different sort of problems at the international level. One of the most strict regulation in this field, is this lecture Professors Albin Eser and Hans-Georg Koch analyse the german legal framework in relation with the use of embryos and human embryonic stem cells for scientific purposes.

  11. The effects of experimentally induced adelphophagy in gastropod embryos.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Olaf; Collin, Rachel; Carrillo-Baltodano, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Adelphophagy, development where embryos grow large by consuming morphologically distinct nutritive embryos or their own normal siblings is widespread but uncommon among animal phyla. Among invertebrates it is particularly common in some families of marine gastropods and segmented worms, but rare or unknown in other closely related families. In calyptraeid gastropods phylogenetic analysis indicates that adelphophagy has arisen at least 9 times from species with planktotrophic larval development. This pattern of frequent parallel evolution of adelphophagy suggests that the embryos of planktotrophic species might be predisposed to evolve adelphophagy. Here we used embryos of three species of planktotrophic calyptraeids, one from each of three major genera in the family (Bostrycapulus, Crucibulum, and Crepidula), to answer the following 3 questions: (1) Can embryos of species with planktotrophic development benefit, in terms of pre-hatching growth, from the ingestion of yolk and tissue from experimentally damaged siblings? (2) Does ingestion of this material from damaged siblings increase variation in pre-hatching size? and (3) Does this experimentally induced adelphophagy alter the allometry between the velum and the shell, increasing morphological similarity to embryos of normally adelphophagic species? We found an overall increase in shell length and velum diameter when embryos feed on damaged siblings within their capsules. There was no detectable increase in variation in shell length or velum diameter, or changes in allometry. The overall effect of our treatment was small compared to the embryonic growth observed in naturally adelphophagic development. However each embryo in our experiment probably consumed less than one sibling on average, whereas natural adelphophages often each consume 10-30 or more siblings. These results suggest that the ability to consume, assimilate, and benefit from yolk and tissue of their siblings is widespread across calyptraeids.

  12. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome have successful embryo arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Wei, Duo; Song, Xiaobing; Xie, Juanke; Zhang, Cuilian

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we investigate the relationship between embryo arrest and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET). In this study, 667 subjects were enrolled, including 330 patients with PCOS and 337 subjects without PCOS. The subjects underwent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer (IVF/ICSI-ET) cycles at the Reproductive Medical Centre of Henan Provincial Hospital from January 2009 to December 2012. Four protocols were used to stimulate the ovaries, including long protocol, super-long down-regulation protocol, short protocol and antagonist protocol. Oocytes were retrieved using transvaginal ultrasound guidance. Pronuclei were checked on the next morning after IVF/ICSI. Cleavage stage embryo was assessed after 62-66 hours. Women with PCOS had significantly elevated body mass index, basal luteinizing hormone, estradiol and testosterone compared with normal women. Basal Follicle stimulating hormone level in PCOS patients was lower compared with that in control group. After IVF-ET, PCOS patients had more available oocytes than subjects in control group. PCOS patients had slightly lower fertilization rate than the controls in IVF cycles, but in ICSI cycles, fertilization rate in PCOS patients was significantly higher than that in controls. For either IVF or ICSI, the embryo arrest rate was not changed by PCOS. Moreover, there was no significant difference in embryo arrest rate between both groups adopting different stimulation protocols. Interestingly, embryo arrest rate was not correlated with testosterone for patients in PCOS group. The data indicated that patients with PCOS had successful early embryo arrest during IVF-ET. PMID:26131233

  13. Spemann's organizer and self-regulation in amphibian embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    In 1924, Spemann and Mangold demonstrated the induction of Siamese twins in transplantation experiments with salamander eggs. Recent work in amphibian embryos has followed their lead and uncovered that cells in signalling centres that are located at the dorsal and ventral poles of the gastrula embryo communicate with each other through a network of secreted growth-factor antagonists, a protease that degrades them, a protease inhibitor and bone-morphogenic-protein signals. PMID:16482093

  14. Following the Motion of Polycomb Bodies in Living Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Cheutin, Thierry; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, observation of cell nuclei in live microscopy evidences motion of nuclear compartments. Drosophila embryos constitute a good model to study nuclear dynamic during cell differentiation because they can easily be observed in live microscopy. Inside the cell nucleus, Polycomb group proteins accumulate in foci named Pc bodies. Here, we describe a method to visualize and analyze the motion of these nuclear compartments inside cell nuclei of Drosophila embryos. PMID:27659993

  15. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Adelphophagy in Gastropod Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Olaf; Collin, Rachel; Carrillo-Baltodano, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Adelphophagy, development where embryos grow large by consuming morphologically distinct nutritive embryos or their own normal siblings is widespread but uncommon among animal phyla. Among invertebrates it is particularly common in some families of marine gastropods and segmented worms, but rare or unknown in other closely related families. In calyptraeid gastropods phylogenetic analysis indicates that adelphophagy has arisen at least 9 times from species with planktotrophic larval development. This pattern of frequent parallel evolution of adelphophagy suggests that the embryos of planktotrophic species might be predisposed to evolve adelphophagy. Here we used embryos of three species of planktotrophic calyptraeids, one from each of three major genera in the family (Bostrycapulus, Crucibulum, and Crepidula), to answer the following 3 questions: (1) Can embryos of species with planktotrophic development benefit, in terms of pre-hatching growth, from the ingestion of yolk and tissue from experimentally damaged siblings? (2) Does ingestion of this material from damaged siblings increase variation in pre-hatching size? and (3) Does this experimentally induced adelphophagy alter the allometry between the velum and the shell, increasing morphological similarity to embryos of normally adelphophagic species? We found an overall increase in shell length and velum diameter when embryos feed on damaged siblings within their capsules. There was no detectable increase in variation in shell length or velum diameter, or changes in allometry. The overall effect of our treatment was small compared to the embryonic growth observed in naturally adelphophagic development. However each embryo in our experiment probably consumed less than one sibling on average, whereas natural adelphophages often each consume 10–30 or more siblings. These results suggest that the ability to consume, assimilate, and benefit from yolk and tissue of their siblings is widespread across calyptraeids

  16. [The human embryo after Dolly: new practices for new times].

    PubMed

    de Miguel Beriain, Iñigo

    2008-01-01

    The possiblity of cloning human beings introduced a lot of issues in our ethical and legal frameworks. In this paper, we will put the focus into the necessary changes in the concept of embryo that our legal systems will have to implement in order to face the new situation. The description of the embryo as a group of cells able to develop into a human being will be defended here as the best way of doing so.

  17. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  18. [The human embryo after Dolly: new practices for new times].

    PubMed

    de Miguel Beriain, Iñigo

    2008-01-01

    The possiblity of cloning human beings introduced a lot of issues in our ethical and legal frameworks. In this paper, we will put the focus into the necessary changes in the concept of embryo that our legal systems will have to implement in order to face the new situation. The description of the embryo as a group of cells able to develop into a human being will be defended here as the best way of doing so. PMID:19334406

  19. Global transcriptome profiles of Italian Mediterranean buffalo embryos with normal and retarded growth.

    PubMed

    Strazzullo, Maria; Gasparrini, Bianca; Neglia, Gianluca; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Francioso, Romina; Rossetti, Cristina; Nassa, Giovanni; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Weisz, Alessandro; Di Francesco, Serena; Vecchio, Domenico; D'Esposito, Maurizio; D'Occhio, Michael John; Zicarelli, Luigi; Campanile, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptome profiles were compared for buffalo embryos with normal growth and embryos with retarded growth on Day 25 after mating. Embryos with retarded growth on Day 25 after mating have a reduced likelihood of undergoing attachment to the uterine endometrium and establishing a pregnancy. Italian Mediterranean buffaloes were mated by AI and on Day 25 underwent trans-rectal ultrasonography to ascertain embryo development. Embryos with an embryonic width (EW)>2.7 mm were classed as normal embryos and embryos with an EW<2.7 mm were classed as retarded embryos. Three buffaloes with embryos of the largest EW (3.7, 3.7 and 3.9 mm) and three buffaloes with embryos of the smallest EW (1.5, 1.6 and 1.9 mm) were slaughtered on Day 27 to recover embryos for transcriptome analysis using a bovine custom designed oligo array. A total of 1,047 transcripts were differentially expressed between embryos with normal growth and embryos with retarded growth. Retarded embryos showed 773/1,047 (74%) transcripts that were down-regulated and 274/1,047 (26%) transcripts that were up-regulated relative to normal embryos; in silico analyses focused on 680/1,047 (65%) of the differentially expressed transcripts. The most altered transcripts observed in retarded embryos were associated with membrane structure and function and with metabolic and homeostasis maintenance functions. Other notable functions altered in retarded embryos were developmental processes and in particular nervous system differentiation and function. Specific biochemical pathways such as the complement cascade and coagulation were also altered in retarded embryos. It was concluded from the findings that buffalo embryos with retarded growth on Day 25 after mating show altered gene expression compared with normal embryos, and some de-regulated functions are associated with attachment to the uterine endometrium. PMID:24587197

  20. Global Transcriptome Profiles of Italian Mediterranean Buffalo Embryos with Normal and Retarded Growth

    PubMed Central

    Neglia, Gianluca; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Francioso, Romina; Rossetti, Cristina; Nassa, Giovanni; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Weisz, Alessandro; Di Francesco, Serena; Vecchio, Domenico; D'Esposito, Maurizio; D'Occhio, Michael John; Zicarelli, Luigi; Campanile, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptome profiles were compared for buffalo embryos with normal growth and embryos with retarded growth on Day 25 after mating. Embryos with retarded growth on Day 25 after mating have a reduced likelihood of undergoing attachment to the uterine endometrium and establishing a pregnancy. Italian Mediterranean buffaloes were mated by AI and on Day 25 underwent trans-rectal ultrasonography to ascertain embryo development. Embryos with an embryonic width (EW)>2.7 mm were classed as normal embryos and embryos with an EW<2.7 mm were classed as retarded embryos. Three buffaloes with embryos of the largest EW (3.7, 3.7 and 3.9 mm) and three buffaloes with embryos of the smallest EW (1.5, 1.6 and 1.9 mm) were slaughtered on Day 27 to recover embryos for transcriptome analysis using a bovine custom designed oligo array. A total of 1,047 transcripts were differentially expressed between embryos with normal growth and embryos with retarded growth. Retarded embryos showed 773/1,047 (74%) transcripts that were down-regulated and 274/1,047 (26%) transcripts that were up-regulated relative to normal embryos; in silico analyses focused on 680/1,047 (65%) of the differentially expressed transcripts. The most altered transcripts observed in retarded embryos were associated with membrane structure and function and with metabolic and homeostasis maintenance functions. Other notable functions altered in retarded embryos were developmental processes and in particular nervous system differentiation and function. Specific biochemical pathways such as the complement cascade and coagulation were also altered in retarded embryos. It was concluded from the findings that buffalo embryos with retarded growth on Day 25 after mating show altered gene expression compared with normal embryos, and some de-regulated functions are associated with attachment to the uterine endometrium. PMID:24587197

  1. Generation of transgenic Hydra by embryo microinjection.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Celina E; Lin, Haifan; Steele, Robert E

    2014-09-11

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the sister group to all bilaterians, Hydra can shed light on fundamental biological processes shared among multicellular animals. Hydra is used as a model for the study of regeneration, pattern formation, and stem cells. However, research efforts have been hampered by lack of a reliable method for gene perturbations to study molecular function. The development of transgenic methods has revitalized the study of Hydra biology(1). Transgenic Hydra allow for the tracking of live cells, sorting to yield pure cell populations for biochemical analysis, manipulation of gene function by knockdown and over-expression, and analysis of promoter function. Plasmid DNA injected into early stage embryos randomly integrates into the genome early in development. This results in hatchlings that express transgenes in patches of tissue in one or more of the three lineages (ectodermal epithelial, endodermal epithelial, or interstitial). The success rate of obtaining a hatchling with transgenic tissue is between 10% and 20%. Asexual propagation of the transgenic hatchling is used to establish a uniformly transgenic line in a particular lineage. Generating transgenic Hydra is surprisingly simple and robust, and here we describe a protocol that can be easily implemented at low cost.

  2. Toxicity of trihalomethanes to common carp embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; Tsai, S.C.; Burch, M.B.; Beauchamp, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    Trihalomethanes recently have been identified in real and simulated effluents from power plants where chlorine is used for biofouling control. Toxicity of the four chlorine- or bromine-containing trihalomethanes (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) to developing common carp (Cyprinus carpio) embryos was determined under conditions of intermittent (8-hour) toxicant renewal, based on percent hatch as the end point. Nominal median lethal concentrations (LC50) ranged from 161 mg/liter for chloroform to 53 mg/liter for dibromochloromethane. Decay studies conducted under conditions similar to those used for the toxicity studies, but in distilled water, indicated that (1) half-lives of the trihalomethanes ranged from 4.4 to 6.9 hours; (2) decay was due primarily to volatilization; (3) higher relative toxicity of dibromochloromethane probably was due to formation of a degradation product (likely Br/sub 2/). Correction of the nominal LC50 values to time-weighted mean concentrations over the period between toxicant changes gave weighted LC50 values of 97.2, 67.4, 33.5, and 52.3 mg/liter for chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform, respectively. In addition, the period of water-hardening of fertilized eggs was not critical for expression of toxicity of dibromochloromethane. Comparison of these and other published data on effluent and toxic concentrations, persistence, and bioaccumulation of water-chlorination products suggests that trihalomethanes are not as environmentally critical as other chlorinated organic compounds or residual chlorine.

  3. Generation of Transgenic Hydra by Embryo Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Celina E.; Lin, Haifan; Steele, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the sister group to all bilaterians, Hydra can shed light on fundamental biological processes shared among multicellular animals. Hydra is used as a model for the study of regeneration, pattern formation, and stem cells. However, research efforts have been hampered by lack of a reliable method for gene perturbations to study molecular function. The development of transgenic methods has revitalized the study of Hydra biology1. Transgenic Hydra allow for the tracking of live cells, sorting to yield pure cell populations for biochemical analysis, manipulation of gene function by knockdown and over-expression, and analysis of promoter function. Plasmid DNA injected into early stage embryos randomly integrates into the genome early in development. This results in hatchlings that express transgenes in patches of tissue in one or more of the three lineages (ectodermal epithelial, endodermal epithelial, or interstitial). The success rate of obtaining a hatchling with transgenic tissue is between 10% and 20%. Asexual propagation of the transgenic hatchling is used to establish a uniformly transgenic line in a particular lineage. Generating transgenic Hydra is surprisingly simple and robust, and here we describe a protocol that can be easily implemented at low cost. PMID:25285460

  4. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  5. Collection and transfer of preimplantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Watson, J G; Wright, R W; Chaykin, S

    1977-10-01

    An improved method of collection and transfer of preimplantation mouse embryos focusing on increasing the predictability of the mating process and utilizing artificial insemination and artifical induction of pseudopregnancy is presented. Donor females were superovulated by the injection of 10 IU pregnant mare's serum followed 60 hours later by 10 IU human chorionic gonadotropin. Immature C3HeB/J females were treated with 6 IU of the 2 hormones on exactly the same schedule. In some foster mothers the estrous cycle was phased with the administration of 1.5 or 3.0 IU of the gonadotropins. Artificial insemination and artificial inductions of pseudopregnancy were performed 12 hours after the 2nd injection. The appropriate time of artificial insemination or induction was predicted in animals untreated with hormones, on the basis of estrous smears. A modification of artificial insemination techniques, refraining from use of the artificial penis and vaginal tampon, was used. Embroys were flushed from the oviducts of females 36 hours after insemination. Attainment of the 2-celled stage was evidence of fertilization. Embroys were maintained in vitro and then transferred to foster mothers at the early blastula stage. 5 embroys were transferred to each uterine horn. Implantation was evaluated. The yield of embroys was doubled through the use of artificial insemination. 1 male was used to inseminate up to 20 females. It was found that selection of recipients from normally cycling females was preferable to hormone priming.

  6. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Akkers, Robert C; Jacobi, Ulrike G; Veenstra, Gert Jan C

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a powerful technique to study epigenetic regulation and transcription factor binding events in the nucleus. It is based on immune-affinity capture of epitopes that have been cross-linked to genomic DNA in vivo. A readout of the extent to which the epitope is associated with particular genomic regions can be obtained by quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR), microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip), or deep sequencing (ChIP-seq). ChIP can be used for molecular and quantitative analyses of histone modifications, transcription factors, and elongating RNA polymerase II at specific loci. It can also be applied to assess the cellular state of transcriptional activation or repression as a predictor of the cells' capabilities and potential. Another possibility is to employ ChIP to characterize genomes, as histone modifications and binding events occur at specific and highly characteristic genomic elements and locations. This chapter provides a step-by-step protocol of ChIP using early Xenopus embryos and discusses potential pitfalls and other issues relevant for successful probing of protein-genome interactions by ChIP-qPCR and ChIP-seq. PMID:22956095

  7. Embryo production by ovum pick up from live donors.

    PubMed

    Galli, C; Crotti, G; Notari, C; Turini, P; Duchi, R; Lazzari, G

    2001-04-01

    Embryo production by in vitro techniques has increased steadily over the years. For cattle where this technology is more advanced and is applied more, the number of in vitro produced embryos transferred to final recipients was over 30,000 in 1998. An increasing proportion of in vitro produced embryos are coming from oocytes collected from live donors by ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration (ovum pick up, OPU). This procedure allows the repeated production of embryos from live donors of particular value and is a serious alternative to superovulation. Ovum pick up is a very flexible technique. It can be performed twice a week for many weeks without side effects on the donor's reproductive career. The donor can be in almost any physiological status and still be suitable for oocyte recovery. A scanner with a sectorial or convex probe and a vacuum pump are required. Collection is performed with minimal stress to the donor. An average of 8 to 10 oocytes are collected per OPU with an average production of 2 transferable embryos. The laboratory production of embryos from such oocytes does not differ from that of oocytes harvested at slaughter as the results after transfer to final recipients. For other species such as buffalo and horses OPU has been attempted similarly to cattle and data will be presented and reviewed. For small ruminants, laparotomy or laparoscopy seems the only reliable route so far to collect oocytes from live donors.

  8. Embryo mechanics: balancing force production with elastic resistance during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lance A

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis requires the spatial and temporal control of embryo mechanics, including force production and mechanical resistance to those forces, to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. Thus, biomechanical processes play a key role in directly shaping the embryo. Additional roles for embryo mechanics during development may include the patterning of positional information and to provide feedback to ensure the success of morphogenetic movements in shaping the larval body and organs. To understand the multiple roles of mechanics during development requires familiarity with engineering principles of the mechanics of structures, the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials, and the integration of force and stress within embryonic structures as morphogenesis progresses. In this chapter, we review the basic engineering principles of biomechanics as they relate to morphogenesis, introduce methods for quantifying embryo mechanics and the limitations of these methods, and outline a formalism for investigating the role of embryo mechanics in birth defects. We encourage the nascent field of embryo mechanics to adopt standard engineering terms and test methods so that studies of diverse organisms can be compared and universal biomechanical principles can be revealed.

  9. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming in bovine SCNT preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Xin; Wang, Fang; An, Xinglan; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Xueming; Sun, Liguang; Li, Ziyi

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation reprogramming plays important roles in mammalian embryogenesis. Mammalian somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos with reprogramming defects fail to develop. Thus, we compared DNA methylation reprogramming in preimplantation embryos from bovine SCNT and in vitro fertilization (IVF) and analyzed the influence of vitamin C (VC) on the reprogramming of DNA methylation. The results showed that global DNA methylation followed a typical pattern of demethylation and remethylation in IVF preimplantation embryos; however, the global genome remained hypermethylated in SCNT preimplantation embryos. Compared with the IVF group, locus DNA methylation reprogramming showed three patterns in the SCNT group. First, some pluripotency genes (POU5F1 and NANOG) and repeated elements (satellite I and α-satellite) showed insufficient demethylation and hypermethylation in the SCNT group. Second, a differentially methylated region (DMR) of an imprint control region (ICR) in H19 exhibited excessive demethylation and hypomethylation. Third, some pluripotency genes (CDX2 and SOX2) were hypomethylated in both the IVF and SCNT groups. Additionally, VC improved the DNA methylation reprogramming of satellite I, α-satellite and H19 but not that of POU5F1 and NANOG in SCNT preimplantation embryos. These results indicate that DNA methylation reprogramming was aberrant and that VC influenced DNA methylation reprogramming in SCNT embryos in a locus-specific manner. PMID:27456302

  10. [Characteristics of morphogenesis of the Japanese quail embryos during microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadasheva, O. A.; Gur'eva, T. S.; Sychev, V. N.; Jehns, G.; Jahns, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Experiments performed in the period of 1995-1996 cooperatively with US investigators within the MIR/SHUTTLE and MIR/NASA space science projects continued exploration of avian embryogenesis in microgravity. Evaluation of Japanese quail embryos incubated in spaceflight microgravity showed that for the most part they were normally developed and compliant with duration of incubation. One of the major morphometric characteristics of embryo are its mass and size. Comparative analysis of body mass values in the space and laboratory and synchronous control groups pointed to a slight retardation. Body length of space embryos mimicked their mass curve. Data on the dynamics of mass and length of Japanese quail embryos support the well-known theory according to which growth and formation are distinguished by equifinality. No differences were revealed by the investigations of individual parts of embryonic bodies in the space and control groups. However, this finding was true only with regard to the embryos that had no developmental abnormalities. A part of embryos had defective eyes (microphtalmia), limbs (twisted fingers), and beaks.

  11. Anaerobiosis and Release from Dormancy in Apple Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, Philippe; Bulard, Camille

    1983-01-01

    An anaerobic treatment released Pyrus malus L. cv Golden Delicious embryos from their primary dormancy. It also suppressed the inhibitory effect induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) on after-ripened embryos. For the study of ABA metabolism, a two-step culture method was developed. Embryos in primary dormancy were cultivated aerobically in the presence of [14C]ABA (first culture). Some were directly analyzed to evaluate metabolism of absorbed ABA. The remaining embryos were cultivated on moist cotton without ABA, either in aerobic or anaerobic conditions (second culture). The amounts of ABA and its metabolites were measured both in the embryos and the water-leachates. After the second culture, the embryos showed a spectacular decrease in ABA content, with no difference between anaerobic and aerobic cultures. The amount of ABA glucose ester increased slightly in aerobiosis but diminished markedly in anaerobiosis. Radioactivity of the butanol fraction, which corresponded to polar conjugates, decreased considerably in anaerobiosis, whereas it increased in aerobiosis. Analysis of the water-leachates indicated that, compared to aerobic conditions, anaerobiosis increased total leaching of radioactive materials (× 4.2) as well as leaching of ABA (× 1.4). In addition, anaerobiosis induced leaching of conjugates, such as ABA glucose ester and butanol-soluble metabolites. We concluded that the anaerobic treatment affects mainly membrane permeability. PMID:16663111

  12. Precision matters for position decoding in the early fly embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Mariela D.; Tkacik, Gasper; Wieschaus, Eric F.; Bialek, William; Gregor, Thomas

    Genetic networks can determine cell fates in multicellular organisms with precision that often reaches the physical limits of the system. However, it is unclear how the organism uses this precision and whether it has biological content. Here we address this question in the developing fly embryo, in which a genetic network of patterning genes reaches 1% precision in positioning cells along the embryo axis. The network consists of three interconnected layers: an input layer of maternal gradients, a processing layer of gap genes, and an output layer of pair-rule genes with seven-striped patterns. From measurements of gap gene protein expression in hundreds of wild-type embryos we construct a ``decoder'', which is a look-up table that determines cellular positions from the concentration means, variances and co-variances. When we apply the decoder to measurements in mutant embryos lacking various combinations of the maternal inputs, we predict quantitative changes in the output layer such as missing, altered or displaced stripes. We confirm these predictions by measuring pair-rule expression in the mutant embryos. Our results thereby show that the precision of the patterning network is biologically meaningful and a necessary feature for decoding cell positions in the early fly embryo.

  13. Preliminary studies on cryopreservation of snakehead (Channa striata) embryos.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sharifuddin, M; Siti Azizah, M N

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the findings of the ongoing studies on cryopreservation of the snakehead, Channa striata embryos. The specific objective of this study was to collect data on the sensitivity of C. striata embryo hatching rate to low temperatures at two different developmental stages in the presence of four different cryoprotectants. Embryos at morula and heartbeat stages were selected and incubated in 1M dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), 1M ethylene glycol (EG), 1M methanol (MeOH) and 0.1M sucrose solutions at different temperatures for a period of time. Embryos were kept at 24 °C (control), 15 °C, 4 °C and -2 °C for 5 min, 1h and 3h. Following these treatments, the embryos were then transferred into a 24 °C water bath until hatch to evaluate the hatching rate. The results showed that there was a significant decrease of hatching rate in both developmental stages following exposure to 4 °C and -2 °C at 1h and 3h exposure in each treatment. Heartbeat stage was more tolerant against chilling at -2 °C for 3h exposure in Me2SO followed by MeOH, sucrose and EG. Further studies will be conducted to find the best method to preserve embryos for long term storage.

  14. Embryo transfer in competition horses: Managing mares and expectations

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M L H

    2014-01-01

    Embryo transfer (ET) is an accepted and successful technique for obtaining foals from mares without interrupting their competition careers. Recent research, however, suggests that the potential of factors including heat, exercise, repeated embryo flushing and repeated manipulation of the reproductive cycle using exogenous hormones to have a negative impact on fertility may have been underestimated. This paper reviews the evidence base for involvement of these factors in repeated failures to recover embryos from nongeriatric competition mares without obvious clinical or pathological indications of reproductive abnormalities. It concludes that, for some mares at least, a cessation of exercise for the periovulatory period and the period between ovulation and embryo flushing, combined with careful management of flushing-induced endometritis, and minimal hormonal manipulation of the reproductive cycle, may be necessary to optimise embryo recovery rates. Mare owners may have been encouraged to request ET for their mares following high-profile examples in the media of elite mares that have produced foals by ET whilst competing. The veterinarian should educate mare owners about the multiple factors that may affect the chances of recovering an embryo from their mares, and should manage the expectations of mare owners so that they do not approach ET programmes in the expectation that there will be no disruption to their training and competition plans. PMID:25977596

  15. Preliminary studies on cryopreservation of snakehead (Channa striata) embryos.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sharifuddin, M; Siti Azizah, M N

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the findings of the ongoing studies on cryopreservation of the snakehead, Channa striata embryos. The specific objective of this study was to collect data on the sensitivity of C. striata embryo hatching rate to low temperatures at two different developmental stages in the presence of four different cryoprotectants. Embryos at morula and heartbeat stages were selected and incubated in 1M dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), 1M ethylene glycol (EG), 1M methanol (MeOH) and 0.1M sucrose solutions at different temperatures for a period of time. Embryos were kept at 24 °C (control), 15 °C, 4 °C and -2 °C for 5 min, 1h and 3h. Following these treatments, the embryos were then transferred into a 24 °C water bath until hatch to evaluate the hatching rate. The results showed that there was a significant decrease of hatching rate in both developmental stages following exposure to 4 °C and -2 °C at 1h and 3h exposure in each treatment. Heartbeat stage was more tolerant against chilling at -2 °C for 3h exposure in Me2SO followed by MeOH, sucrose and EG. Further studies will be conducted to find the best method to preserve embryos for long term storage. PMID:24726775

  16. Molecular biology of the stress response in the early embryo and its stem cells.

    PubMed

    Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Yang, Yu; Jiang, Zhongliang; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Stress is normal during early embryogenesis and transient, elevated stress is commonplace. Stress in the milieu of the peri-implantation embryo is a summation of maternal hormones, and other elements of the maternal milieu, that signal preparedness for development and implantation. Examples discussed here are leptin, adrenaline, cortisol, and progesterone. These hormones signal maternal nutritional status and provide energy, but also signal stress that diverts maternal and embryonic energy from an optimal embryonic developmental trajectory. These hormones communicate endocrine maternal effects and local embryonic effects although signaling mechanisms are not well understood. Other in vivo stresses affect the embryo such as local infection and inflammation, hypoxia, environmental toxins such as benzopyrene, dioxin, or metals, heat shock, and hyperosmotic stress due to dehydration or diabetes. In vitro, stresses include shear during handling, improper culture media and oxygen levels, cryopreservation, and manipulations of the embryo to introduce sperm or mitochondria. We define stress as any stimulus that slows stem cell accumulation or diminishes the ability of cells to produce normal and sufficient parenchymal products upon differentiation. Thus stress deflects downwards the normal trajectories of development, growth and differentiation. Typically stress is inversely proportional to embryonic developmental and proliferative rates, but can be proportional to induction of differentiation of stem cells in the peri-implantation embryo. When modeling stress it is most interesting to produce a 'runting model' where stress exposures slow accumulation but do not create excessive apoptosis or morbidity. Windows of stress sensitivity may occur when major new embryonic developmental programs require large amounts of energy and are exacerbated if nutritional flow decreases and removes energy from the normal developmental programs and stress responses. These windows correspond

  17. Effect of embryo density on in vitro development and gene expression in bovine in vitro-fertilized embryos cultured in a microwell system.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Akai, Tomonori; Hashiyada, Yutaka; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Matsuda, Hideo; Kobayashi, Shuji; Kobayashi, Eiji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2013-01-01

    To identify embryos individually during in vitro development, we previously developed the well-of-the-well (WOW) dish, which contains 25 microwells. Here we investigated the effect of embryo density (the number of embryos per volume of medium) on in vitro development and gene expression of bovine in vitro-fertilized embryos cultured in WOW dishes. Using both conventional droplet and WOW culture formats, 5, 15, and 25 bovine embryos were cultured in 125 μl medium for 168 h. The blastocysts at Day 7 were analyzed for number of cells and expression of ten genes (CDX2, IFN-tau, PLAC8, NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, AKR1B1, ATP5A1, GLUT1 and IGF2R). In droplet culture, the rates of formation of >4-cell cleavage embryos and blastocysts were significantly lower in embryos cultured at 5 embryos per droplet than in those cultured at 15 or 25 embryos per droplet, but not in WOW culture. In both droplet and WOW culture, developmental kinetics and blastocyst cell numbers did not differ among any groups. IFN-tau expression in embryos cultured at 25 embryos per droplet was significantly higher than in those cultured at 15 embryos per droplet and in artificial insemination (AI)-derived blastocysts. Moreover, IGF2R expression was significantly lower in the 25-embryo group than in the 5-embryo group and in AI-derived blastocysts. In WOW culture, these expressions were not affected by embryo density and were similar to those in AI-derived blastocysts. These results suggest that, as compared with conventional droplet culture, in vitro development and expression of IFN-tau and IGF2R in the microwell system may be insensitive to embryo density. PMID:23154384

  18. Effect of Embryo Density on In Vitro Development and Gene Expression in Bovine In Vitro-fertilized Embryos Cultured in a Microwell System

    PubMed Central

    SUGIMURA, Satoshi; AKAI, Tomonori; HASHIYADA, Yutaka; AIKAWA, Yoshio; OHTAKE, Masaki; MATSUDA, Hideo; KOBAYASHI, Shuji; KOBAYASHI, Eiji; KONISHI, Kazuyuki; IMAI, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To identify embryos individually during in vitro development, we previously developed the well-of-the-well (WOW) dish, which contains 25 microwells. Here we investigated the effect of embryo density (the number of embryos per volume of medium) on in vitro development and gene expression of bovine in vitro-fertilized embryos cultured in WOW dishes. Using both conventional droplet and WOW culture formats, 5, 15, and 25 bovine embryos were cultured in 125 µl medium for 168 h. The blastocysts at Day 7 were analyzed for number of cells and expression of ten genes (CDX2, IFN-tau, PLAC8, NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, AKR1B1, ATP5A1, GLUT1 and IGF2R). In droplet culture, the rates of formation of >4-cell cleavage embryos and blastocysts were significantly lower in embryos cultured at 5 embryos per droplet than in those cultured at 15 or 25 embryos per droplet, but not in WOW culture. In both droplet and WOW culture, developmental kinetics and blastocyst cell numbers did not differ among any groups. IFN-tau expression in embryos cultured at 25 embryos per droplet was significantly higher than in those cultured at 15 embryos per droplet and in artificial insemination (AI)-derived blastocysts. Moreover, IGF2R expression was significantly lower in the 25-embryo group than in the 5-embryo group and in AI-derived blastocysts. In WOW culture, these expressions were not affected by embryo density and were similar to those in AI-derived blastocysts. These results suggest that, as compared with conventional droplet culture, in vitro development and expression of IFN-tau and IGF2R in the microwell system may be insensitive to embryo density. PMID:23154384

  19. Outcomes of elective cryopreserved single or double embryo transfers following failure to conceive after fresh single embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Pedro Augusto Araújo; Mirisola, R J; Gonçalves, S P; Baracat, Edmund C; Serafini, Paulo C

    2016-08-01

    The main adverse effect of IVF is the high multiple pregnancy rate resulting from the transfer of two or more embryos. The objective was to evaluate pregnancy rates in infertile women with a good prognosis who failed to conceive in a fresh elective single embryo transfer (eSET) and had a second cycle with elective double vitrified-warmed embryo transfer (eDFET) compared with elective single vitrified-warmed embryo transfer (eSFET). A total of 142 intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using a conventional protocol were evaluated. Good-prognosis patients underwent eSET in a fresh cycle, and those who failed to conceive underwent a second vitrified-warmed embryo transfer: eDFET (n = 102) or eSFET (n = 40). Embryos were transferred and vitrified on day 5 of development. Patients who received eDFET had fewer implantations (30.9%) than eSFET (52.5%; P = 0.004); pregnancy rates were similar (eDFET: 35.3%, eSFET: 42.5%). Patients with the eSFET had one monozygotic twin (5.9%), and 22.2% of eDFET patients had multiple pregnancies. Patients with a good prognosis who failed to conceive in the first fresh eSET did not have an advantage when receiving eDFET in the second cycle, as pregnancy rates were similar; 22.2% of patients in the eDFET group had multiple pregnancies. PMID:27317130

  20. Effect of ambient light exposure of media and embryos on development and quality of porcine parthenogenetically activated embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Liu, Ying; Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard; Callesen, Henrik

    2015-06-01

    Light exposure is a common stress factor during in vitro handling of oocytes and embryos that originates from both microscope and ambient light. In the current study, the effect of two types of ambient light (daylight and laboratory light) on porcine parthenogenetically activated (PA) embryos was tested in two experiments: (1) ambient light on medium subsequently used for embryo in vitro development; and (2) ambient light exposure on activated oocytes before in vitro development. The results from Experiment 1 showed that exposure of culture medium to both types of ambient light decreased the percentage of blastocysts that showed good morphology, only after 24 h exposure. The results from Experiment 2 revealed a reduction in both blastocyst formation and quality when activated oocytes were exposed to both types of ambient light. This effect was seen after only 1 h exposure and increased with time. In conclusion, exposure to ambient light can be harmful to embryo development, both when medium is exposed for a long period of time and, to a greater extent, when the embryo itself is exposed for >1 h. In practice, it is therefore recommended to protect both culture medium and porcine embryos against ambient light during in vitro handling in the laboratory.

  1. Artificial intelligence techniques for embryo and oocyte classification.

    PubMed

    Manna, Claudio; Nanni, Loris; Lumini, Alessandra; Pappalardo, Sebastiana

    2013-01-01

    One of the most relevant aspects in assisted reproduction technology is the possibility of characterizing and identifying the most viable oocytes or embryos. In most cases, embryologists select them by visual examination and their evaluation is totally subjective. Recently, due to the rapid growth in the capacity to extract texture descriptors from a given image, a growing interest has been shown in the use of artificial intelligence methods for embryo or oocyte scoring/selection in IVF programmes. This work concentrates the efforts on the possible prediction of the quality of embryos and oocytes in order to improve the performance of assisted reproduction technology, starting from their images. The artificial intelligence system proposed in this work is based on a set of Levenberg-Marquardt neural networks trained using textural descriptors (the local binary patterns). The proposed system was tested on two data sets of 269 oocytes and 269 corresponding embryos from 104 women and compared with other machine learning methods already proposed in the past for similar classification problems. Although the results are only preliminary, they show an interesting classification performance. This technique may be of particular interest in those countries where legislation restricts embryo selection. One of the most relevant aspects in assisted reproduction technology is the possibility of characterizing and identifying the most viable oocytes or embryos. In most cases, embryologists select them by visual examination and their evaluation is totally subjective. Recently, due to the rapid growth in our capacity to extract texture descriptors from a given image, a growing interest has been shown in the use of artificial intelligence methods for embryo or oocyte scoring/selection in IVF programmes. In this work, we concentrate our efforts on the possible prediction of the quality of embryos and oocytes in order to improve the performance of assisted reproduction technology

  2. Production of chimeric embryos by aggregation of bovine egfp eight-cell stage blastomeres with two-cell fused and asynchronic embryos.

    PubMed

    Hiriart, M I; Bevacqua, R J; Canel, N G; Fernández-Martín, R; Salamone, D F

    2013-09-01

    Embryo disaggregation allows the production of two to four identical offspring from a single cow embryo. In addition, embryo complementation has become the technique of choice to demonstrate the totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to generate a new and simple method by aggregation in the well-of-the-well system to direct each single enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) eight-cell blastomere derived from bovine in vitro fertilization embryos to the inner cell mass (ICM) of chimeras produced with fused and asynchronic embryos. To this end, the best conditions to generate in vitro fertilization-fused embryos were determined. Then, the fused (F) and nonfused (NF) embryos were aggregated in two distinct conditions: synchronically (S), with both transgenic and F embryos produced on the same day, and asynchronically (AS), with transgenic embryos produced one day before F embryos. The highest fusion and blastocysts rates were obtained with two pulses of 40 V. The 2ASF and 2ASNF groups showed the best number of blastocysts expressing the EGFP protein (48% and 41%, respectively). Furthermore, the 2ASF group induced the highest localization rates of the egfp-expressing blastomere in the ICM (6/13, 46% of ICM transgene-expressing blastocysts). This technique will have great application for multiplication of embryos of high genetic value or transgenic embryos and also with the generation of truly bovine embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

  3. Somatic embryos of daylily in space.

    PubMed

    Krikorian, A D

    1999-01-01

    Poor growth and nuclear abnormalities observable in some space-grown plants have been hypothesized as due to a combination of factors such as degree of development, the specific way the plants are grown and the way they experience multiple stresses, some of which are space-specific. Data from a 132-day experiment on 'Mir' using embryogenic cell cultures of daylily (Hemerocallis) allow seemingly contradictory evidence from earlier Shuttle missions to be harmonized: a) the more developed an embryo the less likely it is to suffer catastrophic cell stress during growth, whereas the less developed it is, the greater its vulnerability; (b) the extent to which the stress becomes manifest is also dependent on the extent of pre-existing stresses imposed by suboptimal growing conditions; (c) an appropriate, albeit undesirable, 'stress match' with other non-equilibrium determinants, much like a 'tug of war', can result in genomic variations in space. It is not understood what is/are the feature(s) of the space environment that cause the various cell division perturbations but they have not yet been mimicked on earth. The stress symptoms were found only in space materials and, as predicted, they were most frequently encountered in smaller, less-developed materials grown under non-optimized conditions. It is concluded that, while any substantial deviation from 'optimum' can be a 'stress', spaceflight subjects vulnerable materials to cell division or DNA-repair stress(es) that appear distinctive, but remain elusive so far. Fastidiously-controlled growing environments must be devised to resolve the matter of direct versus indirect effects of space. On a practical level, it is predicted that adapting plant biotechnologies to space conditions will not be a casual matter. Grant Numbers: NAG21026. PMID:11710380

  4. Somatic embryos of daylily in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1999-01-01

    Poor growth and nuclear abnormalities observable in some space-grown plants have been hypothesized as due to a combination of factors such as degree of development, the specific way the plants are grown and the way they experience multiple stresses, some of which are space-specific. Data from a 132-day experiment on `Mir' using embryogenic cell cultures of daylily (Hemerocallis) allow seemingly contradictory evidence from earlier Shuttle missions to be harmonized: a) the more developed an embryo the less likely it is to suffer catastrophic cell stress during growth, whereas the less developed it is, the greater its vulnerability; (b) the extent to which the stress becomes manifest is also dependent on the extent of pre-existing stresses imposed by suboptimal growing conditions; (c) an appropriate, albeit undesirable, `stress match' with other non-equilibrium determinants, much like a `tug of war', can result in genomic variations in space. It is not understood what is/are the feature(s) of the space environment that cause the various cell division perturbations but they have not yet been mimicked on earth. The stress symptoms were found only in space materials and, as predicted, they were most frequently encountered in smaller, less-developed materials grown under non-optimized conditions. It is concluded that, while any substantial deviation from `optimum' can be a `stress', spaceflight subjects vulnerable materials to cell division or DNA-repair stress(es) that appear distinctive, but remain elusive so far. Fastidiously-controlled growing environments must be devised to resolve the matter of direct versus indirect effects of space. On a practical level, it is predicted that adapting plant biotechnologies to space conditions will not be a casual matter.

  5. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Improves Mouse Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin Yu; Diao, Yun Fei; Kim, Hong Rye; Jin, Dong Il

    2012-01-01

    X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) is an important regulator of a subset of genes during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In the current study, we analyzed endogenous XBP-1 expression and localization, with a view to determining the effects of ER stress on the developmental competency of preimplantation embryos in mice. Fluorescence staining revealed that functional XBP-1 is localized on mature oocyte spindles and abundant in the nucleus at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. However, in preimplantation embryos, XBP-1 was solely detected in the cytoplasm at the one-cell stage. The density of XBP-1 was higher in the nucleus than the cytoplasm at the two-cell, four-cell, eight-cell, morula, and blastocyst stages. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis confirmed active XBP-1 mRNA splicing at all preimplantation embryo stages, except the one-cell stage. Tunicamycin (TM), an ER stress inducer used as a positive control, promoted an increase in the density of nuclear XBP-1 at the one-cell and two-cell stages. Similarly, culture medium supplemented with 25 mM sorbitol displayed a remarkable increase active XBP-1 expression in the nuclei of 1-cell and 2-cell embryos. Conversely, high concentrations of TM or sorbitol led to reduced nuclear XBP-1 density and significant ER stress-induced apoptosis. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a known inhibitor of ER stress, improved the rate of two-cell embryo development to blastocysts by attenuating the expression of active XBP-1 protein in the nucleus at the two-cell stage. Our data collectively suggest that endogenous XBP-1 plays a role in normal preimplantation embryonic development. Moreover, XBP-1 splicing is activated to generate a functional form in mouse preimplantation embryos during culture stress. TUDCA inhibits hyperosmolar-induced ER stress as well as ER stress-induced apoptosis during mouse preimplantation embryo development. PMID:22808162

  6. Physical constraints on body size in teleost embryos.

    PubMed

    Kranenbarg, S; Muller, M; Gielen, J L; Verhagen, J H

    2000-05-01

    All members of the subphylum "Vertebrata" display the characteristics of the vertebrate body plan. These characteristics become apparent during the phylotypic period, in which all vertebrate embryos have a similar body shape and internal organization. Phylogenetic constraints probably limit the morphological variation during the phylotypic period. Physical laws, however, also limit growth and morphogenesis in embryos. We investigated to what extent oxygen availability-as a physical constraint-might limit morphological variation during embryonic development. This paper gives an analysis of time-dependent diffusion into spherical embryos without a circulatory system. Equilibrium appeared to settle in about 1.5 min in running water and in about 10min in stagnant water. Hence, steady-state conditions were assumed and expressions for maximum body size were obtained for spherical, cylindrical and sheet-like embryos in running water and spherical embyros in stagnant water. Predictions of the model based on literature data suggest that in running water-both for spherical, cylindrical and sheet-like embryos-diffusion alone suffices to cover the oxygen needs of a teleost embryo in its phylotypic period. The size of carp (Cyprinus carpio) and African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) embryos is very close to the predicted maximum. This suggests that in these species the development of a functional circulatory system is correlated with the onset of oxygen shortage. Oxygen availability is therefore a potentially important physical constraint on embryonic morphology, though in most species the circulatory system becomes functional well in advance of the onset of oxygen shortage and other demands than oxygen delivery (e.g. nutrient distribution, waste disposal, osmoregulation) might require the development of a circulatory system. PMID:10772852

  7. Cryomicroscopic observations of cattle embryos during freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Lehn-Jensen, H; Rall, W F

    1983-02-01

    A cryomicroscope was used to observe changes in the appearance of day 6 1 2 to 7 1 2 cattle embryos during cooling and warming in 1.4M glycerol/PBS. Embryos were cooled at various rates between 0.2 and 25 degrees C/min to temperatures between -25 and -60 degrees C and then cooled rapidly ( approximately 250 degrees C/min) to temperatures below -140 degrees C. The volume of the embryos calculated from the cross-sectional area during slow cooling decreased at -25 degrees C to about 50% of the isotonic volume. Fracture planes could be observed in the extracellular ice matrix surrounding the embryos after rapid cooling to approximately -140 degrees C. The fracture planes often touched the zona pellucida and sometimes caused cracks in the zona. Cracks in the zona pellucida were observed more often after rapid cooling from temperatures between -20 to -35 degrees C (9 13 ) than from temperatures between -36 to -60 degrees C (2 7 ). When embryos were warmed rapidly ( approximately 250 degrees C/min) from temperatures below -140 degrees C, no change was observed in the appearance of either the embryo or its surroundings except the melting of the extracellular ice. However, when embryos were warmed slowly (2 or 5 degrees C/min), a series of events was observed; first, at approximately -70 degrees C the cytoplasm and the extracellular space gradually darkened and reached maximum darkness at approximately -55 degrees C. Then, on continued slow warming, the dark material gradually disappeared and finally the large extracellular ice crystals melted.

  8. Effects of perfluorinated compounds on development of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin-Mei; Liu, Hong-Ling; Shi, Wei; Wei, Si; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hong-Xia

    2011-08-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been widely used in industrial and consumer products and frequently detected in many environmental media. Potential reproductive effects of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) have been reported in mice, rats and water birds. PFOS and PFOA were also confirmed developing toxicants towards zebrafish embryos; however, the reported effect concentrations were contradictory. Polyfluorinated alkylated phosphate ester surfactants (including FC807) are precursor of PFOS and PFOA; however, there is no published information about the effects of FC807 and PFNA on zebrafish embryos. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effects of these four PFCs on zebrafish embryos. Normal fertilized zebrafish embryos were selected to be exposed to several concentrations of PFOA, PFNA, PFOS or FC807 in 24-well cell culture plates. A digital camera was used to image morphological anomalies of embryos with a stereomicroscope. Embryos were observed through matching up to 96-h post-fertilization (hpf) and rates of survival and abnormalities recorded. PFCs caused lethality in a concentration-dependent manner with potential toxicity in the order of PFOS > FC807 > PFNA > PFOA based on 72-h LC(50). Forty-eight-hour post-fertilization pericardial edema and 72- or 96-hpf spine crooked malformation were all observed. PFOA, PFNA, PFOS and FC807 all caused structural abnormalities using early stages of development of zebrafish. The PFCs all retarded the development of zebrafish embryos. The toxicity of the PFCs was related to the length of the PFC chain and functional groups. PMID:22828880

  9. [How can we nowadays select the best embryo to transfer?].

    PubMed

    Alter, L; Boitrelle, F; Sifer, C

    2014-01-01

    Multiple pregnancies stand as the most common adverse outcome of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) and the dangers associated with those pregnancies have been reduced by doing elective single embryo transfers (e-SET). Many studies have shown that e-SET is compatible with a continuously high pregnancy rate per embryo transfer. Yet, it still becomes necessary to improve the selection process in order to define the quality of individual embryos - so that the ones we choose for transfer are more likely to implant. First, analysis of embryo morphology has greatly helped in this identification and remains the most relevant criterion for choosing the embryo. The introduction of time-lapse imaging provides new criteria predictive of implantation potential, but the real contribution of this system - including the benefit/cost ratio - seems to be not yet properly established. In this context, extended culture until blastocyst stage is an essential practice but it appears wise to keep it for a population showing a good prognosis. Then, the failure of aneuploid embryos to implant properly led to achieve preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) in order to increase pregnancy and delivery rates after ART. However, PGS by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) at day 3 is a useless process - and may even be harmful. Another solution involves using comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and moving to blastocyst biopsy. Finally, it is envisaged that morphology will also be significantly aided by non-invasive analysis of biomarkers in the culture media that give a better reflection of whole-embryo physiology and function. PMID:24951187

  10. Lipid droplet analysis using in vitro bovine oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Leon, E A; Merchant, H; Medrano, A; Kjelland, M; Romo, S

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the content of lipid droplets in bovine oocytes and embryos from Bos indicus (Bi), Bos taurus (Bt) and Bos indicus × Bos taurus (Bi × Bt). Oocytes were aspirated post-mortem and subjected to in vitro maturation, in vitro fertilization and in vitro development; the medium employed at each stage (TCM-199, TALP, SOF) was supplemented with (i) serum replacement (SR), (ii) foetal calf serum (FCS) or (iii) oestrous cow serum (ECS). The structure and distribution of the lipid droplets were established using electron microscopy, but were quantified using an optical microscope on semi-fine toluidine blue-stained sections. The highest percentage of embryos corresponded to those produced with FCS and ECS, which differed from embryos generated with SR (p < 0.05). The highest percentage of morulae and the lowest percentage of blastocysts were obtained with the SR supplement (p < 0.05). The oocytes cultured in FCS demonstrated a higher number of lipid droplets compared to those cultured in SR and ECS (p < 0.05). Less accumulation of lipids was observed in embryos supplemented with SR. The lowest and highest numbers of lipid droplets in oocytes corresponded to the Bi and Bt strain, respectively. The lowest amount of lipid droplets in embryos was observed in Bi (p < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation of the in vitro development culture medium (synthetic oviduct fluid) with a synthetic substitute serum produced similar results in terms of embryo development compared to those obtained with FCS, but a decreased degree of lipid droplet accumulation was observed in the in vitro-cultured embryos. PMID:24467659

  11. Live embryo imaging to follow cell cycle and chromosomes stability after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Balbach, Sebastian T; Boiani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) into mouse oocytes yields a transcriptionally and functionally heterogeneous population of cloned embryos. Most studies of NT embryos consider only embryos at predefined key stages (e.g., morula or blastocyst), that is, after the bulk of reprogramming has taken place. These retrospective approaches are of limited use to elucidate mechanisms of reprogramming and to predict developmental success. Observing cloned embryo development using live embryo cinematography has the potential to reveal otherwise undetectable embryo features. However, light exposure necessary for live cell cinematography is highly toxic to cloned embryos. Here we describe a protocol for combined bright-field and fluorescence live-cell imaging of histone H2b-GFP expressing mouse embryos, to record cell divisions up to the blastocyst stage. This protocol, which can be adapted to observe other reporters such as Oct4-GFP or Nanog-GFP, allowed us to quantitatively analyze cleavage kinetics of cloned embryos. PMID:25287344

  12. The effects of superovulation of donor sows on ovarian response and embryo development after nonsurgical deep-uterine embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Angel, M A; Gil, M A; Cuello, C; Sanchez-Osorio, J; Gomis, J; Parrilla, I; Vila, J; Colina, I; Diaz, M; Reixach, J; Vazquez, J L; Vazquez, J M; Roca, J; Martinez, E A

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of superovulation protocols in improving the efficiency of embryo donors for porcine nonsurgical deep-uterine (NsDU) embryo transfer (ET) programs. After weaning (24 hours), purebred Duroc sows (2-6 parity) were treated with 1000 IU (n = 27) or 1500 IU (n = 27) of eCG. Only sows with clear signs of estrus 4 to 72 hours after eCG administration were treated with 750 IU hCG at the onset of estrus. Nonhormonally treated postweaning estrus sows (n = 36) were used as a control. Sows were inseminated and subjected to laparotomy on Days 5 to 6 (Day 0 = onset of estrus). Three sows (11.1%) treated with the highest dosage of eCG presented with polycystic ovaries without signs of ovulation. The remaining sows from nonsuperovulated and superovulated groups were all pregnant, with no differences in fertilization rates among groups. The number of CLs and viable embryos was higher (P < 0.05) in the superovulated groups compared with the controls and increased (P < 0.05) with increasing doses of eCG. There were no differences among groups in the number of oocytes and/or degenerated embryos. The number of transferable embryos (morulae and unhatched blastocysts) obtained in pregnant sows was higher (P < 0.05) in the superovulated groups than in the control group. In all groups, there was a significant correlation between the number of CLs and the number of viable and transferable embryos, but the number of CLs and the number of oocytes and/or degenerated embryos were not correlated. A total of 46 NsDU ETs were performed in nonhormonally treated recipient sows, with embryos (30 embryos per transfer) recovered from the 1000-IU eCG, 1500-IU eCG, and control groups. In total, pregnancy and farrowing rates were 75.1% and 73.2%, respectively, with a litter size of 9.4 ± 0.6 piglets born, of which 8.8 ± 0.5 were born alive. There were no differences for any of the reproductive parameters evaluated among groups. In conclusion, our results

  13. Characterization of somatic embryo attached structures in Feijoa sellowiana Berg. (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Correia, Sandra M; Canhoto, Jorge M

    2010-06-01

    The presence of an attached organ to somatic embryos of angiosperms connecting the embryo to the supporting tissue has been a subject of controversy. This study shows that 67% of the morphologically normal somatic embryos of Feijoa sellowiana possess this type of organ and that its formation was not affected by culture media composition. Histological and ultrastructural analysis indicated that the attached structures of somatic embryos displayed a great morphological diversity ranging from a few cells to massive and columnar structures. This contrast with the simple suspensors observed in zygotic embryos which were only formed by five cells. As well as the suspensor of zygotic embryos, somatic embryo attached structures undergo a process of degeneration in later stages of embryo development. Other characteristic shared by zygotic suspensors and somatic embryo attached structures was the presence of thick cell walls surrounding the cells. Elongated thin filaments were often associated with the structures attached to somatic embryos, whereas in other cases, tubular cells containing starch grains connected the embryo to the supporting tissue. These characteristics associated with the presence of plasmodesmata in the cells of the attached structures seem to indicate a role on embryo nutrition. However, cell proliferation in the attached structures resulting into new somatic embryos may also suggest a more complex relationship between the embryo and the structures connecting it to the supporting tissue.

  14. Fresh embryo donation for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research: the experiences and values of IVF couples asked to be embryo donors

    PubMed Central

    Haimes, E.; Taylor, K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND This article reports on an investigation of the views of IVF couples asked to donate fresh embryos for research and contributes to the debates on: the acceptability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, the moral status of the human embryo and embryo donation for research. METHODS A hypothesis-generating design was followed. All IVF couples in one UK clinic who were asked to donate embryos in 1 year were contacted 6 weeks after their pregnancy result. Forty four in-depth interviews were conducted. RESULTS Interviewees were preoccupied with IVF treatment and the request to donate was a secondary consideration. They used a complex and dynamic system of embryo classification. Initially, all embryos were important but then their focus shifted to those that had most potential to produce a baby. At that point, ‘other’ embryos were less important though they later realise that they did not know what happened to them. Guessing that these embryos went to research, interviewees preferred not to contemplate what that might entail. The embryos that caused interviewees most concern were good quality embryos that might have produced a baby but went to research instead. ‘The’ embryo, the morally laden, but abstract, entity, did not play a central role in their decision-making. CONCLUSIONS This study, despite missing those who refuse to donate embryos, suggests that debates on embryo donation for hESC research should include the views of embryo donors and should consider the social, as well as the moral, status of the human embryo. PMID:19502616

  15. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  16. Phytohemagglutinin facilitates the aggregation of blastomere pairs from Day 5 donor embryos with Day 4 host embryos for chimeric bovine embryo multiplication.

    PubMed

    Simmet, Kilian; Reichenbach, Myriam; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-12-01

    Multiplication of bovine embryos by the production of aggregation chimeras is based on the concept that few blastomeres of a donor embryo form the inner cell mass (ICM) and thus the embryo proper, whereas cells of a host embryo preferentially contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), the progenitor cells of the embryonic part of the placenta. We aggregated two fluorescent blastomeres from enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic Day 5 morulae with two Day 4 embryos that did not complete their first cleavage until 27 hours after IVF and tested the effect of phytohemagglutinin-L (PHA) on chimeric embryo formation. The resulting blastocysts were characterized by differential staining of cell lineages using the TE-specific factor CDX2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy to facilitate the precise localization of eGFP-positive cells. The proportions of blastocyst development of sandwich aggregates with (n = 99) and without PHA (n = 46) were 85.9% and 54.3% (P < 0.05), respectively. Epifluorescence microscopy showed that the proportion of blastocysts with eGFP-positive cells in the ICM was higher in the PHA group than in the no-PHA group (40% vs. 16%; P < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the total cell numbers of blastocysts from the PHA group of aggregation chimeras (n = 17; 207.8 ± 67.3 [mean ± standard deviation]) were higher (P < 0.05) than those of embryos without ZP and exposed to PHA (n = 30; 159.6 ± 42.2) and of handling control embryos (n = 19; 176.9 ± 53.3). The same was true for ICM cell counts (56.5 ± 22.0 vs. 37.7 ± 14.2 and 38.7 ± 12.4) and TE cell counts (151.2 ± 58.0 vs. 121.9 ± 37.4 and 138.3 ± 53.0), whereas the ICM/total cell number ratio was not different between the groups. Of the 17 chimeric blastocysts analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, nine had eGFP-positive cells (three of them in the ICM, three in the TE, and three in both lineages). When integration in

  17. Toxicity of 15 veterinary pharmaceuticals in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunnar; Patring, Johan; Kreuger, Jenny; Norrgren, Leif; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2013-01-15

    Extensive use of veterinary pharmaceuticals may result in contamination of water bodies adjacent to pasture land or areas where animal manure has been applied. In order to evaluate the potential risk to fish embryos 15 veterinary pharmaceuticals were investigated by use of an extended zebrafish embryo toxicity test. Chemical analysis of the exposure medium was performed by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) for 11 of the compounds and potential metabolism by the embryos was studied for albendazole, febantel, fenbendazole and oxfendazole. Newly fertilized zebrafish eggs were exposed under static conditions in 96-well plates for 6 days to the pharmaceuticals: 5 antibacterials and 10 antiparasitics. Endpoints including mortality, malformations and other sublethal responses were recorded at 24, 48 and 144 h post fertilization (hpf). The pharmaceuticals causing the highest toxicity were antiparasitics whereas the tested antibacterials, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, tylosine, trimethoprim and oxytetracyclin had a much lower toxic potency in zebrafish embryos. Most toxic were fenbendazole, albendazole and flumethrin with no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) around 0.02 mg/L. The overall NOEC was determined by lethality for the following pharmaceuticals: albendazole, fenbendazole and oxfendazole. Sublethal endpoints, including malformations, side-laying embryos, tremors, reduced movements and altered heart rate increased the sensitivity of the tests and determined the overall NOECs for febantel, doramectin, ivermectin, flumethrin and toltrazuril. Exposure to doramectin and ivermectin caused a decrease in movements at 24 hpf and a decrease in heart rate at 48 hpf. Flumethrin exposure resulted in decreased time to hatching, except at the highest concentrations, and caused an increase in heart rate at 48 hpf. In contrast, toltrazuril caused an increased time to hatching and a decrease in heart rate. Chemical analysis of the

  18. Creating and selling embryos for "donation": ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Robert; Sauer, Mark V

    2015-02-01

    The commercial creation and sale of embryos has begun, which poses a series of ethical questions that have received little scholarly attention. Some of the concerns that arise are similar to those posed by the sale of gametes, while other issues differ markedly. Questions emerge, first, regarding the rights of the unborn children and their ability to know their biological parents. Companies that create human embryos de novo may wish to keep gamete providers anonymous. Many of these offspring thus will never learn that their parents are not their biologic parents. Yet, such disclosures, regarding not only one but both of these biologic parents, may be important for these individuals; and a lack of this knowledge may impede their physical and psychological health. Second, questions surface regarding the fees that providers should charge for embryos and whether these amounts should vary based on the traits of 1 or both of the gamete donors. Some prospective parents may seek specific traits in a baby (eg, height or eye/hair coloring), which prompts the creation of embryos from 2 gamete donors who possess these characteristics. Third, ownership of embryos created without an advanced directive by patients poses dilemmas (eg, disposition of any remaining embryos). Fourth, guidelines do not yet exist to limit the number of embryos sold from each pair of gamete donors. Hence, unbeknownst to each other, full siblings could potentially meet, get married, and procreate. This discussion has several critical implications for future practice and professional education and policy. Patients with diseases associated with genetic tests may well ask obstetricians, gynecologists, and other physicians about these techniques and practices. Clinicians can refer such patients to assisted reproductive technology specialists; however, familiarity with the basic aspects of the issues and complexities involved could aid these providers and their patients Several of these issues can be

  19. Creating and Selling Embryos for “Donation”: Ethical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Robert; Sauer, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The commercial creation and sale of embryos has begun, posing a series of ethical questions that have received little scholarly attention. Some of the concerns that arise are similar to those posed by the sale of gametes, while other issues differ markedly. Questions emerge, firstly, regarding the rights of the unborn children – their ability to know their biological parents. Companies that create human embryos de novo may wish to keep gamete providers anonymous. Many of these offspring will thus never learn that their parents are not their biological parents. Yet, such disclosures – regarding not only one, but both of these biological parents – may be important for these individuals; and lack of this knowledge may impede their physical and psychological health. Secondly, questions surface regarding the fees that providers should charge for embryos, and whether these amounts should vary based on the traits of one or both of the gamete donors. Some prospective parents may seek specific traits in a baby (e.g., height or eye/hair coloring), prompting creation of embryos from two gamete donors who possess these characteristics. Thirdly, ownership of embryos created without an advanced directive by patients poses dilemmas – e.g., disposition of any remaining embryos. Fourthly, guidelines do not yet exist to limit the number of embryos sold from each pair of gamete donors. Hence, unbeknownst to each other, full siblings could potentially meet, get married and procreate. This discussion has several critical implications for future practice, and professional education and policy. Patients with diseases associated with genetic tests may well ask obstetricians, gynecologists and other physicians about these techniques and practices. Clinicians can refer such patients to Assisted Reproductive Technology specialists, but familiarity with the basic aspects of the issues and complexities involved could aid themselves and their patients Several of these issues can be

  20. Metabolomics: approaches to assessing oocyte and embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Sinclair, K D

    2007-09-01

    Morphological evaluation remains the primary method of embryo assessment during IVF cycles, but its modest predictive power and inherent inter- and intra-observer variability limits its value. Low-molecular weight metabolites represent the end products of cell regulatory processes and therefore reveal the response of biological systems to a variety of genetic, nutrient or environmental influences. It follows that the non-invasive quantification of oocyte and embryo metabolism, from the analyses of follicular fluid or culture media, may be a useful predictor of pregnancy outcome following embryo transfer, a potential supported by recent clinical studies working with specific classes of metabolites such as glycolytic intermediates and amino acids. Such selective approaches, however, whilst adhering closely to known cellular processes, may fail to harness the full potential of contemporary metabolomic methodologies, which can measure a wider spectrum of metabolites. However, an important technical drawback with many existing methodologies is the limited number of metabolites that can be determined by a single analytical platform. Vibrational spectroscopy methodologies such as Fourier transform infrared and near infrared spectroscopy may overcome these limitations by generating unique spectral signatures of functional groups and bonds, but their application in embryo quality assessment remains to be fully validated. Ultimately, a combination of evaluation criteria that include morphometry with metabolomics may provide the best predictive assessment of embryo viability.

  1. Oviductal response to gametes and early embryos in mammals.

    PubMed

    Maillo, Veronica; Sánchez-Calabuig, Maria Jesus; Lopera-Vasquez, Ricaurte; Hamdi, Meriem; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Lonergan, Patrick; Rizos, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    The oviduct is a complex and organized thin tubular structure connecting the ovary with the uterus. It is the site of final sperm capacitation, oocyte fertilization and, in most species, the first 3-4days of early embryo development. The oviductal epithelium is made up of ciliary and secretory cells responsible for the secretion of proteins and other factors which contribute to the formation of the oviductal fluid. Despite significant research, most of the pathways and oviductal factors implicated in the crosstalk between gametes/early embryo and the oviduct remain unknown. Therefore, studying the oviductal environment is crucial to improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling fertilization and embryo development. In vitro systems are a valuable tool to study in vivo pathways and mechanisms, particularly those in the oviducts which in livestock species are challenging to access. In studies of gamete and embryo interaction with the reproductive tract, oviductal epithelial cells, oviductal fluid and microvesicles co-cultured with gametes/embryos represent the most appropriate in vitro models to mimic the physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:27512123

  2. The Arabidopsis embryo as a miniature morphogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Wendrich, Jos R; Weijers, Dolf

    2013-07-01

    Four basic ingredients of morphogenesis, oriented cell division and expansion, cell-cell communication and cell fate specification allow plant cells to develop into a wide variety of organismal architectures. A central question in plant biology is how these cellular processes are regulated and orchestrated. Here, we present the advantages of the early Arabidopsis embryo as a model for studying the control of morphogenesis. All ingredients of morphogenesis converge during embryogenesis, and the highly predictable nature of embryo development offers unprecedented opportunities for understanding their regulation in time and space. In this review we describe the morphogenetic principles underlying embryo patterning and discuss recent advances in their regulation. Morphogenesis is under tight transcriptional control and most genes that were identified as important regulators of embryo patterning encode transcription factors or components of signaling pathways. There exists, therefore, a large gap between the transcriptional control of embryo morphogenesis and the cellular execution. We describe the first such connections, and propose future directions that should help bridge this gap and generate comprehensive understanding of the control of morphogenesis.

  3. Developmental defects in pelagic fish embryos from the western Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. Westernhagen, H.; Dethlefsen, V.; Cameron, P.; Berg, J.; Fürstenberg, G.

    1988-03-01

    In February/March 1983 and 1984 a survey of pelagic fish eggs was conducted in the western Baltic (Kiel Bight), employing a horizontally towed plankton net (1 m Ø and 300 μm mesh). Maximum egg numbers in the upper meter of the S=21×10-3 salinity layer were 200·100 m-3. The most abundant eggs were cod (up to 142 eggs·100 m-3), followed by plaice (up to 74 eggs·100 m-3) and flounder (20 eggs·100 m-3). A considerable percentage of embryos of all species displayed aberrant development. In 1983 18% of cod, 22% of flounder and 24% of plaice eggs caught contained defective embryos; in 1984 this number was larger, ranging from 28% in plaice over 32% in cod to 44% in flounder. Early developmental stages showed the highest malformation rates (up to 51% in the case of early flounder embryos). With progressive development, malformations decreased in numbers, being lowest prior to hatching. Highest rates of malformations were recorded in the Mecklenburg Bight in 1983. A second area with high incidence of malformation rates was located south and east of the island of Langeland. Several reasons, including environmental and anthropogenic factors, for the occurrence of malformed embryos in pelagic fish eggs are discussed. The potential of malformation rates in embryos of pelagic fish eggs as a tool for monitoring is considered.

  4. Chlormequat chloride retards rat embryo growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiagedeer, Bayindala; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Yingjuan; Hao, Weidong

    2016-08-01

    Chlormequat chloride is the most widely used plant growth regulator in agriculture to promote sturdier growth of grain crops by avoidance of lodging. Therefore, human exposure to chlormequat chloride is very common, but its developmental toxicity has not been studied. Thus, we investigated the developmental toxicity of chlormequat chloride by applying rat whole embryo culture (WEC) model, limb bud micromass culture and 3T3 fibroblast cytotoxicity test. Chlormequat chloride at 150μg/ml (0.93mM) retarded the rat embryo growth without causing significant morphological malformations and at 500μg/ml (3.1mM) caused both retardation and morphological malformation of the embryos. However, the proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells were not affected by chlormequat chloride at as high as up to 1000μg/ml (6.2mM) applied. This concentration of chlormequat chloride did not affect the cell viability as examined by 3T3 fibroblast cytotoxicity test either, suggesting that cellular toxicity may not play a role in chlormequat induced inhibition of rat embryo growth. Collectively, our results demonstrated that chlormequat chloride may affect embryo growth and development without inhibiting cell viability.

  5. Reduction of high order multiples in frozen embryo transfers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anthony R; Wilkinson, Shan S; Price, Sandy; Crain, Jack L

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if blastocyst frozen embryo transfers are able to reduce the potential for the rate of high order multiples (HOM) (>2 fetal sacs) without affecting the overall pregnancy and implantation potential. Group A included all frozen blastocyst transfers prior to 1 January 2002. Group B included all frozen blastocyst transfers between 1 January 2002 and 12 December 2003. There was no significant difference for survival for the two time periods (79 versus 80%). A significantly (P<0.05) lower number of embryos were transferred in group B (1.9) compared with group A (2.8). There was a significant (P<0.05) reduction of (HOM) from 31 to 3% for groups A and B respectively. Ongoing pregnancy rates for group A resulted in 52% of 25 embryo transfers and 41% of 75 embryo transfers in group B (not significant). Reducing the number of embryos transferred between groups A and B did not significantly impact implantation rates. It is concluded that blastocyst freezing is effective for overall survival, pregnancy and implantation while reducing the rate of high order multiples.

  6. Filial cannibalism improves survival and development of beaugregory damselfish embryos.

    PubMed

    Payne, Adam G; Smith, Carl; Campbell, Andrew C

    2002-10-22

    Cannibalism of small numbers of offspring by a parent has been proposed as an adaptive parental strategy, by providing energy to support parental care. However, there are few empirical studies to support this hypothesis. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to investigate partial filial cannibalism in Stegastes leucostictus, a coral reef fish with paternal care. Partial cannibalism was shown to be common, and males were found to remove developing embryos from throughout a clutch in a random pattern, rather than in the more aggregated pattern seen during embryo predation. Males that received a diet supplement grew faster than control males, but did not engage in less cannibalism. Also, males did not concentrate cannibalism on early embryonic stages with the highest energetic value. Experimental reduction of embryo densities was found to significantly increase embryo development rate and survival from egg deposition to hatching, and experimental reduction of oxygen levels significantly increased rates of partial filial cannibalism by males. Artificial spawning sites with low oxygen levels were avoided by spawning females, and cannibalism rates by males were higher. We propose that partial filial cannibalism serves as an adaptive parental strategy to low oxygen levels in S. leucostictus by increasing the hatching success of embryos. PMID:12396483

  7. Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks as a Mechanism for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Christopher; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the plausibility of a planetary embryo bow shock as a mechanism for chondrule formation in the early solar system. A Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty early environment of the solar system will experience supersonic velocities relative to the circularly orbiting gas and dust. The resulting bow shock can thermally process solids that pass through it, with a wide range of possible conditions depending on impact radius. Volatile outgassing by the embryo along with some gas capture from the surrounding nebula can produce temporary atmospheres. We use radiation hydrodynamics simulations with direct particle integration to model the consequences of solids that encounter a bow shock produced by a 3000 km embryo with relative speeds to the gas of 5, 6, and 7 km/s. The embryos are envisaged to be surrounded by low- and high-mass atmospheres (0.75 and 6.25 Martian-mass atmospheres, respectively), and we explore different opacities for the gas. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and low dust opacity can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are most consistent with constraints set by chondrule furnace studies for plausible shock speeds.

  8. Developmental imaging: the avian embryo hatches to the challenge.

    PubMed

    Kulesa, Paul M; McKinney, Mary C; McLennan, Rebecca

    2013-06-01

    The avian embryo provides a multifaceted model to study developmental mechanisms because of its accessibility to microsurgery, fluorescence cell labeling, in vivo imaging, and molecular manipulation. Early two-dimensional planar growth of the avian embryo mimics human development and provides unique access to complex cell migration patterns using light microscopy. Later developmental events continue to permit access to both light and other imaging modalities, making the avian embryo an excellent model for developmental imaging. For example, significant insights into cell and tissue behaviors within the primitive streak, craniofacial region, and cardiovascular and peripheral nervous systems have come from avian embryo studies. In this review, we provide an update to recent advances in embryo and tissue slice culture and imaging, fluorescence cell labeling, and gene profiling. We focus on how technical advances in the chick and quail provide a clearer understanding of how embryonic cell dynamics are beautifully choreographed in space and time to sculpt cells into functioning structures. We summarize how these technical advances help us to better understand basic developmental mechanisms that may lead to clinical research into human birth defects and tissue repair.

  9. T-Cell Development in Early Partially Decapitated Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier; Vicente, Angeles; Varas, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated the immunohistological and cytofluorometric changes that occur in the thymus of chicken embryos partially decapitated at 33-38 hr of incubation (DCx embryos) in an attempt to analyze possible neuroendocrinological influences on T-cell differentiation and, indirectly, the ontogeny of the so-called neuroendocrine-immune network. The thymus of DCx embryos shows important variations that profoundly and selectively affect different T-cell subsets, but not the nonlymphoid cell components of thymic stroma. These modifications include the accumulation of cell precursors, mainly DN (CD4- CD8-) cells and immature CD8high CD4- cells, which expand but do not differentiate, resulting in an extreme decline of both DP (CD4+ CD8+) cells and TcR c-expressing cells. Accordingly, both subcapsulary and outer cortex increase in size, whereas the deep cortex and principally the thymic medulla almost disappear in DCx embryos. In contrast, other T-cell subsets of DCx embryos, largely CDgglowCD4- cells and TcR γδ-expressing cells do not undergo significant variations throughout thymic ontogeny. PMID:8770560

  10. Double-effect reasoning and the conception of human embryos.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2013-08-01

    Some commentators argue that conception signals the onset of human personhood and that moral responsibilities toward zygotic or embryonic persons begin at this point, not the least of which is to protect them from exposure to death. Critics of the conception threshold of personhood ask how it can be morally consistent to object to the embryo loss that occurs in fertility medicine and research but not object to the significant embryo loss that occurs through conception in vivo. Using that apparent inconsistency as a starting point, they argue that if that embryo loss is tolerable as a way of conceiving children, it should be tolerable in fertility medicine and human embryonic research. Double-effect reasoning shows, by contrast, that conception in vivo is justified even if it involves the death of persons because the motives for wanting children are not inherently objectionable, because the embryo loss that occurs in unassisted conception is not the means by which successful conception occurs, and because the effect of having children is proportionate to the loss involved. A similar outcome holds true for in vitro fertilisation in fertility medicine but not for in vitro fertilisation for research involving human embryos.

  11. Coronavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be able to reduce your risk of infection by washing your hands often with soap and ... sick. There is no vaccine to prevent coronavirus infection. There are no specific treatments. You can relieve ...

  12. Campylobacter infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection occurs in the small intestine from a bacteria called Campylobacter jejuni . It is a type of food poisoning. ... Campylobacter enteritis is a common cause of intestinal infection . ... of traveler's diarrhea or food poisoning . People most often ...

  13. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  14. Dual Positive Regulation of Embryo Implantation by Endocrine and Immune Systems--Step-by-Step Maternal Recognition of the Developing Embryo.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Araki, Yoshihiko; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeru; Daikoku, Takiko; Shigeta, Minoru; Kanzaki, Hideharu; Mori, Takahide

    2016-03-01

    In humans, HCG secreted from the implanting embryo stimulates progesterone production of the corpus luteum to maintain embryo implantation. Along with this endocrine system, current evidence suggests that the maternal immune system positively contributes to the embryo implantation. In mice, immune cells that have been sensitized with seminal fluid and then the developing embryo induce endometrial differentiation and promote embryo implantation. After hatching, HCG activates regulatory T and B cells through LH/HCG receptors and then stimulates uterine NK cells and monocytes through sugar chain receptors, to promote and maintain pregnancy. In accordance with the above, the intrauterine administration of HCG-treated PBMC was demonstrated to improve implantation rates in women with repeated implantation failures. These findings suggest that the maternal immune system undergoes functional changes by recognizing the developing embryos in a stepwise manner even from a pre-fertilization stage and facilitates embryo implantation in cooperation with the endocrine system. PMID:26755274

  15. Local activation of uterine Toll-like receptor 2 and 2/6 decreases embryo implantation and affects uterine receptivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier Arturo; Caballero, Ignacio; Montazeri, Mehrnaz; Maslehat, Nasim; Elliott, Sarah; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Calle, Alexandra; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex interaction between maternal endometrium and embryonic structures. Failure to implant is highly recurrent and impossible to diagnose. Inflammation and infections in the female reproductive tract are common causes of infertility, embryo loss, and preterm labor. The current work describes how the activation of endometrial Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 2/6 reduces embryo implantation chances. We developed a morphometric index to evaluate the effects of the TLR 2/6 activation along the uterine horn (UH). TLR 2/6 ligation reduced the endometrial myometrial and glandular indexes and increased the luminal index. Furthermore, TLR 2/6 activation increased the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in UH lavages in the preimplantation day and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the implantation day. The engagement of TLR 2/6 with its ligand in the UH during embryo transfer severely affected the rate of embryonic implantation (45.00% ± 6.49% vs. 16.69% ± 5.01%, P < 0.05, control vs. test, respectively). Furthermore, this interference with the embryo implantation process was verified using an in vitro model of human embryo implantation where trophoblast spheroids failed to adhere to a monolayer of TLR 2- and TLR 2/6-activated endometrial cells. The inhibition of TLR receptors 2 and 6 in the presence of their specific ligands restored the ability of the spheroids to bind to the endometrial cells. In conclusion, the activation of the innate immune system in the uterus at the time of implantation interfered with the endometrial receptivity and reduced the chances of implantation success.

  16. Local activation of uterine Toll-like receptor 2 and 2/6 decreases embryo implantation and affects uterine receptivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier Arturo; Caballero, Ignacio; Montazeri, Mehrnaz; Maslehat, Nasim; Elliott, Sarah; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Calle, Alexandra; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex interaction between maternal endometrium and embryonic structures. Failure to implant is highly recurrent and impossible to diagnose. Inflammation and infections in the female reproductive tract are common causes of infertility, embryo loss, and preterm labor. The current work describes how the activation of endometrial Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 2/6 reduces embryo implantation chances. We developed a morphometric index to evaluate the effects of the TLR 2/6 activation along the uterine horn (UH). TLR 2/6 ligation reduced the endometrial myometrial and glandular indexes and increased the luminal index. Furthermore, TLR 2/6 activation increased the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in UH lavages in the preimplantation day and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the implantation day. The engagement of TLR 2/6 with its ligand in the UH during embryo transfer severely affected the rate of embryonic implantation (45.00% ± 6.49% vs. 16.69% ± 5.01%, P < 0.05, control vs. test, respectively). Furthermore, this interference with the embryo implantation process was verified using an in vitro model of human embryo implantation where trophoblast spheroids failed to adhere to a monolayer of TLR 2- and TLR 2/6-activated endometrial cells. The inhibition of TLR receptors 2 and 6 in the presence of their specific ligands restored the ability of the spheroids to bind to the endometrial cells. In conclusion, the activation of the innate immune system in the uterus at the time of implantation interfered with the endometrial receptivity and reduced the chances of implantation success. PMID:24621922

  17. Amphibian embryo and parental defenses and a larval predator reduce egg mortality from water mold.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Touchon, Justin C; Warkentin, Karen M

    2006-10-01

    Water molds attack aquatic eggs worldwide and have been associated with major mortality events in some cases, but typically only in association with additional stressors. We combined field observations and laboratory experiments to study egg stage defenses against pathogenic water mold in three temperate amphibians. Spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) wrap their eggs in a protective jelly layer that prevents mold from reaching the embryos. Wood frog (Rana sylvatica) egg masses have less jelly but are laid while ponds are still cold and mold growth is slow. American toad (Bufo americanus) eggs experience the highest infection levels. They are surrounded by thin jelly and are laid when ponds have warmed and mold grows rapidly. Eggs of all three species hatched early when infected, yielding smaller and less developed hatchlings. This response was strongest in B. americanus. Precocious hatching increased vulnerability of wood frog hatchlings to invertebrate predators. Finally, despite being potential toad hatchling predators, R. sylvatica tadpoles can have a positive effect on B. americanus eggs. They eat water mold off infected toad clutches, increasing their hatching success.

  18. A formula for scoring human embryo growth rates in in vitro fertilization: its value in predicting pregnancy and in comparison with visual estimates of embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Cummins, J M; Breen, T M; Harrison, K L; Shaw, J M; Wilson, L M; Hennessey, J F

    1986-10-01

    Two systems for measuring embryo development in vitro were evaluated. One was a 1-4 scale based on a subjective evaluation of embryo quality (EQ) from microscopic appearance. In addition, a formula for scoring embryo growth rate in vitro was developed. The embryo development rating (EDR) was based on the ratio between the time at which embryos were observed at a particular stage after insemination and the time at which they would be expected to reach that stage in a hypothetical "ideal" growth rate with a cell cycle length of 11.9 hr. Using this scoring system, "normally" growing embryos scored 100. This approach was aimed at partially normalizing the data and allowed all embryos to be analyzed similarly regardless of the time of observation. Analysis of 1539 embryo replacements resulting in 232 clinical pregnancies showed that both EDR and embryo-quality scores were of value in predicting success, with clinical pregnancy most likely to eventuate from a combination of moderate to good EQ scores (2-4) coupled with average or above-average growth rates (EDR scores from 90 to 129). Poor-quality and very slowly or very rapidly growing embryos were underrepresented in cycles that proceeded to pregnancy. These inferences were based on all embryos transferred (mean, 2.73 per transfer cycle), and they were substantiated by an analysis of 33 pregnancies resulting from replacement of a single embryo and from 18 pregnancies in which all embryos scored the same with both systems. EQ and EDR were significantly associated with each other and together provide a valuable guide in predicting pregnancy, in selecting embryos for freezing, and in monitoring day-to-day performance in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) program.

  19. Purification of water for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Fleetham, J; Mahadevan, M M

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether water obtained from the Milli-Q water purification system (Millipore, Mississauga, Canada) needed further purification for use in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. We describe a method for maintenance of the Milli-Q system. To assess water quality, alternate batches of culture media were prepared by using either Milli-Q water or Milli-Q water further treated by twice glass distillation. The percentage of mouse two-cell embryos that developed to blastocysts and the human in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer pregnancy rates were recorded for each batch. There were no significant differences in the parameters examined, indicating that further purification by twice glass distillation is not necessary if the Milli-Q system has been maintained as outlined.

  20. Temperature and photoperiod responses of soybean embryos cultured in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Patterson, R. P.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and photoperiod each have direct effects on growth rate of excised embryos of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill). To determine if the effects of photoperiod are altered by temperature, embryos of 'Ransom II' were cultured in vitro at 18, 24, and 30 degrees C under photoperiod durations of 12 and 18 h at an irradiance of 9 W m-2 (700 to 850 nm) and a photosynthetic photon flux density of 58 micromoles m-2 s-1 (400 to 700 nm). Accumulation rates of fresh and dry weight were greater under 18-h than 12-h photoperiods over the entire range of temperature. Water content of the culture embryos was not affected by photoperiod but was greater at 18 and 30 than 24 degrees C. The accumulation rate of dry weight increased from 18 to 26 but declined at 30 degrees C.

  1. Characterization of Starch-Debranching Enzymes in Pea Embryos1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Hylton, Christopher M.; Rössner, Ute; Smith, Alison M.

    1998-01-01

    Two distinct types of debranching enzymes have been identified in developing pea (Pisum sativum L.) embryos using native gel analysis and tests of substrate preference on purified or partially purified activities. An isoamylase-like activity capable of hydrolyzing amylopectin and glycogen but not pullulan is present throughout development and is largely or entirely confined to the plastid. Activities capable of hydrolyzing pullulan are present both inside and outside of the plastid, and extraplastidial activity increases relative to the plastidial activity during development. Both types of debranching enzyme are also present in germinating embryos. We argue that debranching enzymes are likely to have a role in starch metabolism in the plastid of the developing embryo and in starch degradation during germination. PMID:9765544

  2. Dysregulation of hydrogen sulphide metabolism impairs oviductal transport of embryos.

    PubMed

    Ning, Nannan; Zhu, Jianchun; Du, Yahui; Gao, Xiaolin; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2014-06-10

    Embryo retention in the fallopian tube is thought to lead to ectopic pregnancy, which is a significant cause of morbidity. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a gaseotransmitter produced mainly by cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase. Here we show that cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine -β-synthase are ubiquitously distributed in human fallopian tube epithelium and that H2S signalling relaxes the spontaneous contraction of the human oviduct. Furthermore, an aberration in H2S signalling, either silenced or enhanced activity induced by pharmacologic or genetic methods, causes embryo retention and developmental delay in the mouse oviduct, which is partly reversed by administration of either GYY4137, a slow-releasing H2S donor, or NaHS. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism for oviductal embryo transport.

  3. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Smit, Margot E; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-12-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mechanisms interact to generate local auxin accumulation in the early embryo. New auxin-dependent reporters help identifying these sites, while atomic structures of transcriptional response mediators help explain the diverse outputs of auxin signaling. Key auxin outputs are control of cell identity and cell division orientation, and progress has been made towards understanding the cellular basis of each. Importantly, a number of studies have combined computational modeling and experiments to analyze the developmental role, genetic circuitry and molecular mechanisms of auxin-dependent cell division control.

  4. Taste sensitivity in the embryo of the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Vince, M A

    1977-11-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate the sense of taste in embryos of the domestic fowl. In the first, four taste substances; NaCl, HCl, glucose and SOA were diluted with distilled water and the response was compared with that to distilled water alone. No significant effects of taste were found. In the second experiment five taste substances: HCl, fructose, NaCl, KCl and quinine were diluted with fluids normally imbibed by the embryo: amniotic and/or allantoic fluid taken from other eggs. These solutions and also distilled water were compared with egg-fluid alone. A highly significant effect of the five solutions was found showing that the taste system becomes functional before the time of hatching. Distilled water produced on an unexpectedly large response in the embryo; possible reasons for this are discussed.

  5. The science, fiction, and reality of embryo cloning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jacques; Tomkin, Giles

    1994-09-01

    Although many scientists view cloning as a useful procedure for scientific research into early embryo development -- one that cannot currently be used to produce multiple copies of humans -- the popular literature has led some individuals to view it as sinister. To address the concerns of the public, various conceptions of cloning are distinguished and their basis in fact analyzed. The possible uses, benefits, and detriments of both embryo splitting and nuclear transplantation are explained. Once the nature and purposes of cloning are understood, and the distinctive ethical dilemmas created by embryo splitting and nuclear transplantation are sorted out, these procedures should be clinically implemented to assist in vitro fertilization treatment for those who are infertile and to further other therapeutic and investigational efforts in medicine.

  6. Embryo-scale tissue mechanics during Drosophila gastrulation movements

    PubMed Central

    Rauzi, Matteo; Krzic, Uros; Saunders, Timothy E.; Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož; Hufnagel, Lars; Leptin, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis of an organism requires the development of its parts to be coordinated in time and space. While past studies concentrated on defined cell populations, a synthetic view of the coordination of these events in a whole organism is needed for a full understanding. Drosophila gastrulation begins with the embryo forming a ventral furrow, which is eventually internalized. It is not understood how the rest of the embryo participates in this process. Here we use multiview selective plane illumination microscopy coupled with infrared laser manipulation and mutant analysis to dissect embryo-scale cell interactions during early gastrulation. Lateral cells have a denser medial–apical actomyosin network and shift ventrally as a compact cohort, whereas dorsal cells become stretched. We show that the behaviour of these cells affects furrow internalization. A computational model predicts different mechanical properties associated with tissue behaviour: lateral cells are stiff, whereas dorsal cells are soft. Experimental analysis confirms these properties in vivo. PMID:26497898

  7. [The human embryo: a reality in need of protection].

    PubMed

    Junquera de Estéfani, R

    2000-01-01

    Today many advances in biotechnology involve the use of human embryos, which suffer the consequences of experimentation-research and are considered to be mere sources of raw materials. Given this the facto situation, it is crucial that embryos are afforded recognition. If they are considered to be human beings many of these actions should be banned. If not, then they should be permitted. At the root of this problem lies the great question facing philosophers and scientists, namely, when does life become human? This issue should be addressed in an interdisciplinary manner due to the ethical, religious, philosophical, biological and other aspects involved. However, aside from this debate, the mere fact that embryos belong to our species and possess intrinsic potential make them deserving of respect and protection. The Law therefore should intervene to provide this protection and prevent uncontrolled actions by researchers working alone in their laboratories.

  8. Phenotype Classification of Zebrafish Embryos by Supervised Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jeanray, Nathalie; Marée, Raphaël; Pruvot, Benoist; Stern, Olivier; Geurts, Pierre; Wehenkel, Louis; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish is increasingly used to assess biological properties of chemical substances and thus is becoming a specific tool for toxicological and pharmacological studies. The effects of chemical substances on embryo survival and development are generally evaluated manually through microscopic observation by an expert and documented by several typical photographs. Here, we present a methodology to automatically classify brightfield images of wildtype zebrafish embryos according to their defects by using an image analysis approach based on supervised machine learning. We show that, compared to manual classification, automatic classification results in 90 to 100% agreement with consensus voting of biological experts in nine out of eleven considered defects in 3 days old zebrafish larvae. Automation of the analysis and classification of zebrafish embryo pictures reduces the workload and time required for the biological expert and increases the reproducibility and objectivity of this classification. PMID:25574849

  9. Whole mount nuclear fluorescent imaging: convenient documentation of embryo morphology.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Lisa L; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe a relatively inexpensive and easy method to produce high quality images that reveal fine topological details of vertebrate embryonic structures. The method relies on nuclear staining of whole mount embryos in combination with confocal microscopy or conventional wide field fluorescent microscopy. In cases where confocal microscopy is used in combination with whole mount nuclear staining, the resulting embryo images can rival the clarity and resolution of images produced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fluorescent nuclear staining may be performed with a variety of cell permeable nuclear dyes, enabling the technique to be performed with multiple standard microscope/illumination or confocal/laser systems. The method may be used to document morphology of embryos of a variety of organisms, as well as individual organs and tissues. Nuclear stain imaging imposes minimal impact on embryonic specimens, enabling imaged specimens to be utilized for additional assays.

  10. Use of the Chick Embryo Model in Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kalirai, Helen; Shahidipour, Haleh; Coupland, Sarah E; Luyten, Gregorius

    2015-04-01

    Animal models play a crucial role in basic and translational oncology research. Conventional rodent experiments, however, face ethical, practical and technical issues that limit their use. The chick embryo represents an accessible and economical in vivo model, which has long been used in developmental biology and for the study of angiogenesis. It is also a recognised xenograft model, and because of its lack of immune system in early development, the chick embryo has established itself as a key model system for cancer research, with which to study various steps in the metastatic process. In this chapter, we review the chick embryo model and the technical approaches adopted by cancer biologists, including advances in real-time imaging, and discuss how this has been or can be applied to improve our understanding of the biological events during uveal melanoma development and metastasis.

  11. Estrogen-Initiated Protein Interactomes During Embryo Implantation.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Renjini A; Laloraya, Malini

    2016-03-01

    Failed implantation is the major restraining factor in assisted reproduction and is defined as the 'black-box of assisted reproduction'. Although work on understanding the complex process of implantation has substantially advanced, it has been limited to studies on mechanism of steroid hormone-mediated signaling during embryo implantation and knocking out single molecules and assessing their impact on embryo implantation. It is important to realize that most proteins exert their function via interaction with other proteins in order to relay downstream signals and/or regulate gene expression via interactions within promoter complexes. Such networks of biomolecular interactions constitute the basis for life as protein interactions are obligatory for cellular functioning. Thus, this review will focus on highlighting protein interactions during the complex process of embryo implantation as they attain a larger significance as pregnancy is fundamental to childbirth and the continuity of life per se. PMID:26662181

  12. Wavefronts and mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idema, Timon; Dubuis, Julien; Manning, Lisa; Nelson, Philip; Liu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Mitosis in the early syncytial Drosophila embryo has a high degree of spatial and temporal correlations, visible as mitotic wavefronts that travel across the embryo. This mitosis wavefront is preceded by another wavefront which corresponds to chromosome condensation. The two wavefronts are separated by a time interval that is independent of cell cycle and propagate at the same speed for a given embryo in a given cycle. We study the wavefronts in the context of excitable medium theory, using two different models, one with biochemical signaling and one with mechanical signaling. We find that the dependence of wavefront speed on cell cycle number is most naturally explained via a mechanical signaling, and that the entire process suggests a scenario in which biochemical and mechanical signaling are coupled.

  13. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  14. Microfluidic trap array for massively parallel imaging of Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Levario, Thomas J; Zhan, Mei; Lim, Bomyi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lu, Hang

    2013-04-01

    Here we describe a protocol for the fabrication and use of a microfluidic device to rapidly orient >700 Drosophila embryos in parallel for end-on imaging. The protocol describes master microfabrication (∼1 d), polydimethylsiloxane molding (few hours), system setup and device operation (few minutes) and imaging (depending on application). Our microfluidics-based approach described here is one of the first to facilitate rapid orientation for end-on imaging, and it is a major breakthrough for quantitative studies on Drosophila embryogenesis. The operating principle of the embryo trap is based on passive hydrodynamics, and it does not require direct manipulation of embryos by the user; biologists following the protocol should be able to repeat these procedures. The compact design and fabrication materials used allow the device to be used with traditional microscopy setups and do not require specialized fixtures. Furthermore, with slight modification, this array can be applied to the handling of other model organisms and oblong objects. PMID:23493069

  15. Genetic Modification of Preimplantation Embryos: Toward Adequate Human Research Policies

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects. PMID:15016248

  16. Atomic force microscopy of living and fixed Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Yu M; Pukhlyakova, E A; Bagrov, D V; Shaitan, K V

    2011-12-01

    Xenopus laevis embryos are a rather simple and at the same time a very interesting animal model, which is widely used for research in developmental biology. Intensive coordinated cell movements take place during the multi-cellular organism development. Little is known of the cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms of these movements. The conceptual framework for analysis of cell interactions within integrated populations is poorly developed. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the surface of fixed X. laevis embryos at different stages of their development. We have developed a new sample preparation protocol for these observations. The obtained images were compared with scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) data. Cell rearrangement during morphogenesis in vivo was also visualized by AFM. In the current paper we discuss facilities and challenges of using this technique for further embryo researching.

  17. Cotyledonary somatic embryos of Pinus pinaster Ait. most closely resemble fresh, maturing cotyledonary zygotic embryos: biological, carbohydrate and proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Trontin, Jean-François; Corbineau, Françoise; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Beaufour, Martine; Reymond, Isabelle; Le Metté, Claire; Ader, Kevin; Harvengt, Luc; Cadene, Martine; Label, Philippe; Teyssier, Caroline; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne

    2014-11-01

    Cotyledonary somatic embryos (SEs) of maritime pine are routinely matured for 12 weeks before being germinated and converted to plantlets. Although regeneration success is highly dependent on SEs quality, the date of harvesting is currently determined mainly on the basis of morphological features. This empirical method does not provide any accurate information about embryo quality with respect to storage compounds (proteins, carbohydrates). We first analyzed SEs matured for 10, 12 and 14 weeks by carrying out biological (dry weight, water content) and biochemical measurements (total protein and carbohydrate contents). No difference could be found between collection dates, suggesting that harvesting SEs after 12 weeks is appropriate. Cotyledonary SEs were then compared to various stages, from fresh to fully desiccated, in the development of cotyledonary zygotic embryos (ZEs). We identified profiles that were similar using hierarchical ascendant cluster analysis (HCA). Fresh and dehydrated ZEs could be distinguished, and SEs clustered with fresh ZEs. Both types of embryo exhibited similar carbohydrate and protein contents and signatures. This high level of similarity (94.5 %) was further supported by proteome profiling. Highly expressed proteins included storage, stress-related, late embryogenesis abundant and energy metabolism proteins. By comparing overexpressed proteins in developing and cotyledonary SEs or ZEs, some (23 proteins) could be identified as candidate biomarkers for the late, cotyledonary stage. This is the first report of useful generic protein markers for monitoring embryo development in maritime pine. Our results also suggest that improvements of SEs quality may be achieved if the current maturation conditions are refined. PMID:25115559

  18. Equine cloning: in vitro and in vivo development of aggregated embryos.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Andrés; Jarazo, Javier; Olivera, Ramiro; Salamone, Daniel F

    2012-07-01

    The production of cloned equine embryos remains highly inefficient. Embryo aggregation has not yet been tested in the equine, and it might represent an interesting strategy to improve embryo development. This study evaluated the effect of cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro and in vivo equine embryo development. Zona-free reconstructed embryos were individually cultured in microwells (nonaggregated group) or as 2- or 3-embryo aggregates (aggregated groups). For in vitro development, they were cultured until blastocyst stage and then either fixed for Oct-4 immunocytochemical staining or maintained in in vitro culture where blastocyst expansion was measured daily until Day 17 or the day on which they collapsed. For in vivo assays, Day 7-8 blastocysts were transferred to synchronized mares and resultant vesicles, and cloned embryos were measured by ultrasonography. Embryo aggregation improved blastocyst rates on a per well basis, and aggregation did not imply additional oocytes to obtain blastocysts. Embryo aggregation improved embryo quality, nevertheless it did not affect Day 8 and Day 16 blastocyst Oct-4 expression patterns. Equine cloned blastocysts expanded and increased their cell numbers when they were maintained in in vitro culture, describing a particular pattern of embryo growth that was unexpectedly independent of embryo aggregation, as all embryos reached similar size after Day 7. Early pregnancy rates were higher using blastocysts derived from aggregated embryos, and advanced pregnancies as live healthy foals also resulted from aggregated embryos. These results indicate that the strategy of aggregating embryos can improve their development, supporting the establishment of equine cloned pregnancies.

  19. Applying embryo cryopreservation technologies to the production of domestic and black-footed cats.

    PubMed

    Pope, C E; Gómez, M C; Galiguis, J; Dresser, B l

    2012-12-01

    Our objectives were (i) compare in vitro development of early cleavage stage domestic cat embryos after cryopreservation by minimal volume vitrification vs a standard slow, controlled-rate method, (ii) determine viability of vitrified domestic cat embryos by oviductal transfer into synchronous recipients and (iii) evaluate in vivo survival of black-footed cat (BFC, Felis nigripes) embryos after intra- and inter-species transfer. In vitro-derived (IVM/IVF) cat embryos were used to evaluate in vitro development after controlled-rate cryopreservation vs vitrification vs controls. Blastocyst development was similar in both groups of cryopreserved embryos (22-26%), but it was lower (p < 0.05) than that of fresh embryos (50%). After embryo transfer, four of eight recipients of vitrified embryos established pregnancies--three of six (50%) and one of two (50%) that received embryos from in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes, respectively. Three male and two female kittens weighing from 51 to 124 g (mean = 88 g) were delivered on days 61-65 of gestation. In BFC, four intra-species embryo transfer procedures were carried out--two recipients received fresh day 2 embryos (n = 5, 8) and two recipients received embryos that had been cryopreserved on day 1 (n = 6) or 2 (n = 8). A 2-year-old recipient of cryopreserved embryos established pregnancy and delivered two live male kittens. Subsequently, five cryopreserved BFC embryos were transferred to a domestic cat recipient. On day 29, the recipient was determined to be pregnant and delivered naturally a live, healthy female BFC kitten on day 66. In summary, in vivo survival of vitrified domestic cat embryos was shown by the births of kittens after transfer into recipients. Also, we demonstrated that sperm and embryo cryopreservation could be combined with intra- and inter-species embryo transfer and integrated into the array of assisted reproductive techniques used successfully for propagation of a rare and vulnerable felid species

  20. Identification of bovine embryos cultured in groups by attachment of barcodes to the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Novo, Sergi; Morató, Roser; Penon, Oriol; Duran, Sara; Barrios, Leonardo; Nogués, Carme; Plaza, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Luisa; Mogas, Teresa; Ibáñez, Elena

    2014-06-01

    The low number of oocytes collected from unstimulated donors by ovum pick-up means that embryos produced from each individual female have to be cultured individually or in very small groups. However, it has been demonstrated that single-embryo culture is less efficient than embryo culture in groups. To overcome this limitation, we developed a direct embryo-tagging system, which allows the collective culture of embryos from different origins whilst preserving their pedigree. Presumptive bovine zygotes were tagged with eight wheat-germ agglutinin biofunctionalised polysilicon barcodes attached to the outer surface of the zona pellucida (ZP). Four different barcodes were used to encode groups of 20-25 embryos, which were then cultured in the same drop. Cleavage, Day-7 and Day-8 blastocysts and barcode retention rates were assessed. In addition, Day-7 blastocysts were vitrified and warmed. Barcode attachment to the ZP of bovine embryos affected neither in vitro embryo development nor post-warming survival of the tagged embryos. All the embryos maintained barcodes attached until Day 8 of culture (3.63±0.37 barcodes per embryo) and could be identified. In conclusion, identification of embryos by barcodes attached to the ZP is feasible and will allow the culture of embryos from different donors in the same drop. PMID:24942183

  1. Identification of bovine embryos cultured in groups by attachment of barcodes to the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Novo, Sergi; Morató, Roser; Penon, Oriol; Duran, Sara; Barrios, Leonardo; Nogués, Carme; Plaza, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Luisa; Mogas, Teresa; Ibáñez, Elena

    2014-06-01

    The low number of oocytes collected from unstimulated donors by ovum pick-up means that embryos produced from each individual female have to be cultured individually or in very small groups. However, it has been demonstrated that single-embryo culture is less efficient than embryo culture in groups. To overcome this limitation, we developed a direct embryo-tagging system, which allows the collective culture of embryos from different origins whilst preserving their pedigree. Presumptive bovine zygotes were tagged with eight wheat-germ agglutinin biofunctionalised polysilicon barcodes attached to the outer surface of the zona pellucida (ZP). Four different barcodes were used to encode groups of 20-25 embryos, which were then cultured in the same drop. Cleavage, Day-7 and Day-8 blastocysts and barcode retention rates were assessed. In addition, Day-7 blastocysts were vitrified and warmed. Barcode attachment to the ZP of bovine embryos affected neither in vitro embryo development nor post-warming survival of the tagged embryos. All the embryos maintained barcodes attached until Day 8 of culture (3.63±0.37 barcodes per embryo) and could be identified. In conclusion, identification of embryos by barcodes attached to the ZP is feasible and will allow the culture of embryos from different donors in the same drop.

  2. [DNA fingerprinting analysis of silkworm embryo cell lines].

    PubMed

    Pan, Min Hui; Feng, Zhen Yue; Tian, Zhi Qiang; Liu, Min; Lu, Cheng

    2006-12-01

    DNA extraction and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used on DNA genomes study of cell lines of Bombyx mori. DNA polymorphic marker analysis was conducted and DNA fingerprint of cell lines of Bombyx mori. was carried out using ISSR and RAPD. Primers that can reliably find polymorphic bands were screened out. 26 ISSR primers were selected from them any available, and 797 polymorphic bands were abtained through PCR amplification in 9 samples, including 3 embryo cell lines of Bombyx mori (BmE-SWU1, BmE-SWU2, BmE-SWU3), 5 passage cell lines (BmE, BmN, Sf9, Sf21, Hi5) and the embryos from which BmE-SWU1 originated. The ration of polymorphic bands was 89.9%. 43 RAPD primers were selected out through PCR amplification, and 1205 polymorphic bands were obtained in 9 samples. The ration of polymorphic bands was 76.6%. There were many DNA polymorphic bands differences in the cell lines of Bombyx mori. The special DNA markers of the 3 embryo cell lines were found respectively. The similarity index Nei and genetic distance of the 9 samples were calculated and the phylogeny tree of 9 samples was constructed by UPGMA. Results showed that 2 groups were divided,one group including the 3 embryo cell lines and the embryo of XQ has close relative. Another group constructed by five insect cell lines came from different species, their genetic distance was closer than the 3 embryo cell lines.

  3. Pine somatic embryogenesis using zygotic embryos as explants.

    PubMed

    Pullman, Gerald S; Bucalo, Kylie

    2011-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) has the potential to be the lowest-cost method to rapidly produce large numbers of high-value somatic seedlings with desired characteristics for plantation forestry. At least 24 of the 115-120 known Pinus species can undergo SE. Initiation for most species works best with immature megagametophytes as starting material, although a few pines can initiate SE cultures from isolated mature seed embryos. Successful initiation depends heavily on explant type, embryo developmental stage, and medium salt base. Most first reports of initiation used 2,4-D and BAP or a combination of cytokinins. More recent reports have optimized initiation for many Pinus spp., but still use mostly the combinations of auxin and cytokinins. Initiation can be stimulated with medium supplements including abscisic acid (ABA), brassinosteroids, ethylene inhibitors, gibberellin inhibitors, organic acids, putrescine, specific sugar types (maltose, galactose, D-chiro-inositol, and D-xylose), triacontanol, vitamins (B12, biotin, vitamin E, and folic acid), or manipulation of environmental factors including pH, water potential, cone cold storage, gelling agent concentration, and liquid medium. Embryo development and maturation usually occur best on medium containing ABA along with water potential reduction (with sugars and polyethylene glycol) or water availability reduction (with raised gelling agent increasing gel-strength). Activated carbon and maltose may also improve embryo maturation. The main issues holding SE technology back are related to the high cost of producing a somatic seedling, incurred from low initiation percentages for recalcitrant species, culture loss, and decline after initiation and poor embryo maturation resulting in no or poor germination. Although vast progress has been made in pine SE technology over the past 24 years, fundamental studies on seed and embryo physiology, biochemistry, and gene expression are still needed to help improve the technology

  4. Developmental effects of lead acetate on the chick embryo metanephros.

    PubMed

    Errede, M; Elia, G; Bertossi, M; Mulas, M L; Riva, A; Virgintino, D; Benagiano, V; Girolamo, F; Roncali, L; Ambrosi, L

    2001-07-01

    The developmental effects of lead acetate were studied in the chick embryo metanephros, the third renal rudiment that acquires morphological characteristics of functioning kidney already during the prenatal life. Lead exposure was obtained by applying a lead acetate solution on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane at the days 9, 10 and 11 of incubation. Quantitative evaluation of the lead concentration assessed by furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry at the days 14 and 21 of incubation demonstrated metal presence both in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in metanephros (MN). The lead concentration was higher in CAM than in MN; the metal amount was similar in the CAM of 14 and 21 day embryos, but significantly higher in the 14day embryo MN than in the 21 day embryo MN. Morphological observations on metanephros tissue of control and lead-treated embryos were performed under light, electron transmission and electron scanning microscopes. Peculiar attention was devoted to the expression of the junctional protein connexin 43, the major component of the gap junctions in the renal cells. The results indicated that lead treatment does not intervene in the general differentiation of the metanephric nephrons. The lead is reabsorbed by the proximal tubule cells that are engulfed by endocytotic vacuoles and metal deposits and show long term degenerative changes. Expression of Cx43 protein and ultrastructure of gap junctions between proximal tubule cells appeared to be unchanged. The morphological aspects of the MN corpuscles and tubules agree with the suggestion of a lead cytotoxic effect but do not corroborate, at least in this experimental model, the view of primary damage exerted by lead on the gap junctions of the renal epithelial cells.

  5. Embryo quality predictive models based on cumulus cells gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Burnik Papler, T; Verdenik, I; Fon Tacer, K; Vrtačnik Bokal, E

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Since the introduction of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in clinical practice of infertility treatment, the indicators for high quality embryos were investigated. Cumulus cells (CC) have a specific gene expression profile according to the developmental potential of the oocyte they are surrounding, and therefore, specific gene expression could be used as a biomarker. The aim of our study was to combine more than one biomarker to observe improvement in prediction value of embryo development. In this study, 58 CC samples from 17 IVF patients were analyzed. This study was approved by the Republic of Slovenia National Medical Ethics Committee. Gene expression analysis [quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)] for five genes, analyzed according to embryo quality level, was performed. Two prediction models were tested for embryo quality prediction: a binary logistic and a decision tree model. As the main outcome, gene expression levels for five genes were taken and the area under the curve (AUC) for two prediction models were calculated. Among tested genes, AMHR2 and LIF showed significant expression difference between high quality and low quality embryos. These two genes were used for the construction of two prediction models: the binary logistic model yielded an AUC of 0.72 ± 0.08 and the decision tree model yielded an AUC of 0.73 ± 0.03. Two different prediction models yielded similar predictive power to differentiate high and low quality embryos. In terms of eventual clinical decision making, the decision tree model resulted in easy-to-interpret rules that are highly applicable in clinical practice. PMID:27785402

  6. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  7. Live birth of a bear cub following nonsurgical embryo collection.

    PubMed

    Boone, W R; Catlin, J C; Casey, K J; Dye, P S; Boone, E T; Schuett, R J

    1999-02-01

    In the near future, 6 of 8 bear species will face extinction mainly because of loss of their natural habitat. This loss of habitat will ultimately require some of these bears to be maintained in zoos and wildlife preserves in the hope of conserving genetic diversity. If the giant panda is representative of other bear species, reproductive performance will be inhibited in such an environment. In this study, we used the nonendangered American black bear (Ursus americanus) as the model for developing appropriate embryo transfer procedures. The donor bear mated numerous times between late May and early June. In late July we anesthetized her and used a series of telescoping sheaths to gain access to the uterus Then we passed a catheter through the largest sheath, inflated the balloon, and, using a 20-mL syringe, repeatedly infused into and then aspirated from the uterus PBS + BSA. We emptied the syringe into Petri dishes and observed 2 embryos. We rinsed the embryos, placed them in human tubal fluid + HSA + HEPES and then held them at 35 degrees C for 5 h. The recipient mated during mid-June; in late July we anesthetized her and, with the aid of laparoscopy, transferred an embryo into the cranial portion of the uterine horn ipsilateral to the ovary containing a CL. The recipient delivered 2 cubs in January. Necropsy results indicated that the neonates lived for 6 to 8 wk before succumbing to flooding in the den. The DNA from hair samples belonging to the neonates indicated that the male cub belonged to the donor, the female cub to the recipient. The delayed implantation mechanism in bears probably allowed for the successful development of the embryo in the presence of a substantial asynchrony between the donor and the recipient (13 d). We conclude that embryo transfer is possible in the American black bear and can lead to the birth of live cubs. PMID:10729038

  8. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  9. CHONDRULE FORMATION IN BOW SHOCKS AROUND ECCENTRIC PLANETARY EMBRYOS

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Melissa A.; Desch, Steven J.; Athanassiadou, Themis; Boley, Aaron C.

    2012-06-10

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas and Pourmand have established that large ({approx}3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules-millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites-were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rates are consistent with the formation of the dominant, porphyritic texture of most chondrules, assuming a modest enhancement above the likely solar nebula average value of chondrule densities (by a factor of 10), attributable to settling of chondrule precursors to the midplane of the disk or turbulent concentration. We calculate the rate at which a planetary embryo's eccentricity is damped and conclude that a single planetary embryo scattered into an eccentric orbit can, over {approx}10{sup 5} years, produce {approx}10{sup 24} g of chondrules. In principle, a small number (1-10) of eccentric planetary embryos can melt the observed mass of chondrules in a manner consistent with all known constraints.

  10. Chondrule Formation in Bow Shocks around Eccentric Planetary Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Melissa A.; Boley, Aaron C.; Desch, Steven J.; Athanassiadou, Themis

    2012-06-01

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas & Pourmand have established that large (~3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules—millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites—were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rates are consistent with the formation of the dominant, porphyritic texture of most chondrules, assuming a modest enhancement above the likely solar nebula average value of chondrule densities (by a factor of 10), attributable to settling of chondrule precursors to the midplane of the disk or turbulent concentration. We calculate the rate at which a planetary embryo's eccentricity is damped and conclude that a single planetary embryo scattered into an eccentric orbit can, over ~105 years, produce ~1024 g of chondrules. In principle, a small number (1-10) of eccentric planetary embryos can melt the observed mass of chondrules in a manner consistent with all known constraints.

  11. Histone storage and deposition in the early Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Horard, Béatrice; Loppin, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila development initiates with the formation of a diploid zygote followed by the rapid division of embryonic nuclei. This syncytial phase of development occurs almost entirely under maternal control and ends when the blastoderm embryo cellularizes and activates its zygotic genome. The biosynthesis and storage of histones in quantity sufficient for chromatin assembly of several thousands of genome copies represent a unique challenge for the developing embryo. In this article, we have reviewed our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the production, storage, and deposition of histones in the fertilized egg and during the exponential amplification of cleavage nuclei.

  12. Superovulation and embryo transfer in wood bison (Bison bison athabascae).

    PubMed

    Toosi, Behzad M; Tribulo, Andres; Lessard, Carl; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F; McCorkell, Robert B; Adams, Gregg P

    2013-09-15

    Two experiments were done to develop an effective superovulatory treatment protocol in wood bison for the purpose of embryo collection and transfer. In experiment 1, donor bison were assigned randomly to four treatment groups (N = 5 per group) to examine the effects of method of synchronization (follicular ablation vs. estradiol-progesterone treatment) and ovarian follicular superstimulation (single slow-release vs. split dose of FSH). Recipient bison were synchronized with donor bison by either follicular ablation (N = 8) or estradiol-progesterone treatment (N = 9). In experiment 2, bison were assigned randomly to four treatment groups (N = 5 per group) to examine the ovarian response to two versus four doses of FSH, and the effect of progesterone (ovarian superstimulation with or without an intravaginal progesterone-releasing device). Donor bison were inseminated with fresh chilled wood bison semen 12 and 24 hours after treatment with GnRH (experiment 1) or LH (experiment 2). The ovarian response was assessed using ultrasonography. In experiment 1, the number of large follicles (≥ 7 mm) increased in response to both FSH treatments, but the diameter of the largest follicle detected 4 and 5 days after the start of ovarian superstimulation was greater in bison treated with a single dose of FSH than in those treated with two doses (P < 0.05). A total of 10 ova and/or embryos were collected. One blastocyst was transferred to each of five recipient bison resulting in the birth of two live wood bison calves. In experiment 2, two doses of FSH resulted in a greater number of large follicles (≥ 9 mm) on Days 4, 5, and 6 (P < 0.05) after beginning of superstimulation (Day 0), and more ovulations than four doses of FSH (11.2 ± 2.4 vs. 6.4 ± 0.8; P < 0.05). Embryo collection was performed on only five donors, and a total of 19 ova and/or embryos were recovered. In summary, fewer FSH treatments were as good or better than multiple treatments, consistent with the notion

  13. Sulfated polysaccharides and cell differentiation in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Løvtrup-Rein, H; Løvtrup, S

    1984-01-01

    The synthesis of sulfated polysaccharides during the embryonic development of Paracentrotus lividus has been investigated by incorporation of radioactive sulfate, glucose, glucosamine and fucose. The following substances become labelled: fucan sulfate (approximately 60%), heparan sulfate (approximately 20%) and dermatan sulfate (approximately 20%), and possibly a very slight amount of chondroitin sulfate. In animalized and vegetalized embryos, the rate of incorporation is significantly reduced, and furthermore dermatan sulfate is almost absent in animalized embryos. It is concluded that this substance is associated with the differentiation of vegetative cells, possibly the mesenchyme cells.

  14. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation.

  15. Reprogramming the genome to totipotency in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-quan; Dean, Jurrien

    2015-02-01

    Despite investigative interest, the artificial derivation of pluripotent stem cells remains inefficient and incomplete reprogramming hinders its potential as a reliable tool in regenerative medicine. By contrast, fusion of terminally differentiated gametes at fertilization activates efficient epigenetic reprogramming to ensure totipotency of early embryos. Understanding the epigenetic mechanisms required for the transition from the fertilized egg to the embryo can improve efforts to reprogram differentiated cells to pluripotent/totipotent cells for therapeutic use. We review recent discoveries that are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms required for epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency in vivo. PMID:25448353

  16. Cloning in cattle: from embryo splitting to somatic nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Y; Vignon, X; Chesné, P; Le Bourhis, D; Marchal, J; Renard, J P

    1998-01-01

    The ability to obtain genetically identical offspring in cattle (clones) is useful for research and for potential applications to breeding schemes. Experimental possibilities for generating such animals have evolved considerably in the last two decades. Embryo splitting has become a relatively simple technique but is limited to twinning. Embryonic nuclear transfer has improved and is associated with sexing to generate sets of clones despite a great variability of results between parent embryos. The factors of progress are reviewed here. Recently, somatic cells used as a source of nuclei in bovine nuclear transfer has been demonstrated. Here we present the results of the developmental potential of nuclei from skin and muscle cells.

  17. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  18. Messenger RNA in early sea-urchin embryos: size classes.

    PubMed

    Nemer, M; Infante, A A

    1965-10-01

    Rapidly labeled RNA from four-cell embryos and blastulae of sea urchins was analyzed by sedimentation and for ability to form DNA-RNA hybrids. The RNA was derived from polyribosomes and from the "gel interphase," an extraction compartment resulting from treatment of whole embryos with phenol and known to be enriched with nuclei. The RNA from both sources displayed a high degree of structural complementarity to DNA. This DNA-like RNA of the polyribosomes sedimented in discrete classes, rather than in the sedimentation continuum demonstrable for the labeled RNA of the gel interphase. Thus messenger RNA appears to emerge in the cytoplasm in discrete size classes. PMID:5837338

  19. Importance of embryo transfer technique in maximizing assisted reproductive outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schoolcraft, William B

    2016-04-01

    Embryo transfer is arguably the most critical process in the sequential events that encompass an IVF cycle. Several variables play a role in the success of a transfer, including catheter type, atraumatic technique, and the use of ultrasound guidance. The inclusion of hyaluronan in the ET media also has a benefit for implantation. Because of the adverse effects of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation on the endometrium, frozen embryo transfers have demonstrated improved pregnancy rates as well as better obstetric outcomes. This review will talk about various aspects of ET as it is currently performed, variables affecting its success, and methods of optimization. PMID:26940790

  20. Isolation and characterization of nuclei from rice embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, J; Lim, P Y; Aratani, K; Akazawa, T

    1992-04-01

    A method has been developed to isolate pure preparations of nuclei in high yield from commercially available viable rice embryos (germ), employing extraction with buffer solution containing glycerol (without detergent) and polyamine, followed by centrifugation on a 30% Percoll cushion. The intactness of the isolated nuclei was confirmed by light microscopy as well as electron microscopy. The protein profiles of both whole nuclei and nuclear extracts obtained by SDS-PAGE, organellar marker enzyme activities, DNA and RNA analyses, and in vitro RNA synthesis, all indicate that the highly purified nuclei are isolated from rice embryos.

  1. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  2. Telomere Length Reprogramming in Embryos and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, LeRoy G.; Wang, Fang; Liu, Lin; Keefe, David

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres protect and cap linear chromosome ends, yet these genomic buffers erode over an organism's lifespan. Short telomeres have been associated with many age-related conditions in humans, and genetic mutations resulting in short telomeres in humans manifest as syndromes of precocious aging. In women, telomere length limits a fertilized egg's capacity to develop into a healthy embryo. Thus, telomere length must be reset with each subsequent generation. Although telomerase is purportedly responsible for restoring telomere DNA, recent studies have elucidated the role of alternative telomeres lengthening mechanisms in the reprogramming of early embryos and stem cells, which we review here. PMID:24719895

  3. [The protector effect of ribosomal preparations against experimental influenza infection in mice].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted on the protective effect of some ribosomal preparations, isolated from chorionic-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos, infected or not with parainfluenza (Sendai) or influenza (AoPR8) virus, in mice experimentally inoculated with influenza virus strain AoPR8 adapted to the mouse. Results showed that the tested preparation, containing ribosomes and polysomes isolated from chorio-allantoic membranes of Sendai virus inoculated chicken embryos, ensure the mice complete protection against AoPR8 virus, if administrated before the control infection. PMID:2549704

  4. OpenSource lab-on-a-chip physiometer for accelerated zebrafish embryo biotests.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Jin; Hall, Chris J; Crosier, Kathryn E; Cooper, Jonathan M; Crosier, Philip S; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2014-01-02

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo assays have recently come into the spotlight as convenient experimental models in both biomedicine and ecotoxicology. As a small aquatic model organism, zebrafish embryo assays allow for rapid physiological, embryo-, and genotoxic tests of drugs and environmental toxins that can be simply dissolved in water. This protocol describes prototyping and application of an innovative, miniaturized, and polymeric chip-based device capable of immobilizing a large number of living fish embryos for real-time and/or time-lapse microscopic examination. The device provides a physical address designation to each embryo during analysis, continuous perfusion of medium, and post-analysis specimen recovery. Miniaturized embryo array is a new concept of immobilization and real-time drug perfusion of multiple individual and developing zebrafish embryos inside the mesofluidic device. The OpenSource device presented in this protocol is particularly suitable to perform accelerated fish embryo biotests in ecotoxicology and phenotype-based pharmaceutical screening.

  5. Lack of embryotoxicity of homocysteine thiolactone in mouse embryos in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D K; Grafton, T F; Melnyk, S; James, S J

    2001-01-01

    Recent work from humans and chick embryos has suggested that homocysteine may play a role in producing neural tube defects (NTDs). In an effort to determine if homocysteine is able to produce NTDs in mammalian embryos, mouse embryos were explanted on GD 8 and cultured for 44 h. When either homocysteine or homocysteine thiolactone was added to the culture medium, treated embryos developed as well as controls and had closed neural tubes. Homocysteine thiolactone was also microinjected into the amniotic sac of mouse embryos. Again, development proceeded normally with no significant increase in the number of embryos with open neural tubes at the end of the culture period. HPLC analysis of embryonic thiols 24 h after microinjection revealed a significant increase in embryonic cystathionine levels. These data suggest that homocysteine does not produce NTDs in mouse embryos cultured in vitro and that early organogenesis-stage embryos are able to metabolize homocysteine.

  6. 'New embryos' - new challenges for the ethics of stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Holm, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Among the many ethical issues raised by human embryonic stem cell research (in the following all references to 'stem cells' should be read as references to human embryonic stem cells), two have gained specific prominence: (1) whether stem cell research is ethically problematic because it entails the destruction of human embryos and (2) what kind of control embryo donors should have over the stem cell lines derived from their embryos. In the present paper, I will analyse how these two issues are engaged by various attempts to derive stem cells from anomalous embryos (e.g. embryos in cleavage arrest, embryos not implanted following pre-implantation genetic diagnosis or embryos created by altered nuclear transfer) or in ways that are claimed to be non-destructive for the embryo (e.g. blastocyst or blastomere biopsy).

  7. Identification of the glycerol kinase gene and its role in diapause embryo restart and early embryo development of Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Yao, Feng; Chu, Bing; Li, Xuejie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Yang; Mei, Yanli; Wang, Peisheng; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2014-03-01

    Glycerol kinase (GK) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycerol utilization by transferring a phosphate from ATP to glycerol, yielding glycerol 3-phosphate, which is an important intermediate for both energy metabolism and glycerolipid production. Artemia sinica has an unusual diapause process under stress conditions of high salinity, low temperature and lack of food. In the process, diapause embryos of A. sinica (brine shrimp) accumulate high concentrations of glycerol as a cryoprotectant to prevent low temperature damage to embryos. Upon embryo restart, glycerol is converted into glucose and other carbohydrates. Therefore, GK plays an important role in the diapause embryo restart process. However, the role of GK in diapause termination of embryo development in A. sinica remains unknown. In the present study, a 2096 bp full-length cDNA of gk from A. sinica (As-gk) was obtained, encoding putative 551 amino acids, 60.6 kDa protein. As a crucial enzyme in glycerol uptake and metabolism, GK has been conserved structurally and functionally during evolution. The expression pattern of As-gk was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Expression locations of As-gk were analyzed using in situ hybridization. As-gk was widely distributed in the early embryo and several main parts of Artemia after differentiation. The expression of As-GK was also induced by stresses such as cold exposure and high salinity. This initial research into the expression pattern and stress response of GK in Artemia provides a sound basis for further understanding of the function and regulation of genes in early embryonic development in A. sinica and the stress response. PMID:24365596

  8. Use of DNA strand damage (Comet assay) and embryo hatching effects to assess contaminant exposure in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.F.; Steinert, S.A.; Nakayama, K.; Oshima, Y.

    1999-07-01

    After fertilization, blue crab eggs are embedded in a sponge which is attached to the female abdomen during embryo development. Embryos after 9 stages in the egg sac hatch into a swimming zoea stage (stage 10). The authors have developed a bioassay where embryo development is monitored in culture plates with and without toxicants in the water. Toxicant effects are based on determining the percentage of embryos which hatch to zoea. Hatching EC{sub 50} (toxicant concentration at which 50% of the embryos fail to hatch) for a number of pesticides, organometallics and metals were determined. The test takes from 2 to 6 days depending on the embryo stage selected for the study. In addition to embryo development effects the prevalence of DNA single-strand breaks in individual embryo cells were determined using the single cell gel electrophoresis method (Comet assay). A good correlation between DNA strand breakage and embryo defects was found after exposure to genotoxic contaminants. Thus, the bioassay linking DNA damage to embryo hatching effects is rapid, sensitive and mechanistically relevant.

  9. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  10. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  11. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  12. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  13. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  14. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments.

  15. Evaluation of a quali embryo model for the detection of botulism toxin type A activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Japanese quail embryo (Coturnix japonica) was evaluated for use as a bioassay to detect biologically active botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). Day 15 of incubation embryos were injected with decreasing dosages of BoNT/A from 250 to 0.5 ng of toxin. At 1 day post-injection, embryos receiving ...

  16. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis reveals mechanisms of embryo abortion during chrysanthemum cross breeding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Zhiquan; Dong, Wen; Sun, Chunqing; Wang, Haibin; Song, Aiping; He, Lizhong; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi; Teng, Nianjun

    2014-01-01

    Embryo abortion is the main cause of failure in chrysanthemum cross breeding, and the genes and proteins associated with embryo abortion are poorly understood. Here, we applied RNA sequencing and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) to analyse transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of normal and abortive embryos. More than 68,000 annotated unigenes and 700 proteins were obtained from normal and abortive embryos. Functional analysis showed that 140 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 41 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were involved in embryo abortion. Most DEGs and DEPs associated with cell death, protein degradation, reactive oxygen species scavenging, and stress-response transcriptional factors were significantly up-regulated in abortive embryos relative to normal embryos. In contrast, most genes and proteins related to cell division and expansion, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and energy metabolism were significantly down-regulated in abortive embryos. Furthermore, abortive embryos had the highest activity of three executioner caspase-like enzymes. These results indicate that embryo abortion may be related to programmed cell death and the senescence- or death-associated genes or proteins contribute to embryo abortion. This adds to our understanding of embryo abortion and will aid in the cross breeding of chrysanthemum and other crops in the future. PMID:25288482

  17. Avian Egg Odour Encodes Information on Embryo Sex, Fertility and Development

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Ben; Hayes, William; Pike, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Avian chemical communication is a rapidly emerging field, but has been hampered by a critical lack of information on volatile chemicals that communicate ecologically relevant information (semiochemicals). A possible, but as yet unexplored, function of olfaction and chemical communication in birds is in parent-embryo and embryo-embryo communication. Communication between parents and developing embryos may act to mediate parental behaviour, while communication between embryos can control the synchronicity of hatching. Embryonic vocalisations and vibrations have been implicated as a means of communication during the later stages of development but in the early stages, before embryos are capable of independent movement and vocalisation, this is not possible. Here we show that volatiles emitted from developing eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) convey information on egg fertility, along with the sex and developmental status of the embryo. Specifically, egg volatiles changed over the course of incubation, differed between fertile and infertile eggs, and were predictive of embryo sex as early as day 1 of incubation. Egg odours therefore have the potential to facilitate parent-embryo and embryo-embryo interactions by allowing the assessment of key measures of embryonic development long before this is possible through other modalities. It also opens up the intriguing possibility that parents may be able to glean further relevant information from egg volatiles, such as the health, viability and heritage of embryos. By determining information conveyed by egg-derived volatiles, we hope to stimulate further investigation into the ecological role of egg odours. PMID:25629413

  18. 10 CFR 20.1208 - Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. 20.1208 Section 20... Limits § 20.1208 Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. (a) The licensee shall ensure that the dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus during the entire pregnancy, due to the occupational exposure of a...

  19. 10 CFR 20.1208 - Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. 20.1208 Section 20... Limits § 20.1208 Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. (a) The licensee shall ensure that the dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus during the entire pregnancy, due to the occupational exposure of a...

  20. 10 CFR 20.1208 - Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. 20.1208 Section 20... Limits § 20.1208 Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. (a) The licensee shall ensure that the dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus during the entire pregnancy, due to the occupational exposure of a...