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Sample records for infected hip replacement

  1. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  2. The treatment of the infected hip replacement. The complex case.

    PubMed

    Haddad, F S; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Duncan, C P

    1999-12-01

    The treatment of the infected total hip replacement remains expensive, leads to a long difficult course for the patient, and frequently results in a suboptimal functional outcome. Various treatment techniques are available, and may be suitable for the more straightforward case. These include one-stage exchange arthroplasty, two-stage exchange arthroplasty, resection arthroplasty, and debridement and irrigation. The complex infected total hip replacement encompasses numerous host and organism factors. These include unusual or multiple organisms, diagnostic difficulties, bone loss, immunocompromise, and reinfection. In the authors' experience, the problem of the complex infected hip replacement is best addressed using the prosthesis of antibiotic-loaded acrylic cement approach. This interval arthroplasty is a modular, custom-made, immediate fit, antibiotic selective, temporary spacer system that allows the surgeon to reconstruct even the most deficient bone stock safely and effectively using two-stage exchange arthroplasty. It affords the patient rapid pain relief, allows them to mobilize quickly while successfully eradicating infection in 96% of hips with severe bone loss, and sets an appropriate soft tissue environment for a relatively straightforward second stage procedure. The prosthesis of antibiotic-loaded acrylic cement system affords the benefits of two-stage exchange without the functional disadvantages of an excision arthroplasty particularly when the proximal femur is severely deficient. It allows flexibility for the interval period and the type of fixation used, and the potential for allograft reconstruction at the final stage.

  3. Successful treatment of late Salmonella infections in total hip replacement - report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Kálmán; Janositz, Gábor; Kovács, Gyula; Sisák, Krisztián; Rudner, Ervin

    2010-06-08

    Salmonella species can be rarely isolated from periprosthetic joint infections, however when present, are usually part of a severe septic clinical picture. Two patients presented with late infected hip replacements to our institution. The first patient with multiple comorbidities had a confirmed Salmonella Enteridis infection with an abscess in the groin, with loosening of both components. He underwent a successful one stage cemented revision hip replacement, followed by 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy (ciprofloxacin). He had no recurrence or complications. The second patient was admitted in a septic condition with ARDS to the Intensive Care Unit 7 years following an uncemented total hip replacement. From an ultrasound guided hip aspirate Salmonella cholerae-suis was isolated. He underwent a successful a two-stage revision hip replacement. Successful treatment of such potentially life threatening infections is achievable using modern orthopaedic techniques and close collaboration with the infectious diseases specialists.

  4. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise can reduce stiffness and increase flexibility and muscle strength. People who have an artificial hip should talk ... and cross-country skiing. These exercises can increase muscle strength and cardiovascular fitness without injuring the new hip. ...

  5. Infection in total hip replacement: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Senthi, Surendra; Munro, Jacob T.

    2010-01-01

    While total hip arthroplasty has progressed to become one of the most successful surgical procedures ever developed, infection remains a serious complication. We have conducted a review of the literature pertaining to management of deep infection in total hip arthroplasty, specifically focusing on clinically relevant articles published in the last five years. A search was conducted using MEDLINE and PubMed, as well as a review of the Cochrane database, using the terms “total hip arthroplasty”, “total hip replacement” and “infection”. References for all selected articles were cross-checked. While the so-called two-stage revision is generally considered to be the gold standard for management, numerous studies now report outcomes for implant retention and reassessing one-stage revision strategies. There are encouraging reports for complex reconstruction options in patients with associated severe bone stock loss. The duration of antibiotic therapy remains controversial. There is concern about increasing bacterial resistance especially with the widespread use of vancomycin and ertapenem (carbapenem). PMID:21085957

  6. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to replace all or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint called a prosthesis. This ... You're in the Hospital You had a hip joint replacement surgery to replace all or part of ...

  7. Is homologous blood transfusion a risk factor for infection after hip replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, Dan; Harvey, Edward J.; Leighton, Ross K.; Petrie, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To assess the risk of postoperative infection associated with blood transfusion in patients who undergo primary total hip arthroplasty. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, (a tertiary-care centre). Patients All patients who underwent primary total hip replacement between 1990 and 1995 (N = 1206). Interventions Hip replacement with or without perioperative blood transfusion. Outcome measures The rate of postoperative infection, the number of blood transfusions, patient age and sex, duration of surgery and the surgeon who performed the procedure. Victoria General Hospital medical records, the transfusion services record and the Dalhousie University Hip Study databases were integrated and analyzed using a standard statistical package. Results The incidence of infection postoperative was 9.9% overall, 8.4% in patients receiving no transfusion, and 14% in those receiving homologous transfusion (p = 0.035). There were no infections in the 11 patients who received an autologous blood transfusion. Significant predictors of postoperative infection were sex, age and duration of surgery; these were not confounding variables (χ2 multivariate analysis). Neither the operating surgeon nor the blood product transfused affected the infection rate. Conclusions These findings suggest an increased risk of postoperative infection in patients who undergo primary hip replacement and receive homologous blood transfusions perioperatively. PMID:11603748

  8. [Etiological agents more common in primary hip and knee joint replacement infections in older adults].

    PubMed

    Argüelles-Martínez, O; Rivera-Villa, A H; Miguel-Pérez, A; Torres-González, R; Pérez-Atanasio, J M; Mata-Hernández, A; De la Fuente-Zuno, J C

    2016-01-01

    The most common etiological agents in periprosthetic infections are Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The frequency of these infections are found in knee replacement with 0.68 to 1.60% compared to the hip with 0.67 to 2.4%. To identify what are the most common etiologic agents in periprosthetic infections in elderly patients with primary hip and knee surgery. An observational study, transverse and retrospective case series was performed in a period from June 2011 to December 2014, patients over 60 years with a diagnosis of periprosthetic infection by two positive cultures with antibiograma. 62 patients were evaluated 59.7% were infections of knee and hip 40.3%, 59% were infections by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus 22%. The best sensitivity reported antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 40.3%. The largest penicillin G resistance 32.2%. The most common causative agents were Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  9. Routine one-stage exchange for chronic infection after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Lengert, Régis; Diesinger, Yann; Gaudias, Jeannot; Boeri, Cyril; Kempf, Jean-François

    2014-12-01

    We hypothesized that a routine one-stage exchange for treatment of chronically infected total hip replacement (THR) will lead to (1) a higher rate of infection recurrence and (2) a poorer hip outcome than the published rates after two-stage exchange. Sixty-five cases have been treated consecutively with one-stage exchange. All patients have been followed for a period of three to six years or until death or infection recurrence. The five-year rate for infection recurrence was 16%. The five-year survival rate for recurrence of the index infection was 8%. Forty-two percent of the hips had a good or excellent PMA score, and 46% a good or excellent OH score. Routine one-stage exchange was not associated with a higher recurrence rate and a poorer hip function than previously published series of two-stage exchange. Therefore, there is little support to choose two-stage exchange as the routine treatment for management of chronically infected THR.

  10. Streptococcus gordonii—a rare cause of prosthetic joint infection in a total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Fenelon, Christopher; Galbraith, John G.; Dalton, David M.; Masterson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with a history of bilateral total hip replacements presented with rigors, fever and sudden onset left groin pain. A pelvic X-ray showed well-fixed implants. Blood results revealed a leucocytosis (white cell count 22.3 × 109 l–1) and elevated C-reactive protein (211 mg/l). Ultrasound-guided aspiration of her left hip grew Streptococcus gordonii. No source infection could be identified apart from a new chronic sinus infection in a left upper incisor. Following a discussion with the patient a 6-week course of intravenous ceftriaxone was started and was successful in normalizing her inflammatory markers. She was placed on long-term suppressive amoxicillin following this. Her suppressive antibiotic therapy was complicated by the development of a clostridium difficile infection and her antibiotics were changed to doxycycline. At 1-year follow-up, she was asymptomatic with no further episodes of groin pain or fever. PMID:28096320

  11. Salvage Procedures for Management of Prosthetic Joint Infection After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Samer S.S.; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Shaath, Mohammed; Sabri, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increasing load placed by joint replacement surgery on health care systems makes infection, even with the lowest rates, a serious concern that needs to be thoroughly studied and addressed using all possible measures. Methods: A comprehensive review of the current literature on salvage procedures for recurrent PJIs using PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL has been conducted. Results: Prolonged suppressive antibiotic therapy (PSAT), resection arthroplasty and arthrodesis were the most common procedures performed. Suppressive antibiotic therapy is based on the use of well tolerated long term antibiotics in controlling sensitive organisms. Resection arthroplasty which should be reserved as a last resort provided more predictable outcomes in the hip whereas arthrodesis was associated with better outcomes in the knee. Various methods for arthrodesis including internal and external fixation have been described. Conclusion: Despite good union and infection control rates, all methods were associated with complications occasionally requiring further surgical interventions. PMID:28144373

  12. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  13. Modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov external fixator as a salvage method in the management of severely infected total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ababkov, Yuri V; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resection arthroplasty or hip arthrodesis after total hip replacement (THR) can be used to salvage the limb in case with deep infection and severe bone loss. The Ilizarov fixator provides stability, axial correction, weight-bearing and good fusion rates. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively assessed the outcomes of 37 patients with severe periprosthetic infection after THR treated between 1999 and 2011. The treatment included implant removal, debridement and a modified Girdestone arthroplasty (29 cases) or hip arthrodesis (seven cases) using the Ilizarov fixator. The Ilizarov fixation continued from 45 to 50 days in the modified arthroplasty group and 90 days in the arthrodesis group. One case was treated using the conventional resection arthroplasty bilaterally. Results: Eighteen months after treatment, infection control was seen in 97.3% cases. Six hips were fused as one patient died in this group. Limb length discrepancy (LLD) averaged 5.5 cm. The Harris hip score ranged from 35 to 92 points. Hip joint motion ranged from 10° to 30° in the modified arthroplasty group. All subjects could walk independently or using support aids. No subluxation or LLD progression was observed. Conclusion: The modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov apparatus results in sufficient ability for ambulation and good infection control in cases of failed THR associated with severe infection. PMID:26955173

  14. The challenge of methicillin resistant staphylococcal infection after total hip replacement: overlooked or overstated?

    PubMed

    Parry, M C; Duncan, C P

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infections of the hip have once more pushed prosthesis preserving techniques into the limelight. At the same time, the common infecting organisms are evolving to become more resistant to conventional antimicrobial agents. Whilst the epidemiology of resistant staphylococci is changing, a number of recent reports have advocated the use of irrigation and debridement and one-stage revision for the treatment of periprosthetic joint infections due to resistant organisms. This review presents the available evidence for the treatment of periprosthetic joint infections of the hip, concentrating in particular on methicillin resistant staphylococci. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement System.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure that is done to alleviate discomfort secondary to osteoarthritis in the hip, which is most often a result of hip dysplasia. Commercially available total hip replacement implants for small animal patients are classified as cemented or cementless. The INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement system includes modular, screw-in cementless components that were developed to improve implant stability by maintaining as much normal anatomic structure, and by extension biomechanics of the coxofemoral joint, as possible. As a newer system, there are few data and no long-term studies available in the veterinary literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of an old infection in a total hip replacement with an interim spacer prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Zilkens, K W; Casser, H R; Ohnsorge, J

    1990-01-01

    When treating a septic hip-joint prosthesis with bone loss of the proximal femur secondary to osteomyelitis, we implanted a specially designed prosthesis to act as a local antibiotic and spacer between the acetabulum and femur until the infection abated. Arthroplasty could then be carried out with no trouble and there was no recurrence of infection.

  17. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations.

  18. Intraoperative subcutaneous wound closing culture sample: a predicting factor for periprosthetic infection after hip- and knee-replacement?

    PubMed

    Frank, Christian B; Adams, Martin; Kroeber, Markus; Wentzensen, Andreas; Heppert, Volkmar; Schulte-Bockholt, Dietrich; Guehring, Thorsten

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether intraoperative subcutaneous wound closing culture samples (WCCS) are useful to predict periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Here we prospectively followed 167 out of a total of 175 consecutive patients with primary total hip (THR) or knee replacement (TKR) between 01/2002 and 12/2002 for a mean follow-up period of 5 years; of those patients, n = 159 (96.8%) underwent WCCS. The results showed a positive WCCS in n = 9 cases (5.8%). Nine patients developed postoperative wound complication and required revision surgery. Two patients developed signs of a deep periprosthetic infection; however, only one out of nine patients had initial positive WCCS. Our results thus indicate that WCCS during primary joint replacement is not an appropriate predictive method to identify patients at risk for periprosthetic joint infections.

  19. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  20. What Is a Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce joint pain and stiffness. It can increase muscle strength and joint range of motion (how much you ... goals after hip replacement surgery are to: Increase muscle strength Increase your blood circulation and overall fitness Avoid ...

  1. Minimally invasive hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles around the hip are cut or detached. Description To perform this surgery: A cut will be ... 30 centimeters) long. The surgeon will use special instruments to work through the small cut. Surgery involves ...

  2. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... A socket, which is usually made of strong metal. A liner, which fits inside the socket. It ... are now trying other materials, like ceramic or metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  3. [Hip replacement in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I B; Paniushin, K A; Brizhan', L K; Buriachenko, B P; Varfolomeev, D I; Mimanchev, O V

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint diseases and injuries are common for orthopedic pathology among military personnel. Hip replacement is one of the most frequent operations. Authors evaluated hip replacement in 136 servicemen treated at the center of traumatology and orthopedics of Burdenko General Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defense of Russia in 2010-2013. On the basis of the conducted analysis the main disease groups were revealed, peculiarities of pathology among this category of patients. Authors proposed surgical doctrine for the treatment of this contingent. Effective surgical treatment, in particular, hip replacement surgery, conducted with the use of the proposed principles, as a rule, fully functionally cured patients and contributes to return them in the system that contributes to the strengthening of defensibility of the country.

  4. Active warming systems to maintain perioperative normothermia in hip replacement surgery: a therapeutic aid or a vector of infection?

    PubMed

    Moretti, B; Larocca, A M V; Napoli, C; Martinelli, D; Paolillo, L; Cassano, M; Notarnicola, A; Moretti, L; Pesce, V

    2009-09-01

    Various reliable body heat-regulating systems have been designed and developed with the aim of maintaining an adequate body temperature in the course of major surgery. This is crucial to avoid the onset of potentially severe complications that are especially serious in elderly and debilitated subjects. Among these systems, the Bair Hugger blanket has demonstrated excellent efficacy. However, some reports in the literature have suggested that the use of such devices can increase the risk of nosocomial infections, particularly surgical wound infections. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of contamination of the surgical site correlated to the use of the Bair Hugger blanket during hip replacement surgery. To this end, the level of bacterial contamination of the air in the operating theatre was quantified with and without the use of the Bair Hugger, during the course of 30 total non-cemented hip implants performed in patients with osteoarthritis. Sampling was done both in the empty theatre and during surgical procedures, in different zones around the operating table and on the patient's body surface. Statistical analysis of the results demonstrated that the Bair Hugger system does not pose a real risk for nosocomial infections, whereas it does offer the advantage of preventing the potentially very severe consequences of hypothermia during major orthopaedic surgery. In addition, monitoring patients over the six months following the operation allowed us to exclude a later manifestation of a nosocomial infection.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  6. Hip Replacement: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) Also in Spanish Total Hip Replacement (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) - PDF Also in Spanish Total Hip Replacement (Arthroplasty) (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) ...

  7. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hip Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Hip Replacement Potpuna zamjena kuka - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Hip Replacement 全髋关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  8. Do hip replacements improve outcomes for hip fracture patients?

    PubMed

    Burns, R B; Moskowitz, M A; Ash, A; Kane, R L; Finch, M; McCarthy, E P

    1999-03-01

    Hip fracture is a common problem among older Americans. Two types of procedures are available for repairing hip fractures: hip replacement and open or closed reduction with or without internal fixation. The assumption has been that hip replacement produces better functional outcomes. Although that is the common wisdom, outcome studies evaluating hip replacement for treatment of hip fracture are few and have not clearly documented its superiority. To compare outcomes of hip fracture patients who receive hip replacement versus another stabilizing procedure (open or closed reduction with or without internal fixation). Prospective cohort study. We studied 332 patients (age, > 65) who were hospitalized for a femoral neck fracture and discharged alive. We examined 2 treatment groups, hip replacement versus another procedure, on 6 outcomes [Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), walking, living situation (institutionalized or not), perceived health (excellent/good vs. fair/poor), rehospitalization, and mortality] at 3 postdischarge times (6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year). Mean age was 80, 80% were female, 96% White, 28% married, and 71% had a hip replacement. The treatment groups were similar at baseline (3 months before admission as reported at discharge) on ADLs, walking, living situation, and perceived health (all P > 0.24). After adjusting for demographics, clinical characteristics, fracture characteristics, and prior ADLs, walking ability, living situation, and perceived health, patients with a hip replacement did not do better at 6 weeks, 6 months, or 1 year post-discharge on any of the 6 outcome measures (all 18 P > 0.10). A global test of all 6 outcomes finds hip replacement patients doing less well at one year (P = 0.02). Despite the commonly held belief that hip replacement is a superior treatment for hip fracture, we found no suggestion of better outcomes for hip replacement on any of 6 key outcomes.

  9. Hip Resurfacing: An Alternative to Conventional Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone is reshaped and capped with a metal prosthesis. The hip socket is fitted with a metal ... but higher levels may be problematic. The socket prosthesis for a traditional hip replacement is usually lined ...

  10. Iliopsoas bursitis following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y M; Gupte, C M; Beverly, M J

    2004-12-01

    We report the imaging features of a 52-year-old man presenting with a groin mass and gross lower limb oedema secondary to venous occlusion by massive cystic enlargement of the iliopsoas bursa 4 years after uncemented primary total hip replacement. Ultrasonography of the groin mass demonstrated a large cystic lesion extending into the pelvis. CT showed displacement of the external iliac vessels with venous compression. Bursography showed the bursa's margins and no communication with the hip joint. Diagnostic aspiration excluded infection, but fluid recollection occurred subsequently. Complete resolution of symptoms, including limb swelling, followed surgical excision with no recurrence at the 5-year follow-up. We believe iliopsoas bursitis occurred as a tissue response to polyethylene wear within the prosthetic hip and occurred even in the absence of loosening or a direct communication between bursa and joint.

  11. [Treatment of infected total hip endoprostheses].

    PubMed

    Zilkens, K W; Forst, R; Casser, H R

    1989-07-01

    In total hip arthroplasty the most serious complication besides aseptic loosening is infection. The results observed in 42 cases of infected hip arthroplasties are presented. In contrast to early superficial infection, deep infection following total hip replacement is difficult to treat. Depending on the general condition of the patient, a well-defined, adequate treatment is required. In patients at vital risk the provocation of a permanent fistula can be recommended as an alternative method in preference to revision arthroplasty.

  12. Rationale for one stage exchange of infected hip replacement using uncemented implants and antibiotic impregnated bone graft.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Heinz

    2009-09-04

    Infection of a total hip replacement (THR) is considered a devastating complication, necessitating its complete removal and thorough debridement of the site. It is undoubted that one stage exchange, if successful, would provide the best benefit both for the patient and the society. Still the fear of re-infection dominates the surgeons decisions and in the majority of cases directs them to multiple stage protocols. However, there is no scientifically based argument for that practice. Successful eradication of infection with two stage procedures is reported to average 80% to 98%. On the other hand a literature review of Jackson and Schmalzried (CORR 2000) summarizing the results of 1,299 infected hip replacements treated with direct exchange (almost exclusively using antibiotic loaded cement), reports of 1,077 (83%) having been successful. The comparable results suggest, that the major factor for a successful outcome with traditional approaches may be found in the quality of surgical debridement and dead space management. Failures in all protocols seem to be caused by small fragments of bacterial colonies remaining after debridement, whereas neither systemic antibiotics nor antibiotic loaded bone cement (PMMA) have been able to improve the situation significantly. Reasons for failure may be found in the limited sensitivity of traditional bacterial culturing and reduced antibiotic susceptibility of involved pathogens, especially considering biofilm formation. Whenever a new prosthesis is implanted into a previously infected site the surgeon must be aware of increased risk of failure, both in single or two stage revisions. Eventual removal therefore should be easy with low risk of additional damage to the bony substance. On the other hand it should also have potential of a good long term result in case of success. Cemented revisions generally show inferior long term results compared to uncemented techniques; the addition of antibiotics to cement reduces its

  13. Bacterial Findings in Infected Hip Joint Replacements in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis: A Study of 318 Revisions for Infection Reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Schrama, J. C.; Lutro, O.; Langvatn, H.; Hallan, G.; Espehaug, B.; Sjursen, H.; Engesaeter, L. B.; Fevang, B.-T.

    2012-01-01

    High rates of Staphylococcus aureus are reported in prosthetic joint infection (PJI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA patients are considered to have a high risk of infection with bacteria of potentially oral or dental origin. One thousand four hundred forty-three revisions for infection were reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR) from 1987 to 2007. For this study 269 infection episodes in 255 OA patients served as control group. In the NAR we identified 49 infection episodes in 37 RA patients from 1987 to 2009. The RA patients were, on average, 10 years younger than the OA patients and there were more females (70% versus 54%). We found no differences in the bacterial findings in RA and OA. A tendency towards a higher frequency of Staphylococcus aureus (18% versus 11%) causing PJI was found in the RA patients compared to OA. There were no bacteria of potential odontogenic origin found in the RA patients, while we found 4% in OA. The bacteria identified in revisions for infection in THRs in patients with RA did not significantly differ from those in OA. Bacteria of oral or dental origin were not found in infected hip joint replacements in RA. PMID:24977078

  14. International variation in hip replacement rates

    PubMed Central

    Merx, H; Dreinhofer, K; Schrader, P; Sturmer, T; Puhl, W; Gunther, K; Brenner, H

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To summarise epidemiological data on the frequency of hip replacements in the countries of the developed world, especially in countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and to investigate whether missing consensus criteria for the indication for total hip replacement (THR) result in different replacement rates. Methods: Country-specific hip replacement rates were collected using the available literature, different data sources of national authorities, and estimates of leading hip replacement manufacturers. Results: According to administrative and literature data sources the reported crude primary THR rate varied between 50 and 130 procedures/100 000 inhabitants in OECD countries in the 1990s. The crude overall hip implantation rate, summarising THR, partial hip replacement, and hip revision procedures, was reported to range from 60 to 200 procedures/100 000 inhabitants in the late 1990s. Moreover, large national differences were seen in the relationship between total and partial hip replacement procedures. Conclusion: The reported differences in hip replacement rates in OECD countries are substantial. They may be due to various causes, including different coding systems, country-specific differences in the healthcare system, in total expenditure on health per capita, in the population age structure, and in different indication criteria for THR. PMID:12594106

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis in total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, J P; Hughes, S P; Scott, J E; Evans, M J; Benson, M K

    1979-01-01

    A controlled prospective trial to compare the efficacy of the antibiotics cephaloridine and flucloxacillin in preventing infection after total hip replacement was conducted at three hospitals. The antibiotic regimens began before surgery, cephaloridine being continued for 12 hours and flucloxacillin for 14 days afterwards. Over an 18-month period 297 patients undergoing a total of 310 hip replacements were entered into the trial and randomly allocated to one of the regimens. The follow-up period ranged from one to two and a half years. All operations were performed in conventional operating theatres; at two of the hospitals these were also used by various other surgical disciplines. Four patients developed deep infection, two having received the cephaloridine and two the flucloxacillin regimen. The overall rate of deep infection was therefore 1.3%. Thus three doses of cephaloridine proved to be as effective as a two-week regimen of flucloxacillin. Giving a prophylactic systemic antibiotic reduced the incidence of infection to a level comparable with that obtained in ultra-clean-air operating enclosures. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:373841

  16. Control strategies to prevent total hip replacement-related infections: a systematic review and mixed treatment comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Henry; Barnett, Adrian G; Merollini, Katharina; Sutton, Alex; Cooper, Nicola; Berendt, Tony; Wilson, Jennie; Graves, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the available evidence and estimate the comparative efficacy of control strategies to prevent total hip replacement (THR)-related surgical site infections (SSIs) using a mixed treatment comparison. Design Systematic review and mixed treatment comparison. Setting Hospital and other healthcare settings. Participants Patients undergoing THR. Primary and secondary outcome measures The number of THR-related SSIs occurring following the surgical operation. Results 12 studies involving 123 788 THRs and 9 infection control strategies were identified. The strategy of ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+conventional ventilation’ significantly reduced the risk of THR-related SSI compared with the referent strategy (no systemic antibiotics+plain cement+conventional ventilation), OR 0.13 (95% credible interval (CrI) 0.03–0.35), and had the highest probability (47–64%) and highest median rank of being the most effective strategy. There was some evidence to suggest that ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+laminar airflow’ could potentially increase infection risk compared with ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+conventional ventilation’, 1.96 (95% CrI 0.52–5.37). There was no high-quality evidence that antibiotic-impregnated cement without systemic antibiotic prophylaxis was effective in reducing infection compared with plain cement with systemic antibiotics, 1.28 (95% CrI 0.38–3.38). Conclusions We found no convincing evidence in favour of the use of laminar airflow over conventional ventilation for prevention of THR-related SSIs, yet laminar airflow is costly and widely used. Antibiotic-impregnated cement without systemic antibiotics may not be effective in reducing THR-related SSIs. The combination with the highest confidence for reducing SSIs was ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+conventional ventilation’. Our evidence synthesis underscores the need to review

  17. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  18. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  19. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Review Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  20. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Review Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  1. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. Case presentation A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Conclusions Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected joints are negative. Clinical

  2. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, Pasquale; Corpolongo, Angela; Conte, Aristide; Gentilotti, Elisa; Narciso, Pasquale

    2012-01-10

    Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected joints are negative. Clinical outcomes of prosthetic joint infection by

  3. Bacteria isolated from deep joint sepsis after operation for total hip or knee replacement and the sources of the infections with Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lidwell, O M; Lowbury, E J; Whyte, W; Blowers, R; Stanley, S J; Lowe, D

    1983-03-01

    A wide variety of bacterial species, many usually regarded as of low pathogenicity, were isolated from septic joints after operation for total hip or knee joint replacement in a multi-centre trial of ultraclean air in operating rooms. The prophylactic antibiotics generally used appeared to reduce considerably the rates of infection with most species but to be ineffective against 'gut' organisms. For about half the septic infections involving Staphylococcus aureus nasal swabs had been obtained from the patient and operating staff at the time of operation for insertion of the prosthesis. Strains of Staph, aureus isolated from these and from the infected joints were phage typed and tested for antibiotic sensitivity. A probable source among the carriers was found for seven out of the 14 infections and a possible source for another five. Very small numbers of Staph. aureus were needed to initiate infection.

  4. Trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed

    Hartofilakidis, G; Babis, G C; Georgiades, G; Kourlaba, G

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of trochanteric osteotomy in 192 total hip replacements in 140 patients with congenital hip disease. There was bony union in 158 hips (82%), fibrous union in 29 (15%) and nonunion in five (3%). The rate of union had a statistically significant relationship with the position of reattachment of the trochanter, which depended greatly on the pre-operative diagnosis. The pre-operative Trendelenburg gait substantially improved in all three disease types (dysplasia, low and high dislocation) and all four categories of reattachment position. A persistent Trendelenburg gait post-operatively was noticed mostly in patients with defective union (fibrous or nonunion). Acetabular and femoral loosening had a statistically significant relationship with defective union and the position of reattachment of the trochanter. These results suggest that the complications of trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for patients with congenital hip disease are less important than the benefits of this surgical approach.

  5. A multidisciplinary team approach to two-stage revision for the infected hip replacement: a minimum five-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M S; Raja, S; Khan, M A; Haddad, F S

    2014-10-01

    We report the five year outcomes of a two-stage approach for infected total hip replacement. This is a single-surgeon experience at a tertiary centre where the more straightforward cases are treated using single-stage exchange. This study highlights the vital role of the multidisciplinary team in managing these cases. A total of 125 patients (51 male, 74 female) with a mean age of 68 years (42 to 78) were reviewed prospectively. Functional status was assessed using the Harris hip score (HHS). The mean HHS improved from 38 (6 to 78.5) pre-operatively to 81.2 (33 to 98) post-operatively. Staphylococcus species were isolated in 85 patients (68%). The rate of control of infection was 96% at five years. In all, 19 patients died during the period of the study. This represented a one year mortality of 0.8% and an overall mortality of 15.2% at five years. No patients were lost to follow-up. We report excellent control of infection in a series of complex patients and infections using a two-stage revision protocol supported by a multidisciplinary approach. The reason for the high rate of mortality in these patients is not known.

  6. Total hip replacement for hip fracture: Surgical techniques and concepts.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Ross; Porteous, Matthew; Hubble, Matthew J W; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-10-01

    When treating a hip fracture with a total hip replacement (THR) the surgical technique may differ in a number of aspects in comparison to elective arthroplasty. The hip fracture patient is more likely to have poor bone stock secondary to osteoporosis, be older, have a greater number of co-morbidities, and have had limited peri-operative work-up. These factors lead to a higher risk of complications, morbidity and perioperative mortality. Consideration should be made to performing the THR in a laminar flow theatre, by a surgeon experienced in total hip arthroplasty, using an anterolateral approach, cementing the implant in place, using a large head size and with repair of the joint capsule. Combined Ortho-geriatric care is recommended with similar post-operative rehabilitation to elective THR patients but with less expectation of short length of stay and consideration for fracture prevention measures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  8. A cost-effectiveness modelling study of strategies to reduce risk of infection following primary hip replacement based on a systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Nicholas; Wloch, Catherine; Wilson, Jennie; Barnett, Adrian; Sutton, Alex; Cooper, Nicola; Merollini, Katharina; McCreanor, Victoria; Cheng, Qinglu; Burn, Edward; Lamagni, Theresa; Charlett, Andre

    2016-01-01

    123,788 total hip replacements (THRs) and nine infection control strategies, were identified. The quality of the evidence was judged against four categories developed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Methods for Development of NICE Public Health Guidance ( http://publications.nice.org.uk/methods-for-the-development-of-nice-public-health-guidance-third-edition-pmg4 ), accessed March 2012. All evidence was found to fit the two highest categories of 1 and 2. Nine competing infection control interventions [treatments (Ts) 1-9] were used in a cohort simulation model of 77,321 patients who had a primary THR in 2012. Predictions were made for cases of deep infection and total costs, and QALY outcomes. Compared with a baseline of T1 (no systemic antibiotics, plain cement and conventional ventilation) all other treatment strategies reduced risk. T6 was the most effective (systemic antibiotics, antibiotic-impregnated cement and conventional ventilation) and prevented a further 1481 cases of deep infection, and led to the largest annual cost savings and the greatest gains to QALYs. The additional uses of laminar airflow and body exhaust suits indicate higher costs and worse health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS T6 is an optimal strategy for reducing the risk of SSI following THA. The other strategies that are commonly used among NHS hospitals lead to higher cost and worse QALY outcomes. Policy-makers, therefore, have an opportunity to save resources and improve health outcomes. The effects of laminar air flow and body exhaust suits might be further studied if policy-makers are to consider disinvesting in these technologies. LIMITATIONS A wide range of evidence sources was synthesised and there is large uncertainty in the conclusions. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme and the Queensland Health Quality Improvement and Enhancement Programme (grant number 2008001769). PMID:27468732

  9. A cost-effectiveness modelling study of strategies to reduce risk of infection following primary hip replacement based on a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nicholas; Wloch, Catherine; Wilson, Jennie; Barnett, Adrian; Sutton, Alex; Cooper, Nicola; Merollini, Katharina; McCreanor, Victoria; Cheng, Qinglu; Burn, Edward; Lamagni, Theresa; Charlett, Andre

    2016-07-01

    A deep infection of the surgical site is reported in 0.7% of all cases of total hip arthroplasty (THA). This often leads to revision surgery that is invasive, painful and costly. A range of strategies is employed in NHS hospitals to reduce risk, yet no economic analysis has been undertaken to compare the value for money of competing prevention strategies. To compare the costs and health benefits of strategies that reduce the risk of deep infection following THA in NHS hospitals. To make recommendations to decision-makers about the cost-effectiveness of the alternatives. The study comprised a systematic review and cost-effectiveness decision analysis. 77,321 patients who had a primary hip arthroplasty in NHS hospitals in 2012. Nine different treatment strategies including antibiotic prophylaxis, antibiotic-impregnated cement and ventilation systems used in the operating theatre. Change in the number of deep infections, change in the total costs and change in the total health benefits in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Literature searches using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were undertaken to cover the period 1966-2012 to identify infection prevention strategies. Relevant journals, conference proceedings and bibliographies of retrieved papers were hand-searched. Orthopaedic surgeons and infection prevention experts were also consulted. English-language papers only. The selection of evidence was by two independent reviewers. Studies were included if they were interventions that reported THA-related deep surgical site infection (SSI) as an outcome. Mixed-treatment comparisons were made to produce estimates of the relative effects of competing infection control strategies. Twelve studies, six randomised controlled trials and six observational studies, involving 123,788 total hip replacements (THRs) and nine infection control strategies, were identified. The quality of

  10. Pelvic position and movement during hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, G; Pandit, H G; da Assunção, R; Taylor, A; McLardy-Smith, P; De Smet, K A; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2014-07-01

    The orientation of the acetabular component is influenced not only by the orientation at which the surgeon implants the component, but also the orientation of the pelvis at the time of implantation. Hence, the orientation of the pelvis at set-up and its movement during the operation, are important. During 67 hip replacements, using a validated photogrammetric technique, we measured how three surgeons orientated the patient's pelvis, how much the pelvis moved during surgery, and what effect these had on the final orientation of the acetabular component. Pelvic orientation at set-up, varied widely (mean (± 2, standard deviation (sd))): tilt 8° (2sd ± 32), obliquity -4° (2sd ± 12), rotation -8° (2sd ± 14). Significant differences in pelvic positioning were detected between surgeons (p < 0.001). The mean angular movement of the pelvis between set-up and component implantation was 9° (sd 6). Factors influencing pelvic movement included surgeon, approach (posterior > lateral), procedure (hip resurfacing > total hip replacement) and type of support (p < 0.001). Although, on average, surgeons achieved their desired acetabular component orientation, there was considerable variability (2sd ± 16) in component orientation. We conclude that inconsistency in positioning the patient at set-up and movement of the pelvis during the operation account for much of the variation in acetabular component orientation. Improved methods of positioning and holding the pelvis are required.

  11. Infection and sepsis after operations for total hip or knee-joint replacement: influence of ultraclean air, prophylactic antibiotics and other factors.

    PubMed

    Lidwell, O M; Lowbury, E J; Whyte, W; Blowers, R; Stanley, S J; Lowe, D

    1984-12-01

    Operating in ultraclean air and the prophylactic use of antibiotics have been found to reduce the incidence of joint sepsis confirmed at re-operation, after total hip or knee-joint replacement. The reduction was about 2-fold when operations were done in ultraclean air, 4.5-fold when body-exhaust suits also were worn, and about 3- to 4-fold when antibiotics had been given prophylactically. The effects of ultraclean air and antibiotics were additive. Wound sepsis recognized during post-operative hospital stay was, however, reduced by these measures only when it had been classed as major wound sepsis. This was reported after 2.3% of operations done without antibiotic cover in conventionally ventilated operating rooms. Joint sepsis was much more frequent after wound infection and especially after major wound sepsis, although most cases of joint sepsis were not preceded by recognized wound sepsis. This was particularly noticeable after major wound sepsis associated with Staphylococcus aureus; after 37 such infections the same species was subsequently found in the septic joint of 11 patients. The sources of wound colonization with Staph. aureus, when this was not followed by joint sepsis, appeared to differ widely from those where joint sepsis occurred later. Operating-room sources could be found for most of the latter and the risk of infection appeared to be similar with respect to any carrier in the operating room whether a member of the operating team or the patient. For wound colonization that was not followed by joint sepsis, operating-room sources could only be inferred for fewer than half and of these more than one half appeared to be related to strains carried by the patient at the time of operation. During the follow-up period, which averaged about 2 1/4 years with a maximum of four years, there were, in addition to the 86 instances of deep joint sepsis confirmed at re-operation, 85 instances in which sepsis in the joint was suspected during this period but was

  12. Infection and sepsis after operations for total hip or knee-joint replacement: influence of ultraclean air, prophylactic antibiotics and other factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lidwell, O. M.; Lowbury, E. J.; Whyte, W.; Blowers, R.; Stanley, S. J.; Lowe, D.

    1984-01-01

    Operating in ultraclean air and the prophylactic use of antibiotics have been found to reduce the incidence of joint sepsis confirmed at re-operation, after total hip or knee-joint replacement. The reduction was about 2-fold when operations were done in ultraclean air, 4.5-fold when body-exhaust suits also were worn, and about 3- to 4-fold when antibiotics had been given prophylactically. The effects of ultraclean air and antibiotics were additive. Wound sepsis recognized during post-operative hospital stay was, however, reduced by these measures only when it had been classed as major wound sepsis. This was reported after 2.3% of operations done without antibiotic cover in conventionally ventilated operating rooms. Joint sepsis was much more frequent after wound infection and especially after major wound sepsis, although most cases of joint sepsis were not preceded by recognized wound sepsis. This was particularly noticeable after major wound sepsis associated with Staphylococcus aureus; after 37 such infections the same species was subsequently found in the septic joint of 11 patients. The sources of wound colonization with Staph. aureus, when this was not followed by joint sepsis, appeared to differ widely from those where joint sepsis occurred later. Operating-room sources could be found for most of the latter and the risk of infection appeared to be similar with respect to any carrier in the operating room whether a member of the operating team or the patient. For wound colonization that was not followed by joint sepsis, operating-room sources could only be inferred for fewer than half and of these more than one half appeared to be related to strains carried by the patient at the time of operation. During the follow-up period, which averaged about 2 1/4 years with a maximum of four years, there were, in addition to the 86 instances of deep joint sepsis confirmed at re-operation, 85 instances in which sepsis in the joint was suspected during this period but was

  13. Fixation Versus Replacement in Geriatric Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, H. K.; Selvaraj, Dahshaini; Chan, William; Naidu, G.; Ramason, R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although there is evidence of improved functional outcomes with our “integrated care pathway” for geriatric hip fractures, we do not know if there is a significant difference in functional recovery of activities of daily living and attainment of independence in self-care between patients who underwent fixation and those treated with arthroplasty. Objective: To determine whether such a difference exists in surgically fixed hip fractures. Materials and Methods: Patients with hip fracture treated surgically were divided into group A (internal fixation, n = 213) and group B (arthroplasty, n = 199). Demographic data, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score, time to surgery, and length of stay were recorded. Inpatient complications and mortality rates were also documented. Modified Barthel Index (MBI) scores were recorded for the following intervals: prefall, discharge, 6-month, and at 1-year follow-up. Results: The mean age (A: 80 years and B: 81years), CCI (A: 5.41 and B: 5.43), and length of stay (A: 13.6 days and B: 15.2 days) were not significantly different. However, there was a significant difference (P < .05) in time to surgery (A: 102.2 hours and B: 86.6 hours). Complication rates were about 6% in both groups (A = 6.57%: urinary infections = 13, wound infections = 1 and B = 6.03%: urinary infections = 10, wound infections = 1, pressure ulcer = 1). The preinjury MBI scores were significantly different (P < .05; A: 91.65 and B: 88.19), however, there was no significant difference in scores measured at discharge (A: 60.79 and B: 59.39), 6 months (A: 77.65 and B: 77.47) and 1 year (A: 80.71 and B: 83.03). Patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture had overall recovered 90.9% of their preinjury function (overall MBI at 1 year: 81.83). Conclusion: The MBI scores reflect the extent of attainment of independence in self-care, and actual functional recovery is gauged from the percentage of recovery of preinjury function at 1 year postsurgery. We

  14. Hip involvement in ankylosing spondylitis: epidemiology and risk factors associated with hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Vander Cruyssen, Bert; Muñoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Font, Pilar; Mulero, Juan; de Vlam, Kurt; Boonen, Annelies; Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Flores, Diana; Vastesaeger, Nathan; Collantes, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Although clinicians recognize hip involvement, which frequently leads to hip replacement surgery, as an important feature of AS, data on the epidemiology, nature of the disease and therapeutic strategies are scarce. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of clinical and radiological hip involvement and define the risk factors for the hip replacement surgery in AS patients. Data from 3 datasets were merged, including 847 Belgian (ASPECT database), 1405 Spanish (REGISPONSER database) and 466 Ibero-American (RESPONDIA database) AS patients. The ASPECT and REGISPONSER database (Dataset A) are used for exploratory analysis; the RESPONDIA database (Dataset B) is used for confirmative analysis. Factors associated with hip involvement and the hip replacement surgery were analysed. Twenty four (REGISPONSER) to 36% (RESPONDIA) of AS patients under rheumatologist's care presented clinical hip involvement, including the 5% (Dataset A) of AS patients who needed hip replacement surgery. Patients with hip involvement had significantly worse overall Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) scores compared with patients without hip involvement (mean difference = 1.6, P < 0.001) (Dataset A, confirmed in B). Corrected for disease duration, patients with early disease onset, enthesial and axial disease needed most frequently hip replacement surgery (Dataset A, confirmed in B). Hip involvement is commonly recognized by rheumatologists in AS patients, and involves about one out of the three to four patients with AS and is associated with impaired functioning reflected by higher overall BASFI scores. Early onset of disease, axial and enthesial disease are associated with the hip replacement surgery in AS.

  15. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshid, T.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  16. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  17. Dual mobility total hip replacement in a high risk population

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Jatinder Singh; Al Riyami, Amur; Allami, Mohamad Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate results of dual mobility total replacement in a high risk population who take hip into hyperflexed position while sitting and praying on the floor. Method: The study included 65 (35 primary total replacement and 30 complex total hip replacement) cases of total hip replacement using avantage privilege dual mobility cup system from biomet. A cemented acetabular component and on femoral side a bimetric stem, either cemented or uncemented used depending on the canal type. Ten cases were examined fluoroscopically in follow up. Result: There was dislocation in one patient undergoing complex hip replacement. Fluoroscopy study showed no impingement between the neck of prosthesis and acetabular shell at extremes of all movements. Conclusion: The prevalence of dislocation is low in our high risk population and we consider it preferred concept for patients undergoing complex total hip replacement. PMID:27924742

  18. Subsidence in Collarless Corail Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Selvaratnam, Veenesh; Shetty, Vishwanath; Sahni, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether subsidence occurs in collarless Corail hip replacement (CCHR) and to ascertain the extent and timing of subsidence if present. Retrospective case notes analysis was performed. Sixty eight patients who had CCHR were identified from our database. Male to female ratio was 32:36. Their mean age was 74.2 years (range 37-95 years). Indications for surgery were osteoarthritis in 64 (94%) patients, rheumatoid arthritis in two (3%) patients and avascular necrosis in two (3%) patients. Subsidence was measured at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year post-op compared to initial post-op x-rays. At 6 weeks x-ray 21 patients did not have any subsidence, 18 patients had 1 millimeter (mm) subsidence, 10 patients had 2mms subsidence, 4 patients had 3mms subsidence, 5 patients had 4mms subsidence, 1 patient had 5mms subsidence, 4 patients had 6 mms subsidence and 1 patient each had subsidence of 7mms, 9mms, 11mms, 13mms and 26 mms respectively. When compared with 6 months x-rays only 2 patients had a further subsidence of 2mms while another patient had 3mms subsidence. No further subsidence occurred at 1 year follow up x-rays. One patient had revision surgery due to symptomatic subsidence (29mms) at 6 months follow up. Subsidence does occur in the first 6 weeks in collarless Corail hip replacement, and to a lesser extent until 6 months postoperatively, but does not progress further. PMID:26069515

  19. Subsidence in Collarless Corail Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, Veenesh; Shetty, Vishwanath; Sahni, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether subsidence occurs in collarless Corail hip replacement (CCHR) and to ascertain the extent and timing of subsidence if present. Retrospective case notes analysis was performed. Sixty eight patients who had CCHR were identified from our database. Male to female ratio was 32:36. Their mean age was 74.2 years (range 37-95 years). Indications for surgery were osteoarthritis in 64 (94%) patients, rheumatoid arthritis in two (3%) patients and avascular necrosis in two (3%) patients. Subsidence was measured at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year post-op compared to initial post-op x-rays. At 6 weeks x-ray 21 patients did not have any subsidence, 18 patients had 1 millimeter (mm) subsidence, 10 patients had 2mms subsidence, 4 patients had 3mms subsidence, 5 patients had 4mms subsidence, 1 patient had 5mms subsidence, 4 patients had 6 mms subsidence and 1 patient each had subsidence of 7mms, 9mms, 11mms, 13mms and 26 mms respectively. When compared with 6 months x-rays only 2 patients had a further subsidence of 2mms while another patient had 3mms subsidence. No further subsidence occurred at 1 year follow up x-rays. One patient had revision surgery due to symptomatic subsidence (29mms) at 6 months follow up. Subsidence does occur in the first 6 weeks in collarless Corail hip replacement, and to a lesser extent until 6 months postoperatively, but does not progress further.

  20. Recent Patents and Designs on Hip Replacement Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  1. Recent patents and designs on hip replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term.

  2. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/− 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  3. Infection in periprosthetic hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Fracture around the acetabulum and femur in total hip arthroplasty is a possible complication, sometimes with difficult surgical solution, namely when a sepsis is present. Periprosthetic hip fractures were classified according to a modified Vancouver classification. We treated 112 patients (67 men and 45 women) with periprosthetic hip fractures: 105 femoral fractures (94%) and seven acetabular fractures (6%). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years. For Type A (seven cases - 7%), B1 (10 cases - 10%) or C (13 cases - 12%) fractures around well fixed femoral stems we only fixed the fractures. For Type B2 (17 cases - 16%), B3 (46 cases - 44%) and D (12 cases - 11%, with associated fractures, not contemplated in the Vancouver classification) we used an uncemented long femoral stem, fixation with metallic cables and cancellous bone allografts to fill the femoral bone loss. We observed a deep infection in three patients (2.7%), three early hip dislocations treated by closed reductions, two cases with asymptomatic trochanteric non-union and one femoral refracture. In the three infection cases we performed two-stage revision with cementless hip prosthesis, using an antibiotic-loaded cement hip spacer (three to eight months), a six weeks period of parenteral antibiotics and we performed articular aspiration before revision surgery. Until now, we did not observe any re-infection. It is very important to make an early diagnosis, isolate micro-organisms and ensure their antibiotic susceptibility. The surgery solution depends on the well fixed implants and periprosthetic osteolysis and articular instability.

  4. A new anterolateral surgical approach for total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRANO, GIOVANNI F.; PAVLIDOU, MARIA; TODESCO, ALBERTO; PALERMO, AUGUSTO; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of the present paper is to present the short-term results of a “detachment-free” (DF) anterolateral approach for primary total hip replacement (THR) performed in a large series of patients. Methods two hundred patients submitted to primary THR were retrospectively reviewed for the present study. In all cases, the surgery was performed using a minimally invasive DF anterolateral approach, which entails no disconnection of tendons and no muscle damage. The study population consisted of 96 men (48%) and 104 women (52%), with an average age of 69.4 years (range 38–75). Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed after 12 months. Results the clinical results, evaluated using the Harris Hip Score, were excellent in 95% of the cases and good in 5%; no cases had fair or poor results. X-rays taken at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery did not show heterotopic ossification, mobilization of the prosthetic components, or hip dislocation. No infections, deep vein thrombosis, or failure of the gluteal muscles were reported. Conclusions the DF anterolateral approach for THR proved safe and provided effective results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:27900306

  5. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients.

  6. Countrywise results of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose An earlier Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) report on 280,201 total hip replacements (THRs) based on data from 1995–2006, from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, was published in 2009. The present study assessed THR survival according to country, based on the NARA database with the Finnish data included. Material and methods 438,733 THRs performed during the period 1995–2011 in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate survival probabilities with 95% confidence interval (CI). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and diagnosis, was used to analyze implant survival with revision for any reason as endpoint. Results The 15-year survival, with any revision as an endpoint, for all THRs was 86% (CI: 85.7–86.9) in Denmark, 88% (CI: 87.6–88.3) in Sweden, 87% (CI: 86.4–87.4) in Norway, and 84% (CI: 82.9–84.1) in Finland. Revision risk for all THRs was less in Sweden than in the 3 other countries during the first 5 years. However, revision risk for uncemented THR was less in Denmark than in Sweden during the sixth (HR = 0.53, CI: 0.34–0.82), seventh (HR = 0.60, CI: 0.37–0.97), and ninth (HR = 0.59, CI: 0.36–0.98) year of follow-up. Interpretation The differences in THR survival rates were considerable, with inferior results in Finland. Brand-level comparison of THRs in Nordic countries will be required. PMID:24650019

  7. Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery Research shows patients fare well, sometimes better, if ... involved with the studies, but agrees that home recovery is the best option for most patients. "The ...

  8. Total hip and total knee replacement: preoperative nursing management.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Brian

    Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery are carried out for the relief of hip or knee pain, usually caused by osteoarthritis. This is the first of two articles on THR and TKR. It will outline the different types of replacement used in lower limb joint replacement surgery. Preparation of patients for surgery requires attention to physical, psychological and social factors and these are explored in detail. The organization of services along the patient pathway to ensure comprehensive preparation is considered and the nursing role highlighted. The second article, to be published in the next issue, will discuss recovery and rehabilitation from THR and TKR surgery.

  9. Retrospective Evaluation of Anaesthesia Techniques for Hip Replacement Operations.

    PubMed

    Koç, Murat; Saçan, Özlem; Gamlı, Mehmet; Taşpınar, Vildan; Postacı, Aysun; Fikir, Emel; Dikmen, Bayazit

    2014-06-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated the demographic characteristics of patients that underwent hip replacement surgery in our orthopedic clinic. Associated diseases, preoperative laboratory findings, intraoperative findings, and the effect of admission or refusal to the intensive care unit on postoperative mortality and morbidity were recorded. Furthermore, we tried to identify surgical and anaesthetic methods applied, intraoperative hemodynamic changes, length of stay in the post-anaesthesia care unit, and postoperative complications. Demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, preoperative laboratory findings, intraoperative findings, and admission or refusal to the intensive care unit of patients who underwent hip replacement surgery between January 2008-December 2010 were enrolled. Out of 500 patients, 33.4% (n=164) were operated under general anaesthesia, 34% (n=170) under combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia, 22.2% (n=111) under spinal anaesthesia, 6.4% (n=32) under combined lomber plexus block and sciatic nerve block, and 4% (n=20) under epidural anaesthesia. Mean hospital stay was 7 days in the general anaesthesia group and 5 days in the regional anaesthesia group. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores and incidence of co-morbidities were higher in the partial hip replacement group. Admission to the intensive care unit was lower in the total hip replacement group. Hospital stay was shorter in the partial hip replacement group. Mortality rates on the 7(th) and 30(th) days were higher in the partial hip replacement group.

  10. Retrospective Evaluation of Anaesthesia Techniques for Hip Replacement Operations

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Murat; Saçan, Özlem; Gamlı, Mehmet; Taşpınar, Vildan; Postacı, Aysun; Fikir, Emel; Dikmen, Bayazit

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this retrospective study, we evaluated the demographic characteristics of patients that underwent hip replacement surgery in our orthopedic clinic. Associated diseases, preoperative laboratory findings, intraoperative findings, and the effect of admission or refusal to the intensive care unit on postoperative mortality and morbidity were recorded. Furthermore, we tried to identify surgical and anaesthetic methods applied, intraoperative hemodynamic changes, length of stay in the post-anaesthesia care unit, and postoperative complications. Methods Demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, preoperative laboratory findings, intraoperative findings, and admission or refusal to the intensive care unit of patients who underwent hip replacement surgery between January 2008-December 2010 were enrolled. Results Out of 500 patients, 33.4% (n=164) were operated under general anaesthesia, 34% (n=170) under combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia, 22.2% (n=111) under spinal anaesthesia, 6.4% (n=32) under combined lomber plexus block and sciatic nerve block, and 4% (n=20) under epidural anaesthesia. Mean hospital stay was 7 days in the general anaesthesia group and 5 days in the regional anaesthesia group. Conclusion American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores and incidence of co-morbidities were higher in the partial hip replacement group. Admission to the intensive care unit was lower in the total hip replacement group. Hospital stay was shorter in the partial hip replacement group. Mortality rates on the 7th and 30th days were higher in the partial hip replacement group. PMID:27366407

  11. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  12. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  13. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  14. [Hip and knee replacement and sport].

    PubMed

    Flecher, X; Argenson, J N; Aubaniac, J M

    2004-08-01

    Knee or hip arthroplasty in the sportsman raise many problems including the possibility or to come back to sports activities, and the implants longevity. Unicompartimental prosthesis of the knee is a relatively preserving surgery whose results in the long run in particular for the sporting subject can be for some authors sometimes disappointing. Total knee arthroplasty remains more invasive but with functional results always compatible with some sports activities. The functional result depends much on the postoperative, plurifactorial flexion. Concerning the hip, the sportsman, more active and younger than the average population suffering from osteoarthritis suffer statically more of osteoarthritis. The contribution of the total hip prostheses without cement, anatomical even custom, and of the new couples of friction seems to allow a better longevity. In addition, the contribution of the mini-invasive techniques and the computer-assisted surgery seem techniques with a promising future. We present our experience with the unicompartimental arthroplasty, the postoperative flexion in the total knee prostheses and in the hip arthroplasty for the younger patient and the relations between these interventions and sports. Many authors studied the possibilities of sporting recovery (standard of sport and level of practice). The majority of the activities can be taken again, by excluding the sports of team, of ball and the jogging. The contribution of the mini-invasive techniques seems to allow a faster recovery and the uncemented hip prostheses give good long-term results in the young and active patient.

  15. Bone sparing surgical options for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Audrey; Pesut, Tracy; Peacock, Charity; Tucci, Michelle; Buckhalter, Ruth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Between 4/5/99 and 5/20/2002, our university performed 31 total hip arthroplasties in 27 young patients utilizing a conservative hip prosthesis developed at the Mayo Clinic. Eleven patients underwent Bipolar replacement, while the remaining twenty required an acetabular component. The patients ranged in age from 25 to 50 (mean of 39.9). The mean follow up was 12.4 months (range 4.5-27). Twenty-eight hips were treated for AVN secondary to RA, HIV, ETOH abuse, and SLE; while two underwent THA for OA secondary to trauma, and one for JRA. Three patients were lost to follow up at less than 6 months and were excluded from the study. The patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months utilizing the Harris hip score, the Charnley hip score, and radiographic evaluation including subsidence, radiolucency, and calcar resorption. Four patients (13%) had subsidence ranging from 1 to 3 mm at the most recent visit. One patients (3.2%) had radiographic evidence of radiolucency measuring 2 mm. Nine patients (29%) developed 1-3 mm of calcar resorption. No hips required revision. Thirty patients had improvement in their Harris hip score and Charnley hip score. The one patient who decreased his score had developed AVN secondary to ETOH abuse. Three hips had an intra-operative complication of lateral cortex penetration and required circlage wiring. Comparisons were made utilizing Multiple Logistic Regression to determine if preoperative BMI, Dorr score, and gender had an impact on the postoperative hip scores or degree of osteolysis, subsidence, and calcar resorption. Although the Harris hip score and Charnley hip scores significantly improved postoperatively, the preoperative BMI, Dorr score, and gender did not correlate with patient outcome. Our patients improved clinically in pain level, function and ROM. Further follow up will reveal if this component truly preserves bone stock for ease of future revision.

  16. Management of Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Dong; Prashant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Total hip joint replacement offers dramatic improvement in the quality of life but periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the most devastating complication of this procedure. The infection threatens the function of the joint, the preservation of the limb, and occasionally even the life of the patient due to long term hospitalization and high cost. For the surgeon it is a disastrous burden, which requires repeated, complicated procedures to eradicate infection and to provide a mobile joint without pain. Yet in the absence of a true gold standard, the diagnosis of PJI can be elusive. Synovial fluid aspiration, diagnostic imaging, traditional culture, peripheral serum inflammatory markers, and intraoperative frozen sections each have their limitations but continue to be the mainstay for diagnosis of PJI. Treatment options mainly include thorough irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, or a two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic PJI. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention is the obvious choice for treatment of acute PJI, with good success rates in selected patients. This article presents an overview of recent management concepts for PJI of the hip emphasizing diagnosis and the clinical approach, and also share own experience at our institution. PMID:27536605

  17. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Czyżewska, Anna; Glinkowski, Wojciech M; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-10-27

    The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery.

  18. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  19. Use of ceramics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jason E; Whiddon, David R; Smith, Eric L; Salyapongse, Aaron K

    2008-01-01

    Ceramics have been used as a bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty (THA) for more than 30 years. Properties of this material which make it particularly attractive for this application include its hardness, high compression strength, and excellent wettability. The low incidence of biologically significant particle generation and clinically significant osteolysis with the use of ceramics in THA reflects these properties. However, low fracture toughness and linear elastic behavior demonstrated by ceramic make it prone to breakage under stress. Improvements in the processing of ceramic as well as advances in engineering of head-neck articulations and liner design have led to an overall decrease in the incidence of ceramic fracture and dislocation. This article reviews the science behind the use of ceramics in THA, the clinical results of ceramics in THA, including complications unique to this bearing surface, and future directions for the application of ceramics in THA.

  20. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  1. [Infection of a hip prosthesis after dry needling].

    PubMed

    Steentjes, Koen; de Vries, Lieke M A; Ridwan, Ben U; Wijgman, A J Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old patient presented to the orthopaedic department with hip pain 7 months after hip replacement and two weeks after dry needling by a physiotherapist. Dry needling is used by physiotherapists to treat pain and stiffness. In the Netherlands, there are no clear guidelines or contra-indications described for this treatment. The surgical scar of our patient showed signs of inflammation for which debridement and irrigation were performed. Tissue samples showed positive bacterial cultures and the patient was treated with antibiotics. One week after completing this treatment, the infection returned. Debridement and irrigation were repeated and antibiotic treatment was recommenced. Three months later, the patient showed no signs of infection with the prosthesis still in situ. Although there is no strong evidence for a causal relationship between dry needling and the infection, dry needling should be used carefully in patients with a joint replacement, due to the increased risk of infection.

  2. CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2013-01-21

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in vivo and in vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair.

  3. CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in-vivo and in-vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  4. Femoral neck preservation in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Molfetta, L

    1993-01-01

    Preservation of the femoral neck in hip arthroplasty creates a particular biomechanical situation which is clearly different from what is found even after partial neck removal. The femoral neck consists in fact of a "cylinder of cortical bone" that can be used as the "base" for anchoring the stem to the femur, in contrast to the press-fit procedure or other solutions. The mechanical and biological advantages are as follows: 1) Primary triplanar stem stability, in particular rotational stability. Rotational movements of the stem are blocked by the tough lateral cortical cylinder of the neck. Resistance to varus-valgus stress and collapse is also increased vertically and frontally. 2) Proximal cortical fixation. Primary fixation of the stem is provided by the neck cortex, whereas its mid-distal part is merely held by the metaphyseal cancellous bone and the tip is undersized with respect to the medullary canal. 3) Stress loads distributed along physiological lines of stress. Retention of the neck permits preservation of the trabecular systems, along which the stress is distributed towards the diaphysis and the greater trochanter. 4) Elasticity of the bone-prosthesis system. Most of the stem is contained within the metaphyseal cancellous bone that lies between the prosthesis and the cortical bone, creating a bone-prosthesis module with variable and integrated elasticity. 5) Preservation of the bone-stock. The amount of residual bone following implant of the prosthesis increases, not only because of the presence of the femoral neck, but also as a result of the preservation of most of the metaphyseal cancellous bone. There is therefore greater bone-ingrowth, which is also favoured by the fewer changes in the endosteal blood supply. 6) Prosthesis revision is simpler, since the stem can easily be removed and a second neck resection performed. Our clinical and experimental studies, together with those of Freeman et al., confirm that the femoral neck is present for a long

  5. Early failure of total hip replacements implanted at distant hospitals to reduce waiting lists.

    PubMed Central

    Ciampolini, Jac; Hubble, Matthew J. W.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: In the years 1990-1993, in an effort to reduce waiting-list time, a small number of patients were sent from Exeter to hospitals in London to undergo elective total hip replacement. No medium- or long-term follow-up was arranged. Our aim was to audit the outcome of these hip replacements. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Review of the records of the referring medical practices, Regional Health Authority, local orthopaedic hospital and the distant centres at which the surgery was performed identified 31 cases. A total of 27 hip replacements in 24 patients were available for clinical and radiological review. RESULTS: 12 (44%) hips have so far required revision surgery, at a mean of 6.5 years. Of these, three (11%) have been for deep infection. A further three hips (11%) are radiologically loose and are being closely monitored. Two patients (7%) suffered permanent sciatic nerve palsy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients whose surgery was performed locally over a similar time period have a published failure rate of only 4.9%. This difference is highly statistically significant (P < 0.001). The causes for such a difference in outcome were analysed and include surgical technique, implant selection and absence of follow-up. In the light of this evidence, we would like to urge the government to address waiting list problems by investing in the local infrastructure. Expanding those facilities where properly audited and fully accountable surgeons operate must be the way forward. PMID:15720905

  6. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-11-25

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. The tribology of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2006-02-01

    Total hip surgery is an effective way of alleviating the pain and discomfort caused by diseased or damaged joints. However, in the majority of cases, these joints have a finite life. The main reason for failure is osteolysis (bone resorption). It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis, and therefore the subsequent loosening and failure of conventional metal- or ceramic-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene joints, is the body's immunological response to the polyethylene wear particles. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal joints. The intention of this paper is to review the studies that have taken place within different laboratories to determine the tribological performance of new-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements. These types of joint offer a potential solution to enhance the longevity of prosthetic hip systems; however, problems may arise owing to the effects of metal ion release, which are, as yet, not fully understood.

  8. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  9. Total hip replacement in an ipsilateral above-the-knee amputation: surgical technique, rehabilitation, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Malagelada, Francesc; Coll Rivas, Moisès; Jiménez Obach, Albert; Auleda, Jaume; Guirao, Lluis; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we present a case report of a 62-year-old patient who previously underwent an above-the-knee amputation for vascular disease and we performed a total hip replacement on him because of hip osteoarthritis. As the only postoperative complication, the patient developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection, which was successfully treated. The surgical technique and the postoperative rehabilitation program are described in detail in an attempt to detect and face the challenges that patients with major lower limb amputations may present. The literature is reviewed and all known cases of hip replacements in amputees are presented.

  10. The hip and knee replacement operation: an extensive life event.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Birgitta Åkesdotter; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Ponzer, Sari; Heikkilä, Kristiina

    2010-12-01

    A total hip replacement and a total knee replacement have shown to effectively reduce pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee joint despite associated risks. Even though the intervention primarily concerns older people with additional health problems, the patients stand on their feet the day after the operation and are discharged a few days later. Previous research indicates that reflections about life are related to the operation. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of reflections related to hip and knee replacement surgery. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach with a longitudinal design was chosen in order to study the participants' experiences of the hip and knee replacement intervention across the entire perioperative period. Four themes emerged from the structural analysis; choosing the challenge, past memories connect to the current situation, moving from happiness to ordinary everyday life and moving from despair towards reluctant acceptance of unexpected bad conditions for everyday life. There was inner negotiations about having surgery or not, and existential anxiety that reminded people that life cannot be taken for granted. Our findings indicate the operation was seen as an extensive life event including reflections about life and death and about hope and fear. Previous bad experiences of care seemed to influence the way patients dealt with fear and hope. Fear had to be overcome by inner negotiations about undergoing surgery or not. Relief was expressed about surviving the actual operation, but soon after fears arose about how to manage on the actual road to recovery. Hope for a good life grew either stronger or weaker, depending on the progress following the operation. The outcome eventually generated a transition from happiness to ordinary everyday life, or a transition from despair towards reluctant acceptance of unfulfilled expectations. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

  11. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  12. Evolution and future of surface replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, H C; Grigoris, P; Dorey, F J

    1998-01-01

    Surface replacement is a bone-conserving alternative to total hip arthroplasty and is a significant development in the evolution of hip arthroplasty. Surface replacement with polyethylene bearings was largely abandoned, primarily because of component aseptic loosening caused by tissue reaction to high-volumetric polyethylene wear. For patients with osteonecrosis and collapse of the femoral head but with preservation of some acetabular articular cartilage, precision fit, hemisurface replacement of the femoral head only has emerged as the treatment of choice. The survivorship of our series of patients, performed in the 1981-84 era (average age, 32 years), has been 85% at 5 years, 67% at 10 years, and 42% at 16 years. In the absence of polyethylene, there has been no loosening. Revisions were for cartilage wear. The procedure is now much improved with instrumentation for non-trochanteric osteotomy approaches and off-the-shelf components in 1-mm increments. For arthritic hips, a new era of surface replacement has emerged. With metal-on-metal bearings, the volumetric wear has been reduced 20-100 times from those with polyethylene, and there is no penalty for the large ball size. The devices are now conservative on the acetabular as well as femoral side. Hybrid or all-cementless fixation is superior to earlier all-cemented devices. In those patients, the results with up to 4 years have been complication-free, with an absence of pain and a return to high functional levels, including participation in sports. Forty patients have received a Conserve Plus with interference fitting of the acetabular component with sintered beads to obtain fixation. Although the follow-up is short, surface replacement with the large ball size is extremely stable, and dislocation is rare.

  13. [Hip fractures in the elderly : Osteosynthesis versus joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Knobe, M; Siebert, C H

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporotic fractures of the femoral neck and trochanteric region pose an ever-expanding existential problem both for the individual and for society. Despite numerous innovations and advances regarding implant design, mortality and the systemic and mechanical complication rates remain high. Depiction of treatment options for femoral neck fractures and trochanteric femur fractures in the elderly comparing joint replacement and osteosynthesis. A search of the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases was carried out focusing on hip fracture treatment. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and reviews comparing joint replacement or fixation implants in the elderly were included. Displaced fractures of the femoral neck often require total joint arthroplasty whereas trochanteric fractures are amenable to internal fixation. Cemented total hip replacement as opposed to cementless techniques is recommended in the elderly and yields good functional results in active patients. Hemiarthroplasty is the treatment of choice in infirm patients with multiple comorbidities and cognitive impairment. Trochanteric fractures (AO/OTA types A1 and A2) can be successfully treated with intramedullary or extramedullary fixation. Adequate reduction and stable fixation are prerequisites for uneventful healing. A meticulous operative technique can prevent iatrogenic complications. In summary, there are many parameters affecting the outcome in the treatment of fragility and hip fractures. Technical features as well as surgeon characteristics play an important role and the ultimate solution has yet to be developed. Even though fracture morphology may indicate a specific treatment option, patient characteristics play an important role in decision-making. The development of centers of fragility fracture care in Germany could help to lower the complication rate and increase quality of life in hip fracture patients in the future.

  14. Plasma, bone, hip capsule, synovial and drain fluid concentrations of lincomycin during total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, R L; Beavis, J P; Hossack, G A; Paddock, G M

    1977-01-01

    1 Lincomycin (600 mg) was given 6 h preoperatively by intramuscular injection, as an intravenous infusion over 30 min and for 72 h postoperatively in twelve patients having total hip replacement. 2 The plasma, bone, hip capsule, synovial and drain fluid concentrations of lincomycin were almost always above the M.I.C. of lincomycin against penicillinase producing Staphylococcus aureus. 3 There was a good correlation between the estimated concentrations of lincomycin in bone by the grinding and agitation methods of analysis. 4 Two patients developed pseudomembranous colitis after parenteral lincomycin. PMID:901734

  15. Piroxicam and naproxen in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip waiting for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Alho, A; Jaer, O; Slungaard, U; Holme, I

    1988-06-01

    Two-hundred and fifty-two patients waiting for a total hip replacement for degenerative hip disease were randomized to two groups of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication using piroxicam, 20 mg per day, and naproxen, 750 mg per day, after exclusion for severe dyspepsia or peptic ulcer, asthma, idiosyncracy, dissent, age below 50 years, Harris hip score above 50, or significant contralateral disease. A significant improvement in the pain and daily activity parameters was obtained in both groups. The effect was better in the piroxicam group one month after the commencement of the treatment, and equal in the groups later during the observation period of 2-5 months. We conclude that continuous medication is beneficial in patients with severe osteoarthritis scheduled for operation. However, the side effects of the medication have to be carefully considered and followed up.

  16. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  17. Are hip hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty infections different entities? The importance of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    del Toro, M D; Nieto, I; Guerrero, F; Corzo, J; del Arco, A; Palomino, J; Nuño, E; Lomas, J M; Natera, C; Fajardo, J M; Delgado, J; Torres-Tortosa, M; Romero, A; Martín-Rico, P; Muniain, M Á; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2014-08-01

    Hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) infections are usually considered as one entity; however, they may show important differences. We analyze these differences, as well as predictors of treatment failure (TF) and poor functional status among patients with prosthetic hip infections (PHIs). A multicenter cohort study of consecutive patients with PHIs was performed. The main outcome variable was TF after the first surgical treatment performed to treat the infection. Multivariate analysis was used to identify predictors of TF. A total of 127 patients with PHI were included (43 HHA, 84 THA). Patients with HHA infections were more frequently women (88% vs. 54%; p < 0.001), had comorbidities (86% vs. 67%, p = 0.02), and were older (median age 79 vs. 65 years, p < 0.001), and the reason for arthroplasty was more frequently a fracture (100% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Failure of initial treatment and crude mortality were more frequent among HHA patients (44% vs. 23%, p = 0.01 and 28% vs. 7%, p = 0.001, respectively). However, HHA was not associated with TF in the multivariate analysis when hip fracture was considered; thus, variables independently associated with TF were hip fracture, inadequate surgical management, prosthesis retention, and higher C-reactive protein level. Failure of the first surgical treatment was associated with poorer functional status. HHA and THA infections showed significant differences in epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome. Although patients with HHA infections had a higher risk of TF, this was related to the reason for hip implant: a hip fracture. Success of the initial management of infection is a predictor of better clinical and functional outcome.

  18. Predictors of Infective Outcomes Following Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hotchen, Andrew J.; Vonberg, Frederick W.; Ironside, Emily C.; Ross-Thriepland, Stephen; Avery, Naomi; Pearce, Oliver J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess the value of differing pre-operative measures in prediction of post-operative non-surgical site infection (NSSI) and length of hospital stay following hip fracture surgery. Methods: All patients admitted during a one year period with a hip fracture to our department were included in the study (n=207). Primary outcome measures were ten independent risk factors correlated to the development of non-surgical site infection following surgery for hip fracture. Secondary outcome measures were duration of hospital stay and inpatient mortality. Results: The patients who had severe cognitive impairment had a 71.0% risk of developing non-surgical site infection. Patients who had multiple medical co-morbidities also had increased risk of developing non-surgical site infection at 59.1%. Patients who developed NSSI on average stayed in hospital 13.1 days longer than patients who did not (31.6 vs. 18.5, p < .001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of reducing post-operative infection in hip fracture patients in view of reducing morbidity, mortality and cost. These patients can be stratified by risk factors and interventions can be employed in view of reducing inpatient post-operative infection rates in this cohort. PMID:28138499

  19. Femoral nerve lesion in total hip replacement: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Heller, K D; Prescher, A; Birnbaum, K; Forst, R

    1998-01-01

    A total of 20 hip joints of 10 non-fixed corpses were examined within 48 h of death to measure the pressure below the inguinal ligament simulating the surgical conditions during total hip arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various leg positions and insertion techniques of retractors during the surgical procedure for total hip replacement in order to detect supposed causes for indirect pressure injuries of the femoral nerve. The obtained results verified no increase of pressure in the inguinal canal which could explain an indirect injury of the femoral nerve. If the retractor is inserted correctly at the anterior acetabular rim, the pressure in the lacuna musculorum can even be reduced, and furthermore, the femoral nerve is protected by the iliopsoas muscle. Femoral nerve lesions which have been published so far can only be explained by an incorrect use of instruments or implants (e.g., screws, cement, acetabular cup) or an extreme postoperative leg length discrepancy.

  20. Intrapelvic protrusion of the acetabular component following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Salvati, E A; Bullough, P; Wilson, P D

    1975-09-01

    Protrusion of the acetabular component into the true pelvis following total hip replacement has occurred in 5 patients, 4 with severe rheumatoid arthritis and 1 with a destructive type of degenerative hip disease. Preoperatively all hips had severe protrusio acetabuli, a markedly thin acetabular medial wall and advanced osteoporosis. Four had a McKee-Farrar prosthesis, a metal-to-metal device with high frictional torque, particularly when the contact is equatorial, and no damping capacity against marginal impingement in the extreme range of motion. In order to reduce the incidence of intrapelvic protrusion, extreme care should be given to preserve the medial bone stock of the acetabulum, more so when it is already damaged or defective. If anchoring holes are used they should be restricted to the superior ilium, pubis and ischium and should not perforate the medial wall. Once loosening is present, reoperation is indicated to avoid progressive bone reabsorption by the abrasive motion of the loosened prosthesis, that might lead to irreparable bone loss. To reduce the stress transmitted to an already weakened acetabulum, select a total prosthetic device with low friction; fix it with acrylic cement in order to distribute the stress over a large surface; carefully orient both components to avoid marginal impingement; be certain to preserve the medial wall as much as possible and if it is already defective reinforce it by bone grafting and/or wire mesh.

  1. The provision of total hip replacement for displaced intracapsular hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) currently recommends the use of total hip replacement (THR) for displaced intracapsular hip fractures in patients who meet certain mobility, cognitive and health criteria. Methods A multicentre prospective audit was conducted within a defined geographic region to assess current practice and variation in provision of THR for displaced intracapsular hip fractures. Results A total of 879 patients with hip fractures, admitted to 8 acute trauma units, were included in this study. Of 462 patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures, 169 fulfilled the NICE criteria for THR. THR was performed for only 49 of (29%) the eligible patients. There was significant variation in THR provision between the eight units (0% to 50% THR usage, p<0.001). There were statistically significant differences in age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade, abbreviated mental test score and walking ability prior to the injury between patients who underwent fixation, THR or hemiarthroplasty (all p≤0.05). There was a significantly increased chance of not undergoing THR if a patient was older than 77 years (median age for the THR eligible cohort; relative risk [RR]: 7.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8–22.0, p<0.001). There was also a trend for this with patients who were ASA grade 3 compared with ASA grade 1 or 2 (RR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.0–7.3, p=0.06). The surgeons gave multifactorial reasons for not performing THR in eligible patients. Conclusions There is significant variation in the provision of THR for eligible hip fracture patients, which is influenced by both patient demographics and the unit to which a patient is admitted. PMID:26741658

  2. The appropriateness of blood transfusion following primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Joy, PJ; Bennet, SJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant proportion of all red cell transfusions are given to patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. Concern over transfusion safety and cost, coupled with evidence showing that restrictive transfusion policies benefit patients, prompted us to audit our blood prescribing practice at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in order to assess the appropriateness of every transfusion episode following elective primary total hip replacement. METHODS All patients undergoing a primary total hip replacement in our department over a six-month period were included in the study. Data were collected retrospectively using case note examination and transfusion service data. Standards were dictated by the British Orthopaedic Association guidelines on blood conservation in elective orthopaedic surgery. RESULTS Twenty-seven per cent of patients (39/143) were transfused. Forty-six per cent of these (18/39) were transfused inappropriately and twenty-three per cent (9/39) appropriately. Thirteen per cent (5/39) had a valid indication for transfusion but were over-transfused and in eighteen per cent (7/39) the quality of documentation did not allow an assessment to be made. Fifty-two per cent of patients who had surgical drains (29/56) were transfused. Reaudit following staff education and amendments to the local transfusion policy did not demonstrate a reduction in transfusion rates. CONCLUSIONS This audit showed that significant potential exists for reducing transfusion rates based on optimising prescribing practice alone. It also demonstrated that changing local practice based on audit data can be challenging. PMID:22507728

  3. Does total hip replacement affect sexual quality of life?

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Rita Th E; Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Sierevelt, Inger N; Jansma, Elise P; Nolte, Peter A; Nicolai, Melianthe P J; Wall, Peter D H; Van Royen, Barend J

    2016-05-04

    Total Hip Replacement (THR) is an effective treatment for end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Since the introduction of total joint replacement, the effect on the Sexual Quality of Life (SQoL) following THR has been addressed in scant studies. The aim of our study was to systematically review the literature, to summarise effects of THR on patients' SQoL. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO between January 1970 and February 9th, 2015 with search terms including Total Hip, Osteoarthritis, SQoL, and THR. Eligible studies were identified and two independent authors extracted data including details of SQoL, study quality and risk of bias. There were 12 eligible studies, which included a total of 2099 patients with an age range of 20-85 years. The methodological quality of ten studies was rated as low, and of two as moderate. Amongst the majority of patients, SQoL improved after surgery, both in terms of physical-functional and psychosocial well-being. However, changes between pre-operative and postoperative SQoL ranged extensively: for example, Sexual Dysfunction Δ 8-51% and Sexual Activity (SA) Δ 0-77%. Three studies reported that some patients never resumed SA again after surgery. In over 40 years of THR treatment, scant studies have examined the effect of THR on patients' SQoL. This review suggests that SQol improves after THR, although the magnitude of effects varies highly. However, the quality of the supporting evidence was rated as low to moderate. This suggests a need for more high quality evidence about the effects of THR on SQoL.

  4. Perioperative morbidity and mortality of total hip replacement in liver transplant recipients: a 7-year single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Aminata, Iman; Lee, Soo-Ho; Chang, Jae-Suk; Lee, Choon-Sung; Chun, Jae-Myeung; Park, Jin-Woong; Pawaskar, Aditya; Jeon, In-Ho

    2012-12-15

    This study aims to evaluate perioperative mortality and morbidity after total hip replacement in liver transplant recipients and suggesting safety guidelines. Hip replacement surgery is one of the most common elective surgeries even for organ transplant recipients. However, there is a paucity of literature addressing the morbidity and complications of hip replacement surgery for liver transplant recipients. We analyzed retrospectively 33 arthroplasty cases in 20 liver transplant recipients carried out in a single center from 2005 to 2011. All perioperative clinical and laboratory data were evaluated together with early and late morbidity and mortality. Of 2253 liver transplant recipients, 20 (0.9%) patients underwent 33 total hip arthroplasties. Thirty-two arthroplasties were performed for avascular necrosis of the femoral head, whereas only one was performed for osteoarthritis. There was no death, liver failure, or infection within 30 days after surgery. Three patients showed elevated liver enzyme more than 5 times the normal value, but it eventually decreased to normal within 1 week. Of 33 cases of arthroplasty, postoperative blood transfusion was needed in 14 cases with 1 case receiving more than 4 U. On long-term follow-up, no patients have developed periprosthetic fracture, implant loosening, or liver failure. All patients showed good to excellent postoperative Harris hip score. In this series, we can infer that hip replacement surgery in liver transplantation patients is safe and gives a reliably good result. Some preoperative conditions should be obtained to reduce postoperative morbidity.

  5. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nielen, Johannes T.H.; Emans, Pieter J.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J.F.; de Vries, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality. To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity. A population-based case–control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity. Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78–0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82–0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c. This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  6. Subsidence of collarless uncemented femoral stems in total hips replacements performed for trauma.

    PubMed

    Pentlow, Alanna K; Heal, James S

    2012-06-01

    Collarless, uncemented, femoral stems give excellent results in elective hip replacements but few studies look at outcomes in trauma patients. The presence of osteoporosis and subsequent widened femoral canal may compromise the mechanical stability of uncemented femoral stems resulting in early subsidence. The aim of this study was to assess whether early subsidence occurred when collarless uncemented stems were used to treat trauma patients. Post-operative radiographs of 46 patients, mean age 71, who underwent an uncemented, collarless, total hip replacement for trauma, were reviewed. The difference in distance from the calcar to the prosthesis tip between the immediate post operative radiograph and the subsequent follow-up radiograph was calculated and adjusted for magnification. The same procedure was performed on 36 age-matched patients, who underwent elective hip replacements for osteoarthritis. Hospital notes were reviewed to assess for complications and DEXA scans reviewed for trauma patients where available. The mean femoral stem subsidence was significantly greater in the fracture cohort than in elective patients (p=0.001) with mean subsidence of 4.27 mm (range 0.02-22.05 mm) and 1.57 mm (range 0-5.5 mm), respectively. In the fracture cohort there were 4 revisions within 6 months of surgery, 1 for infection and 3 for femoral stem subsidence leading to dislocation. There were no revisions in the elective cohort. This study showed that collarless uncemented stems subsided significantly more when performed for fractures and had a high early revision rate. We recommend that uncemented collarless should not be used in trauma patients requiring total hip replacement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  8. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient's factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems.

  9. The impact of surgeon handedness in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, A; Stewart, T; Stone, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Total hip replacement (THR) is successful and performed commonly. Component placement is a determinant of outcome. Influence of surgeon handedness on component placement has not been considered previously. This study was a radiographic assessment of component positioning with respect to handedness. Early data from 160 patients are reported. Methods Overall, 160 primary THRs for osteoarthritis were included. Equal numbers of left and right THRs were performed by four surgeons, two right-handed and two left-handed. Postoperative radiography was assessed for THR component position by measurement of leg length inequality, acetabular inclination and centre of rotation. Surgeons’ handedness was assessed using the Edinburgh inventory. Results For leg length inequality, no significant interaction was seen between hip side and surgeon handedness. Acetabular inclination angles showed a statistically significant difference, however, depending on hand dominance, with higher inclination angles recorded when operating on the dominant side. There was a trend towards greater medialisation of the centre of rotation on the non-dominant side although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Surgeon handedness appears to influence acetabular component position during THR but it is one factor of many that interact to achieve a successful outcome. PMID:25198975

  10. Total hip replacement as primary treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Amarjit Singh; Singh, Ajay Pal; Singh, Arun Pal; Singh, Sukhraj

    2010-08-01

    Fifty-three patients with A2.2 and A2.3 intertrochanteric fracture according to the Muller classification were treated with total hip replacement between April 2000 and February 2004. The average age of the patients was 77 years. Average follow-up period was 3.7 years. We studied postoperative complications, mortality rate, functional outcome using the Harris hip score, time to return to normal activities, and radiographic evidence of healing. Two patients died on the third and fifth postoperative days. Seven more patients died within one year. The Harris hip score at one month was 66 +/- 7 (mean +/- standard deviation); at three months 72 +/- 6; at one year 74 +/- 5; at three years 76 +/- 6 and in the 27 patients who completed five year follow-up it was 76 +/- 8. Mobilisation and weight-bearing was started immediately in the postoperative period. Average time taken to return to normal daily activities was 28 days (range 24-33). No loosening or infection of the implants was observed. Total hip arthroplasty is a valid treatment option for mobile and mentally healthy elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures. This procedure offers quick recovery with little risk of mechanical failure, avoids the risks associated with internal fixation and enables the patient to maintain a good level of function immediately after surgery.

  11. Painful total hip replacement due to sciatic nerve entrapment in scar tissue and lipoma.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Michael; Garofalo, Raffaele; Mouhsine, Elyazid

    2010-11-01

    Painful total hip replacement remains a challenging problem because of the large amount of possible diagnoses. We report about a 64-year-old female patient who was misdiagnosed during 4 years as psychiatric. She suffered of excruciating left retrotrochanteric pain after the implantation of a cementless total hip replacement and revision because of recurrent hip dislocations. Walking was limited to short distances using two crutches. The work-up at this time included the usual diagnoses and remained unsuccessful. No loosening, infection or malposition of the prosthesis could be found, and she had no neurologic deficits in her operated leg. An MRI was obtained to visualize the retrotrochanteric soft tissues and showed a tight scar surrounding the sciatic nerve, which was also compressed by an adjacent lipoma. Therefore, she was reoperated on to remove the lipoma and the scar tissue around the sciatic nerve. To decrease the risk of recurrent scarring around the sciatic nerve, an adhesion barrier was applied before closure. One year after the operation, the patient has no neurologic deficit, no more pain and is able to walk unlimited distances without crutches. Scar tissue around the sciatic nerve is frequently observed during revision surgery. However, we feel that sciatic nerve entrapment by scar tissue should be a part of the differential diagnosis of painful THR. MRI may be a useful tool to achieve this diagnosis.

  12. [Diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections].

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, C M; Schütze, N; Rudert, M

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic infection requires a clear definition itself and structured procedure concerning anamnesis, clinical examination, laboratory findings, puncture and imaging diagnostics. The clinical presentation may vary considerable due to the time of their occurrence as early, delayed, or late infection. Recognition of risk factors and knowledge of differential diagnoses facilitate and confirm the diagnosis. The synovial fluid is assessed with regard to leukocyte count, protein content, and glucose. Intraoperative tissue specimen sampling has to be performed correctly; the histopathological and microbiological studies must be assessed using specific criteria. The examination and classification of periprosthetic membranes make discrimination of the causal pathological mechanism possible, especially distinction between septic and aseptic loosening. In this manner statements with regard to etiology and prosthesis durability are possible. Different causative microorganisms appear postoperatively at specific times. Pathogens that grow as biofilms are of great significance, as they may compound diagnosis and therapy. Early infections are often caused by virulent microorganisms (S. aureus) with acute onset. Delayed (low grade) infections are usually caused by less virulent microorganisms, such as S. epidermidis or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Many diagnostic imaging methods have been used in the assessment of periprosthetic infection: plain radiographs, arthrography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Nuclear medicine with bone scintigraphy or positron-emission tomography enhance diagnostic capabilities. Cultures of samples obtained by sonication of prostheses are more sensitive than conventional periprosthetic tissue culture. Multiplex PCR of sonication fluid is a promising test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection. The promising diagnostic accuracy for interleukin-6 and procalcitonin has yet not been

  13. Pathogenic organisms in hip joint infections

    PubMed Central

    Geipel, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Infections of the hip joint are usually of bacterial etiology. Only rarely, an infectious arthritis is caused in this localization by viruses or fungi. Native joint infections of the hip are less common than infections after implantation of prosthetic devices. Difficulties in prosthetic joint infections are, (I) a higher age of patients, and, thus an associated presence of other medical risk factors, (II) often long courses of treatment regimes depending on the bacterium and its antibiotic resistance, (III) an increased mortality, and (IV) a high economic burden for removal and reimplantation of an infected prosthetic device. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for articular infections are well studied only for some bacteria, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, while others are only partially understood. Important known bacterial properties and microbiological characteristics of infection are the bacterial adhesion on the native joint or prosthetic material, the bacterial biofilm formation, the development of small colony variants (SCV) as sessile bacterial types and the increasing resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19834588

  14. Revision hip arthroplasty in patients with a previous total hip replacement for osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Moon, Young-Wan; Lee, Keun-Ho; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2014-12-01

    Patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head are typically relatively young and active and often require high rates of revision after primary total hip arthroplasty. However, outcomes of revision hip arthroplasty in this patient population have rarely been reported in the literature. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 72 patients (75 hips) who underwent revision hip arthroplasty with a primary diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Mean age at index revision was 53.3 years (range, 34-76). Components of acetabular revision included a cementless porous-coated cup in 58 hips and an acetabular cage in 3 hips. Components of femoral revision included a fully grit-blasted tapered stem in 30 hips and a proximally porous-coated modular stem in 9 hips. Mean duration of follow-up was 7 years (range, 3-17). Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 49 points preoperatively to 90 points postoperatively. At final follow-up, 11 hips (14.7%) required reoperation because of aseptic loosening (6 hips), infection (2 hips), recurrent dislocation (1 hip), periprosthetic fracture (1 hip), and ceramic fracture (1 hip). Kaplan-Meier survivor-ship with an endpoint of re-revision for any reason was 81% and for mechanical failure was 87.5% for the cup and 100% for the stem at 10 years. Unlike the previous report, the authors' study showed a lower failure rate of the femoral stem after revision hip arthroplasty using modern cementless femoral components in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Aseptic cup loosening or osteolysis is the most common mechanism of failure at medium-term follow-up. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Revision in Cemented and Cementless Infected Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Paolo; Puricelli, Marco; D’Angelo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a frequent cause of failure after joint replacement surgery. The infection rate after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been reduced to 1-2% in the last years. However, it still represents a challenging problem for the orthopedic surgeon. Difficulty of therapeutic approach, and poor functional outcomes together with length of treatment and overall cost are the main burden of this issue. Even the diagnosis of an infected hip could be challenging although it is the first step of an accurate treatment. At the end, many cases require removing the implants. Afterwards, the treatment strategy varies according to authors with three different procedures: no re-implantation, immediate placement of new implants or a two-stage surgery re-implantation. Based on the most recently systematic review there is no suggestion that one- or two-stage revision methods have different re-infection outcomes. The two-stage implant-exchange protocol remains the gold standard. It is considered as the most efficacious clinical approach for the treatment of periprosthetic infection, especially in patients with sinus tracts, swelling, extended abscess formation in depth and infection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), and other multidrug-resistant bacteria as reported in recent consensus documents. PMID:23898351

  16. Heart failure after conventional metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Gillam, Marianne H; Pratt, Nicole L; Inacio, Maria C S; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Shakib, Sepehr; Nicholls, Stephen J; Graves, Stephen E

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — It is unclear whether metal particles and ions produced by mechanical wear and corrosion of hip prostheses with metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings have systemic adverse effects on health. We compared the risk of heart failure in patients with conventional MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA) and in those with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Patients and methods — We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the Australian Government Department of Veterans’ Affairs health claims database on patients who received conventional THA for osteoarthritis between 2004 and 2012. The MoM THAs were classified into groups: Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) XL Acetabular System, other large-head (LH) (> 32 mm) MoM, and small-head (SH) (≤ 32 mm) MoM. The primary outcome was hospitalization for heart failure after THA. Results — 4,019 patients with no history of heart failure were included (56% women). Men with an ASR XL THA had a higher rate of hospitalization for heart failure than men with MoP THA (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.6–6.5). No statistically significant difference in the rate of heart failure was found with the other LH MoM or SH MoM compared to MoP in men. There was no statistically significant difference in heart failure rate between exposure groups in women. Interpretation — An association between ASR XL and hospitalization for heart failure was found in men. While causality between ASR XL and heart failure could not be established in this study, it highlights an urgent need for further studies to investigate the possibility of systemic effects associated with MoM THA. PMID:27759468

  17. Cementless total hip replacement: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Harumoto; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Henmi, Osamu; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Shiromoto, Yuichiro; Kawano, Tomoki; Kanaji, Arihiko; Ando, Kennichi; Nakagawa, Masato; Kosaki, Naoto; Fukaya, Eiichi

    2009-03-01

    Cementless total hip replacement (THR) is rapidly being accepted as the surgery for arthritic diseases of the hip joint. The bone-ingrowth rate in porous-type cementless implants was about 90% over 10 years after surgery, showing that biological fixation of cementless THR was well maintained on both the stem and cup sides. As for the stress shielding of the femur operated using a distal fixation-type stem, severe bone resorption was observed. The severe bone resorption group showed continuous progression for more than 10 years after surgery. Stem loosening directly caused by stress shielding has been considered less likely; however, close attention should be paid to bone resorption-associated disorders including femoral fracture. Cementless cups have several specific problems. It is difficult to decide whether a cup should be placed in the physiological position for the case of acetabular dysplasia by bone grafting or at a relatively higher position without bone grafting. The bone-ingrowth rate was lower in the group with en bloc bone grafting, and the reactive line was frequently noted in the bone-grafted region. Although no data indicated that en bloc bone grafting directly led to poor outcomes, such as loosening, cup placement at a higher site without bone grafting is now selected by most operators. The polyethylene liner in a cementless cup is thinned due to the metal cup thickness; however, it has been suggested that the apparent relation between the cup size and the wear rate was absent as long as a cementless cup is used. Comparative study indicated cementless THR was inferior with regard to the yearly polyethylene wear rate and incidence of osteolysis on both the stem and cup sides. Meta-analysis study on the survival rate between cement and cementless THR reported that cemented THR was slightly superior. It should be considered that specific problems for cementless THR, especially with regard to polyethylene wear, do occur.

  18. Case report: Salmonella infection following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chong, Paul Y; Sporer, Scott M

    2005-01-01

    A case of a total hip arthroplasty infection with Staphylococcus aureus, co-infected with Salmonella choleraesuis was treated with two-stage exchange and administration of vancomycin and ciprofloxacin. No signs of re-infection have appeared fourteen months after surgery. Cases of salmonella infection of hip prostheses are quite rare, with only a handful of reports in the literature.

  19. Adverse local tissue reaction after 2 revision hip replacements for ceramic liner fracture

    PubMed Central

    Antoniac, Iulian; Negrusoiu, Mihai; Mardare, Mihai; Socoliuc, Claudiu; Zazgyva, Ancuţa; Niculescu, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: In younger patients, ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearing surfaces are usually recommended for total hip replacement (THR) because of their low wear rate and longer expected functional life. Although technical advancements have reduced the risk of ceramic bearings fracture, this complication remains a major concern. Case description: We present the case of a 56-year-old patient undergoing 3 revision hip arthroplasties of the right hip due to ceramic liner fractures. Initial THR (2008) was performed with a CoC bearing, followed by liner fracture due to trauma a year later. The acetabular component and liner were replaced, with a minor incongruence between the old head and new insert. The 2nd ceramic insert fractured 3.5 years later, following minor trauma. Upon revision, the bearing surface was changed to metal-on-polyethylene (MoP). The performed retrieval analysis demonstrated stripe and rim wear, and evidence of adhesive wear. The patient was referred to us a month later, with a fistula on the lateral side of the hip, discharging black, petroleum-like liquid. Radiology showed well-fixed implants, no dislocation and no apparent polyethylene wear. Microbiological assessment of the discharge showed no infection. Intraoperatively massive metallosis was noticed, with stable acetabular and femoral components. The metal femoral head was heavily abraded, with almost 1% volumetric wear. Hematoxylin and eosin stained frozen tissue samples showed muscular and adipose tissue necrosis, while polarized light microscopy highlighted metal, polyethylene, and ceramic particles. Conclusion: The present case is yet another report showing the adverse outcomes of using MoP bearings for revision after ceramic liner fracture in THR. PMID:28489745

  20. Gait patterns after total hip arthroplasty and surface replacement arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nantel, Julie; Termoz, Nicolas; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2009-03-01

    To compare gait patterns in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) and surface hip arthroplasty. Observational study. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Two groups of 10 surface hip arthroplasty and THA patients and 10 control subjects participated in the study (N=30). The patients were volunteers recruited from a larger randomized study. Not applicable. Gait patterns, hip abductor muscle strength, clinical outcomes, and radiographic analyses were compared between groups. In the sagittal plane, the THA group showed a larger flexor moment and larger mechanical work in H2S and K3S power bursts compared with surface hip arthroplasty and control subjects. In the frontal plane, both THA and surface hip arthroplasty patients had smaller hip abductor muscles energy generation (H3F) than the control group. No difference was found for the hip abductor muscles strength. In the THA group, the larger energy absorption in H2S and K3S would be a cost-effective mechanical adaptation to increase stability. The surface hip arthroplasty characteristics could allow the return to a more normative gait pattern compared with THA. The modification in the frontal plane in surface hip arthroplasty and THA would be related to the hip abductor muscles strength.

  1. Infection of total hip prostheses by Peptococcus magnus: an immunofluorescence and ELISA study of two cases.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A G; Fincham, W J; Golding, M A; Cook, J

    1979-01-01

    In two cases of infected total hip replacements, Peptococcus magnus was isolated in pure culture from the implant when it was removed. Fluorescent antibody and ELISA studies have shown that both patients developed an antibody response to this anaerobic coccus soon after the replacement operation. These results suggest that the organism is a true infective agent, which was probably responsible for the failure of the arthroplasty operation. PMID:372250

  2. Reverse engineering of pelvic bone for hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Popov, I; Onuh, S O

    2009-01-01

    Research into fabrication of hip joint replacements combines knowledge from distinct domains, such as engineering, materials and medical fields. Recent computer assisted technologies have played an important role in the medical field. Unlike the modelling of most of the human bones, the creation of an accurate 3D model of a pelvic bone has been a challenging task. The main source of difficulties in this case has proven to be the complexity of the structure of the pelvis, having basically a free-form shape with a hole in the middle constituting some over-shadowed areas (undercuts), various cavities, areas with high form curvature, variable wall thickness with some very thin sections and inside layers with different mechanical properties. In this research work, a pelvic bone is generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and rapid tooling techniques. The geometric data obtained from reverse engineering through laser scanning are used and manipulated to create accurate 3D CAD representations of these devices. These CAD models can be used for various virtual tests and simulations, as well as for reproduction through rapid manufacturing processes and then used as prototypes in tooling, physical tests and planning of surgical operations.

  3. Patient factors Predict Periprosthetic Fractures Following Revision Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Jensen, Matthew; Lewallen, David

    2011-01-01

    We assessed important patient risk factors for postoperative periprosthetic fractures after revision total hip replacement (THR) using prospectively collected Institutional Joint Registry data. We used univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analyses. There were 330 postoperative periprosthetic fractures after 6,281 revision THRs. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, hazard [95% confidence interval] of periprosthetic fracture was higher for: women, 1.66 [1.32, 2.08], p<0.001; higher Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index of 2, 1.46 (1.03, 2.07) and index of 3+, 2.01 (1.48, 2.73), overall p<0.001; and operative diagnosis, especially previous non-union, 5.76 (2.55, 13.02), overall p<0.001. Hazard was lower in 61–70 year old, 0.64 (0.49, 0.84) and 71–80 year old 0.57 (0.43, 0.76), compared to <60 years (overall p<0.0001). Our study identified important modifiable and unmodifiable risk factors for fractures after revision THR. PMID:22342128

  4. Novel Highly Porous Metal Technology in Artificial Hip and Knee Replacement: Processing Methodologies and Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, John; Poggie, Matthew; Kulesha, Gene; Michael Meneghini, R.

    2013-02-01

    Hip and knee replacement can dramatically improve a patient's quality of life through pain relief and restored function. Fixation of hip and knee replacement implants to bone is critical to the success of the procedure. A variety of roughened surfaces and three-dimensional porous surfaces have been used to enhance biological fixation on orthopedic implants. Recently, highly porous metals have emerged as versatile biomaterials that may enhance fixation to bone and are suitable to a number of applications in hip and knee replacement surgery. This article provides an overview of several processes used to create these implant surfaces.

  5. Intravenous versus topical tranexamic acid in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Pengtao; Fang, Yongchao; He, Jinshan; Wang, Jingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: As the prevalence of total hip arthroplasty (THA) is increasing, it is usually associated with considerable blood loss. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been reported to reduce perioperative blood loss in hip joint arthroplasty. But the best route of TXA administration continues to be controversial. So, we conducted a meta-analysis that integrated all data from the 7 included trials to compare the effectiveness and safety of topical and intravenous TXA administration in primary THA. The endpoints assessed in this meta-analysis include the comparisons of total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, the incidence rate of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolisms (PE), and wound infection. Methods: Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biomedical Literature database, the CNKI database, and Wan Fang Data were performed up to August 30, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our meta-analysis if they compared the efficiency and safety of intravenous versus topical administration of TXA in patients who underwent primary THA. The endpoints included the comparisons of total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, the incidence rate of DVT, PE, and wound infection. A meta-analysis was performed following the guidelines of the Cochrane Reviewer's Handbook and the PRISMA statement. The pooling of data was carried out by using RevMan 5.3, Denmark. Results: Seven RCTs involving 964 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis indicated that there were no significant differences in the 2 groups in terms of total blood loss ([mean difference (MD) = −14.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): −89.21 to 59.74, P = 0.7], transfusion rates [RD = −0.02, 95% CI: −0.05 to 0.02, P = 0.39]; no significant differences were found regarding the incidence of adverse effects such as deep venous thrombosis [DVT] [RD = 0.00, 95% CI: −0

  6. Prevalence of knee and hip osteoarthritis and the appropriateness of joint replacement in an older population.

    PubMed

    Quintana, José M; Arostegui, Inmaculada; Escobar, Antonio; Azkarate, Jesus; Goenaga, J Ignacio; Lafuente, Iratxe

    2008-07-28

    Relatively little is known about the prevalence of knee and hip osteoarthritis in the general population. To estimate the prevalence of knee and hip osteoarthritis and the appropriateness of joint replacement in a general population of older individuals, the validated Knee and Hip OsteoArthritis Screening Questionnaire (KHOA-SQ) was sent to a random sample of individuals aged 60 to 90 years, stratified by age and sex, living in a single province in Spain. Respondents positive for knee or hip osteoarthritis on the KHOA-SQ were invited to be examined by an orthopedic surgeon. Diagnosis of knee or hip osteoarthritis was based on clinical and radiographic data. For respondents judged as having osteoarthritis, the appropriateness of knee or hip replacement was evaluated using published explicit criteria. Of 11 002 individuals contacted, 7577 completed the KHOA-SQ. The derived prevalence of hip osteoarthritis was approximately 7.4%. It was slightly higher in women (8.0%) than in men (6.7%) and tended to increase with age. The estimated appropriateness rate for hip replacement was 37.7% in men and 52.7% in women with osteoarthritis. The derived prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 12.2%; it was significantly higher in women (14.9%) than in men (8.7%) and tended to increase with age. The estimated appropriateness rate for knee replacement was 11.8% in men and 17.9% in women with osteoarthritis. Knee and hip osteoarthritis are highly prevalent diseases in the older population. The estimation of appropriateness for hip replacement seems to be significantly higher than that for knee replacement.

  7. A frictional study of total hip joint replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Goldsmith, A. A. J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric wear debris produced by articulation of the femoral head against the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene socket of a total hip replacement has been implicated as the main cause of osteolysis and subsequent failure of these implants. Potential solutions to this problem are to employ hard bearing surface combinations such as metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in lubrication modes and friction of a range of material combinations using synthetic and biological fluids as the lubricants. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) fluids as the lubricant. Under these conditions the ceramic-on-ceramic joints showed full fluid film lubrication while the metal-on-metal, metal-on-plastic, diamond-like carbon-coated stainless steel (DLC)-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic prostheses operated under a mixed lubrication regime. With bovine serum as the lubricant in the all ceramic joints, however, the full fluid film lubrication was inhibited due to adsorbed proteins. In the metal-on-metal joints this adsorbed protein layer acted to reduce the friction while in the ceramic coupling the friction was increased. The use of bovine serum as the lubricant also significantly increased the friction in both the metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic joints. The friction produced by the DLC-on-plastic joints depended on the quality of the coating. Those joints with a less consistent coating and therefore a higher surface roughness gave significantly higher friction than the smoother, more consistently coated heads.

  8. Pulmonary embolism associated with canine total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Liska, William D; Poteet, Brian A

    2003-01-01

    To determine by pulmonary perfusion scans and ultrasonography if embolemia occurs during total hip replacement (THR) surgery in dogs. Prospective clinical study. Forty client-owned dogs that had THR surgery. Thoracic radiographs were taken immediately after THR and immediately after completion of (99m)Tc-MAA lung scans. Scintigraphy was performed in 28 dogs, 48 hours after THR. Intraoperative ultrasonography (intercostal or transesophageal) was performed in another 12 dogs that had THR. The right atrium and ventricle and pulmonary outflow tract were observed during and for 5 to 8 minutes after femoral component insertion into medullary canals prepared by reaming, and lavage and aspiration of debris before filling with polymethylmethacrylate in dough stage. A modified Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) classification system was used to evaluate lung scans. No pulmonary radiographic abnormalities were identified. Segmental and subsegmental perfusion defects occurred in 23 (82%) dogs and were classified as severe in 9 (32%) dogs, moderate in 11, and mild in 3. There was no particular lobe predilection. Patchy mulberry-appearing defects, indicative of fat embolism, were most common. Embolemia was observed by ultrasound in 10 dogs. Variable-sized particles occurred in 8 dogs, particles and bubbles in 2 dogs, and no emboli were observed in 2 dogs. Embolemia was observed within 10 seconds after femoral stem insertion and lasted < 1 minute. Pneumoemboli remained in the right atrium for > 8 minutes before dislodgement. Embolemia of either air, particles, or both occurs in most dogs during THR surgery. Most dogs seemingly spontaneously recover from pulmonary embolism that occurs during THR. The risk of clinical complications from this pulmonary embolism should be taken seriously, even though the exact morbidity and mortality rates are unknown. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  9. The influence of spine-hip relations on total hip replacement: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rivière, C; Lazennec, J-Y; Van Der Straeten, C; Auvinet, E; Cobb, J; Muirhead-Allwood, S

    2017-06-01

    Sagittal pelvic kinematics along with spino-pelvic angular parameters have recently been studied by numerous investigators for their effect on total hip replacement (THR) clinical outcomes, but many issue of spine-hip relations (SHR) are currently unexplored. Therefore, our review aims at clarifying the following questions: is there any evidence of a relationship between articular impingement/dislocation risk in primary THR and (1) certain sagittal pelvic kinematics patterns, (2) pelvic incidence, and (3) types of SHRs? A systematic review of the existing literature utilising PubMed and Google search engines was performed in January 2017. Only clinical or computational studies published in peer-reviewed journals over the last five years in either English or French were reviewed. We identified 769 reports, of which 12 met our eligibility criteria. A review of literature shows that sagittal pelvic kinematics, but not the pelvic incidence, influences the risk of prosthetic impingement/dislocation. We found no study having assessed the relationship between this risk and the types of SHRs. Sagittal pelvic kinematics is highly variable among individuals and certain kinematic patterns substantially influences the risk of prosthetic impingement/dislocation. Recommendations for cup positioning are therefore switching from a systematic to a patient-specific approach, with the standing cup orientation Lewinneck safe zone progressively giving way to a new parameter of interest: the functional orientation of the cup. Based on a recently published classification for SHRs, We propose a new concept of "kinematically aligned THR" for the purposes of THR planning. Further studies are needed to investigate the relevance of such a classification towards the assumptions and hypothesis we have made. Level of evidence,- Level IV, systematic review of level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  11. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III).

  12. Changes in blood ion levels after removal of metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Salim K; Sampson, Barry; Panetta, Therese; Liddle, Alexander D; Sabah, Shiraz A; Chan, Newton K; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose In patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, pain and joint effusions may be associated with elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions. Since little is known about the kinetics of metal ion clearance from the body and the rate of resolution of elevated blood ion levels, we examined the time course of cobalt and chromium ion levels after revision of MoM hip replacements. Patients and methods We included 16 patients (13 female) who underwent revision of a painful MoM hip (large diameter, modern bearing) without fracture or infection, and who had a minimum of 4 blood metal ion measurements over an average period of 6.1 (0–12) months after revision. Results Average blood ion concentrations at the time of revision were 22 ppb for chromium and 43 ppb for cobalt. The change in ion levels after revision surgery varied extensively between patients. In many cases, over the second and third months after revision surgery ion levels decreased to 50% of the values measured at revision. Decay of chromium levels occurred more slowly than decay of cobalt levels, with a 9% lag in return to normal levels. The rate of decay of both metals followed second-order (exponential) kinetics more closely than first-order (linear) kinetics. Interpretation The elimination of cobalt and chromium from the blood of patients who have undergone revision of painful MoM hip arthroplasties follows an exponential decay curve with a half-life of approximately 50 days. Elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions can persist for at least 1 year after revision, especially in patients with high levels of exposure. PMID:24758321

  13. Modular calcar replacement prosthesis with strengthened taper junction in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Adolph V; Berend, Keith R; Mallory, Thomas H; Adams, Joanne B

    2007-01-01

    Whereas femoral component modularity allows the surgeon to address a variety of femoral defects in complex total hip arthroplasty (THA), breakage of modular stems is a known complication that typically occurs at the taper junction. In response, a proprietary process of taper roller-hardening that increases taper strength by a factor of 3.5 was introduced in 1999. The authors reviewed a consecutive series of patients by a single surgeon who underwent cementless revision or difficult primary THA with a taper roller-hardened modular calcar replacement prosthesis, and have the potential for a minimum of two-year follow up. In 116 patients, 123 hips were involved. Two surgeries were primary, 101 were revision/conversion, 18 were for reimplantation after treatment of infection, and two were intramedullary total femur constructs, one of which was a reimplantation after sepsis. The patients' ages at surgery averaged 71 years, and BMIs averaged 28.12 kg/m2. Nine of the patients, all with single hip involvement, were lost to contact. Twenty-one patients, three of whom had bilateral hip involvement, expired during the follow-up period with implant outcome known. Follow up in the patients who survived averaged 44 (range: 18-78) months. Six femoral components have been revised: two (1.6%) due to recurrent sepsis, three (2.4%) due to sepsis, one (0.8%) from periprosthetic fracture, and none from septic loosening or component breakage. Survivorship with aseptic loosening as the end-point was 100%. In this series, roller-hardening appears to improve the durability of the tapered junction. No roller-hardened modular calcar devices have failed due to component breakage. However, their use is not recommended in the totally deficient proximal femur, as fatigue breaks of distally fixed monoblock extensively coated stems have been reported. Caution is advised when potting or anchoring any stem in the femoral diaphysis without reconstituting proximal bone stock and support.

  14. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  15. Hip or knee replacement - in the hospital after

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hip. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  16. Functional activity in patients after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Pogorzała, Adam M; Stryła, Wanda; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2012-11-08

    Osteoarthritis of hip joints is one of the most common diseases limiting social functioning of patients. Pain and mobility disorders are major problems associated with the disease. The goal of the study was to compare the efficacy of surgical treatment in a selected group of patients using a modified Harris Hip Score questionnaire including questions regarding the pain, the type of gait disorders and the functional activity. Surgical treatment helped to reduce the pain and improve the gait quality and parameters as well as functional activities associated with putting on socks and shoes, climbing stairs, sitting and using public transportation. Following conclusions were drawn after the study: Surgical treatment leads to significant reduction in hip pain. Mobility improvement was observed in most analyzed patients in early post-operative period as a consequence of hip contracture and pain being eliminated. The walking speed and distance improved significantly during the first 3 months after the surgery. All patients were satisfied with the treatment.

  17. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  18. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  19. Short-term total hip replacement outcomes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Susan M; Zhu, Rebecca; Figgie, Mark P; Huang, Wei-Ti; Mandl, Lisa A

    2014-10-01

    While rates of total hip replacement (THR) in spondyloarthritis are increasing, contemporary outcomes are not well described. This study analyzes 2-year outcomes in a contemporary cohort of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients undergoing THR. A case-control study was performed using data from an institutional arthroplasty registry. Validated AS cases were matched 4:1 by age and procedure to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Data were obtained prior to surgery and at 2 years. Multiple imputation techniques were performed to avoid systematic bias due to missing data. Thirty eligible AS cases were identified between May 2007 and February 2010. Ankylosing spondylitis cases had worse American Society of Anesthesia class (P < 0.001) and more comorbidities (P = 0.02) compared with OA. Ankylosing spondylitis had worse preoperative lower-extremity Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain (46.8 vs 55.4; P = 0.03), function (43.0 vs 55.1; P = 0.04), and general health status measured as SF-12 (Short-Form Health Survey) physical component scale (PCS) score (29.6 vs 36.0; P < 0.001), however, there was no difference at two years in pain (89.4 vs 92.5; P = 0.23) or function (83.9 vs 90.1; P = 0.04). Physical component scale score remained significantly worse (41.2 vs 50.1; P < 0.001). Better preoperative SF-12 PCS score significantly decreased the risk of a poor pain outcome (odds ratio, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.40). Overall satisfaction was high. Although patients with AS in a contemporary cohort have more comorbidities and worse physical function prior to THR, they achieve similar gains as OA. In a multivariate regression controlling for multiple potential confounders including back pain, only preoperative health status measured as SF-12 PCS score was a significant risk factor for a poor 2-year pain. Among contemporary patients, AS is not an independent risk factor for poor THR outcomes.Take-Home Message Patients with AS have significant

  20. Alternative materials to improve total hip replacement tribology.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo; Böhler, Max; Harris, William H; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Lappalainen, Reijo; Muratoglu, Orhun; Rieker, Claude; Salzer, Martin

    2003-08-01

    An improvement in tribology of bearing surfaces is an effective means of increasing the longevity of total hip replacement (THR). Currently, 3 approaches are available to achieve this aim: first, use of highly cross-linked UHMWPE; second, aluminum oxide ceramic bearings, and third, metal-on-metal bearings. Cross-linking reduces the wear resistance of UHMWPE markedly without impairment of other significant properties of the material. Simulator studies and some clinical long-term (10-22 years) follow-up surveys suggest an almost immeasurable wear of the highly cross-linked UHMWPE-based acetabular components during an expected clinical life span. Bioinert alumina ceramic (aluminum oxide) was introduced 3 decades ago for THR-bearing surfaces to improve performance and longevity. Alumina ceramic is entirely biostable and bioinert and has good mechanical properties. For correctly positioned alumina-on-alumina bearings, the annual linear wear rate has been reported to be 3.9 microm. Alumina heads have been successfully used in combination with polyethylene sockets, but as regards wear, the best results have been obtained with alumina-on-alumina bearings. In ceramic THR bearings, precise manufacture and contact surface geometry, including optimal clearance, are most important. For the currently available products, the component fracture risk is almost nonexistent (less than 1 per 1000). Metal-on-metal bearings were used in the early stage of THR surgery, although not all old designs were successful. More recent analyses of the early series have shown the advantages of metal-on-metal to be better and have led to a renaissance of this articulation. Initially, stainless steel was used because it was easy to manufacture and polish. Current metal-on-metal bearings are based on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with varying carbon contents. Such bearings are self-polishing. Linear wear rates remain at the level of a few microm a year. An improvement in technology has increased

  1. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Christodoulou, Michael; Sasalos, Gregory; Babis, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH) is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is challenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH) differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term. PMID:25386570

  2. Evaluation of a Centers of Excellence Program for Knee and Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ateev; Sloss, Elizabeth M.; Hussey, Peter S.; Adams, John L.; Lovejoy, Susan; SooHoo, Nelson F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Medicare and private plans are encouraging individuals to seek care at hospitals which are designated as centers of excellence. Few evaluations of such programs have been conducted. The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, whose member plans insure one in three Americans, has established an initiative to designate hospitals as centers of excellence for knee and hip replacement. Objective Comparison of outcomes and costs associated with knee and hip replacement at designated hospitals and other hospitals. Research design Retrospective claims analysis of approximately 54 million enrollees. Study population Individuals with Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance who underwent a primary knee or hip replacement in 2007-2009. Outcomes Primary outcomes were any complication within 30 days of discharge and costs within 90 days following the procedure. Results 80,931 patients had a knee replacement and 39,532 patients had a hip replacement of which 52.2% and 56.5%, respectively, were performed at a designated hospital. Designated hospitals had a larger number of beds and were more likely to be an academic center. Patients with a knee replacement at designated hospitals did not have a statistically significantly lower overall complication rate with an odds ratio of 0.90 (p=0.08). Patients with a hip replacement treated at designated hospitals had a statistically significantly lower risk of complications with an odds ratio of 0.80 (p=0.002). There was no significant difference in 90-day costs for either procedure. Conclusions Hospitals designated as joint replacement centers of excellence had lower rates of complications for hip replacement, but there was no statistically significant difference for knee replacement. It is important to validate the criteria used to designate centers of excellence. PMID:23222470

  3. Revision Rates after Primary Hip and Knee Replacement in England between 2003 and 2006

    PubMed Central

    Sibanda, Nokuthaba; Copley, Lynn P; Lewsey, Jim D; Borroff, Mick; Gregg, Paul; MacGregor, Alex J; Pickford, Martin; Porter, Martyn; Tucker, Keith; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2008-01-01

    Background Hip and knee replacement are some of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in the world. Resurfacing of the hip and unicondylar knee replacement are increasingly being used. There is relatively little evidence on their performance. To study performance of joint replacement in England, we investigated revision rates in the first 3 y after hip or knee replacement according to prosthesis type. Methods and Findings We linked records of the National Joint Registry for England and Wales and the Hospital Episode Statistics for patients with a primary hip or knee replacement in the National Health Service in England between April 2003 and September 2006. Hospital Episode Statistics records of succeeding admissions were used to identify revisions for any reason. 76,576 patients with a primary hip replacement and 80,697 with a primary knee replacement were included (51% of all primary hip and knee replacements done in the English National Health Service). In hip patients, 3-y revision rates were 0.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%–1.1%) with cemented, 2.0% (1.7%–2.3%) with cementless, 1.5% (1.1%–2.0% CI) with “hybrid” prostheses, and 2.6% (2.1%–3.1%) with hip resurfacing (p < 0.0001). Revision rates after hip resurfacing were increased especially in women. In knee patients, 3-y revision rates were 1.4% (1.2%–1.5% CI) with cemented, 1.5% (1.1%–2.1% CI) with cementless, and 2.8% (1.8%–4.5% CI) with unicondylar prostheses (p < 0.0001). Revision rates after knee replacement strongly decreased with age. Interpretation Overall, about one in 75 patients needed a revision of their prosthesis within 3 y. On the basis of our data, consideration should be given to using hip resurfacing only in male patients and unicondylar knee replacement only in elderly patients. PMID:18767900

  4. Living history in current orthopaedic hip surgery: intrapelvic teflon granuloma after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Daniel; Peter, Viju; Lynch, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The teflon hip arthroplasty design was used by Sir John Charnley in the early 60's but was taken off the market due to high complication rates. A case is reported of an intrapelvic granuloma after total hip arthroplasty following the use of a teflon socket. This appears to be the last surviving patient treated by Sir John Charnley using a Teflon hip socket design.

  5. Two-Stage Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Infected Primary Hip Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Camurcu, Yalkin; Sofu, Hakan; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Gursu, Sarper; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to analyze the clinical features, the most common infective agents, and the results of two-stage total hip revision using a teicoplanin-impregnated spacer. Between January 2005 and July 2011, 41 patients were included. At the clinical status analysis, physical examination was performed, Harris hip score was noted, isolated microorganisms were recorded, and the radiographic evaluation was performed. The mean Harris hip score was improved from 38.9 ± 9.6 points to 81.8 ± 5.8 points (P<0.05). Infection was eradicated in 39 hips. Radiographic evidence of stability was noted in 37 acetabular revision components, and all femoral stems. Two-stage revision of the infected primary hip arthroplasty is a time-consuming but a reliable procedure with high rates of success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process.

  7. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  8. Association between market concentration of hospitals and patient health gain following hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pistollato, Michele; Charlesworth, Anita; Devlin, Nancy; Propper, Carol; Sussex, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between market concentration of hospitals (as a proxy for competition) and patient-reported health gains after elective primary hip replacement surgery. Methods Patient Reported Outcome Measures data linked to NHS Hospital Episode Statistics in England in 2011/12 were used to analyse the association between market concentration of hospitals measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) and health gains for 337 hospitals. Results The association between market concentration and patient gain in health status measured by the change in Oxford Hip Score (OHS) after primary hip replacement surgery was not statistically significant at the 5% level both for the average patient and for those with more than average severity of hip disease (OHS worse than average). For 12,583 (49.1%) patients with an OHS before hip replacement surgery better than the mean, a one standard deviation increase in the HHI, equivalent to a reduction of about one hospital in the local market, was associated with a 0.104 decrease in patients’ self-reported improvement in OHS after surgery, but this was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Conclusions Hospital market concentration (as a proxy for competition) appears to have no significant influence (at the 5% level) on the outcome of elective primary hip replacement. The generalizability of this finding needs to be investigated. PMID:25213207

  9. Association between market concentration of hospitals and patient health gain following hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Pistollato, Michele; Charlesworth, Anita; Devlin, Nancy; Propper, Carol; Sussex, Jon

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between market concentration of hospitals (as a proxy for competition) and patient-reported health gains after elective primary hip replacement surgery. Patient Reported Outcome Measures data linked to NHS Hospital Episode Statistics in England in 2011/12 were used to analyse the association between market concentration of hospitals measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) and health gains for 337 hospitals. The association between market concentration and patient gain in health status measured by the change in Oxford Hip Score (OHS) after primary hip replacement surgery was not statistically significant at the 5% level both for the average patient and for those with more than average severity of hip disease (OHS worse than average). For 12,583 (49.1%) patients with an OHS before hip replacement surgery better than the mean, a one standard deviation increase in the HHI, equivalent to a reduction of about one hospital in the local market, was associated with a 0.104 decrease in patients' self-reported improvement in OHS after surgery, but this was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Hospital market concentration (as a proxy for competition) appears to have no significant influence (at the 5% level) on the outcome of elective primary hip replacement. The generalizability of this finding needs to be investigated. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Body size from birth to middle age and the risk of hip and knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bette; Balkwill, Angela; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie

    2016-06-14

    Information regarding the effects of body size in childhood and early adulthood on the risk of hip and knee replacement in later life is inconsistent. We aimed to assess their effect, taking into account body mass index (BMI) in middle-age. Prospective cohort (Million Women Study) of 791,034 women with information on birth weight, body size at age 10 and age 20, and current BMI (at mean age 59.5 years) were followed for 6.82 million person-years. Adjusted relative risks (RRs) and absolute risks of hospitalisations for hip or knee replacement surgery for osteoarthritis were estimated. After a mean of 8.6 years follow-up, 17,402 women had a hip replacement and 18,297 a knee replacement. Between the ages of 50 and 79 years, absolute risks for women with current BMIs of <22.5 kg/m(2) and 35 + kg/m(2) were respectively 5.6 and 13.2 % for hip replacement; and 2.6 and 35.1 % for knee replacement. Within each category of current BMI, increasing body size at age 10 and at age 20 had comparatively small effects; there were no significant associations with birth weight. We estimate that 40 % of UK women with a BMI 35 + kg/m(2) have either a hip or knee replacement between the ages of 50-79 years; this compares to just 10 % of UK women with a healthy BMI (<25 kg/m(2)). The effects of body size in childhood and early adulthood on the absolute risks of either a hip or knee replacement are minimal compared to the effect of adiposity in middle age.

  11. Assessment of gait after bilateral hip replacement. Case study.

    PubMed

    Winiarski, Sławomir; Aleksandrowicz, Krzysztof; Jarząb, Sławomir; Pozowski, Andrzej; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective methods of treatment of severe hip osteoarthritis (HOA). In many cases pathological gait patterns persist despite properly conducted surgery and disturb the normal wear of the artificial joint surfaces. The aim of the study was to conduct functional and biomechanical assessment of gait in a patient after bilateral THA due to severe degenerative changes in the hip. The assessment focused on the gait parameters which significantly deviate from a normal gait pattern at various stages of treatment. Physiotherapeutic assessment of the patient included measurements of the range of motion in lower limb joints, the Timed Up and Go test, and pain assessment. Biomechanical assessment involved measurements of spatiotemporal gait parameters and the dynamic range of motion using BTS Smart-E motion analysis system. Although clinical examinations after both the first and second procedure suggested recovery of the patient's physical function, biomechanical assessment of her gait after the second procedure indicated the presence of deviations from a normal gait pattern. Secondary to a limited range of internal/external hip rotation, extension, and abduction, corresponding indices were still in the pathological range.

  12. A National Analysis of Complications Following Total Hip Replacement in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence rate of hip fracture has steadily increased over time and is a major common event in patients with osteoporosis and COPD. Total hip replacement (THR) is commonly performed in patients with hip fracture. Our aim was to compare the complications of THR between patients with and without COPD. Longitudinally linked data from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of registration, claims, and reimbursement records, for a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees traced retrospectively from 1996 to 2000 in Taiwan. Patients who had undergone THR surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008, were identified and divided into COPD and non-COPD cohorts. Outcomes and complications, including 90-day mortality, 1-year mortality, 1-year wound infection, 30-day readmission for hospitalization, 30-day pneumonia, 30-day acute respiratory failure, 30-day cerebrovascular accident, and length of stay during hospitalization, were measured after THR. The COPD group had a significantly higher ratio of complications, including 30-day readmission (14.0% vs 8.4%), 30-day pneumonia (10.4% vs 4.4%), 30-day acute respiratory failure (1.5% vs 0.5%), 1-year mortality (6.9% vs 2.7%), and length of stay in the hospital (10.6% vs 0.8%) than the non-COPD group. In addition to airway diseases, patients in the COPD group had higher mortality than those in non-COPD group after THR. Surgeons should give more attention to airway evaluation and selection of patients with COPD for THR. PMID:27015210

  13. A National Analysis of Complications Following Total Hip Replacement in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence rate of hip fracture has steadily increased over time and is a major common event in patients with osteoporosis and COPD. Total hip replacement (THR) is commonly performed in patients with hip fracture. Our aim was to compare the complications of THR between patients with and without COPD.Longitudinally linked data from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of registration, claims, and reimbursement records, for a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees traced retrospectively from 1996 to 2000 in Taiwan. Patients who had undergone THR surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008, were identified and divided into COPD and non-COPD cohorts. Outcomes and complications, including 90-day mortality, 1-year mortality, 1-year wound infection, 30-day readmission for hospitalization, 30-day pneumonia, 30-day acute respiratory failure, 30-day cerebrovascular accident, and length of stay during hospitalization, were measured after THR.The COPD group had a significantly higher ratio of complications, including 30-day readmission (14.0% vs 8.4%), 30-day pneumonia (10.4% vs 4.4%), 30-day acute respiratory failure (1.5% vs 0.5%), 1-year mortality (6.9% vs 2.7%), and length of stay in the hospital (10.6% vs 0.8%) than the non-COPD group.In addition to airway diseases, patients in the COPD group had higher mortality than those in non-COPD group after THR. Surgeons should give more attention to airway evaluation and selection of patients with COPD for THR.

  14. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  15. Two-stage revision of hip prosthesis infection using a hip spacer with stabilising proximal cementation.

    PubMed

    Gil Gonzalez, Sergi; Marqués López, Fernando; Rigol Ramon, Pau; Mestre Cortadellas, Carlos; Cáceres Palou, Enric; León García, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Two-stage revision hip arthroplasty for infection using an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer has been used frequently with good results. However, spacer instability is also frequent. Proximal cementation of the spacer could avoid spacer dislocation. We retrospectively assessed 35 patients in whom a 2-stage revision hip arthroplasty for infection was carried out using an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer with gentamicin (Spacer-G) in which the spacer was proximally cemented in 16 patients. The mean follow-up was 32 months. We assessed spacer stability and infection elimination. There were 8 spacer dislocations (22.9%), 5 in hips without proximal cementation and 2 in hips with proximal cementation (p>0.05). There was no fracture in any hip. Reinfection occurred in 5 hips (14.3%), in 3 with the same microorganism, while 2 had a different microorganism. Our results indicate that the proximal cementation of the spacer prevents its dislocation. Infection was eliminated in 86% of the hips.

  16. Population requirement for primary hip-replacement surgery: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Frankel, S; Eachus, J; Pearson, N; Greenwood, R; Chan, P; Peters, T J; Donovan, J; Smith, G D; Dieppe, P

    1999-04-17

    There has been a long-standing failure in many countries to satisfy the demand for several elective surgical treatments, including total hip replacement. We set out to estimate the population requirement for primary total hip replacement in England. We undertook a cross-sectional study of a stratified random sample of 28,080 individuals aged 35 and over from 40 general practices in inner-city, urban, and rural areas of Avon and Somerset, UK. Prevalent disease was identified through a two-stage process: a self-report screening questionnaire (22,978 of 26,046 responded) and subsequent clinical examination. Incident disease was estimated from the point prevalence by statistical modelling. The requirement for total hip replacement surgery was estimated on the basis of pain and loss of functional ability, with adjustment for evidence of comorbidity and patients' treatment preferences. 3169 people reported hip pain on the screening questionnaire. 2018 were invited for clinical examination, and 1405 attended. The prevalence of self-reported hip pain was 107 per 1000 (95% CI 101-113) for men and 173 per 1000 (166-180) for women. The prevalence of hip disease severe enough to require surgery was 15.2 (12.7-17.8) per 1000 aged 35-85 years. The corresponding annual incidence of hip disease requiring surgery was estimated as 2.23 (1.56-2.90), which suggests an overall requirement in England of 46,600 operations per year for patients who expressed a preference for, and were suitable for, surgery; the recent actual provision in England was about 43,500. This research suggests that the satisfaction of demand for total hip replacement, given agreed criteria for surgery, is a realistic objective.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus infections following knee and hip prosthesis insertion procedures.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Jean Marie; Kaye, Keith S; Reed, Shelby D; Peter, Senaka A; Sexton, Daniel J; Chen, Luke F; Hardy, N Chantelle; Tong, Steven Yc; Smugar, Steven S; Fowler, Vance G; Anderson, Deverick J

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common and most important pathogen following knee and hip arthroplasty procedures. Understanding the epidemiology of invasive S. aureus infections is important to quantify this serious complication. This nested retrospective cohort analysis included adult patients who had undergone insertion of knee or hip prostheses with clean or clean-contaminated wound class at 11 hospitals between 2003-2006. Invasive S. aureus infections, non-superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSIs) and blood stream infections (BSIs), were prospectively identified following each procedure. Prevalence rates, per 100 procedures, were estimated. 13,719 prosthetic knee (62%) and hip (38%) insertion procedures were performed. Of 92 invasive S. aureus infections identified, SSIs were more common (80%) than SSI and BSI (10%) or BSI alone (10%). The rate of invasive S. aureus infection/100 procedures was 0.57 [95% CI: 0.43-0.73] for knee insertion and 0.83 [95% CI: 0.61-1.08] for hip insertion. More than half (53%) were methicillin-resistant. Median time-to-onset of infection was 34 and 26 days for knee and hip insertion, respectively. Infection was associated with higher National Healthcare Safety Network risk index (p ≤ 0.0001). Post-operative invasive S. aureus infections were rare, but difficult-to-treat methicillin-resistant infections were relatively common. Optimizing preventative efforts may greatly reduce the healthcare burden associated with S. aureus infections.

  18. Trends in revision hip and knee arthroplasty observations after implementation of a regional joint replacement registry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jas; Politis, Angelos; Loucks, Lynda; Hedden, David R.; Bohm, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Background National joint replacement registries outside North America have been effective in reducing revision risk. However, there is little information on the role of smaller regional registries similar to those found in Canada or the United States. We sought to understand trends in total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty revision patterns after implementation of a regional registry. Methods We reviewed our regional joint replacement registry containing all 30 252 cases of primary and revision THA and TKA performed between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2013. Each revision case was stratified into early (< 2 yr), mid (2–10 yr) or late (> 10 yr), and we determined the primary reason for revision. Results The early revision rate for TKA dropped from 3.0% in 2005 to 1.3% in 2011 (R2 = 0.84, p = 0.003). Similarly, the early revision rate for THA dropped from 4.2% to 2.1% (R2 = 0.78, p = 0.008). Despite primary TKA and THA volumes increasing by 35.5% and 39.5%, respectively, there was no concomitant rise in revision volumes. The leading reasons for TKA revision were infection, instability, aseptic loosening and stiffness. The leading reasons for THA revision were infection, instability, aseptic loosening and periprosthetic fracture. There were no discernible trends over time in reasons for early, mid-term or late revision for either TKA or THA. Conclusion After implementation of a regional joint replacement registry we observed a significant reduction in early revision rates. Further work investigating the mechanism by which registry reporting reduces early revision risk is warranted. PMID:27438053

  19. Wear of ceramic-on-carbon fiber-reinforced poly-ether ether ketone hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; John, Gemma; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John

    2012-08-01

    Total hip replacement has been a successful surgical intervention for over 50 years, with the majority of bearings using a polyethylene cup. Long-term failure due to osteolysis and loosening has been widely documented and alternative bearings have been sought. A novel carbon fiber-reinforced poly-ether ether ketone (CFR-PEEK) cup was investigated through experimental friction and wear studies. Friction studies demonstrated the bearings operated in a boundary lubrication condition, with friction factors higher than those for other hip replacement bearings. The wear study was conducted with 36 mm diameter bearings tested against Biolox Delta heads for a period of 10 million cycles. The mean volumetric wear rate was 0.3 mm(3)/Mc, indicating the ceramic-on-CFR-PEEK bearing to be a very low wearing option for total hip replacement.

  20. Effects of Home Exercise Programmes During Home Visits After Hip Replacement: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ozlem; Tosun, Bet Uuml L

    2017-01-01

    This study systematically reviews the research, focused on the effects of home exercise programmes implemented during home visits after hip replacement on patients. PubMed (MEDLINE), Wiley Online Library, EBSCOhost, Science Direct databases (between 2004 and June 2015) were searched with the keywords "hip replacement, home exercise programme and home visit". Eleven original articles were retrieved. Different parameters were used in the trials to assess the physical functions, mobility and quality of life of patients. In six trials, the intervention group achieved significantly better improvements statistically in all parameters after home exercise programmes. In three trials, the intervention group achieved better but not significant outcomes. Early recovery in daily living activities with home exercise programme was reported only in one trial. Reviewed studies suggest that home exercise programmes, implemented during home visits after hip replacement, improve patients' physical functions and life quality.

  1. Do financial incentives trump clinical guidance? Hip Replacement in England and Scotland.

    PubMed

    Papanicolas, Irene; McGuire, Alistair

    2015-12-01

    Following devolution in 1999 England and Scotland's National Health Services diverged, resulting in major differences in hospital payment. England introduced a case payment mechanism from 2003/4, while Scotland continued to pay through global budgets. We investigate the impact this change had on activity for Hip Replacement. We examine the financial reimbursement attached to uncemented Hip Replacement in England, which has been more generous than for its cemented counterpart, although clinical guidance from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommends the later. In Scotland this financial differential does not exist. We use a difference-in-difference estimator, using Scotland as a control, to test whether the change in reimbursement across the two countries had an influence on treatment. Our results indicate that financial incentives are directly linked to the faster uptake of the more expensive, uncemented Hip Replacement in England, which ran against the clinical guidance.

  2. Metallosis with pseudotumour formation: Long-term complication following cementless total hip replacement in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Volstad, Nicola J.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Snyder, Laura A.; Meinen, Jeffrey B.; Sample, Susannah J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Case description A 10-year-old female Belgian Teruven dog was presented to our clinic for total hip revision following a diagnosis of implant (cup) failure with metallosis and abdominal pseudotumour formation. The patient had a cementless metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement performed nine years prior to presentation. Clinical findings The clinical findings, including pseudotumour formation locally and at sites distant from the implant and pain associated with the joint replacement, were similar to those described in human patients with this condition. Histopathological, surgical, and radiographic findings additionally supported the diagnosis of metallosis and pseudotumour formation. Treatment and outcome Distant site pseudo tumours were surgically removed and the total hip replacement was explanted due to poor bone quality. The patient recovered uneventfully and has since resumed normal activity. Conclusion In veterinary patients with metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants, cup failure leading to metallosis and pseudotumour formation should be considered as a potential cause of ipsilateral hindlimb lameness, intra-pelvic abdominal tumours, or a combination of both. These clinical findings may occur years after total hip replacement surgery. PMID:27189390

  3. CT-based surgical planning software improves the accuracy of total hip replacement preoperative planning.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, M; Lattanzi, R; Antonietti, B; Paderni, S; Olmi, R; Sudanese, A; Toni, A

    2003-06-01

    The present study is aimed to compare accuracy and the repeatability in planning total hip replacements with the conventional templates on radiographs to that attainable on the same clinical cases when using CT-based planning software. The sizes of the cementless components planned with new computer aided preoperative planning system called Hip-Op and with standard templates were compared to those effectively implanted. The study group intentionally included only difficult clinical cases. The most common aetiology was congenital dysplasia of hip (65.6%). The Hip-Op planning system allowed the surgeons to obtain a preoperative planning more accurate than with templates, especially for the socket. Assuming correct a size planned one calliper above or below that implanted the accuracy increased from 83% for the stem and 69% for the socket when using templates to 86% for the stem and 93% for the socket when using the Hip-Op system. The repeatability of the Hip-Op system was found comparable to that of the template procedure, which is much more familiar to the surgeons. Furthermore, the repeatability of the preoperative planning with the Hip-Op system was consistent between surgeons, independently from their major or minor experience. The study clearly shows the advantages of a three-dimensional computer-based preoperative planning over the traditional template planning, especially when deformed anatomies are involved. The surgical planning performed with the Hip-Op system is accurate and repeatable, especially for the socket and for less experienced surgeons.

  4. 24 hours stay after hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Van Den Eeden, Yannick N T; De Turck, Bruno J G; Van Den Eeden, Frank M C

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - The length of stay after total hip arthroplasty has been reduced to 2-4 days after implementing fast-track surgery. We investigated whether a new time-based patient-centered primary direct anterior approach (DAA) total hip arthroplasty (THA) treatment protocol in a specialized clinic, with a planned length of stay of about 24 hours, could be achieved in all patients or only in a selected group of patients. Patients and methods - We analyzed prospectively collected data in a cohort of 378 consecutive patients who underwent a primary direct anterior THA as a patient-centered time-based procedure between March 1, 2012 and December 31, 2015. Patients with complicated medical comorbidity and those over the age of 85 were excluded from the study. The average length of stay was recorded and all complications, re-admissions, and reoperations were registered and analyzed. The primary outcome measures were length of stay and complication rate, at discharge and 90 days postoperatively. Results - The average length of stay for all patients was 26 hours. All patients were discharged from the clinic on the day after the operation and were able to continue their recovery at home or in a rehabilitation facility. The overall complication rate within 3 months of surgery was 6%. The 3-month re-admission rate and the 3-month reoperation rate were both 2%. Interpretation - Performing a time-based, patient-centered fast-track program for DAA total hip arthroplasty can result in a standardized length of stay of about 24 hours and a high level of patient satisfaction with few complications, re-admissions, and reoperations.

  5. 24 hours stay after hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Eeden, Yannick N T; De Turck, Bruno J G; Van Den Eeden, Frank M C

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — The length of stay after total hip arthroplasty has been reduced to 2–4 days after implementing fast-track surgery. We investigated whether a new time-based patient-centered primary direct anterior approach (DAA) total hip arthroplasty (THA) treatment protocol in a specialized clinic, with a planned length of stay of about 24 hours, could be achieved in all patients or only in a selected group of patients. Patients and methods — We analyzed prospectively collected data in a cohort of 378 consecutive patients who underwent a primary direct anterior THA as a patient-centered time-based procedure between March 1, 2012 and December 31, 2015. Patients with complicated medical comorbidity and those over the age of 85 were excluded from the study. The average length of stay was recorded and all complications, re-admissions, and reoperations were registered and analyzed. The primary outcome measures were length of stay and complication rate, at discharge and 90 days postoperatively. Results — The average length of stay for all patients was 26 hours. All patients were discharged from the clinic on the day after the operation and were able to continue their recovery at home or in a rehabilitation facility. The overall complication rate within 3 months of surgery was 6%. The 3-month re-admission rate and the 3-month reoperation rate were both 2%. Interpretation — Performing a time-based, patient-centered fast-track program for DAA total hip arthroplasty can result in a standardized length of stay of about 24 hours and a high level of patient satisfaction with few complications, re-admissions, and reoperations. PMID:27658640

  6. Tribological characteristics of a composite total-surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous fiber, woven E glass composite femoral shells having the same elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle wear tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these continuous fiber particulate composite femoral shells articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups were comparable to those of a vitallium ball articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cup.

  7. Prometheus payment model: application to hip and knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Amita; Mohr, Beth A; Williams, Jeffery O; Soobader, Mah-Jabeen; de Brantes, Francois

    2009-10-01

    The Prometheus Payment Model offers a potential solution to the failings of the current fee-for-service system and various forms of capitation. At the core of the Prometheus model are evidence-informed case rates (ECRs), which include a bundle of typical services that are informed by evidence and/or expert opinion as well as empirical data analysis, payment based on the severity of patients, and allowances for potentially avoidable complications (PACs) and other provider-specific variations in payer costs. We outline the methods and findings of the hip and knee arthroplasty ECRs with an emphasis on PACs. Of the 2076 commercially insured patients undergoing hip arthroplasty in our study, PAC costs totaled $7.8 million (14% of total costs; n = 699 index PAC stays). Similarly, PAC costs were $12.7 million (14% of total costs; n = 897 index PAC stays) for 3403 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. By holding the providers clinically and financially responsible for PACs, and by segmenting and quantifying the type of PACs generated during and after the procedure, the Prometheus model creates an opportunity for providers to focus on the reduction of PACs, including readmissions, making the data actionable and turn the waste related to PAC costs into potential savings.

  8. Peri-acetabular bone mineral density in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, L.; Dinh, L.; Beaulé, P. E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify and compare peri-acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) between a monoblock acetabular component using a metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing and a modular titanium shell with a polyethylene (PE) insert. The secondary outcome was to measure patient-reported clinical function. Methods A total of 50 patients (25 per group) were randomised to MoM or metal-on-polyethlene (MoP). There were 27 women (11 MoM) and 23 men (14 MoM) with a mean age of 61.6 years (47.7 to 73.2). Measurements of peri-prosthetic acetabular and contralateral hip (covariate) BMD were performed at baseline and at one and two years’ follow-up. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score, Harris hip score, and RAND-36 were also completed at these intervals. Results At two years, only zone 1 showed a loss in BMD (-2.5%) in MoM group compared with a gain in the MoP group (+2.2%). Zone 2 showed loss in both groups (-2.2% for MoM; -3.9% for MoP) and zones 3 and 4 a gain in both groups (+0.1% for MoM; +3.3% for MoP). No other between-group differences were detected. When adjusting for BMD of the contralateral hip, no differences in BMD were observed. The only significant differences in functional scores at two years were higher UCLA activity (7.3 (sd 1.2) vs 6.1 (sd 1.5); p = 0.01) and RAND-36 physical function (82.1 (sd 13.0) vs 64.5 (sd 26.4); p = 0.02) for MoM bearings versus MoP. One revision was performed in the MoM group, for aseptic acetabular loosening at 11 months. Conclusions When controlling for systemic BMD, there were no significant differences between MoM and MoP groups in peri-acetabular BMD. However, increasing reports of adverse tissue reactions with large head MoM THR have restricted the use of the monoblock acetabular component to resurfacing only. PMID:23913361

  9. Total hip replacements done without cement after acetabular fractures: a 4- to 8-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Huo, M H; Solberg, B D; Zatorski, L E; Keggi, K J

    1999-10-01

    Twenty-one patients (21 hips) underwent cementless total hip replacement surgeries for previous acetabular fractures. The mean age at the time of hip replacement was 52 years (range, 23-78 years). The mean follow-up was 65 months (range, 48-104 months). One hip required revision of the stem secondary to a periprosthetic femur fracture from a fall at 3 months after surgery. Good to excellent clinical rating was achieved and maintained in 19 hips. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated stable cup and stem fixation in 17 and 15 hips. Only 1 patient with radiographic loosening of the components was sufficiently symptomatic. The results in this series appeared slightly better than those reported previously in hip replacements done with cement at comparable medium-term follow-up. The mechanical failure rates remained high in this patient population: 19% for the cups and 29% for the stems.

  10. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  11. [SECOT consensus on thromboembolisms in knee and hip replacement surgery].

    PubMed

    Castellet, E; Peidró, L; Otero, R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a professional consensus that proposes, in the light of the current scientific evidence and the clinical experience of an expert panel, some clinical recommendations directed at the Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery (OTS) specialist and with the aim of reducing the variability in the prophylactic management of venous thromboembolic disease in knee and hip arthroplasty in clinical practice. The Delphi method was used, which consisted of two rounds of an e-mail questionnaire. Of the 55 items considered, a consensus was reached in 37 (67.2%) of them. In 31 cases there was consensus with the formulation of the item, and in 6 cases there was no agreed consensus. It was observed that there was a consensus in multiple clinical recommendations that could help OTS specialists in the making of decisions in their clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical experience with ceramics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oonishi, H; Wakitani, S; Murata, N; Saito, M; Imoto, K; Kim, S; Matsuura, M

    2000-10-01

    As part of a search for better articulation in total hip prostheses, the decrease in the thickness of the socket in different total hip prostheses was measured in vivo. The wear rates of (1) RCH 1000 (molecular weight, 10(6)) socket gamma-irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with a crude COP (stainless steel containing 20% cobalt and 0.01% phosphorous) metal femoral head; (2) RCH 1000 socket nonirradiated articulating with a crude COP femoral head; (3) RCH 1000 socket irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with an alumina femoral head; (4) ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (molecular weight, 5-6 x 10(6)) socket articulating with an alumina femoral head; and (5) ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a stainless steel femoral head (T-28) were 0.06, 0.30, 0.06, 0.1 and 0.25 mm/year, respectively, in the authors' clinical cases. Alumina femoral heads were effective in decreasing wear of the polyethylene socket. However, the wear rates of gamma-irradiated sockets articulating with alumina and with metal femoral heads wear very low and were not different from each other. Regarding the relationship between wear rate and the thickness of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a 28 mm alumina femoral head, on radiographs, average wear rates of socket thicknesses of 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 mm were 0.14, 0.15, 0.12, 0.06, and 0.08 mm/year, respectively. On measuring retrieved prostheses, average wear rates of 7, 8, 9 and 11 mm thickness sockets were 0.2, 0.19, 0.14, and 0.1 mm/year, respectively. The wear of sockets has been proven to be minimal in alumina femoral heads articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene sockets thicker than 10 mm.

  13. Compatibility of the totally replaced hip. Reduction of wear by amorphous diamond coating.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo

    2003-12-01

    Particulate wear debris in totally replaced hips causes adverse local host reactions. The extreme form of such a reaction, aggressive granulomatosis, was found to be a distinct condition and different from simple aseptic loosening. Reactive and adaptive tissues around the totally replaced hip were made of proliferation of local fibroblast like cells and activated macrophages. Methylmethacrylate and high-molecular-weight polyethylene were shown to be essentially immunologically inert implant materials, but in small particulate form functioned as cellular irritants initiating local biological reactions leading to loosening of the implants. Chromium-cobalt-molybdenum is the most popular metallic implant material; it is hard and tough, and the bearings of this metal are partially self-polishing. In total hip implants, prerequisites for longevity of the replaced hip are good biocompatibility of the materials and sufficient tribological properties of the bearings. The third key issue is that the bearing must minimize frictional shear at the prosthetic bone-implant interface to be compatible with long-term survival. Some of the approaches to meet these demands are alumina-on-alumina and metal-on-metal designs, as well as the use of highly crosslinked polyethylene for the acetabular component. In order to avoid the wear-based deleterious properties of the conventional total hip prosthesis materials or coatings, the present work included biological and tribological testing of amorphous diamond. Previous experiments had demonstrated that a high adhesion of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings to a substrate can be achieved by using mixing layers or interlayers. Amorphous diamond was found to be biologically inert, and simulator testing indicated excellent wear properties for conventional total hip prostheses, in which either the ball or both bearing surfaces were coated with hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond films. Simulator testing with such total hip prostheses

  14. One-stage Exchange Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Manny; Sukeik, Mohamed; Zahar, Akos; Nizam, Ikram; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery. In an aging population of the developed world, the increasing numbers of hip and knee replacements will inevitably lead to increasing incidence of PJI, carrying with (it) significant patient morbidity and cost to the health care system. Two-stage exchange arthroplasty is currently the gold standard but it is associated with multiple operations, prolonged hospitalization and impaired functionality. One-stage exchange arthroplasty is similar to the two-stage procedure but the interval between removal of the prosthesis and reimplantation of a new one is only a few minutes. It has the theoretical benefits of a single anesthetic, shorter hospitalization, less cost and improved function. Methods: We reviewed the current literature regarding the outcomes of one-stage exchange arthroplasties focusing on re-infection rates and functional outcomes. Results: Current themes around the one-stage exchange procedure include the indications for the procedure, definition of re-infection, surgical techniques used to provide fixation and differences in approach for hip and knee replacements. Conclusion: The current literature on one-stage exchange procedure is promising, with comparable results to two-stage revisions for hips and knees in selected patients. However, there is a great need for a large multi-centred randomized control trial, focusing on re-infection rates and functional scores postoperatively, to provide concrete guidelines in managing this complex condition. PMID:28144374

  15. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  16. [The use of radiotherapy in the prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients with total hip replacement].

    PubMed

    Marziano, C; Pichi, E; Chiarlone, R; Luzi, G; Siccardi, C

    1996-12-01

    In order to prevent heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip replacement, 21 high risk hips were irradiated pre- and postoperatively to prevent heterotopic bone formation in the St. Paul Department of Radiation Oncology from 1993 to September, 1995. Eighteen hips in 15 patients were eligible for analysis with a minimum follow-up of 3 months. All the hips in our series were at high risk of heterotopic bone formation. All assessable patients had radiographic findings of ipsilateral or contralateral previous ectopic bone formation, 8 following total hip arthroplasty, 4 following trauma and 3 had heterotopic osteoarthritis. Four hips were treated 46 hours preoperatively, while all the others were treated on the first postoperative day. The irradiation field was limited to the hip region and radiation exposure to a rectangular field, ranging in size from 8 x 12 to 10 x 15 cm, to include the lateral aspect of the greater trochanter. We used a cobalt-60 unit. Opposed anterior-posterior fields were irradiated at midplan, with a source-to-axis distance of 80 cm; the dose was 6-8 Gy in one fraction. Preoperative irradiation appeared as effective as postoperative treatment, and more comfortable for the patients. There were neither side-effects nor failure of ossification. The treatment appeared effective in the prophylaxis of HO in 88% of patients, with clinical advantages in 67% of them.

  17. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  18. Good outcome of total hip replacement in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    King, Garry; Hunt, Linda P; Wilkinson, J Mark; Blom, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have painful deformed hips, but they are seldom treated with hip replacement as the surgery is considered to be high risk. However, few data are available on the outcome of hip replacement in these patients. Patients and methods — We linked Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records to the National Joint Registry for England and Wales to identify 389 patients with CP who had undergone hip replacement. Their treatment and outcomes were compared with those of 425,813 patients who did not have CP. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to describe implant survivorship and the curves were compared using log-rank tests, with further stratification for age and implant type. Reasons for revision were quantified as patient-time incidence rates (PTIRs). Nationally collected patient-reported outcomes (PROMS) before and 6 months after operation were compared if available. Cumulative mortality (Kaplan-Meier) was estimated at 90 days and at 1, 3, and 5 years. Results — The cumulative probability of revision at 5 years post-surgery was 6.4% (95% CI: 3.8–11) in the CP cohort as opposed to 2.9% (CI 2.9–3%) in the non-CP cohort (p < 0.001). Patient-reported outcomes showed that CP patients had worse pain and function preoperatively, but had equivalent postoperative improvement. The median improvement in Oxford hip score at 6 months was 23 (IQR: 14–28) in CP and it was 21 (14–28) in non-CP patients. 91% of CP patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. The cumulative probability of mortality for CP up to 7 years was similar to that in the controls after stratification for age and sex. Interpretation — Hip replacement for cerebral palsy appears to be safe and effective, although implant revision rates are higher than those in patients without cerebral palsy. PMID:26863583

  19. The Main Cause of Death Following Primary Total Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of 26,766 Deaths Following 332,734 Hip Replacements and 29,802 Deaths Following 384,291 Knee Replacements.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Whitehouse, Michael R; Porter, Martyn L; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-04-05

    Patients undergoing primary total joint replacement are selected for surgery and thus (other than having a transiently increased mortality rate postoperatively) have a lower mortality rate than age and sex-matched individuals do. Understanding the causes of death following joint replacement would allow targeted strategies to reduce the risk of death and optimize outcome. We aimed to determine the rates and causes of mortality for patients undergoing primary total hip or knee replacement compared with individuals in the general population who were matched for age and sex. We compared causes and rates of mortality between age and sex-matched individuals in the general population (National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland; Hospital Episode Statistics; and Office for National Statistics) and a linked cohort of 332,734 patients managed with total hip replacement (26,766 of whom died before the censoring date) and 384,291 patients managed with primary total knee replacement (29,802 of whom died before the censoring date) from 2003 through 2012. The main causes of death were malignant neoplasms (33.8% [9,037] of 26,766 deaths in patients with total hip replacement and 33.3% [9,917] of 29,802 deaths in patients with total knee replacement), circulatory system disorders (32.8% [8,784] of the deaths in patients with total hip replacement and 33.3% [9,932] of the deaths in patients with total knee replacement), respiratory system disorders (10.9% [2,928] of the deaths in patients with total hip replacement and 9.8% [2,932] of the deaths in patients with total knee replacement), and digestive system diseases (5.5% [1,465] of the deaths in patients with total hip replacement and 5.3% [1,572] of the deaths in patients with total knee replacement). There was a relative reduction in mortality (39%) compared with the individuals in the general population that equalized to the rate in the general population by 7 years for hips (overall standardized mortality

  20. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after total knee or hip replacement: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patientsTo determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patientsTo determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person's functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. THE THERAPY: The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may receive inpatient or outpatient

  1. [Conduct and tactics of infections after hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Białecki, Jerzy; Marczyński, Wojciech; Milecki, Marcin; Obrebski, Marcin; Szyszka, Michał

    2009-01-01

    The number of arthroplasty surgeries is growing globally, bringing about an increase in the absolute number of infected complications. No precise statistics of complications are available in Poland. The present paper discusses the main causes of infected complications of hip arthroplasty. The object is to present both pre-surgery prophylaxis and the treatment of an infected complication adjacent to the endoprosthesis. Infections are commonly divided after Coventry and Fitzgerald. The most common pathogens in infected endoprostheses include Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, while the treatment of infections with the Gram-negative flora poses many problems. Discussed within treatment of infected complications of hip arthroplasty has been one- and two-stage surgical treatment with temporary implants--"spacers"--combines with prolonged antibiotic therapy. Important within the post-surgery treatment is prolonged monitoring of the infective agents (CRP and SR).

  2. Patients' experience of pain and pain relief following hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Joelsson, Maud; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Jakobsson, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe patients' experience of pain and pain relief following hip replacement surgery. Annually, many patients undergo hip replacement surgery. Previous research has focused largely on the long-term effects on pain for patients who undergo hip replacement surgery and to a lesser degree on their subjective, early postoperative pain experience. A descriptive qualitative design was used. The study was carried out in an orthopaedic ward at a hospital in Sweden during 2006. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 patients who had undergone hip replacement surgery. Data were analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. The postoperative pain experience was characterised in terms of interrelated contexts of time, various bodily activities and postoperative pain intensity. The postoperative pain intensity was characterised in terms of intensive and worst imaginable, strange feelings and fear and a feeling of faintness. Easing of postoperative pain was related to professional care features, such as nursing staff, pharmacological pain relief and technical aids. Self-care features were related to relieving body positions, endurance and looking ahead. Although the development of total hip replacement surgery has been very successful, there are issues that need to be addressed in relation to postoperative pain management. The findings in this study show that there are reasons for making a more concerted effort to develop postoperative pain management, particularly during the first few days after surgery. The results provide some indication that pain management for this group of patients in the early postoperative period needs to be improved to reduce the fear of moving and improve the process of regaining independence. Devoting more attention to the patients during the initial postoperative phase may be the key to improve the training and making it even more effective. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods — From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results — The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2–2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation — The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  4. Normalization of widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity after total hip replacement in patients with hip osteoarthritis is associated with clinical and functional improvements.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Villalobos, Pilar; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Navarro-Espigares, Jose L; Hernández-Torres, Elisa; Villalobos, Mercedes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the relevance of ongoing nociceptive joint inputs to the maintenance of widespread pain hypersensitivity in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and to determine whether a reversal in the widespread pressure hypersensitivity together with an improvement in pain and function occurs after total hip replacement in these patients. Forty patients with hip OA participated. Twenty patients underwent total hip replacement, and the other 20 patients were assigned to a waiting list. Pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) over the second metacarpal bone and the gluteus medius, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles were assessed bilaterally with a pressure algometer before and 3 months after total hip replacement surgery. Assessments of pain intensity (by visual analog scale [VAS]), physical function (by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), and health status (by the Short Form 12 health survey and the EuroQol 5-domain index) were also performed. Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty exhibited a reduction in widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia (increases in PPTs) over local and distant pain-free areas, as compared with before surgery and as compared with the patients assigned to the waiting list. PPTs were related to hip pain intensity, and significant correlations were found between higher VAS scores and lower average PPTs over all points assessed (-0.409 < r < -0.306, P < 0.05). Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty exhibited a greater decrease in pain intensity and greater increases in function and health status than did those who were on the waiting list. Changes in the intensity of hip pain were moderately associated with changes in pressure pain sensitivity in the hip arthroplasty group. Normalization of widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia was found after successful hip joint replacement in patients with hip OA. Altered pain processing seems to be driven by ongoing peripheral joint

  5. Psoas abscess associated with infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buttaro, M; González Della Valle, A; Piccaluga, F

    2002-02-01

    A 65-year-old man with a left uncemented total hip arthroplasty performed 11 years previously was admitted with a history of progressive low back pain, left hip pain, and sepsis that had begun 6 months earlier. On physical examination, a gross, fluctuant mass was palpated in the left thigh. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 6.5 x 3 cm left retrofascial psoas abscess communicating with the hip joint. The patient underwent irrigation and débridement of the hip with removal of the components. The psoas abscess was drained through the iliopsoas bursa. A residual psoas abscess was drained percutaneously under CT guidance. Cultures isolated Escherichia coli, and the patient responded to 6 months of ciprofloxacin therapy. After 1 year, the patient had no evidence of infection. Pathways of infection spread, diagnosis, and treatment of a patient with this rare association are discussed with a review of the literature.

  6. [Incidence of hip and knee prosthetic infections in a specialized center of Mexico City].

    PubMed

    Franco-Cendejas, Rafael; Contreras-Córdova, Erika Lizbeth; Mondragón-Eguiluz, Jaime Arturo; Vanegas-Rodríguez, Edgar Samuel; Ilizaliturri-Sánchez, Víctor Manuel; Galindo-Fraga, Arturo

    2016-12-17

    Hip and knee prosthetic replacements have proven to be the most appropriate treatment in the joints that do not benefit from medical or arthroscopic interventions; however, infections are the most feared complication. It is recommended that the incidence of infection should not exceed 2%. This was an observational, prospective, longitudinal and observational study conducted in patients fitted with a prosthetic joint from August 2011 to July 2012. Patients were followed up pre and post-surgery for one year to identify a prosthetic infection, diagnosed using international parameters. We calculated the incidence of prosthetic infection, as well as the incidence density. A total of 339 patients (179 hip and 160 knee) were included. Variations in the time of pre-operative antibiotics' administration were observed. Six prosthetic infections were identified with an incidence rate of 1.79/339 arthroplasties, 2.2/179 hip procedures, and 1.25/160 knee arthroplasties. An incidence density of 0.02/year for hip arthroplasties and 0.11/year for knee procedures was identified. There were 4 infections of hip and 2 of knee. Five infections were acute and one chronic. The isolated microorganisms were E. faecalis, S. epidermidis (2), S. mitis, S. aureus and P. stomatis. The incidence of prosthetic joint infection in the first year of follow-up at our centre is within the recommended parameters. Surgical techniques and organizational practices influence the results. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Cobalt toxicity after revision total hip replacement due to fracture of a ceramic head.

    PubMed

    Pelayo-de Tomás, J M; Novoa-Parra, C; Gómez-Barbero, P

    2017-01-25

    Symptomatic cobalt toxicity from a failed total hip replacement is a rare, but devastating complication. Potential clinical findings include cardiomyopathy, hypothyroidism, skin rash, visual and hearing impairment, polycythaemia, weakness, fatigue, cognitive impairment, and neuropathy. The case is presented of a 74year-old man in whom, after a ceramic-ceramic replacement and two episodes of prosthetic dislocation, it was decided to replace it with a polyethylene-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA). At 6months after the revision he developed symptoms of cobalt toxicity, confirmed by analytical determination (serum cobalt level=651.2μg/L). After removal of the prosthesis, the levels of chromium and cobalt in blood and urine returned to normal, with the patient currently being asymptomatic. It is recommended to use a new ceramic on ceramic bearing at revision, in order to minimise the risk of wear-related cobalt toxicity following breakage of ceramic components.

  8. Traumatic breakage of the ceramic head of prosthesis in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Moreschini, O; Braidotti, P

    1991-09-01

    The authors describe breakage of the 32 mm alumina AL2 O3 ceramic head in 3 cases of total hip replacement using two different models of prosthesis (Charnley-Müller and Mittelmeier). All three patients were of average height, weight, and activity (Brown et al., 1985; Callaghan et al., 1988), and the breakage had been caused by an accidental fall. The same mechanism of injury, in people the same age as our subjects, can cause femoral neck fractures. Reoperation was necessary in order to replace the component. The implants all appeared to be positioned correctly, and the patients had reported no symptoms. Before the trauma that caused breakage, there had been no other injuries worth noting. All patients were satisfied with their hip replacements.

  9. Total hip replacement in younger patients: survival rate after avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Wolfgang; Knahr, Karl

    2004-04-01

    A high risk of loosening has been reported in replacements performed because of avascular necrosis. To study cementless total hip replacement (THR) in younger patients with avascular necrosis (AVN), we analyzed retrospectively the outcome in 129 cases: 46 Mittelmeier monobloc ceramic hips (22 cases with AVN), and 83 Zweymüller total hip systems (35 cases with AVN) clinically and radiographically. At follow-up, 17 Mittelmeier prostheses (10 AVN) and 4 Zweymüller prostheses (none with AVN) had been revised. The diagnosis did not affect the implant survival, but the Zweymüller THR fared better than the Mittelmeier system. The main reason for revision of Mittelmeier implants was aseptic loosening, 3 of 4 Zweymüller revisions were necessary due to polyethylene wear. This difference was confirmed by the radiographic evaluation of the still intact implants: Zweymüller THR showed better values for signs of osseointegration, radiolucent lines around the implants and migration, but more acetabular wear. None of these differences was affected by the AVN diagnosis. We could not confirm that AVN is a risk factor in total hip replacement.

  10. Agreements and disagreements in exercise therapy prescriptions after hip replacement among rehabilitation professionals: a multicenter survey.

    PubMed

    Eulenburg, Christine; Rahlf, Anna-Lina; Kutasow, Andrej; Zech, Astrid

    2015-08-05

    Exercise therapy following total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be important during the initial postoperative care, but till date only a few evidence-based recommendations exist. The aim of this survey was to identify prescription standards among different rehabilitation professionals, for the exercise therapy management after THR in Germany. The study was a cross-sectional survey. Standardized questionnaires were sent to 38 eligible rehabilitation facilities in Germany. Participating surgeons, orthopaedic physicians, physiotherapists and exercise therapists rated the optimal early weight-bearing, resistance training, key components and dose of exercise therapy, and the hip loading during exercising. The returned questionnaires were then analyzed for level of agreement (≥80%) among respondents. 313 rehabilitation professionals from 28 clinics returned completed questionnaires and were considered eligible for analysis. Out of total respondents, 53.9% (cemented THR) and 18.2% (uncemented THR) recommended full weight-bearing within five days after surgery. Commencement of resistance training later than three weeks after surgery is recommended by 20.6% (36%) for cemented (uncemented) prosthesis. Feedback varied significantly amongst the professions. Regarding the overall objectives of rehabilitation after hip replacement, respondents agree in six out of eight requested items. Agreement concerning priorities of specific exercises was achieved in three out of twelve items. The recommended exercise therapy dose varied significantly with working experience (p = 0.02). Rehabilitation professionals mainly disagreed with the exercise therapy prescriptions following the total hip replacement during the initial postoperative care in Germany.

  11. Large diameter metal on metal total hip replacement for femoral neck fractures with neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Jinzhu; Liu, Denghui; Xu, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis can have a femoral neck fracture; yet, the optimal methods of treatment for these hips remains controversial. Many constrained or semi-constrained prostheses, using constrained liners (CLs) with a locking mechanism to capture the femoral head, were used to treat femoral neck fractures in patients with neurological disorders. We retrospectively studied a group of patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis who sustained femoral neck fractures and were treated by total hip arthroplasty using an L-MoM prosthesis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 12 hips in 12 patients who underwent large-diameter metal-on-metal (L-MoM) total hip replacement between May 2007 and October 2009. Eight of the 12 patients (8 hips; 66.7%) had Parkinson's disease and 4 patients (4 hips; 33.3%) were affected with poliomyelitis. Results: The followup time was 5.2 years (range 3.6-6.0 years). At the latest followup, all the patients showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic results, with pain relief. No complications, such as dislocation or aseptic loosening occurred. Conclusion: We believe the use of L-MoM can diminish the rate of instability or dislocation, after operation. The L-MoM is an option for patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis with femoral neck fracture. PMID:25404774

  12. [Total hip replacement in the G-DRG-system].

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, M M; Franz, D; Lassahn, C; Siebert, C H

    2007-01-01

    Due to the continuing increase in life expectancy, the ageing process of the German population in general and the high demands placed on activity levels and quality of life today, the demand for primary and secondary joint replacement surgery continues to increase. To distribute the economic and medical resources properly, while still making technical and surgical innovations available to a broad public, hospitals must be able to adequately finance these procedures with the help of the proper diagnosis related groups. The development of the German DRG-system over the past years, as well as the new calculation for the year 2006 are to be reviewed and analysed in this article with this in mind. An improvement in the degree of differentiation between the individual procedures can be documented. Whether or not these changes will ensure the long-term financial survival of the German health care system will remain to be seen.

  13. In vitro fatigue failure of cemented acetabular replacements: a hip simulator study.

    PubMed

    Zant, N P; Heaton-Adegbile, P; Hussell, J G; Tong, J

    2008-04-01

    Although hip simulators for in vitro wear testing of prosthetic materials used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have been available for a number of years, similar equipment has yet to appear for endurance testing of fixation in cemented THA, despite considerable evidence of late aseptic loosening as one of the most significant failure mechanisms in this type of replacements. An in vitro study of fatigue behavior in cemented acetabular replacements has been carried out, utilizing a newly developed hip simulator. The machine was designed to simulate the direction and the magnitude of the hip contact force under typical physiological loading conditions, including normal walking and stair climbing, as reported by Bergmann et al. (2001, Hip 98, Freie Universitaet, Berlin). A 3D finite element analysis has been carried out to validate the function of the hip simulator and to evaluate the effects of boundary conditions and geometry of the specimen on the stress distribution in the cement mantle. Bovine pelvic bones were implanted with a Charnley cup, using standard manual cementing techniques. Experiments were carried out under normal walking and descending stairs loading conditions with selected load levels from a body weight of 75-125 kg. Periodically, the samples were removed from the test rigs to allow CT scanning for the purpose of monitoring damage development in the cement fixation. The hip simulator was found to be satisfactory in reproducing the hip contact force during normal walking and stair climbing, as reported by Bergmann et al. Finite element analysis shows that the stress distributions in the cement mantle and at the bone-cement interface are largely unaffected by the geometry and the boundary conditions of the model. Three samples were tested up to 17 x 10(6) cycles and sectioned post-testing for microscopic studies. Debonding at the bone-cement interface of various degrees in the posterior-superior quadrant was revealed in these samples, and the location

  14. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Young

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  15. Analysis of mixed lubrication mechanism in metal-on-metal hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M

    2002-01-01

    A simple mixed lubrication model has been developed to predict the asperity contact and wear for the metal-on-metal bearing couple for total hip joint replacements. It has been shown that the femoral head radius has a large effect on the predicted asperity contact and wear depending on the lubrication regime. An increase in the femoral head radius can lead to an increase in wear under a predominantly boundary lubrication regime, but this trend can be reversed under a mixed lubrication regime towards fluid film lubrication. These observations are consistent with the recent experimental findings from hip simulator studies by Smith and co-workers.

  16. [Hybrid replacement of the hip joint of the poldi-cech system.].

    PubMed

    Cech, O; Beznoska, S; Krbec, M

    1992-01-01

    The authors present cementless endoprothesis of the hip joint from the new series of hybrid endoprothesis of the hip joint being developed. The endoprothesis has a conic shaft allowing - with a precise reaming of the medullary canal by means of pneumatic reamer - good primary stability which provides the prerequisites for the remodellation of the bone bed. Endoprothesis is produced from the titanium alloy Ti-5 AI-2,5 Fe. The replacement is indicated for biologically young patients with a solid skeleton. Key words: hybrid endoprothesis, titanium alloy Ti-5 AI-2,5 Fe, cementless endoprothesis.

  17. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  18. Retaining well-fixed cementless stem in the treatment of infected hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Two-stage reconstruction, reimplantation after removal of an infected prosthesis, has been considered to be the gold standard for treatment of infected hip arthroplasty. However, during the removal of a well-fixed femoral stem, the proximal femur can be damaged and a sequestrum can be formed, which might lead to chronic osteomyelitis and difficulty in reimplantation. We wanted to determine whether infection after hip arthroplasty can be treated without removal of a well-fixed stem. Methods We treated 19 patients who had an infection after hip replacement, but a well-fixed cementless stem, with 2-stage reconstruction. At the first stage, we removed the acetabular cup, the liner and the head, but not the stem. We then implanted a cup of cement spacer. After control of infection, we reimplanted the acetabular component and head. Results 2 patients did not undergo second-stage reconstruction because they were satisfied with the pain relief and the activity that they had with the cement-spacer implantation. The remaining 17 patients underwent the second-stage of the reconstruction using cementless arthroplasty. At a mean follow-up time of 4 (2–8) years, 15 of the patients had no recurrence of infection, with satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcome. Interpretation This second-stage reconstruction after retention of the stem could be an alternative treatment option for periprosthetic infection with a well-fixed stem. PMID:23621807

  19. Mid-to long-term results of revision total hip replacement in patients aged 50 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Lee, P T H; Lakstein, D L; Lozano, B; Safir, O; Backstein, J; Gross, A E

    2014-08-01

    Revision total hip replacement (THR) for young patients is challenging because of technical complexity and the potential need for subsequent further revisions. We have assessed the survivorship, functional outcome and complications of this procedure in patients aged < 50 years through a large longitudinal series with consistent treatment algorithms. Of 132 consecutive patients (181 hips) who underwent revision THR, 102 patients (151 hips) with a mean age of 43 years (22 to 50) were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 11 years (2 to 26) post-operatively. We attempted to restore bone stock with allograft where indicated. Using further revision for any reason as an end point, the survival of the acetabular component was 71% (sd 4) and 54% (sd 7) at ten- and 20 years. The survival of the femoral component was 80% (sd 4) and 62% (sd 6) at ten- and 20 years. Complications included 11 dislocations (6.1%), ten periprosthetic fractures (5.5%), two deep infections (1.1%), four sciatic nerve palsies (2.2%; three resolved without intervention, one improved after exploration and freeing from adhesions) and one vascular injury (0.6%). The mean modified Harris Hip Score was 41 (10 to 82) pre-operatively, 77 (39 to 93) one year post-operatively and 77 (38 to 93) at the latest review. This overall perspective on the mid- to long-term results is valuable when advising young patients on the prospects of revision surgery at the time of primary replacement. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. The effect of education and supervised exercise vs. education alone on the time to total hip replacement in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Carsten; Roos, Ewa M; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2013-01-14

    The age- and gender-specific incidence of total hip replacement surgery has increased over the last two decades in all age groups. Recent studies indicate that non-surgical interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability, even at later stages of the disease when joint replacement is considered. We hypothesize that the time to hip replacement can be postponed in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis following participation in a patient education and supervised exercise program when compared to patients receiving patient education alone. A prospective, blinded, parallel-group multi-center trial (2 sites), with balanced randomization [1:1]. Patients with hip osteoarthritis and an indication for hip replacement surgery, aged 40 years and above, will be consecutively recruited and randomized into two treatment groups. The active treatment group will receive 3 months of supervised exercise consisting of 12 sessions of individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training, and 12 sessions of intensive resistance training plus patient education (3 sessions). The control group will receive only patient education (3 sessions). The primary end-point for assessing the effectiveness of the intervention is 12 months after baseline. However, follow-ups will also be performed once a year for at least 5 years. The primary outcome measure is the time to hip replacement surgery measured on a Kaplain-Meier survival curve from time of inclusion. Secondary outcome measures are the five subscales of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, physical activity level (UCLA activity score), and patient's global perceived effect. Other measures include pain after exercise, joint-specific adverse events, exercise adherence, general health status (EQ-5D-5L), mechanical muscle strength and performance in physical tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be performed. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized clinical trial comparing a patient education plus

  1. Risk factors for perioperative hyperglycemia in primary hip and knee replacements

    PubMed Central

    Jämsen, Esa; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Eskelinen, Antti; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Moilanen, Teemu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Background and purpose — Perioperative hyperglycemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in several fields of surgery. In this observational study, we identified factors associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia following hip and knee replacement. Patients and methods Patients and methods — We prospectively monitored changes in glucose following primary hip and knee replacements in 191 patients with osteoarthritis. Possible associations of patient characteristics and operation-related factors with hyperglycemia (defined as glucose > 7.8 mmol/L in 2 consecutive measurements) and severe hyperglycemia (glucose > 10 mmol/L) were analyzed using binary logistic regression with adjustment for age, sex, operated joint, and anesthesiological risk score. Results Results — 76 patients (40%) developed hyperglycemia, and 48 of them (25% of the whole cohort) had severe hyperglycemia. Glycemic responses were similar following hip replacement and knee replacement. Previously diagnosed diabetes was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia and severe hyperglycemia, compared to patients with normal glucose metabolism, whereas newly diagnosed diabetes and milder glucose metabolism disorders had no effect. In patients without previously diagnosed diabetes, increased values of preoperative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting glucose on the day of operation were associated with hyperglycemia. Higher anesthesiological risk score—but none of the operation-related factors analyzed—was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia. Interpretation Interpretation — Perioperative hyperglycemia is common in primary hip and knee replacements. Previously diagnosed diabetes is the strongest risk factor for hyperglycemia. In patients with no history of diabetes, preoperative HbA1c and fasting glucose on the day of operation can be used to stratify the risk of hyperglycemia. PMID:25409255

  2. Total Hip Replacement for the Treatment of End Stage Arthritis of the Hip: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Grove, Amy; Freeman, Karoline; Court, Rachel; Johnson, Samantha; Connock, Martin; Clarke, Aileen; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Evolvements in the design, fixation methods, size, and bearing surface of implants for total hip replacement (THR) have led to a variety of options for healthcare professionals to consider. The need to determine the most optimal combinations of THR implant is warranted. This systematic review evaluated the clinical effectiveness of different types of THR used for the treatment of end stage arthritis of the hip. Methods A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in major health databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews published from 2008 onwards comparing different types of primary THR in patients with end stage arthritis of the hip were included. Results Fourteen RCTs and five systematic reviews were included. Patients experienced significant post-THR improvements in Harris Hip scores, but this did not differ between impact types. There was a reduced risk of implant dislocation after receiving a larger femoral head size (36 mm vs. 28 mm; RR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.78) or cemented cup (vs. cementless cup; pooled odds ratio: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.89). Recipients of cross-linked vs. conventional polyethylene cup liners experienced reduced femoral head penetration and revision. There was no impact of femoral stem fixation and cup shell design on implant survival rates. Evidence on mortality and complications (aseptic loosening, femoral fracture) was inconclusive. Conclusions The majority of evidence was inconclusive due to poor reporting, missing data, or uncertainty in treatment estimates. The findings warrant cautious interpretation given the risk of bias (blinding, attrition), methodological limitations (small sample size, low event counts, short follow-up), and poor reporting. Long-term pragmatic RCTs are needed to allow for more definitive conclusions. Authors are encouraged to specify the minimal clinically important difference and power calculation for their primary outcome(s) as well CONSORT, PRISMA and STROBE

  3. Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. Results There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. Conclusion A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:21235820

  4. Tribological investigations of the wear couple alumina-CFRP for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Willmann, G

    1998-07-01

    Wear debris is the main reason for aseptic loosening in total hip. Most troublesome is the wear of polyethylene cups. Ceramic femoral heads were introduced about 20 years ago. The combination ceramic-on-polyethylene reduces the wear rate and the loosening rate. But cups of polyethylene are still the weakest link in a hip prosthesis. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was proposed as an alternative for polyethylene. Various test were performed to study the combination metal-on-CFRP, zirconia-on-CFRP, and alumina-on-CFRP. The simulator tests showed that the wear rate of alumina-on-CFRP is in the order of 1-3 microm per year. Based on investigation of retrieved implants the wear rate is 6.3 microm per year. Based on these results the combination alumina femoral heads (Biolox-forte) and CFRP cups (Caproman) could be approved for total hip replacement.

  5. Comparison of hydroxyapatite- and porous-coated stems in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Lee, Jong-Yoon; Yun, Sang-Hak; Jung, Min-Wook; Oh, Irvin

    2003-06-01

    24 patients underwent bilateral hip replacement, using the SROM modular system (Depuy Johnson & Johnson, MA, USA) with the porous-coated sleeve in one hip and an HA-coated sleeve in the other. 20 patients were followed for at least 4 years with clinical and radiographic evaluations. We found no difference between the two sides as regards the time of disappearance of thigh pain and hip scores. Radiographs showed a buttress sign in 18 HA-coated and 15 porous coated stems. There were no differences in the serial bone-remodeling pattern around the proximal sleeve and measurement of wear volume between the two groups. In the short- to medium-term, our findings support the view that the hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stem has no advantages over those with porous coating.

  6. Optimal sterilization method for the zirconia/alumina composites used for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2009-08-01

    Zirconia/alumina composite ceramics have been recently developed for total hip arthroplasty because of their excellent mechanical properties and tribologic characteristics. All such materials used clinically must be easily sterilized, but no report has been issued concerning methods for sterilizing zirconia/alumina composite hip prostheses. Here, we show that 50 kGy of gamma irradiation effectively sterilizes both the surfaces and interiors of these materials. In addition, it was found that the commonly used ethylene oxide and 25-kGy gamma irradiation sterilization methods inadequately sterilize deep inside the femoral head. Moreover, no changes in the chemical or mechanical properties of the composites were noted after exposure to 50-kGy gamma irradiation. We suggest that 50-kGy gamma irradiation is an optimal sterilization method for zirconia/alumina composite total hip replacements.

  7. Total hip replacement: A meta-analysis to evaluate survival of cemented, cementless and hybrid implants

    PubMed Central

    Phedy, Phedy; Ismail, H Dilogo; Hoo, Charles; Djaja, Yoshi P

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether cemented, cementless, or hybrid implant was superior to the other in terms of survival rate. METHODS Systematic searches across MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane that compared cemented, cementless and hybrid total hip replacement (THR) were performed. Two independent reviewers evaluated the risk ratios of revision due to any cause, aseptic loosening, infection, and dislocation rate of each implants with a pre-determined form. The risk ratios were pooled separately for clinical trials, cohorts and registers before pooled altogether using fixed-effect model. Meta-regressions were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. Funnel plots were analyzed. RESULTS Twenty-seven studies comprising 5 clinical trials, 9 cohorts, and 13 registers fulfilled the research criteria and analyzed. Compared to cementless THR, cemented THR have pooled RR of 0.47 (95%CI: 0.45-0.48), 0.9 (0.84-0.95), 1.29 (1.06-1.57) and 0.69 (0.6-0.79) for revision due to any reason, revision due to aseptic loosening, revision due to infection, and dislocation respectively. Compared to hybrid THR, the pooled RRs of cemented THR were 0.82 (0.76-0.89), 2.65 (1.14-6.17), 0.98 (0.7-1.38), and 0.67 (0.57-0.79) respectively. Compared to hybrid THR, cementless THR had RRs of 0.7 (0.65-0.75), 0.85 (0.49-1.5), 1.47 (0.93-2.34) and 1.13 (0.98-1.3). CONCLUSION Despite the limitations in this study, there was some tendency that cemented fixation was still superior than other types of fixation in terms of implant survival. PMID:28251071

  8. [Survey on the use and behaviour of metal-metal hip replacements in Spain].

    PubMed

    Calcerrada, N; Fernández-Vega, A; Valls-León, C; Garcia-Cimbrelo, E

    2016-01-01

    Following medical device alerts published in different countries of problems with metal-on-metal total hip replacements, the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices (AEMPS) in collaboration with the Spanish Hip Society Surgery designed a national survey to gather information on the use and behaviour of these hip implants. The survey consisted of a questionnaire sent by e-mail to 283 clinical centre recipients of metal-on-metal hips to be filled in by surgeons with expertise in the field. A total of 257 questionnaires were completed. The response rate of the clinical centres was 36.7%. A total of 97.7% of the responses reported that clinical and radiological follow-ups are carried out, and 79.6% undertook metal ion analyses (chromium and cobalt). A large majority (83.6%) of the responders who had who used surface implants, and 70% of those with large-head implants reported peri-operative complications. The most common complication was pain (25% with surface implants and 30.8% with large-head implants). Currently 80.8% of those responding were considering abandoning implanting of these hip replacements. Despite the many limitations to this study, the survey has allowed us to obtain in a quick first view of the implant scenario of Metal on Metal hip implants in Spain, and to determine the type of patient implanted, the time of implantation, and the experience/expertise of the surgeons, and the type of follow-up carried out. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Primary hip replacement prostheses and their evidence base: systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kynaston-Pearson, F; Ashmore, A M; Malak, T T; Rombach, I; Taylor, A; Beard, D; Arden, N K; Price, A; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Judge, A; Carr, A J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which prostheses with no readily available evidence to support their use are being implanted in primary total hip arthroplasty. Design Systematic review of the literature. Data sources The 9th annual report of the National Joint Registry of England and Wales (NJR) was analysed to identify prostheses with an Orthopaedic Data Evaluation Panel rating of “unclassified” or “pre-entry” used in primary total hip arthroplasty in 2011. A systematic review of those prostheses was carried out using PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, OVID, and Google databases. Study selection Prostheses used in primary total hip arthroplasty as published in the NJR’s 9th annual report were analysed. Only literature that included the name of the prosthesis was included. Literature yielded in the search results was excluded if it reported animal, non-orthopaedic, non-total hip arthroplasty, or non-device related studies. Results The systematic review found that 24% (57/235) of all hip replacement implants available to surgeons in the UK have no evidence for their clinical effectiveness. It also shows that 10 617 (7.8%) of the 136 593 components used in primary hip replacements in 2011 were implanted without readily identifiable evidence of clinical effectiveness. These comprised 157 cemented stems (0.5% of 34 655 implanted), 936 (2.8% of 33 367) uncemented stems, 1732 (7.1% of 24 349) cemented cups, and 7577 (17.1% of 44 222) uncemented cups. Conclusions This study shows that a considerable proportion of prostheses available to orthopaedic surgeons have no readily available evidence of clinical effectiveness to support their use. Concern exists about the current system of device regulation, and the need for a revised process for introducing new orthopaedic devices is highlighted. PMID:24355538

  10. [Hip joint infections - Results of a questionnaire among 28 university orthopedic departments].

    PubMed

    Anagnostakos, K; Kohn, D

    2011-09-01

    Despite numerous prophylactic measures infections still remain a hazardous complication in orthopedic surgery. A questionnaire about hip joint infections was sent to all university orthopedic departments in Germany and Austria. The questionnaire included 33 questions with respect to demographic data, causative organisms, diagnostic measures, treatment options for early and late infections, antibiotic therapy and prosthesis reimplantation. The participation rate was 70%. The most frequent primary surgical indication was primary total hip replacement and Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis were the most common pathogens identified. All departments performed a joint aspiration for diagnosis confirmation but for other diagnostic measures a great discrepancy could be observed. In the treatment of early infections removable components were always exchanged, whereas a local antibiotic therapy was not always employed. With regard to late infections a two-stage protocol was more frequently used than a one-stage treatment, whereby the implantation of a cement spacer was more commonly performed than a resection arthroplasty. The time between stages varied between 6 and 12 weeks and systemic antibiotics were administered for a mean time of 6 weeks. For prosthesis reimplantion cementless components were mostly used but no clear tendency could be determined for systemic antibiotic therapy. Treatment of hip joint infections among German and Austrian university orthopedic departments is only partly carried out in a similar manner.

  11. Is tantalum protective against infection in revision total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Tokarski, A T; Novack, T A; Parvizi, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the use of tantalum (Ta) acetabular components in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) was protective against subsequent failure due to infection. We identified 966 patients (421 men, 545 women and 990 hips) who had undergone revision THA between 2000 and 2013. The mean follow up was 40.2 months (3 months to 13.1 years). The mean age of the men and women was 62.3 years (31 to 90) and 65.1 years (25 to 92), respectively. Titanium (Ti) acetabular components were used in 536 hips while Ta components were used in 454 hips. In total, 73 (7.3%) hips experienced subsequent acetabular failure. The incidence of failure was lower in the Ta group at 4.4% (20/454) compared with 9.9% (53/536) in the Ti group (p < 0.001, odds ratio 2.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 4.27). Among the 144 hips (64 Ta, 80 Ti) for which revision had been performed because of infection, failure due to a subsequent infection was lower in the Ta group at 3.1% (2/64) compared with 17.5% (14/80) for the Ti group (p = 0.006). Thus, the use of Ta acetabular components during revision THA was associated with a lower incidence of failure from all causes and Ta components were associated with a lower incidence of subsequent infection when used in patients with periprosthetic joint infection. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  13. Analysis of fluid film lubrication in artificial hip joint replacements with surfaces of high elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M; Dowson, D; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    Lubrication mechanisms and contact mechanics have been analysed for total hip joint replacements made from hard bearing surfaces such as metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A similar analysis for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a hard bearing surface has also been carried out and used as a reference. The most important factor influencing the predicted lubrication film thickness has been found to be the radial clearance between the ball and the socket. Full fluid film lubrication may be achieved in these hard/hard bearings provided that the surface finish of the bearing surface and the radial clearance are chosen correctly and maintained. Furthermore, there is a close relation between the predicted contact half width and the predicted lubrication film thickness. Therefore, it is important to analyse the contact mechanics in artificial hip joint replacements. Practical considerations of manufacturing these bearing surfaces have also been discussed.

  14. [Konzept Perioperative management for endoprosthetic hip joint replacement. The functional interdisciplinary therapy (FIT) concept].

    PubMed

    Jerosch, J; Heisel, J

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade there have been significant changes in the perioperative management of total hip replacement patients. This process begins in the preoperative phase. Many patients are much better informed and standardized preoperative patient programs improve patient outcome and optimize the clinical pathways. The techniques in perioperative pain management have also significantly improved. The surgeon should not only rely on the anesthesiologist but should also use the options available during surgery. Postoperative weight bearing is handled in a much more progressive way than previously. In a standard primary hip replacement pain-adapted full weight bearing is possible if there are no patient-specific problems. There has also been a shift in the postoperative capability of performing athletic or recreational activities. In general patients can perform those activities that were performed before the surgery, which also includes, for example downhill skiing.

  15. Employment status and personal characteristics in patients awaiting hip-replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Eric R

    2009-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a cost-effective surgical intervention that substantially improves quality of life. Recent advances have broadened the indications to include younger, working-age patients. Despite these benefits, there are often long waits for this procedure in Canada. Furthermore, there exists little documentation of the ability of patients waiting for THA to maintain employment or perform their occupational duties. I prospectively identified patients younger than 65 years from a primary hip-replacement surgery waiting list. The study coordinator contacted patients by phone and asked them to participate; if they agreed, we mailed them a validated questionnaire. To compare working with nonworking patients, I used univariate analysis and logistic regression modeling. A total of 84 of the 100 patients who agreed to participate returned the questionnaire. While awaiting THA, 20% of patients who considered themselves to be in the workforce were off work owing to their hip conditions. Work cessation resulted in a median drop in income of $15,000 CDN and forgone tax revenues of $3800. Poor hip function was related to both lowered productivity and work cessation before surgery. Patients with an Oxford 12 hip score of 50 or worse appeared to have about a 50% chance of stopping work before THA, whereas those with a score of 40 or better appeared to have only a 10% chance of stopping work. About 20% of patients in the workforce who are awaiting THA are off work owing to their hip conditions while on the waiting list. Poor hip function is associated with work cessation and decreased productivity.

  16. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  17. Influence of hip replacement on sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine: An EOS study.

    PubMed

    Bredow, J; Katinakis, F; Schlüter-Brust, K; Krug, B; Pfau, D; Eysel, P; Dargel, J; Wegmann, K

    2015-01-01

    Changes in pelvic position can influence the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine. The restoration of hip kinematics by hip replacement thus appears to offer the possibility of correcting sagittal alignment. This preliminary retrospective study used EOS imaging to investigate the influence of total hip arthroplasty on pelvic parameters in patients with normal preoperative pelvic parameters. Twenty patients with hip osteoarthritis undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) between 2011 and 2012 received unilateral THA. To evaluate the preoperative and postoperative changes of the pelvic parameters, we analyzed EOS imaging of the patients to determine pelvic incidence, sacral slope, sacral tilt, pelvic tilt, anterior pelvic plane inclination and pelvic axial rotation. Additionally, anteversion and inclination of the acetabular cup position were determined. No statistically significant difference was found between the preoperative and postoperative measurements of pelvic parameters, although the change in pelvic tilt approached significance. Postoperatively, respective average values of 42.6° and 22.7° were measured for inclination and anteversion of the acetabular cup position. THA did not influence pelvic position and sagittal alignment in patients with normal preoperative pelvic parameters. A subsequent study will investigate whether corrections of pelvic parameters outside the norm in patients with OA are possible with THA.

  18. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. [Monitoring of IL-6 levels in patients after total hip joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Waldemar; Wierusz-Kozłowska, Małgorzata; Markuszewski, Jacek; Leśniewska, Kinga; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    Total hip replacement became a method of choice in treatment of the severe osteoarthritis. Despite the progress in constructing the implants and also the surgical technique, the number of complications rises together with the number of arthroplasties performed. The periprosthetic osteolysis and its consequence--the loosening is the one of the greatest problems of today's joint replacement. It creates the main obstacle for the long-term efficiency of the total hip arthroplasty. It was proved by the numerous research, wear debris of the implant induce the chronic periprosthetic inflammatory process. Many studies emphasize the influence of the proinflammatory cytokines on the bone metabolism. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the inflammatory process in patients with the severe osteoarthritis before the surgery and in subsequent periods after total hip replacements and also in patients with the aseptic loosening of the endoprosthesis, by the monitoring the levels of IL-6 in serum of the peripheral blood. The results suggest, that in patients following THA with the elevated level of IL-6, the inflammatory process was present. This inflammation may lead in future to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

  20. Causes for revision surgery in total hip replacement. A retrospective epidemiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Capón-García, D; López-Pardo, A; Alves-Pérez, M T

    2016-01-01

    To determine the impact of each cause of revision surgery in total hip arthroplasty during the period 2009-2013. To analyse the relationship between these causes with different variables. A study was conducted on 127 patients who had hip replacement revision surgery in our hospital during this period. Parameters, such as age, sex, date of primary arthroplasty, prosthetic replacement date, and main cause of the revision were recorded. Those revisions performed within 5 years after the primary arthroplasty were considered as early rescue. The most common cause of rescue was aseptic loosening in 38 (30%) followed by instability in 30 (24%). In terms of age at the time of rescue, statistically significant differences were found, with it being significantly higher in patients re-operated for a fracture. Differences in age at first surgery were found to be 7 years younger than those with late rescue (63.40) with respect to early (70.21). Similar results to ours have been observed in other published series, except for the higher incidence of instability in early rescue. This study demonstrates aseptic loosening and instability as the most frequent causes of revision surgery in our hospital. Age is a very influential factor in relation to longevity of primary arthroplasty. Complications were higher in when the primary hip replacement is implanted in older patients. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress shielding effects of two prosthetic groups after total hip joint simulation replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study aims to compare the stress shielding effects of implantable anatomical and traditional prostheses after in vitro total hip joint replacement simulation. The study serves as a biomechanical basis for novel artificial prostheses and for clinical hip joint replacements. Methods Sixteen femoral specimens from adult male corpses were randomly divided into two groups: the traditional prosthesis group implanted into femur specimens using simulated total hip joint replacement (n = 8) and the femoral neck-preserved anatomical prosthesis implantation group that used a collum femoris preserving stem/trabeculae oriented pattern (CFP/TOP) acetabular cup (n = 8). The strain values in the two groups before and after prosthesis implantation were measured at different test points using electric resistance strain gauges. The stress shielding rate was calculated according to the related formula. Results The results showed that the rates of proximal femoral stress shielding were significantly higher at test points 1–10 in the traditional femoral prosthesis transplantation group than in the anatomical prosthesis group (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were different effects of stress shielding between the anatomical and traditional prostheses. Retained femoral anatomical implants should reduce stress shielding and increase the stability of anatomical prosthesis implants. PMID:25174846

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Total Hip and Knee Replacements for the Australian Population with Osteoarthritis: Discrete-Event Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Hideki; Barendregt, Jan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively) under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively). However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. Conclusions/Significance Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements. PMID:21966520

  3. Molecular Identification of a Dietzia maris Hip Prosthesis Infection Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, O.; Argenson, J.-N.; Jacomo, V.; Drancourt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Dietzia maris, an environmental actinomycete, has been implicated only once in human disease. We herein report the first D. maris isolate from a bone biopsy specimen in a patient hospitalized for a total hip prosthesis replacement. Cell wall fatty acid analysis and 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing were utilized to achieve its definite identification. This case report illustrates the usefulness of such methods for the accurate identification of actinomycetes. PMID:11427581

  4. Telemedicine support shortens length of stay after fast-track hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vesterby, Martin Svoldgaard; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Laursen, Malene; Mikkelsen, Søren; Larsen, Jens; Søballe, Kjeld; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Telemedicine could allow patients to be discharged more quickly after surgery and contribute to improve fast-track procedures without compromising quality, patient safety, functionality, anxiety, or other patient-perceived parameters. We investigated whether using telemedicine support (TMS) would permit hospital discharge after 1 day without loss of self-assessed quality of life, loss of functionality, increased anxiety, increased rates of re-admission, or increased rates of complications after hip replacement. Patients and methods — We performed a randomized controlled trial involving 72 Danish patients in 1 region who were referred for elective fast-track total hip replacement between August 2009 and March 2011 (654 were screened for eligibility). Half of the patients received a telemedicine solution connected to their TV. The patients were followed until 1 year after surgery. Results — Length of stay was reduced from 2.1 days (95% CI: 2.0–2.3) to 1.1 day (CI: 0.9–1.4; p < 0.001) with the TMS intervention. Health-related quality of life increased in both groups, but there were no statistically significant differences between groups. There were also no statistically significant differences between groups regarding timed up-and-go test and Oxford hip score at 3-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, the rates of complications and re-admissions were similar between the groups, but the number of postoperative hospital contacts was lower in the TMS group. Interpretation — Length of postoperative stay was shortened in patients with the TMS solution, without compromising patient-perceived or clinical parameters in patients undergoing elective fast-track surgery. These results indicate that telemedicine can be of value in fast-track treatment of patients undergoing total hip replacement. PMID:28097941

  5. Monocular Vision- and IMU-Based System for Prosthesis Pose Estimation During Total Hip Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Su, Shaojie; Zhou, Yixin; Wang, Zhihua; Chen, Hong

    2017-03-30

    The average age of population increases worldwide, so does the number of total hip replacement surgeries. Total hip replacement, however, often involves a risk of dislocation and prosthetic impingement. To minimize the risk after surgery, we propose an instrumented hip prosthesis that estimates the relative pose between prostheses intraoperatively and ensures the placement of prostheses within a safe zone. We create a model of the hip prosthesis as a ball and socket joint, which has four degrees of freedom (DOFs), including 3-DOF rotation and 1-DOF translation. We mount a camera and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) inside the hollow ball, or "femoral head prosthesis," while printing customized patterns on the internal surface of the socket, or "acetabular cup." Since the sensors were rigidly fixed to the femoral head prosthesis, measuring its motions poses a sensor ego-motion estimation problem. By matching feature points in images of the reference patterns, we propose a monocular vision based method with a relative error of less than 7% in the 3-DOF rotation and 8% in the 1-DOF translation. Further, to reduce system power consumption, we apply the IMU with its data fused by an extended Kalman filter to replace the camera in the 3-DOF rotation estimation, which yields a less than 4.8% relative error and a 21.6% decrease in power consumption. Experimental results show that the best approach to prosthesis pose estimation is a combination of monocular vision-based translation estimation and IMU-based rotation estimation, and we have verified the feasibility and validity of this system in prosthesis pose estimation.

  6. Telemedicine support shortens length of stay after fast-track hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Vesterby, Martin Svoldgaard; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Laursen, Malene; Mikkelsen, Søren; Larsen, Jens; Søballe, Kjeld; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Telemedicine could allow patients to be discharged more quickly after surgery and contribute to improve fast-track procedures without compromising quality, patient safety, functionality, anxiety, or other patient-perceived parameters. We investigated whether using telemedicine support (TMS) would permit hospital discharge after 1 day without loss of self-assessed quality of life, loss of functionality, increased anxiety, increased rates of re-admission, or increased rates of complications after hip replacement. Patients and methods - We performed a randomized controlled trial involving 72 Danish patients in 1 region who were referred for elective fast-track total hip replacement between August 2009 and March 2011 (654 were screened for eligibility). Half of the patients received a telemedicine solution connected to their TV. The patients were followed until 1 year after surgery. Results - Length of stay was reduced from 2.1 days (95% CI: 2.0-2.3) to 1.1 day (CI: 0.9-1.4; p < 0.001) with the TMS intervention. Health-related quality of life increased in both groups, but there were no statistically significant differences between groups. There were also no statistically significant differences between groups regarding timed up-and-go test and Oxford hip score at 3-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, the rates of complications and re-admissions were similar between the groups, but the number of postoperative hospital contacts was lower in the TMS group. Interpretation - Length of postoperative stay was shortened in patients with the TMS solution, without compromising patient-perceived or clinical parameters in patients undergoing elective fast-track surgery. These results indicate that telemedicine can be of value in fast-track treatment of patients undergoing total hip replacement.

  7. Validation of the HOOS, JR: A Short-form Hip Replacement Survey.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Stephen; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Franklin, Patricia D; Li, Wenjun; Mayman, David J; Padgett, Douglas E

    2016-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly in demand for outcomes evaluation by hospitals, administrators, and policymakers. However, assessing total hip arthroplasty (THA) through such instruments is challenging because most existing measures of hip health are lengthy and/or proprietary. The objective of this study was to derive a patient-relevant short-form survey based on the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), focusing specifically on outcomes after THA. We retrospectively evaluated patients with hip osteoarthritis who underwent primary unilateral THA and who had completed preoperative and 2-year postoperative PROMs using our hospital's hip replacement registry. The 2-year followup in this population was 81% (4308 of 5351 patients). Of these, 2371 completed every item on the HOOS before surgery and at 2 years, making them eligible for the formal item reduction analysis. Through semistructured interviews with 30 patients, we identified items in the HOOS deemed qualitatively most important to patients with hip osteoarthritis. The original HOOS has 40 items, the four quality-of-life items were excluded a priori, five were excluded for being redundant, and one was excluded based on patient-relevance surveys. The remaining 30 items were evaluated using Rasch modeling to yield a final six-item HOOS, Joint Replacement (HOOS, JR), representing a single construct of "hip health." We calculated HOOS, JR scores for the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) cohort and validated this new score for internal consistency, external validity (versus HOOS and WOMAC domains), responsiveness to THA, and floor and ceiling effects. Additional external validation was performed using calculated HOOS, JR scores in collaboration with the Function and Outcomes Research for Comparative Effectiveness in Total Joint Replacement (FORCE-TJR) nationally representative joint replacement registry (n = 910). The resulting six-item PROM (HOOS, JR) retained items

  8. Hip Joint Replacement Using Monofilament Polypropylene Surgical Mesh: An Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Białecki, Jacek; Klimowicz-Bodys, Małgorzata Dorota; Wierzchoś, Edward; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur) leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS), triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO), total hip replacement (THR), and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE). The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform. PMID:24987672

  9. Mechanical failure of metal-polyethylene sandwich liner in metal-on-metal total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Fetto, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal had been proposed as an optimal articulation in THRs, however, many monoblock prostheses have been recalled in the USA because of significant high rates of early failure. Metal-on-metal prostheses had been implanted in our institution, and this is a case history of a single patient, in whom metal-on-metal THRs with different femoral sizes of heads were implanted. A 57-year-old female patient underwent bilateral total hip replacements with metal-on-metal prostheses using metal-polyethylene "sandwich" liners 9 years ago on the right side and 7 years ago on the left side respectively. The only difference in both sides was the femoral head diameter of 28 mm in right and 34 mm in left. Seven years after the left surgery, the acetabular liner was dissociated, however, metallosis was not detected. Although the larger femoral head was thought to increase hip joint stability, it dictated a reduction in polyethylene thickness in this prosthesis design, and it was 4 mm in the left hip. Recently, metal-on-metal articulations are thought not to be optimal for hip joint bearing surface, however, this clinical failure was due to the polyethylene thickness and quality.

  10. Implant survival and radiographic outcome of total hip replacement in patients less than 20 years old

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Halvorsen, Vera; Nordsletten, Lars; EngesæTer, Ingvild Ø; EngesæTer, Lars B; Marie Fenstad, Anne; Röhrl, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is not recommended for children and very young teenagers because early and repetitive revisions are likely. We investigated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of THR performed in children and teenage patients. Patients and methods We included 111 patients (132 hips) who underwent THR before 20 years of age. They were identified in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, together with information on the primary diagnosis, types of implants, and any revisions that required implant change. Radiographs and Harris hip score (HHS) were also evaluated. Results The mean age at primary THR was 17 (11–19) years and the mean follow-up time was 14 (3–26) years. The 10-year survival rate after primary THR (with the endpoint being any revision) was 70%. 39 patients had at least 1 revision and 16 patients had 2 or more revisions. In the latest radiographs, osteolysis and atrophy were observed in 19% and 27% of the acetabulae and 21% and 62% of the femurs, respectively. The mean HHS at the final follow-up was 83 (15–100). Interpretation The clinical score after THR in these young patients was acceptable, but many revisions had been performed. However, young patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip had lower implant survival. Moreover, the bone stock in these patients was poor, which could complicate future revisions. PMID:27435903

  11. Fracture of Ceramic Bearing Surfaces following Total Hip Replacement: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Traina, Francesco; Faldini, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic bearing surfaces are increasingly used for total hip replacement, notwithstanding that concern is still related to ceramic brittleness and its possible mechanical failure. The aim of this systematic review is to answer three questions: (1) Are there risk factors for ceramic component fracture following total hip replacement? (2) Is it possible to perform an early diagnosis of ceramic component failure before catastrophic fracture occurs? (3) Is it possible to draw guidelines for revision surgery after ceramic components failure? A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed and reference citations from publications identified in the literature search were reviewed. The use of 28 mm short-neck femoral head carries an increased risk of fracture. Acetabular component malposition might increase the risk of ceramic liner fractures. Synovial fluid microanalysis and CT scan are promising in early diagnosis of ceramic head and liner failure. Early revision is suggested in case of component failure; no consensus exists about the better coupling for revision surgery. Ceramic brittleness remains a major concern. Due to the increased number of ceramic on ceramic implants, more revision surgeries and reports on ceramic components failure are expected in the future. An algorithm of diagnosis and treatment for ceramic hip failure is proposed. PMID:23844356

  12. Contact surface motion paths associated with leg length inequality following unilateral total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Budenberg, Sarah; Redmond, Anthony; White, Derek; Grainger, Andrew; O'Connor, Philip; Stone, Martin H; Stewart, Todd D

    2012-12-01

    In the past, there has been little research into leg length inequality (LLI) and its effect on hip arthroplasty bearing longevity. This investigation aimed to determine the effects of post-operative LLI on hip motions during gait and to postulate the subsequent influence on the wear of the artificial hip joint replacement. Motion data from a clinical gait analysis were processed with an in-house computational model to plot graphs showing the movement of loci of 20 points on the femoral head during one gait cycle for two cohorts: 19 LLI patients and 38 normal healthy patients. Loci paths were quantified by calculating the aspect ratio (AR) of the path shape. It was found that on average, LLI patients had a reduction in flexion/extension and abduction/adduction. Furthermore, the AR of LLI patients was found to be 8% smaller than the normal group. The shorter, more multidirectional, motion paths in LLI patients would suggest the potential for greater wear in a polyethylene bearing compared to an asymptomatic, non-LLI patient. The results have potential implications towards preclinical wear testing of joint replacements.

  13. The impact of a total hip replacement on jaw position, upper body posture and body sway.

    PubMed

    Ohlendorf, Daniela; Lehmann, Christoph; Heil, Daniel; Hörzer, Stefan; Kopp, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether, and to what extent, a total hip replacement can influence the position and the movement of the jaw, the upper body posture and body sway. Twenty test subjects (6 females, 14 males) participated in this study pre- and post-total hip replacement, in addition to a healthy control group of 20 subjects (5 females, 15 males). The measurements were conducted by means of an ultrasound system to measure jaw condyle position and movement of the lower jaw, a three-dimensional back scan to analyze upper back posture, and a static and dynamic force plate to measure body sway. For statistical analysis the Wilcoxon-Matched-Pairs-Test or Man-Whitney-U-Test, including a Bonferroni-Holm correction, respectively, was used. After surgery, the mean values of the left and right jaw condyles of the test group moved posterior, and the left condyle position was located more caudally. There were no significant differences concerning the jaw position between the two groups. There was little change in upper body posture in both groups. The test group had a more anteriorly inclined thoracic spine and a less pronounced lumbar lordosis. During static body sway measurements, increased fluctuations in the test group after surgery could be seen. Differences between both groups in the pre- and post-surgical condition could be detected. These differences were more prominent when the measured body segments were more distally located with respect to the hip region.

  14. Fracture of ceramic bearing surfaces following total hip replacement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Traina, Francesco; De Fine, Marcello; Di Martino, Alberto; Faldini, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic bearing surfaces are increasingly used for total hip replacement, notwithstanding that concern is still related to ceramic brittleness and its possible mechanical failure. The aim of this systematic review is to answer three questions: (1) Are there risk factors for ceramic component fracture following total hip replacement? (2) Is it possible to perform an early diagnosis of ceramic component failure before catastrophic fracture occurs? (3) Is it possible to draw guidelines for revision surgery after ceramic components failure? A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed and reference citations from publications identified in the literature search were reviewed. The use of 28 mm short-neck femoral head carries an increased risk of fracture. Acetabular component malposition might increase the risk of ceramic liner fractures. Synovial fluid microanalysis and CT scan are promising in early diagnosis of ceramic head and liner failure. Early revision is suggested in case of component failure; no consensus exists about the better coupling for revision surgery. Ceramic brittleness remains a major concern. Due to the increased number of ceramic on ceramic implants, more revision surgeries and reports on ceramic components failure are expected in the future. An algorithm of diagnosis and treatment for ceramic hip failure is proposed.

  15. Experience with Designing and Implementing a Bundled Payment Program for Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Winthrop F.; Lagu, Tara; Krushell, Robert J.; Lehman, Andrew P.; Greenbaum, Jordan; McGirr, Joan; Pekow, Penelope S.; Calcasola, Stephanie; Benjamin, Evan; Mayforth, Janice; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bundled payments, also known as episode-based payments, are intended to contain health care costs and promote quality. In 2011 a bundled payment pilot program for total hip replacement was implemented by an integrated health care delivery system in conjunction with a commercial health plan subsidiary. In July 2015 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model to test bundled payment for hip and knee replacement. Methods Stakeholders were identified and a structure for program development and implementation was created. An Oversight Committee provided governance over a Clinical Model Subgroup and a Financial Model Subgroup. Results The pilot program included (1) a clinical model of care encompassing the period from the preoperative evaluation through the third postoperative visit, (2) a pricing model, (3) a program to share savings, and (4) a patient engagement and expectation strategy. Compared to 32 historical controls— patients treated before bundle implementation—45 post-bundle-implementation patients with total hip replacement had a similar length of hospital stay (3.0 versus 3.4 days, p = .24), higher rates of discharge to home or home with services than to a rehabilitation facility (87% versus 63%), similar adjusted median total payments ($22,272 versus $22,567, p = .43), and lower median posthospital payments ($704 versus $1,121, p = .002), and were more likely to receive guideline-consistent care (99% versus 95%, p = .05). Discussion The bundled payment pilot program was associated with similar total costs, decreased posthospital costs, fewer discharges to rehabilitation facilities, and improved quality. Successful implementation of the program hinged on buy-in from stakeholders and close collaboration between stakeholders and the clinical and financial teams. PMID:26289235

  16. Acetabular distraction: an alternative approach to pelvic discontinuity in failed total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Brown, N M; Hellman, M; Haughom, B H; Shah, R P; Sporer, S M; Paprosky, W G

    2014-11-01

    A pelvic discontinuity occurs when the superior and inferior parts of the hemi-pelvis are no longer connected, which is difficult to manage when associated with a failed total hip replacement. Chronic pelvic discontinuity is found in 0.9% to 2.1% of hip revision cases with risk factors including severe pelvic bone loss, female gender, prior pelvic radiation and rheumatoid arthritis. Common treatment options include: pelvic plating with allograft, cage reconstruction, custom triflange implants, and porous tantalum implants with modular augments. The optimal technique is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable healing between the two segments. A method of treating pelvic discontinuity using porous tantalum components with a distraction technique that achieves both initial stability and subsequent long-term biological fixation is described.

  17. Oral antibiotics are effective for highly resistant hip arthroplasty infections.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Ampuero, José; Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1-12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70-98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32-76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections.

  18. Current attitudes to total hip replacement in the younger patient: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tennent, T D; Goddard, N J

    2000-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all practicing consultant orthopaedic surgeons in the UK seeking information regarding their usual total hip replacement practice, the age at which they would define a patient as falling into the 'young hip group' and whether this might modify their practice. In particular, in the 'younger' age group, we were interested in the frequency of usage of uncemented implants, the choice of implant and the bearing surfaces. Of 1242 surgeons surveyed, we had a response from 935 who currently undertake total hip arthroplasty. Their responses confirm that approximately 60,645 total hip replacements are performed annually in the UK of which 9,376 are performed in the younger age group (mean age 57.5 years). As with our previous survey, the most popular prosthesis in the 'older' age group overall was the Charnley (51%) followed by the Exeter (15%). These implants also proved to be the most popular in the 'younger' age group (40% Charnley, 18% Exeter), with 75% of surgeons choosing a cemented stem, and 65% also opting to cement the socket. 23% of surgeons used hydroxy-apatite coated implants on both the femoral and acetabular sides of the joint. Stainless steel remained the most popular choice of femoral head bearing surface (42%) followed by chrome-cobalt (33%) and ceramic (25%). On the acetabular side, high density polyethylene predominated--accounting for 95%, with only 3% using chrome cobalt and 2% ceramic. There would appear to be a remarkably conservative attitude among British surgeons, the majority of whom prefer to stick with tried and tested cemented femoral implants when dealing with the younger patient. There are a small number of uncemented acetabulae and the hybrid configuration. Hydroxy-apatite coatings seem to be the most popular choice for the non-cemented prostheses. Ceramic femoral heads are used more frequently than the ceramic acetabular bearing, and equally metal/metal bearings remain infrequently used.

  19. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  20. Novel chitosan/diclofenac coatings on medical grade stainless steel for hip replacement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Uzunalić, Amra Perva; Stergar, Janja; Gradišnik, Lidija; Maver, Uroš

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, improved osteointegration, as well the prevention of inflammation and pain are the most desired characteristics of hip replacement implants. In this study we introduce a novel multi-layered coating on AISI 316LVM stainless steel that shows promise with regard to all mentioned characteristics. The coating is prepared from alternating layers of the biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan and the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac. Electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated samples in physiological solution. It is shown that these coatings improve corrosion resistance. It was also found that these coatings release the incorporated drug in controlled, multi-mechanism manner. Adding additional layers on top of the as-prepared samples, has potential for further tailoring of the release profile and increasing the drug dose. Biocompatibility was proven on human-derived osteoblasts in several experiments. Only viable cells were found on the sample surface after incubation of the samples with the same cell line. This novel coating could prove important for prolongation of the application potential of steel-based hip replacements, which are these days often replaced by more expensive ceramic or other metal alloys.

  1. Novel chitosan/diclofenac coatings on medical grade stainless steel for hip replacement applications

    PubMed Central

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Uzunalić, Amra Perva; Stergar, Janja; Gradišnik, Lidija; Maver, Uroš

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, improved osteointegration, as well the prevention of inflammation and pain are the most desired characteristics of hip replacement implants. In this study we introduce a novel multi-layered coating on AISI 316LVM stainless steel that shows promise with regard to all mentioned characteristics. The coating is prepared from alternating layers of the biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan and the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac. Electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated samples in physiological solution. It is shown that these coatings improve corrosion resistance. It was also found that these coatings release the incorporated drug in controlled, multi-mechanism manner. Adding additional layers on top of the as-prepared samples, has potential for further tailoring of the release profile and increasing the drug dose. Biocompatibility was proven on human-derived osteoblasts in several experiments. Only viable cells were found on the sample surface after incubation of the samples with the same cell line. This novel coating could prove important for prolongation of the application potential of steel-based hip replacements, which are these days often replaced by more expensive ceramic or other metal alloys. PMID:27215333

  2. Prospective monitoring improves outcomes of primary total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N; Pachón, Marcela; Kerguelén, Carlos A; Navas, José; Portocarrero, Julio; Pesantez, Rodrigo F; Zayed, Gamal; Carrillo, Germán; Llinás, Adolfo M

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past decade several studies have questioned current standards of patient safety in health care delivery. In response, our institution started a clinical pathway for total hip replacement in 1996. Prospective monitoring with regular feedback sessions to the individuals involved in patient care did however not start until 2003. The present study evaluates the effect of prospective monitoring on outcomes of total hip replacement. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing primary elective total hip replacement between 1997 and 2004 were reviewed. Data on adverse events as well as adherence to protocols for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis were extracted retrospectively for the period 1997 to 2001 and prospectively from 2003 to 2004. Results were compared and analyzed in order to establish possible improvement in outcomes. Data was analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's Exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Alpha was set as less than 5% and analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 for Macintosh. Results Two-hundred and eighty-three patients were included from 1997 to 2001, and 62 from 2003 to 2004. Mean age, male to female ratio and initial diagnosis were similar in both groups. At least one adverse event occurred in 45% of patients in 1997–2001 and in 21% in 2003–2004 (p < 0.001). In-hospital hip dislocations occurred in 6% and 0% (p = 0.05), oliguria in 19% and 5% (p = 0.007), SSI and VTE in 3% and 0% (p = 0.37), adverse drug reactions in 11% and 13% (p = 0.66) and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols in 15% and 2% of cases respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusion Overall rate of adverse events as well as in-hospital hip dislocations, oliguria and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols were significantly reduced during the second period. We conclude that clinical pathways alone are insufficient to improve patient safety and require prospective monitoring and continuous feedback to health

  3. [A comparison of operative invasiveness in minimally invasive anterolateral hip replacement (MIS-AL) and standard hip procedure, using biochemical markers].

    PubMed

    Musil, D; Stehlík, J; Verner, M

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized study was to compare, by means of biochemical markers, the operative invasiveness of the standard total hip replacement with that of the minimally invasive anterolateral (MIS-AL) approach. Twenty-six randomly assigned patients with standard and 22 patients with MIS-AL total hip replacement were included in the study. Patients with elevated pre-operative levels of the markers evaluated or patients taking medication that might affect marker levels were not included. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen as markers of muscle damage and post-operative inflammatory changes, respectively. Blood samples were drawn before surgery (less than 24 hours) and after surgery at 24, 48 and 96 hours, which respected biological half-lives of the markers and permitted us to study their dynamics. The results were evaluated and statistically analyzed at the department of biochemistry, using the two sample t-test. Statistically significant differences between the two groups of patients were found for both markers. The average CRP values differed significantly (p < 0.05) at 48 and 96 hours post-operatively, being higher for the standard than MIS-AL total hip replacement by 28% and 44%, respectively. The average CPK values showed the most marked difference at 48 hours after surgery, when the level was higher by 62.5% in the standard than MIS-AL total hip replacement (p < 0.05). Our objective evaluation of the invasiveness of surgery in total hip replacement was based on the most frequently recommended markers for assessment of muscle tissue damage and post-operative inflammatory changes. The study was focused on the invasiveness of surgery only and neither subjective nor objective outcomes of implantation were evaluated. The use of the muscle sparing approach MIS-AL results in minimal damage to muscle tissue and, consequently, a lower degree of post-operative inflammation than is recorded in traditional hip replacement

  4. Warming infusion improves perioperative outcomes of elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, He; Lai, Bingjie; Dong, Shanshan; Li, Xinyu; Cui, Yunfeng; Sun, Qianchuang; Liu, Wenhua; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lv, Hui; Han, Hongyu; Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This prospective, randomized, and controlled study was performed to determine the benefits of prewarmed infusion in elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement. Methods: Between September 2015 and April 2016, elderly patients who underwent bilateral hips replacement that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. After inclusion, patients were randomized into one of the study groups: in the control group, patients received an infusion of fluid kept at room temperature (22–23°C); in the warming infusion group, patients received an infusion of fluid warmed using an infusion fluid heating apparatus (35°C). Postoperative outcomes, including recovery time, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and postoperative complications rate of patients from both groups, were compared. Results: A total of 64 patients were included in our study (71.2 ± 7.6 years, 53.1% males), with 32 patients in the control group and 32 patients in warming infusion group. No significant difference was found in terms of demographic data and intraoperative blood transfusion rate between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Patients receiving a prewarmed infusion had a significantly shorter time to spontaneous breath, eye opening, consciousness recovery, and extubation than the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, significant differences were found in Steward score and VAS score between 2 groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, warming infusion group also showed an obviously decreased incidence of shivering and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A prewarmed infusion could reduce the incidence of perioperative hypothermia and improve outcomes in the elderly during bilateral hip replacement. PMID:28353593

  5. Conceptualising time before surgery: the experience of patients waiting for hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Emma C; Horwood, Jeremy; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2014-09-01

    Interpretations of time underlie patients' experiences of illness and the way in which the National Health Service (NHS) is organised. In the NHS, achieving short waiting times for treatment is seen as important, and this is particularly evident in relation to chronic conditions where the time waiting in care from onset of symptoms to successful management can last months and years. One example of a chronic condition with high prevalence is osteoarthritis, estimated to affect 10% of people aged over 55 years in the UK. Osteoarthritis of the hip is particularly common, and treatments include exercise and medication. If these options do not provide enough relief from pain and functional difficulties, then joint replacement may be considered. With over 70,000 such operations conducted every year in England and Wales, processes relating to waiting times impact on many patients. This article explores how 24 patients with osteoarthritis experience time during the lead up to hip replacement surgery. We draw on data collected during longitudinal in-depth interviews with patients a median of 9.5 days before surgery and at two to four weeks post-operatively. Transcripts of audio-recorded interviews were imported into Atlas.ti(®) and inductive thematic analysis undertaken. Increasing pain and deterioration in function altered the experience of time during the journey towards hip replacement. Patients made essential changes to how they filled their days. They experienced lost and wasted time and faced disruption to the temporal order of their lives. A surgical date marked in the calendar became their focus. However, this date was not static, moving because of changing perceptions of duration and real-time alterations by the healthcare system. Findings highlight that patients' experience of time is complex and multi-dimensional and does not reflect the linear, monochronic conceptualisation of time embedded in the healthcare system. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by

  6. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study.

  7. Histological characterization of periprosthetic tissue responses for metal-on-metal hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Eual A; Klein, Gregg R; Cates, Harold E; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla

    2014-01-01

    The histology of periprosthetic tissue from metal-on-metal (MOM) hip devices has been characterized using a variety of methods. The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the suitability of two previously developed aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesions (ALVAL) scoring systems for periprosthetic hip tissue responses retrieved from MOM total hip replacement (THR) systems revised for loosening. Two ALVAL scoring systems (Campbell and Oxford) were used to perform histological analyses of soft tissues from 17 failed MOM THRs. The predominant reactions for this patient cohort were macrophage infiltration and necrosis, with less than half of the patients (41%) showing a significant lymphocytic response or a high ALVAL reaction (6%). Other morphological changes varied among patients and included hemosiderin accumulation, cartilage formation, and heterotopic ossification. Both scoring systems are useful for correlating macrophage and lymphocyte responses and for comparison with the other; however, given the diversity and variability of the current responses, the Oxford-ALVAL system is more suitable for scoring tissues from MOM THR patients revised for loosening. It is important that standardized methods of scoring MOM tissue responses be used consistently so multiple study results can be compared and a consensus can be generated.

  8. Surface micro-analyses of long-term worn retrieved "Osteal" alumina ceramic total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Clarke, Ian C; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Sedel, Laurent; Kumakura, Tsuyoshi; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2007-11-01

    We analyzed wear pattern of long-term retrieved alumina-alumina hip prostheses from Osteal, which were implanted for 15-19 years. A comparison was carried out with our previous study of 17-year Biolox alumina-on-alumina hip prostheses, (Shishido et al., J Biomed Mater Res B 2003;67:638-647) and all-alumina total hip replacement run under microseparation simulator tests. Of particular interest was the occurrence of stripe wear in these first generation alumina ceramic bearings. Two balls of Osteal revealed only one stripe wear as did the respective liners on their rim areas. In these latter balls, the stripes were shallower than those previously observed in Biolox implants. A microscopic analysis of the bearing surface was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microprobe spectroscopy. On average, the Osteal retrievals had one grade lower wear than Biolox retrievals. Fluorescence microprobe maps showed that Biolox ball surfaces had higher compressive stress than the Osteal likely due to severe impingement and microseparation promoted by the bulky implant design.

  9. Racial disparities in receiving total hip/knee replacement surgery: the effect of hospital admission sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Rizzo, John A; Parasuraman, Shreekant; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2013-02-01

    Using a nationally-representative inpatient care dataset (the HCUP National Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2007) we examined racial disparities in receiving total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgeries. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed that racial minorities were significantly less likely to receive THR or TKR than Whites, controlling for patients' hospital admission source and hospital characteristics. Employing Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition techniques, we found that observed difference in population characteristics explained 55%-67% and 78% of the racial disparities in THR and TKR, respectively. Differences in patients' hospital admission source emerged as the major individual factor associated with these disparities, explaining 57%-77% of racial disparities in THR and 26%-50% of racial disparities in TKR. This study suggests that substantive racial and ethnic disparities exist in utilization of THR and TKR surgery. Observed population characteristics accounted for most of these differences, with hospital admission source being the key factor.

  10. The effect of body mass index on the risk of post-operative complications during the 6 months following total hip replacement or total knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Wallace, G; Judge, A; Prieto-Alhambra, D; de Vries, F; Arden, N K; Cooper, C

    2014-07-01

    To assess the effect of obesity on 6-month post-operative complications following total knee (TKR) or hip (THR) replacement. Data for patients undergoing first THR or TKR between 1995 and 2011 was taken from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Logistic regression was used to assess whether body mass index (BMI) was associated with 6-month post-operative complications [deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (DVT/PE), myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, respiratory infection, anaemia, wound infection, urinary tract infection or death] after controlling for the effects of age, gender, smoking, drinking, socio-economic status (SES), co-morbidities and medications. 31,817 THR patients and 32,485 TKR patients were identified for inclusion. Increasing BMI was associated with a significantly higher risk of wound infections, from 1.6% to 3.5% in THR patients (adjusted P < 0.01), and from 3% to 4.1% (adjusted P < 0.05) in TKR patients. DVT/PE risk also increased with obesity from 2.2% to 3.3% (adjusted P < 0.01) in THR patients and from 2.0% to 3.3% (adjusted P < 0.01) in TKR patients. Obesity was not associated with increased risk of other complications. Whilst an increased risk of wound infection and DVT/PE was observed amongst obese patients, absolute risks remain low and no such association was observed for MI, stroke and mortality. However this is a selected cohort (eligible for surgery according to judgement of NHS GPs and surgeons) and as such these results do not advocate surgery be given without consideration of BMI, but indicate that universal denial of surgery based on BMI is unwarranted. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. OPTIMAL IMPROVEMENT IN FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT: HOW DEEP DO YOU KNOW YOUR PATIENT’S MIND?

    PubMed

    De Caro, M F; Vicenti, G; Abate, A; Picca, G; Leoncini, V; Lomuscio, M; Casalino, A; Solarino, G; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee causes pain and loss of joint mobility, leading to limitations in physical function. When conservative treatment fails total hip and knee replacement is a cost-effective surgical option. Patients have high expectations regarding functional outcome after these procedures. If such expectations are not met, they may still be dissatisfied with the outcome of a technically successful procedure. Recently, numerous studies reported that psychological factors can influence the outcome of total knee replacement (tkr) and total hip artrhoplasty with total hip replacement (thr). We conducted a prospective study on a consecutive sample of 280 patients affected by hip or knee OA who underwent total joint replacement. At patients’ admission, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Knee Society Score (KSS) were used to assess pain and function. Furthermore, SF-36, Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (BRIEF-COPE) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) were administered. Patients had clinical and radio graphical follow up at 1, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The HHS and KSS values before surgery showed a linear correlation with both SCL-90-R and MMSE. None of the investigated variables influenced post-operative HHS and KSS scores; however, the improvement of functional scores resulted conditioned by SCL-90-R values, VAS score, schooling and MMSE. Psychological factors and mental status in primary total hip and knee replacement can affect outcome and patient satisfaction. Strategies focused on identification and facing of these conditions must be considered to improve outcome of total replacement.

  12. Over-expression of p53/BAK in aseptic loosening after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Landgraeber, Stefan; Toetsch, Martin; Wedemeyer, Christian; Saxler, Guido; Tsokos, Michael; von Knoch, Fabian; Neuhäuser, Markus; Löer, Franz; von Knoch, Marius

    2006-05-01

    Particle-induced osteolysis is a major cause of aseptic loosening after total joint replacement. The possible induction of apoptosis has not been addressed in great detail. Thus far, it has been shown that ceramic and polyethylene particles can induce apoptosis of macrophages in vitro. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that wears debris generated from total hip arthroplasty could induce cellular damage and apoptosis in vivo. We therefore determined by immunohistochemical methods if increased expression of p53, an important transcription factor, and BAK and Bcl-2, two important regulators of apoptosis, can be found in interface membranes and capsules of hips with aseptically loose implants. Strongly positive immunohistochemical staining for p53 and BAK was found in peri-implant tissues from patients with aseptic hip implant loosening. Differentiation of various cell types showed that macrophages stained positive for p53 in all capsule and interface specimens. p53 was frequently detected in giant cells. Positive staining of BAK in macrophages and giant cells was seen in all specimens. Some positive reactions were observed in fibroblasts, only two of 19 cases stained for p53 and three cases for BAK within synovial cells. Positive macrophages and giant cells were localized around polyethylene particles. While T-lymphocytes showed a regular BAK-staining, the other leukocytes were negative. Statistical analyses showed significant positive correlations (p < 0.001) between the presence of polyethylene and metal debris and the expression of BAK and p53. Polyethylene particles were surrounded by more positive macrophages and giant cells than were metal particles, indicating that polyethylene debris may be a stronger inductor of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis than metal debris. In this study apoptosis of macrophages, giant cells and T-lymphocytes in capsules and interface membranes of patients with aseptic hip implant loosening has been demonstrated in

  13. Development of Computer-Tailored Education Program for Patients with Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeo Won

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based computer-tailored education program to promote self-care for patients with total hip replacement. Methods The program was developed in five phases. Results Phase 1: Program content was developed, including the educational needs of patients with total hip replacement, based on a review of previous research and literature. Phase 2: A computer-tailored algorithm written as a series of 'if-then' statements was developed to offer the appropriate type of intervention based on an individual's personal health characteristics. Phase 3: A professional Web programmer produced then the program for use on the Web. Phase 4: An expert evaluation was performed focusing on two aspects, Web contents and website design. SPSS ver. 16.0 was used for the analysis, and grade point averages were used to compare each evaluation item. Phase 5: Based on comments from the experts' evaluation, modifications and revisions were made, and the program was completed. Conclusions The developed program presented tailored messages using animations, video and flash considering the individual health status and characteristics of the primary target generation. In addition, the expert evaluation confirmed the validity of the program's content and design. PMID:25405061

  14. Expression of tenascin-C in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Konttinen, Y.; Li, T.; Michelsson, O.; Xu, J.; Sorsa, T.; Santavirta, S.; Imai, S.; Virtanen, I.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess if the bonding interlayer between the implant and bone in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement (THR) is qualitatively deteriorated by excessive accumulation of anti-adhesive glycoprotein, tenascin-C.
METHODS—Alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method was used for immunohistochemical staining of tenascin-C in interface tissue and control synovial tissue.
RESULTS—Tenascin-C was found to be a major component of the extracellular matrix at a hitherto unrecognised site, namely the synovial membrane-like interface tissue between implant and bone in aseptic loosening of THR. The overall tenascin-C staining (median score 4.0) was greatly increased in aseptic loosening compared with synovial membrane (median score 2.0; p<0.001) and fibrous capsule (median score 2.0; p<0.001) from primary THR operations. Topological analysis disclosed that tenascin-C was also found at the critical implant-interface and interface-bone surfaces.
CONCLUSION—Local tenascin-C expression is increased as a result of a chronic foreign body type reaction associated with excessive cytokine production and tissue injury mediated by microtrauma and neutral endoproteinases. This qualitative and topological deterioration of the bonding interlayer by an increase of anti-adhesive tenascin-C expression may inadvertantly contribute to loosening.

 Keywords: tenascin; aseptic loosening; total hip replacement PMID:9893574

  15. Development of computer-tailored education program for patients with total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeo Won; Kim, Jung A

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based computer-tailored education program to promote self-care for patients with total hip replacement. The program was developed in five phases. Phase 1: Program content was developed, including the educational needs of patients with total hip replacement, based on a review of previous research and literature. Phase 2: A computer-tailored algorithm written as a series of 'if-then' statements was developed to offer the appropriate type of intervention based on an individual's personal health characteristics. Phase 3: A professional Web programmer produced then the program for use on the Web. Phase 4: An expert evaluation was performed focusing on two aspects, Web contents and website design. SPSS ver. 16.0 was used for the analysis, and grade point averages were used to compare each evaluation item. Phase 5: Based on comments from the experts' evaluation, modifications and revisions were made, and the program was completed. The developed program presented tailored messages using animations, video and flash considering the individual health status and characteristics of the primary target generation. In addition, the expert evaluation confirmed the validity of the program's content and design.

  16. [Fascia iliaca compartment block for analgesia following total hip replacement surgery].

    PubMed

    Goitia Arrola, L; Telletxea, S; Martínez Bourio, R; Arízaga Maguregui, A; Aguirre Larracoechea, U

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the fascia iliaca compartment block to control pain following total hip replacement by assessing pain intensity 24 hours after surgery and recording the use of opiates for rescue analgesia. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. The patients were divided into 2 groups: a group that received a fascia iliaca compartment block with 0.45% ropivacaine at a dosage of 0.3 mL/kg (maximum dose, 30 mL) and a control group in which no block was performed. Patients were enrolled consecutively as they entered the postanesthetic recovery unit. Postoperative pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) immediately after surgery and 24 hours later. Other variables recorded were opiate use for rescue analgesia and adverse effects due to the use of opiates. The VAS scores recorded in the postanesthetic recovery unit were significantly different in the 2 groups, with lower scores in the group receiving the fascia iliaca compartment block (P < .001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in VAS scores recorded on the ward 24 hours after surgery (P = .57). A single-injection fascia iliaca compartment block was effective in controlling initial postoperative pain in a postanesthetic recovery unit. It was effective on the ward in the first few hours after surgery but not for the entire 24-hour period because of the limited duration of the block.

  17. Thoracic Unilateral Spinal Cord Injury After Spinal Anaesthesia for Total Hip Replacement: Fate or Mistake?

    PubMed

    Fabio, Costa; Romualdo, Del Buono; Eugenio, Agrò Felice; Vittoradolfo, Tambone; Massimiliano, Vitali Andrea; Giovanna, Ricci

    2017-04-01

    Spinal anaesthesia is the most preffered anesthesia technique for total hip replacement, and its complications range from low entity (insignificant) to life threatening. The incidence of neurologic complications after neuraxial anaesthesia is not perfectly clear, although there are several described cases of spinal cord ischaemia. We present a case of unilateral T8-T11 spinal cord ischaemia following L2-L3 spinal anaesthesia for total hip replacement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hyperintense T8-T11 signal alteration on the leftside of paramedian spinal cord. A temporal epidemiologic linkage between the damage and the surgery seems to be present. The injury occurred without anatomical proximity between the injury site and the spinal needle entry site. This may be due to multiple contributing factors, each of them is probably not enough to determine the damage by itself; however, acting simultaneously, they could have been responsible for the complication. The result was unpredictable and unavoidable and was caused by unforeseeable circumstances and not by inadequate medical practice.

  18. Thoracic Unilateral Spinal Cord Injury After Spinal Anaesthesia for Total Hip Replacement: Fate or Mistake?

    PubMed Central

    Fabio, Costa; Romualdo, Del Buono; Eugenio, Agrò Felice; Vittoradolfo, Tambone; Massimiliano, Vitali Andrea; Giovanna, Ricci

    2017-01-01

    Spinal anaesthesia is the most preffered anesthesia technique for total hip replacement, and its complications range from low entity (insignificant) to life threatening. The incidence of neurologic complications after neuraxial anaesthesia is not perfectly clear, although there are several described cases of spinal cord ischaemia. We present a case of unilateral T8–T11 spinal cord ischaemia following L2–L3 spinal anaesthesia for total hip replacement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hyperintense T8–T11 signal alteration on the leftside of paramedian spinal cord. A temporal epidemiologic linkage between the damage and the surgery seems to be present. The injury occurred without anatomical proximity between the injury site and the spinal needle entry site. This may be due to multiple contributing factors, each of them is probably not enough to determine the damage by itself; however, acting simultaneously, they could have been responsible for the complication. The result was unpredictable and unavoidable and was caused by unforeseeable circumstances and not by inadequate medical practice. PMID:28439446

  19. Development of an extremely wear-resistant ultra high molecular weight polyethylene for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; Lu, B; Campbell, P; Salovey, R

    1999-03-01

    Osteolysis induced by ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris is one of the primary factors limiting the lifespan of total hip replacements. Crosslinking polyethylene is known to improve its wear resistance in certain industrial applications, and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups have shown improved wear resistance in two clinical studies. In the present study, crosslinked polyethylene cups were produced by two methods. Chemically crosslinked cups were produced by mixing a peroxide with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene powder and then molding the cups directly to shape. Radiation-crosslinked cups were produced by exposing conventional extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene bar stock to gamma radiation at various doses from 3.3 to 100 Mrad (1 Mrad = 10 kGy), remelting the bars to extinguish residual free radicals (i.e., to minimize long-term oxidation), and then machining the cups by conventional techniques. In hip-joint simulator tests lasting as long as 5 million cycles, both types of cross-linked cups exhibited dramatically improved resistance to wear. Artificial aging of the cups by heating for 30 days in air at 80 degrees C induced oxidation of the chemically crosslinked cups. However, a chemically crosslinked cup that was aged 2.7 years at room temperature had very little oxidation. Thus, whether substantial oxidation of chemically crosslinked polyethylene would occur at body temperature remains unclear. The radiation-crosslinked remelted cups exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation. Because crosslinking can reduce the ultimate tensile strength, fatigue strength, and elongation to failure of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, the optimal crosslinking dose provides a balance between these physical properties and the wear resistance of the implant and might substantially reduce the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis with total hip replacements.

  20. Tribology and total hip joint replacement: current concepts in mechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Mazzega-Fabbro, C; Viceconti, M

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the rheology and effects of interacting surfaces is as ancient as man. This subject can be represented by a recently coined word: tribology. This term is derived from the Greek word "tribos" and means the "science of rubbing". Friction, lubrication, and wear mechanism in the common English language means the precise field of interest of tribology. Wear of total hip prosthesis is a significant clinical problem that involves, nowadays, a too high a number of patients. In order to acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve hip prosthesis wear tests are conducted on employed materials to extend lifetime of orthopaedic implants. The most basic type of test device is the material wear machine, however, a more advanced one may more accurately reproduce some of the in vivo conditions. Typically, these apparatus are called simulators, and, while there is no absolute definition of a joint simulator, its description as a mechanical rig used to test a joint replacement, under conditions approximating those occurring in the human body, is acceptable. Simulator tests, moreover, can be used to conduct accelerated protocols that replicate/simulate particularly extreme conditions, thus establishing the limits of performance for the material. Simulators vary in their level of sophistication and the international literature reveals many interpretations of the design of machines used for joint replacement testing. This paper aims to review the current state of the art of the hip joint simulators worldwide. This is specified through a schematic overview by describing, in particular, constructive solutions adopted to reproduce in vivo conditions. An exhaustive commentary on the evolution and actually existing simulation standards is proposed by the authors. The need of a shared protocol among research laboratories all over the world could lead to a consensus conference.

  1. Clinical failure analysis of contemporary ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jan-M; Gascoyne, Trevor C; Guenther, Leah E; Allen, Andrew; Hedden, David R; Turgeon, Thomas R; Bohm, Eric R

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigates the performance of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacements by combining a retrieval analysis with a survivorship analysis to elucidate mechanisms that led to clinical failure. Semiquantitative surface damage assessment, contact profilometry, contour measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were performed to characterize the types and quantify the extent of surface damage on the retrieved ceramic components. The implantation period was positively correlated with both damage scores of the femoral heads (R = 0.573, p < 0.001) and the acetabular cups (R = 0.592, p < 0.001). Increased maximal out-of-roundness values of the femoral heads correlated with both increased metal transfer damage score (R = 0.384, p = 0.023) and increased stripe damage score (R = 0.729, p ≤ 0.001) of the acetabular liners. The damage rate (damage score/year) for both the retrieved heads and acetabular liners was at least 2.2-fold greater at inclination angles of >45° than the damage rate at inclination angles of ≤45°. For the retrieved femoral heads only, the linear wear rate of 25.5 ± 21.3 µm/year at inclination angles of >45° was 6-fold greater than the linear wear rate of 4.2 ± 2.3 µm/year at inclination angles of ≤45°. Metal transfer on the ceramic bearing surface could possibly contribute to fluid-film starvation and, in combination with an increased inclination angle, may facilitate an adhesive wear mechanism associated with stripe surface damage. At our institution, the clinical survivorship of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacements was 98.9% (a total of 9 out of 815 patients were revised within 10 years after total hip arthroplasty) with revision as the end point, suggesting their safe use in younger patients.

  2. Performance of EQ-5D, howRu and Oxford hip & knee scores in assessing the outcome of hip and knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Benson, Tim; Williams, Dan H; Potts, Henry W W

    2016-09-22

    We aimed to compare the performance of EQ-5D-3 L and howRu, which are short generic patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), in assessing the outcome of hip and knee replacements, using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the Oxford Knee Scores (OKS) for comparison. Outcome was assessed as the difference between pre-surgery and 6-month post-surgery scores. We used a large sample from the NHS PROMs database, which used EQ-5D-3 L, and a small cohort of patients having the same operations collected by MyClinicalOutcomes (MCO), which used howRu. Both cohorts completed the OHS (hips) or the OKS (knees). The change (outcome) between pre-op and post-op scores as measured by howRu was greater than that measured by EQ-5D, relative to that measured by OHS or OKS. For hip replacements, the correlation for change measured by howRu and OHS was r = 0.77 (0.66-0.85). The corresponding correlation for change measured by EQ-5D Index and OHS was r = 0.64 (0.63-0.64). For knee replacements the correlation between change in howRu and OKS was r = 0.86 (0.75-0.92); between EQ-5D Index and OKS r = 0.59 (0.58-0.60). For hip and knee replacement, the outcome measured by howRu was more highly correlated with that measured by the condition-specific Oxford Hip and Knee Scores than were EQ-5D Index or EQ-VAS. The magnitude of change before and after surgery was also greater.

  3. Association between psoas abscess and prosthetic hip infection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Dupon, Michel; Dutronc, Hervé; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Lawson-Ayayi, Sylvie; Dubuisson, Vincent; Souillac, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The relationship between prosthetic hip infection and a psoas abscess is poorly documented. We determined the frequency of prosthetic hip infections associated with psoas abscesses and identified their determinants. We conducted a 2-year observational study. Data from patients with psoas abscesses that were associated with prosthetic hip infections were examined in a case-control study. Of 106 patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department with prosthetic hip infection, 13 also had a psoas abscess (12%; 95% CI: 6-19). By conditional logistic regression analysis, psoas abscesses were observed more frequently in cases of hematogenous prosthetic infections (OR = 93, p = 0.06) and in patients with a history of neoplasm (OR = 20, p = 0.03). Our results suggest that the presence of psoas abscesses is a frequent but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip infection. We recommend that an abdominal CT scan be performed on patients with hematogenous prosthetic hip infection or with a history of neoplasm.

  4. Granulicatella adiacens prosthetic hip joint infection after dental treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Sabapathy; Teferi, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Granulicatella adiacens is a Gram-positive bacteria and a normal component of oral flora. It is also found in dental plaques, endodontic abscesses and can rarely cause more serious infections. Case presentation: We describe a prosthetic hip joint infection in an 81-year-old fit and healthy man due to Granulicatella adiacens who underwent a prolonged dental intervention two days earlier without antibiotic prophylaxis. The infection was successfully treated with surgical intervention and a combination of antibiotics. The patient eventually succumbed to severe community-acquired pneumonia two months later. Conclusion: Current guidelines recommend avoidance of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental treatment in patients who have no co-morbidities and no prior operation on the index prosthetic joint. This case report indicates that infections of prosthetic joints may be associated with dental procedures even in fit and healthy patients without the recognized risk factors. PMID:28348763

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of prosthetic hip and knee joint infections].

    PubMed

    Huotari, Kaisa; Leskinen, Jarkko

    2016-01-01

    Successful replacement arthroplasty enhances the patient's functional capacity, alleviates pain and improves the quality of life. Prosthetic joint infection is one of the most dangerous complications following replacement arthroplasty. In cases of suspected prosthetic joint infection it is essential to consult with the prosthetic joint unit and abstain from starting antibiotics before the appropriate microbiological samples. The diagnosis is made on the basis of history, clinical picture, levels of inflammatory markers, synovial fluid cells and microbiological findings. The most common options of surgical treatment are early debridement and replacement of loose parts, and replacement of the prosthesis. Antimicrobial drug therapy will be planned according to the surgical mode of treatment and the causative bacterium.

  6. Oral Antibiotics are Effective for Highly Resistant Hip Arthroplasty Infections

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1–12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70–98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32–76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19333670

  7. Meaningful changes for the Oxford hip and knee scores after joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Beard, David J; Harris, Kristina; Dawson, Jill; Doll, Helen; Murray, David W; Carr, Andrew J; Price, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To present estimates of clinically meaningful or minimal important changes for the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) after joint replacement surgery. Secondary data analysis of the NHS patient-reported outcome measures data set that included 82,415 patients listed for hip replacement surgery and 94,015 patients listed for knee replacement surgery was performed. Anchor-based methods revealed that meaningful change indices at the group level [minimal important change (MIC)], for example in cohort studies, were ∼ 11 points for the OHS and ∼ 9 points for the OKS. For assessment of individual patients, receiver operating characteristic analysis produced MICs of 8 and 7 points for OHS and OKS, respectively. Additionally, the between group minimal important difference (MID), which allows the estimation of a clinically relevant difference in change scores from baseline when comparing two groups, that is, for clinical trials, was estimated to be ∼ 5 points for both the OKS and the OHS. The distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) estimates for the OKS and OHS were 4 and 5 points, respectively. This study has produced and discussed estimates of minimal important change/difference for the OKS/OHS. These estimates should be used in the power calculations and the interpretation of studies using the OKS and OHS. The MDC90 (∼ 4 points OKS and ∼ 5 points OHS) represents the smallest possible detectable change for each of these instruments, thus indicating that any lower value would fall within measurement error. Copyright © 2015 University of Oxford. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Meaningful changes for the Oxford hip and knee scores after joint replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Beard, David J.; Harris, Kristina; Dawson, Jill; Doll, Helen; Murray, David W.; Carr, Andrew J.; Price, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present estimates of clinically meaningful or minimal important changes for the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) after joint replacement surgery. Study Design and Setting Secondary data analysis of the NHS patient-reported outcome measures data set that included 82,415 patients listed for hip replacement surgery and 94,015 patients listed for knee replacement surgery was performed. Results Anchor-based methods revealed that meaningful change indices at the group level [minimal important change (MIC)], for example in cohort studies, were ∼11 points for the OHS and ∼9 points for the OKS. For assessment of individual patients, receiver operating characteristic analysis produced MICs of 8 and 7 points for OHS and OKS, respectively. Additionally, the between group minimal important difference (MID), which allows the estimation of a clinically relevant difference in change scores from baseline when comparing two groups, that is, for clinical trials, was estimated to be ∼5 points for both the OKS and the OHS. The distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) estimates for the OKS and OHS were 4 and 5 points, respectively. Conclusion This study has produced and discussed estimates of minimal important change/difference for the OKS/OHS. These estimates should be used in the power calculations and the interpretation of studies using the OKS and OHS. The MDC90 (∼4 points OKS and ∼5 points OHS) represents the smallest possible detectable change for each of these instruments, thus indicating that any lower value would fall within measurement error. PMID:25441700

  9. Increased risk of chronic osteomyelitis after hip replacement: a retrospective population-based cohort study in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Hung, D-Z; Tien, N; Lin, C-L; Lee, Y-R; Wang, C C N; Chen, J-J; Lim, Y-P

    2017-04-01

    The correlation between hip replacement (Hip-Repl) and chronic osteomyelitis (COM) has not been studied in Asian populations. Thus, we assessed Hip-Repl-related risk of developing COM via a population-based, nationwide, retrospective cohort study. The Hip-Repl cohort was obtained from Taiwan's Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, and included patients who underwent Hip-Repl between 2000 and 2010; the control cohort was also selected from this database. Patients with a history of COM were excluded in both cohorts. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) by age, sex, and comorbidities for developing COM. A total of 5349 patients who received a Hip-Repl and 10,372 matched controls were enrolled. In the Hip-Repl group, the risk for COM was 4.18-fold [95 % confidence interval (CI) = 2.24-7.80] higher than that in the control group after adjustment. For patients aged ≤65 years, the risk was 10.0-fold higher (95 % CI = 2.89-34.6). Furthermore, the risk was higher in the Hip-Repl cohort than in the non-Hip-Repl cohort, for both patients without comorbidity (aHR = 16.5, 95 % CI = 2.07-132.3) and those with comorbidity (aHR = 3.49, 95 % CI = 1.78-6.83). The impact of Hip-Repl on the risk for COM was greater among patients not using immunosuppressive drugs, and occurred during the first postoperative year. Patients who received Hip-Repl have an increased risk of developing COM. This risk was higher among males and patients aged 65 years or younger, and during the first postoperative year.

  10. Preoperative Hip Injections Increase the Rate of Periprosthetic Infection After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schairer, William W; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Mayman, David J; Lyman, Stephen; Jerabek, Seth A

    2016-09-01

    Intraarticular injections are both diagnostic and therapeutic for patients with osteoarthritis. A potential risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may occur from direct inoculation and/or immune suppression by corticosteroids. Large population-level databases were used to evaluate hip injection on the 1-year rate of PJI in patients undergoing primary THA. State-level ambulatory surgery and inpatient databases for Florida and California (2005-2012) were used to identify primary THA patients with 1-year preoperative and postoperative windows to evaluate possible injections or PJI, respectively. Patients were grouped as no injection or as THA performed 6-12 months, 3-6 months, or 0-3 months after injection. Risk adjustment was performed with multivariable regression. A total of 173,958 patients were included; 5421 (3.1%) underwent THA after an injection: 1395 (1.1%) of patients after 6-12 months, 1863 patients after 3-6 months, and 2163 (1.2%) after 0-3 months. In the 0-3 month group, PJI was significantly increased at 3 months (1.58%, P = .015), 6 months (1.76%, P = .022), and 1 year (2.04%, P = .031) compared with the noninjection control group (1.04%, 1.21%, and 1.47%, respectively). There were no differences in the 3- to 6-month and 6- to 12-month injection groups. There is an increased risk of PJI when THA is performed within 3 months of hip injection. We recommend that patients and their surgeons consider delaying elective THA until 3 months after an injection to avoid this elevated risk of infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic periprosthetic hip infection: micro-organisms responsible for infection and re-infection.

    PubMed

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to delineate the infecting micro-organisms identified at the first-time revision for infected THA, analyze pre-operative versus intra-operative findings, as well as intra-operative ones against re-infection micro-organisms. Microbiological laboratory findings were studied in 73 patients (mean age, 51.93 ± 10.9 years) with chronic periprosthetic hip infection pre-operatively and intra-operatively. Forty-three patients had a two-stage revision THA while 30 patients were treated with a modified resection arthroplasty using the Ilizarov apparatus. Re-infection developed in 29 cases. Its microbial species were identified. Pre-operative findings on micro-organisms coincided 50.7 % with the intra-operative ones. Bacterial growth in the intra-operative tests was detected in 72 (98.5 %) cases. Gram-positive single genus infection was identified in 35 patients (48 %); microbe associations were present in 33 patients (45 %). Staphylococcus species prevailed. Gram-negative infection was detected in 5.5 % of cases. One case (1.5 %) did not have any microbe growth. Re-infection happened in 10 cases (23.2 %) in a two-stage revision THA. In the resection arthroplasty group, early re-infection was observed in 63.3 % of cases. Among a total of 29 re-infection cases, staphylococcus species were identified in 19 cases, present either in associations or as single germs. Intra-operative microbiological tests at the first-time revision for infected THR detect a reliable spectrum of micro-organisms to assess microbial resistance to antibiotics, develop treatment protocols, and for prognostic purposes. Preventive measures at primary THR and strategies to fight periprosthetic infection and reinfection should be targeted on staphylococci.

  12. Cementless revision for infection following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Philip A; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    Eradication of chronic infection complicating total hip arthroplasty requires removal of all infected, devitalized and foreign tissue, including the arthroplasty components. Reimplantation into a sterile bed is the goal of treatment in most patients and successful reimplantation yields better functional results than excision arthroplasty. Reimplantation may be performed at the same stage as débridement as part of a single-stage procedure, using cemented components with antibiotic-loaded cement. Alternatively, a two-stage procedure may be performed so that the débridement and reimplantation are separated by a period of antibiotic delivery, both locally and systemically. The results of these treatment regimens and the rationale for cementless reconstruction at the second stage of a two-stage treatment protocol are important considerations in the treatment of periprosthetic infection.

  13. Exercise therapy may postpone total hip replacement surgery in patients with hip osteoarthritis: a long-term follow-up of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Svege, Ida; Nordsletten, Lars; Fernandes, Linda; Risberg, May Arna

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown. Methods We conducted a long-term follow-up of a randomised trial investigating the efficacy of exercise therapy and patient education versus patient education only on the 6-year cumulative survival of the native hip to THR in 109 patients with symptomatic and radiographic hip OA. Results regarding the primary outcome measure of the trial, self-reported pain at 16 months follow-up, have been reported previously. Results There were no group differences at baseline. The response rate at follow-up was 94%. 22 patients in the group receiving both exercise therapy and patient education and 31 patients in the group receiving patient education only underwent THR during the follow-up period, giving a 6-year cumulative survival of the native hip of 41% and 25%, respectively (p=0.034). The HR for survival of the native hip was 0.56 (CI 0.32 to 0.96) for the exercise therapy group compared with the control group. Median time to THR was 5.4 and 3.5 years, respectively. The exercise therapy group had better self-reported hip function prior to THR or end of study, but no significant differences were found for pain and stiffness. Conclusions Our findings in this explanatory study suggest that exercise therapy in addition to patient education can reduce the need for THR by 44% in patients with hip OA. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00319423 (original project protocol) and NCT01338532 (additional protocol for long-term follow-up). PMID:24255546

  14. Prevalence of periprosthetic osteolysis after total hip replacement in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perez Alamino, Rodolfo; Casellini, Carolina; Baňos, Andrea; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Gagliardi, Susana Alicia; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis (PO) is a frequent complication in patients with joint implants. There are no data regarding the prevalence of PO in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of PO in patients with RA, JCA, AS, and OA, who have undergone total hip replacement (THR), and to identify factors associated with its development. Methods The study included patients diagnosed with RA (ACR 1987), AS (modified New York criteria), JCA (European 1977 criteria), and osteoarthritis (OA) (ACR 1990 criteria) with unilateral or bilateral THR. Demographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were collected. Panoramic pelvic plain radiographs were performed, to determine the presence of PO at acetabular and femoral levels. Images were read by two independent observers. Results One hundred twenty-two hip prostheses were analyzed (74 cemented, 30 cementless, and 18 hybrids). The average time from prosthesis implantation to pelvic radiograph was comparable among groups. PO was observed in 72 hips (59%). In 55% of cases, PO was detected on the femoral component, with a lower prevalence in RA (53%) vs AS (64.7%) and JCA (76.5%). Acetabular PO was more frequent in JCA patients (58.8%), compared with RA (11.6%) and OA (28.5%) patients (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.06, respectively). There was no significant association between the presence of PO and clinical, functional, or therapeutic features. Conclusion The prevalence of PO was 59%, being more frequent at the femoral level. Larger studies must be carried out to determine the clinical significance of radiologic PO. PMID:27790012

  15. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. Results: There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Conclusion: Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26997914

  16. Is Preoperative Patient-Reported Health Status Associated with Mortality after Total Hip Replacement?

    PubMed

    Cnudde, Peter; Nemes, Szilard; Mohaddes, Maziar; Timperley, John; Garellick, Göran; Burström, Kristina; Rolfson, Ola

    2017-08-10

    The influence of comorbidities and worse physical status on mortality following total hip replacement (THR) leads to the idea that patient-reported health status may also be a predictor of mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient-reported health status before THR and the risk of dying up to 5 years post-operatively. For these analyses, we used register data on 42,862 THR patients with primary hip osteoarthritis operated between 2008 and 2012. The relative survival ratio was calculated by dividing the observed survival in the patient group by age- and sex-adjusted expected survival of the general population. Pre-operative responses to the five EQ-5D-3L (EuroQol Group) dimensions along with age, sex, education status, year of surgery, and hospital type were used as independent variables. Results shown that, as a group, THR patients had a better survival than the general population. Broken down by the five EQ-5D-3L dimensions we observed differentiated survival patters. For all dimensions, those reporting extreme problems had higher mortality than those reporting moderate or no problems. In conclusion, worse health status according to the EQ-5-3L before THR is associated with higher mortality up to five years after surgery. EQ-5D-3L responses may be useful in a multifactorial individualized risk assessment before THR.

  17. Cobalt Intoxication Heart Failure after Revision Total Hip Replacement for Ceramic Head Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Choi, Young Hyun; Jeong, Mi Yeon; Chang, Jae Suk

    2016-01-01

    In 1960s, toxic heart failure due to cobalt poisoning was firstly reported from Canadian industrial worker. Following development of bearing materials in hip arthroplasties, using cobalt-chrome alloy in bearing surface, there were rarely reported of systemic affect toxic cobaltism include toxic heart failure due to articulation wear in Western countries. It could be happened more easily by third body wear from ceramic particle especially revision total hip replacement (THR) surgery using cobalt-chrome alloy following ceramic articulation breakage which index surgery performed by ceramic on ceramic bearing. In Korea, due to many surgeons prefer ceramic on ceramic bearing in THR compared to Western countries, it might be more important issue within a time. However in our knowledge, there was no previous report about cobalt poisoning heart failure in Korea. It is still very rare and hard to diagnose cobalt intoxication heart failure after THR, so we report a case of fatal heart failure caused by cobalt intoxication after revision THR in 53-year old man who successfully underwent re-revision THR. PMID:28097117

  18. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  19. The effect of total hip replacement on employment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    He, Chongru; He, Xiaokang; Tong, Wenwen; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Tianfang; Zhao, Jinzhu; Xu, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    Although total hip replacement (THR) has been proven to be effective, the effect of THR on employment in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Chinese population is still unknown. We aimed to demonstrate whether or not patients with AS returned to work following THR and factors associated with the work ability after THR. We performed a retrospective study including a total number of 128 AS patients undergoing THR between 2009 and 2013. Presurgery and postsurgery data including disease state, work status, type of job, and time of resuming work were collected. Factors associated with early return to work were assessed through ordinal regression. Eighty-seven of 128 patients (68 %) were employed within 1 year before THR and 98 returned to work after surgery. Among them, 21, 46, and 31 resumed work by 3, 6, and 12 months postoperation, respectively. Multivariate ordinal regression showed that patients with unilateral THR, younger age, lower BASFI score, employed presurgery, and low or moderate physical demand were more likely to resume work earlier. Most individuals working presurgery returned to work after THR. For young AS patients with hip involvement, THR is an effective treatment for improving and maintaining work ability.

  20. Cobalt Intoxication Heart Failure after Revision Total Hip Replacement for Ceramic Head Fracture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Choi, Young Hyun; Jeong, Mi Yeon; Chang, Jae Suk; Yoon, Pil Whan

    2016-12-01

    In 1960s, toxic heart failure due to cobalt poisoning was firstly reported from Canadian industrial worker. Following development of bearing materials in hip arthroplasties, using cobalt-chrome alloy in bearing surface, there were rarely reported of systemic affect toxic cobaltism include toxic heart failure due to articulation wear in Western countries. It could be happened more easily by third body wear from ceramic particle especially revision total hip replacement (THR) surgery using cobalt-chrome alloy following ceramic articulation breakage which index surgery performed by ceramic on ceramic bearing. In Korea, due to many surgeons prefer ceramic on ceramic bearing in THR compared to Western countries, it might be more important issue within a time. However in our knowledge, there was no previous report about cobalt poisoning heart failure in Korea. It is still very rare and hard to diagnose cobalt intoxication heart failure after THR, so we report a case of fatal heart failure caused by cobalt intoxication after revision THR in 53-year old man who successfully underwent re-revision THR.

  1. New polyethylenes in total hip replacement: A ten- to 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    García-Rey, E; García-Cimbrelo, E; Cruz-Pardos, A

    2013-03-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, 90 patients underwent total hip replacement using the same uncemented acetabular and femoral components with a 28 mm metallic femoral head but with prospective randomisation of the acetabular liner to either Durasul highly cross-linked polyethylene or nitrogen-sterilised Sulene polyethylene. We assessed 83 patients at a minimum follow-up of ten years. Linear penetration of the femoral head was estimated at six weeks, six and 12 months and annually thereafter, using the Dorr method, given the non-spherical shape of the acetabular component. There was no loosening of any component; only one hip in the Sulene group showed proximal femoral osteolysis. The mean penetration of the femoral head at six weeks was 0.08 mm (0.02 to 0.15) for the Durasul group and 0.16 mm (0.05 to 0.28) for the Sulene group (p = 0.001). The mean yearly linear penetration was 64.8% lower for the Durasul group at 0.05 mm/year (sd 0.035) for the Sulene group and 0.02 mm/year (sd 0.016) for the Durasul (p < 0.001). Mean linear femoral head penetration at ten years was 61% less in the Durasul than Sulene group. Highly cross-linked polyethylene gives excellent results at ten years.

  2. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  3. Subject-specific finite element model with an optical tracking system in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing; Chen, Youngang; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Intra-operative peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty and can occur at any time during surgery, with the highest incidence during implant insertion. This study combines subject-specific finite element analysis modeling with an optical tracking system to characterize the resultant strain in the bone and results of impaction during total hip replacement surgery. The use of ABG II femoral stem (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ, USA) in the model yielded the following results. Hammer velocity was measured experimentally using a three-dimensional optical tracking system and these data were input into the finite element analysis model so that intra-operative loading scenario could be simulated. A quasi-static explicit simulation and a dynamic loading step using two implant-bone interface friction (0.1 and 0.4 friction coefficients) states were simulated. The maximum swing velocity of a mallet was experimentally measured at 1.5 m/s and occurred just before impaction of the hammer with implant introducer. Two friction states resulted in different results with the lower friction coefficient generating higher strains in the anterior regions of the model and higher displacement of the implant with respect to the femur when compared to the high friction state.

  4. Computer tomography prototyping and virtual procedure simulation in difficult cases of hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Condino, Sara; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Lisanti, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Each year approximately 1 million total hip replacements (THR) are performed worldwide. A percentage of failure due to surgical approach and imprecise implant placement still exists. These result in several serious complications. We propose an approach to plan, to simulate, and to assist prosthesis implantation for difficult cases of THR based on 3-D virtual models, generated by segmenting patients' CT images, 3-D solid models, obtained by rapid prototyping (RP), and virtual procedure simulation. We carried out 8 THR with the aid of 3-D reconstruction and RP. After each procedure a questionnaire was submitted to the surgeon to assess the perceived added value of the technology. In all cases, the surgeon evaluated the 3-D model as useful in order to perform the planning. The clinical results showed a mean increase in the Harris Hip Score of about 42.5 points. The mean time of prototyping was 7.3 hours, (min 3.5 hours, max 9.3 hours). The mean surgery time was 65 minutes (min 50 minutes, max 88 minutes). Our study suggests that meticulous preoperative planning is necessary in front of a great aberration of the joint and in absence of normal anatomical landmarks, CT scan is mandatory, and 3-D reconstruction with solid model is useful.

  5. An appraisal of rehabilitation regimes used for improving functional outcome after total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to systematically review the literature with regards to studies of rehabilitation programmes that have tried to improve function after total hip replacement (THR) surgery. 15 randomised controlled trials were identified of which 11 were centre-based, 2 were home based and 2 were trials comparing home and centre based interventions. The use of a progressive resistance training (PRT) programme led to significant improvement in muscle strength and function if the intervention was carried out early (< 1 month following surgery) in a centre (6/11 centre-based studies used PRT), or late (> 1 month following surgery) in a home based setting (2/2 home based studies used PRT). In direct comparison, there was no difference in functional measures between home and centre based programmes (2 studies), with PRT not included in the regimes prescribed. A limitation of the majority of these intervention studies was the short period of follow up. Centre based program delivery is expensive as high costs are associated with supervision, facility provision, and transport of patients. Early interventions are important to counteract the deficit in muscle strength in the affected limb, as well as persistent atrophy that exists around the affected hip at 2 years post-operatively. Studies of early home-based regimes featuring PRT with long term follow up are needed to address the problems currently associated with rehabilitation following THR. PMID:22313723

  6. The role of retraction in direct nerve injury in total hip replacement: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    McConaghie, F A; Payne, A P; Kinninmonth, A W G

    2014-06-01

    Acetabular retractors have been implicated in damage to the femoral and obturator nerves during total hip replacement. The aim of this study was to determine the anatomical relationship between retractor placement and these nerves. A posterior approach to the hip was carried out in six fresh cadaveric half pelves. Large Hohmann acetabular retractors were placed anteriorly, over the acetabular lip, and inferiorly, and their relationship to the femoral and obturator nerves was examined. If contact with bone was not maintained during retractor placement, the tip of the anterior retractor had the potential to compress the femoral nerve by passing superficial to the iliopsoas. If pressure was removed from the anterior retractor, the tip pivoted on the anterior acetabular lip, and passed superficial to the iliopsoas, overlying and compressing the femoral nerve, when pressure was reapplied. The inferior retractor pierced the obturator membrane in all specimens medial to the obturator nerve, with subsequent retraction causing the tip to move laterally, making contact with the nerve. Iliopsoas can only offer protection to the femoral nerve if the retractor passes deep to the muscle bulk. The anterior retractor should be reinserted if pressure is removed intra-operatively. Vigorous movement of the inferior retractor should be avoided. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:212-6. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Surfing for hip replacements: has the "internet tidal wave" led to better quality information.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Mujtaba; Bruce-Brand, Robert A; O'Neill, Francis; Chenouri, Shojaeddin; Curtin, Paul T

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the quality of information available on the internet regarding Total Hip Replacement (THR). The unique websites identified were categorised by type and assessed using the DISCERN score, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria, and a novel (THR)-specific content score. The presence of the Health On the Net (HON) code, a reported quality assurance marker, was noted. Commercial websites predominate. Governmental & Non-Profit Organizations websites attained the highest DISCERN score. Sites that bore the HONcode seal obtained significantly higher DISCERN and THR content scores than those without the certification. Physicians should recommend the HONcode seal to their patients as a reliable indicator of website quality or, better yet, refer patients to sites they have personally reviewed.

  8. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Aseptic Loosening of Total Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Steinbeck, Marla J; Jablonowski, Lauren J; Parviz, Javad; Freeman, Theresa A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that wear particle-induced oxidative stress initiates osteolysis after total hip replacement (THR). Patient radiographs were scored for osteolysis and periprosthetic tissues were immunostained and imaged to quantify polyethylene wear, inflammation, and five osteoinflammatory and oxidative stress-responsive factors. These included high mobility group protein-B1 (HMGB1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and nitrotyrosine (NT). The results show wear debris correlated with inflammation, 4-HNE, NT and HMGB1, whereas inflammation only correlated with NT and HMGB1. Similar to wear debris and inflammation, osteolysis correlated with HMGB1. Additionally, osteolysis correlated with COX2 and 4-HNE, but not iNOS or NT. Understanding the involvement of oxidative stress in wear-induced osteolysis will help identify diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets to prevent osteolysis after THR. PMID:24290740

  9. Effectiveness of intermittent pneumatic leg compression for preventing deep vein thrombosis after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hull, R D; Raskob, G E; Gent, M; McLoughlin, D; Julian, D; Smith, F C; Dale, N I; Reed-Davis, R; Lofthouse, R N; Anderson, C

    1990-05-02

    A randomized trial was performed in consecutive patients undergoing total hip replacement to evaluate the effectiveness of sequential intermittent calf and thigh compression for preventing venous thrombosis compared with a control group given no prophylaxis. Both groups underwent case finding for deep vein thrombosis using combined fibrinogen I 125 leg scanning, impedance plethysmography, and venography. Deep vein thrombosis by venography was present in 77 (49%) of 158 control patients compared with 36 (24%) of 152 patients given intermittent compression. Proximal vein thrombosis was present in 42 controls (27%) compared with 22 patients (14%) given intermittent compression. Combined impedance plethysmography and leg scanning was insensitive in this patient group (sensitivity, 46%); venography was required to detect more than half the patients with venous thrombosis. Sequential intermittent leg compression clinically and statistically significantly reduced the frequency of both proximal vein and calf vein thrombosis. Case finding resulted in early detection and treatment of patients with venous thrombosis.

  10. [Rehabilitation of patients after total endoprosthesis replacement of hip joint by the method of functional electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Oskanian, T L; Solopova, I A; Grishin, A A; Sidorov, V D

    2008-01-01

    Patients after total endoprosthesis replacement of hip joint underwent method of functional electrostimulation (FES) with the purpose to recovery correct walking stereotype, to increase leisured muscle strength, to prevent secondary coxarthrosis development via stimulation or relaxation of muscles, and for analgesia of joints and pain zones at walking. Results of treatment of 143 patients received rehabilitation course of FES (15 procedures of 30 minutes) were compared with results of treatment of 54 patients received traditional methods. It is shown that FES is effective method of rehabilitation because it makes possible to improve muscle strength significantly, to eliminate or reduce motor deficit, to decrease pain syndrome, to form correct walking stereotype, and to perform early prophylaxis of secondary coxarthrosis on contralateral side. The main advantage of proposed method of nonmedicamental influence is better clinic-biomechanical result without use of drugs.

  11. Pose measurement of Anterior Pelvic Plane based on inertial measurement unit in total hip replacement surgeries.

    PubMed

    Zhe Cao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Hao Tang; Yixin Zhou; Zhihua Wang

    2016-08-01

    In Total Hip Replacement (THR), inaccurate measurement of Anterior Pelvic Plane (APP), which is usually used as a reference plane, will lead to malposition of the acetabular prosthesis. As a result, the risk of impingement, dislocation and wear will increase and the safe range of motion will be limited. In order to acquire the accurate pose of APP, a measurement system is designed in this paper, which includes two parts: one is used to estimate the initial pose of APP and the other is used to trail dynamic motion of APP. Both parts are composed of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and magnetometer sensors. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is adopted to fuse the data from IMU and the magnetometer sensors to estimate the orientation of the pelvis. The test results show that the error angle between calculated axis and true axis of the pelvis in geodetic coordinate frame is less than 1.2 degree, which meets the requirement of the surgery.

  12. Health-related quality of life after total hip replacement: a Taiwan study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hon-Yi; Khan, Mahmud; Culbertson, Richard; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Jun-Wen; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2009-10-01

    This study applied the generalised estimating equations (GEE) in a large-scale prospective cohort study of predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a Taiwan population. The study population included all patients who had undergone primary total hip replacement (THR) performed between March 1998 and December 2002 by either of two orthopaedic surgeons in two hospitals. The SF-36 was used in pre- and postoperative assessments of 335 patients. Young age, male gender, minimal comorbidity, use of epidural anaesthesia, lack of readmission within the previous 30 days, and higher preoperative functional status were positively associated with HRQoL (P < 0.05). Patients should be advised that their postoperative HRQoL may depend not only on their postoperative health care but also on their preoperative functional status. These analytical results should be applicable to other Taiwan hospitals and to other countries with similar social and cultural practices.

  13. Hydroxyapatite porous coating and the osteointegration of the total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Landor, Ivan; Vavrik, Pavel; Sosna, Antonin; Jahoda, David; Hahn, Henry; Daniel, M

    2007-02-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the plasma sprayed, combined porous titanium alloy/HA coating in promoting bony ingrowth and mechanical stabilization of total hip implants. The performance of the titanium alloy/HA type coated hip prostheses and the one of the same shape but without any coating, is compared in this paper. The implants were manufactured from titanium alloy VT-6 (ASTM F-136). The hip stems utilized in the control group were identical to those subsequently coated. The coating consists of a plasma deposited first layer of porous titanium alloy (TiAl(6)V(4)), similar in composition to the forged substrate and a plasma deposited second layer of over-sprayed hydroxyapatite, Ca(10)(PO(4))6(OH)2. Coating is located in the critical area of the hip stems, where high fixation interface strength is desired, i.e. in the proximal area of the stem where the highest stresses occur. The porous titanium alloy/hydroxyapatite (HA) coated femoral stems were implanted in 50 patients. The results were compared with a control group of 50 patients with the same type of endoprosthesis, but without the porous titanium alloy/HA coating. Both groups of patients were operated on and evaluated by the same orthopedic surgeons with a mean follow up of 11.4 years in the HA group and 10.6 years in the control group. HHS in the control group was preoperatively 35.5 points (range 26-49) and 85.1 points (range 54-100) in the time of the last control. HHS in the HA group was preoperatively 34.1 points (range 27-56) and 94.4 points (range 89-100) in the time of the last control. In 28 cases (56%) of the control group a range of translucencies were obvious. These translucent lines, however, did not appear with any of the patients in the coated implant group except one infection stem migration. Experience with the HA-type coated hip implants demonstrates substantially higher degree and quality of osteointegration in the porous titanium alloy/HA type implants.

  14. Mesh morphing for finite element analysis of implant positioning in cementless total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Bah, Mamadou T; Nair, Prasanth B; Browne, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis of the effect of implant positioning on the performance of cementless total hip replacements (THRs) requires the generation of multiple meshes to account for positioning variability. This process can be labour intensive and time consuming as CAD operations are needed each time a specific orientation is to be analysed. In the present work, a mesh morphing technique is developed to automate the model generation process. The volume mesh of a baseline femur with the implant in a nominal position is deformed as the prosthesis location is varied. A virtual deformation field, obtained by solving a linear elasticity problem with appropriate boundary conditions, is applied. The effectiveness of the technique is evaluated using two metrics: the percentages of morphed elements exceeding an aspect ratio of 20 and an angle of 165 degrees between the adjacent edges of each tetrahedron. Results show that for 100 different implant positions, the first and second metrics never exceed 3% and 3.5%, respectively. To further validate the proposed technique, FE contact analyses are conducted using three selected morphed models to predict the strain distribution in the bone and the implant micromotion under joint and muscle loading. The entire bone strain distribution is well captured and both percentages of bone volume with strain exceeding 0.7% and bone average strains are accurately computed. The results generated from the morphed mesh models correlate well with those for models generated from scratch, increasing confidence in the methodology. This morphing technique forms an accurate and efficient basis for FE based implant orientation and stability analysis of cementless hip replacements.

  15. Sick leave in Sweden before and after total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stigmar, Kjerstin; Dahlberg, Leif E; Zhou, Caddie; Jacobson Lidgren, Helena; Petersson, Ingemar F; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is know about patterns of sick leave in connection with total hip and knee joint replacement (THR and TKR) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods Using registers from southern Sweden, we identified hip and knee OA patients aged 40–59 years who had a THR or TKR in the period 2004–2012. Patients who died or started on disability pension were excluded. We included 1,307 patients with THR (46% women) and 996 patients with TKR (56% women). For the period 1 year before until 2 years after the surgery, we linked individual-level data on sick leave from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. We created a matched reference cohort from the general population by age, birth year, and area of residence (THR: n = 4,604; TKR: n = 3,425). The mean number of days on sick leave and the proportion (%) on sick leave 12 and 24 months before and after surgery were calculated. Results The month after surgery, about 90% of patients in both cohorts were on sick leave. At the two-year follow-up, sick leave was lower for both cohorts than 1 year before surgery, except for men with THR, but about 9% of the THR patients and 12–17% of the TKR patients were still sick-listed. In the matched reference cohorts, sick leave was constant at around 4–7% during the entire study period. Interpretation A long period of sick leave is common after total joint replacement, especially after TKR. There is a need for better knowledge on how workplace adjustments and rehabilitation can facilitate the return to work and can postpone surgery. PMID:27996342

  16. Return to work and workplace activity limitations following total hip or knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Sankar, A; Davis, A M; Palaganas, M P; Beaton, D E; Badley, E M; Gignac, M A

    2013-10-01

    Total hip (THR) and knee (TKR) replacements increasingly are performed on younger people making return to work a salient outcome. This research evaluates characteristics of individuals with early and later return to work following THR and TKR. Additionally, at work limitations pre-surgery and upon returning to work, and factors associated with work limitations were evaluated. 190 THR and 170 TKR of a total 931 cohort participants were eligible (i.e., working or on short-term disability pre-surgery). They completed questionnaires pre-surgery and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post-surgery that included demographics, type of occupation, and the Workplace Activity Limitations Scale (WALS). 166 (87%) and 144 (85%) returned to work by 12 months following THR and TKR, respectively. Early (1 month) return to work was associated with, male gender, university education, working in business, finance or administration, and low physical demand work. People with THR returned to work earlier than those with TKR. For both groups, less pain and every day functional limitations were associated with less workplace activity limitations at the time return to work. The majority of individuals working prior to surgery return to work following hip or knee replacement for osteoarthritis (OA) and experience fewer limitations at work than pre-surgery. The changing workforce dynamics and trends toward surgery at younger ages mean that these are important outcomes for clinicians to assess. Additionally, this is important information for employers in understanding continued participation in employment for people with OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Good sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 83 failed metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Reito, Aleksi; Pajamäki, Jorma; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ultrasound is used for imaging of pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) hips. Ultrasound has been compared with magnetic resonance imaging, but to date there have been no studies comparing ultrasound findings and revision findings. Methods We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of preoperative ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 82 patients with MoM hip replacement (82 hips). Ultrasound examinations were performed by 1 of 3 musculoskeletal radiologists, and pseudotumors seen by ultrasound were retrospectively classified as fluid-filled, mixed-type, or solid. Findings at revision surgery were retrieved from surgical notes and graded according to the same system as used for ultrasound findings. Results Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 83% (95% CI: 63–93) and a specificity of 92% (CI: 82–96) for detecting trochanteric region pseudotumors, and a sensitivity of 79% (CI: 62–89) and a specificity of 94% (CI: 83–98) for detecting iliopsoas-region pseudotumors. Type misclassification of pseudotumors found at revision occurred in 8 of 23 hips in the trochanteric region and in 19 of 33 hips in the iliopsoas region. Interpretation Despite the discrepancy in type classification between ultrasound and revision findings, the presence of pseudotumors was predicted well with ultrasound in our cohort of failed MoM hip replacements. PMID:25582840

  18. A longitudinal study of quality of life and functional status in total hip and total knee replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Mandzuk, Lynda L; McMillan, Diana E; Bohm, Eric R

    2015-05-01

    Primary total hip and primary total knee surgeries are commonly performed to improve patients' quality of life and functional status. This longitudinal retrospective study (N = 851) examined self-reported quality of life and functional status over the preoperative and postoperative periods: 12 months prior to surgery, one month prior to surgery and 12 months following surgery. A linear mixed effects model was used to analyze the changes in quality of life and functional status over the sampling period. Patients in the convenience sample reported improvements in quality of life and functional status utilizing the SF-12 and Oxford Hip and Oxford Knee, although differences were noted by procedure and gender. Total hip patients tended to demonstrate greater improvement than total knee patients and males reported higher levels of physical and mental quality of life as well as functional status when compared to females. Of particular note was that mental health scores were consistently lower in both total hip and total knee replacement patients across the perioperative period and up to one year postoperative. This study identifies an opportunity for health care providers to proactively address the mental health of total hip and total knee replacement patients throughout their joint replacement trajectory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bilateral prosthetic hip joint infections associated with a Psoas abscess. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratne, G D Rajitha; Khan, Riaz J K; Tan, Cynthia; Golledge, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psoas abscess is a recognized but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip joint infections. Case report: We report a case of a 68-year-old man with right and left hip arthroplasties performed 22 and 14 years ago, respectively, who presented with non-specific symptoms and was subsequently diagnosed with left psoas abscess on CT scan. Drainage of the psoas abscess was complicated by the formation of a discharging sinus connected to the left hip. He then developed an infected right thigh haematoma, which also formed a discharging sinus connecting to the right hip post-drainage. He was treated with bilateral two-stage revision total hip arthroplasties and multiple courses of prolonged antibacterial therapy. Both abscesses and hip joints cultured the same species of multi-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The causal link between the psoas abscess and the prosthetic hip infections is discussed, as well as the investigation and management. Conclusion: We recommend routine exploration of the iliopsoas bursa when revision of an infected total hip arthroplasty is performed to rule out intrapelvic spread of the infection [3]. There should be high index of suspicion of prosthetic hip infection in patients presenting with Psoas abscess and vice versa. A CT scan might be warranted to rule out concomitant infection in both these patients. PMID:28116254

  20. Development of a ceramic surface replacement for the hip. An experimental Sialon model.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C; Phillips, W; McKellop, H; Coster, I R; Hedley, A; Amstutz, H C

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the design and fixation advantages of Sialon ceramic surface replacements implanted without acrylic bone cement. The biocompatibility and friction and wear properties of Sialon ceramic were compared with more conventional prosthetic materials such as stainless steel and alumina. A functional load-bearing canine hip surface replacement model was established to test Sialon femoral cups designed for fixation by bone ingrowth. The results of the polyethylene wear tests on highly polished ceramic and stainless steel counterfaces were essentially similar. These laboratory data indicated that the in-vivo polyethylene wear performance on metal or ceramic prosthetic surfaces could be expected to be indistinguishable, i.e. the ceramic/polyethylene combination would not offer any improved wear resistance in-vivo. It was found possible to get bone ingrowth into the macrokeying areas of the ceramic femoral cups but not into the microporous surfaces due to the presence of a fibrous membrane lining their internal surfaces. The biocompatability specimens also appeared to be invested with a fibrous membrane. Further studies are under way to determine the relationship between reaming procedures, micro motion at the interfaces and Sialon biocompatibility.

  1. Metal on metal surface replacement of the hip. Experience of the McMinn prothesis.

    PubMed

    McMinn, D; Treacy, R; Lin, K; Pynsent, P

    1996-08-01

    The historical failure of surface replacement has been due to the production of wear debris with subsequent bone resorption, loosening, and failure. To avoid these problems, a surface replacement using a metal on metal bearing allowing thin components and femoral design and instrumentation to avoid varus alignment has been designed. Two hundred thirty-five joints have been resurfaced with this prosthesis in almost 5 years. There have been no femoral neck fractures and no dislocations. There have been 4 designs differing in the method of fixation. In the press fit group, 6 of 70 hips had to be revised for aseptic loosening. In the cemented group, debonding of the cup occurred in 3 of 43 cases. Six patients had hydroxyapatite coated components and have had excellent clinical outcomes. The current design uses a peripherally expanded hydroxyapatite coated cup and a cemented metal head; 116 of this design have been implanted during a 19-month period with excellent outcome. Despite short followup the authors are hopeful that the combination of a polar metal on metal bearing with appropriate fixation will yield a method of preserving bone stock in the younger patient requiring arthroplasty.

  2. Characterization and tribology of PEG-like coatings on UHMWPE for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sheryl R; Ashby, Paul D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2010-03-15

    A crosslinked hydrogel coating similar to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was covalently bonded to the surface of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the lubricity and wear resistance of the UHWMPE for use in total joint replacements. The chemistry, hydrophilicity, and protein adsorption resistance of the coatings were determined, and the wear behavior of the PEG-like coating was examined by two methods: pin-on-disk tribometry to evaluate macroscale behavior, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simulate asperity wear. As expected, the coating was found to be highly PEG-like, with approximately 83% ether content by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and more hydrophilic and resistant to protein adsorption than uncoated UHMWPE. Pin-on-disk testing showed that the PEG-like coating could survive 3 MPa of contact pressure, comparable to that experienced by total hip replacements. AFM nanoscratching experiments uncovered three damage mechanisms for the coatings: adhesion/microfracture, pure adhesion, and delamination. The latter two mechanisms appear to correlate well with wear patterns induced by pin-on-disk testing and evaluated by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy mapping. Understanding the mechanisms by which the PEG-like coatings wear is critical for improving the behavior of subsequent generations of wear-resistant hydrogel coatings.

  3. Role of Mental Disorders in Nosocomial Infections after Hip Fracture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Cano, Juan Ramon; Cruz, Encarnacion; Benitez-Parejo, Nicolás; Perea-Milla, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    The association between mental disorders (MDs) and iatrogenic complications after hip fracture surgery has been poorly studied. Among iatrogenic complications, nosocomial infections (NIs) are a major factor in hip fracture surgery. The aim of this paper was to determine whether patients with a MD and a hip fracture develop more NIs after hip surgery than patients with no MD. We studied 912 patients who underwent surgery for a hip fracture (223 patients with a MD who underwent surgery for a hip fracture and 689 control patients without a MD who also underwent surgery for a hip fracture) and followed them after surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using simple and multiple logistic regression analysis (confidence interval, crude and adjusted odds ratios, and P value). We found that MDs, gender, and comorbidities were not associated with a higher risk of developing a NI after surgery for a hip fracture. Only age increases the risk of a NI. PMID:20628560

  4. Geographic variation in admissions for knee replacement, hip replacement, and hip fracture in France: evidence of supplier-induced demand in for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weeks, William B; Jardin, Marie; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Paraponaris, Alain; Ventelou, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    We sought to determine whether there was evidence of supplier-induced demand in mainland France, where health care is mainly financed by a public and compulsory health insurance and provided by both for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals. Using a dataset of all admissions to French hospitals for 2009 and 2010, we calculated department-level age-adjusted and sex-adjusted per capita admission rates for hip replacement, knee replacement, and hip fracture for 2 age groups (45-64 and 65-99 y old), for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals. We used spatial regression analysis to examine the relationship between ecological variables, procedure rates, and supply of surgeons or sector-specific surgical beds. The large majority of hip and knee replacement surgeries were performed in for-profit hospitals, whereas the large majority of hip fracture admissions were in not-for-profit hospitals; nonetheless, we found approximately 2-fold variation in per capita rates of hip and knee replacement surgery in both age groups and settings. Spatial regression results showed that among younger patients, higher incomes were associated with lower admission rates; among older patients, higher levels of reliance on social benefits were associated with lower rates of elective surgery in for-profit hospitals. Although overall surgical bed supply was not associated with admission rates, for-profit-specific and not-for-profit-specific bed supply were associated with higher rates of elective procedures within a respective hospital type. We found evidence of supplier-induced demand within the French for-profit and not-for-profit hospital systems; however, these systems appear to complement one another so that there is no overall national supplier-induced effect.

  5. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty as a salvage procedure for failed infected internal fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Shubhranshu S; Agashe, Mandar V; Sheth, Binoti A; Dash, Kumar K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Failed infected internal fixation produces significant pain and functional disability. In infected internal fixation of hip fractures with partial or complete head destruction, total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be technically challenging; however, it restores hip biomechanics. The present study is to evaluate the results and assess the complications of THA following failed infected internal fixation of these fractures. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data in a tertiary healthcare center was performed of 20 consecutive patients of THA following failed infected internal fixation operated between September 2001 and November 2007. There were 11 dynamic hip screw failures for intertrochanteric fractures, 6 failed osteotomies following transcervical fractures, and 3 failed screw fixations for transcervical fractures. Results: The average age of the patients was 48.5 years (range 28-70 years) and the average followup period was 6.5 years (range 3.5-10.5 years). An indigenously designed cement spacer was used in a majority of patients (n = 15). The custom-made antibiotic impregnated cement spacer was prepared on-table, with the help of a K-nail bent at 130°, long stem Austin Moore's prosthesis (n=1), Charnley's prosthesis (n=1), or bent Rush nail (n=1). The antibiotic mixed cement was coated over the hardware in its doughy phase and appropriately shaped using an asepto syringe or an indigenously prepared spacer template. Nineteen of the 20 patients underwent two-stage revision surgeries. The average Harris hip score improved from 35.3 preoperatively to 82.85 postoperatively at the last followup. A significant difference was found (P < 0.0001). None of the patients had recurrence of infection. Conclusions: The results were comparable to primary arthroplasty in femoral neck fractures. Thus, THA is a useful salvage procedure for failed infected internal fixation of hip fractures. PMID:23533069

  6. Ceramic-on-metal for total hip replacement: mixing and matching can lead to high wear.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; Spinelli, Michele; Zavalloni, Mara; Traina, Francesco; Carmignato, Simone; Toni, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal bearing surfaces are often employed for total hip replacement because of their resistance to wear. However, they have some limits: brittleness is a major concern for ceramic, and ion release is a drawback for metal. To reduce the effect of these limitations, a hybrid coupling of ceramic-on-metal has been proposed. The theoretical advantage of this new coupling might lead orthopedic surgeons to use it indiscriminately. We asked whether the wear rate of this innovative solution was comparable with that of ceramic-on-ceramic, which is considered to be the gold standard for wear resistance. In a hip simulator study, we tested the wear pattern of a hybrid ceramic-on-metal coupling supplied by the same distributor; in particular, three different configurations were tested for 5 million cycles: 36-mm ceramic-on-ceramic, 32-mm and 36-mm ceramic-on-metal. These combinations were gravimetrically and geometrically evaluated. After 5 million cycles, the volumetric loss for the metal acetabular cups (Phi 36-mm) was 20-fold greater than that of the ceramic cups of the same size (Phi 36-mm); a volumetric loss of 4.35 mm(3) and 0.26 mm(3) was observed, respectively, for ceramic-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic combinations. Significant statistical differences were observed between all 36-mm different combinations (P < 0.0001). The increased diameter of the 36-mm ceramic-on-metal configuration resulted in a lower volumetric loss compared with that of the 32-mm ceramic-on-metal configuration. Our findings showed an increase in wear for the proposed hybrid specimens with respect to that of the ceramic-on-ceramic ones. This confirms that even in the case of ceramic-on-metal bearings, mixing and matching could not prove effective wear behavior, not even comparable with that of the ceramic-on-ceramic gold standard.

  7. Serum levels of cobalt and chromium in patients with Sikomet metal-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Milosev, Ingrid; Pisot, Venceslav; Campbell, Pat

    2005-05-01

    Metal/metal total hip replacements (M/M THRs) made of CoCr-based alloys were reintroduced in hip arthroplasty in order to avoid the problem of polyethylene wear and consequently to diminish the wear debris-related osteolysis. Emerging concerns accompanying the reintroduction of M/M THRs are related to the possibility increase of Co and Cr serum levels and, therefore, a careful surveillance of M/M patients is recommended. In the present work three groups of patients with Sikomet SM21 low-carbon alloy were investigated: retrospective group, prospective group and revision group. The investigation of these different groups of patients provided data concerning the metal concentration as a function of time in situ, as well as time ex situ, i.e., following the removal of M/M bearing. A retrospective group of 25 patients sampled at average 60 +/- 20 months postoperatively showed a 3-fold increase in cobalt and a 4.4-fold increase in chromium compared with the control group. In the prospective group of seven patients both cobalt and chromium increase with time and at average 140 +/- 80 days achieved a significant increase compared with preoperative values. An important contribution of this study to the current knowledge on M/M bearings is achieved by the measurements in the revision group of 10 patients, where we observed a decline of serum Co and Cr levels following the removal of M/M articulation. While the link between the increase in metal serum levels and the presence of M/M THR is proved, the biological impact of these results remains to be elucidated.

  8. Pre-operative function, motivation and duration of symptoms predict sporting participation after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, M; Frey, S; Parratte, S; Flecher, X; Argenson, J N

    2014-08-01

    There is little in the literature on the level of participation in sports which patients undertake after total hip replacement (THR). Our aims in this study were to determine first, the level of sporting activity, second, the predictive factors for returning to sporting activity, and third, the correlation between participation in sports and satisfaction after THR. We retrospectively identified 815 patients who had undergone THR between 1995 and 2005. All were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding their sporting activity. A total of 571 patients (71%) met the inclusion criteria and completed the evaluation. At a mean follow-up of 9.8 years (sd 2.9), 366 patients (64%) returned to sporting activity as defined by a University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score of > 5. The main reasons that patients had for refraining from sports were fear of dislocation (65; 31.6%), avoiding wear (52; 25.4%), and the recommendation of the surgeon (34; 16.6%). There was a significant relationship between higher post-operative participation in sport in those patients with a higher pre-operative Harris hip score (HHS) (p = 0.0074), motivation to participate in sporting activities (p = 0.00022) and a shorter duration of symptoms (p = 0.0034). Finally, there was a correlation between age (p = 0.00013), UCLA score (p = 0.012) and pre-operative HHS (p = 0.00091) and satisfaction. In conclusion, we found that most patients participate in sporting activity after THR, regardless of the advice of their surgeon, and that there is a correlation between the level of participation and pre-operative function, motivation, duration of symptoms and post-operative satisfaction. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Symposium on Surface Replacement Arthroplasty of the Hip. Biomechanics: mutifactorial design choices--an essential compromise?

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C

    1982-10-01

    The main flaws to be overcome in realizing the potential success of the double-cup arthroplasty procedure are failures due to femoral cup loosening, acetabular cup loosening, and femoral-neck fractures. The clinical uncertainties include the selection of a suitable patient with adequate bone stock and the technical difficulties associated with (I) reaming the acetabulum adequately, (2) reaming down onto the neck without violating it, and (3) anchoring the components securely by interdigitation of acrylic cement. The higher frictional torques of the double-cup arthroplasty designs are not a clinical loosening issue--the resulting acetabular cement-bone shear stresses are very low. Computer models of both the femoral and acetabular components predict significant stress shielding of the cancellous bone under metal femoral shells. At the rim of the femoral cup, the stresses are increased by a factor of 3 owing to the stress concentration effect and can rise to a factor of 10 if cystic or osteoporotic changes are present. This finding if confirmed in the three-dimensional models may explain some of the femoral neck fractures. The thin polyethylene acetabular cups may also cause a stress concentration effect on the underlying cement and bone. This may explain the higher incidence of radiographic loosening around the acetabulum in double-cup arthroplasty designs compared with total hip replacements. Metal-backed sockets may reduce cancellous bone stresses and appear advantageous. There is no clinical evidence of unusual wear or wear-related problems. However, new material formulations are now either in use or being planned for the double-cup arthroplasty designs. As yet, there have been no published data on hip simulator wear for the efficacy of any of the current or proposed changes. Biologic fixation appears to be the theme for the 1980s. However, the combination of technology, design instrumentation, and patient selection will be critical in achieving success with this

  10. Cable plates and onlay allografts in periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip replacement: laboratory and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jonathan R; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V; Duncan, Clive P

    2004-01-01

    Fractures of the femur after total hip replacement are an increasingly common and technically challenging problem. The results of nonsurgical treatment are poor. When the general condition of the patient allows, these injuries should be treated surgically. Several surgical treatments can be used to treat these fractures, and classification of the fracture assists the surgeon in the choice of procedure. Over the past decade, cable plate fixation systems and onlay strut allografts have become two of the most commonly used methods of fixation for fractures associated with hip prostheses. The ideal method of fixation is yet to be determined. However, laboratory studies have shown that dual fixation using either a lateral plate and anterior strut graft or two strut grafts produces the strongest construct. Cables rather than smooth wires should be used for fixation, and fixation strength increases with the number of cables used. The use of screws proximally produces a strong fixation but there are theoretical disadvantages to using screws around a femoral implant. Clinical data show high rates of fracture union using cable plate fixation, cortical onlay allograft fixation, and combined fixation methods for fractures that occur around well-fixed implants. Results have been less encouraging when these techniques have been used to fix fractures around prostheses that are either loose or malaligned; such fractures are better managed by revision of the femoral component to a long-stemmed device. Care should also be taken when there has been previous periosteal stripping of the femur because this may predispose to fracture nonunion. Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a complex surgical problem and require specialized training in a range of surgical techniques.

  11. Is the use of antidepressants associated with patient-reported outcomes following total hip replacement surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meridith E; Rolfson, Ola; Gordon, Max; Annerbrink, Kristina; Malchau, Henrik; Garellick, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Patients with anxiety and/or depression tend to report less pain reduction and less satisfaction with surgical treatment. We hypothesized that the use of antidepressants would be correlated to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) 1 year after total hip replacement (THR), where increased dosage or discontinuation would be associated with worse outcomes. Patients and methods THR cases with pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were selected from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (n = 9,092; women: n = 5,106). The PROMs were EQ-5D, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Charnley class, and VAS for satisfaction after surgery. These cases were merged with a national database of prescription purchases to determine the prevalence of antidepressant purchases. Regression analyses were performed where PROs were dependent variables and sex, age, Charnley class, preoperative pain, preoperative health-related quality of life (HRQoL), patient-reported anxiety/depression, and antidepressant use were independent variables. Results Antidepressants were used by 10% of the cases (n = 943). Patients using antidepressants had poorer HRQoL and higher levels of pain before and after surgery and they experienced less satisfaction. Preoperative antidepressant use was independently associated with PROs 1 year after THR regardless of patient-reported anxiety/depression. Interpretation Antidepressant usage before surgery was associated with reduced PROs after THR. Cases at risk of poorer outcomes may be identified through review of the patient’s medical record. Clinicians are encouraged to screen for antidepressant use preoperatively, because their use may be associated with PROs after THR. PMID:27482877

  12. Multinational Comprehensive Evaluation of the Fixation Method Used in Hip Replacement: Interaction with Age in Context

    PubMed Central

    Stea, Susanna; Comfort, Thomas; Sedrakyan, Art; Havelin, Leif; Marinelli, Marcella; Barber, Thomas; Paxton, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Samprit; Isaacs, Abby J.; Graves, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fixation in total hip replacements remains a controversial topic, despite the high level of its success. Data obtained from major orthopaedic registries indicate that there are large differences among preferred fixation and survival results. Methods: Using a distributed registry data network, primary total hip arthroplasties performed for osteoarthritis from 2001 to 2010 were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries. A multivariate meta-analysis was performed using linear mixed models with the primary outcome revision for any reason. Survival probabilities and their standard errors were extracted from each registry for each unique combination of the covariates. Fixation strategies were compared with regard to age group, sex, bearing, and femoral-head diameter. All comparisons were based on the random-effects model and the fixed-effects model. Results: In patients who were seventy-five years of age and older, uncemented fixation had a significantly higher risk of revision (p < 0.001) than hybrid fixation, with a hazard ratio of 1.575 (95% confidence interval, 1.389 to 1.786). We found a similar, if lesser, effect in the intermediate age group of sixty-five to seventy-four years (hazard ratio, 1.16 [95% confidence interval, 1.023 to 1.315]; p = 0.021) and in the younger age group of forty-five to sixty-four years (hazard ratio, 1.205 [95% confidence interval, 1.008 to 1.442]; p = 0.041). There were no significant differences between hybrid and cemented bearings across age groups. Conclusions: We conclude that cementless fixation should be avoided in older patients (those seventy-five years of age or older), although this evidence is less strong in patients of intermediate and younger ages. PMID:25520418

  13. The effect of lubricant constituents on lubrication mechanisms in hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Nečas, David; Vrbka, Martin; Urban, Filip; Křupka, Ivan; Hartl, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to provide a novel experimental approach enabling to assess the thickness of lubricant film within hip prostheses in meaning of the contribution of particular proteins. Thin film colorimetric interferometry was combined with fluorescent microscopy finding that a combination of optical methods can help to better understand the interfacial lubrication processes in hip replacements. The contact of metal femoral head against a glass disc was investigated under various operating conditions. As a test lubricant, the saline solution containing the albumin and γ-globulin in a concentration 2:1 was employed. Two different mean speeds were applied, 5.7 and 22mm/s, respectively. The measurements were carried out under pure rolling, partial negative and partial positive sliding conditions showing that kinematic conditions substantially affects the formation of protein film. Under pure rolling conditions, an increasing tendency of lubricant film independently on rolling speed was detected, while the total thickness of lubricant film can be attributed mainly to albumin. When the ball was faster than the disc (negative sliding), a very thin lubricant film was observed for lower speed with no significant effect of particular proteins. The increase in sliding speed led to the increase of film thickness mainly caused due to the presence of γ-globulin. On the contrary, when the disc was faster than the ball (positive sliding), the film formation was very complex and time dependent while both of the studied proteins have shown any qualitative change during the test, however the effect of albumin seems to be much more important. Since a very good agreement of the results was obtained, it can be concluded that the approach consisting of two optical methods can provide the fundamental information about the lubricant film formation in meaning of particular proteins while the simultaneous presence of other constituents in model synovial fluid. Copyright

  14. Diagnostic utility of joint fluid metal ion measurement for histopathological findings in metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Reito, Aleksi; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Puolakka, Timo; Pajamäki, Jorma; Eskelinen, Antti

    2015-12-22

    In vivo assessment of inflammatory responses in the synovia of patients with MoM hip replacements would be useful in the determination of the prognosis of the hip replacement. Aims of the study was to investigate the correlation between cobalt and chrome levels in joint fluid with histopathological findings and the predictive ability of metal ion levels for these findings. In 163 revision surgeries (141 ASR THAs and 22 ASR hip resurfacings) joint fluid chrome and cobalt levels were assessed and histological analysis of synovial tissues was performed. Histological analysis included assessment of histiocytes, particle load, surface necrosis, lymphocyte cuffs and ALVAL-score. Surface necrosis correlated positively with cobalt levels both in both groups. Neither chrome nor cobalt level had even fair discriminative ability to predict the presence or severity of any histological finding in the THA group. In the hip resurfacing group, cobalt level had good discriminative ability to predict the presence of perivascular lymphocytes and ALVAL-score of ≥ 7 whereas chrome had good discriminative ability to predict surface necrosis, metal particle load and ALVAL-score of ≥ 7. Measurement of metal ion levels following joint fluid aspirate offers no relevant information with regard to histopathological findings in patients with large-diameter MoM THAs. Limited information may be gained from assessment of joint fluid metal ion levels in patients with hip resurfacings, but disadvantages of an aspirate must be carefully reviewed.

  15. Erratum to: Assessing reproducibility for radiographic measurement of leg length inequality after total hip replacement, Hip Int. 2012 Sep-Oct;22(5):539-544.

    PubMed

    2016-09-29

    Erratum to: Hip Int. 2012 Sep-Oct;22(5):539-544. Assessing reproducibility for radiographic measurement of leg length inequality after total hip replacement. McWilliams AB, Grainger AJ, O'Connor PJ, Redmond AC, Stewart TD, Stone MH. PMID: 23100154 DOI:10.5301/HIP.2012.9751 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] In the article "Assessing reproducibility for radiographic measurement of leg length inequality after total hip replacement", by Anthony B. McWilliams, Andrew J. Grainger, Philip J. O'Connor, Anthony C. Redmond, Todd D. Stewart, Martin H. Stone, published in Hip International 2012; 22 (5): 539-544, there is an error in the labelling of Figure 4. The radiograph of the CFR-T-LT method is incorrectly labelled. The S (or stem) measurement and the O (or overall) measurement should be switched. The text in the caption is corrected below. This is an error in labelling and makes no difference to the results of the study; the measurements and methodology remain unchanged and the authors stand by the results. Fig. 4 - The CFR-T-LT Method. An initial reference line is drawn between the centres of femoral rotation. Two further lines are drawn parallel to this. The first at the level of the most inferior part of the acetabular teardrop to give measurement C, which corresponds to any inequality (CA-CN) due to the position of the cup. The second is at the level of the centre of the lesser trochanter to give measurement S, which corresponds to inequality (SA-SN) due to position of the stem. The measurement between these two additional lines is the overall LLI, (OA-ON).

  16. Ximelagatran for the prevention of venous thromboembolism following elective hip or knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Clifford; Mouret, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    Patients undergoing major lower-extremity orthopedic surgery such as total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Routine prophylaxis is necessary to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may progress to potentially fatal pulmonary embolism and secondary complications such as postthrombotic syndrome, recurrent DVT, and chronic pulmonary hypertension. Prophylaxis in patients undergoing TKR, THR, and hip fracture surgery is now standard practice and generally involves anticoagulant treatment with either low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin for a period of 7 to 10 days, with extended prophylaxis in those with ongoing risk factors such as obesity, cancer, or previous VTE. Data from clinical practice suggest that there is a general trend toward longer postsurgical prophylaxis and shorter hospital stays, making practicality of treatment an important consideration. LMWH is effective for the prophylaxis of VTE, but the parenteral route of administration is not convenient for use in the outpatient setting. Warfarin, on the other hand, can be administered orally but requires the infrastructure for careful patient monitoring and dose adjustments because of its unpredictable dose-response relationship. The development of new anticoagulants has been pursued with the aim of improving efficacy, predictability, consistency of response, safety, and convenience. A recently approved anticoagulant, fondaparinux, has been proven to provide superior efficacy for the prevention of VTE compared with LMWH, but this agent requires parenteral administration and does not overcome the convenience issue. Ximelagatran is the oral form of the direct thrombin inhibitor melagatran, which is available for subcutaneous administration. Ximelagatran has a consistent anticoagulant response allowing fixed oral dosing without the need for coagulation monitoring. The efficacy and safety profile of melagatran

  17. Comparison of Balance, Proprioception and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Total Hip Replacement Patients With and Without Fracture: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there was a difference in balance, proprioception, and skeletal muscle mass among patients who undergo hip fracture surgery relative to and elective total hip replacement (THR). Methods Thirty-one THR patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups: fracture group (n=15) and non-fracture group (n=16). Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was used to balance the proprioception of the hip joint while a joint position sense (JPS) test was used to evaluate it. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed using a 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). All tests were assessed at 3 months after the surgery. An independent t-test was used to compare the fracture group and non-fracture group. Spearman correlation was used to identify the correlation of each variable. Results In an independent t-test, the BBS score of patients undergoing elective surgery was higher than the BBS score of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. There was a significant correlation between the BBS and JPS score after a THR. SMI also correlated with the score of BBS. Conclusion It seems that THR patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture might have more trouble balancing than elective THR patients. Therefore THR patients undergoing hip fracture surgery might need more care during rehabilitation. PMID:28119837

  18. Cardiac valve replacement in patients with active infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W R; Geraci, J E

    1983-12-01

    Since the introduction of effective antimicrobial therapy, the leading cause of death in patients with infective endocarditis is no longer sepsis but, rather, congestive heart failure. The mortality is higher in patients with severe heart failure due to infective endocarditis who are treated with medical therapy only than in those who additionally undergo cardiac valve replacement. The mortality is also higher in patients with severe heart failure due to aortic infective endocarditis (40 to 93%) than in those with heart failure due to mitral infective endocarditis (17 to 66%). In patients with and in those without infective endocarditis, surgical intervention can be carried out with comparable mortality not only for aortic valve replacement (9 vs 8.4%) but also overall for valve replacement (10 vs 12%). In patients with class IV heart failure, overall mortality of valve replacement was higher (17%) than in patients with class II (8%) or class III heart failure (7%) and, similarly, comparable with that of matched groups of patients without infective endocarditis. In patients with class IV disability, the mortality of valve replacement was higher in those with active infective endocarditis (19%) than in those with inactive infective endocarditis, possibly due to a higher incidence of sudden onset of severe aortic regurgitation and myocardial abscess. No patient with valve replacement for inactive infective endocarditis developed prosthetic valve endocarditis; a single case of prosthetic valve endocarditis occurred in a patient with active infective endocarditis. In general, early surgical intervention is preferable to procrastination in the management of patients with progressive or severe heart failure due to infective endocarditis. Although, in at least 70% of patients, blood cultures may be rendered sterile within one week of initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, patients with infective endocarditis due to staphylococci, multiply-resistant gram

  19. Predictors of quality of life outcomes after revision total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Biring, G S; Masri, B A; Greidanus, N V; Duncan, C P; Garbuz, D S

    2007-11-01

    A prospective cohort of 222 patients who underwent revision hip replacement between April 2001 and March 2004 was evaluated to determine predictors of function, pain and activity level between one and two years post-operatively, and to define quality of life outcomes using validated patient reported outcome tools. Predictive models were developed and proportional odds regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predict quality of life outcomes at one and two years post-operatively. The dependent outcome variables were the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) function and pain scores, and University of California Los Angeles activity scores. The independent variables included patient demographics, operative factors, and objective quality of life parameters, including pre-operative WOMAC, and the Short Form-12 mental component score. There was a significant improvement (t-test, p < 0.001) in all patient quality of life scores. In the predictive model, factors predictive of improved function (original regression analyses, p < 0.05) included a higher pre-operative WOMAC function score (p < 0.001), age between 60 and 70 years (p < 0.037), male gender (p = 0.017), lower Charnley class (p < 0.001) and aseptic loosening being the indication for revision (p < 0.003). Using the WOMAC pain score as an outcome variable, factors predictive of improvement included the pre-operative WOMAC function score (p = 0.001), age between 60 and 70 years (p = 0.004), male gender (p = 0.005), lower Charnley class (p = 0.001) and no previous revision procedure (p = 0.023). The pre-operative WOMAC function score (p = 0.001), the indication for the operation (p = 0.007), and the operating surgeon (p = 0.008) were significant predictors of the activity assessment at follow-up. Predictors of quality of life outcomes after revision hip replacement were established. Although some patient-specific and surgery-specific variables were important, age, gender

  20. Comparison of robotic-assisted and manual implantation of a primary total hip replacement. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Honl, Matthias; Dierk, Oliver; Gauck, Christian; Carrero, Volker; Lampe, Frank; Dries, Sebastian; Quante, Markus; Schwieger, Karsten; Hille, Ekkehard; Morlock, Michael M

    2003-08-01

    Robotic-assisted total hip replacement has become a common method of implantation, especially in Europe. It frequently has been postulated that robotic reaming would result in an improved clinical outcome due to the better fit of the prosthesis, but that has never been demonstrated in a prospective study, to our knowledge. The purpose of this study was to compare robotic-assisted implantation of a total hip replacement with conventional manual implantation. One hundred and fifty-four patients scheduled for total hip replacement were randomly assigned to undergo either conventional manual implantation of an S-ROM prosthesis (eighty patients) or robotic-assisted implantation of such a prosthesis (seventy-four patients). The five-axis ROBODOC was used for the robotic-assisted procedures. Preoperatively as well as at three, six, twelve, and twenty-four months after surgery, the scores according to the Harris and Merle d'Aubigné systems and the Mayo clinical score were determined. Radiographs made at these intervals were analyzed for evidence of loosening, prosthetic alignment, and heterotopic ossification. Thirteen (18%) of the seventy-four attempted robotic implantations had to be converted to manual implantations as a result of failure of the system. The duration of the robotic procedures was longer than that of the manual procedures (mean and standard deviation,107.1 +/- 29.1 compared with 82.4 +/- 23.4 minutes, p < 0.001). Limb-length equality (mean discrepancy, 0.18 +/- 0.30 compared with 0.96 +/- 0.93 cm, p < 0.001) and varus-valgus orientation of the stem (mean angle between the femur and the shaft of the prosthesis, 0.34 degrees +/- 0.67 degrees compared with 0.84 degrees +/- 1.23 degrees, p < 0.001) were better after the robotic procedures. At six months, slightly more heterotopic ossification was seen in the group treated with robotic implantation. The group treated with robotic implantation had a better Mayo clinical score at six and twelve months and a

  1. [Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures after Total Hip Replacement: Our Results and Treatment Complications].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, T; Salášek, M; Weisová, D

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The study consists of a retroactive evaluation of results of surgical treatment in patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after total hip replacement and a comparison with results reported in the literature. MATERIAL AND METHODS In the period from 2003 to 2013, a total of 83 patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after total hip replacement were treated at our clinic, namely 69 women and 14 men. The mean age in the cohort was 74 years (range 47-87). The Vancouver classification was used to grade the fractures. The cohort included 31 patients with type B1 fracture, 25 patients with type B2 fracture, 8 patients with type B3 fracture, and 19 patients with type C fracture. Altogether 80 patients underwent a surgery, 3 patients with non-displaced type B1 fracture were treated conservatively. The mechanism of injury was a simple fall in 75 % of primary endoprostheses and in 56% of revision endoprostheses. The average time to fracture was 7.6 years in primary implant and 3.6 years in revision endoprosthesis. In fractures with a well-fixed stem (type B1 and C) plate osteosynthesis was used. In case of a comminution zone, osteosynthesis was followed by spongioplasty. In patients with a loose stem (type B2 and B3), the fracture was treated with a revision uncemented stem. In two cases a combination of a revision stem and a massive corticocancellous bone graft was used. The evaluation was performed using the Harris Hip Score and the minimum follow-up from the surgery was 3 years. RESULTS In the group of patients with type B1 fracture, 28 patients were treated surgically. An excellent result was achieved in 22 patients (84%), in 4 patients (16%) the result was very good. The remaining 2 patients failed to meet the requirement of the minimum follow-up of 3 years. In the group of patients with type B2 fractures, composed of 25 patients, the femoral component was replaced with a revision uncemented stem with cerclage wires or titanium tapes or

  2. First Report of a Hip Prosthetic and Joint Infection Caused by Lactococcus garvieae in a Woman Fishmonger▿

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, G. G.; Bémer, P.; Guillouzouic, A.; Crémet, L.; Touchais, S.; Fraquet, N.; Boutoille, D.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Corvec, S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first case of hip prosthetic infection due to Lactococcus garvieae. The patient, a 71-year-old woman fishmonger, developed a hip infection 7 years after total hip arthroplasty. The origin of infection was possibly due to the manipulation or intake of seafood or fish contaminated with Lactococcus garvieae. PMID:21367987

  3. First report of a hip prosthetic and joint infection caused by Lactococcus garvieae in a woman fishmonger.

    PubMed

    Aubin, G G; Bémer, P; Guillouzouic, A; Crémet, L; Touchais, S; Fraquet, N; Boutoille, D; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Corvec, S

    2011-05-01

    We describe the first case of hip prosthetic infection due to Lactococcus garvieae. The patient, a 71-year-old woman fishmonger, developed a hip infection 7 years after total hip arthroplasty. The origin of infection was possibly due to the manipulation or intake of seafood or fish contaminated with Lactococcus garvieae.

  4. Telerehabilitation Versus Traditional Care Following Total Hip Replacement: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Michael; Crossley, Kay; Russell, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is the gold standard treatment for severe hip osteoarthritis. Effectiveness of physical rehabilitation for THR patients following discharge from hospital is supported by evidence; however, barriers such as geographical location and transport can limit access to appropriate health care. One solution to this issue is using an alternative model of care using telerehabilitation technology to deliver rehabilitation programs directly into patients’ homes. A telerehabilitation model may also have potential health care cost savings for health care providers. Objective This study aims to determine if a telerehabilitation model of care delivered remotely is as effective as face-to-face rehabilitation in the THR population and cost effective for health care providers and patients. Methods A total of 70 people undergoing THR will be recruited to participate in a randomized, single-blind, controlled noninferiority clinical trial. The trial will compare a technology-based THR rehabilitation program to in-person care. On discharge from hospital, participants randomized to the in-person group will receive usual care, defined as a paper home exercise program (HEP) targeting strengthening exercises for quadriceps, hip abductors, extensors, and flexors; they will be advised to perform their HEP 3 times per day. At 2, 4, and 6 weeks postoperatively, they will receive a 30-minute in-person physiotherapy session with a focus on gait retraining and reviewing and progressing their HEP. The telerehabilitation protocol will involve a program similar in content to the in-person rehabilitation program, except delivery will be directly into the homes of the participants via telerehabilitation technology on an iPad. Outcomes will be evaluated preoperatively, day of discharge from in-patient physiotherapy, 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The primary outcome will be the quality of life subscale of the hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score

  5. Role of parenteral iron in transfusion requirements after total hip replacement. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Naveira, E; Seara, J; Palmer, J H; Cuenca, J; García-Erce, J A

    2006-04-01

    An important percentage of patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) receive allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) to avoid the risks of acute anaemia. However, concerns about the risks of ABT have led to the search for alternatives, such as stimulation of erythropoiesis. We prospectively investigated the effect of postoperative administration of 300 mg of intravenous iron sucrose on ABT requirements in THR patients (group 2; n = 24). A previous series of 22 THR patients served as the control group (group 1). All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, using the same implant, and a set of clinical data was gathered. No adverse reactions to iron administration were observed. The group-given iron showed a trend to a lower transfusion rate (46 vs. 73%; P = 0.067) and lower transfusion index (0.96 vs. 1.68 units/patient; P = 0.038). Moreover, amongst the non-transfused patients, admission haemoglobin levels were lower in those coming from the iron group than those from the control group (12.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 14.0 +/- 1.2 g dL(-1), respectively; P = 0.017). Postoperative parenteral iron administration could be a safe and effective way to reduce ABT requirements in the THR patients. A large, randomized controlled trial to confirm these results is warranted.

  6. Post-operative radiographic factors and patient-reported outcome after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Wylde, Vikki; Maclean, Angus; Blom, Ashley W

    2012-01-01

    Although total hip replacement (THR) is considered a very successful surgical intervention, a proportion of patients experience persistent pain or disability, and/or dissatisfaction with the outcome of surgery. Our aim was to determine whether post-operative radiographic variables were predictive of patient-reported pain, function and satisfaction after primary THR. At 1-3 years after surgery patients completed the WOMAC Pain scale, WOMAC Function scale and a validated measure of satisfaction with the outcome of surgery. Post-operative radiographs taken prior to discharge were graded for the restoration of offset, restoration of leg length, anteroposterior (AP) alignment of the femoral stem and AP acetabular inclination. Binary logistic regression was used to identify whether radiographic variables were significant predictors of patient-reported outcome scores. Radiographic and patient-reported outcomes data were available for 452 THR patients. No radiographic predictors were found to be significant predictors of patient reported pain, function or satisfaction at 1-3 years after THR. This highlights that patients with continuing problems after THR may benefit from a thorough multidisciplinary assessment to diagnose the underlying cause of the problems.

  7. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01).

  8. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that α-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807

  9. Patient-related risk factors that predict poor outcome after total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    MacWilliam, C H; Yood, M U; Verner, J J; McCarthy, B D; Ward, R E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with poor outcome after total hip replacement (THR) surgery. DATA SOURCES: This article is the first to present results from the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) THR consortium. STUDY DESIGN: The outcomes evaluated were pain and physical function. Eight patient risk factors were evaluated. These included the age, sex, race, marital status, and education of the patient; whether the patient had polyarticular disease or other comorbid conditions; and the patient's preoperative pain and physical function score. DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected from patients using AMGA-approved, self-administered questionnaires preoperatively and at six weeks, three months, six months, one year, and two years postoperatively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the patient risk factors studied, race, education, number of comorbid conditions, and preoperative Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ) score were found to be associated with poor outcome. These risk factors were found to have an effect on both pain and physical function at six months postoperatively. Patients with higher preoperative scores were found to have higher postoperative scores, but substantially fewer of these patients received any benefit from their surgery. For each 10-point increase in preoperative score, patients could expect at least a 6-point decrease in postoperative improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that preoperative status is an important predictor of outcome for THR. PMID:8943994

  10. Lean Six Sigma: a new approach to the management of patients undergoing prosthetic hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Improta, Giovanni; Balato, Giovanni; Romano, Maria; Carpentieri, Francesco; Bifulco, Paolo; Alessandro Russo, Mario; Rosa, Donato; Triassi, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, health care spending in Italy reached €114.5 billion, accounting for 7.2% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and 14.2% of total public spending. Therefore, reducing waste in health facilities could generate substantial cost savings. The objective of this study is to show that Lean Six Sigma represents an appropriate methodology for the development of a clinical pathway which allows to improve quality and to reduce costs in prosthetic hip replacement surgery. The methodology used for the development of a new clinical pathway was Lean Six Sigma. Problem solving in Lean Six Sigma is the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control) roadmap, characterized by five operational phases which make possible to reach fixed goals through a rigorous process of defining, measuring, analysing, improving and controlling business problems. The following project indicated several variables influencing the inappropriate prolongation of the length of stay for inpatient treatment and corrective actions were performed to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the process of care. The average length of stay was reduced from 18.9 to 10.6 days (-44%). This article shows there is no trade-off between quality and costs: Lean Six Sigma improves quality and, at the same time, reduces costs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Attempt to classify patients with arthritis of the hip suitable for prosthetic replacement, and their femoral heads.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, P D; Roper, B A; Glennie, B

    1975-01-01

    Using clinical, radiological, and morbid anatomical data about patients with arthritis of the hip and their femoral heads resected during total hip replacement, an attempt has been made first, to classify patients and femoral heads by a cluster analysis technique, and secondly and more realistically, to use existing clinical and radiological classification as a basis for seeking discriminating features in the data from the femoral head. Both types of analysis failed to give results, and led to a conclusion that arthritis of the hip is a spectrum of disease. This may not pose problems to the clinician, but it does to the investigator studying the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. This problem is briefly discussed. PMID:1190850

  12. Evaluation of a new methodology to simulate damage and wear of polyethylene hip replacements subjected to edge loading in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Susan; Tipper, Joanne L; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2017-06-29

    Wear and fatigue of polyethylene acetabular cups have been reported to play a role in the failure of total hip replacements. Hip simulator testing under a wide range of clinically relevant loading conditions is important. Edge loading of hip replacements can occur following impingement under extreme activities and can also occur during normal gait, where there is an offset deficiency and/or joint laxity. This study evaluated a hip simulator method that assessed wear and damage in polyethylene acetabular liners that were subjected to edge loading. The liners tested to evaluate the method were a currently manufactured crosslinked polyethylene acetabular liner and an aged conventional polyethylene acetabular liner. The acetabular liners were tested for 5 million standard walking cycles and following this 5 million walking cycles with edge loading. Edge loading conditions represented a separation of the centers of rotation of the femoral head and the acetabular liner during the swing phase, leading to loading of the liner rim on heel strike. Rim damage and cracking was observed in the aged conventional polyethylene liner. Steady-state wear rates assessed gravimetrically were lower under edge loading compared to standard loading. This study supports previous clinical findings that edge loading may cause rim cracking in liners, where component positioning is suboptimal or where material degradation is present. The simulation method developed has the potential to be used in the future to test the effect of aging and different levels of severity of edge loading on a range of cross-linked polyethylene materials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A specific inpatient aquatic physiotherapy program improves strength after total hip or knee replacement surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rahmann, Ann E; Brauer, Sandra G; Nitz, Jennifer C

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of inpatient aquatic physiotherapy in addition to usual ward physiotherapy on the recovery of strength, function, and gait speed after total hip or knee replacement surgery. Pragmatic randomized controlled trial with blinded 6-month follow-up. Acute-care private hospital. People (n=65) undergoing primary hip or knee arthroplasty (average age, 69.6+/-8.2y; 30 men). Participants were randomly assigned to receive supplementary inpatient physiotherapy, beginning on day 4: aquatic physiotherapy, nonspecific water exercise, or additional ward physiotherapy. Strength, gait speed, and functional ability at day 14. At day 14, hip abductor strength was significantly greater after aquatic physiotherapy intervention than additional ward treatment (P=.001) or water exercise (P=.011). No other outcome measures were significantly different at any time point in the trial, but relative differences favored the aquatic physiotherapy intervention at day 14. No adverse events occurred with early aquatic intervention. A specific inpatient aquatic physiotherapy program has a positive effect on early recovery of hip strength after joint replacement surgery. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. Our research indicates that aquatic physiotherapy can be safely considered in this early postoperative phase.

  14. Management of a full-thickness burn to the foot following sciatic nerve palsy secondary to primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy following total hip replacement is a rare but serious complication. The neurological sequelae that follow range from pure sensory loss to combined motor and sensory loss involving most of the lower limb. The loss of nociceptive feedback predisposes patients to accidental damage to the lower limb. We present the case of a lady with sciatic nerve palsy who sustained full-thickness burn injuries to her foot via a hot water bottle. The dilemma between debridement and grafting following a recent history of surgical trauma (ie, total hip replacement) versus secondary healing via dressings and regular review is discussed. Although grafting is the standard treatment in such burns, we recommend secondary healing over grafting provided the burns are not extensive. This enables potential recovery of sensation and reduces operative trauma to the limb which may retard resolution of the neuropraxia. PMID:23595171

  15. Activity and loading influence the predicted bone remodeling around cemented hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    Periprosthetic bone remodeling is frequently observed after total hip replacement. Reduced bone density increases the implant and bone fracture risk, and a gross loss of bone density challenges fixation in subsequent revision surgery. Computational approaches allow bone remodeling to be predicted in agreement with the general clinical observations of proximal resorption and distal hypertrophy. However, these models do not reproduce other clinically observed bone density trends, including faster stabilizing mid-stem density losses, and loss-recovery trends around the distal stem. These may resemble trends in postoperative joint loading and activity, during recovery and rehabilitation, but the established remodeling prediction approach is often used with identical pre- and postoperative load and activity assumptions. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of pre- to postoperative changes in activity and loading upon the predicted progression of remodeling. A strain-adaptive finite element model of a femur implanted with a cemented Charnley stem was generated, to predict 60 months of periprosthetic remodeling. A control set of model input data assumed identical pre- and postoperative loading and activity, and was compared to the results obtained from another set of inputs with three varying activity and load profiles. These represented activity changes during rehabilitation for weak, intermediate and strong recoveries, and pre- to postoperative joint force changes due to hip center translation and the use of walking aids. Predicted temporal bone density change trends were analyzed, and absolute bone density changes and the time to homeostasis were inspected, alongside virtual X-rays. The predicted periprosthetic bone density changes obtained using modified loading inputs demonstrated closer agreement with clinical measurements than the control. The modified inputs also predicted the clinically observed temporal density change trends, but still under

  16. Variability of indication criteria in knee and hip replacement: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total knee (TKR) and hip (THR) replacement (arthroplasty) are effective surgical procedures that relieve pain, improve patients' quality of life and increase functional capacity. Studies on variations in medical practice usually place the indications for performing these procedures to be highly variable, because surgeons appear to follow different criteria when recommending surgery in patients with different severity levels. We therefore proposed a study to evaluate inter-hospital variability in arthroplasty indication. Methods The pre-surgical condition of 1603 patients included was compared by their personal characteristics, clinical situation and self-perceived health status. Patients were asked to complete two health-related quality of life questionnaires: the generic SF-12 (Short Form) and the specific WOMAC (Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities) scale. The type of patient undergoing primary arthroplasty was similar in the 15 different hospitals evaluated. The variability in baseline WOMAC score between hospitals in THR and TKR indication was described by range, mean and standard deviation (SD), mean and standard deviation weighted by the number of procedures at each hospital, high/low ratio or extremal quotient (EQ5-95), variation coefficient (CV5-95) and weighted variation coefficient (WCV5-95) for 5-95 percentile range. The variability in subjective and objective signs was evaluated using median, range and WCV5-95. The appropriateness of the procedures performed was calculated using a specific threshold proposed by Quintana et al for assessing pain and functional capacity. Results The variability expressed as WCV5-95 was very low, between 0.05 and 0.11 for all three dimensions on WOMAC scale for both types of procedure in all participating hospitals. The variability in the physical and mental SF-12 components was very low for both types of procedure (0.08 and 0.07 for hip and 0.03 and 0.07 for knee surgery patients). However, a moderate

  17. A multicenter approach evaluating the impact of vitamin e-blended polyethylene in cementless total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, Vitas

    2014-04-22

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  18. A Multicenter Approach Evaluating the Impact of Vitamin E-Blended Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, VITAS

    2014-01-01

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  19. The use of a constrained cementless acetabular component for instability in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rady, Ahmad Emad; Asal, Mohammed Kamal; Bassiony, Ayman Abdelaziz

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty is a disabling complication that can be difficult to treat. We evaluated the early clinical and radiographic outcome associated with the use of a constrained acetabular component for instability in total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent either primary or revision total hip arthroplasty with a cementless constrained acetabular component for different indications. The mean patient age at surgery was 57.4 years and the mean clinical and radiological follow-up period was 26.4 months. Clinical assessment was performed by the Harris hip score and at the latest follow up patients reported outcome using the Oxford hip score questionnaire. All radiographs were evaluated for evidence of loosening. Only one patient experienced redislocation with the constrained prosthesis. The average Harris hip score increased from a preoperative mean of 22 (range, 16 - 36) to a postoperative mean of 85 (range, 66-94). Preoperatively, the mean Oxford Hip Score was 48.6, which decreased to 20.5 at the final examination. All but one of the 15 hips had a well-fixed, stable cup. Femoral component stability with bone ingrowth was achieved in 10 cases. A constrained acetabular component is an effective option for the treatment of hip instability in primary and revision arthroplasty in those at high risk of dislocation. The potential for aseptic loosening requires evaluation by long term studies.

  20. Improved detection methods for infected hip joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Høgdall, Dan; Hvolris, Jørgen Jesper; Christensen, Lise

    2010-11-01

    Awareness of the role of bacterial biofilm in the pathogenesis of low-grade or chronic infections diagnosed in hip arthroplasty has been on the rise in recent years. The importance of bacterial biofilm for the development of prosthesis failure is probably underestimated, and terms like aseptic loosening, sterile pus and aseptic necrosis are up for revision. The diagnosis of biofilm has been, and still is, difficult, but new molecular biological techniques, alone or in combination with older established ones, have further helped us to uncover lesions, where biofilm is part of the pathology. This article based on a literature search and own observations is primarily focused on newer methods that help us identify the pathology behind infection-based prosthesis failure. We suggest that the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique on carefully selected biopsy material is used in the future to identify live as well as dead bacteria within their environment. The method is quick and sensitive and provides a reliable result with optimal detection rate.

  1. Correlation between nutritional status and Staphylococcus colonization in hip and knee replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Russell, Tara A; Shea, Megan; Slover, James D

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with poor nutritional status are at an increased risk of postoperative complications, such as infection and wound healing. Nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus, especially with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has been shown to be a risk factor for surgical-site infections. We examined the incidence of nutritional depletion in our arthroplasty population and its correlation with Staphylococcus aureus colonization. We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of our arthroplasty patient population. Patients with known Staphylococcus aureus colonization or surgical-site infection were compared with a random cohort of patients. Patient demographics, preoperative nasal culture, and two nutritional screening scores were collected. Six hundred and fifty-two patients underwent arthroplasty and completed preoperative nasal cultures and nutritional assessment. A high percentage (27%) of our patients demonstrated some level of nutritional depletion prior to joint replacement. Overall nutritional scores were not significantly associated with surgery-type, preoperative nasal culture, or surgical- site infection in our patient population.

  2. 1-stage primary arthroplasty of mechanically failed internally fixated of hip fractures with deep wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Till O; O’Loughlin, Padraigh F; Citak, Mustafa; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten; Kendoff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Mechanically failed internal fixation following hip fracture is often treated by salvage arthroplasty. If deep wound infection is present, a 2-stage procedure is often used. We have used a 1-stage procedure in infected cases, and we now report the outcome. Patients and methods We reviewed 16 cases of deep wound infection after mechanically failed hip fracture fixation, treated between 1994 and 2010. In all patients, a joint prosthesis was implanted in a 1-stage procedure. Results After an average follow-up period of 12 (2–18) years, no reinfection was detected. In 4 cases, a hip dislocation occurred and 3 of these needed further surgery. Interpretation A 1-stage procedure for arthroplasty of an infected, mechanically failed hip fracture fixation is feasible and carries a low risk of infection. PMID:23799345

  3. Prediction of Polyethylene Wear Rates from Gait Biomechanics and Implant Positioning in Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh M; Amenábar Edwards, Pedro P; Wimmer, Markus A

    2017-08-01

    Patient-specific gait and surgical variables are known to play an important role in wear of total hip replacements (THR). However a rigorous model, capable of predicting wear rate based on a comprehensive set of subject-specific gait and component-positioning variables, has to our knowledge, not been reported. (1) Are there any differences between patients with high, moderate, and low wear rate in terms of gait and/or positioning variables? (2) Can we design a model to predict the wear rate based on gait and positioning variables? (3) Which group of wear factors (gait or positioning) contributes more to the wear rate? Data on patients undergoing primary unilateral THR who performed a postoperative gait test were screened for inclusion. We included patients with a 28-mm metal head and a hip cup made of noncrosslinked polyethylene (GUR 415 and 1050) from a single manufacturer (Zimmer, Inc). To calculate wear rates from radiographs, inclusion called for patients with a series of standing radiographs taken more than 1 year after surgery. Further, exclusion criteria were established to obtain reasonably reliable and homogeneous wear readings. Seventy-three (83% of included) patients met all criteria, and the final dataset consisted of 43 males and 30 females, 69 ± 10 years old, with a BMI of 27.3 ± 4.7 kg/m(2). Wear rates of these patients were determined based on the relative displacement of the femoral head with regard to the cup using a validated computer-assisted X-ray wear-analysis suite. Three groups with low (< 0.1 mm/year), moderate (0.1 to 0.2 mm/year), and high (> 0.2 mm/year) wear were established. Wear prediction followed a two-step process: (1) linear discriminant analysis to estimate the level of wear (low, moderate, or high), and (2) multiple linear and nonlinear regression modeling to predict the exact wear rate from gait and implant-positioning variables for each level of wear. There were no group differences for positioning and gait suggesting that

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of Ceramic-on-Ceramic Implants in Stemmed Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sedrakyan, Art; Graves, Stephen; Bordini, Barbara; Pons, Miquel; Havelin, Leif; Mehle, Susan; Paxton, Elizabeth; Barber, Thomas; Cafri, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The rapid decline in use of conventional total hip replacement with a large femoral head size and a metal-on-metal bearing surface might lead to increased popularity of ceramic-on-ceramic bearings as another hard-on-hard alternative that allows implantation of a larger head. We sought to address comparative effectiveness of ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-HXLPE (highly cross-linked polyethylene) implants by utilizing the distributed health data network of the ICOR (International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries), an unprecedented collaboration of national and regional registries and the U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Methods: A distributed health data network was developed by the ICOR and used in this study. The data from each registry are standardized and provided at a level of aggregation most suitable for the detailed analysis of interest. The data are combined across registries for comprehensive assessments. The ICOR coordinating center and study steering committee defined the inclusion criteria for this study as total hip arthroplasty performed without cement from 2001 to 2010 in patients forty-five to sixty-four years of age with osteoarthritis. Six national and regional registries (Kaiser Permanente and HealthEast in the U.S., Emilia-Romagna region in Italy, Catalan region in Spain, Norway, and Australia) participated in this study. Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with use of linear mixed models, with survival probability as the unit of analysis. We present the results of the fixed-effects model and include the results of the random-effects model in an appendix. SAS version 9.2 was used for all analyses. We first compared femoral head sizes of >28 mm and ≤28 mm within ceramic-on-ceramic implants and then compared ceramic-on-ceramic with metal-on-HXLPE. Results: A total of 34,985 patients were included; 52% were female. We found a lower risk of revision associated with use of ceramic-on-ceramic implants when a larger head

  5. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii reaches a new frontier: prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, G T R; Wimmer, M D; Molitor, E; Seifert, H; Gravius, S; Bekeredjian-Ding, I

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen primarily in countries with a high prevalence of multidrug resistance. Here we report the detection of a bla OXA23 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii strain in a German patient with prosthetic hip joint infection following several hip joint surgeries but no history of foreign travel.

  6. [Acetabular Osteolysis in Total Hip Replacement - When to Retain the Cup?].

    PubMed

    Lutz, B; Faschingbauer, M; Bieger, R; Reichel, H; Kappe, T

    2016-08-01

    Periacetabular osteolysis is a frequent long-term complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty. The decision whether to retain or to revise a cup in the presence of osteolysis remains a challenge. The options are regular clinical and radiological check-ups, isolated liner exchange with and without bone grafting, and complete cup revision. Thorough preoperative diagnostics, including a medical history, examination and imaging, are mandatory for correct decision making. In most patients, computed tomography is useful to assess periacetabular osteolysis. If the cup is well-fixed and positioned in an asymptomatic patient without progressive osteolysis and no implant defect or higher grade polyethylene wear and no signs of infection, continuous clinical and radiological monitoring is preferred. If imaging reveals cup loosening, malposition, osteolysis localised in a weight-bearing area, imminent or present periprosthetic fractures, rapid progressive osteolysis, implant defects or massive inlay wear, surgical treatment may be preferred. Cup revision is usually performed in such patients. If the cup is well-positioned and well-fixed in the X-ray, the procedure has to be discussed with the patient individually. Apart from patient-specific risk factors, the risk of further progression has to be assessed. Isolated liner exchange can be performed if the patient is asymptomatic and the cup proves to be stable intraoperatively. It is still unclear whether filling osteolyses through screw holes or osseous windows is of long-term benefit. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. A visual-aided wireless monitoring system design for total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Gao, Jiyang; Su, Shaojie; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-04-01

    To improve the positioning accuracy of implants in Total Hip Replacement (THR) surgeries, a visual-aided wireless monitoring system for THR surgery is proposed in this paper. This system aims to measure and display the contact distribution and relative pose between femoral head and acetabulum prosthesis during the surgery to help surgeons obtain accurate position of implants. The system consists of two parts: the Sensors Array Measuring System (SAMS) and the display part. The SAMS is composed of a sensors array (including contact sensors and an image sensor), signal conditioning circuits, a low power microcontroller (MCU), and a low-power transceiver. The SAMS is designed to estimate the relative pose of femoral head component to acetabular component. The display part processes the data from sensors and demonstrates the contact distribution and the pose of the prothesis during the surgery in 3-D graphics. The two parts of the system communicate with each other on an RF link at the band of 400 MHz. The signal conditioning circuits have been designed and fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process. Testing results show that the resolution of the signal conditioning circuits is 60.1 μ Vpp (1.35 g) with ±100 mVpp input. The chip can operate under 1.2-to-3.6 V supply voltage for single battery applications with 116-160 μ A current consumption. The system has been verified by the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector. The experimental results show that the contact distribution and relative pose of the two components could be measured and demonstrated in real time. The relative error of rotation is less than 8% and the actual relative error of translation is less than 10%.

  8. Survivorship of Total Hip Joint Replacements Following Isolated Liner Exchange for Wear.

    PubMed

    Vadei, Leone; Kieser, David C; Frampton, Chris; Hooper, Gary

    2017-06-08

    Liner exchange for articular component wear in total hip joint replacements (THJRs) is a common procedure, often thought to be benign with reliable outcomes. Recent studies, however, suggest high failure rates of liner exchange revisions with significant complications. The primary aim of this study was, therefore, to analyze the survivorship of isolated liner exchange for articular component wear, and secondarily to assess the influence of patient demographics (gender, age, and American Society of Anaesthesiologists [ASA] ratings) on rerevisions following isolated liner exchange for wear. A retrospective review of the 15-year New Zealand Joint Registry (1999-2014) was performed, analyzing the outcomes of isolated liner exchange for articular component wear. The survivorship as defined as rerevision with component exchange was determined and 10-year Kaplan-Meier survivorship curves were constructed. These revision rates were compared to age, gender, and ASA rating groups using a log-rank test. The 10-year survivorship of THJR following liner exchange revision for liner wear was 75.3%. If a rerevision was required, the median time to rerevision was 1.33 years with a rerevision rate of 3.33 per 100 component years (95% confidence interval 2.68-4.08/100 component years). The principle reasons for rerevision were dislocation (48.4%) and acetabular component loosening (20.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in rerevision rates based on gender, age categories, or ASA scores. THJR isolated liner exchange for liner wear is not a benign procedure with a survivorship of 75.3% at 10 years. Surgeons contemplating liner exchange revisions should be cognisant of this risk and should adequately assess component position and stability preoperatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient preoperative expectations of total hip replacement in European orthopedic centers.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Nicola; Dixon, Diane; Rasmussen, Susan; Judge, Andy; Dreinhöfer, Karsten E; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Dieppe, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Patient expectations have been identified as a factor that may account for individual differences in recovery after total hip replacement (THR) surgery. However, patient expectations have not been studied within a valid theoretical framework. This study employed the World Health Organization's model of health, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), to classify the content of preoperative patient expectations of THR. A European cohort of 1,108 patients preoperatively reported 2 types of expectations. Patients reported what they anticipated surgery would enable them to do that they needed to be able to do ("need" expectation), and what they would like to be able to do ("desire" expectation) in a year's time. Free-text responses were independently classified by 2 researchers to 1 or more of the ICF constructs of impairment, activity limitation, and participation restriction. Interrater reliability was high (κ = ≥0.87). All patient expectations were classified to the ICF constructs. Less than 5% of patient expectations were identified as impairment, 58% of "need" expectations were identified as activity limitations, and 45% of "desire" expectations were identified as activity limitations and participation restrictions combined. The ICF is a suitable theoretical framework to study patient expectations of THR. THR targets impairment; however, few patient expectations were classified to the ICF definition of impairment. The majority of patient expectations were classified as activity limitation or a combination of activity limitation and participation restriction. Therefore, patient expectations of surgery focus on recovering valued activities rather than reversal of bodily impairments. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. The effect of functional movement ability on the quality of life after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Király, Edit; Gondos, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    To analyse in detail the relationship between the movement and generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators and the subjective feeling of health of the patients, as well as the objective movement parameters measured by the surgeon and the patient's opinion about the success of the total hip replacement (THR). We have only limited information about the effect of mobility function improvement on the HRQoL several years after THR. We have recently found that after THR postoperative health awareness is influenced mainly by cardiovascular diseases, but the effects of the movement parameters on the subsequent feelings of well-being were not examined. Retrospective longitudinal study. This study involved 109 patients who had had THR. The patients' health status and objective and subjective mobility function at the time of operation and five years later were evaluated using questionnaires (including EQ-5D and WOMAC scores) and the hospital database. All components of EQ-5D and WOMAC had significantly improved by Year 5 in patients who experienced a complete recovery after the operation, but not the mobility and pain components of EQ-5D for those patients who felt an improvement only in their subjective mobility function. The surgeon-assessed parameters and use of walking aids showed a similar distribution in patients who considered themselves to be healthy or only moderately sick five years after THR. Successful THR significantly improves the feeling of well-being and the mobility function of patients even five years after the operation. In individual cases, however, other subjective and objective factors, but not the mobility function, have a major influence on the HRQoL. Five years after successful THR, nursing care has to focus not only on the further improvement of the mobility but on strengthening the subjective feeling of the patient's well-being and health. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Modelling the fibrous tissue layer in cemented hip replacements: experimental and finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Waide, V; Cristofolini, L; Stolk, J; Verdonschot, N; Boogaard, G J; Toni, A

    2004-01-01

    The long-term fixation of cemented femoral components may be jeopardised by the presence of a fibrous tissue layer at the bone-cement interface. This study used both experimental and finite element (FE) methods to investigate the load transfer characteristics of two types of cemented hip replacements (Lubinus SPII and Müller-Curved) with a fibrous tissue layer. The experimental part investigated six stems of each type, where these were implanted in composite femurs with a specially selected silicone elastomer modelling the soft interfacial layer. Two fibrous tissue conditions were examined: a layer covering the full cement mantle, representing a revision condition; and a layer covering the proximal portion of the cement mantle, representing a non-revised implant with partial debonding and fibrous tissue formation. The FE method was used to model the full fibrous tissue layer condition, for both implants. The layer was modelled as a homogeneous, linearly isotropic material. A cross-comparison was performed of the experimental and FE findings. Agreement between experimental and FE models was verified to be within 15%. Varying the stiffness parameter of the FE soft tissue layer had little influence on the cortical bone strains, though had considerable effect on the cement strains. Stress shielding occurred for both stems under both fibrous tissue conditions, with the greatest reduction around the calcar. However, the cortical bone strains were generally larger than those for the equivalent well-fixed stems. The fibrous tissue layer was not found to increase the general strain pattern of the cement mantle, though localised regions of high stress were detected.

  12. The influence of femoral offset on health-related quality of life after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Liebs, T R; Nasser, L; Herzberg, W; Rüther, W; Hassenpflug, J

    2014-01-01

    Several factors have been implicated in unsatisfactory results after total hip replacement (THR). We examined whether femoral offset, as measured on digitised post-operative radiographs, was associated with pain after THR. The routine post-operative radiographs of 362 patients (230 women and 132 men, mean age 70.0 years (35.2 to 90.5)) who received primary unilateral THRs of varying designs were measured after calibration. The femoral offset was calculated using the known dimensions of the implants to control for femoral rotation. Femoral offset was categorised into three groups: normal offset (within 5 mm of the height-adjusted femoral offset), low offset and high offset. We determined the associations to the absolute final score and the improvement in the mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) pain subscale scores at three, six, 12 and 24 months, adjusting for confounding variables. The amount of femoral offset was associated with the mean WOMAC pain subscale score at all points of follow-up, with the low-offset group reporting less WOMAC pain than the normal or high-offset groups (six months: 7.01 (sd 11.69) vs 12.26 (sd 15.10) vs 13.10 (sd 16.20), p = 0.006; 12 months: 6.55 (sd 11.09) vs 9.73 (sd 13.76) vs 13.46 (sd 18.39), p = 0.010; 24 months: 5.84 (sd 10.23) vs 9.60 (sd 14.43) vs 13.12 (sd 17.43), p = 0.004). When adjusting for confounding variables, including age and gender, the greatest improvement was seen in the low-offset group, with the normal-offset group demonstrating more improvement than the high-offset group.

  13. Cost effectiveness of venous thromboembolism pharmacological prophylaxis in total hip and knee replacement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Alok; Chuang, Warren; Radhakrishnan, Nila; Smith, Kenneth J; Berlowitz, Dan; Segal, Jodi B; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Total hip and knee replacements (THR and TKR) are high-risk settings for venous thromboembolism (VTE). This review summarizes the cost effectiveness of VTE prophylaxis regimens for THR and TKR. We searched MEDLINE (January 1997 to October 2009), EMBASE (January 1997 to June 2009) and the UK NHS Economic Evaluation Database (1997 to October 2009). We analysed recent cost-effectiveness studies examining five categories of comparisons: (i) anticoagulants (warfarin, low-molecular-weight heparin [LMWH] or fondaparinux) versus acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin); (ii) LMWH versus warfarin; (iii) fondaparinux versus LMWH; (iv) comparisons with new oral anticoagulants; and (v) extended-duration (> or =3 weeks) versus short-duration (<3 weeks) prophylaxis. We abstracted information on cost and effectiveness for each prophylaxis regimen in order to calculate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Because of variations in effectiveness units reported and horizon length analysed, we calculated two cost-effectiveness ratios, one for the number of symptomatic VTE events avoided at 90 days and the other for QALYs at the 1-year mark or beyond. Our search identified 33 studies with 67 comparisons. After standardization, comparisons between LMWH and warfarin were inconclusive, whereas fondaparinux dominated LMWH in nearly every comparison. The latter results were derived from radiographic VTE rates. Extended-duration prophylaxis after THR was generally cost effective. Small numbers prohibit conclusions about aspirin, new oral anticoagulants or extended-duration prophylaxis after TKR. Fondaparinux after both THR and TKR and extended-duration LMWH after THR appear to be cost-effective prophylaxis regimens. Small numbers for other comparisons and absence of trials reporting symptomatic endpoints prohibit comprehensive conclusions.

  14. Changes in cardiopulmonary variables and platelet count during anesthesia for total hip replacement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Otto, K; Matis, U

    1994-01-01

    Changes in cardiopulmonary function and platelet count were determined in 22 dogs of various breeds that underwent total hip replacement with cemented femoral prostheses. In 11 dogs (group I) polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was inserted without venting the reamed and lavaged femoral canal. In a second group of 11 dogs (group II) a urethral catheter (ID: approximately 2.7 mm) was placed into the medullary cavity before the insertion of PMMA. The application of PMMA resulted in a decrease in end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) until 5 minutes after insertion of bone cement. Increases in arterial to end-tidal pCO2 gradient [P(a-ET)CO2] and physiological dead space (VD/VT) were recorded between 2 minutes before and 5 minutes after insertion of PMMA in 12 dogs. A significant decrease in platelet count occurred in both groups of dogs. Decreases in arterial pO2 (PaO2), arterial/alveolar oxygen tension ratio (PaO2/PAO2), and percent O2 saturation of hemoglobin in arterial blood (SaO2) were not statistically significant. No significant differences could be detected between data obtained from both groups of dogs. An increase in femoral intramedullary pressure caused by the insertion of PMMA and subsequent pulmonary microembolism by medullary contents has been considered the most likely cause for changes in pulmonary function. The lack of statistically significant differences in cardiopulmonary variables and platelet count between the two groups of dogs could have been related to inefficient pressure reduction by the method used.

  15. Primary hip and knee replacement surgery: Ontario criteria for case selection and surgical priority.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, C D; Williams, J I

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To develop, from simple clinical factors, criteria to identify appropriate patients for referral to a surgeon for consideration for arthroplasty, and to rank them in the queue once surgery is agreed. DESIGN--Delphi process, with a panel including orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, general practitioners, epidemiologists, and physiotherapists, who rated 120 case scenarios for appropriateness and 42 for waiting list priority. Scenarios incorporated combinations of relevant clinical factors. It was assumed that queues should be organised not simply by chronology but by clinical and social impact of delayed surgery. The panel focused on information obtained from clinical histories, to ensure the utility of the guidelines in practice. Relevant high quality research evidence was limited. SETTING--Ontario, Canada. MAIN MEASURES--Appropriateness ratings on a 7-point scale, and urgency rankings on a 4-point scale keyed to specific waiting times. RESULTS--Despite incomplete evidence panellists agreed on ratings in 92.5% of appropriateness and 73.8% of urgency scenarios versus 15% and 18% agreement expected by chance, respectively. Statistically validated algorithms in decision tree form, which should permit rapid estimation of urgency or appropriateness in practice, were compiled by recursive partitioning. Rating patterns and algorithms were also used to make brief written guidelines on how clinical factors affect appropriateness and urgency of surgery. A summary score was provided for each case scenario; scenarios could then be matched to chart audit results, with scoring for quality management. CONCLUSIONS--These algorithms and criteria can be used by managers or practitioners to assess appropriateness of referral for hip or knee replacement and relative rankings of patients in the queue for surgery. PMID:10157268

  16. Conversion of bilateral hip and knee ankylosis to total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Karva, A R; Board, T N; Porter, M L

    2008-05-01

    We present a 25-year-old patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosis of both hips and both knees treated by staged bilateral hip and knee arthroplasty. She was followed up for 18 months. We discuss the pre-operative planning, surgical details and post-operative rehabilitation.

  17. Rest Pain and Movement‐Evoked Pain as Unique Constructs in Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Beswick, Andrew D.; Gooberman‐Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is limited information about the extent to which the association between preoperative and chronic postoperative pain is mediated via pain‐on‐movement or pain‐at‐rest. We explored these associations in patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). Methods A total of 322 and 316 patients receiving THR and TKR, respectively, were recruited into a single‐center UK cohort (Arthroplasty Pain Experience) study. Preoperative, acute postoperative, and 12‐month pain severity was measured using self‐reported pain instruments. The association between preoperative/acute pain and chronic postoperative pain was investigated using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results Patients with high levels of preoperative pain were more likely to report chronic pain after THR (β = 0.195, P = 0.02) and TKR (β = 0.749, P < 0.0001). Acute postoperative pain‐on‐movement was not associated with chronic pain after TKR or THR after adjusting for preoperative pain; however, acute pain‐at‐rest was associated with chronic pain after THR (β = 0.20, P < 0.0002) but not TKR after adjusting for preoperative pain. Analysis of pain‐at‐rest and pain‐on‐movement highlighted differences between THR and TKR patients. Chronic pain‐at‐rest after THR was weakly associated with pain‐at‐rest during the preoperative (β = 0.11, P = 0.068) and acute postoperative period (β = 0.21, P < 0.0001). In contrast, chronic pain‐on‐movement after TKR was strongly associated with the severity of pain‐on‐movement during the preoperative period (β = 0.51, P = 0.001). Conclusion SEM illustrated the different patterns of association between measures of pain over time in patients undergoing THR and TKR for osteoarthritis. These findings highlight the importance of future work that explores the mechanisms underlying pain‐on‐movement and pain‐at‐rest. PMID:26212349

  18. Clinical outcome of design modifications to the CLS Spotorno Stem in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRACEFFA, ANGELO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; LATELLA, LEONARDO; POLI, PAOLO; FULCO, ALEXANDER; MARCUCCI, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose historically, the original CLS Spotorno Stem has demonstrated excellent survival. The design of this stem was recently modified, resulting in the introduction of a shorter, modular version (CLS Brevius). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the functional, radiological and survivorship outcomes of the cementless CLS Brevius Stem in a multi-surgeon, single center, consecutive series study at two years post-surgery. Methods the Authors performed 170 total hip arthroplasties in 155 patients using the shorter, triple-taper stem design (CLS Brevius). The patients’ diagnoses were primary hip osteoarthritis (OA) in 74.4%, secondary hip OA in 22.6%, and post-traumatic hip OA in 3%. All operations were performed through a mini-posterior approach, with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. The mean follow-up was 32 months (24–44 months). Outcome was assessed using the Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results the mean HHS improved from 32 preoperatively to 92 points at final follow-up, while the stem survival rate was 99.4%. Overall, the results were excellent in148 hips (87%), good in 14 hips (8.2%), fair in six hips (3.6%), and poor in two hips (1.2%). Intraoperative complications included a calcar fissure in three hips (1.7%). Correct femoral offset was reproduced in 97% while the planned center of hip rotation was achieved in 98%. Only one hip underwent early stem revision; this was due to major subsidence. Conclusions the modified CLS stem design showed excellent short-term results with a low rate of early postoperative complications. One of the main findings of this study was the high correlation between the planned femoral offset and center of hip rotation and the final radiographic measurements. This high reproducibility, which indicates the ability of the system to restore normal hip anatomy, is indeed due to the extensive modularity that characterizes this stem system. Long-term follow-up studies are necessary to fully compare the outcomes of

  19. Efficacy of Debridement for Early Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Chun, Sung Kwang; Yoon, Yong Cheol; Lakhotia, Devendra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In early prosthetic joint infection after hip arthroplasty, debridement with prosthesis retention may be performed for implant salvage, but the reported success rates are highly variable. Hence we reviewed the outcome of radical debridement and retention of prosthesis using established diagnostic criteria and surgical procedures in relation to significant variables including clinical characteristics, pathogenicity, and antibiotic treatment. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients (11 men and 9 women) with early prosthetic joint infection after unilateral hip arthroplasty, treated by radical debridement with retention of prosthesis from January 2000 to May 2011. Average follow-up period was 55 months (12-178 months). The outcome was evaluated and analyzed based on recurrence of infection and clinical (Harris hip score) and radiological criteria. Results Pathogens were isolated from 11 hips (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] in three, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis [MRSE] in two, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA] in one, Acinetobacter baumannii in two, Enterococcus faecalis in two patients, and Enterococcus, Citrobacter species in one). The mean duration of antibiotic administration was 43.5 days. Recurrence of infection was not observed in any case. Average Harris hip score was 91 points at the last follow-up. Revision surgery was not required for any reason including implant failure. Dislocation occurred in two hips after debridement and was treated conservatively. Conclusion Radical debridement with prosthesis retention is an effective procedure for early prosthetic joint infection after hip arthroplasty in carefully selected patients and with early diagnosis. PMID:27536586

  20. Effects of metal-on-metal wear on the host immune system and infection in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Joint replacement with metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings have gained popularity in the last decades in young and active patients. However, the possible effects of MOM wear debris and its corrosion products are still the subject of debate. Alongside the potential disadvantages such as toxicity, the influences of metal particles and metal ions on infection risk are unclear. Methods We reviewed the available literature on the influence of degradation products of MOM bearings in total hip arthroplasties on infection risk. Results Wear products were found to influence the risk of infection by hampering the immune system, by inhibiting or accelerating bacterial growth, and by a possible antibiotic resistance and heavy metal co-selection mechanism. Interpretation Whether or not the combined effects of MOM wear products make MOM bearings less or more prone to infection requires investigation in the near future. PMID:20860450

  1. Reconsideration of the Effects of Age on Proximal Femur Structure: Implications for Joint Replacement and Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, B. C. C.; Brown, J. K.; Prince, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In recent years quantitative computed tomography (QCT) has allowed precise non-invasive, three dimensional, in vivo measurement of hip structure in large numbers of individuals. The effects of ageing on proximal femur structure are reported and implications for the prevention of hip prosthesis loosening and hip fracture considered. Design, Setting and Participants An observational cross-sectional study of proximal femur QCT in 719 unselected female European descent aged 20 to 89 years recruited from US and Australian populations. Main Outcomes Measures QCT scans were obtained using software that separates cortical and cancellous bone by a thresholding technique. Voxel based mineral volume and mass was computed for the integral (external), cancellous and cortical compartments of 1 mm wide sections through the femoral neck (FN), trochanter (TR) and intertrochanter (IT) regions. Results Over the adult life span total integral volumes at the FN, TR and IT sites expand linearly by between 18 and 37% at the same time as bone mass decreased by 22 to 25% resulting in massive reductions in true volumetric BMD (vBMD) of 40 to 50%. Cancellous volume expansion was larger at 65 to 79% at the three sites. Between the ages of 65 and 75 the average increase in cancellous volume at the IT site was 3.74 cm3 (12.1%). Voxel determined FN cortical volume decreased linearly by 43%, as did cortical bone mass so that vBMD did not change substantially. TR and IT cortical volumes decreased 54 and 28% respectively, small reductions in TR and IT cortical vBMD also occurred. Conclusions Large endosteal expansion in the area in which hip replacement stem placement occurs may contribute to loosening. Regarding the propensity to hip fracture, periosteal expansion contributes to increased resistance to bending but cortical thinning contributes to loss of bone to resistance to bending forces. Understanding individual hip structure may contribute to individualisation of risk and

  2. Reconsideration of the Effects of Age on Proximal Femur Structure: Implications for Joint Replacement and Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Khoo, B C C; Brown, J K; Prince, R L

    2016-01-01

    In recent years quantitative computed tomography (QCT) has allowed precise non-invasive, three dimensional, in vivo measurement of hip structure in large numbers of individuals. The effects of ageing on proximal femur structure are reported and implications for the prevention of hip prosthesis loosening and hip fracture considered. An observational cross-sectional study of proximal femur QCT in 719 unselected female European descent aged 20 to 89 years recruited from US and Australian populations. QCT scans were obtained using software that separates cortical and cancellous bone by a thresholding technique. Voxel based mineral volume and mass was computed for the integral (external), cancellous and cortical compartments of 1 mm wide sections through the femoral neck (FN), trochanter (TR) and intertrochanter (IT) regions. Over the adult life span total integral volumes at the FN, TR and IT sites expand linearly by between 18 and 37% at the same time as bone mass decreased by 22 to 25% resulting in massive reductions in true volumetric BMD (vBMD) of 40 to 50%. Cancellous volume expansion was larger at 65 to 79% at the three sites. Between the ages of 65 and 75 the average increase in cancellous volume at the IT site was 3.74 cm3 (12.1%). Voxel determined FN cortical volume decreased linearly by 43%, as did cortical bone mass so that vBMD did not change substantially. TR and IT cortical volumes decreased 54 and 28% respectively, small reductions in TR and IT cortical vBMD also occurred. Large endosteal expansion in the area in which hip replacement stem placement occurs may contribute to loosening. Regarding the propensity to hip fracture, periosteal expansion contributes to increased resistance to bending but cortical thinning contributes to loss of bone to resistance to bending forces. Understanding individual hip structure may contribute to individualisation of risk and subsequent targeting of management using pharmaceutical agents.

  3. Femoral impaction bone allografting with an Exeter cemented collarless, polished, tapered stem in revision hip replacement: a mean follow-up of 10.5 years.

    PubMed

    Wraighte, P J; Howard, P W

    2008-08-01

    Femoral impaction bone allografting has been developed as a means of restoring bone stock in revision total hip replacement. We report the results of 75 consecutive patients (75 hips) with a mean age of 68 years (35 to 87) who underwent impaction grafting using the Exeter collarless, polished, tapered femoral stem between 1992 and 1998. The mean follow-up period was 10.5 years (6.3 to 14.1). The median pre-operative bone defect score was 3 (interquartile range (IQR) 2 to 3) using the Endo-Klinik classification. The median subsidence at one year post-operatively was 2 mm (IQR 1 to 3). At the final review the median Harris hip score was 80.6 (IQR 67.6 to 88.9) and the median subsidence 2 mm (IQR 1 to 4). Incorporation of the allograft into trabecular bone and secondary remodelling were noted radiologically at the final follow-up in 87% (393 of 452 zones) and 40% (181 of 452 zones), respectively. Subsidence of the Exeter stem correlated with the pre-operative Endo-Klinik bone loss score (p = 0.037). The degree of subsidence at one year had a strong association with long-term subsidence (p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between previous revision surgery and a poor Harris Hip score (p = 0.028), and those who had undergone previous revision surgery for infection had a higher risk of complications (p = 0.048). Survivorship at 10.5 years with any further femoral operation as the end-point was 92% (95% confidence interval 82 to 97).

  4. Changes in blood ion levels after removal of metal-on-metal hip replacements: 16 patients followed for 0-12 months.

    PubMed

    Durrani, Salim K; Noble, Philip C; Sampson, Barry; Panetta, Therese; Liddle, Alexander D; Sabah, Shiraz A; Chan, Newton K; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2014-06-01

    In patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, pain and joint effusions may be associated with elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions. Since little is known about the kinetics of metal ion clearance from the body and the rate of resolution of elevated blood ion levels, we examined the time course of cobalt and chromium ion levels after revision of MoM hip replacements. We included 16 patients (13 female) who underwent revision of a painful MoM hip (large diameter, modern bearing) without fracture or infection, and who had a minimum of 4 blood metal ion measurements over an average period of 6.1 (0-12) months after revision. Average blood ion concentrations at the time of revision were 22 ppb for chromium and 43 ppb for cobalt. The change in ion levels after revision surgery varied extensively between patients. In many cases, over the second and third months after revision surgery ion levels decreased to 50% of the values measured at revision. Decay of chromium levels occurred more slowly than decay of cobalt levels, with a 9% lag in return to normal levels. The rate of decay of both metals followed second-order (exponential) kinetics more closely than first-order (linear) kinetics. The elimination of cobalt and chromium from the blood of patients who have undergone revision of painful MoM hip arthroplasties follows an exponential decay curve with a half-life of approximately 50 days. Elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions can persist for at least 1 year after revision, especially in patients with high levels of exposure.

  5. Detection of Pantoea agglomerans in hip prosthetic infection by sonication of the removed prosthesis: the first reported case.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Kohlhof, Hendrik; Wimmer, Matthias D; Randau, Thomas M; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Gravius, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is a rare isolate in orthopaedic patients. We describe the first case of an acute hip prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by Pantoea agglomerans. The microorganism was detected after sonication of the removed hip endoprosthesis.

  6. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G.; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Perruccio, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  7. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  8. A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Steve; Waddell, James P.; Cardella, Piera; Morton, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a short course of low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin) in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after elective total hip replacement. Design A prospective cohort study. Follow-up was a minimum of 3 months. Setting An acute-care hospital with a large-volume practice of elective total joint replacement. Patients A prospective group of 150 patients who required primary total hip arthroplasty and a historic control group of 150 patients. All patients were treated with compression stockings, indomethacin and early mobilization. The treatment group received low-molecular-weight heparin, 30 mg every 12 hours for 5 days postoperatively; the control group received no specific anticoagulant therapy. Interventions Total hip replacement. Doppler venography on postoperative day 5 and 2 to 5 days later if required. Main outcome measures Presence or absence of deep venous thrombosis. Wound hemorrhage, transfusion rate, number of units of blood transfused and changes in the hemoglobin level. Results The incidence of proximal deep venous thrombosis (popliteal vein to common iliac vein) was 0% in the treatment group versus 4% in the control group. There was no difference in bleeding or number of transfusions required. There was, however, a significant (p = 0.005) drop in hemoglobin level in the treatment group. Conclusions A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin provides effective protection against proximal deep venous thrombosis without significantly increasing the risk to the patient. The treatment is compatible with early patient discharge and the pharmacologic prevention of heterotopic ossification after total joint replacement. PMID:9126125

  9. Semi-automated CT-based analysis of regional bone-density in contra lateral total hip replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Crilly, Therese; Looney, John R.; O'Keefe, R.; Campbell, Debbie; Totterman, Saara M.

    2004-04-01

    Methods for quantifying hip prosthesis induced changes in the adjacent bone are of great interest to orthopedics. In this work, we present a semi-automated technique for measuring the differences in bone density between the prosthetic and contra lateral hips within a CT volumetric data set. In order to reliably compare the bone-density measurements between the prosthetic and the contra laterals hips, a standardized zoning was developed. Using a spherical model of the outer surface of the prosthetic cup, the superior volume of the acetabular region was subdivided into four distance zones: 0-1mm, 1-6mm, 6-11mm, and 11-16mm, respectively. Furthermore, these regions were divided into four positional zones: medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior. At the same time, the positional zones were divided into four angular regions 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees from the apex of the acetabular cup. The bone density is computed as the average density in Hounsfield unit (HU) measured from the CT scan using all the voxels within each of the 64 zones. Preliminary analysis has been completed on 3 subjects with total hip replacement. The zonal densities on the prosthetic hip and the contra lateral hip were computed and compared. Contrary to initial expectations, a paired t-test showed no statistical significance between the prosthetic and contra lateral bone-densities at any of the four distance zones. Further analysis with a larger sample subject is needed to detect differences in bone-density between the hips in the stress/weight bearing areas in the 15 to 30 degree regions. A method for reliably and consistently measuring the bone-density within standardized zones has been developed and applied on prosthetic and contra lateral hips. The average bone-density for each of the zones takes into account the entire volumetric data set within that region, which is a considerable improvement over the subjective, user driven region of interest estimate selected within one slice practiced in

  10. Should gram stains have a role in diagnosing hip arthroplasty infections?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron J; Zywiel, Michael G; Stroh, D Alex; Marker, David R; Mont, Michael A

    2010-09-01

    The utility of Gram stains in diagnosing periprosthetic infections following total hip arthroplasty has recently been questioned. Several studies report low sensitivity of the test, and its poor ability to either confirm or rule out infection in patients undergoing revision total hip arthroplasty. Despite this, many institutions including that of the senior author continue to perform Gram stains during revision total hip arthroplasty. We assessed the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of Gram stains from surgical-site samplings taken from procedures on patients with both infected and aseptic revision total hip arthroplasties. A review was performed on patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty between 2000 and 2007. Eighty-two Gram stains were performed on patients who had infected total hip arthroplasties and underwent revision procedures. Additionally, of the 410 revision total hip arthroplasties performed on patients who were confirmed infection-free, 120 Gram stains were performed. Patients were diagnosed as infected using multiple criteria at the time of surgery. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were calculated from these Gram stain results. The Gram stain demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 9.8% and 100%, respectively. In this series, the Gram stain had a negative predictive value of 62%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and an accuracy of 63%. Gram stains obtained from surgical-site samples had poor sensitivity and poor negative predictive value. Based on these findings, as well as those of other authors, we believe that Gram stains should no longer be considered for diagnosing infections in revision total hip arthroplasty. Level III, diagnostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Periprosthetic Joint Infection in Hip Arthroplasty: Is There an Association Between Infection and Bearing Surface Type?

    PubMed

    Pitto, Rocco P; Sedel, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary studies have raised the question of whether certain prosthetic biomaterials used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) bearings are associated with increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). For example, some observational data suggest the risk of PJI is higher with metal-on-metal bearings. However, it is not known whether other bearings-including ceramic bearings or metal-on-polyethylene bearings-may be associated with a higher or lower risk of PJI. The objective of this study was to use a national arthroplasty registry to assess whether the choice of bearings-metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP), ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), or metal-on-metal (MoM)-is associated with differences in the risk of revision for deep infection, either (1) within 6 months or (2) over the entire period of observation, which spanned 15 years. Data from primary THAs were extracted from the New Zealand Joint Registry over a 15-year period. A total of 97,889 hips were available for analysis. Inclusion criterion was degenerative joint disease; exclusion criteria were previous surgery, trauma, and any other diagnosis (12,566 hips). We also excluded a small group of ceramic-on-metal THAs (429) with short followup. The median observation period of the selected group of hips (84,894) was 9 years (range, 1-15 years). The mean age of patients was 68 years (SD ± 11 years), and 52% were women. There were 54,409 (64%) MoP, 16,503 (19%) CoP, 9051 (11%) CoC, and 4931 (6%) MoM hip arthroplasties. Four hundred one hips were revised for deep infection. A multivariate assessment was carried out including the following risks factors available for analysis: age, sex, operating room type, use of body exhaust suits, THA fixation mode, and surgeon volume. Because of late introduction of data collection in the Registry, we were unable to include body mass index (BMI, recording started 2010) and medical comorbidities according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists

  12. Adverse peri-operative outcomes following elective total hip replacement in diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Tsang, S-T J; Gaston, P

    2013-11-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been shown to be a cost-effective procedure. However, it is not risk-free. Certain conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, are thought to increase the risk of complications. In this study we have evaluated the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients undergoing THR and the associated risk of adverse operative outcomes. A meta-analysis and systematic review were conducted according to the guidelines of the meta-analysis of observational studies in epidemiology. Inclusion criteria were observational studies reporting the prevalence of diabetes in the study population, accompanied by reports of at least one of the following outcomes: venous thromboembolic events; acute coronary events; infections of the urinary tract, lower respiratory tract or surgical site; or requirement for revision arthroplasty. Altman and Bland's methods were used to calculate differences in relative risks. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was found to be 5.0% among patients undergoing THR, and was associated with an increased risk of established surgical site infection (odds ratio (OR) 2.04 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.52 to 2.76)), urinary infection (OR 1.43 (95% CI 1.33 to 1.55)) and lower respiratory tract infections (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.61 to 2.26)). Diabetes mellitus is a relatively common comorbidity encountered in THR. Diabetic patients have a higher rate of developing both surgical site and non-surgical site infections following THR.

  13. Laboratory-monitored fondaparinux and coagulation activity in association with total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Lauri; Salmela, Birgitta; Leinonen, Jari; Lemponen, Marja; Huhtala, Jukka; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Lassila, Riitta

    2014-09-01

    Fondaparinux, indirect factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, is recommended for thromboprophylaxis for high-risk patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. We evaluated the prothrombotic state and anticoagulant intensity of fondaparinux (2.5 mg daily) after total hip replacement (THR). Twenty patients underwent THR - seven bilateral and 13 unilateral. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and at 6 h, 8 h (2 h after fondaparinux), 1 day (12-14 h after fondaparinux), and 4 weeks (12-14 h after fondaparinux) postoperatively. Antithrombin (AT), fibrinogen, factor VIII activity, coagulation times, thrombin-AT (TAT) complex, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, prothrombinase-induced clotting time (PiCT) and anti-Xa activity were measured. The latter two were also tested after plasma spiking with fondaparinux 0-1.25 μg/ml. In spiked prophylactic fondaparinux samples (0-0.25 μg/ml), PiCT and anti-Xa activity correlated (r = 0.84) better than in the patient samples (r = 0.35). On the first day, anti-Xa activity and PiCT dissociated, and PiCT lost sensitivity for fondaparinux. AT decreased but stayed within the normal range, whereas TAT complex and D-dimer peaked at 6 h as signs of thrombin generation. On the first postoperative day, TAT and D-dimer halved. Bilateral THR associated with higher TAT and D-dimer levels up to 4 weeks. Perioperative FVIII levels were not affected, but were elevated in both groups (range 191-211%) after 4 weeks. Anti-Xa activity detected prophylactic fondaparinux with higher sensitivity than PiCT in vitro, but even more so in vivo. Thus, PiCT is not the method of choice to assess fondaparinux at least in association with THR. THR, bilateral more than unilateral, increased thrombin generation and D-dimer 7-11-fold early after surgery. Factor VIII activity and D-dimer remained elevated even after 4 weeks despite the compliant thromboprophylaxis with fondaparinux.

  14. Survival of ceramic bearings in total hip replacement after high-energy trauma and periprosthetic acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Salih, S; Currall, V A; Ward, A J; Chesser, T J S

    2009-11-01

    Surgeons remain concerned that ceramic hip prostheses may fail catastrophically if either the head or the liner is fractured. We report two patients, each with a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement who sustained high-energy trauma sufficient to cause a displaced periprosthetic acetabular fracture in whom the ceramic bearings survived intact. Simultaneous fixation of the acetabular fracture, revision of the cementless acetabular prosthesis and exchange of the ceramic bearings were performed successfully in both patients. Improved methods of manufacture of new types of alumina ceramic with a smaller grain size, and lower porosity, have produced much stronger bearings. Whether patients should be advised to restrict high-impact activities in order to protect these modern ceramic bearings from fracture remains controversial.

  15. Odontogenic infection sources in patients scheduled for cardiac valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Krennmair, Gerald; Auer, Johann; Krainhöfner, Martin; Piehslinger, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Odontogenic infection sources represent a predisposing risk factor for patients with cardiac valvular disease (CVD) awaiting cardiac valve replacement procedures. The incidence and quality of odontogenic infection sources (foci) were evaluated on 152 consecutive patients (study group, SG) undergoing cardiac valve replacement and were compared to 150 age-, gender- and residence-matched non-cardiac patients (control group, CG). Clinical and radiographic examinations were used to evaluate the incidence of odontogenic infection sources, grouped into potential (high risk) and facultative foci (possible risk), and the presence/severity of periodontal disease (PD). Foci and PD were compared among the overall SG and the CG and also among a sophisticated subdivision of the study group, especially with respect to aortic valve (AVR) and mitral valve replacement (MVR). Overall, 218 potential and 116 facultative odontogenic foci were found in 87 (58.3%) and in 79 (51.9%) patients of the SG respectively. The overall incidence of odontogenic infection sources and the incidence and severity of PD did not differ between the SG and the CG. However, in comparison with the CG (48%), the incidence of potential odontogenic infection foci was significantly higher in patients scheduled for AVR than in those scheduled to undergo MVR (70.4% vs. 25.0%, p < 0.01). Additionally, in patients scheduled for AVR, a significantly higher number (p < 0.01) of individual potential dentogenic infection foci (1.7 vs. 0.8 foci/valve) and a higher prevalence of PD (60.2%) was seen than for patients scheduled for MVR (31.8%) or for patients without CVD (1.0 foci/valve; 39.3%; p < 0.05). Although the overall incidence of odontogenic infection sources did not differ between the patients with and without CVD, a sophisticated subdivison of CVD may be crucial, demonstrating that patients with AVR differ significantly from those with MVR and with the healthy CG. Cardiologists and cardiac surgeons play an

  16. Ultra-low wear rates for rigid-on-rigid bearings in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C; Good, V; Williams, P; Schroeder, D; Anissian, L; Stark, A; Oonishi, H; Schuldies, J; Gustafson, G

    2000-01-01

    With the increased clinical interest in metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic total-hip replacements (THRs), the objective of this hip simulator study was to identify the relative wear ranking of three bearing systems, namely CoCr-polyethylene (M-PE), CoCr-CoCr (M-M) and ceramic-on-ceramic (C-C). Volumetric wear rates were used as the method of comparison. The seven THR groupings included one M-PE study, two M-M studies and four C-C studies. Special emphasis was given to defining the 'run-in' phase of accelerated wear that rigid-on-rigid bearings generally exhibit. The hypothesis was that characterization of the run-in and steady state wear phases would clarify not only the tribological performance in vitro but also help correlate these in vitro wear rates with the 'average' wear rates measured on retrieved implants. The implant systems were studied on multichannel hip simulators using the Paul gait cycle and bovine serum as the lubricant. With 28 mm CoCr heads, the PE (2.5 Mrad/N2) wear rates averaged 13 mm3/10(6) cycles duration. This was considered a low value compared with the clinical model of 74 mm3/year (for 28 mm heads). Our later studies established that this low laboratory value was a consequence of the serum parameters then in use. The mating CoCr heads (with PE cups) wore at the steady state rate of 0.028 mm3/10(6) cycles. The concurrently run Metasul M-M THRs wore at the steady state rate of 0.119 mm3/10(6) cycles with high-protein serum. In the second Metasul M-M study with low-protein serum, the THR run-in rate was 2.681 mm3/10(6) cycles and steady state was 0.977 mm3/10(6) cycles. At 10 years, these data would predict a 70-fold reduction in M-M wear debris compared with the clinical PE wear model. All M-M implants exhibited biphasic wear trends, with the transition point at 0.5 x 10(6) cycles between run-in and steady state phases, the latter averaging a 3-fold decrease in wear rate. White surface coatings on implants (coming from the serum solution

  17. What are the risk factors for infection in hemiarthroplasties and total hip arthroplasties?

    PubMed

    Cordero-Ampuero, José; de Dios, Marisol

    2010-12-01

    Late infection is the second most frequent early complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and the most frequent after hemiarthroplasty. Known risk factors for infection after THA include posttraumatic osteoarthritis, previous surgery, chronic liver disease, corticoid therapy, and excessive surgical time. However, risk factors for hemiarthroplasty are not clearly established. We therefore determined the preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for late infection (more than 3 months after surgery) in patients with hemiarthroplasties and THAs. We retrospectively compared 47 patients with a hip arthroplasty (23 hemiarthroplasties, 24 total hip arthroplasties) and late infection with 200 randomly-selected patients with primary arthroplasty (100 hemiarthroplasties, 100 total hip arthroplasties) during the same time period of time without any infection during followup. Potential risk factors were identified from medical records. Minimum followup was 12 months (mean, 27 months; range, 12-112 months) for the study group and 18 months (mean, 84 months; range, 18-144 months) for the control group. The following factors were more frequent in late infected hemiarthroplasties: female gender; previous surgery; obesity (body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2)); glucocorticoid and immunosuppressant treatments; prolonged surgical time; inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis; prolonged wound drainage; hematoma; dislocation; and cutaneous, urinary, and/or abdominal infections. The following were more frequent in infected total hip arthroplasties: posttraumatic osteoarthritis; previous surgery; glucocorticoids; chronic liver disease; alcohol and intravenous drug abuse; prolonged surgical time; prolonged wound drainage; dislocation; subsequent surgery; and cutaneous, urinary, respiratory and abdominal infections. Diabetes did not appear to be a risk factor. Our data suggest there are specific risk factors for infection in hemiarthroplasties. The major risk factors for late

  18. Cemented Müller straight stem total hip replacement: 18 year survival, clinical and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Korres, Demetrios; Lallos, Stergios; Mavrogenis, Andreas; Lazarettos, Ioannis; Sourlas, Ioannis; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To present the 18 year survival and the clinical and radiological outcomes of the Müller straight stem, cemented, total hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: Between 1989 and 2007, 176 primary total hip arthroplasties in 164 consecutive patients were performed in our institution by the senior author. All patients received a Müller cemented straight stem and a cemented polyethylene liner. The mean age of the patients was 62 years (45-78). The diagnosis was primary osteoarthritis in 151 hips, dysplasia of the hip in 12 and subcapital fracture of the femur in 13. Following discharge, serial follow-up consisted of clinical evaluation based on the Harris Hip Score and radiological assessment. The survival of the prosthesis using revision for any reason as an end-point was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-four (15%) patients died during the follow-up study, 6 (4%) patients were lost, while the remaining 134 patients (141 hips) were followed-up for a mean of 10 years (3-18 years). HSS score at the latest follow-up revealed that 84 hips (59.5%) had excellent results, 30 (22.2%) good, 11 (7.8%) fair and 9 (6.3%) poor. There were 3 acetabular revisions due to aseptic loosening. Six (4.2%) stems were diagnosed as having radiographic definitive loosening; however, only 1 was revised. 30% of the surviving stems showed no radiological changes of radiolucency, while 70% showed some changes. Survival of the prosthesis for any reason was 96% at 10 years and 81% at 18 years. CONCLUSION: The 18 year survival of the Müller straight stem, cemented THA is comparable to those of other successful cemented systems. PMID:24147267

  19. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surface and risk of revision due to dislocation after primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Sexton, S A; Walter, W L; Jackson, M P; De Steiger, R; Stanford, T

    2009-11-01

    Dislocation is a common reason for revision following total hip replacement. This study investigated the relationship between the bearing surface and the risk of revision due to dislocation. It was based on 110 239 primary total hip replacements with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis collected by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry between September 1999 and December 2007. A total of 862 (0.78%) were revised because of dislocation. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces had a lower risk of requiring revision due to dislocation than did metal-on-polyethylene and ceramic-on-polyethylene surfaces, with a follow-up of up to seven years. However, ceramic-on-ceramic implants were more likely to have larger prosthetic heads and to have been implanted in younger patients. The size of the head of the femoral component and age are known to be independent predictors of dislocation. Therefore, the outcomes were stratified by the size of the head and age. There is a significantly higher rate of revision for dislocation in ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces than in metal-on-polyethylene implants when smaller sizes (< or = 28 mm) of the head were used in younger patients (< 65 years) (hazard ratio = 1.53, p = 0.041) and also with larger (> 28 mm) and in older patients (> or = 65 years) (hazard ratio = 1.73, p = 0.016).

  20. Risk factors for postoperative infections in patients with hip fracture treated by means of Thompson arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    García-Alvarez, F; Al-Ghanem, R; García-Alvarez, I; López-Baisson, A; Bernal, M

    2010-01-01

    Specific conditions associated with surgery may predispose elderly people to septic complications after hip fracture surgery. This study investigated the risk factors predisposing infection in aged patients with subcapital hip fracture. We performed a prospective study of 290 patients with displaced subcapital hip fracture, operated by means of Thompson hip hemi-arthroplasty (83.5% fractures in women). The mean age was 85.42+/-6.06 years (ranging from 69 to 104). Follow-up was realized until death or at least for 2 years. The chi(2) test, analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, correlation analysis and the Spearman test were applied. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated. During the hospital stay, there were diagnosed 94 urinary tract infections, 25 pneumonias, 50 superficial wound infections, 11 deep wound infections. Transfusions were made in 120 patients (in average: 2.54+/-1.45 units of red cell concentrate/transfused patient). Transfusion appeared to be correlated with superficial wound infection (OR=1.96), urinary infection (OR=1.76) and pneumonia (OR=2.85). Higher number of days waiting for surgery were related significantly with pneumonia (9.8+/-7.44 days vs. 6.39+/-3.75), or urinary tract infection (7.76+/-4.39 days vs. 6.17+/-4.14). We concluded that the transfusion and longer waiting time for surgery have been associated with the septic complications in elderly patients treated surgically for hip fracture.

  1. No functional benefit of larger femoral heads and alternative bearings at 6 months following primary hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Simon S; Mason, James M; Baker, Paul N; Gregg, Paul J; Deehan, David J; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose There has been a recent trend towards the use of greater femoral head sizes in an attempt to improve function and enhance stability after primary hip replacement. This has been associated with the use of alternative bearings, theoretically to reduce wear and improve implant longevity. Methods We examined the influence of these variables on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for a consecutive series of primary hip replacements using National Joint Registry (NJR) and PROMs-linked data. To minimize the confounding influence of implant design factors, the single most commonly used brand in England and Wales (DePuy Corail Pinnacle) was examined. Improvement in patient hip-specific outcomes (Oxford hip score, OHS), general health outcomes (Euroqol, EQ-5D), and rates of self-reported complications (bleeding, wound problems, re-admission, and reoperation) were compared for different head sizes (28-mm, 32-mm, and 36-mm) and bearings (metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP), and ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC)), adjusting for differences in case mix. Results At a mean follow-up of 7 months, improvements in OHS and EQ5D index were similar for 28-mm and 36-mm heads. A 32-mm head was associated with poorer function (OHS: 20, 99% CI: 19–21, p = 0.002; EQ5D index: 0.39, 99% CI: 0.36–0.42, p = 0.004), although these small differences may not be of clinical importance. There were no statistically significant benefits of either CoP or CoC bearings compared to a MoP bearing. Complication rates were similar within comparisons of head sizes or bearings. Interpretation In this short-term study, we did not find any functional benefits of larger head sizes or alternative bearings, after adjusting for other influences. We question their use in routine primary hip replacement given the lack of evidence of improved long-term survival in the literature. PMID:25301437

  2. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  3. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  4. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis after hip replacement: randomised comparison between unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin.

    PubMed Central

    Leyvraz, P F; Bachmann, F; Hoek, J; Büller, H R; Postel, M; Samama, M; Vandenbroek, M D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the efficacy and safety of two subcutaneous prophylactic regimens for postoperative deep vein thrombosis after total hip replacement. DESIGN--Prospective open randomised multicentre trial. SETTING--28 European departments of orthopaedic surgery. INTERVENTION--All patients had bilateral phlebography 10 days after surgery. 31 patients receiving low molecular weight heparin and 29 receiving unfractionated heparin were excluded from the efficacy analysis for various reasons. PATIENTS--349 patients undergoing total hip replacement between September 1988 and May 1989. 174 patients received subcutaneously a low molecular weight heparin (Fraxiparine) with anti-factor Xa activity of 41 IU/kg/day for three days, then 62 IU/kg/day from day 4 to day 10. 175 patients received subcutaneous unfractionated heparin at intervals of eight hours; doses were adjusted to maintain the activated thromboplastin time at two to five seconds above control values. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Total incidence of deep vein thrombosis and incidence of proximal deep vein thrombosis on bilateral phlebography. RESULTS--The total incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 16% in patients receiving unfractionated heparin and 12.6% in patients receiving low molecular weight heparin (p = 0.45), and the incidence of thrombosis of the proximal veins was 13.1% and 2.9% respectively (p less than 0.001). Four patients receiving unfractionated heparin and one receiving low molecular weight heparin developed pulmonary embolism. The incidence of bleeding complications was low and comparable in the two groups. CONCLUSION--Low molecular weight heparin is at least as effective as unfractionated heparin in preventing deep vein thrombosis and is more effective at preventing thrombosis of the proximal veins in patients undergoing hip replacement. Low molecular weight heparin is not more likely to cause bleeding complications and is simpler to give than unfractionated heparin. PMID:1655136

  5. Linking Swedish health data registers to establish a research database and a shared decision-making tool in hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cnudde, Peter; Rolfson, Ola; Nemes, Szilard; Kärrholm, Johan; Rehnberg, Clas; Rogmark, Cecilia; Timperley, John; Garellick, Göran

    2016-10-04

    Sweden offers a unique opportunity to researchers to construct comprehensive databases that encompass a wide variety of healthcare related data. Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare collect individual level data for all Swedish residents that ranges from medical diagnoses to socioeconomic information. In addition to the information collected by governmental agencies the medical profession has initiated nationwide Quality Registers that collect data on specific diagnoses and interventions. The Quality Registers analyze activity within healthcare institutions, with the aims of improving clinical care and fostering clinical research. The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR) has been collecting data since 1979. Joint replacement in general and hip replacement in particular is considered a success story with low mortality and complication rate. It is credited to the pioneering work of the SHAR that the revision rate following hip replacement surgery in Sweden is amongst the lowest in the world. This has been accomplished by the diligent follow-up of patients with feedback of outcomes to the providers of the healthcare along with post market surveillance of individual implant performance. During its existence SHAR has experienced a constant organic growth. One major development was the introduction of the Patient Reported Outcome Measures program, giving a voice to the patients in healthcare performance evaluation. The next aim for SHAR is to integrate patients' wishes and expectations with the surgeons' expertise in the form of a Shared Decision-Making (SDM) instrument. The first step in building such an instrument is to assemble the necessary data. This involves linking the SHARs database with the two aforementioned governmental agencies. The linkage is done by the 10-digit personal identity number assigned at birth (or immigration) for every Swedish resident. The anonymized data is stored on encrypted serves and can only be accessed after

  6. Fulfilment of knowledge expectations and emotional state among people undergoing hip replacement: a multi-national survey.

    PubMed

    Johansson Stark, Asa; Ingadottir, Brynja; Salanterä, Sanna; Sigurdardottir, Arun; Valkeapää, Kirsi; Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta; Unosson, Mitra

    2014-11-01

    Patient education in connection with hip replacement is intended to prepare patients for surgery, discharge and postoperative recovery. Patients experience symptoms and emotions due to disease or upcoming surgery which can affect how their knowledge expectations are fulfilled. To describe the differences between received and expected knowledge in patients undergoing elective hip replacement in three Nordic countries, and to analyse how these differences are related to patients' characteristics, preoperative symptoms and emotions. A descriptive, prospective survey with two data collection points; before admission and at hospital discharge after surgery. Two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish hospitals. The population consisted of patients on a waiting list for hip replacement. Of the consecutively included patients, 320 answered questionnaires both before admission and at discharge and were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 years, and 55% were women. Structured questionnaires were used; the knowledge expectations of hospital patients scale and self-reported scales for symptoms and emotions before admission and received knowledge of hospital patients scale at discharge. Fulfilment of knowledge expectation was assessed by calculating the difference between received and expected knowledge with a paired sample t-test. A multiple stepwise regression model was used to explain the variance of fulfilled knowledge expectations. Patients expected more knowledge than they received (p<0.001) and 77% of them had unfulfilled knowledge expectations. Patients with a higher level of education were more likely to have unfulfilled knowledge expectations. A higher level of education was also related to a greater difference between received and expected knowledge. The difference was more correlated with patients' emotions than their symptoms. A depressive state was the major predictor of the variance in the difference between received and expected

  7. Voluntary versus involuntary waiting for joint replacements: new Alberta wait times rules for hip and knee arthroplasties, with provincial consensus.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Deborah; Christiansen, Tanya; Smith, Christopher; Howden, Jane Squire; Werle, Jason; Fyie, Ken; Frank, Cy

    2012-01-01

    Despite various health system improvements across Alberta, the wait times benchmark was not being met for all patients requiring hip or knee arthroplasty. Alberta Health Services Bone and Joint Clinical Network working groups, in collaboration with other provincial organizations, gained consensus on the development and implementation of a set of provincial Wait Times Rules. These rules standardize the definition and measurement of data elements specific to joint replacement and distinguish between voluntary (patient-related) versus involuntary (healthcare system-related) wait times. Collectively, this information will help identify trends in wait times and more accurately show where wait times can be reduced.

  8. CT-based quantification of bone stock in large head metal-on-metal unilateral total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Martijn F; Slouwerhof, Inge; van Lingen, Christiaan; Pakvis, Dean F M; van Dalen, Jorn A; Edens, Mireille A; Ettema, Harmen B; Verheyen, Cees C P M; Maas, Mario

    2016-04-01

    To explore ipsilateral and contralateral acetabular roof bone stock density in unilateral large head MoM THA whether there is a significant lower acetabular bone stock in the hip with a metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip replacement compared to the contralateral side. Second part of this study is to examine if there are any associates with regard to potential bone stock density difference. A database of 317 patients with unilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip replacements was set up retrospectively for this study. On computed tomography scans, conducted after a relative short in situ time period averaging 2.8 years, regions-of-interests were drawn in the trabecular bone of the acetabulum to measure average Hounsfield Units (HU). HU differences were calculated and tested by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Univariate analysis was conducted to examine associates of potential bone loss. In a population of 317 patients (156 male, 161 female) with an average age of 61.9 ± 7.8, the median HU on the side of the MoM replacement was 123.3 (7.6-375.4). On the contralateral side, median HU was 144.7 (-0.4 to 332.8). The median HU difference was 21.4 after a mean post-operative in situ time of 2.8 years. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test proved a significant difference (p<0.001). Univariate analyses show that the in situ time of the MoM THA has a significant correlation with the bone density difference. Results show a significant lower bone density at the acetabular roof at the side of the prosthesis compared with the contralateral side after short in situ time of the MoM THA in patients with unilateral MoM total hip replacements. In our patient population, the in situ time showed a significant association with the acetabular bone density difference. As acetabular roof bone stock measurements are feasible and show temporal decline this could become an important parameter to be used in orthopedic decision making for revision surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  9. Socioeconomic inequality in hip replacement in four European countries from 2002 to 2009--area-level analysis of hospital data.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Richard; Gutacker, Nils; Garcia-Armesto, Sandra; Angulo-Pueyo, Ester; Christiansen, Terkel; Bloor, Karen; Bernal-Delgado, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    Cross-country comparisons of socioeconomic equity in health care typically use sample survey data on general services such as physician visits. This study uses comprehensive administrative data on a specific service: hip replacement. We analyse 651 652 publicly funded hip replacements, excluding fractures and accidents, in adults over 35 in Denmark, England, Portugal and Spain from 2002 to 2009. Sub-national administrative areas are split into socioeconomic quintile groups comprising approximately one-fifth of the national population. Area-level Poisson regression with Huber-White standard errors is used to calculate age-sex standardised hip replacement rates by quintile group, together with gaps and ratios between richest and poorest groups (Q5 and Q1) and the middle group (Q3). We find pro-rich-area inequality in England (2009 Q5/Q1 ratio 1.35 [CI 1.25-1.45]) and Spain (2009 Q5/Q1 ratio 1.43 [CI 1.17-1.70]), pro-poor-area inequality in Portugal (2009 Q5/Q1 ratio 0.67 [CI 0.50-0.83]) and no significant inequality in Denmark. Pro-rich-area inequality increased over time in England and Spain but not significantly. Within-country differences between socioeconomic quintile groups are smaller than between-country differences in general population averages: hip replacement rates are substantially lower in Portugal and Spain (8.6 and 7.4 per 10 000 in 2009) than England and Denmark (20.2 and 27.8 per 10 000 in 2009). Despite limitations regarding individual-level inequality and area heterogeneity, analysis of area-level data on publicly funded hospital activity can provide useful cross-country comparisons and longitudinal monitoring of socioeconomic inequality in specific health services. Although this kind of analysis cannot provide definitive answers, it can raise important questions for decision makers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Anesthetic Considerations for Common Procedures in Geriatric Patients: Hip Fracture, Emergency General Surgery, and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lester, Laeben

    2015-09-01

    The elderly population is growing. Geriatric patients undergo a large proportion of surgical procedures and have increased complications, morbidity, and mortality, which may be associated with increased intensive care unit time, length of stay, hospital readmission, and cost. Identification of optimal anesthetic care for these patients, leading to decreased complications and contributing to best possible outcomes, will have great value. This article reviews the anesthetic considerations for intraoperative care of geriatric patients and focus on 3 procedures (hip fractures, emergency abdominal surgery, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement). An approach to evaluation and management of the elderly surgical patient is described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Variations in the trunnion surface topography between different commercially available hip replacement stems.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Walter, William L; Walsh, William Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modular hip implants allows for the adjustment of leg length, offset, and the ability to remove the head for acetabular exposure during primary and revision surgery. The design of the Morse taper facilitates the intimate contact of the conical trunnion of the femoral stem (male component), with the conical bore of the femoral head (female component). Orthopaedic trunnion tapers are not standardized and vary in length, taper angle, and base dimension. Variations in the design and surface characteristics of the trunnion, will directly reflect on the interface at the taper junction and can influence the likelihood of subsequent wear, corrosion and longevity of the implant. The effect of surface topography of trunnions on commercially available hip stems has not yet been considered as a possible contributing factor in the corrosion observed at taper junctions. In this study we analyzed the surface topography and surface roughness of randomly selected commercially available femoral hip stem trunnions to obtain a greater insight into their surface characteristics.

  12. Total hip and knee replacement in a patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kimberly A; Fisher, David A

    2014-04-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a complex disorder that leads to joint stiffness and deformities in 2 or more joints in afflicted children. Late manifestations of this disorder can include secondary degeneration of the abnormal joints with arthritic symptoms of pain and loss of function. There are few reports in the orthopedic literature on the use of total joint arthroplasty to improve the pain and function in patients with arthrogryposis. This case report presents one patient who underwent bilateral total hip and total knee arthroplasties for deteriorating function and pain in her hips and knees secondary to the congenital deformities created by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. We discuss the intraoperative difficulties and techniques used to reconstruct her hips and knees, as well as the potential indications for joint arthroplasty in this challenging group of patients.

  13. [Gluteal compartment syndrome after total hip replacement. A presentation of two cases].

    PubMed

    Villalba, J; Solernou, X

    2013-01-01

    Many postoperative complications have been described after a total hip arthroplasty, with early and acute, as well as late, complications being reported. Two cases of compartment syndrome of the buttock are described following a hybrid total hip arthroplasty (cemented stem and press-fit and screwed acetabulum) performed on 2 patients of 60 and 68 years old, both diagnosed and treated 24-48 hours after the surgery. Both cases had a primary prosthesis with no previous significant pathological findings. This condition is still rare, and few cases have been described at the medical literature.

  14. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case.

    PubMed

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-04-29

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient's original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture.

  15. Factors influencing health-related quality of life after total hip replacement - a comparison of data from the Swedish and Danish hip arthroplasty registers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an increasing focus on measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as part of routine medical practice, particularly in fields such as joint replacement surgery where pain relief and improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are primary outcomes. Between-country comparisons of PROs may present difficulties due to cultural differences and differences in the provision of health care. However, in order to understand how these differences affect PROs, common predictors for poor and good outcomes need to be investigated. This cross-sectional study investigates factors influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) one year after total hip replacement (THR) surgery in Sweden and in Denmark. Methods Data was retrieved from the Swedish (n = 14 560 patients) and Danish (n = 632 patients) Hip Arthroplasty Registers according to preset selection criteria. Using linear regression models, we examined how sex, age, comorbidity and country of surgery were associated with different aspects of HRQoL as measured by the EQ-5D index and EQ VAS. Results Danish patients had an overall higher EQ-5D index and EQ VAS than Swedish patients (p < 0.001). After regression analysis, the estimated coefficients for sex, age, or the Charlson score did not differ between countries for either the EQ-5D index (p = 0.83) or EQ VAS (p = 0.41) one year after THR. Conclusions We conclude that there are clear similarities in how basic predictors influence patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with THR in Sweden and Denmark and these known predictors of good or poor HRQoL outcomes are not specific for each country. PMID:24192304

  16. Periprosthetic Infection following Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The Impact of Limiting the Postoperative Surveillance Period.

    PubMed

    Roth, Virginia R; Mitchell, Robyn; Vachon, Julie; Alexandre, Stéphanie; Amaratunga, Kanchana; Smith, Stephanie; Vearncombe, Mary; Davis, Ian; Mertz, Dominik; Henderson, Elizabeth; John, Michael; Johnston, Lynn; Lemieux, Camille; Pelude, Linda; Gravel, Denise

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND Hip and knee arthroplasty infections are associated with considerable healthcare costs. The merits of reducing the postoperative surveillance period from 1 year to 90 days have been debated. OBJECTIVES To report the first pan-Canadian hip and knee periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) rates and to describe the implications of a shorter (90-day) postoperative surveillance period. METHODS Prospective surveillance for infection following hip and knee arthroplasty was conducted by hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) using standard surveillance definitions. RESULTS Overall hip and knee PJI rates were 1.64 and 1.52 per 100 procedures, respectively. Deep incisional and organ-space hip and knee PJI rates were 0.96 and 0.71, respectively. In total, 93% of hip PJIs and 92% of knee PJIs were identified within 90 days, with a median time to detection of 21 days. However, 11%-16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections were not detected within 90 days. This rate was reduced to 3%-4% at 180 days post procedure. Anaerobic and polymicrobial infections had the shortest median time from procedure to detection (17 and 18 days, respectively) compared with infections due to other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS PJI rates were similar to those reported elsewhere, although differences in national surveillance systems limit direct comparisons. Our results suggest that a postoperative surveillance period of 90 days will detect the majority of PJIs; however, up to 16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections may be missed. Extending the surveillance period to 180 days could allow for a better estimate of disease burden. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:147-153.

  17. Age as a risk factor of nosocomial infection after hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon; Benitez-Parejo, Nicolás; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Guerado, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Surgery for the treatment of hip fractures is considered the gold standard even among nonagerians with a heavy comorbidity burden. Therefore, a study of an association between surgical complications and some variables in elderly individuals appears to be very important. We designed a transverse study in which we determined patient age at the time of development of a nosocomial infection (NI) in patients who underwent surgery to treat a hip fracture. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by simple and multiple logistic regression. We found that age was a determinant in NI after surgical treatment for hip fracture. The older the patient was, the higher the risk of development of an NI after surgical treatment for hip fracture (operative hypothesis). However, the risk of infection changed depending on the treatment. No association with other variables was found.

  18. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Follow-up of a cohort of 28 mm Ultima TPS THRs.

    PubMed

    Ebreo, D; Bell, P J; Arshad, H; Donell, S T; Toms, A; Nolan, J F

    2013-08-01

    Metal artefact reduction (MAR) MRI is now widely considered to be the standard for imaging metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has recommended cross-sectional imaging for all patients with symptomatic MoM bearings. This paper describes the natural history of MoM disease in a 28 mm MoM total hip replacement (THR) using MAR MRI. Inclusion criteria were patients with MoM THRs who had not been revised and had at least two serial MAR MRI scans. All examinations were reported by an experienced observer and classified as A (normal), B (infection) or C1-C3 (mild, moderate, severe MoM-related abnormalities). Between 2002 and 2011 a total of 239 MRIs were performed on 80 patients (two to four scans per THR); 63 initial MRIs (61%) were normal. On subsequent MRIs, six initially normal scans (9.5%) showed progression to a disease state; 15 (15%) of 103 THRs with sequential scans demonstrated worsening disease on subsequent imaging. Most patients with a MoM THR who do not undergo early revision have normal MRI scans. Late progression (from normal to abnormal, or from mild to more severe MoM disease) is not common and takes place over several years.

  19. [Arthroscopic therapy of septic hip infections in childhood].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, F F; Langendörfer, M; Wirth, T; Eberhardt, O

    2015-06-01

    The treatment goal is to rapidly make a diagnosis and establish an effective arthroscopic therapy in order to allow the hip joint to develop normally throughout childhood with respect to anatomical and functional development. Coxarthritis suspected of being septic arthritis No experience with arthroscopy, osteomyelitis of the dorsal femoral neck requiring an intervention. Relative contraindication: absence of cannulated systems. Arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint, including revision of the femoral neck and debridement of osteomyelitis of the femoral neck with placement of an antibiotic carrier if necessary. The arthroscopy is performed using the two portal technique, placing the patient supine on a normal operation table (traction table not required). Drain for 2-3 days with mobilization after removal of the drainage. A second look arthroscopy is not normally planned but may become necessary in cases without improvement of the clinical or laboratory test parameters and after follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The two portal hip joint arthroscopy using an irrigation volume of 6-9 l is an efficient minimally invasive method to safely treat septic arthritis of the hip joint with or without concomitant femoral neck osteomyelitis. It is associated with low morbidity and offers all advantages of an arthroscopic procedure. Out of 23 children 19 could be sufficiently treated by a single arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint. In three patients an additional osseous component required a second intervention. Out of 23 children 22 achieved an excellent Harris hip score, with one girl only achieving a moderate outcome. The 22 children had an unrestricted hip function at follow-up and could return fully to previous activity levels.

  20. [Social and professional effects of hip prosthetic replacment on people under 50 years of age].

    PubMed

    Xenard, J

    1996-12-01

    Although total hip prosthetic replacement is a common surgical procedure, it is not without social and professional consequences. In a certain number of cases, return to occupational activities is not possible. In others, it is difficult. Long-term work break repercussions can be major as they often go together with financial difficulties. The medical counsultant and the occupational doctor will have an important role to play at the time of the return to occupational activities or to determine the conditions of workplace adaptation or a vocational training program.Functional recovery after insertion of total hip prosthesis observes precise rules of articular mobilization, weight bearing and muscular strengthening.In the young patient, before 50 years old, objectives will be more accurate and progress not only will concern recovery of daily living, walking and do-it-yourself activities but also return to sports, play and occupational activities. Not only will reactivation be physical, muscular and articular but also behavioral and psychological.Disease and its consequences, surgery in particular, cause a psychological and a physical aggression which modifies the patient's self-concept. • Vulnerability and plastic wrong (limping, modifications of gesture and sports performanee as well as modifications of the living conditions). The patient unconsciously translates this physical affection into: * loneliness (taking away or exclusion from the usual surroundings of those who are in good health) * "blues" * lack of dynamism * uselessness, feeling of being incompetent "in those conditions, what's the use of fighting?" ٜ At the same time - loss of social status: "Colleagues get up to go to work, children go to school, all the others are productive, I'm good at nothing." - impression of uselessness, dependence; reinforcement of turning in on the self. •The undertaking by a surgeon and his team (anaesthetist, nurse, physiotherapist) which implies constraints, orders

  1. High friction moments in large hard-on-hard hip replacement bearings in conditions of poor lubrication.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nicholas E; Hothan, Arne; Morlock, Michael M

    2013-05-01

    Disappointing clinical results for large diameter metal replacement bearings for the hip are related to compromised lubrication due to poor cup placement, which increases wear as well as friction moments. The latter can cause overload of the implant-bone interfaces and the taper junction between head and stem. We investigated the influence of lubrication conditions on friction moments in modern hip bearings. Friction moments for large diameter metal and ceramic bearings were measured in a hip simulator with cup angles varying from 0° to 60°. Two diameters were tested for each bearing material, and measurements were made in serum and in dry conditions, representing severely compromised lubrication. Moments were lower for the ceramic bearings than for the metal bearings in lubricated conditions, but approached those for metal bearings at high cup inclination. In dry conditions, friction moments increased twofold to 12 Nm for metal bearings. For ceramic bearings, the increase was more than fivefold to over 25 Nm. Although large diameter ceramic bearings demonstrate an improvement in friction characteristics in the lubricated condition, they could potentially replicate problems currently experienced due to high friction moments in metal bearings once lubrication is compromised. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Wear properties of polyethylene-metal and polyethylene-ceramic bearings for hip joint replacements: The effect of temperature and protein precipitation in hip simulator tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yen-Shuo

    Ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (PE) cups bearing against metal or ceramic balls are the most commonly used combinations of materials for human hip joint replacements. The wear properties of these materials are typically evaluated in the laboratory using hip joint wear simulators, while lubricated with bovine serum. A previous test evaluating the PE cups against cobalt-chrome (CoCr), zirconia (Zr) and alumina balls demonstrated the sensitivity of serum proteins to elevated temperature; especially for Zr/PE, which showed the highest protein precipitation and bulk lubricant temperature but the lowest cup wear. In the present investigation, a temperature control system was used on a hip simulator to systematically evaluate the relationship between temperature and denaturation of the serum proteins which, in turn, affects the friction and wear properties of the prosthetic materials being tested. In order to control protein precipitation, the interface was temperature reduced by circulating coolant at 4°C through the center of the CoCr or Zr balls during a wear test. With cooling, protein assay of the serum showed 66% and 50% reductions in protein precipitation with the CoCr and Zr balls, respectively. The wear rate of the PE cups against the CoCr balls decreased by an average of 44%, whereas two of the three PE cups running against Zr balls exhibited slight increases in their wear rates, and the third showed a two fold increase. Under scanning electron microscopy, there were marked differences in the worn surfaces of the cups for the various conditions, and differences in the morphology of the PE wear debris recovered from the serum. For example, granular particles predominated without cooling, whereas fibrous particles predominated with cooling. Since particles generated in vivo (i.e., retrieved from periprosthetic tissues) typically show approximately equal proportions of granules and fibrils, the use of an intermediate coolant temperature might provide

  3. Hip and knee replacement in Germany and the USA: analysis of individual inpatient data from German and US hospitals for the years 2005 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Wengler, Annelene; Nimptsch, Ulrike; Mansky, Thomas

    2014-06-09

    The number of hip and knee replacement operations is rising in many industrialized countries. To evaluate the current situation in Germany, we analyzed the frequency of procedures in Germany compared to the USA, with the aid of similar case definitions and taking demographic differences into account. We used individual inpatient data from Germany (DRG statistics) and the USA (Nationwide Inpatient Sample) to study differences in the age- and sex-adjusted rates of hip and knee replacement surgery and the determinants of trends in case numbers over the years 2005 to 2011. In 2011, hip replacement surgery was performed 1.4 times as frequently in Germany as in the USA (284 vs. 204 cases per 100 000 population per year; the American figures have been adjusted to the age and sex structure of the German population). On the other hand, knee replacement surgery was performed 1.5 times as frequently in the USA as in Germany (304 [standardized] vs. 206 cases per 100,000 population per year). Over the period of observation, the rates of both procedures increased in both countries. The number of elective primary hip replacement operations in Germany grew by 11%, from 140,000 to 155 300 (from 170 to 190 per 100,000 persons); after correction for demographic changes, a 3% increase remained. At the same time, the rate of elective primary hip replacement surgery in the USA rose by 28%, from 79 to 96 per 100 000 population, with a 13% increase remaining after correction for demographic changes. There are major differences between Germany and the USA in the frequency of these operations. The observed upward trend in elective primary hip replacement operations was mostly due to demographic changes in Germany; non-demographic factors exerted a stronger influence in the USA than in Germany. With respect to primary knee replacement surgery, non-demographic factors exerted a comparably strong influence in both countries.

  4. Willingness to undergo surgery again validated clinically important differences in health-related quality of life after total hip replacement or total knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Keurentjes, J Christiaan; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G

    2014-01-01

    To determine clinically important differences (CIDs) in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). SF-36 scores were collected 2 weeks before and at 1.5-6 years after joint replacement in 586 THR and 400 TKR patients in a multicenter cohort study. We calculated distribution-based CIDs (0.8 standard deviations of the preoperative score) for each SF-36 subscale. Responders (patients with an improvement in HRQoL ≥ CID of a particular subscale) were compared with nonresponders using an external validation question: willingness to undergo surgery again. CIDs for THR/TKR were physical functioning (PF), 17.9/16.7; role-physical (RP), 31.1/33.4; bodily pain (BP), 16.8/16.2; general health, 15.5/15.7; vitality, 17.3/16.7; social functioning (SF), 22.0/19.9; role-emotional, 33.7/33.6; and mental health, 14.8/14.1. CIDs of PF, RP, BP, and SF were validated by the validation question. Valid and precise CIDs are estimated of PF, RP, BP, and SF, which are relevant in HRQoL subscales for THR and TKR patients. CIDs of all other subscales should be used cautiously. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ["Barking" micturition noise as sign of acute hip-TEP-late infection].

    PubMed

    Weisenstein, D B; Popescu, I-A

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the case of a patient with an acute late infection of the hip prosthesis. At first, complaints in the hip region were in the foreground. Shortly after the revision operation the patient noticed a barking noise during micturition, as sign of a pneumaturia. The following diagnostics showed a perforated sigmoid diverticulitis with a sigmoid-urinary bladder-fistula.

  6. A custom-made guide-wire positioning device for hip surface replacement arthroplasty: description and first results.

    PubMed

    Raaijmaakers, Martijn; Gelaude, Frederik; De Smedt, Karla; Clijmans, Tim; Dille, Jeroen; Mulier, Michiel

    2010-07-14

    Hip surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA) can be an alternative for total hip arthroplasty. The short and long-term outcome of hip surface replacement arthroplasty mainly relies on the optimal size and position of the femoral component. This can be defined before surgery with pre-operative templating. Reproducing the optimal, templated femoral implant position during surgery relies on guide wire positioning devices in combination with visual inspection and experience of the surgeon. Another method of transferring the templated position into surgery is by navigation or Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). Though CAS is documented to increase accurate placement particularly in case of normal hip anatomy, it requires bulky equipment that is not readily available in each centre. A custom made neck jig device is presented as well as the results of a pilot study. The device is produced based on data pre-operatively acquired with CT-scan. The position of the guide wire is chosen as the anatomical axis of the femoral neck. Adjustments to the design of the jig are made based on the orthopedic surgeon's recommendations for the drill direction. The SRA jig is designed as a slightly more-than-hemispherical cage to fit the anterior part of the femoral head. The cage is connected to an anterior neck support. Four knifes are attached on the central arch of the cage. A drill guide cylinder is attached to the cage, thus allowing guide wire positioning as pre-operatively planned. Custom made devices were tested in 5 patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. The orthopedic surgeons reported the practical aspects of the use of the neck-jig device. The retrieved femoral heads were analyzed to assess the achieved drill place in mm deviation from the predefined location and orientation compared to the predefined orientation. The orthopedic surgeons rated the passive stability, full contact with neck portion of the jig and knife contact with femoral head, positive. There were no guide

  7. Lower Urinary Tract Infection and Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Elective Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Ho; Lee, Young-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a grave complication. Urinary tract infection (UTI) as a source for PJI is controversial. Our purposes were, (1) to evaluate the incidence of PJI after elective primary THA and (2) to determine whether UTI was associated with a risk of PJI after elective primary THA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 527 patients who underwent elective primary THA by using universal aseptic technique from May 2003 to October 2007. UTI group (13 patients) was defined as patients who underwent THA in status of having an UTI, and the remaining patients were defined as control group (514 patients). We compared the incidence of PJI in both groups. Results During the study period, the incidence of PJI was 0%, regardless of existence (or presence) of UTI. Conclusion There was no significant association between UTI and PJI, when cautiously performed THA. PMID:28316960

  8. Supports used for positioning of patients in hip arthroplasty: is there an infection risk?

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Riaz; Tham, Ji; Naqvi, Syed Ghufran Ali; Butt, Umer; Dixon, John

    2011-03-01

    Infection after joint arthroplasty is a disastrous complication. Implants used in hip arthroplasty increase the risk of infection from organisms of low pathogenicity. Potential reservoirs, that have not been assessed as yet, are the supports used for patient positioning in hip arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess these supports for presence of bacterial pathogens. We studied 40 supports used in 20 hip arthroplasty procedures. Tryptone soya agar plates were used to sample these supports. All agar plates were incubated at 37 °C for 48 h. Of the 20 anterior supports, 17 (85%) showed bacterial colonisation; of the 20 posterior supports, 10 (50%) had bacterial colonisation. Fourteen (52%) supports were contaminated with one organism, 9 (33%) with two organisms, three (11%) with three organisms and one (4%) with four organisms. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common isolated organisms (61%) followed by coryneforms (10%) and bacilli (10%). Anterior supports had two times more colony forming units compared to the posterior supports. This study showed contamination of supports used for positioning patients during hip arthroplasty. It reflects poor cleaning practice and certainly raises the possibility that a high bacterial load on these supports may contribute to higher infection rates in hip arthroplasties. The study raises concerns related to contamination of supports, as there is a potential for cross-infection, wound problems, and deep sepsis around implants which could be disastrous. While colonisation does not equate with infection, we suggest thorough cleaning of the supports before and after every surgical procedure.

  9. Geometric analysis and clinical outcome of two cemented stems for primary total hip replacement with and without modular necks.

    PubMed

    Haversath, Marcel; Wendelborn, Christine; Jäger, Marcus; Schmidt, Boris; Kowalczyk, Wojciech; Landgraeber, Stefan

    2017-09-15

    Restoration of the physiological biomechanical principles of the hip is crucial in total hip replacement. The aim of this study was to compare an arthroplasty system with different offset options (a: Exeter(®)) with a dual-modular stem (b: Profemur Xm(®)). A local and an inertial coordinate system were used to assist the description of the components' assembly in the prosthesis. A resection line of the femoral head in standard position was added to the arthroplasties and geometric parameters were measured. The outcomes of 93 patients were clinically evaluated (a: n = 50, b: n = 43). Preoperative planning was compared to postoperative radiographs (femoral offset, leg-length), and clinical scores (HHS, WOMAC, total range of motion) were assessed preoperatively, and then 1 and 2 years after surgery. The Exeter(®) offers an offset range from 32.1 to 56.9 mm and the Profemur Xm(®) a range from 29.3 to 55.3 mm. The leg-length variability of the Profemur Xm(®) has a range of 25.9 mm, the Exeter(®) a range of 13.7 mm. The Profemur Xm(®) offers more possible combinations of offset and leg-length reconstruction. The neck-stem angles of the Exeter(®) range from 125.2° to 126.3°, of the Profemur Xm(®) from 127.2° to 142.6°. There was no statistically significant difference in clinical outcome and radiological parameters. We conclude that both stems offer a wide range of options for anatomical reconstruction of the hip resulting in similarly good clinical results. The Profemur Xm(®) stem has advantages for the reconstruction of hips that deviate from standard anatomy but has the drawback of additional corrosive wear at the stem/neck interface.

  10. More complications with uncemented than cemented femoral stems in total hip replacement for displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chammout, Ghazi; Muren, Olle; Laurencikas, Evaldas; Bodén, Henrik; Kelly-Pettersson, Paula; Sjöö, Helene; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is the preferred method for the active and lucid elderly patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture (FNF). Controversy still exists regarding the use of cemented or uncemented stems in these patients. We compared the effectiveness and safety between a modern cemented, and a modern uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stem in patients 65–79 years of age who were treated with THR for displaced FNF. Patients and methods In a single-center, single-blinded randomized controlled trial, we included 69 patients, mean age 75 (65–79) and with a displaced FNF (Garden III–IV). 35 patients were randomized to a cemented THR and 34 to a reverse-hybrid THR with an uncemented stem. Primary endpoints were: prevalence of all hip-related complications and health-related quality of life, evaluated with EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) index up to 2 years after surgery. Secondary outcomes included: overall mortality, general medical complications, and hip function. The patients were followed up at 3, 12, and 24 months. Results According to the calculation of sample size, 140 patients would be required for the primary endpoints, but the study was stopped when only half of the sample size was included (n = 69). An interim analysis at that time showed that the total number of early hip-related complications was substantially higher in the uncemented group, 9 (among them, 3 dislocations and 4 periprosthetic fractures) as compared to 1 in the cemented group. The mortality and functional outcome scores were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation We do not recommend uncemented femoral stems for the treatment of elderly patients with displaced FNFs. PMID:27967333

  11. The contact mechanics and occurrence of edge loading in modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement during daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of edge loading in hip joint replacement has been associated with many factors such as prosthetic design, component malposition and activities of daily living. The present study aimed to quantify the occurrence of edge loading/contact at the articulating surface and to evaluate the effect of cup angles and edge loading on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR) during different daily activities. A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing system. Different cup inclination and anteversion angles were modelled and six daily activities were considered. The results showed that edge loading was predicted during normal walking, ascending and descending stairs activities under steep cup inclination conditions (≥55°) while no edge loading was observed during standing up, sitting down and knee bending activities. The duration of edge loading increased with increased cup inclination angles and was affected by the cup anteversion angles. Edge loading caused elevated contact pressure at the articulating surface and substantially increased equivalent plastic strain of the polyethylene liner. The present study suggested that correct positioning the component to avoid edge loading that may occur during daily activities is important for MoP THR in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Air bacterial and particle counts in total hip replacement operations using non-woven and cotton gowns and drapes.

    PubMed

    Jalovaara, P; Puranen, J

    1989-11-01

    Air bacterial and particle counts were obtained in a conventionally ventilated operating theatre, during 8 operations for total hip replacement performed using synthetic non-woven fabrics as drapes for the patients and gowns for the staff (trousers and stockings were of conventional cotton material), ('non-woven' group), and in 8 corresponding operations using conventional cotton fabrics ('cotton' group). No significant difference between the groups with regard to air bacterial counts was observed. The use of cotton fabrics was associated with substantially higher particle counts, probably due to particles from the cotton textiles themselves. No significant correlation was observed between the bacterial and particle counts, indicating that these came from different sources and that the particles were mainly of sterile origin. Thus, the benefit of the synthetic, non-woven fabrics in hip replacement surgery, when these fabrics are used to cover theatre staff only partially in the form of gowns, seems questionable with regard to the reduction of air bacterial counts. On the other hand, the surgical textiles of non-woven material improve the purity of the operating theatre since unlike cotton fabrics they do not produce and disperse particles in the air.

  13. Pre-operative and post-operative effect of a pain management programme prior to total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berge, Daniel J; Dolin, Simon J; Williams, Amanda CdeC; Harman, Rachel

    2004-07-01

    Patients may wait some time for total hip replacement with conservative management of pain and disability, but no attempts to rehabilitate them. This study randomised 40 patients accepted for and awaiting total hip replacement to a brief rehabilitative psychologically based pain management programme (PMP) or to a control group with no intervention. Patients were assessed before randomisation, 3 months after the PMP or equivalent waiting time, and again one year later after total hip replacement. Assessments included pain, impact of pain (Arthritis Impact Scale: AIMS), mobility (timed walk), sleep and analgesic consumption. The patients who had learned pain management reported lower pain intensity and pain distress and less sleep disturbance than waiting list controls, but no improvement in function or analgesic consumption. Six patients opted to delay, but this did not differ between groups. Post-hip replacement both groups improved in pain and some aspects of activity (AIMS) with greater improvement in the PMP group for physical activity and total AIMS scores, suggesting that some techniques had continued to be of use post-surgically. Rehabilitative pain management may be useful to patients pre-operatively in managing everyday pain, but not to the extent that they opt to delay surgery; it may also improve their function after hip replacement.

  14. Postoperative Development of Bone Mineral Density and Muscle Strength in the Lower Limb After Cemented and Uncemented Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Tobias; Krüger, Christine; Kasch, Cornelius; Finze, Susanne; Steens, Wolfram; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Skripitz, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background : Numerous studies have shown reduction of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) after hip replacement. The effect on the whole limb, however, is still unexplored. This study’s objective was to analyse the postoperative development of BMD and muscle strength of the limb after total hip replacement (THR) and to determine links between these parameters. Methods : 55 patients, who underwent THR, were included. Depending on therapeutic indication, either an uncemented stem (Group A, n=30) or a cemented stem (Group B, n=25) has been implanted. In the limbs, the measurement of BMD using DEXA and the maximum isometric muscle strength, detected by a leg press, were undertaken preoperatively and after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results : A total of 12 patients (Group A: n = 6, Group B: n = 6) were excluded due to reasons which were not relevant to the study. So, the results refer to the data of 43 patients. In Group A (uncemented, n = 24), a significant decrease of BMD on the operated extremity was seen after 3, 6 and 12 months compared with preoperative values. Isometric muscle strength on the affected extremity increased significantly after 6 and 12 months. In Group B (cemented, n = 19), with a lower baseline compared to group A, an increase in BMD of the affected limb was seen postoperatively. This rise was significant after 12 months. With regard to the isometric muscle strength, a significant increase could be observed in this group after 6 and 12 months. Conclusion : Analogous to postoperative reduction of periprosthetic bone density, a decrease of the entire limb BMD on the operated leg occurred after implantation of uncemented hip stems. In contrast, an increase in BMD was recorded for cemented stems. Regardless of the type of anchoring, a substantial increase in muscular strength could be observed postoperatively in both groups. PMID:25246993

  15. What does standard rehabilitation practice after total hip replacement in the UK entail? results of a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence of prolonged poor function in patients following total hip replacement (THR). Studies of progressive resistance training (PRT) interventions to improve function are often compared to ‘standard’ practice which is not well defined. This study aimed to investigate ‘standard’ rehabilitation care in the UK after total hip replacement (THR) as well as determine whether PRT was part of ‘standard’ care. Methods After ethical approval, questionnaire item development about rehabilitation practice was guided by a focus group interview (after informed consent) with physiotherapists (n = 4; >5 years post-qualification) who regularly treated THR patients. An online questionnaire investigating the exercises prescribed and rehabilitation practice following THR was developed and sent to physiotherapists working in hospitals in the UK. The survey was performed from January to May 2011. The survey results were analysed (frequency (%) of responses) focusing on the exercises the physiotherapists considered important, as well as their use of PRT in prescribed regimes. Results 106 responses were obtained from physiotherapists in the UK. The survey respondents considered that the most important muscles to target in all phases of rehabilitation were the hip abductors (62.2%), followed by the quadriceps (16.9%), and other muscles (21%). Exercise type prescribed revealed no consensus, with weight bearing (42%), functional (45%) and Bed-based/Bridging/Postural exercises (13%) favoured. 83.7% were able to define the basis of progressive resistance training (PRT), but only 33% prescribed it. Conclusions Standard physiotherapy rehabilitation in the UK after THR is variable, and appears to rarely include PRT. This may be a factor in prolonged poor function in some patients after this common operation. PMID:23496875

  16. Variation in rates of hip and knee joint replacement in Australia based on socio-economic status, geographical locality, birthplace and indigenous status.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Tracy; Urquhart, Donna M; Berry, Patricia; Bhatia, Kuldeep; Wang, Yuanyuan; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the incidence of joint replacement across different subgroups of the Australian population is limited. This study investigated whether rates of hip and knee joint replacement vary according to socio-economic status, geographical locality, birthplace and indigenous status. Data from the National Hospital Morbidity Database were obtained. All separations for primary hip or knee joint replacement with the principal diagnosis of arthritis were identified. Age-standardized procedure rates were compared based on socio-economic status, geographical locality, birthplace and indigenous status. Compared with age- and gender-matched individuals, rates of joint replacement overall were significantly lower in people living in the most disadvantaged (P < 0.05) and remote areas (P < 0.001), people born outside Australia (P < 0.05) and indigenous people (P < 0.001). However, there were some exceptions. Knee replacement rates were higher in the most disadvantaged areas than in the least disadvantaged areas (P < 0.01), and both hip and knee replacement rates were higher in regional areas than in major cities (P < 0.05). Males and females born in New Zealand and females born in the United Kingdom, Ireland and parts of Europe had a greater rate of hip replacement, and females from North Africa and the Middle East had a greater rate of knee replacement, than Australia-born people (P < 0.001). There is significant variation in the rates of primary total hip and knee replacement in Australia. Further investigation is needed to determine whether this simply reflects patterns of disease and disease risk factors, or is because of inequalities in health care, unmet need, and/or surgical or patient-related factors. © 2010 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case

    PubMed Central

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient’s original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  18. Metal release and metal allergy after total hip replacement with resurfacing versus conventional hybrid prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Klas; Jakobsen, Stig S; Lorenzen, Nina D; Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Stilling, Maiken; Baad-Hansen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasties were reintroduced because of the problems with osteolysis and aseptic loosening related to polyethylene wear of early metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) arthroplasties. The volumetric wear rate has been greatly reduced with MOM arthroplasties; however, because of nano-size wear particles, the absolute number has been greatly increased. Thus, a source of metal ion exposure with the potential to sensitize patients is present. We hypothesized that higher amounts of wear particles result in increased release of metal ions and ultimately lead to an increased incidence of metal allergy. Methods 52 hips in 52 patients (median age 60 (51–64) years, 30 women) were randomized to either a MOM hip resurfacing system (ReCap) or a standard MOP total hip arthoplasty (Mallory Head/Exeter). Spot urine samples were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, after 3 months, and after 1, 2, and 5 years and tested with inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. After 5 years, hypersensitivity to metals was evaluated by patch testing and lymphocyte transformation assay. In addition, the patients answered a questionnaire about hypersensitivity. Results A statistically significant 10- to 20-fold increase in urinary levels of cobalt and chromium was observed throughout the entire follow-up in the MOM group. The prevalence of metal allergy was similar between groups. Interpretation While we observed significantly increased levels of metal ions in the urine during the entire follow-up period, no difference in prevalence of metal allergy was observed in the MOM group. However, the effect of long-term metal exposure remains uncertain. PMID:24930546

  19. Fabrication and wear test of a continuous fiber/particulate composite total surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous fiber woven E-glass composite femoral shells having the ame elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle were tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these shells atriculating with the acetabular cups are comparable to a vitallium bal articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cup.

  20. Effects of stemmed and nonstemmed hip replacement on stress distribution of proximal femur and implant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ming; Tsai, Wen-Chi; Lin, Shang-Chih; Tseng, Ching-Shiow

    2014-09-26

    Despite improvements in shape, material, and coating for hip stem, both stress shielding and aseptic loosening have been the major drawbacks of stemmed hip arthroplasty. Some nonstemmed systems were developed to avoid rasping off the intramedullary canal and evacuating the bone marrow due to stem insertion. In this study, the finite-element models of one intact, one stemmed, and two nonstemmed femora with minimal removal of the healthy neck were investigated to evaluate their biomechanical effects. The resurfacing (ball-shaped) and fitting (neck-shaped) systems were respectively selected as the representative of the ready- and custom-made nonstemmed implants. The stress distribution and interface micromotion were selected as the comparison indices. The results showed that stress distributions of the two nonstemmed femora are consistently more similar to the intact femur than the stemmed one. Around the proximal femur, the stem definitely induces the stress-shielding phenomenon of its counterparts. The fitting system with the anatomy-shaped cup can make intimate contact with the neck cortex and reduce the bone-cup micromotion and the implant stress. Comparatively, the reamed femoral head provides weaker support to the resurfacing cup causing higher interfacial micromotion. The reserved femoral neck could act as the load-transferring medium from the acetabular cup, femoral neck, to the diaphysial bone, thus depressing the stress-shielding effect below the neck region. If the hip-cup construct can be definitely stabilized, the nonstemmed design could be an alternative of hip arthroplasty for the younger or the specific patients with the disease limited only to the femoral head.

  1. Correlation between patient age at total hip replacement surgery and lifeexpectancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann1, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Crestani, Marcus Vinicius; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most cost-effective hip surgeries among orthopedic procedures. We conducted an extensive literature review with 5,394 papers regarding survival rates after THA. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library from January 1st, 1970 to July 31th, 2014 looking for all citations about total hip arthroplasty with a long term follow-up (longer than 10 years). The criteria were rigorous: no loss of follow-up, and follow-up more than 10 years. The authors should have known the complete history of patients (whether the patient is alive or dead). Considering the criteria, we found only 15 papers. To evaluate the relationship between follow-up and survival, a linear regression analysis was applied. Considering the papers analysed, and applying the search criteria, we obtained a mean age for the patients above 57.5 years. The chance of survival at 15 years was 57.6%, at 20 years it was 34.6% and at 25 years it is only 11.6%. The relationship between follow-up and survival was significantly linear (p <0.001). Only 11.6% of patients undergoing THA will be still alive 25 years after the surgical procedure. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Study. PMID:27057147

  2. [Physiotherapy in metaphysial hip replacement with use J&J Proxima stem].

    PubMed

    Pasek, Jarosław; Koczy, Bodgan; Stołtny, Tomasz; Pajak, Jan; Pyda, Michał; Pasek, Tomasz; Kloza, Zygmunt; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    In last years on the whole world violently grows up the number of patients at which occurrence productive degenerative changes of osteoarticular system. Actually these diseases more and more concern the young persons, active professionally. This consequences of these changes lead to limiting the functional functions of pond, pain as well as they worsen the quality of life. Pain in degenerative joint disease of various aetiology can be combated with the new surgical techniques offered by contemporary orthopaedics. Hip alloplasty is the only effective treatment method facilitating the restoration of physical fitness, correct mobility and the eradication of chronic pain. After operating introduces the different methods of improving finally. This work presents physiotherapeutic procedures, commenced on admission to the orthopaedic ward, involved in hip joint alloplasty with the J&J Proxima stem. The disseminating of introduced model of improving as well as the initiation him to program of the treatment confirms the legitimacy of choice, and it influences on improvement of the state of health also and the patients' functional efficiency with degenerative disease of hip joint.

  3. Correlation between patient age at total hip replacement surgery and lifeexpectancy.

    PubMed

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Crestani, Marcus Vinicius; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most cost-effective hip surgeries among orthopedic procedures. We conducted an extensive literature review with 5,394 papers regarding survival rates after THA. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library from January 1(st), 1970 to July 31(th), 2014 looking for all citations about total hip arthroplasty with a long term follow-up (longer than 10 years). The criteria were rigorous: no loss of follow-up, and follow-up more than 10 years. The authors should have known the complete history of patients (whether the patient is alive or dead). Considering the criteria, we found only 15 papers. To evaluate the relationship between follow-up and survival, a linear regression analysis was applied. Considering the papers analysed, and applying the search criteria, we obtained a mean age for the patients above 57.5 years. The chance of survival at 15 years was 57.6%, at 20 years it was 34.6% and at 25 years it is only 11.6%. The relationship between follow-up and survival was significantly linear (p <0.001). Only 11.6% of patients undergoing THA will be still alive 25 years after the surgical procedure. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Study.

  4. Dynamic virtual simulation of the occurrence and severity of edge loading in hip replacements associated with variation in the rotational and translational surgical position.

    PubMed

    Leng, Joanna; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Wilcox, Ruth; Jones, Alison; Barton, David; Fisher, John

    2017-04-01

    Variation in the surgical positioning of total hip replacement can result in edge loading of the femoral head on the rim of the acetabular cup. Previous work has reported the effect of edge loading on the wear of hip replacement bearings with a fixed level of dynamic biomechanical hip separation. Variations in both rotational and translational surgical positioning of the hip joint replacement combine to influence both the biomechanics and the tribology including the severity of edge loading, the amount of dynamic separation, the force acting on the rim of the cup and the resultant wear and torque acting on the cup. In this study, a virtual model of a hip joint simulator has been developed to predict the effect of variations in some surgical positioning (inclination and medial-lateral offset) on the level of dynamic separation and the contact force of the head acting on the rim as a measure of severity of edge loading. The level of dynamic separation and force acting on the rim increased with increased translational mismatch between the centres of the femoral head and the acetabular cup from 0 to 4 mm and with increased cup inclination angle from 45° to 65°. The virtual model closely replicated the dynamics of the experimental hip simulator previously reported, which showed similar dynamic biomechanical trends, with the highest level of separation being found with a mismatch of 4 mm between the centres of the femoral head and acetabular cup and 65° cup inclination angle.

  5. Comparison of two digital radiostereometric analysis methods in the determination of femoral head penetration in a total hip replacement phantom.

    PubMed

    Bragdon, Charles R; Estok, Daniel M; Malchau, Henrik; Kärrholm, Johan; Yuan, Xunhua; Bourne, Robert; Veldhoven, Jean; Harris, William H

    2004-05-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) has been used extensively to evaluate the magnitude and direction of penetration of the femoral head into the acetabular component of a total hip replacement as a result of polyethylene wear and creep. The accuracy and precision of an RSA study depends on several factors, including the radiographic technique, the analytical software, and the positioning of the tantalum markers. This study had three sequential purposes. First, an in vitro phantom model was used to quantify the accuracy and precision of digital images versus conventional radiography in RSA measurements of penetration of the femoral head into the acetabular shell in a total hip replacement. The Umeå RSA software package was used for analysis of both the conventional films, which were digitized at a resolution of 300 DPI, and digital radiographs, which were converted from a DICOM format at a resolution of 218 DPI. Digital radiography was found to be superior. Next, two methods of RSA analysis currently in use for determining femoral head penetration into polyethylene of total joint replacements were compared. Using the phantom model, we compared the Umeå RSA system (Biomedical Innovations AB) to the RSA-CMS (RSA Clinical Measurement Solution) and in both cases used the digital radiographs. The Umeå RSA system was found to be superior. Finally, two methods of marking the position of the acetabular component with tantalum beads were compared: one in which beads were inserted into previously described towers protruding from the back of the acetabular shell and another in which beads were placed into the peripheral flange of the polyethylene liner using the Umeå RSA analysis system of the digital radiographs. The results using the two marker configurations were similar.

  6. Analysis of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Yew, A; Udofia, I; Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis under a simple steady state rotation. The finite element method was used initially to investigate the effect of the cement and bone on the predicted contact pressure distribution between the two articulating surfaces under dry conditions, and subsequently to determine the elastic deformation of both the femoral and the acetabular components required for the lubrication analysis. Both Reynolds equation and the elasticity equation were coupled and solved numerically using the finite difference method. Important features in reducing contact stresses and promoting fluid-film lubrication associated with the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant were identified as the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup. For the typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis considered under typical walking conditions, an increase in the femoral head radius from 14 to 17.4 mm (for a fixed radial clearance of 79 microm) was shown to result in a 25 per cent decrease in the maximum dry contact pressure and a 60 per cent increase in the predicted minimum film thickness. Furthermore, the predicted maximum contact pressure considering both the cement and the bone was found to be decreased by about 80 per cent, while the minimum film thickness was predicted to be increased by 50 per cent. Despite a significant increase in the predicted minimum lubricating film thickness due to the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup, a mixed lubrication regime was predicted for the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant under estimated in vivo steady state walking conditions, depending on the surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. This clearly demonstrated the important influences of the material, design and manufacturing parameters on the tribological performance of these hard-on-hard hip prostheses. Furthermore, in the present contact

  7. Transcriptome-Wide High-Density Microarray Analysis Reveals Differential Gene Transcription in Periprosthetic Tissue From Hips With Chronic Periprosthetic Joint Infection vs Aseptic Loosening.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Klawonn, Frank; Brand, Stephan; Stiesch, Meike; Krettek, Christian; Eberhard, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Differentiating between periprosthetic hip infection and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening can be challenging, especially in patients with chronic infections. This study used whole-genome microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptomes of periprosthetic hip tissues to identify genes that are differentially transcripted between chronic periprosthetic hip infection and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. In this pilot study, a total of 24 patients with either chronic periprosthetic hip infection (n = 12) or aseptic hip prosthesis loosening (n = 12) were analyzed. Periprosthetic hip infection was diagnosed based on modified criteria of the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. To evaluate differences in gene transcription, whole-genome microarray analysis was performed on the mRNA of periprosthetic tissue. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene transcription in periprosthetic hip tissue affected by chronic hip infection vs aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. A total of 39 genes had area under the curve values greater than 0.9 for diagnosing chronic periprosthetic hip infection; 5 genes had annotations relevant to infection and metabolism. The 39 genes also included 7 genes that were differentially transcribed but that have no apparent connection to immune response processes plus 27 genes with unknown function. Differences in gene transcription profiles might represent novel diagnostic targets that can be used to differentiate between chronic periprosthetic hip infections and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. Secondary metabolites of differentially transcripted genes might serve as easily accessible markers for detecting chronic periprosthetic joint infection in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Eradication of infection, survival, and radiological results of uncemented revision stems in infected total hip arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Born, Philipp; Ilchmann, Thomas; Zimmerli, Werner; Zwicky, Lukas; Graber, Peter; Ochsner, Peter E; Clauss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The use of uncemented revision stems is an established option in 2-stage procedures in patients with periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, in 1-stage procedures, they are still rarely used. There are still no detailed data on radiological outcome after uncemented 1-stage revisions. We assessed (1) the clinical outcome, including reoperation due to persistent infection and any other reoperation, and (2) the radiological outcome after 1- and 2-stage revision, using an uncemented stem. Patients and methods — Between January 1993 and December 2012, an uncemented revision stem was used in 81 THAs revised for PJI. Patients were treated with 1- or 2-stage procedures according to a well-defined algorithm (1-stage: n = 28; 2-stage: n = 53). All hips had a clinical and radiological follow-up. Outcome parameters were eradication of infection, re-revision of the stem, and radiological changes. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Radiographs were analyzed for bone restoration and signs of loosening. The mean clinical follow-up time was 7 (2–15) years. Results — The 7-year infection-free survival was 96% (95% CI: 92–100), 100% for 1-stage revision and 94% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 87–100) (p = 0.2). The 7-year survival for aseptic loosening of the stem was 97% (95% CI: 93–100), 97% for 1-stage revision (95% CI: 90–100) and 97% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 92–100) (p = 0.3). No further infection or aseptic loosening occurred later than 7 years postoperatively. The radiographic results were similar for 1- and 2-stage procedures. Interpretation — Surgical management of PJI with stratification to 1- or 2-stage exchange according to a well-defined algorithm combined with antibiotic treatment allows the safe use of uncemented revision stems. Eradication of infection can be achieved in most cases, and medium- and long-term results appear to be comparable to those for revisions

  9. Eradication of infection, survival, and radiological results of uncemented revision stems in infected total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Born, Philipp; Ilchmann, Thomas; Zimmerli, Werner; Zwicky, Lukas; Graber, Peter; Ochsner, Peter E; Clauss, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - The use of uncemented revision stems is an established option in 2-stage procedures in patients with periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, in 1-stage procedures, they are still rarely used. There are still no detailed data on radiological outcome after uncemented 1-stage revisions. We assessed (1) the clinical outcome, including reoperation due to persistent infection and any other reoperation, and (2) the radiological outcome after 1- and 2-stage revision, using an uncemented stem. Patients and methods - Between January 1993 and December 2012, an uncemented revision stem was used in 81 THAs revised for PJI. Patients were treated with 1- or 2-stage procedures according to a well-defined algorithm (1-stage: n = 28; 2-stage: n = 53). All hips had a clinical and radiological follow-up. Outcome parameters were eradication of infection, re-revision of the stem, and radiological changes. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Radiographs were analyzed for bone restoration and signs of loosening. The mean clinical follow-up time was 7 (2-15) years. Results - The 7-year infection-free survival was 96% (95% CI: 92-100), 100% for 1-stage revision and 94% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 87-100) (p = 0.2). The 7-year survival for aseptic loosening of the stem was 97% (95% CI: 93-100), 97% for 1-stage revision (95% CI: 90-100) and 97% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 92-100) (p = 0.3). No further infection or aseptic loosening occurred later than 7 years postoperatively. The radiographic results were similar for 1- and 2-stage procedures. Interpretation - Surgical management of PJI with stratification to 1- or 2-stage exchange according to a well-defined algorithm combined with antibiotic treatment allows the safe use of uncemented revision stems. Eradication of infection can be achieved in most cases, and medium- and long-term results appear to be comparable to those for revisions for aseptic

  10. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry.

    PubMed

    Lenguerrand, E; Whitehouse, M R; Beswick, A D; Jones, S A; Porter, M L; Blom, A W

    2017-06-01

    We used the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man (NJR) to investigate the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection (PJI) for patients undergoing primary and revision hip arthroplasty, the changes in risk over time, and the overall burden created by PJI. We analysed revision total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed due to a diagnosis of PJI and the linked index procedures recorded in the NJR between 2003 and 2014. The cohort analysed consisted of 623 253 index primary hip arthroplasties, 63 222 index revision hip arthroplasties and 7585 revision THAs performed due to a diagnosis of PJI. The prevalence, cumulative incidence functions and the burden of PJI (total procedures) were calculated. Overall linear trends were investigated with log-linear regression. We demonstrated a prevalence of revision THA due to prosthetic joint infection of 0.4/100 procedures following primary and 1.6/100 procedures following revision hip arthroplasty. The prevalence of revision due to PJI in the three months following primary hip arthroplasty has risen 2.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 4.1) between 2005 and 2013, and 3.0-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 8.5) following revision hip arthroplasty. Over 1000 procedures are performed annually as a consequence of hip PJI, an increase of 2.6-fold between 2005 and 2013. Although the risk of revision due to PJI following hip arthroplasty is low, it is rising and, coupled with the established and further predicted increased incidence of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty, this represents a growing and substantial treatment burden.Cite this article: E. Lenguerrand, M. R. Whitehouse, A. D. Beswick, S. A. Jones, M. L. Porter, A. W. Blom. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:391-398. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.66.BJR-2017-0003.R1. © 2017 Lenguerrand et al.

  11. Type 3 finger length pattern is associated with total knee replacements due to osteoarthritis but not with hip replacements or hand osteoarthritis in the elderly: The AGES-Reykjavik study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent case–control studies have shown an association between type 3 finger length pattern (longer ring finger than index finger) and knee osteoarthritis. This large cross-sectional study tests the hypothesis that the type 3 pattern is associated with total joint replacements due to osteoarthritis in a large population based study. Methods Finger length ratios were assessed visually on 5170 hand photographs (2975 females, 2195 males, mean age 76). In this population-based multidisciplinary study of aging in Reykjavik, Iceland, the prevalence of osteoarthritis associated total knee replacements was 223(4.3%) and total hip replacements 316(6.1%). We then performed a binary logistic regression analysis for total knee replacements and total hip replacements, including finger length patterns, osteoarthritis at other sites and other variables with possible association to osteoarthritis such as age, BMI and bone mineral density of the spine. Results The prevalence of the type 3 pattern was 50% (43% in females, 58% in males). The regression analysis revealed an odds ratio for total knee replacements of 1.65 (1.24-2.2) p = 0.0007, in the type 3 finger pattern group, similar in both genders. This association was independent of the associations we have previously reported between total knee replacements and BMI and the presence of hand osteoarthritis. No association was seen between finger length patterns and total hip replacements. Conclusion Finger length patterns read from digital photographs in this large study confirm previous radiographic observations with significant associations between the type 3 pattern and total knee replacements but not total hip replacements in both genders in this elderly group. PMID:23530906

  12. Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy Effects on Postoperative Infection and Surgical Site Complication After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Redfern, Roberta E; Cameron-Ruetz, Claire; O'Drobinak, Simone K; Chen, John T; Beer, Karl J

    2017-06-17

    The aim of this study is to determine whether negative pressure wound therapy, used prophylactically in clean surgical incisions, reduces surgical site infection, hematoma, and seroma after total joint replacement. A single center, open-label study with a prospective cohort of patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty treated with closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT) of clean surgical wounds was conducted. One hundred ninety-six incisions treated with ciNPT in 192 patients were compared with a historical control group of 400 patients treated with traditional gauze dressing. The rates of clinically significant hematoma, seroma, dehiscence, surgical site infection, and complication were compared using univariate analyses and multiple logistic regression. The rate of deep infection was unchanged in the ciNPT group compared with control (1.0% vs 1.25%); however, the overall rate of infection (including superficial wound infection) decreased significantly (3.5% vs 1.0%, P = .04). Overall complication rate was lower in the ciNPT group than controls (1.5% vs 5.5%, P = .02). Upon logistic regression, only treatment group was associated with complication; patients treated with ciNPT were about 4 times less likely to experience a surgical site complication compared with control (P = .0277, odds ratio 4.251, 95% confidence interval 1.172-15.414). ciNPT for total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty in a comprehensive patient population reduced overall incidence of complication, but did not significantly impact the rate of deep infection. Further research to determine clinical and economic advantages of routine use of ciNPT in total joint arthroplasty is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spinal anaesthesia with adjunctive intrathecal morphine versus continuous lumbar plexus blockade: a randomised comparison for analgesia after hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, M J; Danesh-Clough, T K

    2015-07-01

    Following elective total hip replacement, both continuous lumbar plexus blockade and spinal anaesthesia (with adjunctive intrathecal morphine) have shown early outcome benefits over opioid analgesia and single-injection nerve block. However, the two techniques have not been compared in a prospective randomised manner. Our study examined 50 patients undergoing elective hip joint replacement who were randomised to receive spinal anaesthesia (with adjunctive intrathecal morphine 0.1 mg) or patient-controlled continuous lumbar plexus blockade. All surgery was conducted under general anaesthesia. Measured outcomes included numerically rated postoperative pain, supplemental opioid consumption and indices of mobilisation together with complications. Results show that block placement time was marginally shorter for the spinal group (5 versus 7 minutes, P=0.01). The primary outcome, worst pain on movement/mobilisation during the first 24 hours, was not statistically significantly different between groups. Patients in the lumbar plexus group were given more intraoperative opioid and rescue morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit (median = 4 versus 0 mg, P <0.001), with correspondingly higher pain scores (median 5/10 versus 0/10, P <0.001). Pain scores during the subsequent 24 hours were similar between groups, but more patients in the spinal group were given rescue morphine (5 versus 0, P=0.02). Physiotherapy mobilisation indices appeared similar between groups. More spinal group patients reported pruritus (12 versus 5, P=0.01), but antiemetic requirements, episodes of disorientation, arterial oxygen desaturation and falls were all similar between groups. Postoperative symptoms suggestive of neurological irritation or injury did not differ between groups. We found that following elective hip joint replacement, compared to continuous lumbar plexus blockade, spinal anaesthesia incorporating adjunctive intrathecal morphine did not result in a statistically significant

  14. [Validity and Reliability of the German Version of the HSS Expectation Questionnaire on Hip Joint Replacement].

    PubMed

    Balck, F; Kirschner, S; Jeszenszky, C; Lippmann, M; Günther, K-P

    2016-12-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty is one of the most successful operations in medicine. The clinical result after surgery and compliance during rehabilitation are influenced by the patient's expectations. There is a lack of a validated German instrument to record these expectations in a standardised manner. Patients: 193 patients from the Dresden Hip Register with osteoarthritis of the hip were surveyed with respect to their expectations before the operation. The study sample consists of 108 women and 85 men. The average age of the patients was 59.7 years, with a standard deviation of 12.2 years. Methods: The Hospital for Special Patient Expectations Survey was translated into German and culturally adapted. In addition, the RKI demographic core data set, the HADS-D, LOT-R and the SCL-(K-)9 were collected to validate the instrument. In the statistical analysis, four main factors could be distinguished. These were "everyday activities", "pain relief and improvement in function", "medication and social participation" and "gait improvement". Results: Patients were predominantly married. 20 % of the women were widowed. 20 % had received higher education. Almost half of the patients were retired, 30 % were employed, 15.1 % self-employed and 7.3 % were unemployed. For most of the items, patients expected major improvements up to normalisation of their health. There were many different answers to several items, such as the question on occupation. For sporting and sexual activities no high expectations were given. The average expectation of the whole sample shows major differences to individual expectations. Men showed higher expectations for medication, social participation and gait improvement than did women. There were lower expectations for everyday activities, medication and social participation and gait improvement for older patients. Summary: The German version of the HSS patients expectation survey was validated. The instrument is useful in the

  15. Mid-term results of cementless total hip replacement using a ceramic-on-ceramic bearing with and without computer navigation.

    PubMed

    Sugano, N; Nishii, T; Miki, H; Yoshikawa, H; Sato, Y; Tamura, S

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a CT-based navigation system using infrared light-emitting diode markers and an optical camera. We used this system to perform cementless total hip replacement using a ceramic-on-ceramic bearing couple in 53 patients (60 hips) between 1998 and 2001. We reviewed 52 patients (59 hips) at a mean of six years (5 to 8) postoperatively. The mid-term results of total hip replacement using navigation were compared with those of 91 patients (111 hips) who underwent this procedure using the same implants, during the same period, without navigation. There were no significant differences in age, gender, diagnosis, height, weight, body mass index, or pre-operative clinical score between the two groups. The operation time was significantly longer where navigation was used, but there was no significant difference in blood loss or navigation-related complications. With navigation, the acetabular components were placed within the safe zone defined by Lewinnek, while without, 31 of the 111 components were placed outside this zone. There was no significant difference in the Merle d'Aubigne and Postel hip score at the final follow-up. However, hips treated without navigation had a higher rate of dislocation. Revision was performed in two cases undertaken without navigation, one for aseptic acetabular loosening and one for fracture of a ceramic liner, both of which showed evidence of neck impingement on the liner. A further five cases undertaken without navigation showed erosion of the posterior aspect of the neck of the femoral component on the lateral radiographs. These seven impingement-related mechanical problems correlated with malorientation of the acetabular component. There were no such mechanical problems in the navigated group. We conclude that CT-based navigation increased the precision of orientation of the acetabular component and control of limb length in total hip replacement, without navigation-related complications. It also reduced the rate of

  16. Hip Replacement Surgery in 14-Year-Old Girl with Factor V Deficiency: Haemostatic Treatment and Thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Mingot-Castellano, María Eva; Pérez-Núñez, Josefina; Baeza-Montañez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Factor V (FV) is a pivotal coagulation factor present in plasma and platelets. It plays an essential role in secondary haemostasis acting as a cofactor in the prothrombinase complex, catalysing the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. There is little evidence on the management of mayor orthopaedic surgery in paediatric or adolescents subjects with this coagulopathy and almost no information about thromboprophylaxis in these situations. We report a case of a hip replacement in a 14-year-old girl with moderate FV deficiency (0.07 IU mL(-1)). As haemostatic replacement, inactivated fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was transfused at doses of 600 mL (15 mL kg(-1), 45 kg weight) 2 hours before surgery and then sequential FFP infusions of 250 mL (7 mL kg(-1)) every 12 hours for 7 days. Plasma factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen, and von Willebrand ristocetin cofactor were monitored to avoid supranormal levels. Since the patient was sexually mature (Marshall and Tanner stage 5) with the hormone replacement therapy, she was immobilized and the surgery was considered as a high thrombotic risk. Thus, low molecular weight heparin was administered at doses of intermediate risk (Enoxaparin 20 mg daily, by weight) after finishing the daily infusion of plasma: 24 hours and during the 7 days after intervention. No tranexamic acid was used. No haemorrhagic or thrombotic adverse event was described.

  17. Hip Replacement Surgery in 14-Year-Old Girl with Factor V Deficiency: Haemostatic Treatment and Thrombo