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Sample records for infected permanent pacemaker

  1. Pericarditis following permanent pacemaker insertion.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yair; Shovman, Ora; Granit, Chava; Luria, David; Gurevitz, Osnat; Bar-Lev, David; Eldar, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Glikson, Michael

    2004-10-01

    The appearance of pericarditis following insertion of a permanent pacemaker is not widely acknowledged in the literature. To describe our experience with pericarditis following 395 permanent pacemaker implantations over 2 years. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 395 consecutive patients in whom new pacing systems or pacemaker leads had been implanted over a 2 year period. We searched the records for pericarditis that developed within 1 month after pacemaker implantation according to the ICD-9 code. The incidence, clinical picture, response to treatment, and relationship to lead design and location were studied. Eight cases (2%) of pericarditis following implantation were detected. Clinical manifestations in all patients were similar to those of post-pericardiotomy syndrome and included chest pain (n = 7), friction rub (n = 1), fever (n = 2), fatigue (n = 2), pleural effusion (n = 2), new atrial fibrillation (n = 2), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 4), and echcardiographic evidence of pericardial effusion (n = 8). All affected patients had undergone active fixation (screw-in) lead implantation in the atrial position. The incidence of pericarditis with screw-in atrial leads was 3% compared to 0% in other cases (P < 0.05). Pericarditis is not uncommon following pacemaker implantation with active fixation atrial leads. Special attention should be paid to identifying pericardial complications following pacemaker implantation, especially when anticoagulant therapy is resumed or initiated. The use of passive fixation leads is likely to reduce the incidence of pericarditis but this issue should be further investigated.

  2. [Permanent pacemaker implantation. Indications and results].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, A; Iturralde, P; Gutiérrez Fuster, E; Martínez Ríos, N; Martínez Ríos, M A; Romero, L; Hernández, D; González Hermosillo, J A

    1990-01-01

    Clinical, laboratory and electrocardiographic data from 608 patients with permanent pacemakers implanted over a period of 8 years, were evaluated retrospectively. The number of implants was greater in males (56.5%) and in patients over 60 years of age (77.5%). Atherosclerosis was the most common disease found in this group (50%). Syncope occurred in 96.2% of the cases; and complete AV block was the most common electrocardiographic alteration (50.5%). Electrode displacement occurred in 32 patients (5.2%) and was the most commonly found early complication. Among the late complications, 10.3% of the patients had infections in the area of the generator. The total mortality was 7.7% due to the heart disease rather than pacemaker-related complication.

  3. Reuse of permanent cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, M D; Portnoy, D; Chiu, R C; Paterson, A K

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are part of a growing group of expensive implantable electronic devices; hospitals in which 100 pacemakers are implanted per year must budget over $300 000 for these devices. This cost represents a considerable burden to health care resources. Since the "life-span" of modern pacemakers often exceeds that of the patients who receive them, the recovery and reuse of these devices seems logical. Pacemakers can be resterilized and tested with current hospital procedures. Reuse should be acceptable under Canadian law, but the manner in which the pacemakers are recovered and the patients selected should follow careful guidelines. Every patient should provide written informed consent before receiving a recovered pacemaker. Properly executed, reuse of pacemakers should provide a high level of health care while maintaining or reducing the cost of these devices. PMID:4016637

  4. Femoral approach: an exceptional alternative for permanent pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Tereno Valente, Bruno; Conceição, José M; Nogueira da Silva, Manuel; M Oliveira, Mário; S Cunha, Pedro; Lousinha, Ana; Galrinho, Ana; C Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein.

  5. The effect of metal detector gates on implanted permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Copperman, Y; Zarfati, D; Laniado, S

    1988-10-01

    The effect of metal detector security gates, such as are used in airports, was tested in 103 nonselected pacemaker patients. Various types of single and dual chamber units were examined, using telemetry during the test. Pulse rate and duration were measured immediately before and after the procedure. No ill effect was seen on any of the units tested, pacemaker inhibition was not observed, and programmability was not affected. Metal detector security gates have no effect on implanted permanent pacemakers.

  6. Permanent pacemaker malfunction: diagnostic aspects of temporary pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, N D

    1980-01-01

    A temporary pacing electrode can function as a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic tool. This is illustrated in two patients whose permanent pacemakers unexpectedly failed. In the first patient a demand pacemaker was inhibited by a magnet rather than converting to the asynchronous mode. In the second the pacemaker appeared to be producing low-voltage potentials not detectable on the surface electrocardiogram. The presence of a temporary pacing electrode can be useful for defining the cause of pacemaker failure and the nature of any associated arrhythmias. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 PMID:7260759

  7. Permanent pacemaker for syncope after heart transplantation with bicaval technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyong Joo; Jung, Yun Sook; Lee, Chan Joo; Wi, Jin; Shin, Sanghoon; Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Sang Hak; Kang, Seok-Min; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Park, Han Ki

    2009-08-31

    Sinus node dysfunction occurs occasionally after heart transplantation and may be caused by surgical trauma, ischemia to the sinus node, rejection, drug therapy, and increasing donor age. However, the timing and indication of permanent pacemaker insertion due to sinus node dysfunction following heart transplantation is contentious. Here, we report a case of a permanent pacemaker insertion for syncope due to sinus arrest after heart transplantation, even with a bicaval technique, which has been known to associate with few incidences of sinus node dysfunction.

  8. [Exercise test in patients with permanent pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Esturau, R; Iturralde, P; Férez, S; Galván, O; Rosado, J; Pérez, G; González Hermosillo, J A

    1991-01-01

    From June 1988 to June 1990 we studied fifty patients who had implantation of a pacemaker. (31 females and 19 males). All of them underwent stress test with Bruce's protocol. Patients were divided in two groups; pacemaker-independent (PI) and pacemaker-dependent (PD). Over 50% of the patients inhibited the pacemaker with their own rhythm, most of them had sinus dysfunction. Complete A-V block was predominant in PD. The group of PI achieved more mets and had more oxygen consumption. Blood pressure response was similar in both groups.

  9. [Clinical application of one-stage operation of epicardial permanent pacemaker implantation and cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Ren, C L; Jiang, S L; Xiao, C S; Wang, R; Gao, C Q

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To summarize the results and clinical application experience of one-stage operation of epicardial permanent pacemaker implantation and cardiac surgery. Methods: From November 2014 to July 2016, 15 patients (9 males and 6 females) with ages ranging from 50 to 73 (63.5±6.2) years requiring cardiac surgery with bradycardia underwent one-stage operation of epicardial permanent pacemaker implantation and cardiac surgery. All operations were performed under general anesthesia with chest median incision approach. Among them, single chamber pacemaker (n=10) and dual chamber pacemaker (n=5) permanent epicardial pacing leads were implanted. Simultaneous procedures included valve replacement in 7 cases, valve replacement combined with atrial fibrillation ablation in 3 cases, coronary artery bypass grafting in 2 cases, aortic root replacement in 2 cases, and valve replacement combined with coronary artery bypass surgery in 1 case. Their parameters of pacemaker including sensitivity, pacing threshold, pacing impedance were measured during surgery and closely followed up at 1 week and 3, 6 months after surgery. Results: All 15 patients with epicardial permanent pacemaker implantation in the same period of cardiac surgery were successfully cured and discharged, without any surgical complications. A total of 20 epicardial electrodes were implanted for them including 5 right atrial electrodes and 15 right ventricular electrodes. The postoperative follow-up period ranged from 3 to 22 months. No electrode fracture and surgical wound infection occurred in those patients, and their impedance, sensing and stimulation thresholds were all in normal ranges during follow-up. Conclusions: For patients with bradycardia who required cardiac surgery, one-stage operation of epicardial permanent pacemaker implantation and cardiac surgery is safe and effective, and the results in the short-term and medium-term are satisfactory, avoiding the risk of staged surgery.

  10. Analysis of a five year experience of permanent pacemaker implantation at a Nigerian Teaching Hospital: need for a national database

    PubMed Central

    Falase, Bode; Sanusi, Michael; Johnson, Adeyemi; Akinrinlola, Fola; Ajayi, Reina; Oke, David

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Permanent pacemaker implantation is available in Nigeria. There is however no national registry or framework for pacemaker data collection. A pacemaker database has been developed in our institution and the results are analyzed in this study. Methods The study period was between January 2008 and December 2012. Patient data was extracted from a prospectively maintained database which was designed to include the fields of the European pacemaker patient identification code. Results Of the 51 pacemaker implants done, there were 29 males (56.9%) and 22 females (43.1%). Mean age was 68.2±12.7 years. Clinical indications were syncopal attacks in 25 patients (49%), dizzy spells in 15 patients (29.4%), bradycardia with no symptoms in 10 patients (17.7%) and dyspnoea in 2 patients (3.9%). The ECG diagnosis was complete heart block in 27 patients (53%), second degree heart block in 19 patients (37.2%) and sick sinus syndrome with bradycardia in 5 patients (9.8%). Pacemaker modes used were ventricular pacing in 29 patients (56.9%) and dual chamber pacing in 22 patients (43.1%). Files have been closed in 20 patients (39.2%) and 31 patients (60.8%) are still being followed up with median follow up of 26 months, median of 5 visits and 282 pacemaker checks done. Complications seen during follow up were 3 lead displacements (5.9%), 3 pacemaker infections (5.9%), 2 pacemaker pocket erosions (3.9%), and 1 pacemaker related death (2%). There were 5 non-pacemaker related deaths (9.8%). Conclusion Pacemaker data has been maintained for 5 years. We urge other implanting institutions in Nigeria to maintain similar databases and work towards establishment of a national pacemaker registry. PMID:24498465

  11. Analysis of a five year experience of permanent pacemaker implantation at a Nigerian Teaching Hospital: need for a national database.

    PubMed

    Falase, Bode; Sanusi, Michael; Johnson, Adeyemi; Akinrinlola, Fola; Ajayi, Reina; Oke, David

    2013-01-01

    Permanent pacemaker implantation is available in Nigeria. There is however no national registry or framework for pacemaker data collection. A pacemaker database has been developed in our institution and the results are analyzed in this study. The study period was between January 2008 and December 2012. Patient data was extracted from a prospectively maintained database which was designed to include the fields of the European pacemaker patient identification code. Of the 51 pacemaker implants done, there were 29 males (56.9%) and 22 females (43.1%). Mean age was 68.2±12.7 years. Clinical indications were syncopal attacks in 25 patients (49%), dizzy spells in 15 patients (29.4%), bradycardia with no symptoms in 10 patients (17.7%) and dyspnoea in 2 patients (3.9%). The ECG diagnosis was complete heart block in 27 patients (53%), second degree heart block in 19 patients (37.2%) and sick sinus syndrome with bradycardia in 5 patients (9.8%). Pacemaker modes used were ventricular pacing in 29 patients (56.9%) and dual chamber pacing in 22 patients (43.1%). Files have been closed in 20 patients (39.2%) and 31 patients (60.8%) are still being followed up with median follow up of 26 months, median of 5 visits and 282 pacemaker checks done. Complications seen during follow up were 3 lead displacements (5.9%), 3 pacemaker infections (5.9%), 2 pacemaker pocket erosions (3.9%), and 1 pacemaker related death (2%). There were 5 non-pacemaker related deaths (9.8%). Pacemaker data has been maintained for 5 years. We urge other implanting institutions in Nigeria to maintain similar databases and work towards establishment of a national pacemaker registry.

  12. Guillain-Barré Syndrome with asystole requiring permanent pacemaker: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehul B; Goyal, Sandeep K; Punnam, Sujeeth R; Pandya, Khyati; Khetarpal, Vipin; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2009-01-06

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute demyelinating disorder of the peripheral nervous system that results from an aberrant immune response directed at peripheral nerves. Autonomic abnormalities in Guillain-Barré syndrome are usually transient and reversible. We present a case of Guillain-Barré syndrome requiring a permanent pacemaker in view of persistent symptomatic bradyarrhythmia. An 18-year-old Caucasian female presented with bilateral lower limb paraesthesias followed by bilateral progressive leg weakness and difficulty in walking. She reported an episode of an upper respiratory tract infection 3 weeks prior to the onset of her neurological symptoms. Diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome was considered and a lumbar puncture was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed albuminocytologic dissociation (increased protein but normal white blood cell count) suggestive of Guillain-Barré syndrome and hence an intravenous immunoglobulin G infusion was started. Within 48 hours, she progressed to complete flaccid quadriparesis with involvement of respiratory muscles requiring mechanical ventilatory support. Whist in the intensive care unit, she developed multiple episodes of bradycardia and asystole requiring a temporary pacemaker. In view of the persistent requirement for the temporary pacemaker for more than 5 days, she received a permanent pacemaker. She returned for follow-up three months after discharge with an intermittent need for ventricular pacing. Guillain-Barré syndrome can result in permanent damage to the cardiac conduction system. Patients with multiple episodes of bradycardia and asystole in the setting of Guillain-Barré syndrome should be evaluated and considered as potential candidates for permanent pacemaker implantation.

  13. Concomitant Use of the Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator and a Permanent Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jason; Patton, Kristen K; Prutkin, Jordan M

    2016-11-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) is a novel implanted defibrillator for the prevention of sudden cardiac death that avoids intravascular access. Use of this device is limited by its inability to provide backup pacing. Combined use of the S-ICD with a permanent pacemaker may be the optimal choice in certain situations though experience with the use of both devices together remains limited. We reviewed our single-center experience with the S-ICD from March 2011 to November 2015. Four patients with concomitant use of the S-ICD and a permanent pacemaker were identified. Clinical indication for device therapy, operative details, and subsequent follow-up was reviewed. During implantation, S-ICD sensing of paced morphologies was evaluated at maximal voltage output. After S-ICD implant, if feasible, the upper rate was adjusted to ≤50% of the S-ICD tachycardia zone to minimize risk of inappropriate shocks. After a mean follow-up of over 1 year, no adverse events occurred, including no inappropriate shock, lead malfunction, or device infection. One patient had a total of eight appropriate shocks, while another individual had no inappropriate shocks despite having a unipolar pacing lead. In unique situations, combined use of the S-ICD and a permanent pacemaker may be preferable to alternative options. In our experience, this approach was successful in varying conditions including complex congenital heart disease, recurrent device infection, and limited vascular access. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Successful management of multiple permanent pacemaker complications – infection, 13 year old silent lead perforation and exteriorisation following failed percutaneous extraction, superior vena cava obstruction, tricuspid valve endocarditis, pulmonary embolism and prosthetic tricuspid valve thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Pankaj; Adluri, Krishna; Javangula, Kalyana; Baig, Wasir

    2009-01-01

    A 59 year old man underwent mechanical tricuspid valve replacement and removal of pacemaker generator along with 4 pacemaker leads for pacemaker endocarditis and superior vena cava obstruction after an earlier percutaneous extraction had to be abandoned, 13 years ago, due to cardiac arrest, accompanied by silent, unsuspected right atrial perforation and exteriorisation of lead. Postoperative course was complicated by tricuspid valve thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism requiring TPA thrombolysis which was instantly successful. A review of literature of pacemaker endocarditis and tricuspid thrombosis along with the relevant management strategies is presented. We believe this case report is unusual on account of non operative management of right atrial lead perforation following an unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous removal of right sided infected pacemaker leads and the incidental discovery of the perforated lead 13 years later at sternotomy, presentation of pacemaker endocarditis with a massive load of vegetations along the entire pacemaker lead tract in superior vena cava, right atrial endocardium, tricuspid valve and right ventricular endocardium, leading to a functional and structural SVC obstruction, requirement of an unusually large dose of warfarin postoperatively occasioned, in all probability, by antibiotic drug interactions, presentation of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis uniquely as vasovagal syncope and isolated hypoxia and near instantaneous resolution of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with Alteplase thrombolysis. PMID:19239701

  15. [TRENDS OF PERMANENT PACEMAKER IMPLANTATION IN A SINGLE CENTER OVER A 20-YEAR PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Dante; Ilan, Limor Bushar; Freedberg, Nahum A; Feldman, Alexander; Turgeman, Yoav

    2015-05-01

    To review the changes in permanent pacemaker implantation indications, pacing modes and patients' demographics over a 20-year period. We retrospectively retrieved data on patients who underwent first implantation of the pacemaker between 1-1-1991 and 31-12-2010. One thousand and nine (1,009) patients underwent a first pacemaker implantation during that period; 535 were men (53%), their mean age was 74.6±19.5 years; the highest rate of implanted pacemaker was in patients ranging in age from 70-79 years, however there was an increasing number of patients aged over 80 years. The median survival time after initial pacemaker implantation was 8 years. Syncope was the most common symptom (62.5%) and atrioventricular block was the most common electrocardiographic indication (56.4%) leading to pacemaker implantation. There was increased utilization of dual chamber and rate responsive pacemakers over the years. There was no difference regarding mode selection between genders. Pacemaker implantation rates have increased over a 20-year period. Dual chamber replaced most of the single ventricular chamber pacemaker and rate responsive pacemakers became the norm. The data of a small volume center are similar to those reported in pacemaker surveys of high volume pacemaker implantation centers. They confirm adherence to the published guidelines for pacing.

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with an magnetic resonance imaging conditional permanent pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Andrew J.; Artis, Nigel J.; Sivananthan, U. Mohan; Pepper, Chris B.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as the optimum modality for cardiac imaging. An aging population and rising numbers of patients with permanent pacemakers means many such individuals may require cardiac MRI scanning in the future. Whilst the presence of a permanent pacemaker is historically regarded as a contra-indication to MRI scanning, pacemaker systems have been developed to limit any associated risks. No reports have been published regarding the use of such devices with cardiac MRI in a clinical setting. We present the safe, successful cardiac MRI scan of a patient with an MRI-conditional permanent pacing system. PMID:22355486

  17. Permanent Leadless Cardiac Pacemaker Therapy: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Tjong, Fleur V Y; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2017-04-11

    A new technology, leadless pacemaker therapy, was recently introduced clinically to address lead- and pocket-related complications in conventional transvenous pacemaker therapy. These leadless devices are self-contained right ventricular single-chamber pacemakers implanted by using a femoral percutaneous approach. In this review of available clinical data on leadless pacemakers, early results with leadless devices are compared with historical results with conventional single-chamber pacing. Both presently manufactured leadless pacemakers show similar complications, which are mostly related to the implant procedure: cardiac perforation, device dislocation, and femoral vascular access site complications. In comparison with conventional transvenous single-chamber pacemakers, slightly higher short-term complication rates have been observed: 4.8% for leadless pacemakers versus 4.1% for conventional pacemakers. The complication rate of the leadless pacemakers is influenced by the implanter learning curve for this new procedure. No long-term outcome data are yet available for the leadless pacemakers. Larger leadless pacing trials, with long-term follow-up and direct randomized comparison with conventional pacing systems, will be required to define the proper clinical role of these leadless systems. Although current leadless pacemakers are limited to right ventricular pacing, future advanced, communicating, multicomponent systems are expected to expand the potential benefits of leadless therapy to a larger patient population. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. 76 FR 53851 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Cardiovascular Permanent Pacemaker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... proposed to require the filing of a premarket approval application or a notice of completion of a product development protocol for the class III preamendments device: Cardiovascular permanent pacemaker electrode....

  19. Permanent pacemaker lead induced severe tricuspid regurgitation in patient undergoing multiple valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Wook Sung

    2015-04-01

    Severe and permanent tricuspid regurgitation induced by pacemaker leads is rarely reported in the literature. The mechanism of pacemaker-induced tricuspid regurgitation has been identified, but its management has not been well established. Furthermore, debate still exists regarding the proper surgical approach. We present the case of a patient with severe tricuspid regurgitation induced by a pacemaker lead, accompanied by triple valve disease. The patient underwent double valve replacement and tricuspid valve repair without removal of the pre-existing pacemaker lead. The operation was successful and the surgical procedure is discussed in detail.

  20. Third-generation mobile phones (UMTS) do not interfere with permanent implanted pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohamed M; Badreldin, Akmal M A; Heldwein, Matthias; Hekmat, Khosro

    2010-07-01

    Third-generation mobile phones, UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunication System), were recently introduced in Europe. The safety of these devices with regard to their interference with implanted pacemakers is as yet unknown and is the point of interest in this study. The study comprised 100 patients with permanent pacemaker implantation between November 2004 and June 2005. Two UMTS cellular phones (T-Mobile, Vodafone) were tested in the standby, dialing, and operating mode with 23 single-chamber and 77 dual-chamber pacemakers. Continuous surface electrocardiograms (ECGs), intracardiac electrograms, and marker channels were recorded when calls were made by a stationary phone to cellular phone. All pacemakers were tested under a "worst-case scenario," which includes a programming of the pacemaker to unipolar sensing and pacing modes and inducing of a maximum sensitivity setting during continuous pacing of the patient. Patients had pacemaker implantation between June 1990 and April 2005. The mean age was 68.4 +/- 15.1 years. Regardless of atrial and ventricular sensitivity settings, both UMTS mobile phones (Nokia 6650 and Motorola A835) did not show any interference with all tested pacemakers. In addition, both cellular phones did not interfere with the marker channels and the intracardiac ECGs of the pacemakers. Third-generation mobile phones are safe for patients with permanent pacemakers. This is due to the high-frequency band for this system (1,800-2,200 MHz) and the low power output between 0.01 W and 0.25 W.

  1. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  2. Transvenous permanent pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia: technique, challenges, outcome, and a brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shenthar, Jayaprakash; Rai, Maneesh K; Walia, Rohit; Ghanta, Somasekhar; Sreekumar, Praveen; Reddy, Satish S

    2014-09-01

    Dextrocardia is a rare congenital anomaly. Pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia can be challenging because of the distorted anatomy and associated anomalies. The literature regarding implantation of pacemaker in dextrocardia is scarce. The study involved retrospective analysis of records of patients with dextrocardia who had undergone pacemaker implantation between January 2006 and July 2013 from a single centre. Six patients with dextrocardia (five males and one female) underwent permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) between January 2006 and July 2013. Of them, three had situs solitus dextrocardia and three situs inversus dextrocardia. All three patients with situs solitus dextrocardia had associated corrected transposition of great arteries. The indication for pacemaker implantation was symptomatic complete atrioventricular (AV) block in four, high-grade AV block in one, and sinus node dysfunction in one patient. A favourable outcome was noted during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years (4 months to 7 years) with one patient needing a pulse generator replacement. Permanent pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia can be challenging because of the distorted anatomy. Use of a technique employing angiography to delineate chamber anatomy and relationship can assist the operator during such difficult PPIs. The medium- and long-term survival after a successful pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia is favourable. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Permanent pacemaker implantation after isolated aortic valve replacement: incidence, indications, and predictors.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Sam; Hobson, Alex R; Kalra, Paul R; Tang, Augustine T M; Monro, James L; Dawkins, Keith D

    2008-01-01

    Conducting system defects are common in patients with aortic valve disease. Aortic valve replacement may result in further conduction abnormalities and necessitate permanent pacemaker implantation (PPM). We sought to identify the contemporary incidence and predictors for early postoperative PPM in patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement. Data were analyzed from 354 consecutive patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement at a referral cardiac unit during a 30-month period; data were unavailable on 4 patients and a further 8 had undergone preoperative PPM. Results for the remaining 342 patients (97%; mean age, 67 +/- 14 years), of whom 212 were males, are presented. The major indications for aortic valve replacement were valvular stenosis (n = 224), regurgitation (n = 70), or infective endocarditis (n = 25). Preoperative conducting system disease was present in 26% of patients. In-hospital mortality was 1.8% (6 of 342 patients). Postoperatively 29 patients (8.5%) required early PPM, of which 26 were during the index admission. Patients with preoperative conducting system disease (16% versus 6%; p = 0.004) and valvular regurgitation (16% versus 7%; p = 0.01) were more likely to require PPM as opposed to those without. Preoperative conducting system disease was the only independent predictor of PPM (p < 0.01); the relative risk of PPM requirement in this group was 2.88 (95% confidence interval, 1.31 to 6.33). Permanent pacemaker implantation requirement after aortic valve replacement is a common occurrence, and should be discussed as part of the preoperative consent process. Preexisting conducting disease and preoperative aortic regurgitation were predictors of PPM requirement.

  4. Permanent transvenous pacemaker implantation in an Ibizan hound cross with persistent atrial standstill

    PubMed Central

    MacAulay, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    An Ibizan hound cross was referred with a 1-year history of syncope and exercise intolerance. An electrocardiogram showed bradycardia and no P waves; atrial standstill was diagnosed. A permanent artificial endocardial pacemaker was implanted. The lead dislodged and was reimplanted into the right ventricular apex. Capture was once again achieved. PMID:12395764

  5. Evaluation of Death among the Patients Undergoing Permanent Pacemaker Implantation: A Competing Risks Analysis

    PubMed Central

    GHAEM, Haleh; GHORBANI, Mohammad; ZARE DORNIANI, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Permanent artificial pacemaker is one of the important therapies for treatment of cardiac conduction system problems. The present study aimed to determine the association between some predictive variables and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the patients who had undergone pacemaker implantation. Methods: This study was conducted on 1207 patients who had undergone permanent pacemaker implantation in the hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from Mar 2002 to Mar 2012. The variables that existed in the patients’ medical records included sex, diabetes mellitus, obesity, cerebrovascular accident, cardiomegaly, smoking, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congenital heart disease, sick sinus syndrome, and atrial fibrillation. Competing risks model was used to assess the association between the predictive variables and cause-specific (i.e., cardiac and vascular) mortality. Results: The patients’ mean age was 66.32±17.92 yr (70.62±14.45 yr in the patients with single-chamber pacemakers vs. 61.91±17.69 yr in those with two-chamber pacemakers) (P<0.001). Sick sinus syndrome and age increased the risk of all-cause mortality, while two-chamber pacemaker decreased this risk. Obesity increased the risk of cardiac death, and diabetes mellitus and heart valve disease increased the risk of vascular death. Conclusion: The variables predicting mortality in all-cause model were completely different from those in cause-specific model. Moreover, death in such patients may occur due to reasons other than pacemaker. Therefore, future studies, particularly prospective ones, are recommended to use competing risks models. PMID:28828325

  6. Evaluation of Death among the Patients Undergoing Permanent Pacemaker Implantation: A Competing Risks Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghaem, Haleh; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Zare Dorniani, Samira

    2017-06-01

    Permanent artificial pacemaker is one of the important therapies for treatment of cardiac conduction system problems. The present study aimed to determine the association between some predictive variables and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the patients who had undergone pacemaker implantation. This study was conducted on 1207 patients who had undergone permanent pacemaker implantation in the hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from Mar 2002 to Mar 2012. The variables that existed in the patients' medical records included sex, diabetes mellitus, obesity, cerebrovascular accident, cardiomegaly, smoking, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congenital heart disease, sick sinus syndrome, and atrial fibrillation. Competing risks model was used to assess the association between the predictive variables and cause-specific (i.e., cardiac and vascular) mortality. The patients' mean age was 66.32±17.92 yr (70.62±14.45 yr in the patients with single-chamber pacemakers vs. 61.91±17.69 yr in those with two-chamber pacemakers) (P<0.001). Sick sinus syndrome and age increased the risk of all-cause mortality, while two-chamber pacemaker decreased this risk. Obesity increased the risk of cardiac death, and diabetes mellitus and heart valve disease increased the risk of vascular death. The variables predicting mortality in all-cause model were completely different from those in cause-specific model. Moreover, death in such patients may occur due to reasons other than pacemaker. Therefore, future studies, particularly prospective ones, are recommended to use competing risks models.

  7. Permanent Pacemaker-Induced Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: Successful Treatment by Endovascular Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Lanciego, Carlos Rodriguez, Mario; Rodriguez, Adela; Carbonell, Miguel A.; Garcia, Lorenzo Garcia

    2003-11-15

    The use of metallic stents in the management of benign and malignant superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is well documented. Symptomatic stenosis or occlusion of the SVC is a rare complication of a transvenous permanent pacemaker implant. Suggested treatments have included anticoagulation therapy, thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty and surgery. More recently, endovascular stenting has evolved as an attractive alternative but the data available in the literature are limited. We describe a case in which venous stenting with a Wallstent endoprosthesis was used successfully. The patient remains symptom free and with normal pacemaker function 36 months later.

  8. Suicide attempt by complete self-removal of a 12-year-old permanent pacemaker system: case report.

    PubMed

    Norgaard, Mette Lykke; Melchior, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; Haugan, Ketil

    2014-01-01

    Psychological adaption after pacemaker implantation can be challenging in patients with psychiatric disease. Suicide by self-removal of a permanent pacemaker system is a rare phenomenon described in a few cases in patients with psychiatric disorders. We describe a case of attempted suicide by complete self-removal of a 12-year-old permanent pacemaker system in a 70-year-old male patient with a bipolar disorder and a history of previous suicide attempts. Suicide attempt by self-removal of a permanent pacemaker system is very rare. In patients with a history of psychiatric disease and previous suicide attempts, careful information about the function of a pacemaker should be given. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Risks Lifestyle Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Atrial Fibrillation Heart Block Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Long ... a normal rate. Pacemakers are used to treat arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs). Arrhythmias are problems with ...

  10. Short- and long-term need for permanent pacemaker after transcatheter implantation of the Edwards Sapien aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Raúl; Calvo, Luis; Sánchez-Recalde, Angel; Galeote, Guillermo; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; López, Teresa; Plaza, Ignacio; González-Davia, Rosa; Ramírez, Ulises; Mesa, Jose Maria; Moreno-Gomez, Isidro; López-Sendón, José-Luis

    2015-11-01

    A permanent pacemaker is frequently needed after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, but the available data are mainly on the CoreValve system. To evaluate the need for new permanent pacemaker after implantation of the Edwards Sapien device, as well as related factors. We included the first 100 patients treated with the Edwards Sapien device at our institution. Of these, 12 had a permanent pacemaker before the procedure, and thus our study population was the remaining 88 patients. A permanent pacemaker was indicated in eight patients (9.1%) during hospitalization or at 30 days. After discharge, another four patients needed a pacemaker (at 42 days and three, 18, and 30 months). Two variables were associated with the need for pacemaker during hospitalization: previous dialysis (13% vs. 1%, p=0.042) and complete right bundle branch block before the procedure (25% vs. 5%, p=0.032). More than one month after the procedure, the characteristics associated with the need for pacemaker were plasma creatinine level (2.5±1.7 vs. 1.3±0.6 mg/dl, p=0.001) and previous myocardial infarction (50% vs. 10%, p=0.013). The rate of pacemaker implantation with the Edwards Sapien device was 9.1%. Right bundle branch block and dialysis were associated with this complication.

  11. Trends in permanent pacemaker implantation in the United States from 1993 to 2009: increasing complexity of patients and procedures.

    PubMed

    Greenspon, Arnold J; Patel, Jasmine D; Lau, Edmund; Ochoa, Jorge A; Frisch, Daniel R; Ho, Reginald T; Pavri, Behzad B; Kurtz, Steven M

    2012-10-16

    This study sought to define contemporary trends in permanent pacemaker use by analyzing a large national database. The Medicare National Coverage Determination for permanent pacemaker, which emphasized single-chamber pacing, has not changed significantly since 1985. We sought to define contemporary trends in permanent pacemaker use by analyzing a large national database. We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify permanent pacemaker implants between 1993 and 2009 using the International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification procedure codes for dual-chamber (DDD), single-ventricular (VVI), single-atrial (AAI), or biventricular (BiV) devices. Annual permanent pacemaker implantation rates and patient demographics were analyzed. Between 1993 and 2009, 2.9 million patients received permanent pacemakers in the United States. Overall use increased by 55.6%. By 2009, DDD use increased from 62% to 82% (p < 0.001), whereas single-chamber ventricular pacemaker use fell from 36% to 14% (p = 0.01). Use of DDD devices was higher in urban, nonteaching hospitals (79%) compared with urban teaching hospitals (76%) and rural hospitals (72%). Patients with private insurance (83%) more commonly received DDD devices than Medicaid (79%) or Medicare (75%) recipients (p < 0.001). Patient age and Charlson comorbidity index increased over time. Hospital charges ($2011) increased 45.3%, driven by the increased cost of DDD devices. There is a steady growth in the use of permanent pacemakers in the United States. Although DDD device use is increasing, whereas single-chamber ventricular pacemaker use is decreasing. Patients are becoming older and have more medical comorbidities. These trends have important health care policy implications. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Behaviour of some serum enzymes after permanent pacemaker implantation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, F; Maiolino, P; Allegri, P; Barbieri, E; de Lio, U; Morlino, T; Ometto, R; Vincenzi, M

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of some serum enzymes (CPK, LDH, alpha HBDH, SGOT) in 50 patients after permanent pacemaker implantation is outlined. Changes of each enzyme were analyzed statistically by applying Student's t test. Most significant changes are represented by the increase in CPK serum concentrations (19 cases). In 14 of them LDH isoenzymes were evaluated and in 4 patients alteration of LDH1/LDH2 ratio suggestive of cardiac "injury" were observed.

  13. The effect of radiofrequency catheter ablation on permanent pacemakers: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chin, M C; Rosenqvist, M; Lee, M A; Griffin, J C; Langberg, J J

    1990-01-01

    Radiofrequency current is being investigated as an alternative to direct current shock for transcatheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias. Permanent pacemakers are known to be susceptible to high frequency electromagnetic interference. This study was performed to examine the effects of transcatheter radiofrequency ablation on permanent pacemakers in a worst-case scenario. Nineteen pulse generators representing 16 models from seven manufacturers were acutely implanted in 12 dogs to assess their function during and after ablation. Pulse generators were implanted subcutaneously in the neck and connected to a transvenous permanent pacing lead positioned in the right ventricular apex. A 6F quadripolar electrode catheter was positioned approximately 1 cm from the tip of the permanent pacing lead. Radiofrequency current from an electrosurgical unit was applied between the distal electrode of the catheter and a large diameter skin electrode placed below the left scapula. Three additional ablation sessions were performed with the catheter situated 4-5 cm from the permanent pacing lead. Each ablation consisted of 15 W of radiofrequency power, delivered for up to 30 seconds. Twelve pulse generators were falsely inhibited during radiofrequency ablation while programmed to the VVI or DDD mode, nine of which continued to be inhibited while programmed to the VOO or DOO mode. Five pulse generators paced at abnormal rates, including three examples of one pulse generator model that displayed pacemaker runaway. Runaway was observed during eight ablations, resulting in two episodes of ventricular fibrillation. Eleven pulse generators reverted to noise mode behavior during ablation. Only three pulse generators were unaffected during ablation. No reprogramming or pacing system malfunctions were observed after cessation of radiofrequency current application or during ablations greater than 4 cm from the permanent lead.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Improving e-discharge letters for Permanent pacemaker insertions at Wansbeck General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    670 patients attend Wansbeck General Hospital each year for elective and emergency permanent pacemaker insertion or modification. Elective patients for new devices attend the cardiology department on the day of procedure and are clerked onto the cardiology ward after insertion. Patients are discharged home the following day with a letter typed by a junior doctor. Prior to October 2011, junior doctors were unaware of any guidelines regarding content of discharge letters due to poor accessibility. Vital information such as pacemaker model and indication for implantation were frequently absent from the typed summaries. In October 2011, the cardiology department reviewed the guidelines establishing the information required in all discharge summaries for pacemaker implantation and these guidelines were published on the ward in an easy to follow proforma for any junior doctor typing letters. Eight essential criteria should be included in each letter; date and indication for insertion, pacemaker type, make and model, access route, complications, chest x-ray and device check results, and follow-up details. Finally, a copy of the letter was to be sent to the cardiology department for clinic follow-up. Ten letters were audited prior to the proforma being issued. 0 letters contained 100% of the required information. Main criteria missing in most letters included indication for insertion (50%), make of device (0%), the route of access (10%) and cc to cardiology department (0%). 70 letters were audited in October 2012, one year following introduction of the discharge proforma.100% of letters contained all of the eight essential criteria required by the departmental guidelines. 53% of the letters were also received by the cardiology department. In conclusion, a set of easy to follow guidelines in the form of a published document on the cardiology ward has produced dramatic improvement in the quality of e-discharge letters for patients undergoing permanent pacemaker implantation

  15. Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.L.; Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented.

  16. Clinical Significance of Nonsustained Ventricular Tachycardia on Stored Electrograms in Permanent Pacemaker Patients.

    PubMed

    Gabriels, James; Wu, Michael; Rosen, Lisa; Patel, Apoor; Goldner, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    Permanent pacemaker electrograms record a variety of arrhythmias, including nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Little has been reported regarding incidence and clinical significance of NSVT in pacemaker patients after long-term monitoring. Records from all patients implanted with Medtronic pacemakers (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) at a single institution from January 1, 2009 to February 27, 2012 were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, imaging studies, pacemaker interrogations, and the Social Security Death Index were examined in patients older than 18 years of age who had ≥ 2 follow-up device interrogations. A total of 262 patients with an ejection fraction (EF) >40% were included in the final analysis with a mean follow-up of 29.2 months. Of these patients, 83.2% (n = 218) had hypertension (HTN) and 45.4% (n = 119) had NSVT. Among patients with an EF ≥ 55%, hypertensive patients had a NSVT burden 2.46 times greater than normotensive patients (incidence rate ratio: 2.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-5.50; P < 0.028). NSVT was not associated with increased mortality (P < 0.1229). In this cohort of patients, there was a high prevalence of HTN and while hypertensive subjects had a significantly higher NSVT burden, NSVT was not associated with an increased mortality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Syncope of unknown origin in patients with permanent auriculoventricular block with an implanted pacemaker. Usefulness of the tilt table test].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Encarnación-Roa, Carmen F; Hermosillo, Antonio G; Benítez-Pinto, William J; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    Four female patients aged 26 to 71 years, with permanent complete AV heart block and an implanted pacemaker had syncope or presyncope after the pacemaker implantation. As part of the study protocol the tilt table test was done. Neurological disease, arrhythmias, pacemaker syndrome or dysfunction of the stimulation system were ruled out. A head up tilt was performed, isosorbide was used as pharmacological challenge, since the basal test was negative. In three patients this test was positive: in one patient possibly caused by postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and two with neurally mediated syncope. In one patient it was not possible a diagnosis. The head-up tilt test is a useful procedure to identify the etiology of the appearance of syncope or presyncope after a pacemaker implantation in patients with complete and permanent AV block.

  18. Pacemaker pocket infection due to Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yoo, David K; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2017-01-10

    A woman aged 74 years with an implanted dual-chamber pacemaker presented with pacemaker site infection after failing empiric antimicrobial therapy. The pathogen was later identified as Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing mycobacteria species. The pacemaker was subsequently removed and the patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin and doxycycline with clinical improvement. In this article, we describe a rare case of pacemaker site infection by M. goodii. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Incidence and predictors of permanent pacemaker implantation following treatment with the repositionable Lotus™ transcatheter aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Sarah; McCormick, Liam; Gooley, Robert; Rashid, Hashrul; Ramkumar, Satish; Jackson, Damon; Hui, Samuel; Meredith, Ian T

    2017-07-01

    To determine the incidence and predictors of permanent pacemaker (PPM) requirement following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the mechanically expanded Lotus(TM) Valve System (Boston Scientific). Pacemaker implantation is the most common complication following TAVR. Predictors of pacing following TAVR with the Lotus valve have not been systematically assessed. Consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent Lotus valve implantation were prospectively recruited at a single-centre. Patients with a pre-existing PPM were excluded. Baseline ECG, echocardiographic and multiple detector computed tomography as well as procedural telemetry and depth of implantation were independently analyzed in a blinded manner. The primary endpoint was 30-day incidence of pacemaker requirement (PPM implantation or death while pacing-dependent). Multivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of the primary endpoint. A total of 104 consecutive patients underwent TAVR with the Lotus valve with 9/104 (9%) with a pre-existing PPM excluded. New or worsened procedural LBBB occurred in 78%. Thirty-day incidence of the primary pacing endpoint was 28%. The most common indication for PPM implantation was complete heart block (CHB) (69%). Independent predictors of the primary endpoint included pre-existing RBBB (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.0; P = 0.032) and depth of implantation below the noncoronary cusp (NCC) (HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.0-5.7; P = 0.045). Almost a third of Lotus valve recipients require pacemaker implantation within 30 days. The presence of pre-existing RBBB and the depth of prosthesis implantation below the NCC were significant pacing predictors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A Case of Adult-Onset Acute Rheumatic Fever With Long-Lasting Atrioventricular Block Requiring Permanent Pacemaker Implantation.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yusuke; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Yoshioki; Ueno, Shuichi; Nagashima, Takao; Imai, Yasushi; Shimpo, Masahisa; Kario, Kazuomi

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old hypertensive Japanese woman presented with epigastric pain on inspiration, fever, complete atrioventricular block and polyarthritis. Her antistreptolysin O levels were markedly elevated. A diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made according to the modified Jones criteria. She was prescribed loxoprofen sodium, which was partially effective for her extracardiac clinical symptoms. However, she had syncope due to complete atrioventricular block with asystole longer than 10 seconds. Consequently, we implanted a permanent pacemaker. Although we prescribed prednisolone, the efficacy of which was limited for the patient's conduction disturbance, the complete atrioventricular block persisted. In our systematic review of 12 similar cases, the duration of complete heart block was always transient and there was no case requiring a permanent pacemaker. We thus encountered a very rare case of adult-onset acute rheumatic fever with persistent complete atrioventricular block necessitating permanent pacemaker implantation.

  1. Impact of Pacemaker Lead Characteristics on Pacemaker Related Infection and Heart Perforation: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Hung, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Dong Yi; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Chang, Shih-Tai; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wen, Ming-Shien; Chen, Mien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Several risk factors for pacemaker (PM) related complications have been reported. However, no study has investigated the impact of lead characteristics on pacemaker-related complications. Patients who received a new pacemaker implant from January 1997 to December 2011 were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. This population was grouped according to the pacemaker lead characteristics in terms of fixation and insulation. The impact of the characteristics of leads on early heart perforation was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression analysis, while the impact of the lead characteristics on early and late infection and late heart perforation over a three-year period were analyzed using Cox regression. This study included 36,104 patients with a mean age of 73.4±12.5 years. In terms of both early and late heart perforations, there were no significant differences between groups across the different types of fixation and insulations. In the multivariable Cox regression analysis, the pacemaker-related infection rate was significantly lower in the active fixation only group compared to either the both fixation (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.80; P = 0.020) or the passive fixation group (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.83; P = 0.023). There was no difference in heart perforation between active and passive fixation leads. Active fixation leads were associated with reduced risk of pacemaker-related infection.

  2. Thrombus on pacemaker lead.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Maheshwari, Arun; Dubey, Sumir

    2015-12-01

    A 58-year-old male was admitted with history of shortness of breath and recurrent fever since two months. He had undergone permanent pacemaker implantation six years back for complete heart block. The patient was persistently having thrombocytopenia. Echocardiographic examination revealed mass (size 4.28 cm(2)) attached to pacemaker lead in right atrium. The patient was scheduled for open-heart surgery for removal of right atrial mass. During surgery, pacemaker leads and pulse generator were also removed along with mass considering the possible source of infection.

  3. Single surgical procedure combining epicardial pacemaker implantation and subsequent extraction of the infected pacing system for pacemaker-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, Sana; Barandon, Laurent; Whinnett, Zachary; Ploux, Sylvain; Labrousse, Louis; Denis, Arnaud; Oses, Pierre; Ritter, Philippe; Haissaguerre, Michel; Bordachar, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Management of pacemaker infection in pacing-dependent patients is often challenging. Typically, temporary pacing is used while antibiotic therapy is given for a number of days before reimplantation of a new endocardial system. This results in a prolonged hospital stay and complications associated with temporary pacing. In this study, we examine the feasibility of performing a single combined procedure of epicardial pacemaker implantation followed by system extraction. One hundred consecutive infected pacemaker-dependent patients underwent implantation of 2 epicardial ventricular leads and were converted to a ventricular demand pacing system. The infected pacing system was then extracted during the same procedure. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Significant pericardial bleeding developed during the procedure in 3 patients. The presence of the pericardial drain positioned during the implantation of the epicardial pacing system meant that cardiac tamponade did not occur, allowing surgical repair with sternotomy to be carried out under stable hemodynamic conditions. Two of these 100 patients died in the 30-day postoperative period; 1 death was due to septic shock and 1 to pulmonary distress. Median 1-year epicardial pacing thresholds were stable and excellent (1.4 ± 0.9 volts). However, 1 of the 2 leads developed increased thresholds in 6 patients, which led to the exclusive use of other ventricular lead. A single combined procedure of surgical epicardial pacemaker implantation and pacemaker system extraction appears to be a safe and effective method for managing pacemaker-dependent patients with infected pacemakers. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tricuspid valve repair for torrential tricuspid regurgitation after permanent pacemaker lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Deepak; Kejriwal, Nand K

    2011-01-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation secondary to percutaneous lead extraction is uncommon, and it rarely requires surgical intervention. Most tricuspid regurgitation occurs during the implantation of tined leads, which can be entrapped in the tricuspid valve apparatus and may require immediate withdrawal. Severe tricuspid regurgitation as a sequela of extracting chronically implanted leads has rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of torrential tricuspid regurgitation in a 67-year-old woman after the extraction of a permanent pacemaker lead. The regurgitation was confirmed on transesophageal echocardiography during lead extraction, and the tricuspid valve was successfully repaired with suture bicuspidization of the valve and the support of ring annuloplasty. A short review of the relevant literature follows the case report.

  5. Electrical Injury-Induced Complete Atrioventricular Block: Is Permanent Pacemaker Required?

    PubMed Central

    Beton, Osman; Efe, Tolga Han; Kaya, Hakki; Bilgin, Murat; Dinc Asarcikli, Lale; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-01-01

    A considerable percentage of electrical injuries occur as a result of work activities. Electrical injury can lead to various cardiovascular disorders: acute myocardial necrosis, myocardial ischemia, heart failure, arrhythmias, hemorrhagic pericarditis, acute hypertension with peripheral vasospasm, and anomalous, nonspecific ECG alterations. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia resulting from electrical injury and is the leading cause of death in electrical (especially low voltage alternating current) injury cases. Asystole, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, conduction disorders (various degrees of heart blocks, bundle-brunch blocks), supraventricular tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation are the other arrhythmic complications of electrical injury. Complete atrioventricular block has rarely been reported and permanent pacemaker was required for the treatment in some of these cases. Herein, we present a case of reversible complete atrioventricular block due to low voltage electrical injury in a young electrical technician. PMID:26839721

  6. Electrical Injury-Induced Complete Atrioventricular Block: Is Permanent Pacemaker Required?

    PubMed

    Beton, Osman; Efe, Tolga Han; Kaya, Hakki; Bilgin, Murat; Dinc Asarcikli, Lale; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-01-01

    A considerable percentage of electrical injuries occur as a result of work activities. Electrical injury can lead to various cardiovascular disorders: acute myocardial necrosis, myocardial ischemia, heart failure, arrhythmias, hemorrhagic pericarditis, acute hypertension with peripheral vasospasm, and anomalous, nonspecific ECG alterations. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia resulting from electrical injury and is the leading cause of death in electrical (especially low voltage alternating current) injury cases. Asystole, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, conduction disorders (various degrees of heart blocks, bundle-brunch blocks), supraventricular tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation are the other arrhythmic complications of electrical injury. Complete atrioventricular block has rarely been reported and permanent pacemaker was required for the treatment in some of these cases. Herein, we present a case of reversible complete atrioventricular block due to low voltage electrical injury in a young electrical technician.

  7. Temporal trends in permanent pacemaker implantation: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Uslan, Daniel Z; Tleyjeh, Imad M; Baddour, Larry M; Friedman, Paul A; Jenkins, Sarah M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Hayes, David L

    2008-05-01

    Limited data exist regarding temporal trends in permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation. To describe trends in incidence and comorbidities of PPM recipients, we conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study over a 30-year period. All 1291 adult residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, undergoing PPM implantation between 1975 and 2004 were included in the study. Trends in PPM implantation incidence, pacing mode and indication, and comorbidities (via Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]) were assessed through the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Permanent pacemaker recipients were compared with age- and sex-matched PPM-free controls from the population. Adjusted implantation incidence rates increased from 36.6 per 100,000 person-years during 1975 to 1979 to 99 per 100,000 person-years during 2000 to 2004 (P < .0001). After adjusting for age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), male sex (HR 1.28), and implant year (HR 0.98), the HR for death among PPM recipients by CCI quartiles was 1.0, 1.79, 2.29, and 3.91 for CCI of 0 to 1 (reference), 2 to 3, 4 to 6, and > or = 7, respectively (P < .0001). Overall, PPM recipients had higher CCI than the population-based controls (P = .04), with higher mean CCI noted since 1990. Mean age-adjusted CCI increased from 3.15 to 4.60 among the cases (P < .0001) and from 3.06 to 3.54 among the age- and sex-matched controls (P = .047). There have been significant increases in incidence of PPM implantation over 30 years, and PPM recipients have had an age-independent increase in comorbidities relative to the underlying population, especially over the past 15 years.

  8. [The current status of permanent cardiac pacing in Spain. A report of the National Pacemaker Data Bank].

    PubMed

    Coma Samartín, R

    1997-11-01

    We report the activity concerning permanent cardiac pacing in Spain during year 1995, based on data submitted to the National Pacemaker Registry corresponding to the European Pacemaker Card. We describe population, etiology and electrocardiographic alterations that determined the need for stimulation and the global distribution of stimulation modes (AAI 1.7%; DDD 20.2%; VDD 11.3% and VVI 66.8%). We emphasize, among other aspects, stimulation in A-V block cases, in sick-sinus syndrome and tendencies compared to 1994's data and limited data corresponding to 1996.

  9. Campylobacter fetus infection presenting with bacteremia and cellulitis in a 72-year-old man with an implanted pacemaker: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Campylobacter is an important causative agent of intestinal infections in humans. Bacteremia is detected in less than 1% of patients, mainly in immunocompromised patients and in extreme age groups. Cellulitis is a relatively common manifestation of Campylobacter infection, but concomitant bacteremia is a rare event. Infections of the pacemaker area are caused primarily by staphylococci, followed by fungi, streptococci and Gram-negative rods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of pacemaker pocket infection and bacteremia caused by Campylobacter fetus. Case presentation A 72-year-old Croatian Caucasian man with myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels and a recently implanted permanent pacemaker was admitted to hospital after six days of fever, development of red swelling of the pacemaker pocket area and worsening of his general condition. No antibiotic therapy was introduced in the outpatient setting. He denied any recent gastrointestinal disturbances. With the exception of an elevated leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein and blood glucose levels, other laboratory findings were normal. Treatment with vancomycin plus netilmicin was introduced, and a surgical incision with drainage of the pacemaker pocket was performed. The entire pacemaker system was removed and a new one re-implanted after 14 days of antibiotic therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography showed no pathological findings. Three subsequent blood cultures obtained on admission as well as swab culture of the incised pacemaker area revealed Campylobacter fetus; stool and pacemaker lead cultures were negative. According to the microbiological results, antibiotic therapy was changed to ciprofloxacin plus netilmicin. A clinical examination and the results of a laboratory analysis performed after two weeks of therapy were within normal limits. Conclusion Myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels and older age could be

  10. Clinical Profile and Early Complications after Single and Dual Chamber Permanent Pacemaker Implantation at Manmohan Cardiothoracic Vascular and Transplant Centre, Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khanal, J; Poudyal, R R; Devkota, S; Thapa, S; Dhungana, R R

    2015-01-01

    Permanent pacemaker implantation is a minimally invasive surgical procedure in the management of patients with cardiac problems. However, complications during and after implantation are not uncommon. There is lack of evidences in rate of complications with the selection of pacemakers in Nepal. Therefore, this study was performed to compare the frequency of implantation and complication rate between single chamber and dual chamber pacemaker. The present study is based on all consecutive pacemaker implantations in a single centre between April 2014 and May 2015. A total of 116 patients were categorized into two cohorts according to the type of pacemaker implanted- single chamber or dual chamber. All patients had regular 2-weeks follow-up intervals with standardized documentation of all relevant patient data till 6-week after implantation. Data were presented as means ± standard deviation (SD) for continuous variables and as proportions for categorical variables. Comparison of continuous variables between the groups was made with independent Student's t-test. For discrete variables distribution between groups were compared with Chi-square test. The mean age (±SD) of total population at implant was 64.08 (± 15.09) years. Dual chamber units were implanted in 44 (37.93%) of patients, single chamber in 72 (62.06%). Only 14 women (31.81%) received dual chamber compared with 42 women (58.33%) who received single chamber (Chi-square=18, DF=1, P = 0.0084). Complete atrioventricular block was the commonest (56.03%) indication for permanent pacemaker insertion followed by sick sinus syndrome (33.62%), symptomatic high-grade AV block (11.20%). Hypertension (dual chamber 21.55%, single chamber 40.51%) was the most common comorbidity in both cohorts. Complications occurred in 11 (9.48%) patients. More proportion of complication occurred in single chamber group (9 patients, 12.50%) than in dual chamber (2 patients, 4.54%). Complications occurring in dual chamber group include

  11. Atrioventricular nodal ablation versus antiarrhythmic drugs after permanent pacemaker implantation for bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagamoto, Yasutsugu; Inage, Tomohito; Yoshida, Teruhisa; Takeuchi, Tomohiro; Gondo, Takeki; Fukuda, Yujiro; Takii, Eiichi; Murotani, Kenta; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Patients often require antiarrhythmic drugs to control tachycardia after permanent pacemaker implantation (PMI) for bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome. We compared atrioventricular nodal ablation (AVNA) to antiarrhythmic drugs after PMI for bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome. Twenty-eight symptomatic patients with bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, all of which had a long pause after termination of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, underwent PMI with RV lead placement at the mid-septum site. Among these patients, 14 underwent PMI and AVNA (AVNA group). The remaining 14 patients underwent PMI only, and continued to take anti-arrhythmic drugs (drug group). We compared cardiac function (cardio-thoracic ratio on chest X-ray, left atrial diameter, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and left ventricular-ejection fraction by echocardiography), exercise tolerance (6-min walking distance), symptoms, and the number of antiarrhythmic drugs just before and 6 months after PMI. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, except for the number of antiarrhythmic drugs. Six months after PMI, cardiac function, exercise tolerance, and symptoms did not differ significantly between the two groups. Compared to the drug group (p < 0.01), the number of antiarrhythmic drugs was significantly smaller in the AVNA group 6 months after PMI. Patients who underwent AVNA concurrently with PMI with RV lead placement at the mid-septum site for bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome were able to reduce the intake of drugs and improve their tachycardia-related symptoms while maintaining cardiac function and exercise tolerance.

  12. Differences between Korea and Japan in Physician Decision Making Regarding Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Won; Rho, Robert W; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Shin, Woo-Seung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Oh, Yong-Seog; Lee, Man Young; Zen, Eiwa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The number of permanent pacemakers (PPMs) implanted in patients in Japan and Korea differs significantly. We aimed to investigate the differences in decision making processes of implanting a PPM. Materials and Methods Our survey included 15 clinical case scenarios based on the 2008 AHA/ACC/HRS guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities (class unspecified). Members of the Korean and Japanese Societies of Cardiology were asked to rate each scenario according to a 5-point scale and to indicate their decisions for or against implantation. Results Eighty-nine Korean physicians and 192 Japanese physicians replied to the questionnaire. For the case scenarios in which there was a class I indication for PPM implantation, the decision to implant a PPM did not differ significantly between the two physician groups. However, the Japanese physicians were significantly more likely than the Korean physicians to choose implantation in class IIa scenarios (48% vs. 37%, p<0.001), class IIb scenarios (40% vs. 19%, p<0.001), and class III scenarios (36% vs. 18%, p<0.001). These results did not change when the cases were categorized based on disease entity, such as sinus node dysfunction and conduction abnormality. Conclusion Korean physicians are less likely than Japanese physicians to favor a PPM implantation when considering a variety of clinical case scenarios, which probably contributes to the relatively small number of PPMs implanted in patients in Korea as compared with those in Japan. PMID:27721856

  13. Pacemaker lead perforation of the right ventricle associated with Moraxella phenylpyruvica infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ciavarella, A; Nimmo, J; Hambrook, L

    2016-04-01

    A 13-year-old neutered male Border Collie was presented with acute onset syncope, weakness and anorexia 10 months after transvenous pacemaker implantation. The patient was laterally recumbent, bradycardic (36 beats/min) and febrile (40.7°C) on presentation. An electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed recurrence of third-degree atrioventricular block with a ventricular escape rhythm. Fluoroscopy identified migration of the pacemaker tip through the apex of the right ventricle. Echocardiography failed to reveal any evidence of pericardial effusion or cardiac tamponade. Full postmortem was performed after euthanasia. The pacemaker lead had perforated the apex of the right ventricle and lodged in the right pleural space. Culture of blood (taken antemortem), pericardial sac, right ventricular wall (surrounding pacemaker lead), pacemaker lead tip and pericardial fluid revealed a pure growth of Moraxella phenylpyruvica. Bacteraemia associated with M. phenylpyruvica has never been reported in the dog, but sporadic cases are reported in humans. Infection could have resulted from either pre-existing myocarditis or opportunistic infection and bacteraemia post pacemaker implantation. Evaluation of the pacemaker function at regular intervals would allow early detection of poor pacemaker-to-myocardium contact, which would prompt further investigation of pacemaker lead abnormalities such as perforation. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  14. Permanent pacemaker insertion following isolated aortic valve replacement before and after the introduction of TAVI.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Alexander; Sternik, Leonid; Beinart, Roy; Shalabi, Amjad; Glikson, Michael; Spiegelstein, Danny; Levin, Shany; Raanani, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    Permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is required in 3-12% of all patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Our aim was to evaluate the contemporary incidence and impact of the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for PPM insertion after isolated AVR. Since 2004, during a 10-year period, a total of 858 patients underwent isolated AVR at our institution. Forty-one patients with PPM before operation were excluded from the study and 817 patients were included in the statistical analysis. Of these, 20 patients (2.45%) developed significant conduction disorders, leading to PPM implantation within 120 days postoperatively. Patients were further divided into two groups. Before (Group I: June 2004 to September 2008) and after (Group II: October 2008 to May 2014) the introduction of the TAVI program. There were 343 patients in Group I and 475 patients in Group II. The incidence of PPM implantation decreased from 3.79% (13 patients) in Group I to 1.47% (seven patients) in Group II (P < 0.001). Risk factors for permanent pacing identified by univariate analysis were: Group I (before introducing TAVI program), pulmonary hypertension, preoperative anemia, age older than 75 years, and previous myocardial infarction. Multivariate analysis identified Group I (before introducing TAVI program; P < 0.005; odds ratio [OR] 15.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.3-19.9) and pulmonary hypertension (P < 0.005; OR 12.5, 95% CI 3.2-18.3) to be significant. Irreversible atrio-ventricular block or symptomatic bradycardia requiring PPM implantation is a relatively rare complication. The incidence of PPM implantation after isolated surgical AVR decreased in a contemporary setting after the introduction of the TAVI program. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Long-term outcome in patients receiving permanent pacemaker implantation for atrioventricular block

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jo-Nan; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Kong, Chi-Woon; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A permanent pacemaker (PPM) with dual chamber pacing (DDD) offers atrioventricular synchronization for patients with atrioventricular block (AVB). Single lead atrial synchronous ventricular pacing mode (VDD) is an alternative, but there are concerns about its efficacy and risk of atrial undersensing. Whether VDD can be a good alternative in patients with AVB remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term risk of mortality of VDD with DDD pacing. A total of 207 patients undergoing PPM implantations for AVB with VDD mode were enrolled from 2000 to 2013. Another 828 age- and sex-matched patients undergoing DDD implantations during the same period of time were selected as the control group in a 1 to 4 ratio. The study endpoint was mortality. A total of 1035 patients (64.3% male) were followed up for 46.5 ± 43.2 months. The mean ages were 75.0 years for VDD, and 74.9 years for DDD. The Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed no significant difference in long-term survival between the VDD and DDD groups (log-rank P = 0.313). After adjustment for baseline characteristics, the VDD and DDD groups had a similar long-term prognosis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.875 (P = 0.445). Further analyses for the risk of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular deaths also showed no significant differences between the 2 groups. The long-term prognosis of VDD mode is comparable to that of DDD mode. Single lead VDD can be considered as an alternative choice in patients with AVB without sinus nodal dysfunction. PMID:27583889

  16. Predictors of permanent pacemaker requirement after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: insights from a Brazilian registry.

    PubMed

    Gensas, Caroline S; Caixeta, Adriano; Siqueira, Dimytri; Carvalho, Luiz A; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Mangione, José A; Lemos, Pedro A; Colafranceschi, Alexandre S; Caramori, Paulo; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Abizaid, Alexandre; Brito, Fábio S

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the predictors of permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation after TAVI. Between January 2008 and February 2012, 418 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent TAVI and were enrolled in a Brazilian multicenter registry. After excluding patients who died during the procedure and those with a previous PPM, 353 patients were included in the analysis. At 30 days, the overall incidence of PPM implantation was 25.2%. Patients requiring PPM were more likely to be older (82.73 vs. 81.10 years, p=0.07), have pre-dilation (68.42% vs. 60.07%, p=0.15), receive CoreValve (93.68% vs. 82.55%, p=0.008), and have baseline right bundle branch block (RBBB, 25.26% vs. 6.58%, p<0.001). On multivariable analysis, CoreValve vs. Sapien XT (OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.56-11.49; p=0.005), baseline RBBB (OR, 4.41; 95% CI, 2.20-8.82; p<0.001), and balloon pre-dilatation (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.02-3.02; p=0.04) were independent predictors of PPM implantation. PPM implantation occurred in approximately one-fourth of cases. Pre-existing RBBB, balloon pre-dilatation, and CoreValve use were independent predictors of PPM after TAVI. The type of prosthesis used and pre-balloon dilatation should be considered in TAVI candidates with baseline RBBB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Implant of permanent pacemaker during acute coronary syndrome: Mortality and associated factors in the ARIAM registry.

    PubMed

    Pola-Gallego-de-Guzmán, María Dolores; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Martínez-Arcos, Maria-Angeles; Gómez-Blizniak, Artur; Castillo Rivera, Ana-Maria; Molinos, Jesus Cobo

    2017-03-01

    Patients with acute coronary syndrome complicated with high degree atrioventricular block still have a high mortality. A low percentage of these patients need a permanent pacemaker (PPM) but mortality and associated factors with the PPM implant in acute coronary syndrome patients are not known. We assess whether PPM implant is an independent variable in the mortality of acute coronary syndrome patients. Also, we explored the variables that remain independently associated with PPM implantation. This was an observational study on the Spanish ARIAM register. The inclusion period was from January 2001 to December 2011. This registry included all Andalusian acute coronary syndrome patients. Follow-up for global mortality was until November 2013. We selected 27,608 cases. In 62 patients a PPM was implanted (0.024%). The mean age in PPM patients was 70.71±11.214 years versus 64.46±12.985 years in patients with no PPM. PPM implant was associated independently with age (odds ratio (OR) 1.031, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.007-1.055), with left ventricular branch block (OR 6.622, 95% CI 2.439-18.181), with any arrhythmia at intensive care unit admission (OR 2.754, 95% CI 1.506-5.025) and with heart failure (OR 3.344, 95% CI 1.78-8.333). PPM implant was independently associated with mortality (OR 11.436, 95% CI 1.576-83.009). In propensity score analysis PPM implant was still associated with mortality (OR 5.79, 95% CI 3.27-25.63). PPM implant is associated with mortality in the acute coronary syndrome population in the ARIAM registry. Advanced age, heart failure, arrhythmias and left ventricular branch block at intensive care unit admission were found associated factors with PPM implant in acute coronary syndrome patient.

  18. Bicuspid aortic valve increases risk of permanent pacemaker implant following aortic root replacement.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Laura; Nazif, Tamim; Sorabella, Robert; Akkoc, Deniz; Kantor, Alex; Gomez, Andres; Wang, Catherine; Takayama, Hiroo; Dizon, Jose; Borger, Michael; George, Isaac

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to assess the incidence and possible differences in postoperative conduction delay after aortic root replacement (ARR) in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients compared with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). A total of 380 patients undergoing ARR at our institution between 2005 and 2013 were included in the analysis. Patients were stratified by aortic valve anatomy: BAV, n = 191 vs TAV, n = 189. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic data were retrospectively analysed at different time points (pre-, postoperatively and at follow-up). Primary outcome of interest was permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation within 30 days, the composite of new PPM or new left fascicular or bundle branch block (PPM or LBBB) was the secondary outcome of interest. Age range was 24-89.5 years and incidence of preoperative moderate to severe aortic stenosis was 9.7%. BAV patients had higher incidence of PPM implantation within 30 days (5.8 vs 1.6% in TAV, P = 0.053); moreover, the composite of PPM or LBBB was also more frequent in BAV (8.4 vs 2.1%, P = 0.010). BAV was independently associated with PPM insertion (OR 4.08, P = 0.047) and also an independent predictor of PPM or LBBB in multiple regression (OR 4.96, P = 0.006). Significantly higher incidence of PPM implantation or LBBB may exist after ARR in bicuspid patients and BAV was confirmed to be an independent predictor for postoperative conduction disturbances by multivariable regression. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors for permanent pacemaker implantation after concomitant surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Pecha, Simon; Schäfer, Timm; Yildirim, Yalin; Ahmadzade, Teymour; Willems, Stephan; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Wagner, Florian Mathias

    2014-03-01

    Concomitant surgical atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is a safe and feasible procedure, recommended in guidelines. Pacemaker dependency is a known complication of AF ablation. We sought to determine independent predictors for pacemaker implantation after surgical AF ablation. Between January 2003 and November 2012, 594 patients underwent concomitant surgical AF ablation. Various energy sources, including cryoablation (n = 139), unipolar radiofrequency (n = 278), and bipolar radiofrequency (n = 177), were used. Left atrial (n = 463, 77.9%) and biatrial (n = 131, 22.1%) ablation was performed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors for pacemaker implantation within 30 days after surgical AF ablation. The mean patient's age was 68.6 ± 9.4 years, and 66.8% were male. No major ablation-related complications occurred. A total of 41 (6.9%) of patients received pacemaker implantation during the 30-day follow-up period. Indications for pacemaker implantation were atrioventricular block in 25 (60.9%) of patients, sinus bradycardia or sinus arrest in 9 (22.0%) of patients, and bradyarrhythmia in 7 (17.1%) of patients. Demographic data, type of surgical procedure, and type of energy source did not have a significant impact on pacemaker implantation rate. However, biatrial ablation led to a significant pacemaker implantation rate compared with isolated left-sided ablation (6.3% vs 13.6%; P = .028). Concomitant surgical AF ablation showed a pacemaker implantation rate of 6.9% after 30-day follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed biatrial lesion set as the only statistically significant predictor for pacemaker implantation after surgical AF ablation. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The oral cavity is not a primary source for implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillator infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that the oral cavity is a potential source for implantable pacemaker and cardioverter defibrillators infections, the bacterial diversity on explanted rhythm heart management devices was investigated and compared to the oral microbiome. Methods A metagenomic approach was used to analyze the bacterial diversity on the surfaces of non-infected and infected pacemakers. The DNA from surfaces swaps of 24 non-infected and 23 infected pacemaker were isolated and subjected to bacterial-specific DNA amplification, single strand conformation polymorphism- (SSCP) and sequencing analysis. Species-specific primer sets were used to analyze for any correlation between bacterial diversity on pacemakers and in the oral cavity. Results DNA of bacterial origin was detected in 21 cases on infected pacemakers and assigned to the bacterial phylotypes Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi and Stapyhlococcus. In 17 cases bacterial DNA was found on pacemakers with no clinical signs of infections. On the basis of the obtained sequence data, the phylotypes Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus and an uncultured bacterium were identified. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the only bacteria detected in pacemeaker (n = 25) and oral samples (n = 11). Conclusions The frequency of the coincidental detection of bacteria on infected devices and in the oral cavity is low and the detected bacteria are highly abundant colonizers of non-oral human niches. The transmission of oral bacteria to the lead or device of implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators is unlikely relevant for the pathogenesis of pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators infections. PMID:23575037

  1. Myocardial abscess and bacteremia complicating Mycobacterium fortuitum pacemaker infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Al Soub, Hussam; Al Maslamani, Mona; Al Khuwaiter, Jameela; El Deeb, Yasser; Abu Khattab, Mohammed

    2009-11-01

    A case of pacemaker infection complicated by bacteremia and myocardial abscess caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum is reported and 9 other cases of pacemaker infection associated with rapidly growing mycobacteria are reviewed. Most cases developed within 6 months from implantation suggesting nosocomial acquisition. Wound discharge, fever, and pain at generator site were the most common presenting features. At presentation they had a median duration of symptoms of 34 days. Concomitant bacteremia was present in half of the cases. Antibiotics therapy and removal of the pacemaker system were needed to achieve cure in the majority of cases. Clarithromycin and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used antibiotics.

  2. 50th Anniversary of the first successful permanent pacemaker implantation in the United States: historical review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Beck, Hiroko; Boden, William E; Patibandla, Sushmitha; Kireyev, Dmitriy; Gutpa, Vipul; Campagna, Franklin; Cain, Michael E; Marine, Joseph E

    2010-09-15

    June 2010 marks the 50th anniversary of the first successful human cardiac pacemaker implantation in the United States. On June 6, 1960, in Buffalo, New York, Dr. William Chardack implanted a pacemaker, designed and built by Wilson Greatbatch, an electrical engineer and inventor, in a 77-year old man with complete atrioventricular block, extending the patient's life by 18 months. This landmark event ushered in a new era of implantable cardiac pacemakers with batteries and leads of high reliability and increasing durability. Over the past half century, the field of electrophysiology and implantable devices for the management of cardiac conduction disturbances has evolved dramatically. Today's pacemakers include increasingly complex features such as telemetry monitoring, auto programmability, and hemodynamic sensors. New-generation leads present a sophisticated design with improved geometry and steroid-eluting tips to reduce chronic inflammation, maintaining a low pacing threshold and high sensing capability. The lithium iodide battery remains the mainstay of implantable pacemaker systems, exhibiting a multiple-year lifespan, slow terminal decay, and a reduced size and cost of production. Although Greatbatch's first successful pacemaker implantation remains a seminal scientific contribution to modern cardiovascular disease management, emerging developments in this field may challenge its preeminence. Important challenges such as imaging compatibility, lead durability, and infection prevention are being addressed. Novel concepts such as leadless and biologic pacing are under active investigation. In conclusion, Greatbatch's historic achievement 50 years ago reminds us that technologic progress is timeless, as efforts to enhance clinical outcomes and the quality of life continue unimpeded into the 21st century. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. [Permanent pacemakers in children. The indications, complications and long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Camacho-Casillas, R; Vizcaíno-Alarcón, A; García-Hernández, N; Hurtado-del Río, D; Cerviño-Bárcena, L; Gordillo-Tobar, L

    1992-08-01

    Definitive pacemakers were placed in 27 children from June 1970 to October 1988. The indication for the pacemakers was congenital auriculoventricular block in 12 patients who were symptomatic; 8 were children with postoperative auriculoventricular block; 4 had developed complete auriculoventricular block from myocardiopathies and 3 from idiopathic sick-sinus syndrome. Two patients died: one 4 months after placement of the pacemaker due to unrelated causes, and the other 14 years later due to fracture of the electrode. There were 23 who were reoperated for different reasons but the most frequent was battery failure in 8 patients and pacemaker malfunction in 4 patients. The electrode was implanted in the epicardium in 21 patients and via subclavian vein into the endocardium in 6 cases. The growth and development physically and mentally were normal during the follow-up of these children. The average follow-up period was 55.6 months.

  4. Detection of atrial fibrillation by permanent pacemakers: observations from the STOP AF trial.

    PubMed

    Plummer, C J; McComb, J M

    2003-12-01

    Pacemaker telemetry is increasingly being used to infer the presence or absence of arrhythmias in clinical practice. To evaluate the reliability of these data in patients with sick-sinus syndrome, a sub-study of eighteen consecutive patients in the Systematic Trial of Pacing to prevent Atrial Fibrillation (STOP AF) implanted with dual-chamber pacemakers had simultaneous 24-hour Holter recordings and pacemaker telemetry down-loaded. Whilst heart rate data were very similar, telemetry data achieved only 57% sensitivity with 64% specificity for the presence of atrial fibrillation on Holter recording over 24 hours. False-positive results were due to far-field sensing while false-negatives were seen with very short episodes of atrial fibrillation. The pacemaker's anti-tachycardia responses were not specific for the detection of atrial fibrillation. There are very few published reports correlating pacemaker diagnostic data and stored electrograms with external Holter monitoring. We believe that more validation studies of are needed before pacemaker diagnostic data can be used with confidence in clinical practice. It is unlikely that current devices with sophisticated detection algorithms will fail to detect prolonged episodes of arrhythmia and their capacity to confirm events with stored electrograms, intervals and markers reduces the possibility of false-positives, but care must be taken in the interpretation of stored data from devices without these capabilities. Equally, it cannot be assumed that if intracardiac electrograms from one episode confirm the presence of an arrhythmia, that all recorded events have been similarly correctly interpreted. We have shown in a sub-study of STOP-AF that simple mathematical models using heart rate bin analysis are not reliable for detection of arrhythmias with short durations. Despite these limitations, the potential of implanted pacemakers to record cardiac rhythm and trends, such as heart-rate variability, over time remains an

  5. Complete removal of infected devices and simultaneous implantation of new devices for infective endocarditis after pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takuya; Inoue, Kazushige; Yokota, Takenori; Iwata, Takashi; Yoshitatsu, Masao

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of infective endocarditis after pacemaker implantation were reported. Complete removal of infected devices was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass, and simultaneous implantation of new devices was performed using epicardial leads and generator on the abdominal wall. The postoperative course was uneventful and recurrence was not recognized. These procedures may be suitable for the patients who depend on the pacemaker or who have repeat bacteremia with other infectious disease or conditions.

  6. 21 CFR 870.3680 - Cardiovascular permanent or temporary pacemaker electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator to the heart and/or to transmit the electrical signal of the heart to the pulse generator. (2... end connected to an implantable pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart....

  7. 21 CFR 870.3680 - Cardiovascular permanent or temporary pacemaker electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator to the heart and/or to transmit the electrical signal of the heart to the pulse generator. (2... end connected to an implantable pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart....

  8. 21 CFR 870.3680 - Cardiovascular permanent or temporary pacemaker electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator to the heart and/or to transmit the electrical signal of the heart to the pulse generator. (2... end connected to an implantable pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart....

  9. 21 CFR 870.3680 - Cardiovascular permanent or temporary pacemaker electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator to the heart and/or to transmit the electrical signal of the heart to the pulse generator. (2... end connected to an implantable pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart....

  10. 21 CFR 870.3680 - Cardiovascular permanent or temporary pacemaker electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator to the heart and/or to transmit the electrical signal of the heart to the pulse generator. (2... end connected to an implantable pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart....

  11. [An effective and safe alternative to epicardial pacemaker placement for permanent pacemaker implantation in a patient with mechanical tricuspid valve: stimulation of the left ventricle through the coronary sinus].

    PubMed

    Demir, Ahmet Duran; Sen, Nihat; Erbay, Ali Rıza; Atak, Ramazan

    2011-04-01

    Implantation of a transvenous endocardial pacemaker is contraindicated in patients with a mechanical tricuspid valve. An epicardial left ventricular pacemaker lead was placed by a transvenous route through the coronary sinus into the lateral cardiac vein in a 58-year-old woman with mechanical aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves, for permanent pacing due to chronic atrial fibrillation with a slow ventricular rate accompanied by syncope. This lead was then connected to a single-chamber pacemaker. The patient had no problem in the following three months. Placement of an epicardial pacing lead through the coronary sinus provides a safe and effective pacing in patients with a mechanical tricuspid valve, thus obviating major cardiac surgery.

  12. Transcatheter Heart Valve Selection and Permanent Pacemaker Implantation in Patients With Pre-Existent Right Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Lennart; Tchetche, Didier; Lhermusier, Thibault; Abawi, Masieh; Dumonteil, Nicolas; Rodriguez Olivares, Ramón; Molina-Martin de Nicolas, Javier; Stella, Pieter R; Carrié, Didier; De Jaegere, Peter P; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M

    2017-03-03

    Right bundle branch block is an established predictor for new conduction disturbances and need for a permanent pacemaker (PPM) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the absolute rates of transcatheter aortic valve replacement related PPM implantations in patients with pre-existent right bundle branch block and categorize for different transcatheter heart valves. We pooled data on 306 transcatheter aortic valve replacement patients from 4 high-volume centers in Europe and selected those with right bundle branch block at baseline without a previously implanted PPM. Logistic regression was used to evaluate whether PPM rate differed among transcatheter heart valves after adjustment for confounders. Mean age was 83±7 years and 63% were male. Median Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 6.3 (interquartile range, 4.1-10.2). The following transcatheter valve designs were used: Medtronic CoreValve (n=130; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN); Edwards Sapien XT (ES-XT; n=124) and Edwards Sapien 3 (ES-3; n=32; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA); and Boston Scientific Lotus (n=20; Boston Scientific Corporation, Marlborough, MA). Overall permanent pacemaker implantation rate post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement was 41%, and per valve design: 75% with Lotus, 46% with CoreValve, 32% with ES-XT, and 34% with ES-3. The indication for PPM implantation was total atrioventricular block in 98% of the cases. Lotus was associated with a higher PPM rate than all other valves. PPM rate did not differ between ES-XT and ES-3. Ventricular paced rhythm at 30-day and 1-year follow-up was present in 81% at 89%, respectively. Right bundle branch block at baseline is associated with a high incidence of PPM implantation for all transcatheter heart valves. PPM rate was highest for Lotus and lowest for ES-XT and ES-3. Pacemaker dependency remained high during follow-up. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by

  13. 76 FR 48058 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Cardiovascular Permanent Pacemaker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for... requirement for premarket approval applications or product development protocols for cardiovascular permanent... progress reports and records of the trials conducted under the protocol on the safety and effectiveness...

  14. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  15. Predictors of Permanent Pacemaker Implantation After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Valve Surgery in Adult Patients in Current Surgical Era.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Bandar; Mallawi, Yaseen; Shafquat, Azam; Ledesma, Alexandra; AlRuwaili, Nadiah; Shoukri, Mohamed; Khan, Shahid; Al Sanei, Aly

    2016-08-01

    Permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation after cardiac surgery is required in 0.4-6% of patients depending on cardiac surgery type. PPM implantation in the early postoperative period may reduce morbidity and postoperative hospital stay. We performed a retrospective review of electronic medical records of adult patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valve surgery, or both, over a 3-year period. Our aim was to identify predictors of PPM requirements and PPM dependency on follow-up in the current surgical era. After exclusion of patients with congenital heart disease, patients who already had a PPM or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), and patients with an indication for PPM or ICD before surgery, we identified 1,234 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. A retrospective review of electronic medical records and pacemaker clinic data was performed. Patients' mean age was 46.65 ± 16 years, and 59% were males. CABG was performed in 575 (46.6%) cases, aortic valve replacement in 263 (21.3%), mitral valve replacement in 333 (27%), and tricuspid valve replacement in 76 patients (6.2%). Twenty patients (1.6%) required implantation of a PPM postoperatively. Indications for PPM implantation included complete atrioventricular (AV) block in 13 (65%), sick sinus syndrome in three (15%), and atrial fibrillation (AF) with a slow ventricular rate in four (20%). Predictors for PPM requirement by multivariate analysis were the presence of pulmonary hypertension (P-HTN), reoperation, and left bundle branch block (LBBB) (P < 0.05). Late follow-up was available in 18 patients, at 84.5 ± 30 months. Eleven patients (61%) were PPM dependent on long-term follow-up. Patients at high risk for PPM implantation after cardiac surgery include those with P-HTN, reoperation, and pre-existing LBBB. Of those receiving a PPM, about one-third will recover at least partially at long-term follow-up. We recommend preoperative

  16. Predictors of Permanent Pacemaker Implantation After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Valve Surgery in Adult Patients in Current Surgical Era

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Bandar; Mallawi, Yaseen; Shafquat, Azam; Ledesma, Alexandra; AlRuwaili, Nadiah; Shoukri, Mohamed; Khan, Shahid; Al Sanei, Aly

    2016-01-01

    Background Permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation after cardiac surgery is required in 0.4-6% of patients depending on cardiac surgery type. PPM implantation in the early postoperative period may reduce morbidity and postoperative hospital stay. We performed a retrospective review of electronic medical records of adult patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valve surgery, or both, over a 3-year period. Our aim was to identify predictors of PPM requirements and PPM dependency on follow-up in the current surgical era. Methods After exclusion of patients with congenital heart disease, patients who already had a PPM or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), and patients with an indication for PPM or ICD before surgery, we identified 1,234 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. A retrospective review of electronic medical records and pacemaker clinic data was performed. Results Patients’ mean age was 46.65 ± 16 years, and 59% were males. CABG was performed in 575 (46.6%) cases, aortic valve replacement in 263 (21.3%), mitral valve replacement in 333 (27%), and tricuspid valve replacement in 76 patients (6.2%). Twenty patients (1.6%) required implantation of a PPM postoperatively. Indications for PPM implantation included complete atrioventricular (AV) block in 13 (65%), sick sinus syndrome in three (15%), and atrial fibrillation (AF) with a slow ventricular rate in four (20%). Predictors for PPM requirement by multivariate analysis were the presence of pulmonary hypertension (P-HTN), reoperation, and left bundle branch block (LBBB) (P < 0.05). Late follow-up was available in 18 patients, at 84.5 ± 30 months. Eleven patients (61%) were PPM dependent on long-term follow-up. Conclusions Patients at high risk for PPM implantation after cardiac surgery include those with P-HTN, reoperation, and pre-existing LBBB. Of those receiving a PPM, about one-third will recover at least partially at long

  17. Factors predicting and having an impact on the need for a permanent pacemaker after CoreValve prosthesis implantation using the new Accutrak delivery catheter system.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Antonio J; Hernández-García, José M; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel F; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; Domínguez-Franco, Antonio J; Fernández-Pastor, Julia; Peña Hernández, Jose; Barrera Cordero, Alberto; Alzueta Rodríguez, Javier; de Teresa-Galván, Eduardo

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for a permanent pacemaker after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) using the new Accutrak delivery system (Medtronic, Inc.). The need for a permanent pacemaker is a recognized complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the CoreValve prosthesis. Between April 23, 2008 and May 31, 2011, 195 consecutive patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis. In 124 patients, the traditional delivery system was used, and in 71 patients, the Accutrak delivery system was used. There were no significant differences in baseline electrocardiographic characteristics between the traditional system and the Accutrak patients: PR interval: 153 ± 46 mm versus 165 ± 30 mm, p = 0.12; left bundle branch block: 22 (20.2%) versus 8 (12.7%), p = 0.21; right bundle branch block: 21 (19.3%) versus 8 (12.7%), p = 0.26. The depth of the prosthesis in the left ventricular outflow tract was greater with the traditional system than with the Accutrak system (9.6 ± 3.2 mm vs. 6.4 ± 3 mm, p < 0.001) and the need for a permanent pacemaker was higher with traditional system than with Accutrak (35.1% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.003). The predictors of the need for a pacemaker were the depth of the prosthesis in the left ventricular outflow tract (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08 to 1.34, p < 0.001), pre-existing right bundle branch block (HR: 3.5, 95% CI: 1.68 to 7.29, p = 0.001), and use of the traditional system (HR: 27, 95% CI: 2.81 to 257, p = 0.004). The new Accutrak delivery system was associated with less deep prosthesis implantation in the left ventricular outflow tract, which could be related to the lower rate of permanent pacemaker requirement. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Long-term outcome in patients receiving permanent pacemaker implantation for atrioventricular block: Comparison of VDD and DDD pacing.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jo-Nan; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Kong, Chi-Woon; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-08-01

    A permanent pacemaker (PPM) with dual chamber pacing (DDD) offers atrioventricular synchronization for patients with atrioventricular block (AVB). Single lead atrial synchronous ventricular pacing mode (VDD) is an alternative, but there are concerns about its efficacy and risk of atrial undersensing. Whether VDD can be a good alternative in patients with AVB remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term risk of mortality of VDD with DDD pacing.A total of 207 patients undergoing PPM implantations for AVB with VDD mode were enrolled from 2000 to 2013. Another 828 age- and sex-matched patients undergoing DDD implantations during the same period of time were selected as the control group in a 1 to 4 ratio. The study endpoint was mortality.A total of 1035 patients (64.3% male) were followed up for 46.5 ± 43.2 months. The mean ages were 75.0 years for VDD, and 74.9 years for DDD. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant difference in long-term survival between the VDD and DDD groups (log-rank P = 0.313). After adjustment for baseline characteristics, the VDD and DDD groups had a similar long-term prognosis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.875 (P = 0.445). Further analyses for the risk of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular deaths also showed no significant differences between the 2 groups.The long-term prognosis of VDD mode is comparable to that of DDD mode. Single lead VDD can be considered as an alternative choice in patients with AVB without sinus nodal dysfunction.

  19. Incidence and predictors of late atrioventricular conduction recovery among patients requiring permanent pacemaker for complete heart block after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Erich L; Makki, Tarek; Matar, Ralph M; Johnston, Douglas R; Rickard, John W; Tarakji, Khaldoun G; Kanj, Mohamed; Wazni, Oussama M; Saliba, Walid I; Varma, Niraj; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Cantillon, Daniel J

    2017-08-12

    New-onset complete heart block (CHB) commonly complicates cardiac surgery, for which some patients require a permanent pacemaker (PPM). Little is known regarding late atrioventricular (AV) conduction recovery. The purpose of this study was to characterize the incidence and predictors of late AV conduction recovery among patients requiring PPM after cardiac surgery. Consecutive patients receiving PPM for CHB after cardiac surgery at a high-volume U.S. center from 2000 to 2014 were evaluated. The primary outcome was late AV conduction recovery, defined as a reduction in ventricular pacing requirement to <10% beyond 1 month postimplant. Regression analysis was performed to evaluate predictors of AV recovery. Among 301 patients evaluated over 4 ± 4 years of follow-up, the incidence of late AV conduction recovery was 12% (n = 37), for whom the median ventricular pacing requirement decreased from 96% at implant to <1% at 6 months and persisted throughout study follow-up. AV recovery was less common when preoperative conduction abnormalities were present, including no recovery among patients with preoperative PR >200 ms and QRS >120 ms (n = 42). Multivariable analysis identified only female sex and transient AV conduction postoperatively as independent predictors of recovery (odds ratio 3.5; P <.01 for each). Neither cardiac surgery subtype nor PPM implant timing postoperatively was significantly associated with recovery. Late AV conduction recovery is not uncommon after cardiac surgery, occurring in 1 of 8 patients within 6 months postoperatively. Preoperative AV conduction abnormalities were associated with decreased recovery, whereas female sex and transient postoperative AV conduction were associated with increased recovery. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device

    PubMed Central

    Said, Salah A.M.; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Pacemaker leads endocarditis Symptoms: Bacterial lead endocarditis • congestive heart failure • fever • pacemaker dysfunction Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker box replacement due to end-of-service Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. Case Report: A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: In heart failure

  1. A migrating pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Gale, C P; Mulley, G P

    2005-03-01

    A deceased 79 year old man with a permanent cardiac pacemaker was due to be cremated, but the pacemaker generator was not detectable by palpation. A hand held metal detector to locate the device so that it could be extracted before cremation.

  2. What Are the Risks of Pacemaker Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Risks of Pacemaker Surgery? Pacemaker surgery generally is safe. If problems do occur, ... bruising, or infection in the area where the pacemaker was placed Blood vessel or nerve damage A ...

  3. A novel approach to the pacemaker infection with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Li, Yu; Li, Yinglong; Yu, Shuang; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jue

    2017-08-01

    Although the pacemaker (PM) is a key cardiac implantable electrical device for life-threatening arrhythmias treatment, the related infection is a challenge. Thus, the aim of this study is to validate cold plasma as a potential technology for the disinfection of infected pacemakers. Fifty donated PMs were cleaned and sterilized before use and then infected with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus). Then, each experimental group was treated with cold plasma treatment for 1 min, 3 min, 5 min and 7 min, while the control group was immersed with sterilized water. Effectiveness of disinfection was evaluated by using CFU counting method and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The physicochemical properties of water treated with cold plasma at different time were evaluated, including water temperature change and oxidation reduction potential (ORP). The major reactive species generated by the cold plasma equipment during cold plasma were analyzed with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). No live bacteria were detected with CFU counting method after 7 min of cold plasma treatment, which matches with the CLSM results. The ORP value of water and H2O2 concentration changed significantly after treating with cold plasma. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially NO, O (777 nm) and O (844 nm) were probably key inactivation agents in cold plasma treatment. These results indicate that cold plasma could be an effective technology for the disinfection of implantable devices.

  4. Cardiobacterium hominis and Cardiobacterium valvarum: Two Case Stories with Infective Episodes in Pacemaker Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bonavent, Tina Bennett; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Kristensen, Kjeld Skødebjerg; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Moser, Claus; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiobacterium hominis and Cardiobacterium valvarum are well known, though rare, etiologic agents of infective endocarditis. Cardiac devices are increasingly implanted. Case Reports: Two cases of infective episodes in pacemaker (PM) treated patients with respectively C. hominis and C. valvarum are presented. In one case blood-culture bottles yielded growth of C. hominis at two episodes with two years apart. At the second episode a vegetation was recognized at the PM lead and the PM device and lead was removed. In the C. valvarum case, echocardiography revealed a bicuspid aortic valve with severe regurgitation and a more than 1 cm sized vegetation. Conclusion: The cases illustrate the diversity in disease severity by Cardiobacterium species. Careful follow up has to be performed in order not to overlook a relatively silent relapsing infection. PMID:28077974

  5. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  6. Contamination of transvenous pacemaker leads due to tunneled hemodialysis catheter infection: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Roger G; Garisto, Juan D; Salman, Loay; Merrill, Donna; Asif, Arif

    2010-06-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia is a frequent complication associated with the use of tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Catheter-related bacteremia can lead to metastasis of infection to other sites. This article presents 2 patients with transvenous pacemakers (placed >2 years ago) who were receiving long-term hemodialysis therapy using tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Both were admitted to the hospital with catheter-related bacteremia. Blood cultures showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in both cases. Transesophageal echocardiography was negative for the presence of valvular endocarditis, but showed lead-associated vegetation in both cases. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was initiated, and both the tunneled hemodialysis catheters and cardiac devices were removed by a cardiothoracic surgeon. The catheter tip and leads cultures showed MRSA in both cases. After resolution of bacteremia, both patients received an epicardial cardiac device. Antibiotic therapy was continued for 6 weeks. Renal physicians providing dialysis therapy should be aware that catheter-related bacteremia could cause contamination of transvenous pacemaker leads. Because catheter-related bacteremia is a frequent complication, epicardial leads might be considered as an alternative route to provide cardiac support to catheter-consigned patients. Epicardial leads do not navigate through the central veins, lie in the path of blood flow, or cause central venous stenosis. Copyright 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term survival after ablation of the atrioventricular node and implantation of a permanent pacemaker in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, C; Jahangir, A; Friedman, P A; Patel, P J; Munger, T M; Rea, R F; Lloyd, M A; Packer, D L; Hodge, D O; Gersh, B J; Hammill, S C; Shen, W K

    2001-04-05

    In patients with atrial fibrillation that is refractory to drug therapy, radio-frequency ablation of the atrioventricular node and implantation of a permanent pacemaker are an alternative therapeutic approach. The effect of this procedure on long-term survival is unknown. We studied all patients who underwent ablation of the atrioventricular node and implantation of a permanent pacemaker at the Mayo Clinic between 1990 and 1998. Observed survival was compared with the survival rates in two control populations: age- and sex-matched members of the Minnesota population between 1970 and 1990 and consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation who received drug therapy in 1993. A total of 350 patients (mean [+/-SD] age, 68+/-11 years) were studied. During a mean of 36+/-26 months of follow-up, 78 patients died. The observed survival rate was significantly lower than the expected survival rate based on the general Minnesota population (P<0.001). Previous myocardial infarction (P<0.001), a history of congestive heart failure (P=0.02), and treatment with cardiac drugs after ablation (P=0.03) were independent predictors of death. Observed survival among patients without these three risk factors was similar to expected survival (P=0.43). None of the 26 patients with lone atrial fibrillation died during follow-up (37+/-27 months). The observed survival rate among patients who underwent ablation was similar to that among 229 controls with atrial fibrillation (mean age, 67+/-12 years) who received drug therapy (P=0.44). In the absence of underlying heart disease, survival among patients with atrial fibrillation after ablation of the atrioventricular node is similar to expected survival in the general population. Long-term survival is similar for patients with atrial fibrillation, whether they receive ablation or drug therapy. Control of the ventricular rate by ablation of the atrioventricular node and permanent pacing does not adversely affect long-term survival.

  8. Clinical features and changes in epidemiology of infective endocarditis on pacemaker devices over a 27-year period (1987-2013).

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Francisco; Anguita, Manuel; Ruiz, Martín; Castillo, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Mónica; Mesa, Dolores; Romo, Elias; Pan, Manuel; Suárez de Lezo, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Use of cardiac pacing devices has grown in recent years. Our aim was to evaluate changes in epidemiology and clinical features of infective endocarditis (IE) involving pacemaker devices in a large series of IE over the last 27 years (1987-2013). From 1987 to December 2013, 413 consecutive IE cases were diagnosed in our hospital. During this period, 7424 pacemaker devices were implanted (6917 pacemakers, 239 implantable cardiac defibrillators, 158 resynchronization devices, and 110 resynchronization/defibrillator devices). All consecutive cases of IE on pacemaker devices were included and analysed. Infective endocarditis on pacemaker devices represented 6.1% of all endocarditis cases (25 patients), affecting 3.6/1000 of all implanted pacemakers. Its proportion increased from 1.25% of all endocarditis in 1987-1993 to 4.08% in 1994-2000, 7.69% in 2001-2007 and 9.32% in 2008-2013 (P < 0.01). Its incidence also increased from 1.4/1000 of all pacemaker implants in the period of 1987-1993 to 2.5/1000 in 1994-2000, 3.3/1000 in 2001-2007 and 4.5/1000 implanted devices in 2008-2013 (P < 0.05). Mean age of patients was 68 years, and 80% were male. Causative microorganisms predominantly were Staphylococci (84%: Staphylococcus aureus 48%, Staphylococcus epidermidis 36%). Rate of severe complications was high: persistent sepsis in 60% of cases, heart failure in 20%, and stroke in 12%. Device was removed in 19 patients (76%), mostly by surgery (18 of the 19 cases). Early mortality was 24% (33% of medically, 21% of surgically treated patients, P = 0.82). Infective endocarditis on pacemaker devices has shown an increasing incidence during the past decades, representing almost 10% of all IE in the last 6 years. This is a severe disease, with a high rate of severe complications and requiring removal of device in most cases. In spite of therapy, early mortality is high. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions

  9. Prospective study to develop surface landmarks for blind axillary vein puncture for permanent pacemaker and defibrillator lead implantation and compare it to available contrast venography guided technique

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, S.; Rohit, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop surface landmarks for blind axillary vein puncture for pacemaker lead implantation. Methods and results Patients for routine coronary angiography were counseled for participating in our study. 20 patients who gave consent were taken up for axillary venogram after proper positioning at the time of coronary angiogram. The venograms of these 20 patients, were reviewed and the landmarks were used to develop a blind axillary puncture technique. Success rate of 100% was achieved with surface landmark guided axillary vein puncture. The implantation time while using surface landmark guided axillary puncture was not significantly longer than when venography based approach was used. Another interesting observation made from the study was that increasing BMI had a positive correlation with the time taken for venous access, the fluoroscopic time and the volume of contrast used, all the associations being statistically significant. Thus, the surface landmark guided technique is more safe and expeditious in non obese patients and probably in pediatric patients as well. Moreover, the new surface landmark guided approach is a significant safety step in terms of reducing the unwanted and avoidable radiation exposure to the hands. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that placement of endocardial permanent pacemaker and ICD leads via the developed surface landmarks is effective and safe and is devoid of the harmful effects of radiation and contrast exposure. PMID:26071292

  10. Pacemaker lead endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, M.; van der Linden, E.; van Mechelen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present a patient with a pacemaker lead endocarditis who showed no signs of pocket infection but with high fever and signs of infection in the routine laboratory tests. A diagnosis of pacemaker lead endocarditis must be considered in all patients with fever and infection parameters who have a pacemaker inserted, not only in the first weeks after implantation but also late after implantation, as long as no other cause of infection has been found. Transthoracal echocardiography alone is not sensitive enough to establish the correct diagnosis. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is mandatory to demonstrate the presence or absence of a vegetation on a pacemaker lead. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696204

  11. Radiotherapy in patients with cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Last, A

    1998-01-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Modern pacemakers, using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, differ from older bipolar semiconductor devices both in their sensitivity to damage and the types of malfunction observed. The mechanisms and types of radiotherapy-induced pacemaker malfunction are described and in vitro and in vivo studies of pacemaker irradiation are reviewed. Some simple precautions are recommended during the planning and administration of radiotherapy to minimize the risk of harm to patients with pacemakers.

  12. Complications of pacemaker therapy in adults with congenital heart disease: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Opić, Petra; van Kranenburg, Matthijs; Yap, Sing-Chien; van Dijk, Arie P; Budts, Werner; Vliegen, Hubert W; van Erven, Lieselot; Can, Anil; Sahin, Gulhan; Theuns, Dominic A M J; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2013-10-09

    This study aims to investigate indications and complications of permanent cardiac pacing in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Two-hundred and seventy-four CHD patients were identified who underwent permanent pacemaker implantation between 1972 and 2009. The indication for pacing was acquired sinus node or AV node conduction disease (63%), sinus node or AV node conduction disease after cardiac surgery (28%), and drug/arrhythmia-related indications (9%). Patients with complex CHD received a pacemaker at younger age (23 versus 31 years, p<0.0001) and more often received an epicardial pacing system (51% versus 23%, p<0.0001) compared to those with simple or moderate CHD. Twenty-nine patients (10.6%) had a periprocedural complication during the primary pacemaker implantation (general population: 5.2%). The most common acute complications were lead dysfunction (4.0%), bleeding (2.6%), pocket infection (1.5%) and pneumothorax (1.5%). During a median follow-up of 12 years, pacemaker-related complications requiring intervention occurred in 95 patients (34.6%). The most common late pacemaker-related complications included lead failure (24.8%), pacemaker dysfunction/early battery depletion (5.1%), pacemaker migration (4.7%) and erosion (4.7%). Pacemaker implantation at younger age (<18 years) was an independent predictor of late pacemaker-related complication (adjusted hazard ratio 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 2.63, p=0.023). The risk of periprocedural complications seems higher in the CHD population compared to the general population and more than one-third of CHD patients encountered a pacemaker-related complication during long-term follow-up. This risk increases for those who receive a pacemaker at younger age. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pacemaker (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A pacemaker is a small, battery-operated electronic device which is inserted under the skin to help the heart beat regularly and at an appropriate rate. The pacemaker has leads that travel through a large vein ...

  14. Infection after pacemaker implantation: infection rates and risk factors associated with infection in a population-based cohort study of 46299 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Jens Brock; Jørgensen, Ole Dan; Møller, Mogens; Arnsbo, Per; Mortensen, Peter Thomas; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2011-01-01

    Aims Infection is a serious complication of pacemaker (PM) systems. Although the rate of infection has been debated, the figures are largely unknown. We therefore studied the incidence of PM infection and its associated risk factors in the Danish population. Methods and results Since 1982, all PM implantation and removal procedures performed in Denmark have been prospectively recorded in the Danish Pacemaker Register. All patients (n = 46299) who underwent implantation between 1982 and 2007 were included. The total length of surveillance was 236 888 PM-years. The incidence of infection was calculated according to the total number of PM-years. The incidence of surgical site infection (≤365 days after PM implantation) was compared with later infection in first implant and replacement procedures. Multiple-record and multiple-event-per-subject proportional hazards analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors of PM infection. Surgical site infection occurred in 192 cases after first implantation (incidence rate 4.82/1000 PM-years), and in 133 cases after replacement (12.12/1000 PM-years). Infections occurring more than 365 days after the first implantation occurred in 153 cases (1.02/1000 PM-years), and in 118 cases after replacement (3.26/1000 PM-years). Independent factors associated with an increased risk of PM infection were a greater number of PM operations (including replacements), male sex, younger age, implantation during the earliest part of the study period, and absence of antibiotics (P< 0.001). Conclusion The overall risk of infection after PM implantation was low. A greater number of operations augmented the risk of infection. This should be taken into account when considering revisions of PM systems. PMID:21252172

  15. Infection in permanent circulatory support: experience from the REMATCH trial.

    PubMed

    Holman, William L; Park, Soon J; Long, James W; Weinberg, Alan; Gupta, Lopa; Tierney, Anita R; Adamson, Robert M; Watson, John D; Raines, Edward P; Couper, Gregory S; Pagani, Francis D; Burton, Nelson A; Miller, Leslie W; Naka, Yoshifumi

    2004-12-01

    This analysis of the REMATCH Trial focuses on infection, which was an important source of morbidity and mortality. We use the information to suggest ways to decrease the incidence and effects of device-related infection. Patients were randomized prospectively to receive left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) or optimal medical management (OMM) for end-stage heart failure. Infection variables included sepsis adjudicated as the cause of death; sepsis reported as a serious adverse event; percutaneous site or pocket infection; and pump housing, inflow- or outflow-tract infection. We compared the incidence and prevalence of events between groups and generated time-related descriptions. Survival with LVAD (n=68 patients) was superior to OMM survival (n=61 patients) with a 47% decrease in risk of death (p <0.001), but the aggregate adverse event rate was greater for patients with LVADs (risk ratio, 2.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.85-2.84). Freedom from sepsis in patients with LVADs was 58% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years after implantation with superior survival in non-septic patients (60% vs 39% at 1 year and 38% vs 8% at 2 years in non-septic vs septic patients with LVADs, p <0.06). Percutaneous site or pocket infection did not affect survival (p=0.86). The hazard for onset of sepsis peaked within the first 3 weeks after implantation. Survival is improved with permanent LVAD implantation compared with OMM therapy. However, infection causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Decreasing infections will increase survival and decrease morbidity in permanent LVAD recipients and will improve the risk-benefit ratio for permanent LVAD therapy.

  16. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. Methods: For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Results: Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (P<0.05). Sinus node dysfunction and heart block were the most common indications for pacemaker implantation. Starting in 1997, a bicaval technique was used

  17. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mallidi, Hari R; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (P<0.05). Sinus node dysfunction and heart block were the most common indications for pacemaker implantation. Starting in 1997, a bicaval technique was used for implantation. The incidence

  18. Implantation of permanent pacemaker and ICD leads in children using a three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping system as an aid to fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Silver, Eric S; Nash, Mary C; Liberman, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping systems (3D mapping) allow the creation of an anatomic representation of the cardiac anatomy and real-time monitoring of transvenous pacing catheters. Their use to facilitate pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead placement in the pediatric population has not been well defined. We sought to review our experience using 3D mapping as an adjunct to fluoroscopy for positioning of permanent PM and ICD leads in pediatric patients. We performed a retrospective review of all patients ≤21 years of age who underwent PM or ICD implantation with the aid of the Ensite Velocity system (Ensite) from May 2012 to September 2014. Fluoroscopy was utilized in addition to 3D mapping to aid obtaining vascular access, to visualize fixation of the lead to the myocardium, and to evaluate lead length within the vasculature. Nineteen patients (mean age 14.6 ± 4.4 years) underwent placement of active fixation PM leads (N = 17) and/or ICD leads (N = 10) with the aid of Ensite. All leads were successfully placed (eight atrial, 19 ventricular). Fluoroscopic exposure was a mean of 3.2 minutes (± 2.8, 0.1-10.5). There was one lead dislodgement. Ensite was used successfully as an adjunct to fluoroscopy in all patients in whom it was attempted to aid the placement of permanent transvenous PM and ICD leads. Future evaluation could focus on the use of 3D mapping systems to further minimize or eliminate fluoroscopy from PM and ICD implantations. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Factors associated with cardiac conduction disorders and permanent pacemaker implantation after percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the CoreValve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Baan, Jan; Yong, Ze Yie; Koch, Karel T; Henriques, José P S; Bouma, Berto J; Vis, Marije M; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Piek, Jan J; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders and requirement for permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) are not uncommon after surgical aortic valve replacement and have important clinical implications. We aimed to investigate the incidence of cardiac conduction disorders after percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) and to identify possible clinical factors associated with their development. We studied 34 patients (mean age 80 +/- 8 years, 18 male) who underwent PAVI with the CoreValve bioprosthesis (Corevalve Inc, Irvine, CA). Electrocardiographic evaluation was performed pre- and postprocedurally, and at 1-week and 1-month follow-up. Other clinical variables were obtained from the medical history, echocardiography, and angiography. After PAVI, 7 patients required PPI, all of whom developed total atrioventricular block within 3 days postprocedurally. A smaller left ventricular outflow tract diameter (20.3 +/- 0.5 vs 21.6 +/- 1.8 cm, P = .01), more left-sided heart axis (-20 degrees +/- 29 degrees vs 19 degrees +/- 36 degrees , P = .02), more mitral annular calcification (10 +/- 1 vs 5 +/- 4 mm, P = .008), and a smaller postimplantation indexed effective orifice area (0.86 +/- 0.20 vs 1.10 +/- 0.26 cm(2)/m(2), P = .04) were associated with PPI. The incidence of new left bundle-branch block (LBBB) was 65% and was associated with a deeper implantation of the prosthesis: 10.2 +/- 2.3 mm in the new-LBBB group versus 7.7 +/- 3.1 mm in the non-LBBB group (P = .02). Percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the CoreValve prosthesis results in a high incidence of total atrioventricular block requiring PPI and new-onset LBBB. Preexisting disturbance of cardiac conduction, a narrow left ventricular outflow tract, and the severity of mitral annular calcification predict the need for permanent pacing, whereas the only factor shown to be predictive for new-onset LBBB is the depth of prosthesis implantation.

  20. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor... entitled “Guidance for the Submission of Research and Marketing Applications for Permanent Pacemaker...

  1. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division, formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc., incorporated Apollo technology into the development of the programmable pacemaker system. This consists of the implantable pacemaker together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Physician can communicate with patient's pacemaker by means of wireless telemetry signals transmitted through the communicating head held over the patient's chest. Where earlier pacemakers deliver a fixed type of stimulus once implanted, Programalith enables surgery free "fine tuning" of device to best suit the patient's changing needs.

  2. The impact of stored atrial rhythm diagnostics in permanent pacemakers and the management of atrial fibrillation: the Vitatron Selection AFm Registry study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael H; Reiter, Michael J; Canby, Robert; Navone, Anthony; Lung, Te-Hsin; Pfeiffer, Julie

    2010-09-01

    The Selection AFm Registry investigated the impact of pacemaker diagnostic data on the clinical management of patients with atrial arrhythmias, specifically atrial fibrillation (AF) through the use of advanced atrial arrhythmia monitoring features. Very few data on the clinical impact of such data has been reported in a real world setting. Patients with known or suspected AF with a Class I or Class II indication for a dual-chamber pacemaker received the Selection AFm pacemaker. These patients were prospectively followed at pacemaker follow-up visits, and data were collected on medications and device programming. Physicians identified which therapy changes were based upon the stored data within the pacemaker. Two hundred eighty-two patients were enrolled. A total of 119 patients had 311 changes made to either their medications or device programming after review of diagnostic pacemaker data. Changes involved rate and rhythm control, warfarin anticoagulation, and pacemaker programmed settings. Significantly, more changes were made in patients with documented atrial arrhythmias at follow-up. The atrial arrhythmia recording features were used by clinicians to guide therapy-related decisions in patients with paroxysmal AF. Such data represent an additional source of clinical information for AF disease management.

  3. Tricuspid-valve repair for pacemaker leads endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Federica; Cini, Roberto; Sordini, Paolo

    2010-12-20

    In non-addicted patients, several states, such as permanent pacemakers, can provide the predisposing factors for tricuspid-valve endocarditis. In this report, we present a case of a 66-year-old man with pacemaker lead infection and tricuspid-native-valve endocarditis, related to Staphylococcus hominis, very rare cause of infective endocarditis that carries a high-mortality risk. Surgery was indicated for the patient due to persistent enlarging vegetation on the tricuspid valve, severe tricuspid regurgitation, septic pulmonary emboli and finally uncompensated respiratory and heart failure. Many ingenious methods have been devised to repair the tricuspid valve in patients with infective endocarditis. Valve replacement, however, is hazardous due to the possibility of prosthetic infection, and we choose to repair the native valve. The patient has now been weel for 3 years.

  4. [Morbimortality of infective endocarditis associated with permanent cardiovascular implantable electronic devices].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Baztarrica, Gabriel; Salvaggio, Flavio; Blanco, Norberto; Mazzetti, Héctor; Levin, Ricardo; Botbol, Alejandro; Porcile, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) associated with permanent cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is a complication of low frequency, but high mortality without adequate treatment. Progress on the knowledge of this disease and the development of therapeutic strategies such as early diagnosis, antibiotic management and better extraction techniques, among others, have improved the prognosis of these patients. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the in-hospital and out-of-hospital morbidity, and analyze some factors that explain the differences among the published mortality data. Patients diagnosed with IE associated with CIEDs were studied, retrospectively, between March/2002 and March/2011. We analyzed baseline, diagnostic and therapeutic characteristics, and in-hospital and out-of-hospital courses of the disease. We included 26 cases treated in our hospital, 23 of whom were referred from other centers for diagnosis and treatment. The average age of the patients was 67.5 years. All patients received antibiotics for six weeks and underwent complete removal of the device system, in 95% of patients by percutaneous extraction and 2 patients required a median sternotomy, atriotomy and epicardial pacemaker placement. Mortality was 4% and the follow up mortality was zero. The in-hospital morbidity was 31%. In the follow-ups there were no reinfections or other complications. In conclusion, IE is a serious condition that has a high morbidity with prolonged hospital stays, but with a low mortality. The explanation may lie in the use percutaneous extraction techniques, experience, complete extraction of the device system, the time of reimplantation of the new device and early treatment, among other factors.

  5. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 28 grams). Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  6. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  7. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Released in 1995, the Trilogy cardiac pacemaker is the fourth generation of a unit developed in the 1970s by NASA, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.). The new system incorporates the company's PDx diagnostic and programming software and a powerful microprocessor that allows more functions to be fully automatic and gives more detailed information on the patient's health and the performance of the pacing systems. The pacemaker incorporates bidirectional telemetry used for space communications for noninvasive communication with the implanted pacemaker, smaller implantable pulse generators from space microminiaturization, and longer-life batteries from technology for spacecraft electrical power systems.

  8. Pacemaker pocket infection due to environmental mycobacteria: Successful management of an outbreak and steps for prevention in future

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Vijaya; Hittinahalli, Vivek; Mishra, Meenakshi; Pradhan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Background An outbreak of surgical site infection (SSI) due to environmental mycobacteria (EMB) occurred in a hospital in Eastern India. Method A quality improvement project (QIP) was undertaken to analyze the causes and prevent further outbreak. Step (1) Proof of the need: Four patients who had undergone pacemaker implantation consecutively during a 10-day period developed SSI. Step (2) Diagnostic journey: Since all patients developed SSI within 2 months of implantation, a common source of infection was likely. Atypical mycobacteria (AMB) were grown from surgical sites as well as from the surface of operation table, image intensifier, and lead aprons. It was a rapid growing variety that lacked pigment, a characteristic of EMB with pathogenic potential. The EMB was finally traced to its source, the overhead water tank. Step (3) Remedial journey: By thorough cleaning of the water tank and enriching its chlorine content, the EMB was eliminated from its source. Step (4) Holding the gains: Protocol for cleaning the water tank once in 3 months was made. A checklist was prepared to ensure compliance to asepsis protocol in the operation theater. In the ensuing 5 years, the infection did not recur. Result The bacteria that caused SSI were identified as EMB that grew in the water tank and contaminated the operation room. It could be eliminated by appropriate measures. Interpretation Water is a potential reservoir for EMB. Use of the term ‘environmental mycobacteria’ instead of ‘atypical mycobacteria’ will generate awareness about contamination as the cause of SSI. PMID:26896269

  9. An observational study of the effect of coronary artery disease severity on acute pacing threshold and lead impedance in patients with permanent pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Selim; Yeşil, Murat; Bayata, Serdar; Arikan, Erdinç; Vurgun, Veysel Kutay; Postaci, Nursen; Safak, Ozgen; Ozdemir, Emre

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of coronary artery disease (CAD) severity, distribution and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on acute ventricular pacing threshold and lead impedance at the time of pacemaker implantation. One hundred and thirty-two patients who received a ventricular pacemaker or internal cardioverter-defibrilator (ICD) lead in our institution between 2007-2010 were included in this observational study. Patients were divided into ICD and anti-bradycardic pacemaker (PM) groups. Groups were compared for ventricular stimulation threshold, lead impedance and LVEF. Later, groups were sub-grouped according to the severity and distribution of CAD and subgroups were compared in both groups for ventricular stimulation threshold, lead impedance. Quantitative data of groups were compared by means of independent samples t-test. Ventricular pacing thresholds were found significantly higher ICD group compared with PM group (p<0.05). Impedance and LVEF values were significantly lower in ICD group (p<0.05). Impedance and ventricular pacing thresholds were comparable in subgroups of ICD and PM groups. Our study does not confirm any relationship between pacing parameters and severity-distribution of CAD and LVEF. Patients with ventricular ICD lead had higher pacing thresholds but lower pacing impedance values comparing with PM group. This study did not find any significant relationship between pacing parameters at implantation and LVEF, severity and distribution of CAD.

  10. Insights into the need for permanent pacemaker following implantation of the repositionable LOTUS valve for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in 250 patients: results from the REPRISE II trial with extended cohort.

    PubMed

    Dumonteil, Nicolas; Meredith, Ian T; Blackman, Daniel J; Tchétché, Didier; Hildick-Smith, David; Spence, Mark S; Walters, Darren L; Harnek, Jan; Worthley, Stephen G; Rioufol, Gilles; Lefèvre, Thierry; Modine, Thomas; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Houle, Vicki M; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D

    2017-09-20

    This analysis aimed to evaluate the incidence and predictors of the need for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation following implantation of the repositionable and fully retrievable LOTUS Aortic Valve Replacement System. The prospective, single-arm, multicentre REPRISE II study with extended cohort enrolled 250 symptomatic, high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis for transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a 23 mm or 27 mm LOTUS valve. Echocardiography, computed tomography, and electrocardiography data were evaluated by independent core labs. Post TAVI, 32.0% (72/225) of pacemaker-naïve patients underwent new PPM implantation at 30 days. Most (59/72, 82%) patients were implanted for third-degree atrioventricular block, and >10% overstretch of the LVOT by area was observed in 59.7% (43/72) of PPM patients. Significant independent predictors of PPM at 30 days included baseline RBBB (odds ratio [OR] 12.7, 95% CI: 4.5, 36.2; p<0.001) and LVOT overstretch >10% (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.7, 6.7; p<0.001). There was a trend towards a lower 30-day PPM rate in patients with a shallower (≤5 mm) implant depth (23.9% ≤5 mm vs. 36.9% >5 mm depth from LCS; p=0.06). Careful attention to valve sizing and implant depth may help to reduce the rate of PPM with the LOTUS valve.

  11. Pacemaker pocket infection due to environmental mycobacteria: Successful management of an outbreak and steps for prevention in future.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Vijaya; Hittinahalli, Vivek; Mishra, Meenakshi; Pradhan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of surgical site infection (SSI) due to environmental mycobacteria (EMB) occurred in a hospital in Eastern India. A quality improvement project (QIP) was undertaken to analyze the causes and prevent further outbreak. Step (1) Proof of the need: Four patients who had undergone pacemaker implantation consecutively during a 10-day period developed SSI. Step (2) Diagnostic journey: Since all patients developed SSI within 2 months of implantation, a common source of infection was likely. Atypical mycobacteria (AMB) were grown from surgical sites as well as from the surface of operation table, image intensifier, and lead aprons. It was a rapid growing variety that lacked pigment, a characteristic of EMB with pathogenic potential. The EMB was finally traced to its source, the overhead water tank. Step (3) Remedial journey: By thorough cleaning of the water tank and enriching its chlorine content, the EMB was eliminated from its source. Step (4) Holding the gains: Protocol for cleaning the water tank once in 3 months was made. A checklist was prepared to ensure compliance to asepsis protocol in the operation theater. In the ensuing 5 years, the infection did not recur. The bacteria that caused SSI were identified as EMB that grew in the water tank and contaminated the operation room. It could be eliminated by appropriate measures. Water is a potential reservoir for EMB. Use of the term 'environmental mycobacteria' instead of 'atypical mycobacteria' will generate awareness about contamination as the cause of SSI. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biofilm on artificial pacemaker: fiction or reality?

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana Paula Azevedo; Watanabe, Evandro; Andrade, Denise de

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac pacing through cardiac pacemaker is one of the most promising alternatives in the treatment of arrhythmias, but it can cause reactions natural or complex reactions, either early or late. This study aimed to describe the scientific evidence on the risk of infection and biofilm formation associated with cardiac pacemaker. This is a study of integrative literature review. It included 14 publications classified into three thematic categories: diagnosis (microbiological and/or clinical), complications and therapy of infections. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were the microorganisms most frequently isolated. It was not possible to determine the incidence of infection associated with pacemakers, since the studies were generally of prevalence. In terms of therapy, the complete removal of pacemakers stood out, especially in cases of suspected biofilm. Still controversial is the use of systemic antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of infection associated with implantation of a pacemaker.

  13. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing infection of a biventricular pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhning L; Bridge, Bronwyn; Wang, Jeffrey; Jovin, Ion S

    2012-12-01

    Increased utilization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) has seen a corresponding rise in related infections. Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely the cause. Treatment involves susceptibilities, antimicrobials, and device removal. This study presents a patient who underwent a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator upgrade with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium fortuitum located at the pocket site and a lead infection.

  14. Paced QRS duration predicts left ventricular function in patients with permanent pacemakers – One-year follow-up study using equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gautam; Shetkar, Sudhir Suryakant; Patel, Chetan D.; Singh, Harmandeep; Naik, Nitish; Roy, Ambuj; Juneja, Rajnish; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Permanent pacing, being non physiological, often results in ventricular dysfunction over time. Narrower paced QRS duration from pacing the right ventricular outflow tract septum, might result in relatively preserved ventricular function over long term follow up. PMID:26937092

  15. The effects of periradicular inflamation and infection on a primary tooth and permanent successor.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodriguez; Rocha, Maria Jose de Carvalho

    2005-01-01

    Primary teeth and the permanent successors must be understood as interdependent units, where each one of them interacts with and depends on each other. Pulpal inflammation/infection of a primary tooth and the spread of this condition over the periradicular tissues can lead to alterations in the dental germ of the permanent successor and to the surrounding structures if no therapy is done, i.e. endodontics or extraction. This work will present cases of permanent teeth that showed alteration in eruption and / or in development, as a consequence of inflammation / infection of the preceding primary teeth, such as: hypoplasia, morphological alteration on the dental crown or total arrest of. radicular formation. The teeth analysed in this study belong to patients who attended the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Children's Dentistry Clinic. The earlier these lesions are diagnosed, the less were the destructive effects and the consequences on the primary tooth/permanent germ unit.

  16. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice.

  17. Pacemaker implantation complication rates in elderly and young patients.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Kazım Serhan; Osmonov, Damirbek; Altay, Servet; Dönmez, Cevdet; Yıldırım, Ersin; Türkkan, Ceyhan; Güngör, Barış; Ekmekçi, Ahmet; Alper, Ahmet Taha; Gürkan, Kadir; Erdinler, Izzet

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the complication rate differences between elderly and younger patients who receive a permanent pacemaker implantation. We reviewed all cases admitted to our institution between January 2008 and June 2009 with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia for whom a permanent pacemaker was implanted. Beginning in June 2009, we prospectively collected data from all patients with the same diagnosis and procedure. The frequency of complications due to the pacemaker implantation procedure was evaluated and compared between young (<70 years old) and elderly (≥70 years old) patients. Among 574 patients with a permanent pacemaker, 259 patients (45.1%) were below and 315 patients (54.9%) were above or at 70 years of age. There were 240 (92.7%) and 19 (7.3%) dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD) and single-chamber pacemaker (VVI) implanted patients in the younger group, and 291 (76.8%) and 73 (23.2%) DDD and VVI pacemaker implanted patients in the elderly group, respectively. The complication rate was 39 (15.1%) out of 259 young patients and 24 (7.6%) out of 315 elderly patients. Postprocedural complications were statistically lower in the elderly patients than in younger patients (P = 0.005). A pacemaker implantation performed by an experienced operator is a safe procedure for patients of advanced age. The patients who are above 70 years old may have less complication rates than the younger patients.

  18. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your chest below your collarbone. The pacemaker generator was then placed under the skin at this ... with your pacemaker. Stay away from large motors, generators, and equipment. DO NOT lean over the open ...

  19. Factors associated with Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis infection among permanent residents of three endemic areas in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cadavid, D; Restrepo, A

    1993-08-01

    The natural habitat of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the aetiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, has not been determined. Consequently, the events leading to the acquisition of infection remain controversial. To identify factors associated with infection in endemic areas we conducted a survey in three rural communities in Colombia where we had previously diagnosed paracoccidioidomycosis in children. Permanent residents were surveyed taking into consideration environmental and occupational variables. Skin tests were used to classify subjects as infected or non-infected. Variables found associated with infection were: (i) community A: previous residence around Porce river and agriculture in vegetable gardens; (ii) community C: frequent use of specific water sources; (iii) community V: housekeeping activities, and (iv) total group: age > 25 years and contact with bats. Residents in communities with higher prevalence of infection were older, had more complex residence history, and referred more contact with armadillos than residents of communities with lower infection.

  20. Factors associated with Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis infection among permanent residents of three endemic areas in Colombia.

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid, D.; Restrepo, A.

    1993-01-01

    The natural habitat of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the aetiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, has not been determined. Consequently, the events leading to the acquisition of infection remain controversial. To identify factors associated with infection in endemic areas we conducted a survey in three rural communities in Colombia where we had previously diagnosed paracoccidioidomycosis in children. Permanent residents were surveyed taking into consideration environmental and occupational variables. Skin tests were used to classify subjects as infected or non-infected. Variables found associated with infection were: (i) community A: previous residence around Porce river and agriculture in vegetable gardens; (ii) community C: frequent use of specific water sources; (iii) community V: housekeeping activities, and (iv) total group: age > 25 years and contact with bats. Residents in communities with higher prevalence of infection were older, had more complex residence history, and referred more contact with armadillos than residents of communities with lower infection. PMID:8348926

  1. Pacemaker Dependency after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Steyers, Curtis M; Khera, Rohan; Bhave, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Severe postoperative conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation frequently occur following cardiac surgery. Little is known about the long-term pacing requirements and risk factors for pacemaker dependency in this population. We performed a systematic review of the literature addressing rates and predictors of pacemaker dependency in patients requiring permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. Using a comprehensive search of the Medline, Web of Science and EMBASE databases, studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 8 studies addressing the endpoint of pacemaker-dependency were identified, while 3 studies were found that addressed the recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction endpoint. There were 10 unique studies with a total of 780 patients. Mean follow-up ranged from 6-72 months. Pacemaker dependency rates ranged from 32%-91% and recovery of AV conduction ranged from 16%-42%. There was significant heterogeneity with respect to the definition of pacemaker dependency. Several patient and procedure-specific variables were found to be independently associated with pacemaker dependency, but these were not consistent between studies. Pacemaker dependency following cardiac surgery occurs with variable frequency. While individual studies have identified various perioperative risk factors for pacemaker dependency and non-resolution of AV conduction disease, results have been inconsistent. Well-conducted studies using a uniform definition of pacemaker dependency might identify patients who will benefit most from early permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery.

  2. Pacemaker Dependency after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe postoperative conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation frequently occur following cardiac surgery. Little is known about the long-term pacing requirements and risk factors for pacemaker dependency in this population. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature addressing rates and predictors of pacemaker dependency in patients requiring permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. Using a comprehensive search of the Medline, Web of Science and EMBASE databases, studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 8 studies addressing the endpoint of pacemaker-dependency were identified, while 3 studies were found that addressed the recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction endpoint. There were 10 unique studies with a total of 780 patients. Mean follow-up ranged from 6–72 months. Pacemaker dependency rates ranged from 32%-91% and recovery of AV conduction ranged from 16%-42%. There was significant heterogeneity with respect to the definition of pacemaker dependency. Several patient and procedure-specific variables were found to be independently associated with pacemaker dependency, but these were not consistent between studies. Conclusions Pacemaker dependency following cardiac surgery occurs with variable frequency. While individual studies have identified various perioperative risk factors for pacemaker dependency and non-resolution of AV conduction disease, results have been inconsistent. Well-conducted studies using a uniform definition of pacemaker dependency might identify patients who will benefit most from early permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. PMID:26470027

  3. Pacemaker deactivation: withdrawal of support or active ending of life?

    PubMed

    Huddle, Thomas S; Amos Bailey, F

    2012-12-01

    In spite of ethical analyses assimilating the palliative deactivation of pacemakers to commonly accepted withdrawings of life-sustaining therapy, many clinicians remain ethically uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life. Various reasons have been posited for this discomfort. Some cardiologists have suggested that reluctance to deactivate pacemakers may stem from a sense that the pacemaker has become part of the patient's "self." The authors suggest that Daniel Sulmasy is correct to contend that any such identification of the pacemaker is misguided. The authors argue that clinicians uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation are nevertheless correct to see it as incompatible with the traditional medical ethics of withdrawal of support. Traditional medical ethics is presently taken by many to sanction pacemaker deactivation when such deactivation honors the patient's right to refuse treatment. The authors suggest that the right to refuse treatment applies to treatments involving ongoing physician agency. This right cannot underwrite patient demands that physicians reverse the effects of treatments previously administered, in which ongoing physician agency is no longer implicated. The permanently indwelling pacemaker is best seen as such a treatment. As such, its deactivation in the pacemaker-dependent patient is best seen not as withdrawal of support but as active ending of life. That being the case, clinicians adhering to the usual ethical analysis of withdrawal of support are correct to be uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life.

  4. Percutaneous Implantation of an Entirely Intracardiac Leadless Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vivek Y; Exner, Derek V; Cantillon, Daniel J; Doshi, Rahul; Bunch, T Jared; Tomassoni, Gery F; Friedman, Paul A; Estes, N A Mark; Ip, John; Niazi, Imran; Plunkitt, Kenneth; Banker, Rajesh; Porterfield, James; Ip, James E; Dukkipati, Srinivas R

    2015-09-17

    Cardiac pacemakers are limited by device-related complications, notably infection and problems related to pacemaker leads. We studied a miniaturized, fully self-contained leadless pacemaker that is nonsurgically implanted in the right ventricle with the use of a catheter. In this multicenter study, we implanted an active-fixation leadless cardiac pacemaker in patients who required permanent single-chamber ventricular pacing. The primary efficacy end point was both an acceptable pacing threshold (≤2.0 V at 0.4 msec) and an acceptable sensing amplitude (R wave ≥5.0 mV, or a value equal to or greater than the value at implantation) through 6 months. The primary safety end point was freedom from device-related serious adverse events through 6 months. In this ongoing study, the prespecified analysis of the primary end points was performed on data from the first 300 patients who completed 6 months of follow-up (primary cohort). The rates of the efficacy end point and safety end point were compared with performance goals (based on historical data) of 85% and 86%, respectively. Additional outcomes were assessed in all 526 patients who were enrolled as of June 2015 (the total cohort). The leadless pacemaker was successfully implanted in 504 of the 526 patients in the total cohort (95.8%). The intention-to-treat primary efficacy end point was met in 270 of the 300 patients in the primary cohort (90.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86.0 to 93.2, P=0.007), and the primary safety end point was met in 280 of the 300 patients (93.3%; 95% CI, 89.9 to 95.9; P<0.001). At 6 months, device-related serious adverse events were observed in 6.7% of the patients; events included device dislodgement with percutaneous retrieval (in 1.7%), cardiac perforation (in 1.3%), and pacing-threshold elevation requiring percutaneous retrieval and device replacement (in 1.3%). The leadless cardiac pacemaker met prespecified pacing and sensing requirements in the large majority of patients. Device

  5. Nodular skin reactions in eyebrow permanent makeup: two case reports and an infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe

    2011-09-01

    Permanent makeup is becoming more and more popular. The procedures, however, bear some medical risks. We will describe possible adverse effects of the procedure. This is a report of clinical observations. We report about two women aged 26 and 47 years, who developed nodules with some delay after permanent tattooing the eyebrows. Clinical, histologic, and laboratory investigations revealed a noninfectious granulomatous reaction not responding to topical calcineurin inhibitor but corticosteroids in the younger patient. In the other woman, an infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum could be identified. A triple combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin succeeded in clearance of the lesions. Adverse reactions after permanent makeup need a medical evaluation to identify health risks and initiate early treatment. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus pacemaker endocarditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sahil R; Patel, Nishi H; Borah, Amit; Saltzman, Heath

    2014-12-08

    Aggregatibacter bacteria are a rare cause of endocarditis in adults. They are part of a group of organisms known as HACEK--Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter, Cardiobacter, Eikenella, and Kingella. Among these organisms, several Haemophilus species have been reclassified under the genus Aggregatibacter. Very few cases of Aggregatibacter endocarditis in patients with pacemaker devices have been reported. We present here what we believe to be the first case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus pacemaker endocarditis. A 62-year-old African American male with a medical history significant for dual-chamber pacemaker placement in 1996 for complete heart block with subsequent lead manipulation in 2007, presented to his primary care doctor with fever, chills, night sweats, fatigue, and ten-pound weight loss over a four-month period. Physical examination revealed a new murmur and jugular venous distension which prompted initiation of antibiotics for suspicion of endocarditis. Both sets of initial blood cultures were positive for A. aphrophilus. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed vegetations on the tricuspid valve and the right ventricular pacemaker lead (Figure 1). This case highlights the importance of identifying rare causes of endocarditis and recognizing that treatment may not differ from the standard treatment for typical presentations. The patient received intravenous ceftriaxone for his endocarditis for a total of six weeks. Upon device removal, temporary jugular venous pacing wires were placed. After two weeks of antibiotic treatment and no clinical deterioration, a new permanent pacemaker was placed and the patient was discharged home. This is the first case of A. aphrophilus endocarditis in a patient with a permanent pacemaker. Our patient had no obvious risk factors other than poor dentition and a history of repeated pacemaker lead manipulation. This suggests that valvulopathies secondary to repeated lead manipulation can be clinically significant factors in morbidity

  7. [Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Menard, J; Campana, F; Kirov, K M; Bollet, M-A; Dendale, R; Fournier-Bidoz, N; Marchand, V; Mazal, A; Estève, M; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2011-06-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before radiotherapy and everyday monitoring permitted the safe

  8. Pacemaker recycling: A notion whose time has come

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Mason W; Baman, Timir S; Davis, Sheldon; Weatherwax, Kevin; Goldman, Ed; Eagle, Kim A; Crawford, Thomas C

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the need, feasibility, safety, legality, and ethical perspectives of pacemaker reutilization in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It will also describe, in-depth, Project My Heart Your Heart (PMHYH) as a model for pacemaker reuse in LMICs. The primary source of the discussion points in this paper is a collection of 14 publications produced by the research team at the University of Michigan and its collaborative partners. The need for pacemaker reutilization in LMICs is evident. Numerous studies show that the concept of pacemaker reutilization in LMICs is feasible. Infection and device malfunction are the main concerns in regard to pacemaker reutilization, yet many studies have shown that pacemaker reuse is not associated with increased infection risk or higher mortality compared with new device implantation. Under the right circumstances, the ethical and legal bases for pacemaker reutilization are supported. PMHYH is a proof of concept pacemaker donation initiative that has allowed funeral home and crematory directors to send explanted devices to an academic center for evaluation and re-sterilization before donation to underserved patients in LMICs. The time is now to pursue large-scale studies and trials of pacemaker reuse for the betterment of society. PMHYH is leading the way in the effort and is poised to conduct a prospective randomized, non-inferiority, multicenter study to confirm the clinical efficacy and safety of pacemaker reuse, for clinical and legal support. PMID:28515847

  9. Pacemaker lead erosion simulating "Loch Ness Monster": conservative management.

    PubMed

    Garg, Naveen; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2012-12-01

    The majority of pacemaker pocket or lead erosions are due to either mechanical erosion by the bulky pulse generator or secondary to pacemaker pocket infection. We describe an unusual case of delayed pacemaker lead erosion causing extrusion of a portion of the pacing lead, with separate entry and exit points, with the gap filled with new skin formation, simulating the "Loch Ness Monster", which was successfully managed conservatively by surgical reinsertion.

  10. Markers of Loa loa infection in permanent residents of a loiasis endemic area of Gabon.

    PubMed

    Akue, J P; Hommel, M; Devaney, E

    1996-01-01

    Different markers of infection were analyzed in 56 permanent residents of a Loa loa endemic village in Gabon. The population was divided into those with parasitological evidence of L. loa infection and those with no history of loiasis over the period of observation (c. 5 years). 26.7% of villagers had L. loa microfilariae, 33.9% had an ocular passage of an adult worm, and 17.8% had calabar oedema. Several other clinical symptoms were present in both groups of individuals, but none was considered to be pathognomonic for L. loa infection. Most of the villagers were polyparasitized, with Plasmodium falciparum and gastrointestinal parasites being particularly prevalent. Mansonella perstans was present in 80% of the villagers and was equally distributed between L. loa microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic individuals. Eosinophil levels were elevated in the whole population, and were not significantly different between the groups who were infected and non-infected with L. loa. Polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels were high in both the Ambinda villagers and in Gambian serum from patients infected with M. perstans alone and there was no significant difference between the levels of L. loa specific IgG in the Ambinda villagers and the Gambian patients. However, the level of L. loa specific IgG4 was elevated in 75.6% of amicrofilaraemic individuals and could discriminate between most individuals infected with L. loa and those infected with M. perstans, suggesting that this is the best determinant of infection status in the absence of L. loa microfilariae.

  11. Aspergillus pacemaker endocarditis presenting as pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Colino, A; Golpe, R; González-Rodríguez, A; González-Juanatey, C; Legarra, J J; Blanco, M

    2005-06-01

    Pacemaker endocarditis (PME) is a rare but severe complication of endocardial pacemaker implantation. Fungal PME is extremely uncommon. The case of a 66-year-old female patient who was diagnosed as having a pulmonary embolus based upon the patient's clinical presentation and computed tomography angiography findings is presented. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge vegetation attached to the pacemaker wire. The pacemaker system was removed surgically during cardiovascular bypass. The vegetation was cultured, the results of which were positive for Aspergillus spp. No risk factors for Aspergillus infection were found in the patient. She was treated with liposomal amphotericin B for 3 weeks, followed by itraconazole for 40 weeks. At 1 year later, the patient remains asymptomatic.

  12. A Rare Case of Recurrent Pacemaker Allergic Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Muhammed; Shah, Pooja; Elkhalili, Walid; Suleiman, Addi; Shaaban, Hamid; Shah, Pradip A.; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions to pacemaker device components are uncommon. However, when they occur, they usually mimic pacemaker infection, which results in multiple device replacements and increased morbidity burden. Here we present a 40-year-old female with pacemaker insertion due to complete heart block and who had multiple device replacements because of allergic sensitivity to various pacemaker component-encasing materials, confirmed by allergic testing to these materials. She had complete resolution of her symptoms after replacement with gold-plated device, to which she was not allergic. PMID:26240735

  13. Gene Delivery for the Generation of Bioartificial Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Chan, Patrick K W; Li, Ronald A

    2017-01-01

    Electronic pacemakers have been used in patients with heart rhythm disorders for device-supported pacing. While effective, there are such shortcomings as limited battery life, permanent implantation of catheters, the lack of autonomic neurohumoral responses, and risks of lead dislodging. Here we describe protocols for establishing porcine models of sick sinus syndrome and complete heart block, and the generation of bioartificial pacemaker by delivering a strategically engineered form of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated pacemaker channel protein via somatic gene transfer to convert atrial or ventricular muscle cardiomyocytes into nodal-like cells that rhythmically fire action potentials.

  14. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting.

  15. Case report: pulp revascularization of a necrotic, infected, immature, permanent tooth.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Blayne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the case of a patient wherein revascularization of the necrotic infected pulp space of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor tooth was induced in vivo by stimulation of a blood clot from the periapical tissues into the canal space. This was achieved after disinfecting the canal space with a topical antibiotic paste followed by inducing a blood clot scaffold from the periapical tissues. This treatment approach offers great potential to avoid the need for traditional apexification with calcium hydroxide or the need to achieve an artificial apical barrier with mineral trioxide aggregate. Furthermore, this treatment approach can help rescue infected immature teeth by physiologically strengthening the root walls.

  16. [Analysis of pacemaker ECGs].

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Ekosso-Ejangue, Lucy; Sheta, Mohamed-Karim

    2015-09-01

    The key to a successful analysis of a pacemaker electrocardiogram (ECG) is the application of the systematic approach used for any other ECG without a pacemaker: analysis of (1) basic rhythm and rate, (2) QRS axis, (3) PQ, QRS and QT intervals, (4) morphology of P waves, QRS, ST segments and T(U) waves and (5) the presence of arrhythmias. If only the most obvious abnormality of a pacemaker ECG is considered, wrong conclusions can easily be drawn. If a systematic approach is skipped it may be overlooked that e.g. atrial pacing is ineffective, the left ventricle is paced instead of the right ventricle, pacing competes with intrinsic conduction or that the atrioventricular (AV) conduction time is programmed too long. Apart from this analysis, a pacemaker ECG which is not clear should be checked for the presence of arrhythmias (e.g. atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, junctional escape rhythm and endless loop tachycardia), pacemaker malfunction (e.g. atrial or ventricular undersensing or oversensing, atrial or ventricular loss of capture) and activity of specific pacing algorithms, such as automatic mode switching, rate adaptation, AV delay modifying algorithms, reaction to premature ventricular contractions (PVC), safety window pacing, hysteresis and noise mode. A systematic analysis of the pacemaker ECG almost always allows a probable diagnosis of arrhythmias and malfunctions to be made, which can be confirmed by pacemaker control and can often be corrected at the touch of the right button to the patient's benefit.

  17. Electromagnetic Interference on Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Okan

    2002-01-01

    External sources, either within or outside the hospital environment, may interfere with the appropriate function of pacemakers which are being implanted all around the world in current medical practice. The patient and the physician who is responsible for follow-up of the pacing systems may be confronted with some specific problems regarding the various types of electromagnetic interference (EMI). To avoid these unwanted EMI effects one must be aware of this potential problem and need to take some precautions. The effects of EMI on pacemaker function and precautions to overcome some specific problems were discussed in this review article. There are many sources of EMI interacting with pacemakers. Magnetic resonance imaging creates real problem and should be avoided in pacemaker patients. Cellular phones might be responsible for EMI when they were held on the same side with the pacemaker. Otherwise they don't cause any specific type of interaction with pacemakers. Sale security systems are not a problem if one walks through it without lingering in or near it. Patients having unipolar pacemaker systems are prone to develop EMI because of pectoral muscle artifacts during vigorous active physical exercise. PMID:17006562

  18. Endodontic Management of an Infected Primary Molar in a Child with Agenesis of the Permanent Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2017-01-01

    Missing of mandibular second premolar is one of the most common types of tooth agenesis. In such cases, maintenance of the primary second molar, if possible at all, can prevent many treatment procedures in future. The present case report represents the endodontic management of a necrotic left mandibular primary second molar that had developed an abscess. Considering the missing of the permanent successor, the tooth was disinfected during endodontic preparation and the root canal system was filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in the same session. After 12 months of regular follow-up, not only the tooth was functional and symptom-free, but also healing of the inter-radicular bone lesion and re-establishment of the lamina dura was indicative of treatment success. Further trials are suggested to confirm CEM biomaterial use for management of infected primary molars associated with endodontic lesion. PMID:28179938

  19. Biomarker-based diagnosis of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infections: A prospective, multicentre, case-control evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Vrazic, Hrvoje; Haller, Bernhard; Braun, Siegmund; Petzold, Tobias; Ott, Ilka; Lennerz, Agnes; Michel, Jonathan; Blažek, Patrick; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Whittaker, Peter; Kolb, Christof

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has risen steadily, yet the rate of cardiac device infections (CDI) has disproportionately increased. Amongst all cardiac device infections, the pocket infection is the most challenging diagnosis. Therefore, we aimed to improve diagnosis of such pocket infection by identifying relevant biomarkers. Methods We enrolled 25 consecutive patients with invasively and microbiologically confirmed pocket infection. None of the patients had any confounding conditions. Pre-operative levels of 14 biomarkers were compared in infected and control (n = 50) patients. Our selected biomarkers included white blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), polymorphonuclear-elastase, presepsin, various interleukins, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Results Of the 25 patients with isolated pocket infection (70±13years, 76% male, 40% ICDs), none presented with leukocytosis. In contrast, they had higher serum levels of HS-CRP (p = 0.019) and PCT (p = 0.010) than control patients. Median PCT-level was 0.06 ng/mL (IQR 0.03–0.07 ng/mL) in the study group versus 0.03 ng/mL (IQR 0.02–0.04 ng/mL) in controls. An optimized PCT cut-off value of 0.05 ng/mL suggests pocket infection with a sensitivity of 60% and specificity of 82%. In addition TNF-α- and GM-CSF-levels were lower in the study group. Other biomarkers did not differ between groups. Conclusion Diagnosis of isolated pocket infections requires clinical awareness, physical examination, evaluation of blood cultures and echocardiography assessment. Nevertheless, measurement of PCT- and HS-CRP-levels can aid diagnosis. However, no conclusion can be drawn from normal WBC-values. Clinical trial registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01619267 PMID:28264059

  20. Electromagnetic interference with pacemakers caused by portable media players.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Jay P; Patel, Mehul B; Jongnarangsin, Krit; Liepa, Valdis V; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2008-04-01

    Electromagnetic fields generated by electrical devices may cause interference with permanent pacemakers. Media players are becoming a common mode of portable entertainment. The most common media players used worldwide are iPods. These devices are often carried in a shirt chest pocket, which may place the devices close to an implanted pacemaker. The purpose of this study was to determine if iPods cause interference with pacemakers. In this prospective, single-blinded study, 100 patients who had cardiac pacemakers were tested with four types of iPods to assess for interference. Patients were monitored by a single-channel ECG monitor as well as the respective pacemaker programmer via the telemetry wand. iPods were tested by placing them 2 inches anterior to the pacemaker and wand for up to 10 seconds. To simulate actual use, standard-issue headphones were plugged into the iPods. To maintain consistency, the volume was turned up maximally, and the equalizer was turned off. A subset of 25 patients underwent testing on 2 separate days to assess for reproducibility of interference. Pacemaker interference was categorized as type I or type II telemetry interference. Type I interference was associated with atrial and/or ventricular high rates on rate histograms. Type II interference did not affect pacemaker rate counters. Electromagnetic emissions from the four iPods also were evaluated in a Faraday cage to determine the mechanism of the observed interference. One hundred patients (63 men and 37 women; mean age 77.1 +/- 7.6 years) with 11 single-chamber pacemakers and 89 dual-chamber pacemakers underwent 800 tests. The incidence of any type of interference was 51% of patients and 20% of tests. Type I interference was seen in 19% of patients and type II in 32% of patients. Reproducibility testing confirmed that interference occurred regardless of pacing configuration (unipolar or bipolar), pacing mode (AAI, VVI, or DDD), and from one day to the next. Electromagnetic emissions

  1. Pacemaker Placement in Patients with Stroke-Mediated Autonomic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Alsaad, Ali A.; Austin, Christopher O.; Robinson, Maisha T.

    2017-01-01

    Lateral medullary syndrome (LMS) is an ischemic disease of the medulla oblongata, which involves the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Lateral medullary syndrome is often missed as the cause of autonomic dysregulation in patients with recent brain stem stroke. Due to the location of the baroreceptor regulatory center in the lateral medulla oblongata, patients with LMS occasionally have autonomic dysregulation-associated clinical manifestations. We report a case of LMS-associated autonomic dysregulation. The case presented as sinus arrest and syncope, requiring permanent pacemaker placement. A dual-chamber pacemaker was placed, after failure of conservative measures to alleviate the patient's symptoms. Our case shows the importance of recognizing LMS as a potential cause for life-threatening arrhythmias, heart block, and symptomatic bradycardia. Placement of permanent pacemaker may be necessary in some patients with LMS presenting with syncope, secondary to sinus arrest. PMID:28400822

  2. [Migration of an epicardial pacemaker into the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Barabás, János Imre; Hüttl, Tivadar; Hartyánszky, István; Fazekas, Levente; Oláh, Zoltán; Zima, Endre; Paulovich, Erzsébet; Kőszegi, Andrea; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-01-25

    Migration of a permanent pacemaker generator from their intramuscular pocket to the abdominal cavity is a less frequent, but potentially life-threatening complication. The authors present the case of a 69-year-old woman, who visited the emergency department of the clinic, with complains of non-specific abdominal symptoms. Her past medical history included a complete atrioventricular block diagnosed in 2009 during the mitral valve replacement and since then she had an epicardial permanent pacemaker; the pulse generator was placed into an intramuscular pouch created in the left subcostal region. Surprisingly, radiologic examinations showed that the generator migrated into the pouch of Douglas. Considering patient safety, first a new intracardiac pacemaker was implanted and then the migrated device was removed surgically. The patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day.

  3. [Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for ureteral stone in patient with implanted cardiac pacemaker: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Hou, Kyokushin; Hori, Junichi; Taniguchi, Narumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yachiku, Sunao; Azumi, Makoto; Osanai, Hiroaki

    2003-09-01

    We report a case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for ureteral stone in patient with implanted cardiac pacemaker. A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for left back pain due to left single ureteral stone (13 x 7 mm) in 2002. A permanent cardiac pacemaker has been implanted for sick sinus syndrome in 1997. After evaluation for cardiac function and pacemaker function by a cardiologist and a pacemaker technician, SWL (MFL 5000, Dornier) was performed without changing pacemaker mode (DDD mode). Shock waves were incorrectly exposed a few time triggered by arterial pacing amplitude, but no cardiovascular event or malfunction of the pacemaker was occurred during or after SWL. The ureteral stone was successfully fragmented with 2,400 shock waves (24 kV) and the fragments were delivered immediately.

  4. Combined use of non-thoracotomy cardioverter defibrillators and endocardial pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, H. H.; Peralta, A. O.; John, R. M.; Venditti, F. J.; Martin, D. T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the potential interactions in patients with endocardial permanent pacemakers and non-thoracotomy implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) systems. DESIGN: Case series and cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: Fifteen consecutive patients with both endocardial pacemakers (12 dual chamber and three single chamber) and non-thoracotomy ICD systems. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection inhibition of induced ventricular fibrillation; double counting; and pacemaker function after shocks. In the evaluation of detection inhibition, 124 VF inductions were analysed for detection duration compared with induced VF episodes in controls with an ICD but without a pacemaker. RESULTS: Two patients (13%) showed detection inhibition of VF and required pacemaker system change at the time of the ICD implant. With the final lead position, despite frequent pacemaker undersensing of VF, ICD detection of VF was not inhibited during any induction, and neither initial detection nor redetection times for VF were different from controls. Double/triple counting of pacemaker artefact and evoked electrogram was noted in three patients (20%). In two, this was remedied during the implantation procedure, and in the other it was abolished when amiodarone treatment was discontinued. Pacemaker function was affected by ICD discharges in two patients, one who showed postshock atrial undersensing and loss of capture, and another whose pacemaker reverted to VVI mode. CONCLUSIONS: When careful testing is performed at implantation to detect and remedy device interactions, non-thoracotomy ICD treatment and endocardial pacemakers can be used safely in combination. Images PMID:9290402

  5. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  6. Apical Ballooning Syndrome: A Complication of Dual Chamber Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Abu Sham'a, Raed A. H; Asher, Elad; Luria, David; Berger, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Apical ballooning is a cardiac syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) described as a typical form of acute transient left ventricular dysfunction. While its onset has often been associated with emotionally or physically stressful situations, it has an overall favorable prognosis. We describe here a case of transient apical ballooning following permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:19652736

  7. Apical ballooning syndrome: a complication of dual chamber pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Abu Sham'a, Raed A H; Asher, Elad; Luria, David; Berger, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Apical ballooning is a cardiac syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) described as a typical form of acute transient left ventricular dysfunction. While its onset has often been associated with emotionally or physically stressful situations, it has an overall favorable prognosis. We describe here a case of transient apical ballooning following permanent pacemaker implantation.

  8. Low pacemaker incidence with continuous-sutured valves: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Niclauss, Lars; Delay, Dominique; Pfister, Raymond; Colombier, Sebastien; Kirsch, Matthias; Prêtre, René

    2017-06-01

    Background Permanent pacemaker implantation after surgical aortic valve replacement depends on patient selection and risk factors for conduction disorders. We aimed to identify risk criteria and obtain a selected group comparable to patients assigned to transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Isolated sutured aortic valve replacements in 994 patients treated from 2007 to 2015 were reviewed. Demographics, hospital stay, preexisting conduction disorders, surgical technique, and etiology in patients with and without permanent pacemaker implantation were compared. Reported outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation were compared with those of a subgroup including only degenerative valve disease and first redo. Results The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation was 2.9%. Longer hospital stay ( p = 0.01), preexisting rhythm disorders ( p < 0.001), complex prosthetic endocarditis ( p = 0.01), and complex redo ( p < 0.001) were associated with permanent pacemaker implantation. Although prostheses were sutured with continuous monofilament in the majority of cases (86%), interrupted pledgetted sutures were used more often in the pacemaker group ( p = 0.002). In the subgroup analysis, the incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation was 2%; preexisting rhythm disorders and the suture technique were still major risk factors. Conclusion Permanent pacemaker implantation depends on etiology, preexisting rhythm disorders, and suture technique, and the 2% incidence compares favorably with the reported 5- to 10-fold higher incidence after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Cost analysis should take this into account. Often dismissed as minor complication, permanent pacemaker implantation increases the risks of endocarditis, impaired myocardial recovery, and higher mortality if associated with prosthesis regurgitation.

  9. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Permanent Hearing Loss in Rural North Indian Children.

    PubMed

    Dar, Lalit; Namdeo, Divya; Kumar, Pankaj; Thakar, Alok; Kant, Shashi; Rai, Sanjay; Singh, Pawan K; Kabra, Madhulika; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B

    2017-07-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection (cCMV) is a leading nongenetic cause of permanent congenital or early-onset hearing loss (PCEHL). Although cCMV rates are high despite near-universal seroimmunity, the contribution of cCMV to PCEHL in the developing world is unclear. Neonates at a rural North Indian hospital were screened for cCMV by saliva polymerase chain reaction and hearing by distortion-product otoacoustic emission testing. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-positive infants and those not passing newborn hearing screening (NHS) were evaluated by auditory brainstem response to confirm PCEHL. Infants with cCMV and those with PCEHL were tested for mutations within the GJB2 gene. Of the 1720 infants screened, 40 (2.3%) did not pass NHS and 20 (1.2%) were CMV positive. Auditory brainstem evoked response testing confirmed unilateral or bilateral PCEHL in 11 (0.64%) children who either did not pass NHS or CMV positive. PCEHL was 20-fold higher in neonates with cCMV (2/20, 10%) than those without (9/1700, 0.5%; P < 0.01). None of 11 infants with PCEHL had connexin 26 mutations. PCEHL incidence is high in India, with cCMV contributing significantly despite near-universal seroimmunity. Our findings also demonstrate the feasibility and the utility of simultaneous newborn screening for both cCMV and hearing loss in a resource-limited setting.

  10. What Is a Pacemaker?

    MedlinePlus

    ... says so. •You will probably be given an exercise stress test so the doctor will be able to tell you how much physical activity and what kind of activity is safe for you. • Many pacemakers allow for increases in pacing rates with exercise. •You can have sex. HOW CAN I LEARN ...

  11. Compatibility of Radiofrequency Surgical Sponge Detection Technology with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and Temporary Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Jonathan D; Pretorius, Victor G; Hsu, Jonathan C; Lalani, Gautam G; Schricker, Amir A; Hebsur, Shrinivas M; McGARRY, Thomas J; Hunter, Jessica A; Lewis, Kathryn E; Krummen, David E; Feld, Gregory K; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika

    2016-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) technology has improved detection of retained surgical sponges with a reported 100% sensitivity and specificity. However, the potential for interactions of the RF signals emitted by the detection system with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) or temporary pacemakers may limit its use in those patients with these devices. This study investigated whether RF detection technology causes interference or clinically significant changes in the programmed settings of implanted pacemakers and defibrillators or temporary epicardial pacemakers. Fifty patients who were scheduled either for CIED removal or placement of a temporary epicardial pacemaker (at the time of open heart surgery) were recruited for this study. Device settings and measurements from separate interrogations before and after scanning with the RF detection system were compared. For the temporary pacemakers, we observed for any changes in hemodynamics or signs of pacing interference. Twenty (40%) pacemakers, 20 (40%) implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and 10 (20%) temporary pacemakers were analyzed in this study. During scanning, no signal interference was detected in any permanent device, and there were no significant changes in programmed settings after scanning with the RF detection system. However, pacing inhibition was detected with temporary pacing systems when programmed to a synchronous mode (DDD). RF detection technology can be safely used to scan for retained surgical sponges in patients with permanent CIEDs and temporary pacemakers set to asynchronous mode. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Use of percutaneous anesthesia in cardiac pacemaker implantation].

    PubMed

    Trigano, J A; Paganelli, F; Taramasco, V; Levy, S; Lorec, A M; Blin, O; Bruguerolle, B

    Assess the efficacy of an anesthesic cream for pacemaker implantations. Percutaneous anesthesia was studied in a series of permanent pacemaker transvenous implantations. The anesthesic cream composed of a mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine was applied precisely over operative areas after marking the skin. Percutaneous anesthesia should be applied 2 hours before entering the operating room. This percutaneous local anesthesia was perfectly effective for simple replacement procedures. At first implantations, it was used alone in 4 out of 10 cases while intradermal injections were needed to anesthetize the deep layers in the other patients. Serum concentrations indicate very low levels which are tolerated very well. Alone or combined with lidocaine infiltration, the use of an anesthesic cream is safe and effective in transvenous pacemaker surgery.

  13. Pacemaker leads and cardiac perforation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rachana; Andrews, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This case series highlights the rare but potentially life threatening complication of ventricular perforation caused by pacemaker leads and discusses appropriate investigations and management strategies. PMID:28321317

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation for a skydiver after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic regurgitation and resection of the ascending aorta complicated by active infective endocarditis and heart block requiring a pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Tonja R.; DeJong, Sandra; Bilbrey, Tim; Carbone, Pasquale; Campbell, Mark; Parker, Robert D.; Lira, Alessandra; Amarante, Diogo; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    A professional skydiver underwent aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement complicated by infective endocarditis with root abscess and pacemaker implantation. He then enrolled in the Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program as part of its specificity of testing and exercise training facility. He performed specific skydiving cardiovascular and muscular strength tests at the beginning and the end of the CR program. His pacemaker was interrogated to ascertain any arrhythmias or lead displacement over the course of the CR program. Daily exercise training was customized to match the physical demands of skydiving, including two sessions at iFLY Dallas. Upon completion of the daily exercise sessions, the patient performed a simulated free-fall drop test. He then performed a true jump at Dallas Skydive Center and subsequently traveled to Arizona for a skydiving competition, where he performed 35 true jumps with no adverse events or symptoms. This case illustrates how CR, tailored to a patient's specific needs, can aid in the return to rigorous activity. PMID:28405096

  15. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  16. Trends in cardiac pacemaker batteries.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N Srinivasa

    2004-10-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  17. Outbreak of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections after permanent makeup of the eyebrows.

    PubMed

    Giulieri, Stefano; Morisod, Benoit; Edney, Timothy; Odman, Micaela; Genné, Daniel; Malinverni, Raffaele; Hammann, Catherine; Musumeci, Enrico; Voide, Cathy; Greub, Gilbert; Masserey, Eric; Bille, Jacques; Cavassini, Matthias; Jaton, Katia

    2011-02-15

    We report a Mycobacterium haemophilum outbreak after permanent make-up of the eyebrows performed by the same freelance artist. Twelve patients presented an eyebrow lesion and cervical lymphadenitis. All were treated with antibiotics. Surgery was required in 10 cases. M. haemophilum DNA was identified in the make-up ink.

  18. Cremation of Leadless Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lily; Chan, Gary C P; Chan, Joseph Y S; Lau, Chu-Pak

    2017-03-11

    Cremation of implanted cardiac electronic devices can be associated with explosion from rapid gas formation causing potential hazard to the crematoria staffs and facilities. We present four patients who had undergone cremation with a leadless pacemaker (Micra(TM) , Medtronic Inc., MN) left inside their bodies. There was neither reported explosion nor damage to the cremation chamber during the cremation process. In this small series, cremation of Micra(TM) is not associated with noticeable explosion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    This study updates our May-June 1993 Evaluation of defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers, published in Health Devices 22(5-6), in which we tested eight units from six suppliers. For this Update Evaluation, we tested three additional units, each from a different supplier. We also present update information, including some new ratings, for most of the previously evaluated units. We judged the new units against the same basic criteria and rated and ranked them using the same scheme--with some minor revisions--as in our original Evaluation. We judged the suitability of these units for three primary clinical applications: (1) general crash-cart use, (2) prehospital (emergency medical service [EMS]) use, and (3) in-hospital transport use. Because our criteria have changed slightly since the original study, we have repeated them in this issue. The test methods have not changed significantly and can be found in the original 1993 Evaluation. For more detailed information about this technology, the environments in which these units are used, and the factors to consider when selecting this type of device, we encourage readers to refer to the following sections in the original Evaluation: the Clinical Perspective "The Importance of Early Defibrillation"; the Clinical and Technical Overview; and the Selection and Use Guide for Defibrillator/Monitor/Pacemakers.

  20. Programming of sensor driven pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Strobel, J S; Kay, G N

    2000-02-01

    The chronotropic response is the most important means by which cardiac output is increased and oxygen delivery is maintained in response to increased oxygen consumption during exercise or stress. When the chronotropic response is suboptimal or absent, exercise intolerance results. This condition, called chronotropic incompetence can be treated effectively with a sensor-driven rate-responsive pacemaker. The effectiveness of this therapy assumes that the pacemaker is programmed appropriately. This article focuses on the programming of sensor-driven pacemakers and provides additional suggestions for follow-up testing to ensure maximal benefit from these devices.

  1. 1978 Pacemaker Newspaper Awards: What Makes a Pacemaker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasler, Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Lists the nine high school and college newspapers, and the one newsmagazine, that won Pacemaker Awards in 1978; discusses characteristics that make each of them outstanding, and provides reproductions of a front page from each publication. (GT)

  2. 1978 Pacemaker Newspaper Awards: What Makes a Pacemaker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasler, Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Lists the nine high school and college newspapers, and the one newsmagazine, that won Pacemaker Awards in 1978; discusses characteristics that make each of them outstanding, and provides reproductions of a front page from each publication. (GT)

  3. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A pacemaker consists of a battery, a computerized generator, and wires with sensors at their tips. (The sensors are called electrodes.) The battery powers the generator, and both are surrounded by a thin metal ...

  4. [Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Cuesta, José M; Fariñas, María C; Rodilla, Irene G; Salesa, Ricardo; de Berrazueta, José R

    2005-05-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis is one of the rarest and severest complications in cardiological patients. We describe a patient with an intracardial pacemaker who was diagnosed as having Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis. Postmortem examination showed a large, Aspergillus-infected thrombus encased in the right ventricle, pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary branches.

  5. Relation between demographic and epidemiological characteristics and permanency under a dental health care program for HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Squassi, A; Khaszki, C; Blanco, B; Schnaiderman, M; Scholnik, L; Bonazzi, M; Bordoni, N

    1998-01-01

    The association between factors involved in health care and the health status of the people has been proven. The use of health care services, particularly in the case of patients who suffer from chronic pathologies, has been the object of many studies aimed at establishing factors which contribute to guarantee permanence in treatment and implementation of health care controls. The purpose of the present study was to identify the response of HIV infected or AIDS patients to the oral health care program and establish the association between permanence in treatment and the presence of risk factors, epidemiological or demographic conditions of the users. Ninety patients selected at random from the 300 who attended the Clinic for High Risk Patient Care, School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires (CLAPAR, Spanish acronym) during 1994-1995 were included in this study. The patients were assigned to one of seven groups, according to their permanence in treatment and commitment to the program during the phase of maintenance in health. Each of these categories was characterized in terms of age, sex, educational level, place of residence (CIRFS, 1990), type of job, type of health coverage and place where healthcare was received, risk behavior and date of positive serological diagnosis. The frequency of each variable was established. Contingency tables were employed to establish the statistical significance of the association between the different variables and the patient categories. The data revealed that 24.2% of the patients performed occasional or emergency consultation, 57.1% achieved discharge with or without the assistance of the social worker or are still in treatment and 18.7% abandoned the program. Significant association were found between the response to odontological treatment and the following variables: place of residence, date of positive serological diagnosis, and risk behavior. We may conclude that certain demographic, epidemiological or life

  6. Outcome and management of pacemaker-induced superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai-Xia; Huang, Xin-Miao; Zhong, Li; Osborn, Michael J; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Mulpuru, Siva; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Friedman, Paul A; Cha, Yong-Mei

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to determine the long-term outcomes of percutaneous lead extraction and stent placement in patients with pacemaker-induced superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome. The study retrospectively screened patients who underwent lead extraction followed by central vein stent implantation at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN, USA), from January 2005 to December 2012, to identify the patients with pacemaker-induced SVC syndrome. Demographic, clinical, and follow-up characteristics of those patients were collected from electronic medical records. Six cases were identified. The mean (standard deviation) age was 56 (15) years (male, 67%). All patients had permanent dual-chamber pacemakers, with a mean 11-year history of pacemaker placement. The entire device system was explanted in five patients; one patient had a 21-year-old pacemaker lead that could not be removed. Eight stents were implanted in six patients: five patients had one stent, one patient had three. A new pacemaker system was reimplanted through the stented vein in five patients. Technical success was achieved in all patients, without any complication. Symptoms rapidly resolved in all patients after stent deployment. The mean follow-up duration was 48 months (range, 10-100 months). Three patients remained symptom free. Reintervention with percutaneous balloon venoplasty was successful in three patients with symptom recurrence. Percutaneous stent implantation after lead removal followed by reimplantation of leads is a feasible alternative therapy for pacemaker-induced SVC syndrome, although some cases may require repeat intervention. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Connectivity of Pacemaker Neurons in the Neonatal Rat Superficial Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Neil C.; Arbabi, Shahriar; Baccei, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Pacemaker neurons with an intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic burst-firing have been characterized in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord, where they are innervated by high-threshold sensory afferents. However, little is known about the output of these pacemakers, as the neuronal populations which are targeted by pacemaker axons have yet to be identified. The present study combines patch clamp recordings in the intact neonatal rat spinal cord with tract-tracing to demonstrate that lamina I pacemaker neurons contact multiple spinal motor pathways during early life. Retrograde labeling of premotor interneurons with the trans-synaptic virus PRV-152 revealed the presence of burst-firing in PRV-infected lamina I neurons, thereby confirming that pacemakers are synaptically coupled to motor networks in the spinal ventral horn. Notably, two classes of pacemakers could be distinguished in lamina I based on cell size and the pattern of their axonal projections. While small pacemaker neurons possessed ramified axons which contacted ipsilateral motor circuits, large pacemaker neurons had unbranched axons which crossed the midline and ascended rostrally in the contralateral white matter. Recordings from identified spino-parabrachial and spino-PAG neurons indicated the presence of pacemaker activity within neonatal lamina I projection neurons. Overall, these results show that lamina I pacemakers are positioned to regulate both the level of activity in developing motor circuits as well as the ascending flow of nociceptive information to the brain, thus highlighting a potential role for pacemaker activity in the maturation of pain and sensorimotor networks in the CNS. PMID:25380417

  8. Gene- and cell-based bio-artificial pacemaker: what basic and translational lessons have we learned?

    PubMed

    Li, R A

    2012-06-01

    Normal rhythms originate in the sino-atrial node, a specialized cardiac tissue consisting of only a few thousands of nodal pacemaker cells. Malfunction of pacemaker cells due to diseases or aging leads to rhythm generation disorders (for example, bradycardias and sick-sinus syndrome (SSS)), which often necessitate the implantation of electronic pacemakers. Although effective, electronic devices are associated with such shortcomings as limited battery life, permanent implantation of leads, lead dislodging, the lack of autonomic responses and so on. Here, various gene- and cell-based approaches, with a particular emphasis placed on the use of pluripotent stem cells and the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated-encoded pacemaker gene family, that have been pursued in the past decade to reconstruct bio-artificial pacemakers as alternatives will be discussed in relation to the basic biological insights and translational regenerative potential.

  9. Gene- and cell-based bio-artificial pacemaker: what basic and translational lessons have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Li, RA

    2012-01-01

    Normal rhythms originate in the sino-atrial node, a specialized cardiac tissue consisting of only a few thousands of pacemaker cells. Malfunction of pacemaker cells due to diseases or aging leads to rhythm generation disorders (for example, bradycardias and sick-sinus syndrome (SSS)), which often necessitate the implantation of electronic pacemakers. Although effective, electronic devices are associated with such shortcomings as limited battery life, permanent implantation of leads, lead dislodging, the lack of autonomic responses and so on. Here, various gene- and cell-based approaches, with a particular emphasis placed on the use of pluripotent stem cells and the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated-encoded pacemaker gene family, that have been pursued in the past decade to reconstruct bio-artificial pacemakers as alternatives will be discussed in relation to the basic biological insights and translational regenerative potential. PMID:22673497

  10. Ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead repaired with two hemostatic devices

    PubMed Central

    Prestipino, Filippo; Nenna, Antonio; Casacalenda, Adele; Chello, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cardiac perforation is a rare, but potentially serious, complication of pacemaker implantation that may develop days or weeks after implantation. PRESENTATION OF CASE In the current case, 92-year-old man underwent permanent pacemaker implantation, but he presented 3 weeks later with severe symptoms. Computed tomography showed protrusion of the tip of the ventricular electrode through the right ventricle and into the chest wall. During an urgent surgical intervention, the lead was disconnected and extracted. A sealing hemostatic device and an hemostatic patch were applied to repair the ventricle; the procedure was uneventfull. DISCUSSION This case demonstrates how the correct diagnosis of ventricular perforation is crucial, and should be followed immediately by surgical planning. CONCLUSION The hemostatic patch is a valuable alternative to sutures in patients with thin and fragile ventricular wall, unable to undergo stitching. PMID:25460433

  11. Microgenerators for energy autarkic pacemakers and defibrillators: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Görge, G; Kirstein, M; Erbel, R

    2001-02-01

    Implantable devices for medical use like permanent pacemakers, defibrillators, and fluid pumps depend on an energy provided by batteries. Unfortunately, the battery usually determines the duration of life of these devices, while technical problems occur infrequent. Device replacement for battery exhaustion requires surgical procedures and account for up to 1/3 of all pacemakers sold. Attempts to provide unlimited power support using radio transmission, nuclear energy etc. did not gain clinical acceptance. We therefore evaluated the potential role of a microgenerator (designed for use in wrist watches) to recharge pacemaker batteries. We used the Epson-Seiko Caliber 5M22 that uses a "Gold-Cap" for energy storage. The mass of the actuator is 1.6 g and an angle of > 10 degrees is needed to overcome friction. Output at a rotor frequency of 200 Hz is 1.8 mWatt To measure the power provided, various experiments were made with the microgenerator taped to the chest of a normal person working in an office. Range of 11 experiments over 8 hours each was 0.2 to 3.1 microWatt (median 0.5 microWatt). Therefore, the power generated was 10 to 100 times less than the calculated power needed to recharge a typical pacemaker battery. A second type of generator (Mondaine, Zurich, Switzerland) with less mechanical parts, available in a "black box" version only, generated not more power. Thus, commercially available, yet not optimized microgenerators provided only between 1 to 10% of the power requirements of a pacemaker. However, modifications in design and mainly the orientation and weight of the actuator to generate more power from the G-forces during walking, would result in a more meaningful energy output.

  12. Wireless power transfer for a pacemaker application.

    PubMed

    Vulfin, Vladimir; Sayfan-Altman, Shai; Ianconescu, Reuven

    2017-05-01

    An artificial pacemaker is a small medical device that uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contracting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. The pacemaker is implanted under the skin, and uses for many years regular non-rechargeable batteries. However, the demand for rechargeable batteries in pacemakers increased, and the aim of this work is to design an efficient charging system for pacemakers.

  13. A premature low-birth-weight infant with congenital complete atrioventricular block and myocarditis successfully treated by staged pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Tao; Nii, Masaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is a known lethal condition. Although antenatal diagnosis and the technical advances of pacemaker treatment have reduced its mortality, treatment of premature babies with significant myocardial damage remains a challenge. In this paper, we report the case of a premature low-birth-weight infant with congenital complete atrioventricular block and extremely low ventricular rate, fetal hydrops, and myocarditis who was successfully treated with staged permanent pacemaker implantation.

  14. Electromagnetic device-device interaction between a new generation implantable pacemaker and left ventricular assist device: recognition and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Preetham; Benditt, David G; Adabag, Selcuk

    2012-03-01

    An electromagnetic interaction between St. Jude Medical Inc. (St. Paul, MN, USA) permanent pacemakers and HeartMate II left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) (Thoratec Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) has been reported before, but the problem was thought to be resolved in the St. Jude Medical's most recently released pacemaker platform. We report a case of interference between the HeartMate II LVAD and the most recently released St. Jude Medical pacemaker (model no. PM3210; Anthem) and review new developments to overcome the electromagnetic interference problem in this setting. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to noninvasively change one or more...

  19. Pacemaker-associated Bacillus cereus endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Olivier; Hidri, Nadia; Ly, Kim; Pichon, Nicolas; Manea, Petrus; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Garnier, Fabien

    2012-11-01

    We report the case of a pacemaker-associated Bacillus cereus endocarditis in a nonimmunocompromised patient. Antibiotic treatment was ineffective, and the pacemaker had to be removed. B. cereus was cultured from several blood samples and from the pacemaker electrodes. This case underlines the contribution of the rpoB gene for Bacillus species determination.

  20. [Radiation therapy and cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Serafim, P; Fonseca, G; Oliveira, A; Fernandes, T

    1999-05-01

    The number of patients with cardiac pacemakers submitted annually to radiation therapy is increasing. Radiation therapy causes interference in the normal functioning processes, directly by chemical changes in the structure of the device and also by electromagnetic disturbances generated in the process of treatment. The changes in the technology used in the manufacture of cardiac pacemakers after the 70's, with the introduction of complementary metal-oxide semi-conductors (CMOS) in the circuits, drastically increased the chance of dangerous interference in the normal function of cardiac pacemakers occurring when in contact with an ionizing radiation source. The authors briefly describe the mechanisms underlying the radio-induced damage usually observed. A review of the literature on this issue is made and solutions are pointed out to perform safe radiation therapy and minimize the risk of device malfunction.

  1. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  2. Permanent catheterization of the carotid artery induces kidney infection and inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Uno N K; Nielsen, Sanne Gram; Hau, Jann; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2010-01-01

    Catheterization of the carotid artery and the jugular vein is one of the most commonly applied techniques used to gain intravascular access in pharmacology studies on rodents. We catheterized 10 rats by conventional clean techniques, 10 rats by aseptic techniques and 10 rats by conventional clean techniques using a heparin-coated catheter rather than an ordinary non-coated polyvinyl chloride catheter. In all groups, approximately 80% of the rats developed kidney infection and 10-30% of the rats were septicaemic. Clinical chemistry did not indicate severe kidney damage, but serum haptoglobin and body temperature rises indicated an inflammatory response in rats independent of the surgical method. Heparin coating did not seem to improve the usability of the catheter. It is concluded that this commonly used method for catheterization has an impact on animals that may very well render them unsuitable for the purpose, e.g. pharmacological research, and therefore an alternative method would be preferable.

  3. Inadvertent transarterial pacemaker lead placement.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Ravi R; Fam, Neil; Singh, Sheldon M

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 73-year-old patient with acute left-sided hemiparesis four months after right ventricular pacemaker insertion. Post-procedural electrocardiogram revealed a paced RBBB complex and an abnormal lead path on chest X-ray. Subsequent echocardiography and computed tomography showed left ventricular pacemaker malposition with retrograde passage to the punctured subclavian artery. We also discuss the utility of routine cardiac investigations post-insertion to identify signal lead malposition as well as management strategies once identified.

  4. Lithium pacemaker batteries - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.C.; Holmes, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Batteries used as power sources in cardiac pacemakers are expected to have high energy density, long storage and operating life and high reliability. They must be nonhazardous under normal operating as well as abusive conditions. Intensive research activities on the past 10-15 years have resulted in the development of a variety of high energy density batteries using Li as the anode material (Li-batteries). At least six different chemical systems with Li anodes are in use as power sources for cardiac pacemakers. Some basic characteristics of these systems are discussed. 11 refs.

  5. Transvenous extraction of an abandoned endocardial pacemaker lead in a dog.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Nicole; Scollan, Katherine; Sisson, David

    2014-03-01

    A 6-year-old male castrated labrador retriever presented with endocardial pacemaker infection following migration and subsequent repositioning of the pulse generator. An epicardial lead and pulse generator were surgically implanted and the endocardial lead could not be removed with manual traction. The endocardial lead was severed, anchored, and abandoned at the thoracic inlet. The patient presented 4 months later with endocardial lead migration, bacteremia, and suspected glomerulonephritis. The endocardial pacemaker lead was transvenously extracted using a mechanical dilator sheath and locking stylet. This report of transvenous pacemaker lead extraction in a dog addresses the challenges and describes recent advances in extraction devices.

  6. Reuse of pacemakers, defibrillators and cardiac resynchronisation devices

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, R; Satheesh, Santhosh; Ananthakrishna Pillai, Ajith; Sagnol, Pascal; Jouven, Xavier; Dodinot, Bernard; Balachander, Jayaraman

    2017-01-01

    Objective Access to pacemakers remains poor among many patients in low/middle-income countries. Reuse of explanted pacemakers is a possible solution, but is still not widespread because of concerns regarding outcomes, especially infection. Our objective was to study early outcomes with implants using reused devices and compare them with those with implants using new devices. Methods We studied all patients who underwent implantation of a new or reused pacemaker, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in the last 5 years at a single institution. We analysed outcomes related to infection, device malfunction and device-related death within 6 months after initial implantation. Results During the study period, 887 patients underwent device implant, including 127 CRT devices or ICDs. Of these, 260 devices (29.3%) were reused and the others were new. At 6 months, there were three device-related infections in implants using a new device. There were no infections among patients receiving a reused device. There were no device malfunctions or device-related deaths in either group. Conclusions We found no difference in rate of infection or device malfunction among patients getting a reused device as compared with those with a new device. This study reinforces the safety of reusing devices for implant including CRT and ICDs. PMID:28176981

  7. A Case of Transvenous Pacemaker Implantation in a 10-year-old Patient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajia; Shimada, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this report was to discuss the type, timing, and surgical techniques of permanent pacemaker implantation in a juvenile patient. Patients: A 17-year-old girl with Down syndrome and congenital heart defects comprised of ventricular septal defects (VSD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) suffered from postoperative complete atrioventricular block (AVB) when she was 7 months old. Methods and Results: An epicardial pacemaker was implanted just after the occurrence of complete AVB. Due to the pacing threshold of a ventricular lead not being good, the battery showed rapid depletion. Her generator had to be exchanged under general anesthesia every 2–3 years. When she was 10 years old, we implanted a permanent pacemaker transvenously by using cutdown, screw-in and subpectoral pocket techniques. She has shown a satisfactory outcome since then. Conclusion: Transvenous pacemaker implantation was safe and effective in our young patient without any complications. The timing of surgery and surgical technique are quite important for pacemaker implantation in juvenile patients. PMID:25648084

  8. Do media players cause interference with pacemakers?

    PubMed

    Thaker, Jay P; Patel, Mehul B; Shah, Ashok J; Liepa, Valdis V; Brunett, Joseph D; Jongnarangsin, Krit; Gardiner, Joseph C; Thakur, Ranjan

    2009-11-01

    Electrical devices generate electromagnetic fields that may interfere with pacemakers. Media players cause telemetry interference with pacemakers, but it is not known whether they cause direct interference with pacemakers. The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction between pacemakers and 3 different media players. In this prospective, randomized study, 54 patients with dual chamber pacemakers who were in sinus rhythm underwent baseline observation, followed by observation under telemetry communication. These patients were then randomly evaluated with 3 media players (iPod 3G, iPod Photo, and iPod Touch Apple, Cupertino, CA) with and without telemetry communication for 1 minute each. Patients were monitored for pacemaker malfunction using a single-channel ECG during exposure to media players. The pacemaker was interrogated after each exposure and an interrogation report was printed for evaluation. Pacemaker interference was categorized as type I, II, or III. Types I and II interference described telemetry interference and type III interference was defined as any direct interference with pacemaker function or programmed parameters. A total of 54 patients (29 men and 25 women; mean age 77.2 +/- 9.3 y) were evaluated. In total, of the 162 tests (for telemetry interference) 36.4% were positive (Type I and II). Type III interference was also evaluated in 162 tests and none showed any evidence of direct interference. Media players cause telemetry interference with pacemakers, but they do not directly interfere with pacemaker function.

  9. Conduction Abnormalities and Pacemaker Implantations After SAPIEN 3 Vs SAPIEN XT Prosthesis Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Husser, Oliver; Kessler, Thorsten; Burgdorf, Christof; Templin, Christian; Pellegrini, Costanza; Schneider, Simon; Kasel, Albert Markus; Kastrati, Adnan; Schunkert, Heribert; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is increasingly used in patients with aortic stenosis. Post-procedural intraventricular conduction abnormalities and permanent pacemaker implantations remain a serious concern. Recently, the Edwards SAPIEN 3 prosthesis has replaced the SAPIEN XT. We sought to determine the incidences of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities and permanent pacemaker implantations by comparing the 2 devices. We analyzed the last consecutive 103 patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation with SAPIEN XT before SAPIEN 3 was used in the next 105 patients. To analyze permanent pacemaker implantations and new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities, patients with these conditions at baseline were excluded. Electrocardiograms were recorded at baseline, after the procedure, and before discharge. SAPIEN 3 was associated with higher device success (100% vs 92%; P=.005) and less paravalvular leakage (0% vs 7%; P<.001). The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantations was 12.6% (23 of 183) with no difference between the 2 groups (SAPIEN 3: 12.5% [12 of 96] vs SAPIEN XT: 12.6% [11 of 87]; P=.99). SAPIEN 3 was associated with a higher rate of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities (49% vs 27%; P=.007) due to a higher rate of fascicular blocks (17% vs 5%; P=.021). There was no statistically significant difference in transient (29% [20 of 69] vs persistent 19% [12 of 64]; P=.168) left bundle branch blocks (28% [19 of 69] vs 17% [11 of 64]; P=.154) when SAPIEN 3 was compared with SAPIEN XT. We found a trend toward a higher rate of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities with SAPIEN 3 compared with SAPIEN XT, although this did not result in a higher permanent pacemaker implantation rate. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral.

  11. Rhabdomyosarcoma associated with the lead wire of a pacemaker generator implant.

    PubMed

    Thieman Mankin, Kelley M; Dunbar, Mark D; Toplon, David; Ginn, Pamela; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Risselada, Marije

    2014-06-01

    An 11-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was presented for a draining, painful subcutaneous mass palpated over a previously implanted pacemaker generator. Infection was suspected and the mass was removed surgically. On cut surface, the mass was friable and mottled tan to brown with firm pale tan nodules, surrounding the pacemaker lead wire adjacent to the pacemaker generator. Cytologic interpretation of impression smears was consistent with a sarcoma, and suggestive of a rhabdomyosarcoma due to the presence of strap-like cells. On histopathologic examination, a highly invasive nodular mass surrounded the pacemaker lead, composed of pleomorphic round, spindle and strap cells, and multinucleated giant cells. The population exhibited microscopic invasion into the deep portion of the fibrous capsule surrounding the pacemaker generator. There were tumor emboli within small to medium subcutaneous veins adjacent to the mass. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells stained positive for α-sarcomeric actin and vimentin, and negative for α-smooth muscle actin, consistent with a rhabdomyosarcoma arising at the site of the pacemaker generator. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a rhabdomyosarcoma associated with the lead wire of a pacemaker generator in a dog. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  12. Medial subclavicular musculotendinous complex and insulation break: Rare cause of late pacemaker lead malfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Pranab Jyoti; Agrawal, Shweta; Barkataky, Jogesh Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Anjan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Insulation break in a permanent pacemaker lead is a rare long-term complication. We describe an elderly male with a VVIR pacemaker, who presented with an episode of presyncope more than 3 years after the initial implantation procedure, attributed to insulation break possibly caused by lead entrapment in components of the medial subclavicular musculotendinous complex (MSMC) and repeated compressive damage over time during ipsilateral arm movement requiring lead replacement. The differential diagnosis of a clinical presentation when pacing stimuli are present with failure to capture and the role of the MSMC in causing lead damage late after implantation are discussed. PMID:26995445

  13. [Future cardiac pacemakers – technical visions].

    PubMed

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Pfenniger, Aloïs; Fuhrer, Jürg; Vogel, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are routinely used for the treatment of bradyarrhythmias. Contemporary pacemakers are reliable and allow for a patient specific programming. However, pacemaker replacements due to battery depletion are common (~25 % of all implantation procedures) and bear the risk of complications. Batteryless pacemakers may allow overcoming this limitation. To power a batteryless pacemaker, a mechanism for intracorporeal energy harvesting is required. Such a generator may consist out of subcutaneously implanted solar cells, transforming the small amount of transcutaneously available light into electrical energy. Alternatively, intravascular turbines may harvest energy from the blood flow. Energy may also be harvested from the ventricular wall motion by a dedicated mechanical clockwork converting motion into electrical energy. All these approaches have successfully been tested in vivo. Pacemaker leads constitute another Achilles heel of contemporary pacemakers. Thus, leadless devices are desired. Miniaturized pacemaker circuits and suitable energy harvesting mechanisms (incorporated in a single device) may allow catheter-based implantation of the pacemaker in the heart. Such miniaturized battery- and leadless pacemakers would combine the advantages of both approaches and overcome major limitations of today’s systems.

  14. First percutaneous Micra leadless pacemaker implantation and tricuspid valve repair with MitraClip NT for lead-associated severe tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gilbert H L; Kaple, Ryan; Cohen, Martin; Dutta, Tanya; Undemir, Cenap; Ahmad, Hasan; Poniros, Angelica; Bennett, Joanne; Feng, Cheng; Lansman, Steven

    2017-02-03

    Pacemaker lead-associated severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) can lead to right heart failure and poor prognosis. Surgery in these patients carries significant morbidities. We describe a successful treatment of symptomatic severe TR by leadless pacemaker implantation followed by tricuspid valve (TV) repair with the MitraClip NT. A 71-year-old frail female with poor functional status, chronic atrial fibrillation and permanent pacemaker implantation in 2012 presented with symptomatic moderate-severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and severe TR with the pacemaker lead as the culprit. She was deemed extreme risk for double valve surgery and, because of her pacemaker dependency, the decision was to stage her interventions first with transcatheter mitral repair, then laser lead extraction and leadless pacemaker implantation to free the TV from tethering, then TV repair. An obstructive LAD lesion was identified and treated during mitral repair with the MitraClip NT. The Micra leadless pacemaker implantation and subsequent TV repair with the MitraClip NT were successful and the patient's MR improved to mild and TR to moderate, respectively. We report here a first successful transcatheter strategy to treat lead-associated severe TR by leadless pacemaker and MitraClip. Removing the pacemaker lead relieved leaflet tethering and improved the reparability of the TV.

  15. Lithium-iodine pacemaker cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.A.; Snyder, S.E.; DeVan, T.; Harney, M.J.; Harney, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium-iodine pacemaker cell is described as supplied by several manufacturers. The features of each design are discussed along with their effect on energy density, self-discharge and shape of the discharge curve. Differences in performance characteristics are related to morphology of the lithium iodine electrolyte and to the form of the cathode. A new, high-drain cell is mentioned which can supply 60 /mu/a/cm/sup 2/. 10 refs.

  16. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K⁺ Current: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kuanquan; Li, Qince; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs) could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K(+) current (I K1). In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker.

  17. Transvenous pacemaker placement in a dog with atrioventricular block and persistent left cranial vena cava.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Suzanne M; Rush, John E

    2007-11-01

    The case reported herein describes the placement of a permanent transvenous pacemaker in an older dog with a previously undiagnosed persistent left cranial vena cava (PLCVC) and recent onset symptomatic third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block. On presentation the dog was found to have atrial flutter and third-degree AV block and echocardiography demonstrated evidence of chronic valvular disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The persistent left cranial vena cava was discovered via angiography when difficulties were encountered with pacemaker placement. Successful right ventricular pacing necessitated passage of the lead through the coronary sinus. The attendant complications in pacemaker placement in the presence of a PLCVC are well-described in man but, to the authors' knowledge, have not been described in companion animals.

  18. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  19. The nuclear pacemaker: Is renewed interest warranted

    SciTech Connect

    Parsonnet, V.; Berstein, A.D.; Perry, G.Y. )

    1990-10-01

    From 1973 through 1987, 155 radioisotope-powered nuclear pacemakers were implanted in 132 patients at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. The longevity of the first 15 devices, all of which were fixed-rate (VOO) pacemakers, was significantly better than that of 15 lithium-chemistry demand (VVI) pacemakers used as control devices (p = 0.0002). Of the entire cohort of 155 nuclear pacemakers, 136 were VVI devices and 19 were VOO units. The patients with VOO pacemakers needed reoperations more often than did those with VVI pacemakers, chiefly for mode change (p less than 0.001). Power-source failure was observed in only 1 case, but 47 nuclear pacemakers were removed for other reasons, including component malfunction (15 units), mode change (12 units), high pacing thresholds (8 units) and lead or connector problems (5 units). The actuarial survival at 15 years was 99% for power sources and 82% for the entire pacing systems (pulse generators plus leads). The frequency of malignancy was similar to that of the population at large and primary tumor sites were randomly distributed. Deaths most commonly were due to cardiac causes (68%). Thus, nuclear pacemakers are safe and reliable and their greater initial cost appears to be offset by their longevity and the resulting decrease in the frequency of reoperations. It is reasonable to suggest that further use be made of long-lasting nuclear power sources for modern pacemakers and other implantable rhythm-management devices.

  20. Effect on pacemakers of airport weapons detectors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was carried out using a variety of pacemakers and all the types of weapons detectors in common use in Canada, to determine whether or not such detectors present a hazard to pacemaker bearers. The results indicate that only left-side implants of unipolar sensing pacemakers are likely to be affected, that ventricular fibrillation initiated by interference-induced competitive pacing is the only conceivable hazard, but that the probability of 10−9 for the occurrence of this event is so low that it may be completely disregarded. Physicians may therefore reassure pacemaker bearers of their safety in and around airport weapons detectors. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4825148

  1. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  2. Percutaneous Vacuum-Assisted Thrombectomy Device Used for Removal of Large Vegetations on Infected Pacemaker and Defibrillator Leads as an Adjunct to Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Schaerf, Raymond H M; Najibi, Sasan; Conrad, John

    2016-01-01

    This case series reports our early experience with a minimally invasive percutaneous method of safely removing large vegetations during lead extraction in septic cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED). Debate exists concerning the management of vegetations involving these devices. Lead extraction is mandated for infections, but vegetations may embolize, causing complications. Surgical debridement is recommended; alternatives include cardiopulmonary bypass, minimally invasive thoracotomy, or transatrial approaches. The AngioVac device allows percutaneous right heart bypass and suction removal of vegetations under echocardiographic and fluoroscopic guidance. This case series describes our first 20 patients, all critically ill with persistent sepsis and vegetations despite long-term antibiotics. This series includes patients who would not have been eligible for alternative procedures due to contraindications and highlights the potential role of this new technology.

  3. Dynamics of influenza A virus infections in permanently infected pig farms: evidence of recurrent infections, circulation of several swine influenza viruses and reassortment events.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicolas; Hervé, Séverine; Eveno, Eric; Barbier, Nicolas; Eono, Florent; Dorenlor, Virginie; Andraud, Mathieu; Camsusou, Claire; Madec, François; Simon, Gaëlle

    2013-09-04

    Concomitant infections by different influenza A virus subtypes within pig farms increase the risk of new reassortant virus emergence. The aims of this study were to characterize the epidemiology of recurrent swine influenza virus infections and identify their main determinants. A follow-up study was carried out in 3 selected farms known to be affected by repeated influenza infections. Three batches of pigs were followed within each farm from birth to slaughter through a representative sample of 40 piglets per batch. Piglets were monitored individually on a monthly basis for serology and clinical parameters. When a flu outbreak occurred, daily virological and clinical investigations were carried out for two weeks. Influenza outbreaks, confirmed by influenza A virus detection, were reported at least once in each batch. These outbreaks occurred at a constant age within farms and were correlated with an increased frequency of sneezing and coughing fits. H1N1 and H1N2 viruses from European enzootic subtypes and reassortants between viruses from these lineages were consecutively and sometimes simultaneously identified depending on the batch, suggesting virus co-circulations at the farm, batch and sometimes individual levels. The estimated reproduction ratio R of influenza outbreaks ranged between 2.5 [1.9-2.9] and 6.9 [4.1-10.5] according to the age at infection-time and serological status of infected piglets. Duration of shedding was influenced by the age at infection time, the serological status of the dam and mingling practices. An impaired humoral response was identified in piglets infected at a time when they still presented maternally-derived antibodies.

  4. Dynamics of influenza A virus infections in permanently infected pig farms: evidence of recurrent infections, circulation of several swine influenza viruses and reassortment events

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Concomitant infections by different influenza A virus subtypes within pig farms increase the risk of new reassortant virus emergence. The aims of this study were to characterize the epidemiology of recurrent swine influenza virus infections and identify their main determinants. A follow-up study was carried out in 3 selected farms known to be affected by repeated influenza infections. Three batches of pigs were followed within each farm from birth to slaughter through a representative sample of 40 piglets per batch. Piglets were monitored individually on a monthly basis for serology and clinical parameters. When a flu outbreak occurred, daily virological and clinical investigations were carried out for two weeks. Influenza outbreaks, confirmed by influenza A virus detection, were reported at least once in each batch. These outbreaks occurred at a constant age within farms and were correlated with an increased frequency of sneezing and coughing fits. H1N1 and H1N2 viruses from European enzootic subtypes and reassortants between viruses from these lineages were consecutively and sometimes simultaneously identified depending on the batch, suggesting virus co-circulations at the farm, batch and sometimes individual levels. The estimated reproduction ratio R of influenza outbreaks ranged between 2.5 [1.9-2.9] and 6.9 [4.1-10.5] according to the age at infection-time and serological status of infected piglets. Duration of shedding was influenced by the age at infection time, the serological status of the dam and mingling practices. An impaired humoral response was identified in piglets infected at a time when they still presented maternally-derived antibodies. PMID:24007505

  5. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro; Kirov, Krassen

    2012-07-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  6. Interference of neodymium magnets with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ryf, Salome; Wolber, Thomas; Duru, Firat; Luechinger, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Permanent magnets may interfere with the function of cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become widely available in recent years and are incorporated in various articles of daily life. We conducted an in-vitro study to evaluate the ability of NdFeB magnets for home and office use to cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs. The magnetic fields of ten NdFeB magnets of different size and shape were measured at increasing distances beginning from the surface until a field-strength (B-field) value of 0.5 mT was reached. Furthermore, for each magnet the distance was determined at which a sample pacemaker switched from magnet mode to normal mode. Depending on the size and remanence of individual magnets, a B-field value of 0.5 mT was found at distances ranging from 1.5 cm to 30 cm and a value of 1 mT at distances from 1 cm to 22 cm. The pacemaker behavior was influenced at distances from 1 cm to 24 cm. NdFeB magnets for home and office use may cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs at distances up to 24 centimeters. Patient education and product declarations should include information about the risk associated with these magnets.

  7. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  8. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the risk that your pacemakers may not work properly in those conditions. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions about being around ... of the risk that your pacemakers may not work properly in those conditions. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions about being around ...

  9. Pacemaker failure resulting from radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Quertermous, T.; Megahy, M.S.; Das Gupta, D.S.; Griem, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The authors present a case of radiation-induced pacemaker failure. After 2000 rad (20 Gy) of photon irradiation for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, the pulse generator circuitry failed, producing a runaway rhythm. This suggests that present pacemaker circuitry may be more susceptible to irradiation than previously believed, and that even modest radiation doses can induce life-threatening arrhythmias.

  10. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a...

  16. Mutual entrainment of bilaterally distributed circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Page, T L; Caldarola, P C; Pittendrigh, C S

    1977-03-01

    The interactions between the bilaterally distributed components of the circadin system that controls the locomotor activity rhythm of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae were investigated in a series of surgical lesion experiments. Complete excision of one optic lobe (either right or left) or its surgical isolation from the central nervous system had no effect on the animals' ability to free-run in constant darkness nor was there any indication, as judged by postoperative pi values of any difference between left and right lobe pacemakers. However, these surgical procedures consistently resulted in a significant increase in tau over preoperative value while optic nerve section had no effect on tau. The propostion is developed that the left and right pacemakers in the two optic lobes are mutally coupled and that the compound pacemaker's period is shorter than either of its constituent pacemakers. It was also found that the integrity of either compound eye is sufficient to assure entrainment of both left and right pacemakers.

  17. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  18. [Quality of life in patients with pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Borri Ferrán, M

    1995-05-01

    On the occasion of the doctoral thesis "Epidemiologic study in pacemaker patients", the social and some health factors around the pacemaker patient has been studied. Data were obtained by a patient verbal questionnaire and the pacemaker follow-up form. The social parameters studied are: employment aspects, change life feeling, health feeling, sporting activity and change of intensity of pharmacologic treatment. Just to get alone a quantitative social parameter, a social resulting punctuation or "social balance" has been designed. It has been used in bi-variable relation against the symptoms, electrocardiogram, complications, time from the pacemaker implantation, pacemaker type, dependence of the pacemaker and social variables between himself. Among the 108 variables considered, it has been studied which of them had more weight in the "pacemaker profitability". Greatest profitability (and vice versa): greatest profit in symptoms and in social conditions, smallest number of complications; greater time passed and worst evolution of electrocardiogram. The numerical value of the "profitability" is set up by assigning 20 points to each foregoing concepts, obtaining a greatest theoretical punctuation of 100 points and a smallest of 0 points. We obtained values of arithmetical mean, a frequency profile of quality life parameters, a profile of the better and worst situation in the bi-variable relation and the definition of those social factors who contributed to the segmentation of the "pacemaker profitability". The kind of job and the time of going out of it after the pacemaker implantation, the changing life feeling, the health feeling after the pacemaker and the transport means to the hospital are the variables which contributed to discriminate the major and the minor profitability.

  19. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that it...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED..., used to repair a pacemaker lead or to reconnect a pacemaker lead to a pacemaker generator....

  1. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or that...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or that...

  6. Sensing properties of pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Irnich, W

    1986-11-01

    It is already general practice to attribute sensing properties to geometry and surface structure of pacemaker leads. We have to analyze critically whether claims of having found leads with high sensitivity are in accordance with experimental and theoretical findings. From a model can be derived what kind of typical signal structure will originate from an electrode when an excitation wave crosses it, and what of this signal is influenced by electrode parameters. With decreasing surface area, the frequency content of the signal, the impedance, and, theoretically, the amplitude, increases. If the pacemaker characteristics are not matched to the lead properties, this inverse relationship becomes a direct one: If the input impedance is too low or the upper cut-off frequency of the bandpass is not high enough, the effective heart signal seems to be diminished with decreasing size. This, however, is more a pulse generator than a lead problem. If all pacers would possess an input impedance of greater than or equal to 100 K omega and an upper cut-off frequency of greater than or equal to 350 Hz, an attenuation of the heart signal would be less than or equal to 10% and thus, the results with different leads would be very similar and of equally high sensitivity.

  7. Pacemakers charging using body energy

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists – typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery. PMID:21814432

  8. Pacemakers charging using body energy.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists - typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery.

  9. Delayed right-ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead; a rare complication in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Akın, Alper; Ertuğrul, İlker; Karagöz, Tevfik

    2015-03-01

    Developments in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases have led to an increase in the need for intracardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Various complications related to these interventions can be seen in the short term (pneumothorax, pericardial effusion, cardiac perforation, etc…) and in the long term (infection, subclavian vein thrombosis, sensing and pacing problems, battery erosion and cardiac perforation). In this report, we present a rare case of cardiac perforation occurring 2 years after pacemaker implantation.

  10. Pacemaker failure associated with therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C.; Mutter, M.

    1988-11-01

    A 48-year-old white man with a multiprogrammable Intramedics 259-01 pacemaker was treated for inoperable lung cancer with a course of cobalt-60 radiotherapy (total 3500 rad). Several weeks subsequent to his last radiation treatment, the patient presented to the emergency department with chest and abdominal pain, shortness of breath, hypotension, and tachycardia. A paced tachycardia was noted, and application of a magnet over the pacemaker completely inhibited its function, allowing a normal sinus rhythm to ensue and the patient's symptoms to be relieved. Pacemaker failure probably was a complication of radiotherapy.

  11. [Diaphragmatic pacemaker as an alternative to mechanical ventilation in patients with cervical spinal injury].

    PubMed

    Romero-Ganuza, F J; Gambarrutta-Malfatti, C; Diez de la Lastra-Buigues, E; Marín-Ruiz, M Á; Merlo-González, V E; Sánchez-Aranzueque Pantoja, A M; García-Moreno, F J; Mazaira-Álvarez, J

    2011-01-01

    To verify that the diaphragmatic pacemaker is a form of respiratory support that can be used to replace a volumetric respirator in cervical spinal injury patients with cervical spinal lesion and diaphragmatic paralysis by means of its comparison with the traditional volumetric respirator. Retrospective study of a prospective database and age-matched case-control study. Intensive Care Unit and Intermediate Care Respiratory Unit, Paraplegics National Hospital, Toledo (Spain). We collected data on all patients discharged from the Hospital with permanent respiratory support by volumetric respirator or diaphragmatic pacemaker during a follow-up period of 25 years. Personal interviews were conducted to evaluate health-related quality of life. Comparison and survival tests were used for statistical comparisons. Quality of life questionnaire. The main variables collected were demographic data, hospital stay, mortality, family reintegration and health-related quality of life. We evaluated the clinical records of 101 patients, 37 in the pacemaker-group and 64 in the volumetric respirator-group. Our results show that ICU admission duration and hospitalization as well as family reintegration, without significant differences, with a tendency to greater survival in pacemaker patients (18.18 versus 9.67 years by the Kaplan-Meier method, p<0.001). However, this difference becomes non-significant (p=0.06) after adjustment of the groups by age. Furthermore, better quality of life was found in these same patients with pacemakers in terms of security, communication, sociability, comfort and mobility in the patients. Diaphragmatic pacemaker ventilation is an effective alternative to mechanical ventilation with similar efficacy that improve quality of life in patients with severe respiratory failure due to cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Pacemaker stimulus amplitude alteration without loss of capture: an unusual ECG finding in cardiac tamponade from pacemaker lead perforation.

    PubMed

    Suksaranjit, P; Prasidthrathsint, K

    2014-01-01

    A variation in pacemaker stimulus amplitude can represent pacemaker system dysfunction from generator malfunction, lead insulation defect, lead fracture, or artefact of digital signal processing of the electrocardiography recorder. Pacemaker lead perforation into the pericardial space typically results in loss of capture which was not demonstrated in our patient. In summary, we report an unusual ECG finding of pacemaker stimulus amplitude alteration without loss of capture in the setting of cardiac tamponade from pacemaker lead perforation.

  13. How Will a Pacemaker Affect My Lifestyle?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High-tension wires Metal detectors Industrial welders Electrical generators These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of ... 2 feet away from industrial welders and electrical generators. Some medical procedures can disrupt your pacemaker. These ...

  14. Mangalith: a new lithium pacemaker battery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbier, G.; Lehmann, G.

    1980-01-01

    An original lithium battery system is being developed for pacemaker application. The material used, lithium-manganese dioxide, industrially available at the present time for a variety of electronic applications, has been modified and adapted for pacemaker power requirements. The utilization of a different modification of manganese dioxide offers performance advantages. The cell technology is described and performance comparisons between this new cathode material and the industrial counterpart are reported. 7 refs.

  15. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  16. The challenge of staphylococcal pacemaker endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries endocarditis in congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ng, Julie; Chan, William; Lee, Paul; Joshi, Subodh; Grigg, Leanne E.; Ajani, Andrew E

    2003-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis. The overall incidence of staphylococcal bacteraemia is increasing, contributing to 16% of all hospital-acquired bacteraemias. The use of cardiac pacemakers has revolutionized the management of rhythm disturbances, yet this has also resulted in a group of patients at risk of pacemaker lead endocarditis and seeding in the range of 1% to 7%. We describe a 26-year-old man with transposition of the great arteries who had a pacemaker implanted and presented with S. aureus septicaemia 2 years postpacemaker implantation and went on to develop pacemaker lead endocarditis. This report illustrates the risk of endocarditis in the population with congenital heart disease and an intracardiac device.

  17. Pacemaker diagnostics in atrial fibrillation: limited usefulness for therapy initiation in a pacemaker practice.

    PubMed

    Yedlapati, Neeraja; Fisher, John D

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to determine the practical value of pacemaker diagnostics for atrial fibrillation (AF) in an unselected general pacemaker practice, specifically workflow and initiation of anticoagulation or antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy. We prospectively followed consecutive pacemaker interrogations over a period of 1 year to identify patients with AF (burden from 1% to 99%). We contacted referring physicians with AF details, and then determined whether the information resulted in therapeutic changes. Of the 1,100 pacemakers interrogated, 728 were dual chamber (DDDs) with AF diagnostic capability. AF was recorded in 73 (10%) but seven had limited information, leaving 66 patients; of these, 42 (63%) patients were already anticoagulated and in five (7%) patients, anticoagulation had been stopped because of complications. Initial diagnosis of AF was made by the pacemaker in 17 patients (26% of 66; 2% of 728); four (6% of 66) patients were newly initiated on anticoagulation. Of the 66 patients, 17 patients were already on AADs; 49 (74%) had satisfactory rate control or had other issues; only two (3% of 66; 0.3% of 728) received new AADs. Of 728 patients with DDD pacemakers, only 17 were newly discovered to have AF, and six (0.8%) had changes in medications based on the pacemaker data. Adding pacemaker-derived data to existing clinical information had little therapeutic impact, due to a combination of cumbersome workflow, and because AF was usually known to practitioners. Developments in automated monitoring systems may provide more accessible and therapeutically useful information. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The influence of the lining material on the repair of the infected dentin in young permanent molars after restoration: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Eunice; Reis, Alessandra; Chibinski, Ana Claudia Rodrigues; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the impact of liner material on the fluorescence, morphological and mineral characteristics of permanent carious dentin after cavity sealing. Methods: Thirty children (11.0 ± 2.7 years old) presenting at least one active deep carious lesion in permanent molars were selected. Fragments of carious dentin were removed from teeth before lining the cavity (baseline samples) with high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (G1) or an inert material (wax - G2). Cavities were restored with composite resin and reopened 60 days later, and other fragments were removed (60-day sample). The laser fluorescence (LF) readings and morphological and mineral changes of both groups were compared. Results: After 60 days, forty teeth were available for evaluation. Lower LF means were obtained (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P < 0.05), and enhanced calcium and phosphorus levels were detected for both groups (t-test, P < 0.05). An uptake of fluorine was observed only in G1 (t-test; P < 0.05). Regardless of the group, baseline samples exhibited clear signs of bacterial invasion, and the collagen fibers were exposed; the 60-day samples showed a better-organized tissue with a more compact intertubular dentin. Conclusion: Caries arrestment with dentin reorganization occurs regardless of the lining material placed in contact with the infected dentin. PMID:27994311

  19. The influence of the lining material on the repair of the infected dentin in young permanent molars after restoration: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Eunice; Reis, Alessandra; Chibinski, Ana Claudia Rodrigues; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of liner material on the fluorescence, morphological and mineral characteristics of permanent carious dentin after cavity sealing. Thirty children (11.0 ± 2.7 years old) presenting at least one active deep carious lesion in permanent molars were selected. Fragments of carious dentin were removed from teeth before lining the cavity (baseline samples) with high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (G1) or an inert material (wax - G2). Cavities were restored with composite resin and reopened 60 days later, and other fragments were removed (60-day sample). The laser fluorescence (LF) readings and morphological and mineral changes of both groups were compared. After 60 days, forty teeth were available for evaluation. Lower LF means were obtained (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P < 0.05), and enhanced calcium and phosphorus levels were detected for both groups (t-test, P < 0.05). An uptake of fluorine was observed only in G1 (t-test; P < 0.05). Regardless of the group, baseline samples exhibited clear signs of bacterial invasion, and the collagen fibers were exposed; the 60-day samples showed a better-organized tissue with a more compact intertubular dentin. Caries arrestment with dentin reorganization occurs regardless of the lining material placed in contact with the infected dentin.

  20. SU-E-T-585: Optically-Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters for Monitoring Pacemaker Dose in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Apicello, L; Riegel, A; Jamshidi, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A sufficient amount of ionizing radiation can cause failure to components of pacemakers. Studies have shown that permanent damage can occur after a dose of 10 Gy and minor damage to functionality occurs at doses as low as 2 Gy. Optically stimulated thermoluminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) can be used as in vivo dosimeters to predict dose to be deposited throughout the treatment. The purpose of this work is to determine the effectiveness of using OSLDs for in vivo dosimetry of pacemaker dose. Methods: As part of a clinical in vivo dosimetry experience, OSLDs were placed at the site of the pacemaker by the therapist for one fraction of the radiation treatment. OSLD measurements were extrapolated to the total dose to be received by the pacemaker during treatment. A total of 79 measurements were collected from November 2011 to December 2013 on six linacs. Sixty-six (66) patients treated in various anatomical sites had the dose of their pacemakers monitored. Results: Of the 79 measurements recorded, 76 measurements (96 %) were below 2 Gy. The mean and standard deviation were 50.12 ± 76.41 cGy. Of the 3 measurements that exceeded 2 Gy, 2 measurements matched the dose predicted in the treatment plan and 1 was repeated after an unexpectedly high Result. The repeated measurement yielded a total dose less than 2 Gy. Conclusion: This analysis suggests OSLDs may be used for in vivo monitoring of pacemaker dose. Further research should be performed to assess the effect of increased backscatter from the pacemaker device.

  1. An infected dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted permanent maxillary canine, inverted mesiodens and impacted supernumerary teeth.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Karthik Rajaram; Natarajan, Balan; Mani, Sudhaamani; Sahuthullah, Yasmeen Ahmed; Kannan, Arivukkadal Vijaya; Doraiswamy, Haritha

    2013-07-01

    A dentigerous cyst is an odontogenic cyst associated with the crown of the impacted or unerupted teeth. Such cyst remain initially completely asymptomatic unless when infected and can be discovered only on routine radiographic examination. Here, such a case of dentigerous cyst, which was discovered on routine radiographic examination, is discussed here.

  2. [Evolution of pacing modes in patients with implanted pacemakers. Personal considerations on a case load of 171 patients].

    PubMed

    Santangelo, L; Scialdone, A; Mayer, M S; Civitillo, U F; Costantino, M F; Jacono, A

    1993-06-01

    In this study retrospectively analyse pacemaker-implantation activity carried out during the last 5 years at the Laboratory of Electrophysiology, affiliated with the Cattedra di Cardiologia of the University of Naples--II Ateneo. Evolution in pacing modes is considered with regard to the patient age, the underlying pathologies and the technical progress in the field. The study has been performed in our laboratory, which is fit up for electrophysiologic studies and implantation of either temporary or permanent pacemakers. Patients included in this study have been implanted in our laboratory either for urgency or for election. They have been retrospectively divided into two groups (age < 65 yrs, 129 patients, and age < 65 yrs, 42 patients); in addition the patients have been classified according to the pathology leading to the implantation: atrio-ventricular block (second degree or third degree), low frequency fibrillation, sick sinus syndrome and carotid sinus syndrome. 171 patients have been examined, of whom 129 > 65 yrs. and 42 < 65 yrs. As for the pacing indication, 54 were atrio-ventricular block (56.1%), 50 were sick sinus syndrome (31.6%), 20 low frequency fibrillation (11.7%), and 1 was carotid sinus syndrome (0.6%). The ratio between single- and dual-chamber pacemakers has been progressively changing: in 1987 we implanted 33 single-chamber and no dual-chamber pacemaker, compared to 7 single- and 23 dual-chamber pacemaker implanted in the last year. This trend is in good agreement with literature data.

  3. Mutual entrainment of bilaterally distributed circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed Central

    Page, T L; Caldarola, P C; Pittendrigh, C S

    1977-01-01

    The interactions between the bilaterally distributed components of the circadin system that controls the locomotor activity rhythm of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae were investigated in a series of surgical lesion experiments. Complete excision of one optic lobe (either right or left) or its surgical isolation from the central nervous system had no effect on the animals' ability to free-run in constant darkness nor was there any indication, as judged by postoperative pi values of any difference between left and right lobe pacemakers. However, these surgical procedures consistently resulted in a significant increase in tau over preoperative value while optic nerve section had no effect on tau. The propostion is developed that the left and right pacemakers in the two optic lobes are mutally coupled and that the compound pacemaker's period is shorter than either of its constituent pacemakers. It was also found that the integrity of either compound eye is sufficient to assure entrainment of both left and right pacemakers. Images PMID:265571

  4. Medial subclavicular musculotendinous complex and insulation break: Rare cause of late pacemaker lead malfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Pranab Jyoti; Agrawal, Shweta; Barkataky, Jogesh Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Anjan Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Insulation break in a permanent pacemaker lead is a rare long-term complication. We describe an elderly male with a VVIR pacemaker, who presented with an episode of presyncope more than 3 years after the initial implantation procedure, attributed to insulation break possibly caused by lead entrapment in components of the medial subclavicular musculotendinous complex (MSMC) and repeated compressive damage over time during ipsilateral arm movement requiring lead replacement. The differential diagnosis of a clinical presentation when pacing stimuli are present with failure to capture and the role of the MSMC in causing lead damage late after implantation are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Twenty-Seven Years Experience With Transvenous Pacemaker Implantation in Children Weighing <10 kg.

    PubMed

    Konta, Laura; Chubb, Mark Henry; Bostock, Julian; Rogers, Jan; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Epicardial pacemaker implantation is the favored approach in children weighing <10 kg in many units. The high incidence of premature failure and fractures with earlier epicardial leads led our unit to undertake transvenous pacemaker implantation in neonates and infants from 1987. To date there have been no long-term follow-up reports of what is for many a controversial strategy. Between 1987 and 2003, 37 neonates and infants-median age 6.7 months (1 day to 3 years) and median weight 4.6 kg (2.7-10 kg)-had a permanent transvenous pacing system implanted. Pacing leads were placed into the right ventricular apex/outflow tract through a subclavian vein puncture with a redundant loop in the atrium. Three patients were lost to follow-up, 4 patients died from complications of cardiac surgery, and 2 patients had their system removed. At long-term follow-up in 28 patients at a median of 17.2 (range, 11.2-27.4) years, 10 patients have a single chamber ventricular pacemaker, 14 a dual chamber pacemaker, 3 a biventricular pacemaker, and 1 has a single chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Subclavian vein patency was assessed in 26 patients. The overall subclavian vein occlusion rate was 10 of 13 (77%) <5 kg and 2 of 13 (15%) >5 kg during long-term follow-up. After a median of 14.3 (range, 13.4-17.6) years of pacing, 7 patients continue with their original lead. Transvenous pacing in infants <10 kg results in encouraging short- and long-term clinical outcomes. Subclavian vein occlusion remains an important complication, occurring predominantly in those weighing <5 kg. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Normal and abnormal function of the pacemaker magnetic reed switch.

    PubMed

    Driller, J; Barold, S S; Parsonnet, V

    1976-01-01

    Application of the special test magnet over a demand pacemaker actuates a magnetic reed switch which converts the pacemaker to fixed-rate pacing. The magnetic reed switch is a simple and generally very reliable component. This review discusses the normal and abnormal functions of the pacemaker magnetic reed switch. An understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of this subject is important in the overall management of patients with implanted pacemakers.

  7. In vivo biocompatibility and pacing function study of silver ion-based antimicrobial surface technology applied to cardiac pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Shawcross, James; Bakhai, Ameet; Ansaripour, Ali; Armstrong, James; Lewis, David; Agg, Philip; De Godoy, Roberta; Blunn, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that the rate of cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections is increasing more rapidly than the rates of CIED implantation and is associated with considerable mortality, morbidity and health economic impact. Antimicrobial surface treatments are being developed for CIEDs to reduce the risk of postimplantation infection within the subcutaneous implant pocket. Methods and analysis The feasibility of processing cardiac pacemakers with the Agluna antimicrobial silver ion surface technology and in vivo biocompatibility were evaluated. Antimicrobially processed (n=6) and control pacemakers (n=6) were implanted into subcutaneous pockets and connected to a part of the sacrospinalis muscle using an ovine model for 12 weeks. Pacemaker function was monitored preimplantation and postimplantation. Results Neither local infection nor systemic toxicity were detected in antimicrobial or control devices, and surrounding tissues showed no abnormal pathology or over-reactivity. Semiquantitative scores of membrane formation, cellular orientation and vascularity were applied over five regions of the pacemaker capsule and average scores compared. Results showed no significant difference between antimicrobially processed and control pacemakers. Silver analysis of whole blood at 7 days found that levels were a maximum of 10 parts per billion (ppb) for one sample, more typically ≤2 ppb, compared with <<2 ppb for preimplantation levels, well below reported toxic levels. Conclusions There was no evidence of adverse or abnormal pathology in tissue surrounding antimicrobially processed pacemakers, or deleterious effect on basic pacing capabilities and parameters at 12 weeks. This proof of concept study provides evidence of basic biocompatibility and feasibility of applying this silver ion-based antimicrobial surface to a titanium pacemaker surface. PMID:28674615

  8. The pacemaker-twiddler's syndrome: an infrequent cause of pacemaker failure.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Cader, Fathima Aaysha; Nasrin, Sahela; Chowdhury, Mashhud Zia

    2016-01-20

    The pacemaker-twiddler's syndrome is an uncommon cause of pacemaker malfunction. It occurs due to unintentional or deliberate manipulation of the pacemaker pulse generator within its skin pocket by the patient. This causes coiling of the lead and its dislodgement, resulting in failure of ventricular pacing. More commonly reported among elderly females with impaired cognition, the phenomenon usually occurs in the first year following pacemaker implantation. Treatment involves repositioning of the dislodged leads and suture fixation of the lead and pulse generator within its pocket. An 87 year old Bangladeshi lady who underwent a single chamber ventricular pacemaker (VVI mode: i.e. ventricle paced, ventricle sensed, inhibitory mode) implantation with the indication of complete heart block, and presented to us again 7 weeks later, with syncopal attacks. She admitted to repeatedly manipulating the pacemaker generator in her left pectoral region. Physical examination revealed a heart rate of 42 beats/minute, blood pressure 140/80 mmHg and bilateral crackles on lung auscultation. She had no cognitive deficit. An immediate electrocardiogram showed complete heart block with pacemaker spikes and failure to capture. Chest X-ray showed coiled and retracted right ventricular lead and rotated pulse generator. An emergent temporary pace maker was set at a rate of 60 beats per minute. Subsequently, she underwent successful lead repositioning with strong counselling to avoid further twiddling. Twiddler's syndrome should be considered as a cause of pacemaker failure in elderly patients presenting with bradyarrythmias following pacemaker implantation. Chest X-ray and electrocardiograms are simple and easily-available first line investigations for its diagnosis. Lead repositioning is required, however proper patient education and counselling against further manipulation is paramount to long-term management.

  9. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... adhesive, a sealant, a screw, a crimp, or any other material used to repair a pacemaker lead or to reconnect a pacemaker lead to a pacemaker pulse generator. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  14. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker service tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  18. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker service tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  4. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at preselected...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at preselected...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at preselected...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including pulse...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker generator...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including pulse...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at preselected...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker generator...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker generator...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker generator...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including pulse...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at preselected...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker generator...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including pulse...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including pulse...

  14. Pacemaking Property of RVLM Presympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; da Silva, Melina P.; Souza, George M. P. R.; Lima-Silveira, Ludmila; Karlen-Amarante, Marlusa; Amorim, Mateus R.; Almado, Carlos E. L.; Moraes, Davi J. A.; Machado, Benedito H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite several studies describing the electrophysiological properties of RVLM presympathetic neurons, there is no consensus in the literature about their pacemaking property, mainly due to different experimental approaches used for recordings of neuronal intrinsic properties. In this review we are presenting a historical retrospective about the pioneering studies and their controversies on the intrinsic electrophysiological property of auto-depolarization of these cells in conjunction with recent studies from our laboratory documenting that RVLM presympathetic neurons present pacemaking capacity. We also discuss whether increased sympathetic activity observed in animal models of neurogenic hypertension (CIH and SHR) are dependent on changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of these cells or due to changes in modulatory inputs from neurons of the respiratory network. We also highlight the key role of INaP as the major current contributing to the pacemaking property of RVLM presympathetic neurons. PMID:27713705

  15. Prediction of battery depletion in implanted pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Geoffrey; Siddons, Harold

    1973-01-01

    By the use of a measuring oscilloscope and the standard electrocardiogram limb leads the degree of battery depletion in an implanted pacemaker can be estimated. A formula based on readings obtained by this means has been used to determine when Devices fixed rate pacemakers should be removed. Laboratory tests show that 90% of their useful life is obtained by this means and it proved possible to extend the period of implantation from an arbitrary 24 months to 25 to 34 months without failure from battery depletion. PMID:4731110

  16. Permanent demand pacing for hypersensitive carotid sinus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Dwight I.; Gerein, Alfred N.; Miyagishima, Robert T.

    1973-01-01

    Ten patients with proved hypersensitivity of one or both carotid sinuses and with symptoms of recurrent lightheaded spells and syncope had implanted a permanent transvenous demand pacemaker. In a follow-up course ranging from 6 to 55 months there has been no recurrence of lightheadedness or syncope in any of the patients. Six of the ten have had their battery packs replaced owing to routine battery exhaustion. PMID:4704892

  17. Trends of temporary pacemaker implant and underlying disease substrate.

    PubMed

    Jou, Yu-Lan; Hsu, Hong-Pin; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Kong, Chi-Woon; Chang, Shih-Lin; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate contemporary trends of clinical characteristics, etiologies, and underlying diseases, and their relationship between different bradyarrhythmias in patients undergoing temporary pacemakers (TPMs). This study included 509 patients (77 ± 11 year, 74% males) with symptomatic bradyarrhythmias requiring TPMs between 2002 and 2008. Demographics, electrocardiographic indications, etiologies, underlying diseases, and the outcome of permanent pacemaker (PPM) implants within 30 days were analyzed. Atrioventricular conduction dysfunction (AVCD) (64.0%) dominated in all bradyarrhythmias, with idiopathic degeneration (61%) as its major etiology. Antiarrhythmic drug (38%) was the leading cause in sinoatrial node dysfunction (SAND). There was an increasing trend in AVCD, while a decreasing trend in SAND. Regarding etiologies for TPM, an increasing trend was found in idiopathic degeneration, whereas a decreasing trend in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Idiopathic degeneration had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 for AVCD (P = 0.001), whereas electrolyte/acid-base disturbances (OR = 3.7, P = 0.001), β-blockers (OR = 2.4, P = 0.002), and chronic renal disease (OR = 1.9, P = 0.01) were associated with SAND. Patients with intrinsic etiologies for TPM had a high incidence of PPM implantation within 30 days than those with extrinsic causes (67.5% vs 3.8%, P < 0.0001) Increasing trends in patients requiring TPMs were observed in the elderly patients and those with AVCD and idiopathic degeneration, while decreasing trends were observed in those with SAND and ACS. Idiopathic degeneration was associated with AVCD, whereas extrinsic etiologies were related to SAND. Patients with intrinsic etiologies had a higher incidence of PPM implantation than those with extrinsic factors for TPM. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Initial experience with an autocapture pacemaker system.

    PubMed

    Kam, R M; Tan, C S; Teo, W S

    2000-11-01

    Autocapture management aims to extend pacemaker longevity without compromising on patient safety by automatically monitoring the pacing threshold and adjusting the pacemaker output for consistent capture. This paper describes our initial experience with the Pacesetter Regency pacemaker with autocapture management. Nineteen patients were implanted with single chamber pacemakers with autocapture management. Autocapture was programmed "ON" the day after implantation if Evoked Response (ER) amplitude was at least 2.8 mV. The patients were followed up at 2 weeks, 2 months and 6 months. At each visit, pacing threshold and lead impedance were measured. Autocapture was turned "ON" during follow-up if it had not been done previously. In 16 out of 19 patients, autocapture could be turned "ON" the day after implantation. One patient had an ER signal that was less than 2.8 mV and 2 patients were in fast atrial fibrillation of more than 120 beats per minute which precluded ER signal testing. These patients could not have autocapture programmed "ON". The benefits of autocapture management can only be realised if an ER signal of at least 2.8 mV is obtained. This requires intraoperative testing of the ER signal. Since there is no commercially available pacing system analyser presently that can measure this, modification of the standard implantation procedure with some prolongation of procedure time is needed.

  19. Clinical assessment of pacemaker power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bilitch, M.; Parsonnet, V.; Furman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of power sources for cardiac pacemakers has progressed from a 15-year usage of mercury-zinc batteries to widely used and accepted lithium cells. At present, there are about 6 different types of lithium cells incorporated into commercially distributed pacemakers. The authors reviewed experience over a 5-year period with 1711 mercury-zinc, 130 nuclear (P238) and 1912 lithium powered pacemakers. The lithium units have included 698 lithium-iodide, 270 lithium-silver chromate, 135 lithium-thionyl chloride, 31 lithium-lead and 353 lithium-cupric sulfide batteries. 57 of the lithium units have failed (91.2% component failure and 5.3% battery failure). 459 mercury-zinc units failed (25% component failure and 68% battery depletion). The data show that lithium powered pacemaker failures are primarily component, while mercury-zinc failures are primarily battery related. It is concluded that mercury-zinc powered pulse generators are obsolete and that lithium and nuclear (P238) power sources are highly reliable over the 5 years for which data are available. 3 refs.

  20. [Cardiac Pacemakers, implantable defibrillators and IRM].

    PubMed

    Frank, R; Hidden-Lucet, F; Himbert, C; Petitot, J C; Fontaine, G

    2003-04-01

    The IRM is formally contraindicated to the pacemaker and cardiac defibrillator wearers because of the risk of inhibition or inappropriate stimulations during the examination. However if the examination is essential, suitable programming of the apparatus and a constant monitoring of the heartbeat rate by a qualified doctor in cardiac stimulation must make it possible to avoid any accident.

  1. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, António M; Costa, Francisco; Tralhão, António; Marques, Hugo; Cardim, Nuno; Adragão, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radio frequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. PMID:24851058

  2. Prevention of pacemaker-associated contact dermatitis by polytetrafluoroethylene sheet and conduit coating of the pacemaker system.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takahiro; Maeba, Satoru; Sueda, Taijiro

    2014-09-01

    A 73-year-old female with sick sinus syndrome and atrial fibrillation was implanted with a ventricular demand inhibit pacemaker. She subsequently developed multiple episodes of skin irritation and necrosis. Skin patch testing revealed sensitivity to almost every component of the pacemaker system. The pacemaker was removed and replaced with a new pacemaker in which the generator was covered with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet and the lead was covered with PTFE conduit. The patient suffered no further episodes of pacemaker-associated contact dermatitis.

  3. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. Long-term atrial and ventricular epicardial pacemaker lead survival after cardiac operations in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kelvin C; William Gaynor, J; Fuller, Stephanie M; Karen A Smoots; Shah, Maully J

    2015-03-01

    Multiple cardiac operations and resultant myocardial scarring have been implicated in the overall reduced performance of epicardial pacing systems in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). The aim of the study is to evaluate long-term permanent epicardial pacing lead survival in patients with CHD who had epicardial lead placement in association with surgical repair or palliation. A retrospective review of patients who had implantation of epicardial pacing systems between January 1984 and June 2010 was conducted. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) presence of CHD and (2) cardiac operation(s) concomitant with or before initial permanent epicardial lead implantation. Patients were divided into 2 anatomical groups: single ventricle (SV) and biventricle (Bi-V). Epicardial leads were implanted in 663 patients during the study period. One hundred fifty-five patients (76 SV [49%] and 79 Bi-V [51%]) were included, resulting in 259 leads and 946 lead-years of follow-up. There were 2 deaths and 8 infections attributable to pacemaker placement. Overall atrial lead survival at 1, 2, 5, and 10 years (99%, 93%, 83%, and 72%) was comparable with ventricular lead survival (97%, 90%, 74%, and 60%) (P = .540) and was also similar between SV and Bi-V patients. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that SV palliation and an earlier era of lead implantation (1984-1999) was significantly associated with ventricular, but not atrial, lead malfunction. Epicardial leads had acceptable longevity despite cardiac operations for complex CHD, suggesting the long-term reliability of this pacing method. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S.

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  6. Performance of re-used pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators compared with new devices at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jama, Zimasa V; Chin, Ashley; Badri, Motasim; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the performance of re-used pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in Africa. We sought to compare the risk of infection and the rate of malfunction of re-used pacemakers and ICDs with new devices implanted at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. This was a retrospective case comparison study of the performance of re-used pacemakers and ICDs in comparison with new devices implanted at Groote Schuur Hospital over a 10-year period. The outcomes were incidence of device infection, device malfunction, early battery depletion, and device removal due to infection, malfunction, or early battery depletion. Data for 126 devices implanted in 126 patients between 2003 and 2013 were analysed, of which 102 (81%) were pacemakers (51 re-used and 51 new) and 24 (19%) were ICDs (12 re-used and 12 new). There was no device infection, malfunction, early battery depletion or device removal in either the re-used or new pacemaker groups over the median follow up of 15.1 months [interquartile range (IQR), 1.3-36.24 months] for the re-used pacemakers, and 55.8 months (IQR, 20.3-77.8 months) for the new pacemakers. In the ICD group, no device infection occurred over a median follow up of 35.9 months (IQR, 17.0-70.9 months) for the re-used ICDs and 45.7 months (IQR, 37.6-53.7 months) for the new ICDs. One device delivered inappropriate shocks, which resolved without intervention and with no harm to the patient. This re-used ICD subsequently needed generator replacement 14 months later. In both the pacemaker and ICD groups, there were no procedure-non-related infections documented for the respective follow-up periods. No significant differences were found in performance between re-used and new pacemakers and ICDs with regard to infection rates, device malfunction, battery life and device removal for complications. Pacemaker and ICD re-use is feasible and safe and is a viable option for patients with bradyarrhythmias and

  7. Deglutition Syncope Associated With Ventricular Asystole in a Patient With Permanent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Chang, Bok Soon; Song, Jae-Uk; Ok, Chang Soo; Sohn, Seo-Young; Jo, Hyun Chul; Noh, Hye-Jin; Choi, Soo Hee; Kim, Jun Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Deglutition syncope is a situational syncope that is diagnosed only by a detailed history. We report deglutition syncope in a 62-year-old man, who had permanent atrial fibrillation. The patient had no structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. During syncopal attacks, his electrocardiography showed ventricular asystole that was sustained for 12 seconds. The patient was successfully treated by implantation of a permanent pacemaker. PMID:20182597

  8. Surgical Approaches to Epicardial Pacemaker Placement: Does Pocket Location Affect Lead Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Brian J.; Bichell, David P.; Connolly, Dana M.; Lamberti, John J.; Shepard, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Permanent cardiac pacing in pediatric patients presents challenges related to small patient size, complex anatomy, electrophysiologic abnormalities, and limited access to cardiac chambers. Epicardial pacing currently remains the conventional technique for infants and patients with complex congenital heart disease. Pacemaker lead failure is the major source of failure for such epicardial systems. The authors hypothesized that a retrocostal surgical approach would reduce the rate of lead failure due to fracture compared with the more traditional subrectus and subxiphoid approaches. To evaluate this hypothesis, a retrospective chart review analyzed patients with epicardial pacemaker systems implanted or followed at Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego between January 1980 and May 2007. The study cohort consisted of 219 patients and a total of 620 leads with epicardial pacemakers. Among these patients, 84% had structural congenital heart disease, and 45% were younger than 3 years at time of the first implantation. The estimated lead survival was 93% at 2 years and 83% at 5 years. The majority of leads failed due to pacing problems (54%), followed by lead fracture (31%) and sensing problems (14%). When lead failure was adjusted for length of follow-up period, no significant differences in the rates of failure by pocket location were found. PMID:20690018

  9. Lithium-induced sinus node disease at therapeutic concentrations: Linking lithium-induced blockade of sodium channels to impaired pacemaker activity

    PubMed Central

    Oudit, Gavin Y; Korley, Victoria; Backx, Peter H; Dorian, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes a case of sinus node arrest in a manic-depressive patient being treated with lithium carbonate with a therapeutic serum level of lithium. A permanent rate-modulated ventricular pacemaker was inserted and lithium therapy was continued. A review of literature revealed several other similar case reports in which both therapeutic and toxic levels of serum lithium levels were associated with sinus node dysfunction and bradyarrhythmias. Because lithium is a potent blocker of cardiac sodium channels, and given the critical importance of sodium channels in pacemaker activity, lithium-induced sodium channel blockade is likely an important mechanism in sinus node dysfunction. PMID:17347696

  10. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators--general and anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy G; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2014-01-01

    A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia), special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Nondependent Pacemaker Patients with Pacemakers and Defibrillators with a Nearly Depleted Battery.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hideo; Padmanabhan, Deepak; Watson, Robert E; Dalzell, Connie; Acker, Nancy; Jondal, Mary; Romme, Abby L; Cha, Yong-Mei; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Felmlee, Joel P; Friedman, Paul A

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with non-MRI-conditional cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) has been shown to be safe when performed under closely monitored protocols. However, the safety of MRI in patients with devices with a nearly depleted battery has not been reported. Prospective data were collected between January 2008 and May 2015 in patients with non-MRI-conditional CIEDs undergoing clinically indicated MRI under institutional protocol. Patients who were pacemaker dependent were excluded. Patients whose devices were at elective replacement indicator (ERI) at the time of MRI or close to ERI (ERI or replacement for battery depletion within 3 months of scan) were identified through database review and analyzed for clinical events. MRI scans (n = 569) were performed in 442 patients. Of these, we identified 13 scans performed with a nearly depleted battery in nine patients. All scans with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs, n = 9) were uneventful. However, two scans with pacemakers close to ERI resulted in a power-on-reset (PoR) event. One scan with a pacemaker close to ERI that was programmed to DOO mode reached ERI during MRI and automatically changed to VVI mode. Additionally, one scan with a pacemaker at ERI did not allow programming. All pacemakers with events were implanted before 2005. Patients with pacemakers and ICDs with a nearly depleted battery can safely undergo MRI when patients are not pacemaker dependent. Attention should be paid because old devices can result in PoR or ERI during MRI, which may lead to oversensing and inhibition of pacing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Silent Atrial Fibrillation in Elderly Pacemaker Users: A Randomized Trial Using Home Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ceb; Martinelli, M; Peixoto, G L; Siqueira, S F; Wajngarten, Maurício; Silva, Rodrigo Tavares; Costa, Roberto; Filho, Roberto; Ramires, José Antônio Franchini

    2016-05-01

    Pacemaker with remote monitoring (PRM) may be useful for silent atrial fibrillation (AF) detection. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of silent AF, the role of PRM, and to determine predictors of silent AF occurrence. Three hundred elderly patients with permanent pacemaker (PPM) were randomly assigned to the remote group (RG) or control group (CG). All patients received PPM with remote monitoring capabilities. Primary end point was AF occurrence rate and the secondary end points were time to AF detection and number of days with AF. During the average follow-up of 15.7±7.7 months, AF episodes were detected in 21.6% (RG = 24% vs CG = 19.3%, P = 0.36]. There was no difference in the time to detect the first AF episode. However, the median time to detect AF recurrence in the RG was lower than that in the CG (54 days vs 100 days, P = 0.004). The average number of days with AF was 16.0 and 51.2 in the RG and CG, respectively (P = 0.028). Predictors of silent AF were left atrial diameter (odds ratio [OR] 1.2; 95% CI = 1.1-1.3; P < 0.001) and diastolic dysfunction (OR 4.8; 95% CI = 1.6-14.0; P = 0.005). The incidence of silent AF is high in elderly patients with pacemaker; left atrial diameter and diastolic dysfunction were predictors of its occurrence. AF monitoring by means of pacemaker is a valuable tool for silent AF detection and continuous remote monitoring allows early AF recurrence detection and reduces the number of days with AF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Early Performance and Safety of the Micra Transcatheter Pacemaker in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Matthew; Eggen, Michael; Haddad, Tarek; Sheldon, Todd; Williams, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The Micra® Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS; Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) is a miniaturized single-chamber pacemaker system that is delivered via catheter through the femoral vein. In this study, the electrical performance was compared between the TPS and a traditional leaded pacemaker. In addition, the safety profile of the two systems was compared by thorough monitoring for a number of adverse events. The TPS was implanted in the right ventricular apex of 10 Yucatan mini pigs and a Medtronic single-lead pacemaker (SLP) was implanted in the right ventricular apex of another 10 pigs and connected to a traditional pacemaker. The electrical performance of all devices was monitored for 12 weeks. The safety profile of each system was characterized using x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, blood work, and necropsy to monitor for a variety of adverse events. At implant the mean pacing thresholds were 0.58 ± 0.17 V @0.24 ms and 0.75 ± 0.29 V @0.21 ms for the TPS and the SLP respectively. After 12 weeks, mean thresholds were 0.94 ± 0.46 V and 1.85 ± 0.75 V (P < 0.0001). There were two pulmonary emboli that were small and past the tertiary branch, and one occurred in each arm. There were also two infections with one in each arm. There were no dislodgements (macro or micro), tissue injury, tamponade, or valve injury. Overall, despite the 10-fold size reduction of the Micra TPS, it appears to perform similarly and have a similar safety profile to a traditional pacemaker system. © 2015 Medtronic PLC. Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Sudden death and its risk factors after atrioventricular junction ablation and pacemaker implantation in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru-Xing; Lee, Hon-Chi; Li, Jia-Ping; Hodge, David O; Cha, Yong-Mei; Friedman, Paul A; Munger, Thomas M; Srivathsan, Komandoor; Pavri, Behzad B; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2017-01-01

    Although sudden death (SD) is a rare complication after atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation and permanent pacemaker implantation, the risk factors leading to this SD remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate SD and its risk factors after ablate-and-pace strategy for rate control in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients during long-term follow-up. METHODS: From January 2005 to December 2009, we enrolled into this study 517 AF patients with AVJ ablation and right ventricular pacemaker implantation. Patients were divided into 2 groups, SD and non-SD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess potential risk factors for overall mortality and SD. During a mean follow-up of 25.8 ± 18.6 months (range, 3 days to 63.8 months), 53 patients died (15 with SD). Cox proportional hazards models showed that the presence of congestive heart failure, New York Heart Association functional class, chronic renal failure, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia were risk factors that predicted overall mortality. For SD, the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy and mitral stenosis were associated risk factors. SD was exclusively seen in patients who had narrow QRS complex or right bundle branch block prior to AVJ ablation and pacemaker implantation; SD was not seen in any patient with preexisting complete left bundle branch block. Dilated cardiomyopathy, mitral stenosis, and baseline QRS morphology should be examined as potential risk factors for SD after AVJ ablation and pacemaker implantation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachycardia leading to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest: resolution with atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement.

    PubMed

    Shawa, Hassan; Bajaj, Mandeep; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2014-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma should be considered in young patients who have acute cardiac decompensation, even if they have no history of hypertension. Atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement should be considered for stabilizing pheochromocytoma patients with cardiogenic shock due to atrial tachyarrhythmias. A 38-year-old black woman presented with cardiogenic shock (left ventricular ejection fraction, <0.15) that did not respond to the placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump. A TandemHeart(®) Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Device was inserted emergently. After atrioventricular node ablation and placement of a temporary pacemaker, the TandemHeart was removed. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a pheochromocytoma. After placement of a permanent pacemaker, the patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachyarrhythmia that led to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest unresolved by the placement of 2 different ventricular assist devices, but that was completely reversed by radiofrequency ablation of the atrioventricular node and the placement of a temporary pacemaker. We present the patient's clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings, and we review the relevant literature.

  16. Telemetry guided pacemaker programming: impact of output amplitude and the use of low threshold leads on projected pacemaker longevity.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, B; Fröhlig, G; Schwerdt, H; Heisel, A; Berg, M; Schieffer, H

    1998-11-01

    In a prospective study, a low threshold screw-in electrode (Medtronic 5078, group I, n = 9) was compared to a conventional active fixation lead (Biotronik Y60BP, group II, n = 9) to investigate whether lower pacing thresholds really translate into longer projected service life of the pacemaker. The leads were implanted in the atrium and were connected to a dual chamber pacing system which included the same ventricular lead (Medtronic 5024) and the same pulse generator model (Intermedics 294-03) in both groups. Eighteen months after implantation, atrial and ventricular pacing thresholds were measured as the charge delivered per pulse [microC] at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 3.5 V, respectively. For chronic output programming in both channels, patients capturing at 0.5 V were set to 1.0 V, those capturing at 1.5 V were permanently programmed to 2.0 V with the double of the charge threshold as the safety margin for pacing ("safety charge"). A combination of atrial and ventricular output settings was optimal, if it resulted in minimum battery current drain (microA] as measured by pacemaker telemetry. In both groups, current consumption [microA] decreased significantly as output amplitude was decreased, exhibiting its lowest value at 1.0 V in either channel. All ventricular leads could be programmed to the optimum output amplitude of 1.0 V in groups 1 and 2. As the 2:1 "safety charge" values were almost identical, the ventricular channel essential contributes the same amount to the battery drain of the pacing system in both groups. In the atrium, all patients of group 1 could be programmed to the optimum output amplitude of 1.0 V with an average pulse duration of 0.42 +/- 0.15 ms. In group 2, however, all patients had to be programmed to 2.0 V with a mean pulse width of 0.52 +/- 0.15 ms. With the atrial and ventricular output being optimized, the average battery drain of the whole pacing system was 12.19 +/- 0.63 microA in group 1 versus 14.42 +/- 0.32 microA in group 2 (P

  17. Pacemaker explosions in crematoria: problems and possible solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Christopher P; Mulley, Graham P

    2002-01-01

    The number of artificial cardiac pacemakers is increasing, as is the number of bodies being cremated. Because of the explosive potential of pacemakers when heated, a statutory question on the cremation form asks whether the deceased has a pacemaker and if so whether it has been removed. We sent a questionnaire to all the crematoria in the UK enquiring about the frequency, consequences and prevention of pacemaker explosions. We found that about half of all crematoria in the UK experience pacemaker explosions, that pacemaker explosions may cause structural damage and injury and that most crematoria staff are unaware of the explosive potential of implantable cardiac defibrillators. Crematoria staff rely on the accurate completion of cremation forms, and doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. PMID:12091510

  18. [Magnets, pacemaker and defibrillator: fatal attraction?].

    PubMed

    Bergamin, C; Graf, D

    2015-05-27

    This article aims at clarifying the effects of a clinical magnet on pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators. The effects of electromagnetic interferences on such devices, including interferences linked to electrosurgery and magnetic resonance imaging are also discussed. In general, a magnet provokes a distinctive effect on a pacemaker by converting it into an asynchronous mode of pacing, and on an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator by suspending its own antitachyarythmia therapies without affecting the pacing. In the operating room, the magnet has to be used cautiously with precisely defined protocols which respect the type of the device used, the type of intervention planned, the presence or absence of EMI and the pacing-dependency of the patient.

  19. Current status of pacemaker power sources.

    PubMed

    Tyers, G F; Brownlee, R R

    1978-06-01

    After years during which pacers of very similar design and capabilities were provided by a small number of manufactures, many different lithium, halogen, rechargeable, and nuclear power sources are now available. The variety of chemistries, methods of construction, and sealing techniques used in the batteries of the different manufacturers is almost unlimited. This has made it necessary for physicians who implant and follow pacer to acquire a general knowledge of the field if they are to make an informed choice of pacemaker power source for implantation and if they are to manage recalls with a minimum of patient and physician trauma. More experience is required before it can be definitely determined which of the new pacer power sources will prove superior, but when coupled with well-designed, hermetically sealed pulse generators, all are capable of providing continuous pacing for at least 5 years and the 10-year pacemaker is now a probability.

  20. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Pacemaker (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Pacemaker 心脏起搏器 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Pacemaker 心臟起搏器 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  1. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Essure System Essure is a a permanently implanted birth control device for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  2. Anticoagulation Management in Patients with Pacemaker-Detected Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Poposka, Lidija; Boskov, Vladimir; Risteski, Dejan; Taleski, Jane; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with an implanted pacemaker, asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombo-embolic complications. There is still no consensus which duration of episodes of atrial fibrillation should be taken as an indicator for inclusion of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 patients who had no AF episodes in the past and have an indication for permanent pacing were included in the study. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 18 months, 33 of the patients developed episodes of AF. Inclusion of OAC was performed in 17 patients, in whom AF was recorded, although in all patients CHA2DS2-VASc score was ≥ 1. The inclusion of OAC showed a statistically significant correlation with increasing duration of episodes of AF (r = 0.502, p = 0.003). During the follow-up period none of the patients developed thrombo-embolic complication. CONCLUSION: Considering that our group of patients had no thrombo-embolic events, we could conclude that dividing the AF episodes in less than 1% in 24 hours and longer than 1% within 24 hours could be an indicator for decision-making to include OAK if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is ≥ 1. PMID:27335594

  3. Delayed pacemaker lead perforations: Why unusual presentations should prompt an early multidisciplinary team approach

    PubMed Central

    Chao, John An Kuang; Firstenberg, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Our first case is an 84-year-old female diagnosed with sick sinus syndrome. She underwent implantation of dual chamber permanent pacemaker without complications. On the 8th day status-postimplantation, she returned to the emergency department (ED) with moderately severe left anterior chest pain and significant ecchymosis. She was given an initial diagnosis of shingles and discharged. Two days later, she returned to the ED with increasing chest pain, dyspnea, nausea, and vomiting. Lead migration and cardiac perforation was confirmed by chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT), respectively. She was taken to the operating room (OR) for lead repositioning, and she was discharged the next day. Our second case is a 64-year-old female with a diagnosis of 2:1 high-grade third-degree atrioventricular block. A dual chamber permanent pacemaker system was implanted without initial complication. Five days after implantation, she presented to the ED following an episode of syncope due to hypotension (67/46), shortness of breath, left flank pain, and fatigue. The initial diagnosis was sepsis. A chest CT was obtained, noting lead perforation and hemothorax. The patient was taken to the OR for lead repositioning. PMID:28382260

  4. Re-use of explanted DDD pacemakers as VDD- clinical utility and cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, K K N; Sharma, Y P; Bali, H K; Grover, A

    2004-01-01

    Re-use of DDD pulse generators explanted from patients died of unrelated causes is associated with an additional cost of two transvenous leads if implanted as DDD itself, and high rate of infection according to some studies. We studied the clinical and economical aspects of reutilization of explanted DDD pacemakers programmed to VDD mode. Out of 28 patients who received VDD pacemaker during the period, October 2000- September 2001 in the Department of Cardiology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, 5 poor patients were implanted with explanted DDD pulse generators programmed to VDD mode. Each implantation was planned and carried out according to a standard protocol. The age ranged from 45 to 75 (mean-61) years. The indications for pacing were complete heart block (4) and second degree AV block (1). The clinical profile, costs and complications, if any were noted and followed up at regular intervals. The results were compared with patients who received new DDD pulse generators during this period. The additional cost for the atrial lead was not required in these patients. None of these patients had any local site infection. Compared to the two-lead system, the single lead system provided more rapid implantation and minimized complications associated with placement of an atrial lead. The explanted DDD pacemaker can be safely reused as VDD mode with same efficacy in selected patient population. This is associated with lower cost and complications compared to reimplantation as DDD itself.

  5. Ten-year Survival and Its Associated Factors in the Patients Undergoing Pacemaker Implantation in Hospitals Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences During 2002 - 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rajaeefard, Abdolreza; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Babaee Baigi, Mohammad Ali; Tabatabae, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is a prevalent disease affecting about 4.9 million people in the U.S. and more than 22 million individuals worldwide. Using electric pacemaker is the most common treatment for the patients with heart conduction problems. The present study aimed to determine the factors affecting survival in the patients undergoing pacemaker implantation in the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify the factors affecting the survival of the patients suffering from arrhythmia. Patients and Methods: This retrospective survival analysis was conducted on all 1207 patients with heart failure who had undergone permanent pacemaker implantation in the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from 2002 to 2012. The data were analyzed using non-parametric methods such as Kaplan-Meier method, life table, and Cox regression model. The risk factors of mortality were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards method. Results: Survival data were available for 1030 (80%) patients (median age = 71 years [5th to 95th percentile range: 26 - 86 years]) and follow-up was completed for 84.28% of them. According to the results, 56% of the patients had received dual-chamber systems, while 44% had been implanted by single-chamber ventricular systems. Moreover, sick sinus syndrome and pacemaker mode were independent predictors of increased mortality. Conclusions: In this study, sick sinus syndrome and pacemaker mode followed by syncope were independently associated with increased mortality. PMID:26734484

  6. Two hearts synchronized each other with a DDD pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Brunacci, Michele; Valbusa, Alberto; Brunelli, Claudio; Bertero, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    : We describe the case of a patient with dyspnea and heterotopic cardiac transplant, ventricular fibrillation from the native heart and sinus rhythm from the transplanted one. The two hearts were synchronized with a pacemaker. Electric external cardioversion and a different type of pacemaker stimulation were successfully performed, with improving symptoms.

  7. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... connected to an implanted pacemaker lead that supplies an accurately calibrated, variable pacing pulse...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... connected to an implanted pacemaker lead that supplies an accurately calibrated, variable pacing pulse...

  9. Emergency room and inpatient use after cardiac pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Frank Allen; George, Linda Kaufman; Hu, Linyan

    2013-02-15

    Although studies have demonstrated health benefits, there is limited evidence on utilization and cost changes associated with cardiac pacemaker implantation from national community samples. The aim of this study was to quantify changes in emergency room (ER) and hospital inpatient use and in Medicare payments per beneficiary/year after pacemaker implantation. Outcomes for pacemaker recipients after and before implantation and between pacemaker recipients and controls were compared using propensity score matching. Data came from Health and Retirement Study interviews merged with Medicare claims. Sample subjects were aged ≥68 years with diagnosed conduction disorders or cardiac dysrhythmias in the previous 3 years. Outcome measures were (1) ER visits, inpatient admissions and days, and Medicare payments for ER and inpatient care in the after period for the pacemaker versus control groups, defined per beneficiary/year, (2) difference in differences in the same 5 outcome variables, and (3) binary variables for whether or not utilization or payments were lower in the after versus before periods for the pacemaker versus control groups. In conclusion, most pacemaker recipients improved, as measured by reductions in use and payments in the after versus before period, and there were reductions in ER visits and hospital admissions for conditions commonly leading to pacemaker implantation.

  10. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  13. Monocenter feasibility study of the MRI compatibility of the Evia pacemaker in combination with Safio S pacemaker lead.

    PubMed

    Wollmann, Christian G; Steiner, Erich; Vock, Paul; Ndikung, Bonaventure; Mayr, Harald

    2012-09-25

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the magnetic resonance (MR) conditional pacemaker (PM) system (Evia SR-T and DR-T with Safio S leads) under MR conditions. Patients with standard PM indications and Evia PM were eligible for enrollment in this single center prospective non-randomized pilot study. Patients underwent MR of the brain and lower lumbar spine at 1.5 Tesla. Atrial (RA) und ventricular (RV) lead parameters (sensing, pacing threshold [PTH], pacing impedance) were assessed immediately before (baseline follow-up [FU]) and immediately after MRI (1st FU), after 1 month (2nd FU) and 3 months (3rd FU). The effect of MR on serious adverse device effect (SADE) free-rate, on atrial and ventricular sensing (AS/VS; mV) and atrial (RA) and ventricular (RV) pacing thresholds (PTH; V/0.4 ms) were investigated between baseline and 2nd FU. Continuous variables are expressed as mean ± SD and were compared using paired Student's t-test. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. One patient had to be excluded because of an enrollment violation. Therefore, data of 30 patients (female 12 [40%], age 73 ± 12 years, dual chamber PM 15 [50%]) were included in this analysis. No MR related SADE occurred. Lead measurements were not statistically different between the baseline FU and the 2nd FU (AS/VS at baseline 3.2 ± 2.1/15.0 ± 6.0, at 2nd FU 3.2 ± 2.1/14.9 ± 6.5; p = ns. RA-PTH/RV-PTH at baseline 0.68 ± 0.18/0.78 ± 0.22, at 2nd FU 0.71 ± 0.24/0.78 ± 0.22; p = ns). The presence of the permanent pacemakers led to MR imaging artifacts on diffusion weighted sequences of the brain, but did not affect other sequences (e.g. FLAIR and T2 weighted spin-echo images). The use of the MR conditional Evia PM in a MR environment under predefined conditions is feasible. No MR related SADEs nor clinically relevant changes in device functions occurred.

  14. Monocenter feasibility study of the MRI compatibility of the Evia pacemaker in combination with Safio S pacemaker lead

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the magnetic resonance (MR) conditional pacemaker (PM) system (Evia SR-T and DR-T with Safio S leads) under MR conditions. Methods Patients with standard PM indications and Evia PM were eligible for enrollment in this single center prospective non-randomized pilot study. Patients underwent MR of the brain and lower lumbar spine at 1.5 Tesla. Atrial (RA) und ventricular (RV) lead parameters (sensing, pacing threshold [PTH], pacing impedance) were assessed immediately before (baseline follow-up [FU]) and immediately after MRI (1st FU), after 1 month (2nd FU) and 3 months (3rd FU). The effect of MR on serious adverse device effect (SADE) free-rate, on atrial and ventricular sensing (AS/VS; mV) and atrial (RA) and ventricular (RV) pacing thresholds (PTH; V/0.4 ms) were investigated between baseline and 2nd FU. Continuous variables are expressed as mean ± SD and were compared using paired Student’s t-test. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Thirty-one patients were enrolled. One patient had to be excluded because of an enrollment violation. Therefore, data of 30 patients (female 12 [40%], age 73 ± 12 years, dual chamber PM 15 [50%]) were included in this analysis. No MR related SADE occurred. Lead measurements were not statistically different between the baseline FU and the 2nd FU (AS/VS at baseline 3.2 ± 2.1/15.0 ± 6.0, at 2nd FU 3.2 ± 2.1/14.9 ± 6.5; p = ns. RA-PTH/RV-PTH at baseline 0.68 ± 0.18/0.78 ± 0.22, at 2nd FU 0.71 ± 0.24/0.78 ± 0.22; p = ns). The presence of the permanent pacemakers led to MR imaging artifacts on diffusion weighted sequences of the brain, but did not affect other sequences (e.g. FLAIR and T2 weighted spin-echo images). Conclusion The use of the MR conditional Evia PM in a MR environment under predefined conditions is feasible. No MR related SADEs nor clinically relevant changes in device functions

  15. Antitachycardia pacemakers in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anna N; LaPage, Martin J; Serwer, Gerald A; Dick, Macdonald; Bradley, David J

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) acquire rhythm abnormalities related to their repair, most commonly intraatrial reentrant tachycardia (IART). Treatment of IART in CHD is often multifaceted, and may include medication, ablation, and pacing. Evidence regarding the use of antitachycardia pacing therapies is limited. The aim of the study is to define the use and efficacy of antitachycardia pacing in patients with CHD at a single center. Eighty implants were performed on 72 patients between 2000 and 2010. Follow-up data of more than 3 months were available for 56 patients; median follow-up time was 2.8 years. Twenty (36%) patients received successful antitachycardia pacing at a median 1.3 years postimplant. For those patients with IART after implant, antitachycardia pacing was successful in 57%. Patients with two-ventricle repairs were more likely to have successful antitachycardia pacing than those with one-ventricle palliation (45% vs. 17%, P = .04). Patients with documented IART had more successful antitachycardia pacing than those with no documented atrial tachycardia prior to implant (46% vs. 7%, P = .006). Early complications of antitachycardia pacemaker implant occurred in six patients (11%); late complications after implant occurred in three patients (5.6%). Of the initial 72 patients implanted, there were six deaths (8%). Antitachycardia pacing therapies were successful in the majority of CHD patients who had IART after implant. Patients without documented atrial tachycardia prior to implant were unlikely to require or receive successful therapy from antitachycardia pacemaker. Those patients postatrial switch procedure who had documented IART prior to implant had the highest incidence of successful antitachycardia pacing therapies. Antitachycardia pacemaker implantation is an adjunct to the management of IART in CHD patients, but may not benefit patients who have not yet demonstrated IART. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [What the internist needs to know about pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Nüssli, Dominique; Schär, Beat

    2013-08-07

    In Switzerland, in 2011, 4463 patients underwent pacemaker implantation. This review article focusses on basic pacemaker functions, some fundamental remarks on pacemaker therapy and especially indications and pacemaker models. The current guidelines for PM indications date from the years 2007 [1] and 2008 [2] and form the basis of this article. Very rare indications (congenital heart disease, bradycardia after heart transplantation) are not discussed. Each year, new pacemaker models are released that provide advanced diagnostic features (e. g. detailed heart rate memory, 1:1 ECG recordings). However, these features do not significantly change everyday practice. An innovation with clinical impact is the "MRI-safe" system that has been introduced about a year ago.

  17. A new multiprogrammable isotopic powered cardiac pacemaker

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, N.P.; Purdy, D.L.; Sager, D.; Keshishian, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new multiprogrammable, isotopic-powered cardiac pacemaker was implanted in six patients as a custom device. Five were initial implants and one was a replacement. The patients were studied for up to two years. In five of the six cases it was found advantageous to change one of the programmable parameters. Multiprogrammability is obviously as important in an isotopic pulse generator as in a lithium unit, if not more so, because of the unit's greater longevity. Further studies are continuing in an FDA approved clinical trial.

  18. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase-lock spike-to-spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike-pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input. PMID:19257636

  19. Combined Standby Transvenous Defibrillator and Demand Pacemaker.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    AD-A097 441 CARDIAC CARE SYSTEMS INC RED BANK NJ F/B 6/5 COM13INED STANDBY TRANSVENOJS DEFIBRILLATOR AND DEMAND PACEMAKER--ETC(U) DEC 75 L RUBIN...Development Command Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701 Contract Number DAMD17-74-C-4108. Cardiac Care Systems, Inc. 80 E. Front Street Red Bank , NJ...8217 Cardiac Care Systems, Inc. 4I 80 E. Front Street 61 3121A1j0.4 Red Bank , NJ 07701 a .0_ e- /i\\ - -__________ I1. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 1.)42

  20. [Chronic transvenous pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads implantation induced pathological changes].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Dykoski, Richard; Li, Jianming

    2015-05-01

    Widely pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is also related to an increasing need for transvenous lead extraction. Understanding the location and extent of pathological changes, including adhesions and fibrous tissue formation along the course of chronic pacemaker/ICD leads, are essential for operators performing lead extraction operations in order to reduce the potential life threatening complications. Three parts are included in the research, pathological examination on 83 extracted pacemaker/ICD leads using excimer laser technique from March 2008 to March 2011, autopsy examination of one died patient during lead extraction for lead-related infective endocarditis, and anatomical analysis on pacemaker/ICD leads from 10 patients died of other non-cardiac causes. Extensive encapsulated fibrous tissue around the leads and extensive adhesion/fibrosis along the course of the leads from venous entry site to the lead/myocardial interface could be detected on transvenous pacemaker/ICD leads. Since the tissue at the junction between superior vena cava (SVC) and right atrium (RA) is very thin, free of pericardium, thus, this is a common place for extensive adhesion/fibrosis and myocardial perforation/tear during lead extraction, which accounted for one death during extraction in our cohort. Extensive adhesion and fibrosis were also observed at the tricuspid valve and subvalvular structures. Leads implanted to the right ventricular apex were close to the epicardial surface and prone to perforation through myocardium. It is common to observe thrombus on the leads or at the interface between leads and myocardial tissue, especially at right atrial appendage (RAA) at the site of lead insertion. Extensive adhesions and fibrosis can be commonly seen along the course of pacemaker/ICD leads, and at SVC to RA junction, the tricuspid valve/subvalvular structures, and RA/RV lead interface. The tissue at SVC to RA junction is very thin, making it

  1. Interruption of pacemaker signals is mediated by GABAergic inhibition of the pacemaker nucleus in the African electric fish Gymnarchus niloticus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2007-06-01

    The wave-type African weakly electric fish Gymnarchus niloticus produces electric organ discharges (EODs) from an electric organ in the tail that is driven by a pacemaker complex in the medulla, which consists of a pacemaker nucleus, two lateral relay nuclei and a medial relay nucleus. The prepacemaker nucleus (PPn) in the area of the dorsal posterior nucleus of the thalamus projects exclusively to the pacemaker nucleus and is responsible for EOD interruption behavior. The goal of the present study is to test the existence of inhibition of the pacemaker nucleus by the PPn. Immunohistochemical results showed clear anti-GABA immunoreactive labeling of fibers and terminals in the pacemaker nucleus, but no apparent anti-glycine immunoreactivity anywhere in the pacemaker complex. GABA injection into the pacemaker nucleus could induce EOD interruptions that are comparable to the interruptions induced by glutamate injection into the PPn. Application of the GABA(A) receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide reversibly eliminated the effects of stimulation of the PPn. Thus the EOD interruption behavior in Gymnarchus is mediated through GABAergic inhibition of the pacemaker nucleus by the PPn.

  2. Pacemaker laser lead extraction and reimplantation of dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillator via Mustard baffle in complete transposition of great arteries

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Leo; Bhella, Paul S.; Schussler, Jeffrey M.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a complicated lead extraction and reimplantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in a young woman with complete transposition of great arteries (CTGA), a cyanotic congenital heart defect in which the aorta and the pulmonary trunk are transposed. The malformation results in two parallel circulations, whereby the left ventricle is attached to the pulmonary trunk and the right ventricle is attached to the aorta. Survival depends on the mixing of these two circulations at the level of the atria or ventricles or great arteries. Balloon atrial septostomy and creation of an intra-atrial baffle are procedures that increase atrial mixing, increase systemic oxygenation, and hence improve survival. With the improved survival of patients with CTGA, there is an increasing need for permanent pacemakers (PPMs) and ICDs for rhythm disturbances. These leads and/or devices are often inserted when the patients are very young and need to be replaced or explanted in adulthood due to device or lead malfunction, device-associated infection, or generator replacement or upgrades. These procedures are often complicated by the patients' complex anatomy and/or shunts. We describe a patient with CTGA who had an intra-atrial baffle and a nonfunctioning dual-chamber PPM. The lead was extracted via the baffle and the old PPM was upgraded to an ICD. Such descriptions are rare. PMID:20671822

  3. Pacemaker laser lead extraction and reimplantation of dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillator via Mustard baffle in complete transposition of great arteries.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Leo; Bhella, Paul S; Schussler, Jeffrey M; Grayburn, Paul A; Assar, Manish

    2010-07-01

    We present a case of a complicated lead extraction and reimplantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in a young woman with complete transposition of great arteries (CTGA), a cyanotic congenital heart defect in which the aorta and the pulmonary trunk are transposed. The malformation results in two parallel circulations, whereby the left ventricle is attached to the pulmonary trunk and the right ventricle is attached to the aorta. Survival depends on the mixing of these two circulations at the level of the atria or ventricles or great arteries. Balloon atrial septostomy and creation of an intra-atrial baffle are procedures that increase atrial mixing, increase systemic oxygenation, and hence improve survival. With the improved survival of patients with CTGA, there is an increasing need for permanent pacemakers (PPMs) and ICDs for rhythm disturbances. These leads and/or devices are often inserted when the patients are very young and need to be replaced or explanted in adulthood due to device or lead malfunction, device-associated infection, or generator replacement or upgrades. These procedures are often complicated by the patients' complex anatomy and/or shunts. We describe a patient with CTGA who had an intra-atrial baffle and a nonfunctioning dual-chamber PPM. The lead was extracted via the baffle and the old PPM was upgraded to an ICD. Such descriptions are rare.

  4. Pacemakers, defibrillators, and direct current cardioversion.

    PubMed

    Sgarbossa, E B; Black, I W; Maloney, J D

    1993-01-01

    Technology for pacemakers and automatic implantable defibrillators continues to evolve. Emphasis is placed not only on preventing cardiac death, but also on improving symptoms and quality of life. The basic antibradycardia function of pacemakers is complemented by highly sophisticated rate-responsive capabilities. The search for the perfect physiologic sensor has not ended; potential limitations of the systems currently available are considered in this review. Reports on outcome with pacing in different populations are also discussed. There have been two important advances in automatic implantable defibrillators. One is the introduction of the third generation defibrillator in clinical investigation. A tiered therapy (including antitachycardia pacing, cardioversion, and defibrillation) can now be programmed in the same device, with the protection of back-up antibradycardia pacing. The other remarkable innovation is the expanding use of nonthoracotomy techniques for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement. This approach permits the avoidance of a subcutaneous patch electrode in some cases, the system being entirely transvenous. Finally, recent insights on external cardioversion for atrial arrhythmias are briefly reviewed.

  5. [Pacemaker and implantable defibrillators with telemedical support].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Helms, T M; Neuzner, J; Schweizer, J; Korb, H

    2009-03-01

    Recent developments in pacemaker and ICD therapy can be characterized by a rising number of implantations (especially in the field of ICD and CRT systems) and an increasing complexity of the units involved. Problems evolving from this trend are the soaring numbers of necessary follow-up examinations, issues of patient safety and the necessity of device management by specialized physicians. Telemonitoring offers various possibilities of improvement in these areas. The manufacturers of the devices have developed applicable solutions for concepts of care including telemedical monitoring of patients with pacemakers, ICD and CRT systems. The systems commonly include an implant capable of either automatic or manual data transmission, a device for transmitting the implant's data (mobile communication or fixed line network), a server managing the information and a front-end (internet-based) platform for the physician. Multiple clinical trials have verified the stability and the security of this method of data transmission. Telemedical monitoring can be used in order to improve the monitoring of the patients' state of health (e. g., patients with CRT systems because of their CHF) and the management of arrhythmias (e. g., patients suffering from paroxysmal atrial fibrillation). Telemonitoring allows the intervals between follow-up check-ups to be individualized, thus, leading to financial savings. The telemedical monitoring of patients with ICD and CRT systems facilitates new opportunities for networked follow-up care and comprehensive medical treatment.

  6. Proton Beam Therapy Interference With Implanted Cardiac Pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, Yoshiko Sugahara, Shinji; Noma, Mio; Sato, Masato; Sakakibara, Yuzuru; Sakae, Takeji; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tsuboi, Koji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of proton beam therapy (PBT) on implanted cardiac pacemaker function. Methods and Materials: After a phantom study confirmed the safety of PBT in patients with cardiac pacemakers, we treated 8 patients with implanted pacemakers using PBT to a total tumor dose of 33-77 gray equivalents (GyE) in dose fractions of 2.2-6.6 GyE. The combined total number of PBT sessions was 127. Although all pulse generators remained outside the treatment field, 4 patients had pacing leads in the radiation field. All patients were monitored by means of electrocardiogram during treatment, and pacemakers were routinely examined before and after PBT. Results: The phantom study showed no effect of neutron scatter on pacemaker generators. In the study, changes in heart rate occurred three times (2.4%) in 2 patients. However, these patients remained completely asymptomatic throughout the PBT course. Conclusions: PBT can result in pacemaker malfunctions that manifest as changes in pulse rate and pulse patterns. Therefore, patients with cardiac pacemakers should be monitored by means of electrocardiogram during PBT.

  7. Retrieval of the Leadless Cardiac Pacemaker: A Multicenter Experience.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vivek Y; Miller, Marc A; Knops, Reinoud E; Neuzil, Petr; Defaye, Pascal; Jung, Werner; Doshi, Rahul; Castellani, Mark; Strickberger, Adam; Mead, R Hardwin; Doppalapudi, Harish; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Bennett, Matthew; Sperzel, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    Leadless cardiac pacemakers have emerged as a safe and effective alternative to conventional transvenous single-chamber ventricular pacemakers. Herein, we report a multicenter experience on the feasibility and safety of acute retrieval (<6 weeks) and chronic retrieval (>6 weeks) of the leadless cardiac pacemaker in humans. This study included patients enrolled in 3 multicenter trials, who received a leadless cardiac pacemaker implant and who subsequently underwent a device removal attempt. The overall leadless pacemaker retrieval success rate was 94%: for patients whose leadless cardiac pacemaker had been implanted for <6 weeks (acute retrieval cohort), complete retrieval was achieved in 100% (n=5/5); for those implanted for ≥ 6 weeks (chronic retrieval cohort), retrieval was achieved in 91% (n=10/11) of patients. The mean duration of time from implant to retrieval attempt was 346 days (range, 88-1188 days) in the chronic retrieval cohort, and nearly two thirds (n=7; 63%) had been implanted for >6 months before the retrieval attempt. There were no procedure-related adverse events at 30 days post retrieval procedure. This multicenter experience demonstrated the feasibility and safety of retrieving a chronically implanted single-chamber (right ventricle) active fixation leadless pacemaker. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT02051972, NCT02030418, and NCT01700244. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Neck Pain One Week after Pacemaker Generator Replacement.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ross F; Wightman, John M

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of cardiac pacemaker implantation has risen markedly in the past three decades, making awareness of possible postprocedural complications critical to the emergency physician. This case is the first documented instance of internal jugular (IJ) deep vein thrombosis (DVT) from an uncomplicated pacemaker generator replacement. A patient presented to an Emergency Department with a 2-day history of mild left temporal headache migrating to his left neck. The patient did not volunteer this information, but review of systems revealed a temporary transvenous pacemaker inserted through the right IJ vein 1 week previously during a routine exchange of a left-sided cardiac pacemaker generator. Manipulation of the existing pacemaker wires entering the left subclavian vein was minimal. Computed tomographic angiography of the neck demonstrated near-complete thrombotic occlusion of the entire length of his left IJ vein. This required hospital admission for observation and treatment with anticoagulation. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: DVT, with thrombotic extension into adjacent vessels anywhere along the course of pacemaker wires, should be considered by the emergency provider in the evaluation of head, neck, or upper extremity symptoms after recent or remote implantation or manipulation of a transvenous cardiac pacemaker, including generator replacement. Failure to identify and treat appropriately could result in significant morbidity and mortality from airway edema, septic thrombophlebitis, superior vena cava syndrome, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, or pulmonary embolism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. A devices' game of thrones: cardiac resynchronization therapy vs. pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Moura-Ferreira, Sara; Gonçalves, Helena; Oliveira, Marco; Primo, João; Fonseca, Paulo; Ribeiro, José; Santos, Elisabeth; Pelicano, Nuno; Martins, Dinis; Gama, Vasco

    2017-04-18

    Oversensing can interfere with biventricular pacing. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) output inhibition due to automatic brady mode change from a sensing to a pacing mode of a previously implanted pacemaker as it reached battery capacity depleted indicator has not been previously published in the medical literature. We report the first case of CRT output inhibition in a pacemaker dependent patient due to electrical stimuli from a previously right-sided implanted pacemaker, after unaware reversion of OVO mode (O = no chambers paced; V = ventricular sensing; O = no response to sensing) to backup VVI (V = ventricular pacing; V = ventricular sensing; I = inhibitory response to sensing) when it reached the elective replacement interval. This paper emphasizes the importance of knowing the distinct pacemaker brady mode behaviours after battery capacity depleted indicator has been reached, according to the pacemakers' manufacturer, including the possibility of automatic brady mode change from sensing to pacing mode. It also highlights the potential for severe bradycardia or asystole of this automatic brady mode change from a previously implanted pacemaker in pacemaker dependent patients submitted to CRT upgrade.

  10. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  11. Performance of a radiation protection cabin during implantation of pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Ploux, Sylvain; Ritter, Philippe; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Clementy, Jacques; Bordachar, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Pacemaker implants are associated with a high cumulative exposure of the operators to radiation. Standard radiation protection with lead aprons is incomplete and the cause of spine disorders. A radiation protection cabin offers complete protection by surrounding the operator, without requiring a lead apron. We randomly and evenly assigned 60 patients undergoing implantations of permanent pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) with (a) a radiation protection cabin (cabin group, n = 30) versus (b) standard protection with a 0.5 mm lead-equivalent apron (control group, n = 30). Radiation exposure was measured using personal electronic dosimeters placed on the thorax, back, and head of the operator. The patient, procedural, and device characteristics of the 2 study groups were similar. All procedures in the cabin group were performed as planned without increase in duration or complication rate compared with the control group. The mean radiation dose to the head, normalized for fluoroscopy duration, was significantly lower in the cabin (0.040 +/- 0.032 microSv/min) than in the control (1.138 +/- 0.560 microSv/min) group (p < 0.0001). The radiation doses to the thorax (0.043 +/- 0.027 vs 0.041 +/- 0.040 microSv/min) and back (0.038 +/- 0.029 vs 0.033 +/- 0.018 microSv/min) in the cabin versus control group (under the apron) were similar. The use of a radiation protection cabin markedly decreased the exposure of the operator to radiation, and eliminated the need to wear a lead apron, without increasing the procedural time or complication rate during implantation of pacemaker and ICD.

  12. Acute pericarditis with cardiac tamponade induced by pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-11-01

    An 87-year-old woman was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular block and underwent pacemaker implantation. On postoperative day 12, she experienced cardiac tamponade that was suspected on computed tomography to be caused by lead perforation; therefore, we performed open-heart surgery. However, we could not identify a perforation site on the heart, and drained a 400-mL exudative pericardial effusion. Subsequently, we diagnosed the pericardial effusion as due to pericarditis induced by pacemaker implantation. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish pericarditis from pacemaker lead perforation, so both should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  13. [Problems, complications, and emergencies during pacemaker implantation. Importance of access].

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Ekosso-Ejangue, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    Pacemaker implantation represents a standard procedure with a perceived 100% success rate, without mortality and with extremely rare complications. However, some pacemaker implantations may develop into a very difficult procedure or even be associated with significant complications. Good venous access is crucial and may distinguish between comfortable, successful implantation and futile implantation with severe complications (e.g., pneumo- or hematothorax, venous dissection or perforation, accidental arterial implantation, or air embolism). This review summarizes acute problems and complications during lead implantation and provides tips and hints for prevention and acute reaction during implantation. If these simple precautions are considered, the majority of acute complications during implantation of pacemaker leads can be prevented.

  14. [Pacemaker implantation in dogs: results of the last 30 years].

    PubMed

    François, L; Chetboul, V; Nicolle, A; Carlos, C; Borenstein, N; Pouchelon, J L

    2004-07-01

    Pacemaker implantation in veterinary practice is still not well known and remains uncommon. However, this technique is the only possible way to cure animals suffering from symptomatic bradycardia whose state does not improve with a medical treatment. In most cases, the use of pacemakers in veterinary medicine leads to the disappearance of the clinical and electrocardiographic signs. This retrospective study concerning the last 30 years draws up an evaluation of the improvements, advantages and drawbacks of this method. Moreover, this study allows the understanding of the evolution of pacemakers' use in veterinary cardiology.

  15. APPLICATION III: Permanent Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Satoshi

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Superconducting permanent magnet using pinned type superconductor * Magnetization process based on the critical state * Demagnetizing curve and permanent magnetic properties * Demagnetizing field of pinned type II superconductor * Samples and experiments * Sample preparation * Magnetization measurements * Permanent magnetic properties of the melt processed YBCO * QMG processed YBCO * MPMG processed YBCO * Summary * References

  16. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  17. Myopotential interference with DDD pacemakers: endocardial electrographic telemetry in the diagnosis of pacemaker-related arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Halperin, J L; Camuñas, J L; Stern, E H; Rothlauf, E B; Kupersmith, J; Estioko, M R; Mace, R C; Steinmetz, M Y; Teichholz, L E

    1984-07-01

    Skeletal myopotentials may inhibit the output of unipolar demand ventricular pacemakers, resulting in protracted episodes of asystole in susceptible patients. The new DDD-mode pacemakers have, in addition to a unipolar ventricular lead, a unipolar atrial lead to enable atrioventricular sequential or atrial synchronous function. During clinical investigation of a new dual-unipolar cardiac pacing system programmed to operate in the DDD mode (Pacesetter AFP models 281 and 283), 6 patients were noted (5 men and 1 woman, aged 22 to 68 years) who manifested paroxysmal acceleration of ventricular pacing rate approaching the maximal tracking rate. Two patients also had abrupt slowing or cessation of ventricular output. With the use of atrial electrographic recordings (obtained with telemetry), the following mechanisms of rate change were found: myopotential tracking, myopotential inhibition, interference-mode asynchronous operation, sudden increases in sinus rate, and pacemaker-mediated reentrant tachycardia. In all patients, reprogramming of the implanted devices, based on telemetered atrial electrography, resulted in disappearance of the arrhythmias and loss of symptoms while maintaining the DDD pacing mode. Thus, several mechanisms of rhythm disturbances are peculiar to dual-chamber cardiac pacing systems that use unipolar electrodes. Endocardial telemetry combined with extensive programming capability offers the best opportunity for proper diagnosis and management of these problems.

  18. Identification of Bacteriology and Risk Factor Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacterial Colonization in Pacemaker Replacement Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xian-Ming; Yu, Hua; Sun, Xue-Xia; An, Yi; Li, Bing; Li, Xue-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent researches revealed that asymptomatic bacterial colonization on PMs might be ubiquitous and increase the risk of clinical PM infection. Early diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic bacterial colonization could provide opportunity for targeted preventive measures. Objective The present study explores the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in pacemaker replacement patients without signs of infection, and to analyze risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. Methods From June 2011 to December 2013, 118 patients underwent pacemaker replacement or upgrade. Identification of bacteria was carried out by bacterial culture and 16S rRNA sequencing. Clinical risk characteristics were analyzed. Results The total bacterial positive rate was 37.3% (44 cases), and the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus detection rate was the highest. Twenty two (18.6%) patients had positive bacterial culture results, of which 50% had coagulase-negative staphylococcus. The bacterial DNA detection rate was 36.4 % (43 cases). Positive bacterial DNA results from pocket tissues and the surface of the devices were 22.0% and 29.7%, respectively. During follow-up (median, 27.0 months), three patients (6.8%, 3/44) became symptomatic with the same genus of microorganism, S. aureus (n=2) and S. epidermidis (n=1). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. Conclusion There was a high incidence of asymptomatic bacterial colonization in pacemaker patients with independent risk factors. Bacterial culture combined genetic testing could improve the detection rate. PMID:25768661

  19. Pacemaker limitation of tachycardia in hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Sparacino, Nicholas; Geninatti, Marilyn; Moore, Gregory

    2011-11-01

    A 49-year-old white man was admitted to the emergency department with nausea and diarrhea of 11 hours duration. He had experienced crampy abdominal pain as well. He reported that his stools had been dark and malodorous. He had no prior history of gastrointestinal disorders, nor travel, unusual oral or liquid intake. There was a remote history of alcohol abuse, but no hepatitis or cirrhosis. Recent alcohol intake was denied by the patient. He had no medical allergies. His past medical history was pertinent for a history of hypertension, congestive heart failure, and a dual chamber pacemaker insertion. There was no history of diabetes mellitus, smoking, or myocardial infarction. Medications included lisinopril, a small dose of aspirin daily, and thyroid supplement. Family history was negative for cardiomyopathy, sudden cardiac death, gastric or duodenal ulcers, colon cancer, or any congenital abnormalities.

  20. Cellular Automata Model of Cardiac Pacemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, D.

    2008-05-01

    A network of Greenberg-Hasting cellular automata with cyclic intrinsic dynamics F rightarrow R rightarrow A rightarrow F rightarrow ... is shown to be a reliable approximation to the cardiac pacemaker. The three possible cell's states F, R, A are characterized by fixed timings { nF, nR, nA } -- time steps spent in each state. Dynamical properties of a simple line network are found to be critical with respect to the relation between nF and nR. The properties of a network arisen from a square lattice where some edges are rewired (locally and with the preference to link to cells which are more connected to other cells) are also studied. The resulted system evolves rhythmically with the period determined by timings. The emergence of a small group of neighboring automata where the whole system activity initiates is observed. The dominant evolution is accompanied with other rhythms, characterized by longer periods.

  1. Rare earth permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    Permanent magnets were discovered centuries ago from what was known as {open_quotes}lodestone{close_quotes}, a rock containing large quantities of the iron-bearing mineral magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The compass was the first technological use for permanent magnetic materials; it was used extensively for navigational purposes by the fifteenth century. During the twentieth century, as new applications for permanent magnets were developed, interest and research in permanent magnetic materials soared. Four major types of permanent magnets have been developed since the turn of the century.

  2. Pacemaker-mediated tachycardia: engineering solutions.

    PubMed

    Calfee, R V

    1988-11-01

    This discussion summarizes the interaction of refractory periods and upper rate behaviors in modern dual-chamber demand (DDD) devices, the data regarding and nine events initiating VA conduction and engineering solutions proposed and/or implemented to address the problem of pacemaker-mediated tachycardia (PMT). Among the causes of PMT are premature atrial depolarization, loss of atrial capture, a return to the demand mode after asynchronous magnet mode pacing, programming from a mode that does not guarantee AV synchrony to a mode in which atrial tracking can occur, noise, certain situations involving Wenckebach behavior, loss of sensing, and the inability of a rate-smoothing algorithm to allow a rapid change in ventricular rate. Engineering solutions to prevent the occurrence of PMT include a programmable postventricular atrial refractory period (PVARP), differential AV delay, adaptive AV delay, and the ability to discriminate between P waves of atrial origin and those resulting from retrograde conduction from the ventricle. Features such as the ability to lengthen the PVARP for one cycle after exiting the magnet or noise reversion modes or programming to a new mode, lengthen the PVARP for a single cycle following a PVC or revert to DVI pacing for one cycle following a PVC have been developed to recognize initiating events. A third solution, a tachycardia termination algorithm, can recognize and terminate PMT; varying the AV delay to determine whether P waves move in a corresponding manner and using a metabolic sensor to confirm the need for a fast heart rate are other possibilities in the detection of PMT. Diagnostic data features may also be used to evaluate the appropriateness of programmed settings. This discussion concludes that PMT is no longer a significant clinical entity when more advanced DDD pacemakers are utilized.

  3. Properties of the pacemaker current (If) in latent pacemaker cells isolated from cat right atrium.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z; Lipsius, S L

    1992-01-01

    1. Single latent pacemaker cells were isolated from the Eustachian ridge of cat right atrium using Langendorff perfusion and enzyme dispersion techniques. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(f)). 2. All cells studied beat rhythmically. Pacemaker activity was recorded in the voltage range -68 +/- 1 to -54 +/- 2 mV and its cycle length was 901 +/- 67 ms (72 +/- 5 beats min-1) at 34-36 degrees C. Cells were elongated with tapered ends, and appeared bent or crinkled without obvious striations. Mean cell diameter and length were 7.4 +/- 0.5 microns and 93.1 +/- 5.9 microns, respectively (n = 15). Input resistance and total membrane capacitance were 2.2 +/- 0.2 G omega and 27.8 +/- 3.1 pF, respectively. 3. Hyperpolarizing clamp steps more negative than -50 mV elicited a time-dependent increasing inward current that was maximally activated at -120 mV. Activation of I(f) was well within the pacemaker voltage range. Half-maximal activation voltage and slope factor were calculated, using a Boltzmann function, to be -80.5 mV and 8.4, respectively. 4. The fully activated current-voltage (I-V) relationship was approximately linear at voltages more negative than -30 mV and showed outward rectification at more positive voltages. The reversal potential of I(f) was -26 mV and the fully activated conductance was 1.75 +/- 0.14 nS (n = 21). Caesium (2 mM) blocked I(f) at voltages more negative than the reversal potential. Reducing extracellular Na+ or K+ shifted the reversal potential more negative, and increasing extracellular K+ exerted the opposite effect. Reducing extracellular Na+ decreased I(f) amplitude and the slope of the fully activated I-V relationship, and elevated extracellular K+ increased I(f) amplitude and the slope of the fully activated I-V relationship. 5. Some pacemaker cells exhibited a short delay in the onset of I(f) activation whereas other pacemaker cells exhibited little, if any, delay in

  4. New Approaches to Biological Pacemakers: Links to Sinoatrial Node Development.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Vasanth

    2015-12-01

    Irreversible degeneration of the cardiac conduction system is a common disease that can cause activity intolerance, fainting, and death. While electronic pacemakers provide effective treatment, alternative approaches are needed when long-term indwelling hardware is undesirable. Biological pacemakers comprise electrically active cells that functionally integrate with the heart. Recent findings on cardiac pacemaker cells (PCs) within the sinoatrial node (SAN), along with developments in stem cell technology, have opened a new era in biological pacing. Recent experiments that have derived PC-like cells from non-PCs have brought the field closer than ever before to biological pacemakers that can faithfully recapitulate SAN activity. In this review, I discuss these approaches in the context of SAN biology and address the potential for clinical translation.

  5. Engineered Biological Pacemakers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Cellular Biophysics Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological pacemakers.

  6. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association) How Does a Pacemaker Work? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (National Heart, Lung, and ...

  7. New Approaches to Biological Pacemakers: Links to Sinoatrial Node Development

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Vasanth

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible degeneration of the cardiac conduction system is a common disease that can cause activity intolerance, fainting, and death. While electronic pacemakers provide effective treatment, alternative approaches are needed when long-term indwelling hardware is undesirable. Biological pacemakers are composed of electrically active cells that functionally integrate with the heart. Recent findings on cardiac pacemaker cells (PCs) within the sinoatrial node (SAN), along with developments in stem cell technology, have opened a new era in biological pacing. Recent experiments that have derived PC-like cells from non-PCs have brought the field closer than ever before to biological pacemakers that can faithfully recapitulate SAN activity. This review discusses these approaches in the context of SAN biology and addresses the potential for clinical translation. PMID:26611337

  8. Self-Diagnostics Digitally Controlled Pacemaker/Defibrillators: A Design Plan for Incorporating Diagnostics and Digital Control in the schema of a Pacemaker/Defibrillator Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    This research addresses the need for a pacemaker/ defibrillator that could perform an automatic system self-diagnostics check to assure operational...architecture of a system to store and retrieve digital/wireless communication information from a pacemaker/ defibrillator , or other device, and to alert medical...Digitally Controlled Pacemaker/ Defibrillator Device. Applications of the SDDCPDD design concept for military missions are explored.

  9. Interaction of a commercial heart rate monitor with implanted pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Joglar, J A; Hamdan, M H; Welch, P J; Page, R L

    1999-03-01

    Dry-electrode heart rate monitors allow display of heart rate by transmitting a signal to the receiving device, which typically is on the wrist or exercise machine, but due to the potential for electromagnetic interference, their use has been contraindicated in patients with pacemakers. In 12 patients, we found no adverse effect on pacemaker function; in addition, the monitors generally were accurate in measuring heart rate during pacing.

  10. Pacemaker activity and ionic currents in mouse atrioventricular node cells.

    PubMed

    Marger, Laurine; Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo; Dubel, Stefan; Engeland, Birgit; Kanani, Sandra; Fontanaud, Pierre; Striessnig, Jörg; Shin, Hee-Sup; Isbrandt, Dirk; Ehmke, Heimo; Nargeot, Joël; Mangoni, Matteo E

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that Pacemaker activity of the sino-atrial node (SAN) initiates the heartbeat. However, the atrioventricular node (AVN) can generate viable pacemaker activity in case of SAN failure, but we have limited knowledge of the ionic bases of AVN automaticity. We characterized pacemaker activity and ionic currents in automatic myocytes of the mouse AVN. Pacemaking of AVN cells (AVNCs) was lower than that of SAN pacemaker cells (SANCs), both in control conditions and upon perfusion of isoproterenol (ISO). Block of I(Na) by tetrodotoxin (TTX) or of I(Ca,L) by isradipine abolished AVNCs pacemaker activity. TTX-resistant (I(Nar)) and TTX-sensitive (I(Nas)) Na(+) currents were recorded in mouse AVNCs, as well as T-(I(Ca,T)) and L-type (I(Ca,L)) Ca(2+) currents I(Ca,L) density was lower than in SANCs (51%). The density of the hyperpolarization-activated current, (I(f)) and that of the fast component of the delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) were, respectively, lower (52%) and higher (53%) in AVNCs than in SANCs. Pharmacological inhibition of I(f) by 3 µM ZD-7228 reduced pacemaker activity by 16%, suggesting a relevant role for I(f) in AVNCs automaticity. Some AVNCs expressed also moderate densities of the transient outward K(+) current (I(to)). In contrast, no detectable slow component of the delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) could be recorded in AVNCs. The lower densities of I(f) and I(Ca,L), as well as higher expression of I(Kr) in AVNCs than in SANCs may contribute to the intrinsically slower AVNCs pacemaking than that of SANCs.

  11. Successful pacing using a batteryless sunlight-powered pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Schaerer, Jakob; Wagner, Joerg; Walpen, Sébastien; Huber, Christoph; Haeberlin, Heinrich; Fuhrer, Juerg; Vogel, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Today's cardiac pacemakers are powered by batteries with limited energy capacity. As the battery's lifetime ends, the pacemaker needs to be replaced. This surgical re-intervention is costly and bears the risk of complications. Thus, a pacemaker without primary batteries is desirable. The goal of this study was to test whether transcutaneous solar light could power a pacemaker. We used a three-step approach to investigate the feasibility of sunlight-powered cardiac pacing. First, the harvestable power was estimated. Theoretically, a subcutaneously implanted 1 cm(2) solar module may harvest ∼2500 µW from sunlight (3 mm implantation depth). Secondly, ex vivo measurements were performed with solar cells placed under pig skin flaps exposed to a solar simulator and real sunlight. Ex vivo measurements under real sunlight resulted in a median output power of 4941 µW/cm(2) [interquartile range (IQR) 3767-5598 µW/cm(2), median skin flap thickness 3.0 mm (IQR 2.7-3.3 mm)]. The output power strongly depended on implantation depth (ρSpearman = -0.86, P < 0.001). Finally, a batteryless single-chamber pacemaker powered by a 3.24 cm(2) solar module was implanted in vivo in a pig to measure output power and to pace. In vivo measurements showed a median output power of >3500 µW/cm(2) (skin flap thickness 2.8-3.84 mm). Successful batteryless VVI pacing using a subcutaneously implanted solar module was performed. Based on our results, we estimate that a few minutes of direct sunlight (irradiating an implanted solar module) allow powering a pacemaker for 24 h using a suitable energy storage. Thus, powering a pacemaker by sunlight is feasible and may be an alternative energy supply for tomorrow's pacemakers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effect of monopolar radiofrequency energy on pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Govekar, Henry R; Robinson, Thomas N; Varosy, Paul D; Girard, Guillaume; Montero, Paul N; Dunn, Christina L; Jones, Edward L; Stiegmann, Greg V

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to quantify the clinical parameters of mono- and bipolar instruments that inhibit pacemaker function. The specific aims were to quantify pacer inhibition resulting from the monopolar instrument by altering the generator power setting, the generator mode, the distance between the active electrode and the pacemaker, and the location of the dispersive electrode. A transvenous ventricular lead pacemaker overdrive paced the native heart rate of an anesthetized pig. The primary outcome variable was pacer inhibition quantified as the number of beats dropped by the pacemaker during 5 s of monopolar active electrode activation. Lowering the generator power setting from 60 to 30 W decreased the number of dropped paced events (2.3 ± 1.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.8 beats; p = 0.045). At 30 W of power, use of the cut mode decreased the number of dropped paced beats compared with the coagulation mode (0.6 ± 0.5 vs 1.6 ± 0.8; p = 0.015). At 30 W coagulation, firing the active electrode at different distances from the pacemaker generator (3.75, 7.5, 15, and 30 cm) did not change the number of dropped paced beats (p = 0.314, analysis of variance [ANOVA]). The dispersive electrode was placed in four locations (right/left gluteus, right/left shoulder). More paced beats were dropped when the current vector traveled through the pacemaker/leads than when it did not (1.5 ± 1.0 vs 0.2 ± 0.4; p < 0.001). Clinical parameters that reduce the inhibition of a pacemaker by monopolar instruments include lowering the generator power setting, using cut (vs coagulation) mode, and locating the dispersive electrode so the current vector does not traverse the pacemaker generator or leads.

  13. Complete atrioventricular block in pregnancy: report of seven pregnancies in a patient without pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Keepanasseril, Anish; Maurya, Dilip Kumar; J, Yavana Suriya; Selvaraj, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric management of a woman with a permanent pacemaker in situ is well reported in the literature; but those who present without pacing are still debatable. The necessity for setting the optimal timing or rate of temporary artificial pacing, specifically for labour, has not been objectively assessed. Temporary pacing in most cases reported in the literature might be to withstand the variations in haemodynamic status during delivery and labour. We report a case of a patient with complete heart block without any pacing who had seven pregnancies without any significant changes in haemodynamic status during labour and delivery. Managing a pregnancy without pacing might be an appropriate alternative for women without any underlying cardiac disorder, as it will not lead to significant changes in the haemodynamic system. PMID:25754166

  14. Irreversible third-degree heart block and pacemaker implant in a case of flecainide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Thomas; Zimmerman, Jacob; Griffin, Gregory D

    2013-09-01

    An 82-year-old white woman was seen in the emergency department (ED) after ingesting 400 mg of flecainide in an attempt to treat an episode of dizziness and palpitations that occurred while she was gardening. Consequently, she developed bradycardia, hypotension, and complete heart block. In addition to supportive care, she also received sodium bicarbonate, atropine, calcium gluconate, and dopamine in an effort to reverse the heart block. The patient continued to remain in heart block and was sent to the cardiac catheterization laboratory for placement of an external pacing wire, which stabilized the patient. After further evaluation, a permanent pacemaker was implanted during her admission. External pacing wires may be useful in the treatment of complete heart block in cases of flecainide poisoning when a patient is unresponsive to drug therapy provided in the ED.

  15. Permanent pacing is a risk factor for the development of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Freudenberger, Ronald S; Wilson, Alan C; Lawrence-Nelson, Janet; Hare, Joshua M; Kostis, John B

    2005-03-01

    No previous study has examined the importance of right ventricular pacing as a risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF) in subjects without a history of HF. A cohort study of patients who underwent initial pacemaker implantation (n = 11,426) was conducted to test the hypothesis that patients with ventricular dyssynchrony created by permanent pacing would develop HF, as shown by new HF hospitalizations or HF-related deaths, at a higher rate than matched controls.

  16. A blended sensor restores chronotropic response more favorably than an accelerometer alone in pacemaker patients: the LIFE study results.

    PubMed

    Coman, James; Freedman, Roger; Koplan, Bruce A; Reeves, Russell; Santucci, Peter; Stolen, Kira Q; Kraus, Stacia M; Meyer, Timothy E

    2008-11-01

    Adaptive rate sensors used in permanent pacemakers incorporate an accelerometer (XL) to increase heart rate with activity. Limited data exists regarding the relative benefit of a blended sensor (BS) (XL and minute ventilation) versus XL alone in restoring chronotropic response (CR) in chronotropically incompetent (CI) patients. One thousand five hundred thirty-eight patients from the limiting chronotropic incompetence for pacemaker recipients (LIFE) study were implanted with a pacemaker and 1,256 patients had data collected at 1 month. Patients performed a treadmill test 1-month postimplant while programmed in nonrate responsive mode (DDD-60) to determine CI. Only patients who completed at least three exercise stages and achieved a peak perceived exertion >or=16 were included in the analyses. The metabolic chronotropic relationship (MCR) slope was used to evaluate CR in 547 patients. Patients were randomized to XL or BS with a conservative fixed rate response factor (XL = 8, MV = 4). CI patients performed a follow-up 6-month treadmill test. CI prevalence in this patient population (n = 547) was 34%. No differences in baseline characteristics existed between groups. Although both groups showed significant within-group improvements in MCR slope from 1 to 6 months (both P < 0.001), the BS group had a significantly higher MCR slope at 6 months compared to the XL group (P = 0.011). Improvement in quality of life (QOL) did not differ between groups. In this general pacemaker population with CI, a BS programmed empirically restores CR more favorably than an XL sensor programmed nominally. Further studies are needed to determine if individual sensor optimization would lead to improvement in functional capacity, higher MCR slopes, and QOL.

  17. The epidemiology of pacemaker implantation in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, B G; Gross, T P; Kaczmarek, R G; Hamilton, P; Hamburger, S

    1995-01-01

    Data on pacemaker implantation were obtained from the Medical Device Implant Supplement to the 1988 National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative, population-based survey of 47,485 households (122,310 persons). The survey yielded an estimate of 456,482 noninstitutionalized adults with pacemakers (prevalence, 2.6 per 1,000). Prevalence rose significantly with age, from 0.4 per 1,000 among persons ages 18-64 to 26 per 1,000 among those ages 75 or older. Age-adjusted prevalence in males was 1.5 times that in females, and in whites 1.6 times that in nonwhites, although these differences were of borderline statistical significance. Prevalence did not vary significantly by region of residence, educational level, or income, but was significantly increased (more than threefold) in those reporting any activity limitation compared with those with no limitation. Fifteen percent of pacemakers in use were replacements; about one-fifth of these had been replaced more than twice. Sixty percent of previous pacemakers had been in place for at least 5 years. These data provide the first nationwide, population-based estimates of the epidemiology of pacemaker implantation, focusing particularly on the demographics of U.S. pacemaker recipients. PMID:7838942

  18. [Pets as permanent excretors of zoonoses pathogens].

    PubMed

    Mayr, B

    1993-02-01

    When scrutinizing zoonoses with regard to risks for human beings, the spectrum of pathogens with dogs, cats and birds leading to persistent infections and consequently to the fact that the animals become carriers and permanent excretors is relatively small. Most of the zoonoses cause clinical symptoms and will be taken care of correspondingly. With regard to dogs there is a multitude of persistent infections that are transferred from the pet to the human being and vice versa. In reality, however, the importance of the dog as permanent excretor of zoonosis pathogens endangering human health is minimal, except for some parasitoses. As far as cats are concerned, the situation is totally different. Cats are carriers and permanent excretors of pasteurella, the pathogens of the so-called cat-scratch disease, trichophyton and microsporum species, toxoplasmosis and orthopox viruses. The new zoonosis feline pox serves as an example of the necessity of a permanent observation of persistently infected pets. Healthy, but persistently infected birds form a source of infection not to be underestimated. Through the beat of their wings they constantly stir up dried infectious excrements and dust and thus favour the airborn infection of human beings. Chlamydia psittaci, the Newcastle disease virus and Mycobacterium avium are of major importance in this context. The risk of transferring zoonosis pathogens from persistently infected pets to human beings can be minimized through prophylactic diagnosis, strict measures of hygiene, observation of the schedule of vaccinations for the respective species and regular use of anthelmintica.

  19. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position statement on the perioperative management of patients with implanted pacemakers, defibrillators, and neurostimulating devices.

    PubMed

    Healey, Jeff S; Merchant, Richard; Simpson, Chris; Tang, Timothy; Beardsall, Marianne; Tung, Stanley; Fraser, Jennifer A; Long, Laurene; van Vlymen, Janet M; Manninen, Pirjo; Ralley, Fiona; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Yee, Raymond; Prasloski, Bruce; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Philippon, François

    2012-01-01

    There are more than 200,000 Canadians living with permanent pacemakers or implantable defibrillators, many of whom will require surgery or invasive procedures each year. They face potential hazards when undergoing surgery; however, with appropriate planning and education of operating room personnel, adverse device-related outcomes should be rare. This joint position statement from the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) and the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society (CAS) has been developed as an accessible reference for physicians and surgeons, providing an overview of the key issues for the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of these patients. The document summarizes the limited published literature in this field, but for most issues, relies heavily on the experience of the cardiologists and anesthesiologists who contributed to this work. This position statement outlines how to obtain information about an individual's type of pacemaker or implantable defibrillator and its programming. It also stresses the importance of determining if a patient is highly pacemaker-dependent and proposes a simple approach for nonelective evaluation of dependency. Although the document provides a comprehensive list of the intraoperative issues facing these patients, there is a focus on electromagnetic interference resulting from electrocautery and practical guidance is given regarding the characteristics of surgery, electrocautery, pacemakers, and defibrillators which are most likely to lead to interference. The document stresses the importance of preoperative consultation and planning to minimize complications. It reviews the relative merits of intraoperative magnet use vs reprogramming of devices and gives examples of situations where one or the other approach is preferable.

  20. Permanent Contraception for Women.

    PubMed

    Patil, Eva; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2016-05-01

    Permanent contraception is a highly desired and commonly used contraceptive option for women around the world who desire never to become pregnant. Current methods of female permanent contraception require surgery. Postpartum tubal ligation and interval surgical tubal ligation are safe and effective, do not interfere with menstrual cycles, and require no ongoing cost or medical checkups. Hysteroscopic tubal occlusion offers a less invasive surgical approach, but requires an imaging study for verification of correct placement. However, not all women have access to a surgeon trained to provide permanent contraception, or they may face other prohibitive logistic or financial burdens. The development of novel permanent contraception methods that are immediately effective and/or nonsurgical could help improve access to and acceptability of permanent contraception. The expansion of permanent contraception options could help women achieve their family planning goals and reduce unintended pregnancies.

  1. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  2. Oscillating Permanent Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, M. M.; Haines, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways to partially levitate permanent magnets. Computes field line geometries and oscillation frequencies. Provides several diagrams illustrating the mechanism of the oscillation. (YP)

  3. 77 FR 39924 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Cardiovascular Permanent Pacemaker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... device to meet the statute's approval requirements and the benefits to the public from the use of the... benefit to the public from the use of the device; (3) an opportunity for the submission of comments on the... premarket approval requirements of the FD&C Act, and the benefits to the public from use of the device....

  4. Association between hospital procedure volume and early complications after pacemaker implantation: results from a large, unselected, contemporary cohort of the German nationwide obligatory external quality assurance programme.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Bernd; Tasche, Karl; Barnewold, Linda; Heller, Günther; Schmidt, Boris; Bordignon, Stefano; Chun, K R Julian; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Mehta, Rajendra H

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated an inverse relationship between cardioverter-defibrillator implantation volume and complication rates, suggesting better outcomes for higher volume centres. However, the association of institutional procedural volume with patient outcomes for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation remains less known, especially in decentralized implantation systems. We performed retrospective examination of data on patients undergoing PPM from the German obligatory quality assurance programme (2007-12) to evaluate the relationship of hospital PPM volume (categorized into quintiles of their mean annual volume) with risk-adjusted in-hospital surgical complications (composite of pneumothorax, haemothorax, pericardial effusion, or pocket haematoma, all requiring intervention, or device infection) and pacemaker lead dislocation. Overall 430 416 PPM implantations were documented in 1226 hospitals. Systems included dual (72.8%) and single (25.8%) chamber PPM and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices (1.1%). Complications included surgical (0.92%), and ventricular (0.99%), and atrial (1.22%) lead dislocation. Despite an increase in relatively complex procedures (dual chamber, CRT), there was a significant decrease in the procedural and fluoroscopy times and complications from lowest to highest implantation volume quintiles (P for trend <0.0001). The greatest difference was observed between the lowest (1-50 implantations/year-reference group) and the second-lowest (51-90 implantations/year) quintile: surgical complications [odds ratio (OR) 0.69; confidence interval (CI) 0.60-0.78], atrial lead dislocations (OR 0.69; CI 0.59-0.80), and ventricular lead dislocations (OR 0.73; CI 0.63-0.84). Hospital annual PPM volume was directly related to indication-based implantation of relatively more complex PPM and yet inversely with procedural times and rates of early surgical complications and lead dislocations. Thus, our data suggest better performance and lower

  5. Clinical benefits of remote versus transtelephonic monitoring of implanted pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Crossley, George H; Chen, Jane; Choucair, Wassim; Cohen, Todd J; Gohn, Douglas C; Johnson, W Ben; Kennedy, Eleanor E; Mongeon, Luc R; Serwer, Gerald A; Qiao, Hongyan; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2009-11-24

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate remote pacemaker interrogation for the earlier diagnosis of clinically actionable events compared with traditional transtelephonic monitoring and routine in-person evaluation. Pacemaker patient follow-up procedures have evolved from evaluating devices with little programmability and diagnostic information solely in person to transtelephonic rhythm strip recordings that allow monitoring of basic device function. More recently developed remote monitoring technology leverages expanded device capabilities, augmenting traditional transtelephonic monitoring to evaluate patients via full device interrogation. The time to first diagnosis of a clinically actionable event was compared in patients who were followed by remote interrogation (Remote) and those who were followed per standard of care with office visits augmented by transtelephonic monitoring (Control). Patients were randomized 2:1. Remote arm patients transmitted pacemaker information at 3-month intervals. Control arm patients with a single-chamber pacemaker transmitted at 2-month intervals. Control arm patients with dual-chamber devices transmitted at 2-month intervals with an office visit at 6 months. All patients were seen in office at 12 months. The mean time to first diagnosis of clinically actionable events was earlier in the Remote arm (5.7 months) than in the Control arm (7.7 months). Three (2%) of the 190 events in the Control arm and 446 (66%) of 676 events in the Remote arm were identified remotely. The strategic use of remote pacemaker interrogation follow-up detects actionable events that are potentially important more quickly and more frequently than transtelephonic rhythm strip recordings. The use of transtelephonic rhythm strips for pacemaker follow-up is of little value except for battery status determinations. (PREFER [Pacemaker Remote Follow-up Evaluation and Review]; NCT00294645).

  6. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  7. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators for implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovalov, A.A.; Bovin, A.V.; Fedorets, V.I.; Shapovalov, V.P.

    1986-08-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of long-life lithium batteries and the problems associated with miniature radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RITEG) with service lives of 10 years or longer. On eof the main problems encountered when devising a radioisotope heat source (RHS) for an RITEG is to obtain biomedical /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ with a specific neutron yield of 3.10/sup 3/-4.10/sup 3/ (g /SUP ./ sec)/sup -1/, equivalent to metallic Pu 238, and with a content of gamma impurities sufficient to ensure a permissible exposure a permissible exposure does rate (EDR) of a mixture of neutron and gamma radiation. After carrying out the isotope exchange and purifying the initial sample of its gamma impurity elements, the authors obtain biomedical Pu 238 satisfying the indicated requirements king suitable for use in the power packs of medical devices. Taking the indicated specifications into account, the Ritm-1o and gamma radioisotope heat sources were designed, built, tested in models and under natural conditions, and then into production as radioisotope thermoelectric generators designed to power the electronic circuits of implanted pacemakers. The Ritm-MT and Gemma radioisotope thermoelectric generators described are basic units, which can be used as self-contained power supplies for electronic equipment with power requirements in the micromilliwatt range.

  8. [Right heart failure after pacemaker implantation].

    PubMed

    Gallego Galiana, Juan; López Castellanos, Genoveva; Gioia, Francesca; Ruiz Ortega, Raúl Antonio; Cobo Reinoso, Maria Eugenia; Manzano Espinosa, Luis

    2015-06-22

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) secondary to interference pacemaker (PM) cable is a rare cause of progressive right heart failure (HF), which can worsen patient outcomes. We present 3 clinical cases of right HF secondary to TR after PM implantation. In these patients the clinic is right HF, which can appear early, as in our second patient, or after years of implementation of the PM, as in the first and third patients. The diagnosis is confirmed by echocardiography, the most accurate 3D, followed by transesophageal. The 2D transthoracic can not detect it, because it has low sensitivity for TR associated with PM. Medical treatment is always the first choice, since any other procedure carries significant morbidity and mortality. Probably this is a condition that we will diagnose with increasing frequency, because there are more and more patients with devices and, at the same time, the diagnostic tools are improving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  10. Permanent tensions in organization.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Noora

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change. This study used paradox theory and a case study. The case organization is a public university hospital in Finland involving several stakeholders. The analysis suggests that the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change is a paradox that is part of organizational reality. As an organization learns to live with its permanent tensions, the renewal paradox settles into equilibrium. When tensions are provoked, the paradox is disturbed until it finds a new balance. This flexible nature of the paradox is the force that keeps the different stakeholders simultaneously empowered to maintain their unique missions and cohesive in order to benefit from the larger synergy. This research suggests that identification and evaluation of each permanent tension within an organization is important when executing organizational change. The fact that certain tensions are permanent and cannot be solved may have an influence on how planned change initiatives are executed. The results show that permanent tensions may be harnessed for the benefit of an organizational change. This research demonstrates originality by offering an alternative view of tensions, a view which emphasizes not only their permanent and plural nature but their importance for enabling the organization to change at its own, non-disruptive pace. The research also proposes a new concept, the "renewal paradox", to enhance understanding of the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change.

  11. Permanent Draft Genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain CcI49, a Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Isolated from Casuarina cunninghamiana that Infects Elaeagnaceae.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Samira; Swanson, Erik; McNutt, Zakkary; Pesce, Céline; Harrington, Kelsey; Abebe-Alele, Feseha; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Thomas, W Kelley; Tisa, Louis S

    2017-01-01

    Frankia sp. strain CcI49 was isolated from Casuarina cunninghamiana nodules. However the strain was unable to re-infect Casuarina, but was able to infect other actinorhizal plants including Elaeagnaceae. Here, we report the 9.8-Mbp draft genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CcI49 with a G+C content of 70.5 % and 7,441 candidate protein-encoding genes. Analysis of the genome revealed the presence of a bph operon involved in the degradation of biphenyls and polychlorinated biphenyls.

  12. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  13. Sacral Neuromodulation in Patients With a Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe our experience using sacral neuromodulation to treat urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, and chronic urinary retention in patients with cardiac pacemakers. With the increasingly widespread use of InterStim for bladder function restoration, we are seeing more complex patients with multiple comorbidities, including cardiac conditions. Herein, we report 3 cases of individuals with cardiac pacemakers who underwent InterStim implantation to treat urinary conditions. This study is a case series of 3 patients with cardiac pacemakers who underwent sacral neuromodulation to treat refractory voiding dysfunction. The initial patient screening for InterStim therapy involved percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE), in which a temporary untined lead wire was placed through the S3 foramen. Patients who did not respond to PNE proceeded to a staged implant. All patients in this study had a greater than 50% improvement of their urinary symptoms during the initial trial and underwent placement of the InterStim implantable pulse generator (IPG). Postoperative programming was done under electrocardiogram monitoring by a cardiologist. No interference was observed between the Inter-Stim IPG and the cardiac pacemaker. In this group of patients, sacral neuromodulation in the presence of a cardiac pacemaker appears to have been safe. PMID:27706012

  14. Electrocardiographic "pacemaker pseudo-spikes" and radio frequency interference.

    PubMed

    Cleland, M J; Crosby, E T

    1997-07-01

    To present a case of apparent interference of an ECG monitor by radiofrequency interference (RFI) and to provide a brief review of RFI issues to critical care medicine. A 74-yr-old woman, with an implanted pacemaker, underwent major spinal surgery. In the post-anaesthesia care unit, the cardiac monitor demonstrated graphic evidence of pacemaker malfunction but there was no apparent effect on the patient. Investigation by the hospital's biomedical personnel led to the conclusion that RFI was being interpreted by the monitor as abnormal pacemaker activity. With the emergence of portable, battery-operated communication devices, there is an increased risk of RFI within hospitals. Antennas and repeaters are required to receive and boost the signal levels of these devices to improve signal quality. They are located throughout hospitals and may be situated near patient care areas. Patient monitors may receive these signals, misinterpret them as being patient-generated and output erroneous information. In the case described, the monitor was presented with RFI signals and interpreted as pacemaker spikes, generating a tracing suggestive of pacemaker malfunction. Troubleshooting strategies and minimizing the potential impacts of RFI on patient monitors are discussed.

  15. Pacemaker follow-up and adequacy of Medicare guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vallario, L E; Leman, R B; Gillette, P C; Kratz, J M

    1988-07-01

    The time of occurrence of cardiac pacemaker problems after implantation was identified to assess the adequacy of published federal guidelines for clinic and transtelephonic follow-up. One hundred eighty-nine pacemaker patients' charts were examined retrospectively to identify pacemaker problems: inadequate sensing, non-capture, battery failure, myoinhibition, muscle stimulation, and inadequate threshold safety margin. Twenty-nine patients (15%) were identified as having pacemaker problems. A total of 41 problems were identified, of which 28 (68%) were corrected by reprogramming. Sixty-one percent of the problems were found during a clinic visit. Problems occurred more frequently during the first year in dual-chamber devices (62%) vs single-chamber devices (35%). During years 1 to 4, when few problems are expected, 30% of all problems of single-chamber devices occurred and 39% of all problems of dual-chamber devices occurred. This is a period of time that Medicare guidelines allow for one clinic visit per year for single- and two visits per year for dual-chamber devices. These data suggest: (1) Many pacemaker problems will be missed with transtelephonic follow-up alone. (2) The majority of problems involving dual-chamber devices occurred in the first year. (3) For both dual- and single-chamber devices, an unexpected significant percentage of problems occurred in 1 to 4 years. (4) Medicare guidelines may be inadequate for follow-up during this time period.

  16. Permanent cardiac pacing in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Kuan; Lin, Kuo-Hung; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-12-01

    Studies investigating the risk of cardiac dysrhythmia warranting permanent pacemaker therapy for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are limited. This study investigated the incidence rate of permanent cardiac pacing in dialysis patients. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database, we identified 28 471 newly diagnosed ESRD patients in 2000-2010 [9700 on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 18 771 on hemodialysis (HD)] and 113 769 randomly selected controls without kidney disease, frequency-matched by sex, age and diagnosis date. We also established propensity score-matched HD and PD cohorts with 9700 patients each. Incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) of implantation were evaluated by the end of 2011. Complications were also evaluated among patients with implantation. The incidence rates of permanent pacemaker implantation were 5.93- and 3.50-fold greater in HD and PD patients than in controls (1.44 and 0.85 versus 0.24 per 1000 person-years, respectively). The adjusted HRs (aHRs) of implantation were 3.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.41-4.42] and 2.36 (95% CI = 1.56-3.58) for HD and PD patients, respectively, compared with controls. The pacemaker implantation rate was 0.33 per 1000 person-years greater in the propensity score-matched HD cohort than in the PD cohort, with an aHR of 1.30 (95% CI = 0.82-2.05) for the HD cohort compared with the PD cohort. Dialysis patients are at an increased risk of dysrhythmia requiring pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. The risks are not significantly different between HD and PD patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  17. Pacemaker therapy in patients with neurally mediated syncope and documented asystole: Third International Study on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology (ISSUE-3): a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Brignole, Michele; Menozzi, Carlo; Moya, Angel; Andresen, Dietrich; Blanc, Jean Jacques; Krahn, Andrew D; Wieling, Wouter; Beiras, Xulio; Deharo, Jean Claude; Russo, Vitantonio; Tomaino, Marco; Sutton, Richard

    2012-05-29

    The efficacy of cardiac pacing for prevention of syncopal recurrences in patients with neurally mediated syncope is controversial. We wanted to determine whether pacing therapy reduces syncopal recurrences in patients with severe asystolic neurally mediated syncope. Double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study conducted in 29 centers in the Third International Study on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology (ISSUE-3) trial. Patients were ≥40 years, had experienced ≥3 syncopal episodes in the previous 2 years. Initially, 511 patients, received an implantable loop recorder; 89 of these had documentation of syncope with ≥3 s asystole or ≥6 s asystole without syncope within 12 ± 10 months and met criteria for pacemaker implantation; 77 of 89 patients were randomly assigned to dual-chamber pacing with rate drop response or to sensing only. The data were analyzed on intention-to-treat principle. There was syncope recurrence during follow-up in 27 patients, 19 of whom had been assigned to pacemaker OFF and 8 to pacemaker ON. The 2-year estimated syncope recurrence rate was 57% (95% CI, 40-74) with pacemaker OFF and 25% (95% CI, 13-45) with pacemaker ON (log rank: P=0.039 at the threshold of statistical significance of 0.04). The risk of recurrence was reduced by 57% (95% CI, 4-81). Five patients had procedural complications: lead dislodgment in 4 requiring correction and subclavian vein thrombosis in 1 patient. Dual-chamber permanent pacing is effective in reducing recurrence of syncope in patients ≥40 years with severe asystolic neurally mediated syncope. The observed 32% absolute and 57% relative reduction in syncope recurrence support this invasive treatment for the relatively benign neurally mediated syncope. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00359203.

  18. Positional convulsant syncope in a pacemaker patient following insulation break of the right ventricular lead

    PubMed Central

    Ben Lassoued, Mehdi; Baatour, Makram; Haggui, Abdeddayem; Lamine, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the advances made in the technology of pacemakers which resulted in a decrease in the incidence of pacemaker lead fracture, the latter remains a potential complication of implanted pacemakers manufactured in the early days. In this report, we present a case of fracture of the unipolar electrode diagnosed by an emergency physician in a patient on a pacemaker for 10 years who presented to the emergency department with positional convulsant syncopes. PMID:24827652

  19. Pacemakers: some of the risks and complications you are not warned about.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Ann

    2008-10-01

    Pacemaker technology has advanced rapidly over the last decade. A lot of everyday interference can be regarded as transient. The media tend to cover stories of relatively insignificant transient interference incurred by pacemaker wearers while many manuals gloss over the high risks, some potentially life-threatening. These include the reliability of pacemakers and the use of monopolar diathermy which can generate electromagnetic interference, potentially causing a pacemaker to malfunction.

  20. Two pacing spikes on the QRS complex in a single-chamber pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Dinesh; Sundaram, Shunmuga; Thajudeen, Anees; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2012-01-01

    AutoCapture algorithm helps the pacemakers to automatically adjust output close to the pacing threshold. This algorithm monitors the evoked response signal of myocardial depolarization, and delivers a high output back-up pulse if there is a loss of capture. This case, with two pacemaker spikes on the QRS complexes in a patient with VVI pacemaker, simulating a sensing failure, demands clear understanding of AutoCapture function before labeling the pacemaker malfunction. PMID:23102397

  1. 77 FR 37573 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for an Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Approval for an Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... protocol (PDP) for implantable pacemaker pulse generators. The Agency has summarized its findings regarding... PMA or notice of completion of a PDP for the implantable pacemaker pulse generator. In accordance with...

  2. 76 FR 44872 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for an Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule... preamendments device implantable pacemaker pulse generator. The Agency is also summarizing its proposed findings...). IV. Device Subject to This Proposal--Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator (21 CFR 870.3610) A...

  3. Radioisotope-powered cardiac pacemaker program. Clinical studies of the nuclear pacemaker model NU-5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Beginning in February, 1970, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) undertook a program to design, develop and manufacture a radioisotope powered cardiac pacemaker system. The scope of technical work was specified to be: establish system, component, and process cost reduction goals using the prototype Radioisotope Powered Cardiac Pacemaker (RCP) design and develop production techniques to achieve these cost reduction objectives; fabricate radioisotope powered fueled prototype cardiac pacemakers (RCP's) on a pilot production basis; conduct liaison with a Government-designated fueling facility for purposes of defining fueling requirements, fabrication and encapsulation procedures, safety design criteria and quality control and inspection requirements; develop and implement Quality Assurance and Reliability Programs; conduct performance, acceptance, lifetime and reliability tests of fueled RCP's in the laboratory; conduct liaison with the National Institutes of Health and with Government specified medical research institutions selected for the purpose of undertaking clinical evaluation of the RCP in humans; monitor and evaluate, on a continuing basis, all test data; and perform necessary safety analyses and tests. Pacemaker designs were developed and quality assurance and manufacturing procedures established. Prototype pacemakers were fabricated. A total of 126 radioisotope powered units were implanted and have been followed clinically for approximately seven years. Four (4) of these units have failed. Eighty-three (83) units remain implanted and satisfactorily operational. An overall failure rate of less than the target 0.15% per month has been achieved.

  4. [New conduction disturbances and pacemaker indications after CoreValve® transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Incidence and follow up in a single center experience].

    PubMed

    Aversa, Eliana; Muratore, Claudio A; Nemesio, M Laura; Tentori, Maria Cristina; Payaslian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is currently reserved for patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. One major limiting factor related to TAVI procedural complications is conduction abnormalities and the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. Evaluate the incidence of new conduction disturbances and pacemaker indications in patients with TAVI CoreValve® prosthesis (Medtronic Inc. Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). We included 28 patients, mean age 80 years. ECG parameters were evaluated previous and after implantation. All patients were monitorized during TAVI. Follow up Holter monitoring was performed at one, 6 and 12 months after the procedure and we also evaluated telemetry of implanted pacemaker. In previous ECG we found 7 patients had right bundle branch block and 7 patients had left bundle brunch block (LBBB). The post implant ECG showed 7 new LBBB: 3 during valvuloplasty and 4 on the end of it. Six patients required pacemaker implantation for permanent or paroxysmal complete AV block (CAVB). At one year follow up, 3 patients with LBBB during valvuloplasty had a normal ECG, one still had LBBB and one an asymptomatic CAVB found in Holter monitoring. Conduction abnormalities are frequent after CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis implantation. The incidence of new LBBB was 25%. CAVB during or post TAVI require PM implantation. New LBBB may need a closer follow up because in a 3% of the cases it may progress to CAVB. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Ductal carcinoma of the breast in the pacemaker generator's pocket.

    PubMed

    Zonca, P; Herokova, J; Cambal, M; Jacobi, C A

    2009-01-01

    Authors present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with invasive ductal adenocarcinoma in the pacemaker, s pocket. A decubitus-like tumor had developed in this place, and has been missinterpretated as a benign lesion for 5 months. Diagnosis was done with a time delay. An excisional biopsy revealed annvasive ductal adenocarcinoma. The first step was the implantation of a new pacemaker generator performed on the opposite side. The second step was a modified radical mastectomy, according to Madden, and the removal of the originally implanted pacemaker generator. Radiotherapy and hormonal adjuvant therapy were applied after surgery. The patient was followed-up at an out-patient clinic, and died 25 months after diagnosis because of generalization of the disease (Fig. 2, Ref. 35). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  6. TASER conducted electrical weapons and implanted pacemakers and defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Vanga, Subba R; Bommana, Sudharani; Kroll, Mark W; Swerdlow, Charles; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2009-01-01

    Conducted electrical weapons (CEW) have generated controversy in recent years regarding their effect on heart rhythm and on their suspected interaction with implanted devices such as the pacemakers and ICDs (implantable cardioverter defibrillators). We review the current evidence available on device interactions and pre-sent a new case series of 6 patients. We used the available case reports and animal studies on TASER or CEW related publications in PubMed. Oversensing of TASER CEW discharges may cause noise reversion pacing in pacemakers and inappropriate detection of VF in ICDs. The nominal 5-second discharge is sufficiently short that neither clinically significant inhibition of bradycardia pacing nor inappropriate ICD shocks have been reported. Current evidence indicates that CEW discharges do not have adverse effects on pacemakers and ICDs.

  7. Prophylactic pacemaker implantation in familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Dinanian, Sylvie; Juin, Christophe; Chemla, Denis; Bennani, Soumiya L; Sebag, Claude; Planté, Violaine; Le Guludec, Dominique; Samuel, Didier; Adams, David; Slama, Michel S

    2012-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomic dominant disease with a high rate of conduction disorders and increased risk of sudden death. Prophylactic cardiac pacing may be considered in asymptomatic patients with FAP. However, the potential benefits are unknown. To document conduction disorders in a large series of FAP and the incidence of high-degree atrioventricular (AV) block in patients with prophylactic pacemaker (PM). From January 1999 to January 2010, 262 patients with FAP were retrospectively evaluated. Prophylactic PM was implanted in patients with His-ventricular interval ≥ 70 ms, His-ventricular interval >55 ms associated with a fascicular block, a first-degree AV block, or a Wenckebach anterograde point ≤ 100 beats/min. The spontaneous AV conduction was then analyzed by temporarily inhibiting the PM. As compared with patients with prophylactic PM (n = 100) and patients implanted given a class I/IIa indication (n = 18), the patients who did not require PM (n = 144) were younger and displayed less severe cardiac involvement. Follow-up after prophylactic PM implantation was analyzed in 95 of the 100 patients over 45 ± 35 months, and a high-degree AV block was documented in 24 of the 95 patients (25%). The risk of high-degree AV block was higher in patients with first-degree AV block or Wenckebach anterograde point ≤ 100 beats/min (hazard ratio 3.5; 95% confidence interval 1.2-10) while microvoltage on surface electrocardiogram reduced the risk (hazard ratio 0.2; 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.7). In FAP with conduction disorders, prophylactic PM implantation prevented major cardiac events in 25% of the patients over a 45-month mean follow-up. It is suggested that prophylactic PM implantation prevented symptomatic bradycardia in these patients. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Yao, Xiaoxi; Schilz, Stephanie; Van Houten, Holly; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Friedman, Paul A; Packer, Douglas L; Noseworthy, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction requiring pacemaker implantation is commonly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but may not be clinically apparent until restoration of sinus rhythm with ablation or cardioversion. We sought to determine frequency, time course, and predictors for pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation, and to compare the overall rates to a matched cardioversion cohort. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a large US commercial insurance database and identified 12,158 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2012. Over an average of 2.4 years of follow-up, 5.6 % of the patients underwent pacemaker implantation. Using the Cox proportional hazards models, we found that risk of risks of pacemaker implantation was associated with older age (50-64 and ≥65 versus <50 years), female gender, higher CHADS2 score (≥2 and 1 versus 0), higher Charlson index (≥2 versus 0-1), certain baseline comorbidities (conduction disorder, coronary atherosclerosis, and congestive heart failure), and the year of ablation. There was no significant difference in the risk of pacemaker implantation between ablation patients and propensity score (PS)-matched cardioversion groups (3.5 versus. 4.1 % at 1 year and 8.8 versus 8.3 % at 5 years). Overall, pacemaker implantation occurs in about 1/28 patients within 1 year of catheter ablation. The overall implantation rate decreased between 2005 and 2012. Furthermore, the risk after ablation is similar to cardioversion, suggesting that patients require pacing due to a common underlying electrophysiologic substrate, rather than the ablation itself.

  9. Interference with the pacemakers of two workers at electricity substations.

    PubMed Central

    Butrous, G S; Bexton, R S; Barton, D G; Male, J C; Camm, A J

    1983-01-01

    Pacemaker function was tested in two electricity substation workers exposed to high tension electric fields. High intensity electric fields induced reversion to the interference mode, producing in one case competitive rhythm and in the other inappropriately slow pacing which resulted in asymptomatic pauses of up to 2.5 s. A suit designed to shield the body from the effects of high intensity electric fields was tried and proved to be effective in protecting the pacemaker, allowing it to function normally in the substations. Images PMID:6626476

  10. [Stored electrograms in pacemakers and ICDs from St. Jude Medical].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W

    2010-03-01

    Stored electrograms (EGMs) significantly improve pacemaker and ICD therapy. In pacemaker systems, the main focus of stored EGMs concerns the manual control of device detection of atrial tachyarrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation. In ICD therapy, stored EGMs allow the discrimination of adequate and inadequate detection of ventricular tachycardia. This review presents the implementation of stored EGMs in systems from St. Jude Medical and explains the mode of EGM storage and marker annotations, which are useful for interpretation of stored EGMs and to understand the way the device interprets the EGM. Clinical examples illustrate appropriate and inappropriate device classifications.

  11. Dosimetry of portable image intensifiers in pacemaker insertions.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Malsky, S J; Blatt, C J; Greenberg, E I; Pochaczevsky, R; Simon, D F; Perez, L A

    1975-01-01

    With the increased utilization of portable image intensifiers for pacemaker insertions, an investigation of the radiation hazards to operative personnel was undertaken. The personnel were tested first utilizing a Rando phantom and later during actual pacemaker insertions. Studies of medical personnel show the critical organs to be the thyroid (approximately 15mR per procedure) and the lens of the eye (approximately 13mR per procedure). While the MPD/week was not exceeded, the radiation dosage was substantial and could increase under operating conditions other than those measured. Recommendations to insure safer operation of this equipment are presented.

  12. Unravelling the (arte)fact of increased pacemaker rate with the Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve.

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Giuseppe; Mojoli, Marco; Purita, Paola; Napodano, Massimo; D'Onofrio, Augusto; Frigo, Annachiara; Covolo, Elisa; Facchin, Michela; Isabella, Giambattista; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino

    2015-07-01

    Early data on the Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve (S3-THV) have shown low rates of paravalvular leaks and vascular complications but relatively high 30-day permanent pacemaker implantation (PPMI) rates. No direct comparisons on clinical outcomes including PPMI rates are available for the S3-THV and the Edwards SAPIEN XT (XT-THV). We aimed to compare the 30-day PPMI rates in patients treated with the two prostheses and to assess the interplay among valve type, depth of implantation and PPMI rate. Two hundred and nine patients treated by TAVI were considered. The S3-THV was associated with higher PPMI rates compared to the XT-THV, both overall and in subgroups matched for several predictors of PPMI. However, in the S3-THV group, 30-day PPMI was strictly associated with deep valve implantation, and PPMI risk of high-implanted S3-THVs was similar to that of the overall XT-THV matched group. No cases of significant paravalvular leak were observed in the S3-THV group. The S3-THV was associated with a higher incidence of PPMI compared to the XT-THV. In the S3-THV group, pacemaker implantation was strictly associated with deep valve implantation. An implantation technique involving higher initial placement of the central marker (from 0 to 3 mm above the base of the aortic cusps) and, as a consequence, higher final valve depth might help in preventing post-TAVI PPMI with the S3-THV, without affecting the risk of paravalvular leak.

  13. Pacemaker registration electronic-card. A proposal for a computerised system of storing of the pacemaker registration card.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, V; Bedini, R; Bosi, C; Ialongo, D

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an example of a computerised system dedicated to store an Emergency Health Card into a compact and portable memory support such as the CMOS RAM CARD. Details are given from the system used and of the program developed for this task. In particular, patient, pacemaker and lead data are stored by the prototype system. The acquisition layout is similar to that of the European pacemaker registration card but some other sections are added. The possibilities of an introduction of a card system like this on E.E.C. countries is discussed.

  14. An unusual case of pacemaker failure: complete disconnection of connector block and battery of a subpectorally implanted dual chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Mellert, Fritz; Esmailzadeh, Bahman; Schneider, Christian; Haushofer, Marcus; Schimpf, Rainer; Wolpert, Christian; Preusse, Claus J; Lüderitz, Berndt; Welz, Armin

    2002-04-01

    Local trauma to patients with implanted pacemaker devices may result in lead fracture or breakage of the lead socket with leakage of fluid into the connector system. This report describes an unusual case of complete entrance and exit block in a subpectorally implanted dual chamber pacemaker due to total disconnection and dislodgement of header block and battery part. Damage may be caused by an interaction of machine fatigue/manufacturing defective and fixation of the header with unusual movability of the battery, leading to breakage with intermittent malfunction and consecutive bradycardia and syncope.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of electric fields on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, A.J.; Carstensen, E.

    1985-02-01

    The effects of extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line electric fields on pacemaker function were evaluated in 11 patients with seven different implanted pacemaker models from four manufacturers. Alteration in pacemaker function was demonstrated in five unipolar units (three different models) from two manufacturers during exposure to electric fields ranging from 2 to 9 kV/m, with total body currents from 47 to 175 ..mu..A. These electric fields and body currents are representative of values that can be encountered by individuals standing beneath EHV transmission lines. Transient alterations in pacemaker function observed in this study included inappropriate triggered activity, inhibition of impulse generation, reduction in rate, and reversion from demand to asynchronous mode. Electromagnetic interference from high voltage transmission lines can induce alterations in pacemaker function in certain designs of these devices. However, pacemaker manufacturers can incorporate appropriate circuits in the pacemaker design to eliminate this problem. 8 references.

  16. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimization of cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Barker, Chris; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Mereacre, Alexandru; Paoletti, Nicola; Patane, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers are medical devices that can monitor and correct abnormal heart rhythms. To provide the necessary safety assurance for pacemaker software, both testing and verification of the code, as well as testing the entire pacemaker hardware in the loop, is necessary. In this paper, we present a hardware testbed that enables detailed hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimisation of pacemaker algorithms with respect to a heart model. Both the heart and the pacemaker models are encoded in Simulink/Stateflow™ and translated into executable code, with the pacemaker executed directly on the microcontroller. We evaluate the usefulness of the testbed by developing a parameter synthesis algorithm which optimises the timing parameters based on power measurements acquired in real-time. The experiments performed on real measurements successfully demonstrate that the testbed is capable of energy minimisation in real-time and obtains safe pacemaker timing parameters.

  17. Differentially Timed Extracellular Signals Synchronize Pacemaker Neuron Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ben; Kaplan, Harris S.; Cavey, Matthieu; Lelito, Katherine R.; Bahle, Andrew H.; Zhu, Zhonghua; Macara, Ann Marie; Roman, Gregg; Shafer, Orie T.; Blau, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity is vital for complex processes like behavior. Circadian pacemaker neurons offer an unusual opportunity to study synchrony as their molecular clocks oscillate in phase over an extended timeframe (24 h). To identify where, when, and how synchronizing signals are perceived, we first studied the minimal clock neural circuit in Drosophila larvae, manipulating either the four master pacemaker neurons (LNvs) or two dorsal clock neurons (DN1s). Unexpectedly, we found that the PDF Receptor (PdfR) is required in both LNvs and DN1s to maintain synchronized LNv clocks. We also found that glutamate is a second synchronizing signal that is released from DN1s and perceived in LNvs via the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluRA). Because simultaneously reducing Pdfr and mGluRA expression in LNvs severely dampened Timeless clock protein oscillations, we conclude that the master pacemaker LNvs require extracellular signals to function normally. These two synchronizing signals are released at opposite times of day and drive cAMP oscillations in LNvs. Finally we found that PdfR and mGluRA also help synchronize Timeless oscillations in adult s-LNvs. We propose that differentially timed signals that drive cAMP oscillations and synchronize pacemaker neurons in circadian neural circuits will be conserved across species. PMID:25268747

  18. [Mid-dermal elastolysis after insertion of a pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Kottler, D; Lefèvre, A; Balme, B; Martin-Bourret, V; Zaharia, D; Skowron, F

    2015-11-01

    Mid-dermal elastolysis (MDE) is a rare acquired disease of elastic tissue histologically characterized by focal loss of elastic fibres within the mid-dermis. While the mechanisms leading to MDE remain unknown, increased degradation of elastic fibres may be involved. Many factors potentially triggering such degradation have been suggested. A 58-year-old man consulted for an asymptomatic reticulated eruption that began in the area of a pacemaker implanted six weeks earlier. The eruption consisted of erythematous polycyclic and coalescing macules with a wrinkled centre. Histopathology with orcein staining revealed focal loss of elastic fibres in the superficial reticular dermis only. Hypersensitivity reaction to any components of the pacemaker was ruled out by means of allergy exploration. Laboratory investigations including autoimmunological and haematological factors were unremarkable. A diagnosis was made of a reticular variant of MDE following insertion of a pacemaker. We report the second case of MDE following the insertion of a pacemaker, which could have triggered an inflammatory response directed specifically towards the elastic fibres. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  20. How to program rate responsive pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Greco, E M; Guardini, S; Ferrario, M; Romano, S

    2000-02-01

    Because oxygen uptake (VO2) increases linearly with heart rate during exercise, the oxygen pulse reserve (OPR) method (VO2 reserve divided by heart rate reserve) may provide a valid guide for rate responsive parameter tailoring. Using custom-made software (Pacing Rate Profile Software [PRPS]) it is possible to predict the exercise pacing rate profile with significant accuracy, according to the patient's functional class when ergospirometry apparatus is not available for a cardiopulmonary stress test (CPX). PRPS for Windows is based on the OPR method and some known workload/metabolic cost of exercise relationships during effort. The present study had two aims; first, to evaluate the reliability of PRPS in accurately predicting pacing rate profiles; and second, the suitability of activity and metabolic rate responsive sensors in supplying pacing rates sufficiently near to those predicted using CPX or PRPS. To test the reliability of PRPS we studied 244 patients, NYHA Class I-II, under two different stress test protocols. In one, the bicycle protocol (25 W, 2-minute steps), we tested 137 normal patients (94 men and 43 women, mean age 67 +/- 15 years). Sixty-eight of these were simultaneously CPX tested. PRPS predicted pacing rates were matched against the patients' sinus rhythms or their theoretical CPX measured VO2 heart rates (OPR method). Linear regression analysis was highly significant (r = 0.93 and r = 0.97, respectively). The other, the treadmill protocol, consisted of three different protocols. (1) Speed Incremental Treadmill Stress Test (SITST): 57 patients underwent CPX (33 men and 24 women, mean age 67 +/- 15 years, NYHA Class I-II). All had been pacemaker implanted for SSS and/or advanced atrioventricular block (AVB). PRPS pacing rates were matched against CPX VO2 OPR calculated heart rates (r = 0.93), (linear regression analysis). (2) CAEP: 30 patients underwent CPX (26 men and 4 women, mean age 61 +/- 11 years, NYHA Class I-II). Thirteen of them had been

  1. Complication rates associated with transvenous pacemaker implantation in dogs with high-grade atrioventricular block performed during versus after normal business hours.

    PubMed

    Ward, J L; DeFrancesco, T C; Tou, S P; Atkins, C E; Griffith, E H; Keene, B W

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous pacemaker implantation in dogs is associated with a relatively high complication rate. At our institution, pacemaker implantation in dogs with high-grade atrioventricular block (HG-AVB) frequently is performed as an after-hours emergency. Among dogs with HG-AVB, the rate of major complications is higher when pacemakers are implanted after hours (AH) compared to during business hours (BH). Client-owned dogs with HG-AVB that underwent transvenous pacemaker implantation between January 2002 and December 2012 at the North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Retrospective medical record review. Two-year follow-up was required for complications analysis. Major complications occurred in 14/79 dogs (18%) and included lead dislodgement, lead or generator infection, lead or generator migration, and pacing failure. Incidence of major complications was significantly higher AH (10/36, 28%) compared to BH (4/43, 9%; P = .041), and all infectious complications occurred AH. Median survival time for all dogs was 27 months and did not differ between AH and BH groups for either all-cause (P = .70) or cardiac (P = .40) mortality. AH dogs were younger than BH dogs (P = .010), but there were no other clinically relevant differences between BH and AH groups in terms of demographic, clinical, or procedural variables. At our institution, AH transvenous pacemaker placement is associated with a higher rate of major complications (especially infections) compared to BH placement. This difference may be because of a variety of human factor differences AH versus BH. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Patient Exposure during Fluoroscopy-guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Alkhorayef, M; Sulieman, A; Babikir, E; Daar, E; Alnaaimi, M; Alduaij, M; Bradley, D

    2017-08-10

    A pacemaker, which is used for heart resynchronization with electrical impulses, is used to manage many clinical conditions. Recently, the frequency of pacemaker implantation procedures has increased to more than 50% worldwide. During this procedure, patients can be exposed to excessive radiation exposure. Wide range of doses has been reported in previous studies, suggesting that optimization of this procedure has not been fulfilled yet. The current study evaluated patient radiation exposure during cardiac pacemaker procedures and quantified the patient effective dose. A total of 145 procedures were performed for five pacemaker procedures (VVI, VVIR, VVD, VVDR, and DDDR) at two hospitals. Patient doses were measured using the kerma-area product meter. Effective doses were estimated using software based on Monte Carlo simulation from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB, now The Health Protection Agency). The effective dose values were used to estimate cancer risk from the pacemaker procedure. Patient demographic data and exposure parameters for fluoroscopy and radiography were quantified. The mean patient doses ± SD per procedure (Gycm(2)) for VVI, VVIR, VVD, VVDR, and DDDR were 1.52 ± 0.13 (1.43-1.61), 3.28 ± 2.34 (0.29-8.73), 3.04 ± 1.67 (1.57-4.86), 6.04 ± 2.326 3.29-8.58), and 8.8 ± 3.6 (4.5-26.20), respectively. The overall patient effective dose was 1.1mSv per procedure. It is obvious that the DDDR procedure exposed patients to the highest radiation dose. Patient dose variation can be attributed to procedure type, exposure parameter settings, and fluoroscopy time. The results of this study showed that patient doses during different pacemaker procedures are lower compared to previous reported values. Patient risk from pacemaker procedure is low, compared to other cardiac interventional procedures. Patients' exposures were mainly influenced by the type of procedures and the clinical indication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. Electromagnetic interference in pacemakers in single-engine fixed-wing aircraft: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    De Rotte, August A; Van Der Kemp, Peter

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the possible interference by avionics with cardiac pacemakers of aircrew or passengers/patients in single-engine fixed-wing aircraft. Pacemakers which are implanted in patients are in part electromagnetic sensors and can be subject to interference from various external electromagnetic sources. Although modern (chip-based) pacemakers are effectively shielded from electromagnetic interference (EMI), the magnitude of electromagnetic radiation in cockpits of general aviation aircraft is higher and of a different nature than experienced in daily life. An increasing number of pacemaker-bearing individuals are being transported by air. However, the possible EMI with modern types of pacemakers during flight has not been investigated until now. In order to evaluate the effect of EMI on five modern types of pacemakers in the cockpit environment of a single-engine fixed-wing aircraft, we have subjected the pacemakers, each implanted into an artificial thorax, to a series of test flights. Each pacemaker was equipped with data logging capabilities which were used for detection of possible EMI. After each flight, the pacemakers were examined by means of the dedicated programmers. In addition, two single lead ventricular pacemakers (VVI) were analyzed by means of beat-to-beat Holter recordings during two separate flights. This enabled an exact analysis of pacemaker function and of possible EMI. No effect of EMI could be detected in any of the pacemakers by interrogating their internal counters after the test flights. In addition, no signs of EMI could be detected on the Holter recordings of the VVI pacemakers. We conclude that modern pacemakers are unaffected by EMI in the cockpit environment of single-engine fixed-wing aircraft.

  4. Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Infections Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) Styes Fungal Infections (Ringworm, Yeast, etc.) Diaper Rash Infections That Pets Carry Oral ... Pneumonia Tinea (Ringworm, Jock Itch, Athlete's Foot) Vaginal Yeast Infections Immunizations Do My Kids Need Vaccines Before ...

  5. The pacemaker current in cardiac Purkinje myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    It is generally assumed that in cardiac Purkinje fibers the hyperpolarization activated inward current i(f) underlies the pacemaker potential. Because some findings are at odds with this interpretation, we used the whole cell patch clamp method to study the currents in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization in single canine Purkinje myocytes, a preparation where many confounding limitations can be avoided. In Tyrode solution ([K+]o = 5.4 mM), hyperpolarizing steps from Vh = -50 mV resulted in a time-dependent inwardly increasing current in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization. This time- dependent current (iKdd) appeared around -60 mV and reversed near EK. Small superimposed hyperpolarizing steps (5 mV) applied during the voltage clamp step showed that the slope conductance decreases during the development of this time-dependent current. Decreasing [K+]o from 5.4 to 2.7 mM shifted the reversal potential to a more negative value, near the corresponding EK. Increasing [K+]o to 10.8 mM almost abolished iKdd. Cs+ (2 mM) markedly reduced or blocked the time-dependent current at potentials positive and negative to EK. Ba2+ (4 mM) abolished the time-dependent current in its usual range of potentials and unmasked another time-dependent current (presumably i(f)) with a threshold of approximately -90 mV (> 20 mV negative to that of the time-dependent current in Tyrode solution). During more negative steps, i(f) increased in size and did not reverse. During i(f) the slope conductance measured with small (8-10 mV) superimposed clamp steps increased. High [K+]o (10.8 mM) markedly increased and Cs+ (2 mM) blocked i(f). We conclude that: (a) in the absence of Ba2+, a time-dependent current does reverse near EK and its reversal is unrelated to K+ depletion; (b) the slope conductance of that time-dependent current decreases in the absence of K+ depletion at potentials positive to EK where inactivation of iK1 is unlikely to occur. (c) Ba2+ blocks this time

  6. [INSEE's permanent demographic sample].

    PubMed

    Sautory, O

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the permanent demographic sample survey developed by France's Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques (INSEE), which has been in use in that country since the census of 1968. Approximately one percent of the metropolitan population of France was chosen for inclusion by birthdate. By adding data on marriage, births of children, change of residence, schooling, employment status, and death to each person's file, longitudinal studies of fertility, nuptiality, and mortality can be conducted. Two such studies are included as examples of how the permanent sample survey can be best put to use.

  7. X-ray radiation causes electromagnetic interference in implantable cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Minoru; Tachikawa, Keiichi; Ozaki, Masanori; Umezawa, Naoki; Shinbo, Toshihiro; Kokubo, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Hirosuke

    2010-10-01

    X-rays are not thought to cause electromagnetic interference (EMI) in implantable cardiac pacemakers. However, x-ray radiation during computed tomography (CT) scanning has been reported to cause EMI in some implantable cardiac pacemakers. The objectives of this study were to identify the location within the pacemakers where x-ray radiation causes EMI and to investigate the association of EMI with the x-ray radiation conditions. We verified the location where x-ray radiation caused EMI using a CT scanner and conventional radiographic x-ray equipment. An inhibition test and an asynchronous test were performed using five types of implantable cardiac pacemakers. X-ray radiation inhibited the pacing pulses of four types of implantable cardiac pacemakers when the body of each implantable cardiac pacemaker, containing a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS), was scanned using a CT scanner. We confirmed that x-ray-induced EMI depends on the x-ray radiation conditions, that is, the tube voltage, tube current, x-ray dose, and direction of x-ray radiation, as well as the sensing thresholds of the implantable cardiac pacemakers. X-ray radiation caused EMI in some implantable cardiac pacemakers, probably because the CMOS component was irradiated. The occurrence of EMI depended on the pacemaker model, sensing threshold of the pacemaker, and x-ray radiation conditions. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cardiovascular implantable electronic device infection in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Uslan, Daniel Z; Dowsley, Taylor F; Sohail, Muhammad R; Hayes, David L; Friedman, Paul A; Wilson, Walter R; Steckelberg, James M; Baddour, Larry M

    2010-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED), including permanent pacemakers (PPMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), can be the sole manifestation of device infection. To assess clinical factors associated with CIED infection, we retrospectively reviewed all patients with both CIED and SAB seen at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2001 through 2006. CIED infection was defined using microbiological and clinical criteria. Of the 62 patients with SAB and a CIED, 22 patients (35.5%) had CIED infection. The generator pocket was identified as the source of bacteremia in seven (11%) patients. The majority of CIED infections were device-related infective endocarditis (12 of 22, 55%). Thirty percent of patients presenting with SAB greater than 1 year after device implantation had CIED infection; all but one had CIED-related infective endocarditis. Sixty percent of ICD patients (12 of 20) with SAB had CIED infection, compared with 24% of PPM patients (10 of 42, P = 0.01). On univariate analysis factors associated with CIED-related infective endocarditis included device type [odds ratio (OR) for ICD 13.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 84.9) and presence of a prosthetic heart valve (OR 6.8 95% CI 1.1, 43.4). CIED infection is common in patients with SAB. The presence of an ICD and prosthetic heart valve were associated with CIED-related infective endocarditis. Subsequent work should focus on prospectively characterizing the subset of patients with CIED infection who present with SAB as the sole manifestation of their device infection. (PACE 2010; 407-413).

  9. Ancillary tools in pacemaker and defibrillator lead extraction using a novel lead removal system.

    PubMed

    Manolis, A S; Maounis, T N; Vassilikos, V; Chiladakis, J; Melita-Manolis, H; Cokkinos, D V

    2001-03-01

    A previous report described our preliminary experience with a highly successful pacing lead removal system (VasoExtor). Extending this experience, we found it necessary to use additional tools to enhance the success of percutaneous lead extraction with this system. In the present series, we used the standard locking stylets (S and K), and recently, one newer type of stylet (Magic) over the last 3 years in 34 patients to extract 48 pacemaker leads in 31 patients and 3 defibrillator (ICD) leads in 3 patients. Lead extraction was carried out in 23 men and 11 women (aged 64 +/- 17 years) because of pacemaker infection (n = 21), pacemaker (n = 8) or ICD (n = 3) lead malfunction, or prior to ICD implant (n = 2). Leads were in place for 3.5 +/- 3.7 years. Infections, involving pocket and lead(s), were due to S. epidermidis (n = 13), S. aureus (n = 6), S. aureus plus E. coli (n = 1), for fungi (n = 1). Of the 48 pacing leads, 31 were ventricular, 15 atrial, and 2 were VDD leads. The ICD leads were two double-coil leads (CPI) and one single-coil lead (Telectronics). Using the S (n = 12), K (n = 8), or Magic (n = 3) stylets, all pacing leads in 23 patients and the ICD leads in 2 patients were successfully removed from a subclavian approach using the locking stylets. However, in nine (26.5%) patients ancillary tools were required. In four patients, lead fragments were captured with use of a noose catheter, a pigtail catheter, and a bioptome from a right femoral approach. In two patients, locking could not be effected and a noose catheter from the right femoral vein was used, aided by a pigtail and an Amplatz catheter and a bioptome to remove three leads. In a patient with an ICD lead, a combined subclavian (stylet S) and right femoral approach (noose catheter) was required. In a patient with a dysfunctional ventricular lead 12 years old, a motor drive unit was used to facilitate the exchange of locking stylets, but extraction failed. In another patient, a fragment of a

  10. Holter recordings with continuous marker annotations: a new tool in pacemaker diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Nowak, B; Middeldorf, T; Housworth, C M; Brüls, A; Liebrich, A; Rosocha, S; Voigtländer, T; Himmrich, E; Meyer, J

    1996-11-01

    Pacemakers provide marker annotations to facilitate the interpretation of pacemaker electrocardiograms (ECGs) and can be used in cases of suspected pacemaker malfunction or to understand pacemaker behavior. Due to the need for a programmer, only short-term evaluations are possible. We evaluated a prototype Telemetry Data Logger (TDL) designed to continuously transfer markers from the pacemaker to a conventional Holter recorder. A miniaturized telemetry receiving coil was attached to patient's skin above the pacemaker, which was programmed to transmit markers continuously. The TDL, which receives and converts markers into eight positive and eight negative deflections, ranging from -2.5 to +2.5 mV in amplitude, was connected to one channel of a conventional Holter recorder (Tracker 2). We performed 20 Holters in 13 patients who had implanted VDDR or DDDR devices from the same manufacturer and evaluated three versions of software. Marker transmission was possible in all patients, producing Holter ECGs with complete marker annotations. Artifacts occurred < 4% of the time. A 50-ms rectangular pulse was optimal for marker interpretation. The device, which was easy to use and well accepted by the patients, assisted in the diagnosis of inappropriate pacemaker programming, even when the surface ECG seemed to show regular pacemaker function. In the presence of low quality surface ECGs, marker annotations allowed the assessment of pacemaker function. The capability to annotate the onset of special algorithms, like tachycardia termination algorithms or mode switching, facilitates interpretation of pacemaker behavior, enabling a reliable assessment of the appropriateness of such algorithms. The TDL effectively enables pacemaker markers to be inscribed onto a conventional Holter recording, facilitating the interpretation of pacemaker ECGs and the diagnosis of inappropriate pacemaker programming even when not discernible from the surface ECG alone.

  11. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and…

  12. Clinical safety of the ProMRI pacemaker system in patients subjected to thoracic spine and cardiac 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanning conditions.

    PubMed

    Bailey, William M; Mazur, Alexander; McCotter, Craig; Woodard, Pamela K; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Johnson, Whitney; Mela, Theofanie

    2016-02-01

    Permanent cardiac pacemakers have historically been considered a contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of the ProMRI Phase B Study, a multicenter, prospective, single-arm, nonrandomized study, was to evaluate the clinical safety of the Biotronik ProMRI pacemaker system in patients undergoing thoracic spine and cardiac MRI. The ProMRI Phase B study enrolled 245 patients with stable baseline pacing indices implanted with an Entovis pacemaker (DR-T or SR-T) and Setrox 53-cm and/or 60-cm lead(s). Device interrogation was performed at enrollment, pre- and post-MRI scan, and 1 and 3 months post-MRI. End-points were (1) freedom from MRI- and pacing system-related serious adverse device effects through 1 month post-MRI; (2) freedom from atrial and ventricular MRI-induced pacing threshold increase (>0.5 V); and (3) freedom from P- and R-wave amplitude attenuation (<50%), or P wave <1.5 mV, or R wave <5.0 mV at 1 month post-MRI. In total, 216 patients completed the MRI and 1-month post-MRI follow-up. One adverse event possibly related to the implanted system and the MRI procedure occurred, resulting in a serious adverse device effect-free rate of 99.6% (220/221; P < .0001. Freedom from atrial and ventricular pacing threshold increase was 100% (194/194, P < .001) and 100% (206/206, P < .001) respectively. Freedom from P- and R-wave amplitude attenuation was 98.2% (167/170, P < .001) and 100% (188/188, P < .001) respectively. The results of the ProMRI Phase B study demonstrate the clinical safety and efficacy of the ProMRI pacemaker system in patients subjected to thoracic spine and cardiac MRI conditions. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Society position statement : Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position statement on the perioperative management of patients with implanted pacemakers, defibrillators, and neurostimulating devices.

    PubMed

    Healey, Jeff S; Merchant, Richard; Simpson, Chris; Tang, Timothy; Beardsall, Marianne; Tung, Stanley; Fraser, Jennifer A; Long, Laurene; van Vlymen, Janet M; Manninen, Pirjo; Ralley, Fiona; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Yee, Raymond; Prasloski, Bruce; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Philippon, François

    2012-04-01

    There are more than 200,000 Canadians living with permanent pacemakers or implantable defibrillators, many of whom will require surgery or invasive procedures each year. They face potential hazards when undergoing surgery; however, with appropriate planning and education of operating room personnel, adverse device-related outcomes should be rare. This joint position statement from the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) and the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society (CAS) has been developed as an accessible reference for physicians and surgeons, providing an overview of the key issues for the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of these patients. The document summarizes the limited published literature in this field, but for most issues, relies heavily on the experience of the cardiologists and anesthesiologists who contributed to this work. This position statement outlines how to obtain information about an individual's type of pacemaker or implantable defibrillator and its programming. It also stresses the importance of determining if a patient is highly pacemaker-dependent and proposes a simple approach for nonelective evaluation of dependency. Although the document provides a comprehensive list of the intraoperative issues facing these patients, there is a focus on electromagnetic interference resulting from electrocautery and practical guidance is given regarding the characteristics of surgery, electrocautery, pacemakers, and defibrillators which are most likely to lead to interference. The document stresses the importance of preoperative consultation and planning to minimize complications. It reviews the relative merits of intraoperative magnet use vs reprogramming of devices and gives examples of situations where one or the other approach is preferable.

  14. Design of the Pacemaker REmote Follow-up Evaluation and Review (PREFER) trial to assess the clinical value of the remote pacemaker interrogation in the management of pacemaker patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jane; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Choucair, Wassim; Cohen, Todd J; Crossley, George H; Johnson, W Ben; Mongeon, Luc R; Serwer, Gerald A; Sherfesee, Lou

    2008-01-01

    Background Although pacemakers are primarily used for the treatment of bradycardia, diagnostic data available in current pacemakers allow them to be also used as sophisticated, continuous monitoring devices. Easy access to these stored data may assist clinicians in making diagnostic and therapeutic decisions sooner, thus avoiding potential long-term sequelae due to untreated clinical disorders. Internet-based remote device interrogation systems provide clinicians with frequent and complete access to stored data in pacemakers. In addition to monitoring device function, remote monitors may be a helpful tool in assisting physicians in the management of common arrhythmia disorders. Methods The Pacemaker REmote Follow-up Evaluation and Review (PREFER) trial is a prospective, randomized, parallel, unblinded, multicenter, open label clinical trial to determine the utility of remote pacemaker interrogation in the earlier diagnosis of clinically actionable events compared to the existing practice of transtelephonic monitoring. There have been 980 patients enrolled and randomized to receive pacemaker follow up with either remote interrogation using the Medtronic CareLink® Network (CareLink) versus the conventional method of transtelephonic monitoring (TTM) in addition to periodic in-person interrogation and programming evaluations. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the design of the PREFER trial. The results, to be presented separately, will characterize the number of clinically actionable events as a result of pacemaker follow-up using remote interrogation instead of TTM. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00294645. PMID:18387185

  15. Design of the Pacemaker REmote Follow-up Evaluation and Review (PREFER) trial to assess the clinical value of the remote pacemaker interrogation in the management of pacemaker patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Choucair, Wassim; Cohen, Todd J; Crossley, George H; Johnson, W Ben; Mongeon, Luc R; Serwer, Gerald A; Sherfesee, Lou

    2008-04-03

    Although pacemakers are primarily used for the treatment of bradycardia, diagnostic data available in current pacemakers allow them to be also used as sophisticated, continuous monitoring devices. Easy access to these stored data may assist clinicians in making diagnostic and therapeutic decisions sooner, thus avoiding potential long-term sequelae due to untreated clinical disorders. Internet-based remote device interrogation systems provide clinicians with frequent and complete access to stored data in pacemakers. In addition to monitoring device function, remote monitors may be a helpful tool in assisting physicians in the management of common arrhythmia disorders. The Pacemaker REmote Follow-up Evaluation and Review (PREFER) trial is a prospective, randomized, parallel, unblinded, multicenter, open label clinical trial to determine the utility of remote pacemaker interrogation in the earlier diagnosis of clinically actionable events compared to the existing practice of transtelephonic monitoring. There have been 980 patients enrolled and randomized to receive pacemaker follow up with either remote interrogation using the Medtronic CareLink(R) Network (CareLink) versus the conventional method of transtelephonic monitoring (TTM) in addition to periodic in-person interrogation and programming evaluations. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the design of the PREFER trial. The results, to be presented separately, will characterize the number of clinically actionable events as a result of pacemaker follow-up using remote interrogation instead of TTM. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00294645.

  16. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  17. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome.

  18. Multiple pulse generator malfunctions with a dual chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Lipchenca, Igor; Barlev, David; Luria, David; Granit, Chava; Rotshtein, Zeev; Eldar, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dual chamber uni/bipolarpacemaker Minidual 50, manufactured by Sorin Biomedica. Between 1995 and 1998, 66 Minidual 50 models were implanted at the Heart Institute. During the follow-up period of 33 +/- 12.8 months (range 0-50 months), total function loss in seven (10.6%) units and false threshold measurement of sensing and pacing in three (4.5%) patients were observed. Average time from implantation to malfunction was 37 months (range 28-42). Malfunction was unrelated to battery status and could not be predicted by any measures obtained during the pacemaker follow-up period. Kaplan Meyer survival curve predicted a 70% 4-year malfunction-free survival of that pacemaker model. Given this high rate of total malfunction and the unpredictable nature of its occurrence, the authors recommend the replacement of all remaining Minidual 50 units at risk, at least in dependent patients.

  19. A leadless pacemaker in the real-world setting: The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System Post-Approval Registry.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul R; Clementy, Nicolas; Al Samadi, Faisal; Garweg, Christophe; Martinez-Sande, Jose Luis; Iacopino, Saverio; Johansen, Jens Brock; Vinolas Prat, Xavier; Kowal, Robert C; Klug, Didier; Mont, Lluis; Steffel, Jan; Li, Shelby; Van Osch, Dirk; El-Chami, Mikhael F

    2017-09-01

    First-in-man studies of leadless pacemakers have demonstrated high rates of implant success, and safety and efficacy objectives were achieved. Outside of the investigational setting, there are concerns, particularly over cardiac effusion and perforation, device dislodgement, infection, telemetry, and battery issues. The acute performance of the Micra transcatheter pacemaker from a worldwide Post-Approval Registry is reported. The registry is an ongoing prospective single-arm observational study designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of Micra in the post-approval setting. The safety end point was system- or procedure-related major complications at 30 days post implant. We compared the major complication rate with that of the 726 patients from the investigational study. Electrical performance was also characterized. The device was successfully implanted in 792 of 795 registry patients (99.6%) by 149 implanters at 96 centers in 20 countries. Through 30 days post implant, a total of 13 major complications occurred in 12 patients, for a major complication rate of 1.51% (95% confidence interval, 0.78%-2.62%). Major complications included cardiac effusion/perforation (1, 0.13%), device dislodgement (1, 0.13%), and sepsis (1, 0.13%). After adjusting for baseline differences, the rate of major complications in the registry trended lower than the investigational trial (odds ratio, 0.58, 95% confidence interval, 0.27-1.25; P = .16). Early pacing capture thresholds were low and stable. Performance of the Micra transcatheter pacemaker in a real-world setting demonstrates a high rate (99.6%) of implant success and low rate (1.51%) of major complications through 30 days post implant. In particular, the rates of pericardial effusion, device dislodgement, and infection were low, reinforcing the positive results seen in the investigational study. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  1. Endovascular extraction techniques for pacemaker and ICD lead extraction

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, F.A.; Meijer, A.; van Gelder, B.

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, comprehensive endovascular techniques have been developed to extract chronically implanted pacemaker and defibrillator leads. It is important that referring physician have knowledge of the advantages and limitations of the different techniques. In this paper we discuss the techniques and results of the currently used endovascular extraction techniques. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696690

  2. Exercise-responsive cardiac pacemakers: review and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Galambos, T; Inbar, G

    1991-01-01

    The various aspects of the state of the art of exercise, or physiological responsive pacemakers (PM) are discussed. Models are used to assess the performance of PM controllers already on the market or in experimental stages. Emphasis is placed on comparison between open-loop and closed-loop controllers in light of the anticipation that future PM will have more sophisticated multiparameter expert system controllers.

  3. Plethyzmography in assessment of hemodynamic results of pacemaker functions programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Dariusz; Sionek, Piotr; Peczalski, Kazimierz; Janusek, Dariusz

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents potential role of plethyzmography in optimization of heart hemodynamic function during pacemaker programming. The assessment of optimal stroke volume in patients, with implanted dual chamber pacemaker (DDD), by plethyzmography was a goal of the study. The data were collected during pacing rhythm. 20 patients (8 female and 12 male, average 77.4+/-4.6 years) with dual chamber pacemaker (DDD) and with pacing rhythm during routine pacemaker control and study tests were incorporated in the study group. Hemodynamic parameters were assessed during modification of atrio-ventricular delay (AVD) for pacing rhythm of 70 bpm and 90 bpm. The time of atrioventricular was programmed with 20 ms steps within range 100-200 ms and data were recorded with two minutes delay between two consecutive measurements. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were calculated from plethyzmographic signal by using Beatscope software (TNO Holand). Highest SV calculated for given pacing rhythm was named optimal stroke volume (OSV) and consequently highest cardiac output was named maximal cardiac output (MCO). The time of atrio-ventricular delay for OSV was named optimal atrioventricular delay (OAVD). The results have showed: mean values of OAVD for 70 bpm - 152+/-33 ms and for 90 bpm -149+/-35 ms, shortening of the mean OAVD time caused by increase of pacing rate from 70 bpm to 90 bpm what resulted in statistically significant decrease of OSV with not statistically significant increase of MCO. The analysis of consecutive patients revealed three types of response to increase of pacing rhythm: 1. typical-shortening of OAVD, 2. neutral-no change of OAVD and 3.atypical-lengthening of OAVD.

  4. [Interference between a dual-chamber pacemaker and argon electrocautery device during hepatectomy].

    PubMed

    Werner, P; Charbit, B; Samain, E; Farah, E; Marty, J

    2001-10-01

    We report an unusual electromagnetic interference induced by an argon electrocautery device during a left hepatectomy on a dual chamber pacemaker, implanted for sinus node dysfunction in 87-year-old patient. Argon electrocautery induced inhibition of atrial stimulation and occurrence of irregular ventricular triggered activity. Normal pacemaker function resumed after electrocautery interruption. This case illustrates the need to focus on cardiac rhythm when a new electrical device is used in a pacemaker patient.

  5. Gold-coated pacemaker implantation for a patient with type IV allergy to titanium

    PubMed Central

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Lambert, Thomas; Kammler, Juergen; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was scheduled for pacemaker implantation for symptomatic sick-sinus-syndrome (SSS). He suffered from multiple drug-allergies and allergies to several metals like quicksilver and titanium. Gold-coated pacemaker generators and polyurethane leads are effective in avoiding allergic reactions to pacing system components. Therefore, we decided to implant a custom-made gold-coated DDDR-pacemaker generator and polyurethane leads. PMID:27479204

  6. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kumada, M.; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

    2007-05-23

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

  7. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  8. [Intermittent focal cerebral ischemia in hypotension due to pacemaker syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hagendorff, A; Pizzulli, L; Dettmers, C; Block, A; Omran, H; Hartmann, A; Manz, M; Lüderitz, B

    1994-12-01

    A pacemaker syndrome manifested as transient sensoric aphasia in a 68-year-old woman with a VVI-pace-maker implanted after SA-block. The attack occurred during long-term blood pressure recording and Holter monitoring. Borderline hypotension was documented during ventricular pacing which induced a retrograde excitation of the atrium. Clinical investigations excluded any intracranial abnormality, any source of embolism or stenosis of extra- and intracranial cerebral arteries. Cerebral blood flow measurements revealed a significant increase during pacing at elevated heart rate. Therefore, a device for AV-sequential pacing was implanted and basic pacing rate was elevated. The present case report indicates that focal and not only global cerebral ischemia can be produced by an impairment of systemic hemodynamics due to hypotension and a pacemaker syndrome. Improvement of cerebral blood flow during pacing is an unexpected finding contrasting with the concept of autoregulation. In addition, pacemaker implantation should be discussed in patients with transient cerebral perfusion deficits if an improvement of cerebral blood flow is documented along with rising heart rate.

  9. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-09

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  10. Isolating Neural Correlates of the Pacemaker for Food Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Ian David; Waddington Lamont, Elaine; Rodrigues, Trevor; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s) of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO), whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO. PMID:22558352

  11. Interference between mobile phones and pacemakers: a look inside.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Triventi, Michele; Mattei, Eugenio; Bartolini, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the problem of electromagnetic interference (EMI) between mobile telephones and cardiac pacemakers (PM), by looking at the mechanisms by which the radiated radio frequency (RF) GSM signal may affect the pacemaker function. From a literature review on this topic, we noticed that older pacemakers had a higher rate of being affected by mobile phones when compared to newer ones. This is probably due to the fact that new generation of PM are more protected against electromagnetic field, being equipped with RF feedthrough filters incorporated to the internal PM circuitry. In some experiments conducted by our group, we found that modulated RF signals are somehow demodulated by the PM internal non-linear circuit elements, if no feedthrough assembly is incorporated inside the PM. Such demodulation phenomenon poses a critical problem because digital cellular phones use extremely low-frequency modulation (as low as 2 Hz), that can be mistaken for normal heartbeat. The feedthrough assembly seems instead to prevents the RF signals from accessing the PM enclosure, thus attenuating EMI signals over a broad range of frequencies.

  12. A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Pacemaker Telemonitoring Systems.

    PubMed

    López-Villegas, Antonio; Catalán-Matamoros, Daniel; Martín-Saborido, Carlos; Villegas-Tripiana, Irene; Robles-Musso, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, telemedicine applied to pacemaker monitoring has undergone extraordinary growth. It is not known if telemonitoring is more or less efficient than conventional monitoring. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review analyzing the available evidence on resource use and health outcomes in both follow-up modalities. We searched 11 databases and included studies published up until November 2014. The inclusion criteria were: a) experimental or observational design; b) studies based on complete economic evaluations; c) patients with pacemakers, and d) telemonitoring compared with conventional hospital monitoring. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 2852 patients, with a mean age of 81 years. The main indication for device implantation was atrioventricular block. With telemonitoring, cardiovascular events were detected and treated 2 months earlier than with conventional monitoring, thus reducing length of hospital stay by 34% and reducing routine and emergency hospital visits as well. There were no significant intergroup differences in perceived quality of life or number of adverse events. The cost of telemonitoring was 60% lower than that of conventional hospital monitoring. Compared with conventional monitoring, cardiovascular events were detected earlier and the number or hospitalizations and hospital visits was reduced with pacemaker telemonitoring. In addition, the costs associated with follow-up were lower with telemonitoring. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Managing Permanent Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    sorage me hanism is the Chunk Management System ( CMS ). CMS provides a database-like interface for POMW. On first reference to a permanent object POMS...19] M.P. Atkinson, K.J. Chisholm, and W.P. Cockshott. CMS - A Chunk Management System . Technical Report CSR-110-82, Department of Computer Science...database manager . Creating and using emibedded systems is not always bad. In most large programming projets one ends up constructing and using some sort

  14. Permanent magnet design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  15. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  16. Radiotherapy in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Tomas; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Søgaard, Mette; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with implantable cardiac rhythm devices undergo radiotherapy (RT) for cancer and are thereby exposed to the risk of device failure. Current safety recommendations seem to have limitations by not accounting for the risk of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators malfunctioning at low radiation doses. Besides scant knowledge about optimal safety measures, only little is known about the exact prevalence of patients with devices undergoing RT. In this review, we provide a short overview of the principles of RT and present the current evidence on the predictors and mechanisms of device malfunctions during RT. We also summarize practical recommendations from recent publications and from the industry. Strongly associated with beam energy of photon RT, device malfunctions occur at ∼3% of RT courses, posing a substantial issue in clinical practice. Malfunctions described in the literature typically consist of transient software disturbances and only seldom manifest as a permanent damage of the device. Through close cooperation between cardiologists and oncologists, a tailored individualized approach might be necessary in this patient group in waiting time for updated international guidelines in the field. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Brucella Infection Associated with Complete Atrioventricular Block

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Meki; Demir, Fikri; Yılmazer, Murat Muhtar; Bozkurt, Fatma; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical spectrum of Brucella infection is quite diverse and characterized by multi-system involvement. Patients present with myocarditis, endocarditis, or pericarditis. Infective endocarditis is the most common cardiovascular complication in patients with brucellosis. Although conduction abnormalities are seen in cases with endocarditis, they are reported very rarely in the setting of cardiac Brucella infection. Case Report: An eight and a half-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic due to inadequate response to cotrimaxazole plus streptomycin treatment at the 15th day of admission. Although local hospital records on the patient showed a heart rate of 80 bpm, we determined a heart rate of 46 bpm. The electrocardiogram showed complete atrioventricular (AV) block. The average heart rate was determined as 48 bpm with 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. The echocardiographic examination showed normal-sized heart chambers and the absence of valvular involvement. An agglutination test for brucellosis was found to be positive with a titer of 1/320. High fever, arthralgia, and splenomegaly regressed following doxycycline plus rifampicin therapy, but there was no improvement in the AV block. A permanent pacemaker was implanted because of the detection of an average heart rate of 48 bpm. Conclusion: Because cardiac failure and rhythm abnormalities are reported in the course of Brucella infection and may be associated with significant outcomes, cases with brucellosis should be evaluated carefully in terms of cardiac involvement. This report aims to draw attention to complete AV block as an extremely rare complication of Brucella infection. PMID:27761286

  18. Testing of Common Electromagnetic Environments for Risk of Interference with Cardiac Pacemaker Function

    PubMed Central

    Tiikkaja, Maria; Aro, Aapo L.; Alanko, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Sistonen, Heli; Hartikainen, Juha E.K.; Toivonen, Lauri; Juutilainen, Jukka; Hietanen, Maila

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac pacemakers are known to be susceptible to strong electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This in vivo study investigated occurrence of electromagnetic interference with pacemakers caused by common environmental sources of EMFs. Methods Eleven volunteers with a pacemaker were exposed to EMFs produced by two mobile phone base stations, an electrically powered commuter train, and an overhead high voltage transmission lines. All the pacemakers were programmed in normal clinically selected settings with bipolar sensing and pacing configurations. Results None of the pacemakers experienced interference in any of these exposure situations. However, often it is not clear whether or not strong EMFs exist in various work environments, and hence an individual risk assessment is needed. Conclusions Modern pacemakers are well shielded against external EMFs, and workers with a pacemaker can most often return to their previous work after having a pacemaker implanted. However, an appropriate risk assessment is still necessary after the implantation of a pacemaker, a change of its generator, or major modification of its programming settings. PMID:24106646

  19. The effects of nuclear magnetic resonance on patients with cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlicek, W.; Geisinger, M.; Castle, L.; Borkowski, G.P.; Meaney, T.F.; Bream, B.L.; Gallagher, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging on six representative cardiac pacemakers was studied. The results indicate that the threshold for initiating the asynchronous mode of a pacemaker is 17 gauss. Radiofrequency levels are present in an NMR unit and may confuse or possibly inhibit demand pacemakers, although sensing circuitry is normally provided with electromagnetic interference discrimination. Time-varying magnetic fields can generate pulse amplitudes and frequencies to mimic cardiac activity. A serious limitation in the possibility of imaging a patient with a pacemaker would be the alteration of normal pulsing parameters due to time-varying magnetic fields.

  20. Interference of cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator activity during electronic dental device use.

    PubMed

    Roedig, Jason J; Shah, Jignesh; Elayi, Claude Samy; Miller, Craig S

    2010-05-01

    The authors conducted a study to determine if electromagnetic interference of cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) activity occurs during the operation of electronic dental devices. The authors tested nine electronic dental devices in vitro to assess their ability to interfere with the function of two pacemakers and two ICDs as determined by electrocardiographic telemetry. The pacing activity of both pacemakers and the dual-chamber ICD were inhibited during operation of the battery-operated composite curing light at between 2 and 10 centimeters from the generator or leads. The use of the ultrasonic scaler interfered with the pacing activity of the dual-chamber pacemaker at between 17 and 23 cm from the generator or leads, the single-chamber pacemaker at 15 cm from the generator or leads and both ICDs at 7 cm from the leads. The operation of the ultrasonic cleaning system interfered with the activity of the dual-chamber pacemaker at between 15 and 23 cm from the generator or leads, and of the single-chamber pacemaker at 12 cm. Operation of the electric toothbrush, electrosurgical unit, electric pulp tester, high- and low-speed handpieces, and an amalgamator did not alter pacing function. Select electronic dental devices interfere with pacemakers' and ICDs' sensing and pacing activity in vitro. Use of the ultrasonic scaler, ultrasonic cleaning system and battery-operated composite curing light may produce deleterious effects in patients who have pacemakers or ICDs.

  1. Successful Interventional Management for Pulmonary Arterial Injury Secondary to Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Tokue, Azusa; Morita, Hideo; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Subclavian vein puncture is a relatively fast and safe technique to access the right heart for placement of pacemaker leads. Hemothorax related to injury of the pulmonary artery (PA) is a rare complication of subclavian vein access but can be life-threatening. We report a case of hemothorax occurring after subclavian vein puncture for pacemaker implantation. No cases of transcatheter arterial embolization for PA injury secondary to pacemaker implantation have been reported. Understanding of this rare complication after pacemaker implantation along with its specific clinical presentation may lead to early diagnosis and intervention. PMID:27882248

  2. Powering pacemakers from heartbeat vibrations using linear and nonlinear energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Karami, M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of a pacemaker is very low. However, after few years, patients require another surgical operation just to replace their pacemaker battery. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to the especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variation of heart rate and can meet the power requirement of pacemakers.

  3. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  4. One-Year Follow-Up of Patients Undergoing Transvenous Extraction of Pacemaker and Defibrillator Leads

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Maciej; Budrejko, Szymon; Piepiorka-Broniecka, Marta; Rogowski, Jan; Kozlowski, Dariusz; Raczak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of pacemaker and ICD implantations has increased substantially in the recent years. Therefore, complications are also observed in a greater number. In many cases, transvenous extraction of the previously implanted device (pacemaker or ICD) is the only solution. One may find in the literature information about the efficacy and safety of that procedure, but data concerning the results of long-term follow up are still limited. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the one-year mortality in the cohort of patients undergoing transvenous lead extraction procedures in our centre. Methods Records of the patients undergoing transvenous lead removal in the Department of Cardiology and Electrotherapy of the Medical University of Gdańsk were analyzed. We collected detailed information about 192 patients that had undergone the procedure from January 2003 until June 2012. Data were collected from medical and surgical records. We analyzed concomitant diseases, indications, and possible complications. Long-term follow-up data were gathered in the follow-up ambulatory records and over-the-phone interviews with patients or families. In several cases, we consulted the database of the Polish National Health Fund. Results During the early post-operative period 5 patients died, although none of those deaths was associated with the procedure itself. No other major complications were observed. During one-year follow-up other 5 patients died, which gave the overall one-year survival rate of 92.7%. Heart failure, renal failure and an infective indication showed significant association with increased mortality. Conclusion Results of transvenous lead extraction, a relatively safe procedure, should be assessed over time extending beyond the sole perioperative period. Some complications may be delayed in their nature, and may be observed only during the long-term follow up. PMID:26694032

  5. The effect of single engine fixed wing air transport on rate-responsive pacemakers.

    PubMed

    De Rotte, A A; Van Der Kemp, P

    1999-09-01

    Insufficient information exists about the safety of patients with accelerometer-based rate-responsive pacemakers in air transport by general aviation aircraft. The response in pacing rate of two types of accelerometer-based rate-responsive pacemakers with data logging capabilities was studied during test flights with single engine fixed wing aircraft. Results were compared with the rate-response of these pacemakers during transportation by car and were also interpreted in respect to physiological heart rate response of aircrew during flights in single engine fixed wing aircraft. In addition, a continuous accelerometer readout was recorded during a turbulent phase of flight. This recording was used for a pacemaker-simulator experiment with maximal sensitive motion-sensor settings. Only a minor increase in pacing rate due to aircraft motion could be demonstrated during all phases of flight at all altitudes with the pacemakers programmed in the normal mode. This increase was of the same magnitude as induced during transport by car and would be of negligible influence on the performance of the individual pacemaker patient equipped with such a pacemaker. Moreover, simultaneous Holter monitoring of the pilots during these flights showed a similar rate-response in natural heart rate compared with the increase in pacing rate induced by aircraft motion in accelerometer-based rate-responsive pacemakers. No sensor-mediated pacemaker tachycardia was seen during any of these recordings. However, a 15% increase in pacing rate was induced by severe air turbulence. Programming the maximal sensitivity of the motion sensor into the pacemaker could, on the other hand, induce a significant increase in pacing rate as was demonstrated by the simulation experiments. These results seem to rule out potentially dangerous or adverse effects from motional or vibrational influences during transport in single engine fixed wing aircraft on accelerometer-based rate-responsive pacemakers with

  6. Pacemaker potentials generated by interstitial cells of Cajal in the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2005-03-01

    Pacemaker potentials were recorded in situ from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in the murine small intestine. The nature of the two components of pacemaker potentials (upstroke and plateau) were investigated and compared with slow waves recorded from circular muscle cells. Pacemaker potentials and slow waves were not blocked by nifedipine (3 microM). In the presence of nifedipine, mibefradil, a voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blocker, reduced the amplitude, frequency, and rate of rise of upstroke depolarization (dV/dt(max)) of pacemaker potentials and slow waves in a dose-dependent manner (1-30 microM). Mibefradil (30 microM) changed the pattern of pacemaker potentials from rapidly rising, high-frequency events to slowly depolarizing, low-frequency events with considerable membrane noise (unitary potentials) between pacemaker potentials. Caffeine (3 mM) abolished pacemaker potentials in the presence of mibefradil. Pinacidil (10 microM), an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel opener, hyperpolarized ICC-MY and increased the amplitude and dV/dt(max) without affecting frequency. Pinacidil hyperpolarized smooth muscle cells and attenuated the amplitude and dV/dt(max) of slow waves without affecting frequency. The effects of pinacidil were blocked by glibenclamide (10 microM). These data suggest that slow waves are electrotonic potentials driven by pacemaker potentials. The upstroke component of pacemaker potentials is due to activation of dihydropyridine-resistant Ca(2+) channels, and this depolarization entrains pacemaker activity to create the plateau potential. The plateau potential may be due to summation of unitary potentials generated by individual or small groups of pacemaker units in ICC-MY. Entrainment of unitary potentials appears to depend on Ca(2+) entry during upstroke depolarization.

  7. Liquids with permanent porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G.; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L.; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa; Cooper, Andrew I.; James, Stuart L.

    2015-11-01

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble ‘scrambled’ porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities.

  8. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infection caused by Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ertas, F; Acet, H; Kaya, H; Kayan, F; Soydinc, S

    2012-09-01

    Like any other foreign bodies, implanted cardiac devices can become infected. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphilococci are the most common causes of infections of pacemaker and defibrillator systems. In this case an implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infection caused by an extremely rare microorganism, Klebsiella pneumonia, is presented.

  9. Permanence can be Defended.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew; Gardiner, Dale

    2017-03-01

    In donation after the circulatory-respiratory determination of death (DCDD), the dead donor rule requires that the donor be dead before organ procurement can proceed. Under the relevant limb of the Uniform Determination of Death Act 1981 (USA), a person is dead when the cessation of circulatory-respiratory function is 'irreversible'. Critics of current practice in DCDD have argued that the donor is not dead at the time organs are procured, and so the procurement of organs from these donors violates the dead donor rule. We offer a new argument here in defence of current DCDD practice, and, in particular, of the interpretation of the requirement of 'irreversibility' as permanence.

  10. Permanent Turbidity-Standards

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, William G.; Brewer, Carl R.

    1967-01-01

    Permanent turbidity reference standards suitable for measurement of microbial suspensions were prepared by suspending finely divided titanium dioxide in aryl sulfonamide-formaldehyde or methylstyrene resins. Turbidities of these standards, adjusted to a useful range for microbiological and immunological studies, were compared with other reference standards in use today. Tube holders for a Coleman Photonephelometer and a Nepho-Colorimeter were modified to eliminate the water well and to allow use of optically standardized 10-, 16-, or 18-mm test tubes. The standards and the tube holders have been used satisfactorily for more than 12 years. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6077410

  11. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-06-23

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  12. Circadian Activators Are Expressed Days before They Initiate Clock Function in Late Pacemaker Neurons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianxin; Mahesh, Guruswamy; Houl, Jerry H; Hardin, Paul E

    2015-06-03

    Circadian pacemaker neurons in the Drosophila brain control daily rhythms in locomotor activity. These pacemaker neurons can be subdivided into early or late groups depending on whether rhythms in period (per) and timeless (tim) expression are initiated at the first instar (L1) larval stage or during metamorphosis, respectively. Because CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate circadian oscillator function by activating per and tim transcription, a Clk-GFP transgene was used to mark when late pacemaker neurons begin to develop. We were surprised to see that CLK-GFP was already expressed in four of five clusters of late pacemaker neurons during the third instar (L3) larval stage. CLK-GFP is only detected in postmitotic neurons from L3 larvae, suggesting that these four late pacemaker neuron clusters are formed before the L3 larval stage. A GFP-cyc transgene was used to show that CYC, like CLK, is also expressed exclusively in pacemaker neurons from L3 larval brains, demonstrating that CLK-CYC is not sufficient to activate per and tim in late pacemaker neurons at the L3 larval stage. These results suggest that most late pacemaker neurons develop days before novel factors activate circadian oscillator function during metamorphosis.

  13. A Novel Way Of Repair Of Insulation Breaks During Pacemaker Generator Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor Ali, Syed; Iqbal, Khurshid; Tramboo, Nisar A; Lone, Aijaz A; Kaul, Suresh; Kaul, Neelam; Hafiz, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Minor abrasions can occur while mobilising old lead during pacemaker generator replacement necesittating placement of additional lead adding to the financial burden and junk in heart. We describe a novel way of repair of old pacemaker lead preventing additional lead placement. PMID:19763196

  14. Increased dependency of cardiac pacemaker activity on extracellular Ca after adrenergic blockade in the frog heart.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Y

    1986-01-01

    The frog sinus venosus shows spontaneous regular pacemaker activity, even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. When an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent (phentolamine) is applied, the rate of pacemaker activity, height of action potential, rate of slow diastolic depolarization, and the maximum diastolic potential become strongly dependent upon the extracellular Ca2+ concentration.

  15. Zebrafish heart as a model to study the integrative autonomic control of pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Stoyek, Matthew R; Quinn, T Alexander; Croll, Roger P; Smith, Frank M

    2016-09-01

    The cardiac pacemaker sets the heart's primary rate, with pacemaker discharge controlled by the autonomic nervous system through intracardiac ganglia. A fundamental issue in understanding the relationship between neural activity and cardiac chronotropy is the identification of neuronal populations that control pacemaker cells. To date, most studies of neurocardiac control have been done in mammalian species, where neurons are embedded in and distributed throughout the heart, so they are largely inaccessible for whole-organ, integrative studies. Here, we establish the isolated, innervated zebrafish heart as a novel alternative model for studies of autonomic control of heart rate. Stimulation of individual cardiac vagosympathetic nerve trunks evoked bradycardia (parasympathetic activation) and tachycardia (sympathetic activation). Simultaneous stimulation of both vagosympathetic nerve trunks evoked a summative effect. Effects of nerve stimulation were mimicked by direct application of cholinergic and adrenergic agents. Optical mapping of electrical activity confirmed the sinoatrial region as the site of origin of normal pacemaker activity and identified a secondary pacemaker in the atrioventricular region. Strong vagosympathetic nerve stimulation resulted in a shift in the origin of initial excitation from the sinoatrial pacemaker to the atrioventricular pacemaker. Putative pacemaker cells in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular regions expressed adrenergic β2 and cholinergic muscarinic type 2 receptors. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the zebrafish heart contains the accepted hallmarks of vertebrate cardiac control, establishing this preparation as a viable model for studies of integrative physiological control of cardiac function by intracardiac neurons. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Noise-induced effects on multicellular biopacemaker spontaneous activity: Differences between weak and strong pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghighi, Alireza; Comtois, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Self-organization of spontaneous activity of a network of active elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for pacemaking activity to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, consisting of resting and pacemaker cells, exhibit spontaneous activation of their electrical activity. Similarly, one proposed approach to the development of biopacemakers as an alternative to electronic pacemakers for cardiac therapy is based on heterogeneous cardiac cells with resting and spontaneously beating phenotypes. However, the combined effect of pacemaker characteristics, density, and spatial distribution of the pacemaker cells on spontaneous activity is unknown. Using a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm, we previously showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of pacemaker cells. In this study, we show that this behavior is dependent on the pacemaker cell characteristics, with weaker pacemaker cells requiring higher density and larger clusters to sustain multicellular activity. These multicellular structures also demonstrated an increased sensitivity to voltage noise that favored spontaneous activity at lower density while increasing temporal variation in the period of activity. This information will help researchers overcome the current limitations of biopacemakers.

  17. Tbx18-dependent differentiation of brown adipose tissue-derived stem cells toward cardiac pacemaker cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Deng, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Ji, Rui-Juan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Chuan-Sen; Li, Yu-Quan; Yang, Xiang-Qun

    2017-04-05

    A cell-sourced biological pacemaker is a promising therapeutic approach for sick sinus syndrome (SSS) or severe atrial ventricular block (AVB). Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ATSCs), which are optimal candidate cells for possible use in regenerative therapy for acute or chronic myocardial injury, have the potential to differentiate into spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes. However, the pacemaker characteristics of the beating cells need to be confirmed, and little is known about the underlying differential mechanism. In this study, we found that brown adipose tissue-derived stem cells (BATSCs) in mice could differentiate into spontaneous beating cells in 15% FBS Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) without additional treatment. Subsequently, we provide additional evidence, including data regarding ultrastructure, protein expression, electrophysiology, and pharmacology, to support the differentiation of BATSCs into a cardiac pacemaker phenotype during the course of early cultivation. Furthermore, we found that silencing Tbx18, a key transcription factor in the development of pacemaker cells, terminated the differentiation of BATSCs into a pacemaker phenotype, suggesting that Tbx18 is required to direct BATSCs toward a cardiac pacemaker fate. The expression of Tbx3 and shox2, the other two important transcription factors in the development of pacemaker cells, was decreased by silencing Tbx18, which suggests that Tbx18 mediates the differentiation of BATSCs into a pacemaker phenotype via these two downstream transcription factors.

  18. Zebrafish heart as a model to study the integrative autonomic control of pacemaker function

    PubMed Central

    Stoyek, Matthew R.; Quinn, T. Alexander; Croll, Roger P.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac pacemaker sets the heart's primary rate, with pacemaker discharge controlled by the autonomic nervous system through intracardiac ganglia. A fundamental issue in understanding the relationship between neural activity and cardiac chronotropy is the identification of neuronal populations that control pacemaker cells. To date, most studies of neurocardiac control have been done in mammalian species, where neurons are embedded in and distributed throughout the heart, so they are largely inaccessible for whole-organ, integrative studies. Here, we establish the isolated, innervated zebrafish heart as a novel alternative model for studies of autonomic control of heart rate. Stimulation of individual cardiac vagosympathetic nerve trunks evoked bradycardia (parasympathetic activation) and tachycardia (sympathetic activation). Simultaneous stimulation of both vagosympathetic nerve trunks evoked a summative effect. Effects of nerve stimulation were mimicked by direct application of cholinergic and adrenergic agents. Optical mapping of electrical activity confirmed the sinoatrial region as the site of origin of normal pacemaker activity and identified a secondary pacemaker in the atrioventricular region. Strong vagosympathetic nerve stimulation resulted in a shift in the origin of initial excitation from the sinoatrial pacemaker to the atrioventricular pacemaker. Putative pacemaker cells in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular regions expressed adrenergic β2 and cholinergic muscarinic type 2 receptors. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the zebrafish heart contains the accepted hallmarks of vertebrate cardiac control, establishing this preparation as a viable model for studies of integrative physiological control of cardiac function by intracardiac neurons. PMID:27342878

  19. Interference of apex locator, pulp tester and diathermy on pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Sriman, Narayanan; Prabhakar, V; Bhuvaneswaran, J S; Subha, N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three electronic apex locators (EAL), electric pulp tester (EPT) and diathermy on pacemaker function in vitro. Three EALs: Root ZX (J. Morita Co., Tustin, CA, U.S.A.), Propex (Dentsply), Mini Apex locator (SybronEndo, Anaheim, CA, USA), EPT (Parkell pulp vitality tester Farmingdale, NY, USA) and Diathermy (Neomed 250 B) were tested for any interference with one pacemaker (A medtronic kappa KVDD901-serial number: PLE734632S). Directly connecting the pacemaker lead with the EAL/EPT/diathermy operating on a flat bench top, the telemetry wand was held directly over the pacemaker to monitor the pacing pattern for a period of 30 s. Pacemaker activity was continuously recorded on the telemetric programmer and electro gram (EGM) readings examined for pacer inhibition, noise reversion or inappropriate pacemaker pulses. All the three apex locators showed no pacing interference or background noise during its function or at rest. The EGM readings of EPT showed varying levels of background noise in between pacing however, this did not affect the normal pacing pattern and the pacing interval remained constant. EGM readings of diathermy showed an increase in the pacing interval (irregular pacing pattern) followed by complete inhibition of the pacing system. The tested EALs do not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. The tested EPT showed varying levels of background noise but does not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. Use of Diathermy interfered with the normal pacing, leading to complete inhibition of the pacing system.

  20. Olmesartan Reduces New-onset Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Fibrillation Burden after Dual-chamber Pacemaker Implantation in Atrioventricular Block Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Pan, Chang; Zhang, Juan; Zhu, Lin-Lin; Huang, Kai; Zhong, Yun; Hu, Zuo-Ying

    2016-09-20

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent tachyarrhythmia in patients with a permanent pacemaker. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists have a protective effect against the occurrence of AF in patients with heart diseases. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of olmesartan in the prevention of new-onset AF and AF burden in atrioventricular block (AVB) patients with dual-chamber (DDD) pacemaker implantation. This was a single-center, prospective, randomized, single-blind, controlled clinical study. A total of 116 AVB patients, who received DDD pacemakers implantation with the percentage of ventricular pacing (VP%) ≥40% from April 22, 2011 to December 24, 2012, were prospectively randomized to olmesartan group (20 mg per day; n = 57) or control group (n = 59). Patients were followed up using pacemaker programming, 12-lead electrocardiography in the intrinsic sinus rhythm, laboratory examinations, and transthoracic echocardiography at 24 months. Atrial high rate events (AHREs) were defined as 180 beats/min over a minimum of 5 min. AF burden was calculated by the number of hours with AHREs divided by the number of measurement hours. Ten (17.5%) patients in the olmesartan group and 24 patients (40.7%) in the control group occurred new-onset AF, and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). AF burden was lower in olmesartan group than that in control group (8.02 ± 3.10% vs. 13.66 ± 6.14%, P = 0.04). There were no significant differences in mean days to the first occurrence of AHREs and mean cumulative numbers of AHREs between two groups (P = 0.89 and P = 0.42, respectively). Moreover, olmesartan group had smaller values of maximal P-wave durations and P-wave dispersion (PD) after 24 months follow-up compared with the control group (109.5 ± 7.4 ms vs. 113.4 ± 7.1 ms, P = 0.00; and 40.6 ± 4.5 ms vs. 43.3 ± 4.4 ms, P = 0.02, respectively). Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and left ventricular ejection fraction were

  1. Optogenetic activation of Gq signalling modulates pacemaker activity of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Beiert, Thomas; Bruegmann, Tobias; Sasse, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    Investigation of Gq signalling with pharmacological agonists of Gq-coupled receptors lacks spatio-temporal precision. The aim of this study was to establish melanopsin, a light-sensitive Gq-coupled receptor, as a new tool for the investigation of spatial and temporal effects of Gq stimulation on pacemaking in cardiomyocytes at an early developmental stage. A vector for ubiquitous expression of melanopsin was tested in HEK293FT cells, which showed light-induced production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Mouse embryonic stem cells were stably transfected with this plasmid and differentiated into spontaneously beating embryoid bodies (EBs). Cardiomyocytes within EBs showed melanopsin expression and illumination (60 s, 308.5 nW/mm(2), 470 nm) of EBs increased beating rate within 10.2 ± 1.7 s to 317.1 ± 16.3% of baseline frequency. Illumination as short as 5 s was sufficient for generating the maximal frequency response. After termination of illumination, baseline frequency was reached with a decay constant of 27.1 ± 2.5 s. The light-induced acceleration of beating frequency showed a sigmoid dependence on light intensity with a half maximal effective light intensity of 41.7 nW/mm(2). Interestingly, EBs showed a high rate of irregular contractions after termination of high-intensity illumination. Local Gq activation by illumination of a small region in a functional syncytium of cardiomyocytes led to pacemaker activity within the illuminated area. Light-induced Gq activation in melanopsin-expressing cardiomyocytes increases beating rate and generates local pacemaker activity. We propose that melanopsin is a powerful optogenetic tool for the investigation of spatial and temporal aspects of Gq signalling in cardiovascular research. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Are Cav1.3 pacemaker channels in chromaffin cells?

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Mouse and rat chromaffin cells (MCCs, RCCs) fire spontaneously at rest and their activity is mainly supported by the two L-type Ca2+ channels expressed in these cells (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3). Using Cav1.3−/− KO MCCs we have shown that Cav1.3 possess all the prerequisites for carrying subthreshold currents that sustain low frequency cell firing near resting (0.5 to 2 Hz at −50 mV):1 low-threshold and steep voltage dependence of activation, slow and incomplete inactivation during pulses of several hundreds of milliseconds. Cav1.2 contributes also to pacemaking MCCs and possibly even Na+ channels may participate in the firing of a small percentage of cells. We now show that at potentials near resting (−50 mV), Cav1.3 carries equal amounts of Ca2+ current to Cav1.2 but activates at 9 mV more negative potentials. MCCs express only TTX-sensitive Nav1 channels that activate at 24 mV more positive potentials than Cav1.3 and are fully inactivating. Their blockade prevents the firing only in a small percentage of cells (13%). This suggests that the order of importance with regard to pacemaking MCCs is: Cav1.3, Cav1.2 and Nav1. The above conclusions, however, rely on the proper use of DHPs, whose blocking potency is strongly holding potential dependent. We also show that small increases of KCl concentration steadily depolarize the MCCs causing abnormally increased firing frequencies, lowered and broadened AP waveforms and an increased facility of switching “non-firing” into “firing” cells that may lead to erroneous conclusions about the role of Cav1.3 and Cav1.2 as pacemaker channels in MCCs.2 PMID:21406973

  3. Primary cutaneous plasmacytoma occurring after pacemaker implantation and recurring in scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Anthony; Chen, Alexander; Gallagher, Mark; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Tinwell, Brendan; Sneddon, James; Cliff, Sandeep

    2013-02-15

    Primary cutaneous plasmacytomas are rare and little is known about their treatment and progression. We describe for the first time the predilection of primary cutaneous plasmacytoma to occur in a scar or sites of trauma. We report an 89-year-old man who presented with a slowly expanding asymptomatic mass over his pacemaker implantation, 1 year after insertion. Further investigation ruled out multiple myeloma and histology confirmed it to be a cutaneous plasmacytoma. This was treated successfully by local radiotherapy after extraction of the pacemaker and implantation of a new pacemaker on the opposite side. The patient subsequently developed an additional cutaneous plasmacytoma over the new pacemaker site, followed by the development of progressive multiple myeloma. Primary cutaneous plasmacytoma can show predilection for sites of trauma or surgery. Surgical excision of the plasmocytoma and local radiotherapy may be a reasonable strategy in the first initially after pacemaker removal.

  4. Popeye domain containing proteins and stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Simrick, Subreena; Schindler, Roland; Poon, Kar-Lai; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An intricate network of ion channels and pumps are involved in generating a diastolic pacemaker potential, which is transmitted to the working myocardium with the help of the cardiac conduction system. The principles of cardiac pacemaking are reasonably well understood, however, the mechanism by which the heart increases its beating frequency in response to adrenergic stimulation has not been fully worked out. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode plasma membrane-localized proteins that are able to bind cAMP with high affinity and mice with null mutations in Popdc1 or -2 have a stress-induced pacemaker dysfunction. The phenotype in both mutants develops in an age-dependent manner and thus may model pacemaker dysfunction in man, as well as providing novel mechanistic insights into the process of pacemaker adaptation to stress. PMID:23562093

  5. Radiation dose monitoring in a breast cancer patient with a pacemaker: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nibhanupudy, J R; de Jesus, M A; Fujita, M; Goldson, A L

    2001-01-01

    A pacemaker-bearing patient with left-sided breast cancer was treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy to the intact breast. She was treated via tangential fields and a single anterior supraclavicular field using 6-MV x-rays. The pacemaker, originally in the treatment field, was removed and a new one placed 4 cm outside the radiation field prior to treatment. Silicon diode chamber Keithley-Farmer type 0.6 cc ionization chamber, and lithium fluoride (LiF) (TLD) chips were used to measure, in vivo, the dose to the pacemaker. From all the fields treated, total dose to the pacemaker was 164 cGy by diode measurements, 182 cGy by ionization chamber measurements, and 171 cGy by TLD measurements. The pacemaker functioned normally throughout the course of treatment.

  6. Stroke rehabilitation therapy in a patient with a cardiac pacemaker for chronic atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Hikaru; Koike, Kimiko

    2003-12-01

    A 65-year-old man was implanted with an artificial pacemaker for chronic bradycardic atrial fibrillation associated with hypertensive heart disease. Five years after the pacemaker implantation, he suffered from a cerebral embolism. Approximately 4.5 months after the ictus, he was transferred to the rehabilitation ward. He had flaccid left hemiplegia and severe disuse syndrome. He could not sit and could tilt his head up for only two minutes because of severe orthostatic hypotension. By modulating the rate-responsive mode of the pacemaker every 2-4 weeks, we were able to rehabilitate the patient. Thus, the patient could sit in a wheelchair for more than three hours. This case emphasizes the importance of examining the mode and function of a previously implanted artificial pacemaker. In accord with varying rehabilitation programs and gradual improvement in a patient's physical activities, periodic modulation of a programmable pacemaker can lead to a better functional outcome during rehabilitation therapy.

  7. Linear and nonlinear energy harvesters for powering pacemakers from heart beat vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, M. Amin; Inman, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of the pacemakers is very low. At the same time, after about 10 years from the original implantation of the pacemakers, patients have to go through another surgical operation just to replace the batteries of their pacemakers. We investigate using vibration energy harvesters to significantly increase the battery life of the pace makers. The major source of vibrations in chest area is due to heartbeats. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variations of heart beat frequency and can meet the power requirement of the pacemakers.

  8. Determining a human cardiac pacemaker using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnavsky, A. N.; Antonenco, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a possibility of estimating a human cardiac pacemaker using combined application of nonlinear integral transformation and fuzzy logic, which allows carrying out the analysis in the real-time mode. The system of fuzzy logical conclusion is proposed, membership functions and rules of fuzzy products are defined. It was shown that the ratio of the value of a truth degree of the winning rule condition to the value of a truth degree of any other rule condition is at least 3.

  9. [Atrial fibrillation before and after pacemaker implantation (WI and DDD) in patients with complete atrioventricular block].

    PubMed

    Matusik, Paweł; Woznica, Natalia; Lelakowsk, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent problem of patients with pacemakers, and depends not only on disease but also on stimulation method. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of AF before and after pacemaker implantation as well as to assess the influence of VVI and DDD cardiac pacing on onset of AF in patients with complete atrioventricularblock (AVB). We included 155 patients controlled between 2000 and 2008 in Pacemaker Clinic because of AVB III degree, treated with VVI or DDD pacemaker implantation. Information about the health status of the patients was gathered from medical documentation and analysis of clinical ambulatory electrocardiograms. The study group comprised of 68 women and 87 men, mean age 68.7 +/- 13.9 years during implantation. 69% of patients had VVI pacemaker. There were 72.3% of patients with sinus rhythm before pacemaker implantation. During follow-up 4 +/- 2.8 years in 19.6% cases onset of atrial fibrillation de novo was diagnosed (in 31.3% in VVI mode vs. 2.2% in DDD mode; p = 0.00014). Mean time to AF since implantation was approximately 2.5 years. In VVI group (21 persons) amounted 32.1 months, while in 1 patient with DDD pacemaker 18 months. Between group with AF after implantation and with sinus rhythm preserved there was no statistically significant difference in age or gender (p = 0.89512 and p = 0.1253, respectively). Prevalence of atrial fibrillation after pacemaker implantation increased to 40%. Atrial fibrillation is frequent in patients before and after pacemaker implantation, especially in patients stimulated in VVI mode. Major possibility of atrial fibrillation onset after pacemaker implantation should result in more attention during routine ECG examination.

  10. E and M circadian pacemaker neurons use different PDF receptor signalosome components in drosophila.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Laura B; Taghert, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    We used real-time imaging to detect cAMP levels in neurons of intact fly brains to study the mechanisms of circadian pacemaker synchronization by the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF) in Drosophila. PDF receptor (PDF-R) is expressed by both M (sLNv) and E (LNd) pacemaker subclasses and is coupled to G(sα) in both cases. We previously reported that PDF-R in M pacemakers elevates cAMP levels by activating the ortholog of mammalian adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) but that AC3 disruptions had no effect on E pacemaker sensitivity to PDF. Here, we show that PDF-R in E pacemakers activates a different AC isoform, AC78C, an ortholog of mammalian AC8. Knockdown of AC78C by transgenic RNAi substantially reduces, but does not completely abrogate, PDF responses in these E pacemakers. The knockdown effect is intact when restricted to mature stages, suggesting a physiological and not a development role for AC78C in E pacemakers. The AC78C phenotype is rescued by the overexpression of AC78C but not by overexpression of the rutabaga AC. AC78C overexpression does not disrupt PDF responses in these E pacemakers, and neither AC78C knockdown nor its overexpression disrupted locomotor rhythms. Finally, knockdown of 2 AKAPs, nervy and AKAP200, partially reduces LNd PDF responses. These findings begin to identify the components of E pacemaker PDF-R signalosomes and indicate that they are distinct from PDF-R signalosomes in M pacemakers: we propose they contain AC78C and at least 1 other AC.

  11. E AND M CIRCADIAN PACEMAKER NEURONS USE DIFFERENT PDF RECEPTOR SIGNALOSOME COMPONENTS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    We used real-time imaging to detect cAMP levels in neurons of intact fly brains to study mechanisms of circadian pacemaker synchronization by the neuropeptide PDF in Drosophila. PDF receptor (PDF-R) is expressed by both M (sLNv) and E (LNd) pacemaker sub-classes and is coupled to Gsα in both cases. We previously reported that PDF-R in M pacemakers elevates cAMP levels by activating the ortholog of mammalian Adenylate Cyclase 3 (AC3), but that AC3 disruptions had no effect on E pacemaker sensitivity to PDF. Here we show that PDF-R in E pacemakers activates a different AC isoform, AC78C, an ortholog of mammalian AC8. Knockdown of AC78C by transgenic RNAi substantially reduces, but does not completely abrogate, PDF responses in these E pacemakers. The knockdown effect is intact when restricted to mature stages, suggesting a physiological and not a development role for AC78C in E pacemakers. The AC78C phenotype is rescued by over-expression of AC78C, but not by over-expression of the rutabaga AC. AC78C over-expression does not disrupt PDF responses in these E pacemakers, and neither AC78C knockdown nor its over-expression disrupted locomotor rhythms. Finally, knockdown of two AKAPs, nervy and AKAP 200 partially reduces LNd PDF responses. These findings begin to identify the components of E pacemaker PDF-R signalosomes and indicate they are distinct from PDF-R signalosomes in M pacemakers: we propose they contain AC78C and at least one other AC. PMID:23929551

  12. A prospective pediatric clinical trial of digital music players: do they interfere with pacemakers?

    PubMed

    Chiu, Christine C; Huh, June; De Souza, Laura; Alfaro-Ramirez, Armando; Clegg, Robin; Fenwick, Laura; Hamilton, Robert M; Kirsh, Joel A; Gross, Gil J; Gao, Dongsheng; Stephenson, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent concern in the media about iPod interference with pacemakers. We systematically tested two types of digital music players (DMP) on pacemaker or ICD function in children. Patients were monitored by a 6-lead ECG and programmer telemetry. The pacemaker was tested in bipolar and unipolar sensing at normal and maximal sensitivities. The order of DMP tested was randomized. Each DMP was placed on top of the pacemaker pocket, put into "play" mode three times (5 seconds each), with and without programmer wand placed one cm adjacent to DMP. Pacemaker interference was defined as: pacing inhibition, inappropriate pacing, oversensing, or detection of high-rate episodes associated with the use of DMP. Of the 67 patients (mean age 12 +/- 5 years), 62 had pacemakers and five had ICDs; 39 endocardial and 28 epicardial systems. Patients were tested with Sansa (67), iPod 30 GB (51), and other DMPs (43). There was no evidence of interference with pacemaker function by any DMP under any of the study conditions (each performed in triplicate). Reproducible programmer telemetry interference was shown in 11 cases (Medtronic 6/47, St. Jude Medical 5/18, Guidant 0/2) related to use of iPod (6), Sansa (1), or others (4). None of these were associated with any evidence of pacemaker malfunction. Interference with pacemaker function could not be shown with iPod or MP3 players. No additional precaution beyond standard is necessary for patients with pacemakers when they are using these players.

  13. Modeling of stochastic behavior of pacemaker potential in interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jae Boum; Leem, Chae Hun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Song, In-Sung; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Heo, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Joo; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2014-09-01

    It is widely accepted that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) generate pacemaker potentials to propagate slow waves along the whole gastrointestinal tract. Previously, we constructed a biophysically based model of ICCs in mouse small intestine to explain the pacemaker mechanism. Our previous model, however, could not explain non-uniformity of pacemaker potentials and random occurrence of unitary potentials, thus we updated our model. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization is a key event to drive the cycle of pacemaker activity and was updated to reproduce its stochastic behavior. The stochasticity was embodied by simulating random opening and closing of individual IP3-mediated Ca(2+) channel. The updated model reproduces the stochastic features of pacemaker potentials in ICCs. Reproduced pacemaker potentials are not uniform in duration and interval. The resting and peak potentials are -75.5 ± 1.1 mV and -0.8 ± 0.5 mV, respectively (n = 55). Frequency of pacemaker potential is 14.3 ± 0.4 min(-1) (n = 10). Width at half-maximal amplitude of pacemaker potential is 902 ± 6 ms (n = 55). There are random events of unitary potential-like depolarization. Finally, we compared our updated model with a recently published model to speculate which ion channel is the best candidate to drive pacemaker depolarization. In conclusion, our updated mathematical model could now reproduce stochastic features of pacemaker activity in ICCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting Risk of Endovascular Device Infection in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia (PREDICT-SAB)

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, M. Rizwan; Palraj, Bharath Raj; Khalid, Sana; Uslan, Daniel Z.; Al-Saffar, Farah; Friedman, Paul A.; Hayes, David L.; Lohse, Christine M.; Wilson, Walter R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Baddour, Larry M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prompt recognition of underlying cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection in patients presenting with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is critical for optimal management of these cases. The goal of this study was to identify clinical predictors of CIED infection in patients presenting with SAB and no signs of pocket infection. Methods and Results All cases of SAB in CIED recipients at Mayo Clinic from 2001 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 131 patients with CIED who presented with SAB and had no clinical signs of device pocket infection. Forty-five (34%) of these patients had underlying CIED infection based on clinical and/or echocardiographic criteria. The presence of a permanent pacemaker rather than an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (OR 3.90, 95% CI 1.65–9.23), P=0.002), >1 device-related procedure (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.23–8.86, P=0.018), and duration of SAB ≥4 days (OR 5.54, 95% CI 3.32–13.23, P<0.001) were independently associated with an increased risk of CIED infection in a multivariable model. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for the multivariable model was 0.79, indicating a good discriminatory capacity to distinguish SAB patients with and without CIED infection. Conclusions Among patients presenting with SAB and no signs of pocket infection, the risk of underlying CIED infection can be calculated based on the type of device, number of device-related procedures, and duration of SAB. We propose that patients without any of these high-risk features have a very low risk of underlying CIED infection and may be monitored closely without immediate device extraction. Prospective studies are needed to validate this risk prediction model. PMID:25504648

  15. Predicting risk of endovascular device infection in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (PREDICT-SAB).

    PubMed

    Sohail, M Rizwan; Palraj, Bharath Raj; Khalid, Sana; Uslan, Daniel Z; Al-Saffar, Farah; Friedman, Paul A; Hayes, David L; Lohse, Christine M; Wilson, Walter R; Steckelberg, James M; Baddour, Larry M

    2015-02-01

    Prompt recognition of underlying cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection in patients presenting with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is critical for optimal management of these cases. The goal of this study was to identify clinical predictors of CIED infection in patients presenting with SAB and no signs of pocket infection. All cases of SAB in CIED recipients at Mayo Clinic from 2001 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 131 patients with CIED who presented with SAB and had no clinical signs of device pocket infection. Forty-five (34%) of these patients had underlying CIED infection based on clinical or echocardiographic criteria. The presence of a permanent pacemaker rather than an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (odds ratio, 3.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.65-9.23; P=0.002), >1 device-related procedure (odds ratio, 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-8.86; P=0.018), and duration of SAB ≥4 days (odds ratio, 5.54; 95% confidence interval, 3.32-13.23; P<0.001) were independently associated with an increased risk of CIED infection in a multivariable model. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the multivariable model was 0.79, indicating a good discriminatory capacity to distinguish SAB patients with and without CIED infection. Among patients presenting with SAB and no signs of pocket infection, the risk of underlying CIED infection can be calculated based on the type of device, number of device-related procedures, and duration of SAB. We propose that patients without any of these high-risk features have a low risk of underlying CIED infection and may be monitored closely without immediate device extraction. Prospective studies are needed to validate this risk prediction model. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Effects of protein kinase inhibitors on canine Purkinje fibre pacemaker depolarization and the pacemaker current i(f).

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F; Cohen, I S; DiFrancesco, D; Rosen, M R; Tromba, C

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of the protein kinase inhibitors H-7 and H-8 were investigated on diastolic depolarization of the action potential with microelectrodes and on the pacemaker current if with the two-microelectrode voltage clamp in canine cardiac Purkinje fibres. 2. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect on the slope of diastolic depolarization but eliminated the actions of isoprenaline (1 microM). 3. We examined the actions of H-7 and H-8 on if in the presence and absence of isoprenaline. H-7 (200 microM) shifted the pacemaker current if in the negative direction on the voltage axis, whereas 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect by itself. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 can reverse or prevent the actions of isoprenaline (1-5 microM) on if. 4. We applied activators of the cyclic AMP cascade down-stream to the beta-receptor, to further evaluate where H-7 and H-8 might be exerting their effects. When exposing Purkinje fibres to an adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin, 10-50 microM), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX, 100 microM) and a permeable cyclic AMP analogue (8-chlorophenylthio-cyclic AMP, 200 microM-1 mM), the amplitude of if was increased. H-7 and H-8 at 100-200 microM eliminated each of these actions. 5. These results suggest that a phosphorylation process is involved in the modulation of the pacemaker current, if, in Purkinje fibres. The different actions of H-7 and H-8 on basal if suggest the hypothesis that other protein kinases, possibly protein kinase C, might also be involved in regulating basal phosphorylation of if in Purkinje fibres. PMID:1804968

  17. Effects of protein kinase inhibitors on canine Purkinje fibre pacemaker depolarization and the pacemaker current i(f).

    PubMed

    Chang, F; Cohen, I S; DiFrancesco, D; Rosen, M R; Tromba, C

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of the protein kinase inhibitors H-7 and H-8 were investigated on diastolic depolarization of the action potential with microelectrodes and on the pacemaker current if with the two-microelectrode voltage clamp in canine cardiac Purkinje fibres. 2. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect on the slope of diastolic depolarization but eliminated the actions of isoprenaline (1 microM). 3. We examined the actions of H-7 and H-8 on if in the presence and absence of isoprenaline. H-7 (200 microM) shifted the pacemaker current if in the negative direction on the voltage axis, whereas 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect by itself. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 can reverse or prevent the actions of isoprenaline (1-5 microM) on if. 4. We applied activators of the cyclic AMP cascade down-stream to the beta-receptor, to further evaluate where H-7 and H-8 might be exerting their effects. When exposing Purkinje fibres to an adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin, 10-50 microM), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX, 100 microM) and a permeable cyclic AMP analogue (8-chlorophenylthio-cyclic AMP, 200 microM-1 mM), the amplitude of if was increased. H-7 and H-8 at 100-200 microM eliminated each of these actions. 5. These results suggest that a phosphorylation process is involved in the modulation of the pacemaker current, if, in Purkinje fibres. The different actions of H-7 and H-8 on basal if suggest the hypothesis that other protein kinases, possibly protein kinase C, might also be involved in regulating basal phosphorylation of if in Purkinje fibres.

  18. Achieving permanency for LGBTQ youth.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jill; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    This article brings together two significant efforts in the child welfare field: achieving permanence for youth in out-of-home care and meeting the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. During the past several years, a national movement has taken place to assure all children and youth have a permanent family connection before leaving the child welfare system; however, LGBTQ youth are not routinely included in the permanency discussions. At the same time, efforts in addressing the needs of LGBTQ youth have increased, but permanency is rarely mentioned as a need. This article offers models of permanence and practices to facilitate permanence with LGBTQ youth and their families. It also offers a youth-driven, individualized process, using youth development principles to achieve relational, physical, and legal permanence. Reunification efforts are discussed, including services, supports, and education required for youth to return to their family of origin. For those who cannot return home, other family resources are explored. The article also discusses cultural issues as they affect permanence for LGBTQ youth, and, finally, addresses the need for ongoing support services to sustain and support permanency.

  19. First permanent molar root development arrest associated with compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Sachin A; Patil, Anil; Varekar, Aniruddha

    2013-07-04

    Trauma or infection to the primary tooth may have deleterious effects on the underlying developing tooth buds. Anatomically the root apices of primary teeth are in close proximity to the developing permanent tooth buds; hence spread of infection originating from pulp necrosis of primary tooth may not only affect the underlying tooth bud but may also affect the adjacent tooth buds. The extent of malformation depends on the developmental stage of tooth or the age of patient. Presented here is a rare case of complete arrest of maxillary first permanent molar root growth due to spread of periapical infection originating from second primary molar leading to failure of its eruption and finally extraction. Histopathlogical analysis revealed compound odontoma associated with maxillary first permanent molar.

  20. The MINERVA study design and rationale: a controlled randomized trial to assess the clinical benefit of minimizing ventricular pacing in pacemaker patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Funck, Reinhard C; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Püererfellner, Helmut; Mont, Luis; Tukkie, Raymond; Pisapia, André; Israel, Carsten W; Grovale, Nicoletta; Grammatico, Andrea; Padeletti, Luigi

    2008-09-01

    Dual-chamber (DDD) pacing has generally been regarded as "physiologic pacing" and therefore expected to be superior to ventricular pacing. Major randomized trials have so far failed to demonstrate significant reductions in the incidences of mortality, stroke, and heart failure. It has been shown that unnecessary ventricular pacing in patients with sinus node dysfunction or only intermittent atrioventricular block is associated with ventricular desynchronization and increased risk of atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATA). The MINimizE Right Ventricular pacing to prevent Atrial fibrillation and heart failure (MINERVA) study is a prospective, multi-center, randomized, international, single-blind, controlled trial designed to determine whether physiologic pacing through the managed ventricular pacing (MVP) algorithm combined with preventive atrial pacing (PAP) and atrial antitachycardia pacing (ATP) is superior to standard DDD pacing in terms of 2-year reduction in death, permanent ATA, and cardiovascular hospitalizations. Patients with standard class I or II indications for permanent DDD pacing and history of ATA will receive a Medtronic EnRhythm implantable pacemaker (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). After a 1-month run-in period, patients will be randomized in a 1:1:1 manner to the DDD (control group, all OFF), the DDDRP (MVP + PAP + ATP ON), and the MVP group (only MVP ON). Up to 1,300 patients will be included in approximately 70 centers in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. The MINERVA study will make an important contribution to the management of patients with paroxysmal ATA and accepted indications for dual-chamber pacemaker implantation by determining whether physiologic pacing combined with PAP and ATP is superior to standard DDD pacing in terms of reduction of mortality, incidence of permanent ATA, and cardiovascular hospitalizations.