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Sample records for infected root canal

  1. Clinical management of infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-08-01

    Several hundred different species of bacteria are present in the human intraoral environment. Bacterial penetration of root canal dentin occurs when bacteria invade the root canal system. These bacteria may constitute a reservoir from which root canal reinfection may occur during or after endodontic treatment. The learning objective of this article is to review endodontic microbiology, update readers on the role of bacteria in pulp and periapical disease, and discuss the principles of management of infected root canal dentin. Complete debridement, removal of microorganisms and affected dentin, and chemomechanical cleansing of the root canal are suggested as being the cornerstones of successful endodontic therapy, followed by intracanal medication to remove residual bacteria, when required. PMID:9242125

  2. Synergistic growth effect among bacteria recovered from root canal infections

    PubMed Central

    Moreira Júnior, Gil; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino; Bambirra, Bernardo Henrique Silva; Bambirra, Felipe Henrique Silva; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Farias, Luiz Macedo; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Moreira, Elizabeth Spangler

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ecological relationships between bacterial species that colonize infected root canals. Root canal bacteria recovered from one patient with pulp canal necrosis were evaluated in vitro for synergistic and antagonistic activities determined by mono and co-culture growth kinetics and the production of bacteriocin-like substances using the double layer diffusion method. Peptostreptococcus prevotii triggered a significant increase of Fusobacterium nucleatum growth, while the former bacteria did not affect the growth of P. prevotii. The bacterial species did not produce antagonism activity against itself or against any of the other two species. Despite many studies have demonstrated the capability of root canal microorganisms to produce antagonistic substances, these in vitro experimental tests show the synergistic effect of P. prevotii on the growth of F. nucleatum. PMID:24031714

  3. Rethinking root canal treatment: understanding the difference between preventing and treating endodontic infection.

    PubMed

    El-Ma'aita, A M; Qualtrough, A J E; Darcey, J; Hunter, M J

    2015-07-10

    Root canal treatment is a frequently performed procedure aimed to address pulpal and peri-radicular disease. It comprises a number of clinical steps regardless of the initial diagnosis. The emphasis of each step varies according to whether there is a vital pulp (non-infected) or if the pulp system contains necrotic, infected tissue and there is peri-apical pathology. This article aims to discuss the differences in performing root canal treatments on teeth with vital and non-vital pulps. The reader should understand the differences between performing a root canal treatment in teeth with vital pulps and those with infected root canal spaces and peri-radicular pathology.

  4. Root canal

    MedlinePlus

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Gramicidin S in the Treatment of Root Canal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Lux, Hannah; Babii, Oleg; Afonin, Sergii; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    An intrinsic clindamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, the most common single species present in teeth after failed root canal therapy, often possesses acquired tetracycline resistance. In these cases, root canal infections are commonly treated with Ledermix® paste, which contains demeclocycline, or the new alternative endodontic paste Odontopaste, which contains clindamycin; however, these treatments are often ineffective. We studied the killing activity of the cyclic antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S (GS) against planktonic and biofilm cells of tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates of E. faecalis. The high therapeutic potential of GS for the topical treatment of problematic teeth is based on the rapid bactericidal effect toward the biofilm-forming, tetracycline-resistant E. faecalis. GS reduces the cell number of planktonic cells within 20–40 min at a concentration of 40–80 μg/mL. It kills the cells of pre-grown biofilms at concentrations of 100–200 μg/mL, such that no re-growth is possible. The translocation of the peptide into the cell interior and its complexation with intracellular nucleotides, including the alarmon ppGpp, can explain its anti-biofilm effect. The successful treatment of persistently infected root canals of two volunteers confirms the high effectiveness of GS. The broad GS activity towards resistant, biofilm-forming E. faecalis suggests its applications for approval in root canal medication. PMID:27618065

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Gramicidin S in the Treatment of Root Canal Infections.

    PubMed

    Berditsch, Marina; Lux, Hannah; Babii, Oleg; Afonin, Sergii; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    An intrinsic clindamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, the most common single species present in teeth after failed root canal therapy, often possesses acquired tetracycline resistance. In these cases, root canal infections are commonly treated with Ledermix(®) paste, which contains demeclocycline, or the new alternative endodontic paste Odontopaste, which contains clindamycin; however, these treatments are often ineffective. We studied the killing activity of the cyclic antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S (GS) against planktonic and biofilm cells of tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates of E. faecalis. The high therapeutic potential of GS for the topical treatment of problematic teeth is based on the rapid bactericidal effect toward the biofilm-forming, tetracycline-resistant E. faecalis. GS reduces the cell number of planktonic cells within 20-40 min at a concentration of 40-80 μg/mL. It kills the cells of pre-grown biofilms at concentrations of 100-200 μg/mL, such that no re-growth is possible. The translocation of the peptide into the cell interior and its complexation with intracellular nucleotides, including the alarmon ppGpp, can explain its anti-biofilm effect. The successful treatment of persistently infected root canals of two volunteers confirms the high effectiveness of GS. The broad GS activity towards resistant, biofilm-forming E. faecalis suggests its applications for approval in root canal medication. PMID:27618065

  7. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  8. Bactericidal Efficacy of Cold Plasma at Different Depths of Infected Root Canals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Sascha R.; Hertel, Moritz; Ballout, Husam; Pierdzioch, Philipp; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Wirtz, Henrik C.; Abu-Sirhan, Shady; Kostka, Eckehard; Paris, Sebastian; Preissner, Saskia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cold plasma (CP) has been shown to be effective even against multiresistant microorganisms. As previous investigations on the effect of CP in root canals showed promising results, the aim of the present study was to analyze the bactericidal efficacy of CP in different depths of infected dentin. Methods: 32 standardized root canals of human mandibular premolars were infected with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated for one week. Specimens were randomly selected for one of four disinfection methods: control (5mL NaCl), 5mL chlorhexidine (CHX), CP alone (CP), and a combination of 5mL CHX and cold plasma (CHX+CP). CHX was ultrasonically activated for 30s, while cold plasma was used for 60s in the root canals. Dentin samples at depths of 300, 500 and 800 µm were obtained and diluted serially. Colony forming units (CFUs) were counted on agar plates after 24h of incubation. Results: The highest overall logarithmic reduction factors (RF) were obtained from CHX+CP (log RF 3.56 p<0.01; Mann-Whitney U test), followed by CP (log RF 3.27 p<0.01) and CHX alone (log RF 2.65 p<0.01) related to the control. All disinfection methods showed significantly lower CFU counts compared to the control group in 300 µm and 800 µm (both p<0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test). Discussion: The adjuvant use of CP might be beneficial in highly infected root canals to improved disinfection. However, the disinfection effect against Enterococcus faecalis of CP is comparable to ultrasonically activated CHX. PMID:26962378

  9. Tissue response to potential root-end filling materials in infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Chong, B S; Ford, T R; Kariyawasam, S P

    1997-03-01

    The tissue responses to two potential root-end filling materials, a light-cured glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond) and a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Kalzinol) were compared with that to amalgam. In 27 premolar teeth of beagle dogs (54 roots), a collection of endodontic pathogenic bacteria was first inoculated into the root canals to induce periapical lesions. On each root, an apicectomy was performed and root-end cavities prepared to receive fillings of each material. The teeth and surrounding jaw were removed after 8 weeks (24 roots) and 4 weeks (30 roots); and they were prepared for histological examination. The tissue response to amalgam fillings after 4 and 8 weeks was marked by moderate or severe inflammation on all roots, and extended > 0.5 mm in 10 out of 18 roots. In contrast, after 8 weeks, the majority of roots filled with Kalzinol showed little or moderate inflammation while the tissue response to Vitrebond was the best of the three materials, and was also less extensive. After 4 weeks, the overall best tissue response was with Kalzinol, followed closely by Vitrebond. The differences between materials for both time periods with either none or few inflammatory cells when compared with that with either moderate or severe inflammation were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Similarly, the differences between materials for both time periods with no inflammation or inflammation extending < 0.2 mm when compared with that with inflammation extending > 0.2 mm (< or = 0.5 mm or > 0.5 mm) were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Both Vitrebond and Kalzinol have potential as root-end filling materials as the tissue response was considerably more favourable than that to amalgam.

  10. Short-term tissue response to potential root-end filling materials in infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Chong, B S; Pitt Ford, T R; Kariyawasam, S P

    1997-07-01

    The short-term tissue responses to two potential root-end filling materials, a light-cured glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond) and a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Kalzinol), were compared with that to amalgam using a previously devised experimental model. In 24 premolar teeth of beagle dogs (47 roots), a collection of endodontic pathogenic bacteria was first inoculated into the root canals to induce periradicular lesions. On each root, an apicoectomy was performed and root-end cavities prepared to receive fillings of each material. The teeth and surrounding jaw were removed after 2 weeks (23 roots) and 1 week (24 roots); they were then prepared for histological examination. The tissue response to amalgam fillings after 2 weeks and 1 week was marked by moderate or severe inflammation on all roots, and extended to < or = 0.5 mm or > 0.5 mm in 15 out of 16 roots. In contrast, after 2 weeks, the majority of roots filled with Kalzinol showed little or moderate inflammation, while the tissue response to Vitrebond was the best of the three materials, and was also the least extensive. After 1 week, the overall best tissue response was with Vitrebond, followed by Kalzinol. The differences between materials for both time periods with either none or few inflammatory cells when compared with that with either moderate or severe inflammation were not statistically significant (P < 0.02). However, the differences between materials for both time periods with no inflammation or inflammation extending < 0.2 mm when compared with that with inflammation extending > 0.2 mm (< or = 0.5 mm or > 0.5 mm) were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Apart from amalgam, in which healing was marked by the persistence of a localized focus of inflammation adjacent to the root-end filling, even though there were intersample variations, there was little overall difference in the temporal and qualitative healing response to Vitrebond and Kalzinol. Both Vitrebond and Kalzinol have potential as

  11. Antimicrobial effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation in infected root canals: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio Moura, Marcelo; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Rodrigues de Araujo Estrela, Cyntia; Estrela, Carlos; Djalma Pecora, Jesus

    2003-06-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial action of Er:YAG laser in infected root canals. A total of 36 human anterior teeth were prepared, sterilized and inoculated with suspensions of S. aureus, E. faecalis, P aeruginosa, B. subtilis and C. albicans. After the contamination period (28 days), the teeth were irrigated with sterile distilled water or 1% sodium hypochlorite and, then, irradiated with an Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2094 nm) with two different evaluation parameters: 52 mJ and 110 mJ laser output at the fiber tip. After the irradiation, the teeth were irrigated with sterile distilled water and the solutions were collected with sterile paper points and incubated in Letheen Broth for 48 hours. After this period 0,1 ml of this solution was transferred to 10 ml of Brain Heart Infusion and incubated for 48 hours. After 72 hours a new collect ion was done and incubated again. Based on the data, it was concluded that the distilled water or 1% sodium hypochlorite irradiated or not with an Er:YAG laser with two different parameters: 10 Hz, 110 mJ input and 52 mJ output, and 10 Hz, 250 mJ input and 110 mJ output had no antimicrobial activity in the root canals contaminated with the following microorganisms: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans.

  12. Comparison of Different Irrigants in the Removal of Endotoxins and Cultivable Microorganisms from Infected Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Cardoso, Flávia Goulart da Rosa; Chung, Adriana; Xavier, Ana Cláudia Carvalho; Figueiredo, Mariana Diehl; Martinho, Frederico Canato; Palo, Renato Miotto

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different irrigants used to remove endotoxins and cultivable microorganisms during endodontic therapy. Forty root canals were contaminated and divided into groups according to the irrigant: 2% NaOCl + surfactant, 2% CHX, 2.5% NaOCl, and pyrogen-free saline solution (control). Samples were collected after root canal contamination (S1), after instrumentation (S2), and 7 days after instrumentation (S3). Microorganisms and endotoxins were recovered from 100% of the contaminated root canals (S1). At S2, 2% NaOCl + surfactant, 2% CHX, and 2.5% NaOCl were able to completely eliminate cultivable microorganisms. At S3, both 2% CHX and 2.5% NaOCl were effective in preventing C. albicans and E. coli regrowth, but E. faecalis was still detected. No microorganism species was recovered from root canals instrumented with 2% NaOCl + surfactant. At S2, a higher percentage value of endotoxin reduction was found for 2% NaOCl + surfactant (99.3%) compared to 2% CHX (98.9%) and 2.5% NaOCl (97.18%) (p < 0.05). Moreover, at S3, 2% NaOCl + surfactant (100%) was the most effective irrigant against endotoxins. All irrigants tested were effective in reducing microorganisms and endotoxins from root canals. Moreover, 2% NaOCl + surfactant was the most effective irrigant against endotoxins and regrowth of microorganisms. PMID:26346574

  13. Comparison of Different Irrigants in the Removal of Endotoxins and Cultivable Microorganisms from Infected Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Cardoso, Flávia Goulart da Rosa; Chung, Adriana; Xavier, Ana Cláudia Carvalho; Figueiredo, Mariana Diehl; Martinho, Frederico Canato; Palo, Renato Miotto

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different irrigants used to remove endotoxins and cultivable microorganisms during endodontic therapy. Forty root canals were contaminated and divided into groups according to the irrigant: 2% NaOCl + surfactant, 2% CHX, 2.5% NaOCl, and pyrogen-free saline solution (control). Samples were collected after root canal contamination (S1), after instrumentation (S2), and 7 days after instrumentation (S3). Microorganisms and endotoxins were recovered from 100% of the contaminated root canals (S1). At S2, 2% NaOCl + surfactant, 2% CHX, and 2.5% NaOCl were able to completely eliminate cultivable microorganisms. At S3, both 2% CHX and 2.5% NaOCl were effective in preventing C. albicans and E. coli regrowth, but E. faecalis was still detected. No microorganism species was recovered from root canals instrumented with 2% NaOCl + surfactant. At S2, a higher percentage value of endotoxin reduction was found for 2% NaOCl + surfactant (99.3%) compared to 2% CHX (98.9%) and 2.5% NaOCl (97.18%) (p < 0.05). Moreover, at S3, 2% NaOCl + surfactant (100%) was the most effective irrigant against endotoxins. All irrigants tested were effective in reducing microorganisms and endotoxins from root canals. Moreover, 2% NaOCl + surfactant was the most effective irrigant against endotoxins and regrowth of microorganisms.

  14. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal full) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  15. A preliminary study of the antibacterial potential of cetylpyridinium chloride in root canals infected by E. faecalis.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Carlos; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Alves, Denise Ramos Silveira; Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Santos, Tatiane Oliveira; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to verify the antibacterial potential of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in root canals infected by Enterococcus faecalis. Forty human maxillary anterior teeth were prepared and inoculated with E. faecalis for 60 days. The teeth were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1: Root canal preparation (RCP) + 0.1% CPC with positive-pressure irrigation (PPI, Conventional, NaviTip(®)); 2: RCP + 0.2% CPC PPI; 3: RCP + 2.5% NaOCl PPI; 4: RCP + 2.5% NaOCl with negative-pressure irrigation system (NPI, EndoVac(®)); 5: Positive control; and 6: Negative control. Four teeth of each experimental group were evaluated by culture and 4 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In all teeth, the root canals were dried and filled with 17% EDTA (pH 7.2) for 3 min for smear layer removal. Samples from the infected root canals were collected and immersed in 7 mL of Letheen Broth (LB), followed by incubation at 37°C for 48 h. Bacterial growth was analyzed by turbidity of culture medium and then observed with a UV spectrophotometer. The irrigating solutions were further evaluated for antimicrobial effect by an agar diffusion test.The statistical data were treated by means, standard deviation, Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance. Significance level was set at 5%. The results showed the presence of E. faecalis after root canal sanitization. The number of bacteria decreased after the use of CPC. In the agar diffusion test, CPC induced large microbial inhibition zones, similar to 2% chlorhexidine and large than 2.5% NaOCl. In conclusion, cetylpyridinium chloride showed antibacterial potential in endodontic infection with E. faecalis.

  16. Efficacy of lasers as an adjunct to chemo-mechanical disinfection of infected root canals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fransson, H; Larsson, K M; Wolf, E

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of various types of lasers used as an adjunct to chemo-mechanical disinfection of infected root canals with the outcome measures 'normal periapical condition' or 'reduction of microbial load'. PubMed, CENTRAL and ISI Web of Knowledge literature searches with specific indexing terms and a subsequent hand search were made with stated limits and criteria. Relevant publications were retrieved, followed by interpretation. The quality of each included publication was assessed as high, moderate or low. The initial search process yielded 234 publications. All abstracts of these publications were read, and the reference lists of relevant publications were hand-searched. Ten articles were read in full text and interpreted according to a data extraction form. Five were included in the systematic review and were assessed. A meta-analysis was impossible to perform because the included studies were heterogeneous with regard to study design, treatment and outcome measures. Positive effects were reported; however, no concluding evidence grade could be made because each included study was judged to have low quality, primarily due to lack of a power analysis, blinding and reproducibility. The evidence grade for whether lasers can be recommended as an adjunct to chemo-mechanical disinfection of infected root canals was insufficient. This does not necessarily imply that laser should not be used as an adjunct to root canal treatment but instead underscores the need for future high-quality studies.

  17. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  18. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Irradiation with Radial Firing Tips on Candida albicans in Experimentally Infected Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To compare the disinfection effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser using radial firing tips with NaOCI in root canals infected with C. albicans and to evaluate the irradiation effect on the dentinal surfaces. Material and Methods. In total seventy-six mandibular premolar teeth were used. In order to standardize the incubation and sterilization procedure, eight teeth were used. Sixty-eight of the root canals were incubated with C. albicans suspension for 72 hours. The specimens were divided into 5 experimental groups. Two groups were constituted as Group 1 was irradiated with 1.5 W laser (n = 8) and group 2, which was irradiated with 2 W laser (n = 8). Two more groups were formed as Group 3 (2 W laser (n = 25) and Group 4 NaOCI (5%) (n = 25). Group 5 (n = 2) did not receive any treatment. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used to compare the different laser output powers. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used in order to compare the Candida cfu/ml levels according to treatment protocols (P < 0.05). Results. Both 1.5 W and 2 W laser resulted in a major reduction of C. albicans without a significant difference. The comparison of the dentin surfaces irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at two power settings resulted in similar morphological changes. However, NaOCI was found to be more effective in reduction of C. albicans than 2 W laser application. Conclusion. According to the results of the present study, the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with radial firing tips presented less antifungal effects on C. albicans in root canals of infected teeth than NaOCl solution. PMID:24955367

  19. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  20. Mandibular first molar with single root and single root canal

    PubMed Central

    Munavalli, Anil; Kambale, Sharnappa; Ramesh, Sachhi; Ajgaonkar, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable anatomic complexities and abnormalities with respect to number of roots and root canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of the existence of a fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal was diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. This case report presents a rare case of successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and root canal. PMID:26180424

  1. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    PubMed

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  2. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    PubMed

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  3. Antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa in infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Durand-Ramirez, Jorge Enrique; Falcão, Amanda; Silva, Emmanuel João Leal Nogueira da; Santos, Elizabete Brasil Dos; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa Willd DC (cat's claw, CC) in root dentin contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-eight human premolars were contaminated with E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and randomly divided into four groups according to the irrigant used during chemomechanical preparation (CMP): CC group: 2% CC gel; CHX group: 2% chlorhexidine digluconate gel (CHX); NaOCl group: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); and SS group: sterile saline (SS). Microbiological samples were collected before (S1) and after (S2) CMP and after 7 days (S3). Colony-forming units (CFU/mL) at the different sampling times and comparisons among the groups were statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p < 0.05). Significant bacterial reduction was achieved in all groups after CMP (p < 0.05). Results show no significant difference between S3 and S2 (p > 0.05) in the CC and CHX groups. Bacterial load was higher in S3 than in S2 samples (p < 0.05) in the NaOCl and SS groups. Our results suggest antibacterial effect of 2% CC gel against E. faecalis in infected dentin, in addition to antibacterial substantivity of 2% CC and 2% CHX up to 7 days.

  4. Antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa in infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Durand-Ramirez, Jorge Enrique; Falcão, Amanda; Silva, Emmanuel João Leal Nogueira da; Santos, Elizabete Brasil Dos; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa Willd DC (cat's claw, CC) in root dentin contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-eight human premolars were contaminated with E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and randomly divided into four groups according to the irrigant used during chemomechanical preparation (CMP): CC group: 2% CC gel; CHX group: 2% chlorhexidine digluconate gel (CHX); NaOCl group: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); and SS group: sterile saline (SS). Microbiological samples were collected before (S1) and after (S2) CMP and after 7 days (S3). Colony-forming units (CFU/mL) at the different sampling times and comparisons among the groups were statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p < 0.05). Significant bacterial reduction was achieved in all groups after CMP (p < 0.05). Results show no significant difference between S3 and S2 (p > 0.05) in the CC and CHX groups. Bacterial load was higher in S3 than in S2 samples (p < 0.05) in the NaOCl and SS groups. Our results suggest antibacterial effect of 2% CC gel against E. faecalis in infected dentin, in addition to antibacterial substantivity of 2% CC and 2% CHX up to 7 days. PMID:27119588

  5. Surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canals of maxillary incisors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents surgical endodontic management outcomes of maxillary incisors that were infected via the lateral canals. Two cases are presented in which endodontically-treated maxillary central incisors had sustained lateral canal infections. A surgical endodontic treatment was performed on both teeth. Flap elevation revealed vertical bone destruction along the root surface and infected lateral canals, and microscopy revealed that the lateral canals were the origin of the lesions. After the infected lateral canals were surgically managed, both teeth were asymptomatic and labial fistulas were resolved. There were no clinical or radiographic signs of surgical endodontic management failure at follow-up visits. This case report highlights the clinical significance and surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canal of maxillary incisor. It is important to be aware of root canal anatomy variability in maxillary incisors. Maxillary central incisors infected via the lateral canal can be successfully managed by surgical endodontic treatment. PMID:25671217

  6. Surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canals of maxillary incisors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Min; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Baik; Park, Sang-Hyuk

    2015-02-01

    This case report presents surgical endodontic management outcomes of maxillary incisors that were infected via the lateral canals. Two cases are presented in which endodontically-treated maxillary central incisors had sustained lateral canal infections. A surgical endodontic treatment was performed on both teeth. Flap elevation revealed vertical bone destruction along the root surface and infected lateral canals, and microscopy revealed that the lateral canals were the origin of the lesions. After the infected lateral canals were surgically managed, both teeth were asymptomatic and labial fistulas were resolved. There were no clinical or radiographic signs of surgical endodontic management failure at follow-up visits. This case report highlights the clinical significance and surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canal of maxillary incisor. It is important to be aware of root canal anatomy variability in maxillary incisors. Maxillary central incisors infected via the lateral canal can be successfully managed by surgical endodontic treatment.

  7. Root Canal Therapy of a Mandibular First Molar with Five Root Canals: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reyhani, Mohammad Frough; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar

    2007-01-01

    A mandibular first molar requiring root canal therapy was found with five canals, three mesial canals, and two distal canals. Initially, four canals (mesiobuccal, mesiolingual, distobuccal, and distolingual) were identified. The mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals were found in their normal locations, and a fifth canal was noted between these two. This case demonstrates a rare anatomical configuration and supplements previous reports of the existence of such configurations in mandibular first molars. PMID:24298291

  8. Management of Six Root Canals in Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fabio de Almeida; Sousa, Bruno Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning, shaping, and obturation of the root canal system. This clinical case describes conventional root canal treatment of an unusual mandibular first molar with six root canals. The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth with abnormal morphology is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. PMID:25685156

  9. The Antibacterial Efficacy of Photo-Activated Disinfection, Chlorhexidine and Sodium Hypochlorite in Infected Root Canals: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Shahi, Shahriar; Abdollahi, Amir Ardalan; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Negahdari, Ramin; Pakseresht, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study compared the efficacy of light-activated low-power laser, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 2.5% NaOCl in eliminating Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) from the root canal system. Methods and Materials: The root canals of 60 maxillary central incisors were contaminated with E. faecalis and then the bacteria were incubated for 24 h. All the root canals were instrumented in a crown-down manner with #4 and 3 Gates-Glidden drills, followed by RaCe rotary files (40/0.10, 35/0.08, and 30/0.06). The samples were randomly assigned to three experimental groups and one control group (n=15). In the control group no intervention was made. In the photo-activated disinfection (PAD) group, laser therapy was undertaken with diode laser beams (with an output power of 100 mW/cm2) for 120 sec. For the other two experimental groups, root canals were irrigated either with 5 mL of 2% CHX or 2.5% NaOCl solutions, respectively. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the CFU values of the bacteria and post-hoc Bonferroni test was used for pairwise comparisons. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The inhibition of bacterial growth in all the experimental groups was significantly superior to the control group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the effect of PAD and 2% CHX (P=0.05). The effect of 2.5% NaOCl was significantly better than that of the PAD technique (P<0.001). In addition, 2.5% NaOCl was significantly better than 2% CHX (P=0.007). Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy was effective in reducing the E. faecalis counts in comparison with the control group, but 2.5% NaOCl solution was the most effective protocol. PMID:27471527

  10. Root Canal Treatment of a Maxillary Second Premolar with Two Palatal Root Canals: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Golmohammadi, Maryam; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the root canal morphology and anatomy is essential for thorough shaping and cleaning of the entire root canal system and consequent successful treatment. This report describes a case of maxillary second premolar with two roots and three root canals (two mesial and distal palatal canals). The case report underlines the importance of complete knowledge about root canal morphology and possible variations, coupled with clinical and radiographic examination in order to increase the ability of clinicians to treat difficult cases. PMID:27471538

  11. The mysterious appearance of enterococci in filled root canals.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, M; Guggenheim, B

    2009-04-01

    In this narrative review, the potential reasons for the high occurrence of enterococci in filled root canals are explored. The pulpless root canal appears to be a habitat for these bacteria, particularly for Enterococcus faecalis. However, re-surveying the literature in caries research, it can be concluded that, contrary to earlier belief, enterococci are rare if ever found at the advancing front of dentinal lesions. The same is the case for true primary endodontic infections, but some uncertainty remains, because the coronal seal and the history of teeth harbouring enterococci have rarely been accurately investigated. Furthermore, from longitudinal studies with a known infection at the initiation of treatment, which was carried out under controlled asepsis, it is questionable whether enterococci are as difficult to eliminate from the canal system as is commonly held. A more likely explanation for the high occurrence of enterococci in filled root canals is that they enter after treatment, but from which source? The intriguing finding in this context is that enterococci do not appear to be colonizers of the oral cavity. They are merely transient oral bacteria, unless there is a predilection site such as the unsealed necrotic or filled root canal. The origin of this infection is most likely food. Using the example of enterococci in filled root canals, this paper highlights the possible importance of transient microorganisms in the oral cavity and changes in a microenvironment that can create favourable conditions for infection. PMID:19220511

  12. Nanodiamond-Gutta Percha Composite Biomaterials for Root Canal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Kim, Sue Vin; Limansubroto, Adelheid Nerisa; Yen, Albert; Soundia, Akrivoula; Wang, Cun-Yu; Shi, Wenyuan; Hong, Christine; Tetradis, Sotirios; Kim, Yong; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K; Ho, Dean

    2015-11-24

    Root canal therapy (RCT) represents a standard of treatment that addresses infected pulp tissue in teeth and protects against future infection. RCT involves removing dental pulp comprising blood vessels and nerve tissue, decontaminating residually infected tissue through biomechanical instrumentation, and root canal obturation using a filler material to replace the space that was previously composed of dental pulp. Gutta percha (GP) is typically used as the filler material, as it is malleable, inert, and biocompatible. While filling the root canal space with GP is the standard of care for endodontic therapies, it has exhibited limitations including leakage, root canal reinfection, and poor mechanical properties. To address these challenges, clinicians have explored the use of alternative root filling materials other than GP. Among the classes of materials that are being explored as novel endodontic therapy platforms, nanodiamonds (NDs) may offer unique advantages due to their favorable properties, particularly for dental applications. These include versatile faceted surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and their role in improving mechanical properties, among others. This study developed a ND-embedded GP (NDGP) that was functionalized with amoxicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used for endodontic infection. Comprehensive materials characterization confirmed improved mechanical properties of NDGP over unmodified GP. In addition, digital radiography and microcomputed tomography imaging demonstrated that obturation of root canals with NDGP could be achieved using clinically relevant techniques. Furthermore, bacterial growth inhibition assays confirmed drug functionality of NDGP functionalized with amoxicillin. This study demonstrates a promising path toward NDGP implementation in future endodontic therapy for improved treatment outcomes.

  13. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  14. Electrical impedance measurements of root canal length.

    PubMed

    Meredith, N; Gulabivala, K

    1997-06-01

    Electronic methods are now widely used during endodontic treatment for the assessment of root canal length. These commonly measure the electrical resistance or impedance between the root canal and the buccal mucosa. A number of studies have been undertaken to determine the accuracy of commercially available instruments. The aims of this investigation were to determine the electrical impedance characteristics of the root canal and periapical tissues in vivo, measure the changes relative to the distance of an endodontic instrument from the apical constriction and propose an equivalent circuit modelling the periapical tissues. The length of the root canals of 20 previously untreated teeth were determined using radiographic and electronic methods. Minimal canal preparation was carried out and measurements were made with a size 10 K-Flex file. A microprocessor-controlled LCR analyser was used to measure the electrical impedance characteristics of each root canal. The instrument measured the series and parallel resistive (RS, RP) and capacitance (CS, CP) component of the tissues at two test frequencies, 100 Hz and 1 kHz. Measurements were made for each root canal when the diagnostic file was placed at the apical constriction and repeated when the file was withdrawn to -0.5, -1.0, -1.5, -2.0 and -5.0 mm from the foramen. Readings were taken for each canal after the canal had been dried with paper points, and flooded first with deionised water and then with sodium hypochlorite. The root canals were then prepared, cleaned and obturated using standard endodontic procedures. The LCR analyser selected the series resistance component as the major measurement parameter. There was a clear increase in series resistance (RS) with increasing distance from the radiographic apex for dry canals and those containing deionised water and sodium hypochlorite. The mean resistance for dry canals was markedly higher than for those containing fluid, ranging from 22.19 k omega to 92.07 k omega

  15. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Secondary Dental Root Canal Infections: A Combination of Culture and Culture-Independent Approaches Reveals New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Annette Carola; Hellwig, Elmar; Vespermann, Robin; Wittmer, Annette; Schmid, Michael; Karygianni, Lamprini; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Persistence of microorganisms or reinfections are the main reasons for failure of root canal therapy. Very few studies to date have included culture-independent methods to assess the microbiota, including non-cultivable microorganisms. The aim of this study was to combine culture methods with culture-independent cloning methods to analyze the microbial flora of root-filled teeth with periradicular lesions. Twenty-one samples from previously root-filled teeth were collected from patients with periradicular lesions. Microorganisms were cultivated, isolated and biochemically identified. In addition, ribosomal DNA of bacteria, fungi and archaea derived from the same samples was amplified and the PCR products were used to construct clone libraries. DNA of selected clones was sequenced and microbial species were identified, comparing the sequences with public databases. Microorganisms were found in 12 samples with culture-dependent and -independent methods combined. The number of bacterial species ranged from 1 to 12 in one sample. The majority of the 26 taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (14 taxa), followed by Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. One sample was positive for fungi, and archaea could not be detected. The results obtained with both methods differed. The cloning technique detected several as-yet-uncultivated taxa. Using a combination of both methods 13 taxa were detected that had not been found in root-filled teeth so far. Enterococcus faecalis was only detected in two samples using culture methods. Combining the culture-dependent and –independent approaches revealed new candidate endodontic pathogens and a high diversity of the microbial flora in root-filled teeth with periradicular lesions. Both methods yielded differing results, emphasizing the benefit of combined methods for the detection of the actual microbial diversity in apical periodontitis. PMID:23152922

  1. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section and crossing - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  2. Nanodiamond–Gutta Percha Composite Biomaterials for Root Canal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Root canal therapy (RCT) represents a standard of treatment that addresses infected pulp tissue in teeth and protects against future infection. RCT involves removing dental pulp comprising blood vessels and nerve tissue, decontaminating residually infected tissue through biomechanical instrumentation, and root canal obturation using a filler material to replace the space that was previously composed of dental pulp. Gutta percha (GP) is typically used as the filler material, as it is malleable, inert, and biocompatible. While filling the root canal space with GP is the standard of care for endodontic therapies, it has exhibited limitations including leakage, root canal reinfection, and poor mechanical properties. To address these challenges, clinicians have explored the use of alternative root filling materials other than GP. Among the classes of materials that are being explored as novel endodontic therapy platforms, nanodiamonds (NDs) may offer unique advantages due to their favorable properties, particularly for dental applications. These include versatile faceted surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and their role in improving mechanical properties, among others. This study developed a ND-embedded GP (NDGP) that was functionalized with amoxicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used for endodontic infection. Comprehensive materials characterization confirmed improved mechanical properties of NDGP over unmodified GP. In addition, digital radiography and microcomputed tomography imaging demonstrated that obturation of root canals with NDGP could be achieved using clinically relevant techniques. Furthermore, bacterial growth inhibition assays confirmed drug functionality of NDGP functionalized with amoxicillin. This study demonstrates a promising path toward NDGP implementation in future endodontic therapy for improved treatment outcomes. PMID:26452304

  3. Nanodiamond-Gutta Percha Composite Biomaterials for Root Canal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Kim, Sue Vin; Limansubroto, Adelheid Nerisa; Yen, Albert; Soundia, Akrivoula; Wang, Cun-Yu; Shi, Wenyuan; Hong, Christine; Tetradis, Sotirios; Kim, Yong; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K; Ho, Dean

    2015-11-24

    Root canal therapy (RCT) represents a standard of treatment that addresses infected pulp tissue in teeth and protects against future infection. RCT involves removing dental pulp comprising blood vessels and nerve tissue, decontaminating residually infected tissue through biomechanical instrumentation, and root canal obturation using a filler material to replace the space that was previously composed of dental pulp. Gutta percha (GP) is typically used as the filler material, as it is malleable, inert, and biocompatible. While filling the root canal space with GP is the standard of care for endodontic therapies, it has exhibited limitations including leakage, root canal reinfection, and poor mechanical properties. To address these challenges, clinicians have explored the use of alternative root filling materials other than GP. Among the classes of materials that are being explored as novel endodontic therapy platforms, nanodiamonds (NDs) may offer unique advantages due to their favorable properties, particularly for dental applications. These include versatile faceted surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and their role in improving mechanical properties, among others. This study developed a ND-embedded GP (NDGP) that was functionalized with amoxicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used for endodontic infection. Comprehensive materials characterization confirmed improved mechanical properties of NDGP over unmodified GP. In addition, digital radiography and microcomputed tomography imaging demonstrated that obturation of root canals with NDGP could be achieved using clinically relevant techniques. Furthermore, bacterial growth inhibition assays confirmed drug functionality of NDGP functionalized with amoxicillin. This study demonstrates a promising path toward NDGP implementation in future endodontic therapy for improved treatment outcomes. PMID:26452304

  4. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification... for use during endodontic therapy to fill the root canal of a tooth. (b) Classification. (1) Class...

  5. Root canal anatomy of mandibular second molars. Part I.

    PubMed

    Manning, S A

    1990-01-01

    The root canal anatomy of 149 mandibular second molars was studied using a technique in which the pulp was removed, the canal space filled with black ink and the roots demineralized and made transparent. Of the 149 teeth, 22 per cent had single roots, 76 per cent had two roots and 2 per cent had three roots. In the single-rooted teeth, three canals were most common, while in the mesial root of the two-rooted teeth, two canals that joined near the apex and one canal in the distal root were most frequent. Round canals were most common in two-rooted teeth and C-shaped canals in single-rooted teeth. Transverse anastomoses were found in 33 per cent of roots, most commonly in the middle third of the root. Lateral canals were found in 72 per cent of roots, most commonly in the apical third of the root. The apical foramen was positioned at the apex in only 33 per cent of roots, and apical deltas were found in 35 per cent. The patient's age and race affected canal shape, with more round canals present in patients over 35 years of age, and more C-shaped canals in Asians. The sex of the patient and the side of the mouth affected the presence of apical deltas, with more being found in males and on the left side. Single-rooted teeth had more complex root canal systems than two-rooted teeth, with more lateral canals, transverse anastomoses, apical deltas and C-shaped canals.

  6. Newer Root Canal Irrigants in Horizon: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Sushma; Jaju, Prashant P.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium hypochloride is the most commonly used endodontic irrigant, despite limitations. None of the presently available root canal irrigants satisfy the requirements of ideal root canal irrigant. Newer root canal irrigants are studied for potential replacement of sodium hypochloride. This article reviews the potential irrigants with their advantages and limitations with their future in endodontic irrigation. PMID:22190936

  7. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  11. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  12. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  13. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  14. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  15. Influence of the canal contents on the electrical assisted determination of the length of root canals.

    PubMed

    Pommer, Oliver; Stamm, Oliver; Attin, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of the root canal status on the determination of the root canal length by an electronic apex locator in vital and necrotic canals and canals with root canal filling retrieval. One hundred seven teeth with a total of 171 canals with various contents (105 vital pulp, 47 necrotic pulp, and 19 retrieval of root canal filling materials) were measured for root canal length in vivo with the AFA Apex Finder. The distance between the file tip and the radiographic apex was also determined on radiographs. In 86% of the evaluated roots, the file tip position as indicated by the Apex Finder was located within 0.5 mm of a point 1.0-mm short of the radiographic apex. The Apex Finder showed higher accuracy for determining the apical constriction in vital canals (93.9%) than in necrotic canals (76.6%), and this difference was statistically significant (p < or = 0.05). The Apex Finder indicated the point -1 mm +/- 0.5 mm in canals with retrieval of root canal filling materials in 68.4% of these cases, but because of the small number of retrieval cases, this is not comparable statistically with vital and necrotic cases. The authors concluded that the AFA Apex Finder is highly accurate in vital canals.

  16. Endodontic Management of Maxillary First Molar with Five Root Canals, Including Two Distobuccal Root Canals: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dakshita Joy; Sinha, Ashish Amit; Prakash, Prem; Jaiswal, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Multiple canals in the root are part of the normal morphology of the tooth. A canal may sometimes be overlooked, however, and this may lead to failure of treatment. The first step in successful endodontic treatment, therefore, is gaining access to the pulp chamber and locating all the canals. In order to achieve this goal, practitioners need to be familiar with all possible variations in root canal morphology, and should thoroughly explore roots to ensure that all canals are identified, debrided, and obturated. Here, we report the diagnosis, treatment planning, and endodontic management of a maxillary first molar with five root canals, including two distobuccal root canals, in a 22-year-old woman. PMID:26961335

  17. Treponema diversity in root canals with endodontic failure

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega, Leticia M. M.; Delboni, Maraisa G.; Martinho, Frederico C.; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C. R.; Gomes, Brenda P. F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to investigate the prevalence of eight oral Treponemas (Treponema denticola, T. amylovorum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. pectinovorum, T. socranskii, T. vicentii and T. lecithinolyticum) in teeth with endodontic treatment failure and periapical lesion. Methods: Samples were taken from 40 root canals presenting endodontic failure and periapical lesion. DNA extraction was performed and Nested-PCR technique was used for the detection of Treponema species using specific primers. Results: Treponemas was detected in 56.5% of the samples analyzed (22/39). Individual root canals yielded a maximum of 6 target Treponema species. T. denticola (30.8%) and T. maltophilum (30.8%) were the most frequently detected species followed by T. medium (20.5%), T. socranskii (20.5%), T. pectinovorum (17.9%) and T. vicentii (17.9%). Positive association was verified between T. denticola and T. maltophilum such as T. medium (P<.05). T. lecithinolyticum was positively associated with intraradicular post (P<.05). Conclusion: The present study revealed that a wide variety of Treponema species plays a role in persistent/secondary infection turning the root canal microbiota even more complex than previously described by endodontic literature. PMID:23408792

  18. Deciduous Mandibular Second Molar with Supernumerary Roots and Root Canals Associated with Missing Mandibular Permanent Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Shabina; Gambhir, Natasha; Rehani, Usha

    2011-01-01

    Morphological variations like additional roots and root canals in human deciduous dentition are rare. Knowledge of the morphology, variation of root and root canals of deciduous teeth are useful for successful endodontic treatment and exodontia. Presented here is a case report of the supernumerary roots and additional root canals of deciduous mandibular second molar (85) with congenitally bilateral missing of mandibular permanent second premolar (35 and 45) tooth bud.

  19. Bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser combined with sodium hypochlorite irrigation against Enterococcus faecalis deep inside dentinal tubules in experimentally infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Chen, B; Qiu, J; He, W; Lv, H; Qu, T; Yu, Q; Tian, Y

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser radiation combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation in the treatment of Enterococcus faecalis deep inside dentinal tubules. The Er:YAG laser was activated, respectively, at 0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 W for either 20 or 30 s; 52.5 g l(-1) NaOCl and normal saline were used for the control groups. Root canals before and after treatments were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacterial reductions both on the root canal walls and at 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules were analysed using a one-way analysis of variance. SEM results showed that the Er:YAG laser combined with NaOCl disinfected the dentinal tubules from 200 to over 500 μm depth as irradiation power and time increased. This combination killed significantly more bacteria than both the negative control group at each level tested and the positive control group at 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules. It reached 100% in all experimental groups, both on the root canal walls and at 100 and 200 μm inside the dentinal tubules. However, at 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules, only the groups treated with 0.5 and 1.0 W for 30s exhibited no bacterial growth. Of the two groups in which no bacteria were detected at all tested depths, Er:YAG laser irradiation at 0.5 W for 30 s combined with NaOCl irrigation was preferable because of the lower emission power and shorter irradiation time, and may serve as a new option for effective root canal disinfection. PMID:26645354

  20. Bactericidal effect of the CO2 laser in the root canal: an in-vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, Norbert; Wilkert-Walter, Cornelia; Lampert, Friedrich

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bactericidal effect of a CO2 laser used in a continuous mode. Classically prepared root canals were irradiated under standardized conditions with power settings of 2, 4, and 6 Watts. The mean elimination of Enterococcus faecalis in prepared and infected root canals of extracted teeth was 98.97%, 99.51% and 99.34% respectively. Minimum elimination was 91.67% and maximum 99.696%.

  1. Root canal filling evaluation using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Nica, Luminita; Ionita, Ciprian; Marcauteanu, Corina; Goguta, Luciana; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-04-01

    Endodontic therapy consists in cleaning and shaping the root canal system, removing organic debris and sealing the intra-canal space with permanent filling materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various root canal fillings in order to detect material defects, the marginal adaptation at the root canal walls and to assess the quality of the apical sealing. 21 extracted single-root canal human teeth were selected for this study. We instrumented all roots using NiTi rotary instruments. All canals were enlarged with a 6% taper size 30 GT instrument, 0,5 mm from the anatomical apex. The root canals were irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite, followed by 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the instrumentation was completed, the root canals were obturated using a thermoplasticizable polymer of polyesters. In order to assess the defects inside the filling material and the marginal fit to the root canal walls, the conebeam micro-computed tomography (CBμCT) was used first. After the CBμCT investigation, time domain optical coherence tomography working in en face mode (TDefOCT) was employed to evaluate the previous samples. The TDefOCT system was working at 1300 nm and was doubled by a confocal channel at 970 nm. The results obtained by CBμCT revealed no visible defects inside the root-canal fillings and at the interfaces with the root-canal walls. TDefOCT investigations permit to visualize a more complex stratificated structure at the interface filling material/dental hard tissue and in the apical region.

  2. Root canal treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three roots

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Josey; Devadathan, Aravindan; Syriac, Gibi; Shamini, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment needs a thorough knowledge of both internal and external anatomy of a tooth. Variations in root canal anatomy constitute an impressive challenge to the successful completion of endodontic treatment. Undetected extra roots and canals are a major reason for failed root canal treatment. Three separate roots in a maxillary first premolar have a very low incidence of 0.5–6%. Three rooted premolars are anatomically similar to molars and are sometimes called “small molars or radiculous molars.” This article explains the diagnosis and endodontic management of a three rooted maxillary premolar with separate canals in each root highlighting that statistics may indicate a low incidence of abnormal variations in root canal morphology of a tooth, but aberrant anatomy is a possibility in any tooth. Hence, modern diagnostics like cone beam computed tomography, and endodontic operating microscope may have to be used more for predictable endodontic treatment. PMID:26538958

  3. Bacterial coronal leakage after obturation with three root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Timpawat, S; Amornchat, C; Trisuwan, W R

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bacterial leakage of root canals obturated with three root canal sealers, using Endodontalis faecalis as a microbial tracer to determine the length of time for bacteria to penetrate through the obturated root canal to the root apex. Seventy-five, single-rooted teeth with straight root canals had the crown cut off at the cementoenamel junction. Root canals were instrumented by a step-back technique. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 19 teeth each and another 2 groups as positive and negative controls (9 teeth each). The experimental groups were dependent on the sealer used: AH-Plus, Apexit, and Ketac-Endo. The root canals were obturated using a lateral condensation technique. After 24 h the teeth were attached to microcentrifuge tubes with 2 mm of the root apex submerged in Brain Heart Infusion broth in glass test tubes. The coronal portions of the root canal filling materials were placed in contact with E. faecalis. The teeth were observed for bacterial leakage daily for 30 and 60 days. With the chi2 test for comparing pairs of groups at the 0.05 level (p < 0.05), there was no statistical difference between Ketac-Endo and AH-Plus (p > 0.06), but Apexit had significantly higher leakage (p < 0.05) at 30 days. After 60 days there was no statistical difference between Ketac-Endo and Apexit (p > 0.05), but Apexit leaked more than AH-Plus. The conclusion drawn from this experiment was that epoxy resin root canal sealer was found to be more adaptable to the root canal wall and filling material than a calcium hydroxide sealer when bacterial coronal leakage was studied.

  4. Root canal instruments are poorly standardized.

    PubMed

    Stenman, E; Spångberg, L S

    1993-07-01

    In an earlier study we demonstrated that root canal instruments vary greatly in their effectiveness in removing substrates. To further analyze the reason for this variation of results, the dimensions of the instruments used were considered of interest as their matching effectiveness may be size dependent. Nine different brands of Hedstrom files, seven brands of K files, and four brands of special files were examined. The measurements were done in a computerized measuring microscope and the data were compared with earlier reported data on machining. Although the dimensions of the instruments varied greatly, no correlation could be found between the machining and dimensions. Only one brand of files was completely within allowable size range. PMID:8245754

  5. Alternative techniques in root canal debridement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Ruxandra; Todea, Carmen; Bǎlǎbuc, Cosmin; Nica, Luminita; Armani, Giacomo; Locovei, Cosmin

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional chemo-mechanical preparation is limited regarding the decontamination of the endodontic space, which is why alternative techniques such as laser radiation have their importance in the modern endodontic treatment. The present study aims to assess the possibility of improving the debridement of the root canals by removing smear layer using Er: YAG laser radiation. We used 18 extracted teeth, which were subjected to the same initial protocol and then divided into 5 study groups: the control group has not been treated with laser; the other 4 groups were exposed to laser radiation using two different geometries peaks of quartz and two energy levels. Scanning electronic microscopy revealed an increased efficiency in the debridement of all interested areas when using PIPS and XPulse tips at proper energy. In the two groups treated with inferior laser energy, the debridement didn't prove to be superior to the conventional treatment.

  6. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  7. Mandibular Second Molar with a Single Root and a Single Canal: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anna; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Suresh, Nandhini

    2013-01-01

    The variability of root canal system morphology of multirooted teeth represents a continuous challenge to endodontic diagnosis and therapeutics. This report extends the range of known possible anatomical variations to include teeth with lesser number of root and root canals. Variations of root canal systems need not always be in the form of extra canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of existence of fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Thus the aim of this article is to present three cases of endodontically managed mandibular second molars with a single root and root canal. PMID:24392427

  8. Modeling and measurement of root canal using stereo digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Krisnamurthy, Satthya; Brown, Cecil

    2000-04-01

    Determining root canal length is a crucial step in success of root canal treatment. Root canal length is commonly estimated based on pre-operation intraoral radiography. 2D depiction of a 3D object is the primary source of error in this approach. Techniques based on impedance measurement are more accurate than radiographic approaches, but do not offer a method for depicting the shape of canal. In this study, we investigated a stererotactic approach for modeling and measurement of root canal of human dentition. A weakly perspective model approximated the projectional geometry. A series of computer-simulated objects was used to test accuracy of this model as the first step. The, to assess the clinical viability of such an approach, endodontic files inserted in the root canal phantoms were fixed on an adjustable platform between a radiographic cone and an image receptor. Parameters of projection matrix were computed based on the relative positions of image receptors, focal spot, and test objects. Rotating the specimen platform from 0 to 980 degrees at 5-degree intervals set relative angulations for stereo images. Root canal is defined as the intersection of two surfaces defined by each projection. Computation of error for length measurement indicates that for angulations greater than 40 degrees the error is within clinically acceptable ranges.

  9. Root canal morphology of South Asian Indian maxillary molar teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian Maxillary molars using a tooth clearing technique. Materials and Methods: Hundred teeth each comprising of first, second, and third molars collected from different dental schools and clinics in India were subjected to standard dye penetration, decalcification and clearing procedure before being studied. Results: The first molar mesiobuccal roots exhibited 69% Type I, 24% Type II, 4% Type IV, 2% Type V, and 1% exhibited a Vertuccis Type VIII canal anatomy. In the group with three separate roots the second molar mesiobuccal roots in exhibited 80.6% Type I, 15.3% Type II, 2.7% Type IV, and 1.4% Type V canal anatomy while the third molars mesiobuccal roots exhibited 57.4% Type I, 32% Type II, 2.1% Type III, 8.5% Type IV, 1% had a Type V canal anatomy in the similar group. Conclusion: A varied root canal anatomy was seen in the mesiobuccal root canal of the maxillary molars. PMID:25713497

  10. Cytotoxicity of Two Bioactive Root Canal Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Pezelj-Ribaric, Sonja; Roguljić, Marija; Miletic, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of two different bioactive root canal sealers: one based on mineral trioxide aggregate, MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Solucoes Odontologicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and the other based on bioceramics, Endosequence BC Sealer (Brasseler, Savannah, Georgia, USA), in culture of mouse L929 fibroblasts. Materials and methods Mouse fibroblasts (L929), obtained from subcutaneous connective tissue of mouse line C3Hf, were cultivated in plastic culture flasks in an incubator at 37şC, with 5% CO2 and 90% humidity. Freshly mixed Endosequence BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex (0.1 g each) were placed on sterile teflon discs, 6 mm in diameter. Teflon discs with the materials as well as empty discs serving as control were placed in wells of 12-well plate. After incubation times of 1, 6, 20 and 24 hours, the teflon discs were removed from the wells and the number of viable cells was determined using trypan blue in Neubauer chamber. Results In comparison to the control group, MTA Fillapex had significantly less viable cells for all incubation periods (p≤0.05), while Endosequence BC sealer had significantly less viable cells after 6, 20, and 24 hours of incubation (p≤0.05). MTA Fillapex comprised significantly less viable cells in comparison to Endosequence BC sealer after the first hour and after 20 hours of incubation (p≤0.05), while for the other incubation periods there were no significant differences (p≥0.05). Conclusion MTA Fillapex and Endosequence BC sealer were both cytotoxic in cultures of mouse L929 fibroblasts.

  11. Cytotoxicity of Two Bioactive Root Canal Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Pezelj-Ribaric, Sonja; Roguljić, Marija; Miletic, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of two different bioactive root canal sealers: one based on mineral trioxide aggregate, MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Solucoes Odontologicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and the other based on bioceramics, Endosequence BC Sealer (Brasseler, Savannah, Georgia, USA), in culture of mouse L929 fibroblasts. Materials and methods Mouse fibroblasts (L929), obtained from subcutaneous connective tissue of mouse line C3Hf, were cultivated in plastic culture flasks in an incubator at 37şC, with 5% CO2 and 90% humidity. Freshly mixed Endosequence BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex (0.1 g each) were placed on sterile teflon discs, 6 mm in diameter. Teflon discs with the materials as well as empty discs serving as control were placed in wells of 12-well plate. After incubation times of 1, 6, 20 and 24 hours, the teflon discs were removed from the wells and the number of viable cells was determined using trypan blue in Neubauer chamber. Results In comparison to the control group, MTA Fillapex had significantly less viable cells for all incubation periods (p≤0.05), while Endosequence BC sealer had significantly less viable cells after 6, 20, and 24 hours of incubation (p≤0.05). MTA Fillapex comprised significantly less viable cells in comparison to Endosequence BC sealer after the first hour and after 20 hours of incubation (p≤0.05), while for the other incubation periods there were no significant differences (p≥0.05). Conclusion MTA Fillapex and Endosequence BC sealer were both cytotoxic in cultures of mouse L929 fibroblasts. PMID:27688421

  12. On the dynamics of root canal infections—what we understand and what we don't

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, Matthias; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of the root canal space and their sequelae can be extremely painful and potentially dangerous, yet they do not necessarily have to be. Chronic, asymptomatic inflammatory lesions around the apex of a tooth with a necrotic dental pulp or an insufficient root canal treatment can develop unnoticed by the patient, and remain so for years. The course of disease is modulated by both the virulence of the microbiota established in the root canal space and the capacity of the immune system to curb the infection. To both ends, highly convincing investigations to help us understand when and why the tissues around an endodontically involved tooth become acutely inflamed are missing. We will discuss how recent advances in molecular identification of microorganisms have altered our understanding of root canal infections, and which information is currently missing to link clinical experience with observations from experimental research. PMID:25654162

  13. Root canal preparation in endodontics: conventional versus laser methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.; Moskowitz, Emrey

    1992-06-01

    Conventional cleaning and shaping of root canal systems employs hand and/or rotary instrumentation to remove the contents of the canal and shape the canal to receive a filling material. With the advent of the Nd:YAG laser system another method of accomplishing proper cleaning and shaping is evaluated. Single rooted teeth were radiographed bucco- lingually and mesio-distally and were divided into 2 groups. The first group was accessed and the root canal systems cleaned and shaped with a step back technique utilizing hand files and gates glidden burs. At completion of the procedure the teeth were again radiographed at the same positions as those prior to the procedure. The teeth were split longitudinally and examined under scanning electron microscopy to assess cleaning. The second group of teeth were accessed, and cleaning and shaping was accomplished using the Nd:YAG laser in combination with hand files and rotary instruments. These teeth were subjected to the same analysis as those in the first group. The before and after radiographs of each group were subjected to image analysis to determine effectiveness of the two methods in shaping the canal systems. We will discuss the ability of Nd:YAG to clean and shape root canal spaces and remove smear layer and organic tissue remnants from those areas.

  14. Mandibular lateral incisor with Vertucci Type IV root canal morphological system: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kanika

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the root canal anatomy are commonly occurring phenomenon. A thorough knowledge of root canal anatomy and its variation is necessary for successful completion of endodontic treatment. Mandibular anteriors are known for having extra canals. The role of genetics and racial variations may result in difference of incidence of root number and canal number. This paper attempts at explaining a rare case of successful endodontic management of two-rooted lateral incisor with awareness of data pertaining to number of canals, knowledge of canal morphology, correct radiographic interpretation, and tactile examination of canal wall which are important in detecting the presence of multiple canals. PMID:27003981

  15. Accessory roots and root canals in human anterior teeth: a review and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H M A; Hashem, A A

    2016-08-01

    Anterior teeth may have aberrant anatomical variations in the number of roots and root canals. A review of the literature was conducted using appropriate key words in major endodontic journals to identify the available reported cases as well as experimental and clinical investigations on accessory roots and root canals in anterior teeth. After retrieving the full text of related articles, cross-citations were identified, and the pooled data were then discussed. Results revealed a higher prevalence in accessory root/root canal variations in mandibular anterior teeth than in maxillary counterparts. However, maxillary incisor teeth revealed the highest tendency for accessory root/root canal aberrations caused by anomalies such as dens invaginatus and palato-gingival groove. Primary anterior teeth may also exhibit external and internal anatomical variations in the root, especially maxillary canines. Therefore, dental practitioners should thoroughly assess all teeth scheduled for root canal treatment to prevent the undesirable consequences caused by inadequate debridement of accessory configurations of the root canal system. PMID:26174943

  16. Adhesive Approach Using Internal Coping for Vertical Root Fractured Teeth with Flared Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shuhei; Sekita, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Ken'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Vertical root fractures are often observed in teeth with endodontic treatment and post space preparation. Frequently, because such teeth have flared root canals with thin dentin walls, conventional treatments are disadvantageous in terms of adhesiveness, sealability and risk of refracture. Here we devised an intentional replantation method that uses internal resin coping, with a reinforcing effect on thin root canal dentin. In two patients treated with this method, satisfactory conditions have been maintained. This report suggests that an intentional replantation method in which an internal resin coping is employed may be a useful therapy for fractured teeth with flared root canals.

  17. Adhesive Approach Using Internal Coping for Vertical Root Fractured Teeth with Flared Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shuhei; Sekita, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Ken'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Vertical root fractures are often observed in teeth with endodontic treatment and post space preparation. Frequently, because such teeth have flared root canals with thin dentin walls, conventional treatments are disadvantageous in terms of adhesiveness, sealability and risk of refracture. Here we devised an intentional replantation method that uses internal resin coping, with a reinforcing effect on thin root canal dentin. In two patients treated with this method, satisfactory conditions have been maintained. This report suggests that an intentional replantation method in which an internal resin coping is employed may be a useful therapy for fractured teeth with flared root canals. PMID:26373031

  18. Laser Application in Dentistry: Irradiation Effects of Nd:YAG 1064 nm and Diode 810 nm and 980 nm in Infected Root Canals-A Literature Overview.

    PubMed

    Saydjari, Yves; Kuypers, Thorsten; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Objective. In endodontics, Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and diode laser (810 nm and 980 nm) devices are used to remove bacteria in infected teeth. A literature review was elaborated to compare and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using these lasers. Methods. Using combined search terms, eligible articles were retrieved from PubMed and printed journals. The initial search yielded 40 titles and 27 articles were assigned to full-text analysis. The studies were classified based upon laser source, laser energy level, duration/similarity of application, and initial and final bacterial count at a minimum of 20 prepared root canals. Part of the analysis was only reduced microorganisms and mechanically treated root canals upon preparation size of ISO 30. All studies were compared to evaluate the most favorable laser device for best results in endodontic therapy. Results. A total of 22 eligible studies were found regarding Nd:YAG laser 1064 nm. Four studies fulfilled all demanded criteria. Seven studies referring to the diode laser 980 nm were examined, although only one fulfilled all criteria. Eleven studies were found regarding the diode laser 810 nm, although only one study fulfilled all necessary criteria. Conclusions. Laser therapy is effective in endodontics, although a comparison of efficiency between the laser devices is not possible at present due to different study designs, materials, and equipment. PMID:27462611

  19. Effectiveness of a new method of disinfecting the root canal, using Er, Cr:YSGG laser to kill Enterococcus faecalis in an infected tooth model.

    PubMed

    Licata, M E; Albanese, A; Campisi, G; Geraci, D M; Russo, R; Gallina, G

    2015-02-01

    Some lasers have demonstrated to provide effective disinfection when used as adjunctive device to the conventional treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effectiveness of the erbium, chromium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr:YSGG) laser by measuring its bactericidal effect inside the root canal experimentally colonized with Enterococcus faecalis. The laser was tested at different irradiation times (30 and 60 s) and energy of impulses (75 and 25 mJ). A total of 52 single-rooted extracted human teeth were endodontically prepared with rotary instrumentation. All were sterilized and inoculated with a suspension of E. faecalis (105 bacteria/ml). The teeth were randomized into three treatment (group 1, group 2, and group 3) and one control groups. In all groups, teeth were chemically irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Groups 1 and 2 were also irradiated at 30 and 60 s, respectively, with an Er, Cr:YSGG laser at 75 mJ. Teeth of group 3 were treated with laser for 60 s at 25 mJ. Samples were processed to detect the presence of E. faecalis. For all groups, a bactericidal effect was observed. The use of laser at 75 mJ with an irradiation time of 30 and 60 s eliminated a percentage of 92.3 and 100% of E. faecalis, respectively. In the control group, a reduction of 92.3% was observed. Lower percentage of reduction (46.1%) was obtained in teeth treated with laser at 25 mJ for 60 s. No statistical differences were observed between the groups (P = 0.543, Fisher's exact test). The results indicated a bactericidal effect of Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at the settings used in this study. The highest bactericidal effect of this laser was observed at 60 s of irradiation time, using an energy pulse of 75 mJ.

  20. Effectiveness of KTP laser versus 980 nm diode laser to kill Enterococcus faecalis in biofilms developed in experimentally infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Umberto; Palaia, Gaspare; Nardo, Alessia; Tenore, Gianluca; Telesca, Vito; Kornblit, Roly; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Frioni, Alessandra; Valenti, Piera; Berlutti, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial action of KTP (potassium-titanyl-phosphate) laser irradiations (compared with 980 nm diode laser), associated with conventional endodontic procedures, on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Fifty-six dental roots with single canals were prepared with Ni-Ti rotary instruments, autoclaved, inoculated with an E. faecalis suspension and incubated for 72 h. They were randomly allocated to control and treatment groups. Laser parameters were as follows: power 2.5 W, Ton 35 ms, Toff 50 ms (KTP laser); power 2.5 W, Ton 30 ms, Toff 30 ms (980 nm diode laser). To evaluate the residual bacterial load, BioTimer Assay was employed. The chemo-mechanical treatment together with laser irradiations (KTP and 980 nm diode lasers) achieved a considerable reduction of bacterial load (higher than 96% and 93%, respectively). Regarding both laser systems, comparisons with conventional endodontic procedures (mortality rate of about 67%) revealed statistically highly significant differences (P ≤ 0.01). This study confirms that laser systems can provide an additional aid in endodontic disinfection.

  1. Variations in the Root Form and Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Mandibular First Molars in a Sri Lankan Population

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Roshan; Malwatte, Uthpala; Abayakoon, Janak; Wettasinghe, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the number of roots and morphology of the root canal system of permanent mandibular first molars (M1) in a Sri Lankan population. Sample of 529 M1 teeth was used. The number of roots was examined and the lengths of the mesial and distal roots were measured to the nearest 0.01 mm. Vacuum injection protocol was used to inject China ink into the root canal system, making it transparent. Root canal morphology was recorded using Vertucci's classification. Presence of furcation canals, position of lateral canals, intercanal communications, level of bifurcation, and convergence of the root canal system were recorded. M1 showed three roots in 4.1% of the sample. Commonest root canal morphology of the mesial root was type IV and the distal root was type I. The level of bifurcation of the root canals was commonly observed in the cervical one-third of the root while convergence was observed in the apical one-third in both roots. Prevalence of three rooted mandibular first molars is less than 5%. Mesial root showed the most variable canal morphology. Prevalence of furcation canals was 1.5% while that of middle mesial canals was 0.2%. PMID:26351583

  2. Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Che Ab Aziz, Zeti A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioceramic-based root canal sealers are considered to be an advantageous technology in endodontics. The aim of this review was to consider laboratory experiments and clinical studies of these sealers. An extensive search of the endodontic literature was made to identify publications related to bioceramic-based root canal sealers. The outcome of laboratory and clinical studies on the biological and physical properties of bioceramic-based sealers along with comparative studies with other sealers was assessed. Several studies were evaluated covering different properties of bioceramic-based sealers including physical properties, biocompatibility, sealing ability, adhesion, solubility, and antibacterial efficacy. Bioceramic-based sealers were found to be biocompatible and comparable to other commercial sealers. The clinical outcomes associated with the use of bioceramic-based root canal sealers are not established in the literature. PMID:27242904

  3. Influence of Root Canal Tapering on Smear Layer Removal.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Tanbakuchi, Behrad; Zadeh, Mohsen Movahed; Mohammadi, Marzieh Maghadam

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to compare the influence of root canal taper on the efficacy of irrigants and chelating agents in smear layer removal. Eighty mesial roots of molar teeth were selected and prepared with rotary instruments. In group A, file 30/0.02 and in group B, file 30/0.4 were placed at working length and the smear layer was removed. In groups C and D, root canal preparation was the same as in groups A and B, respectively, except that the smear layer was not removed. The amount of the smear layer was quantified using a scanning electron microscope. Greater smear layer was detected in the apical portion of each group, whereas no significant difference was detected between groups in other portions. No statistical difference was found between canals with different tapers. PMID:27348950

  4. Endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dilip; Reddy, Smitha; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Kamishetty, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Internal anatomy of pulp is complex. The first mandibular molars typically have two roots, one mesial with two root canals and another distal root, which contains one or two canals. A 20-year-old female patient reported with intermittent pain and incomplete root canal treatment in left lower back region since 1-week. Refined access cavity revealed initially two canals in mesial and two canals in the distal root. With operating microscope and cone beam computerized tomography, two additional canals (L-mesio-buccal and B-mesio-lingual) were identified in mesial root. One-year follow-up showed patient was asymptomatic and complete healing of periapical radiolucency. PMID:26430309

  5. Endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dilip; Reddy, Smitha; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Kamishetty, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Internal anatomy of pulp is complex. The first mandibular molars typically have two roots, one mesial with two root canals and another distal root, which contains one or two canals. A 20-year-old female patient reported with intermittent pain and incomplete root canal treatment in left lower back region since 1-week. Refined access cavity revealed initially two canals in mesial and two canals in the distal root. With operating microscope and cone beam computerized tomography, two additional canals (L-mesio-buccal and B-mesio-lingual) were identified in mesial root. One-year follow-up showed patient was asymptomatic and complete healing of periapical radiolucency. PMID:26430309

  6. Evaluation of pre-fabricated root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Hew, Y S; Purton, D G; Love, R M

    2001-03-01

    In this in vitro study, properties of a titanium alloy post recently introduced to the market (IntegraPost), were compared with those of a clinically proven stainless steel post (ParaPost). The IntegraPost has a unique, perforated, spherical head and a microknurled shank surface. The posts were tested for rigidity, for retention within the root canals of extracted teeth and for ability to retain composite resin cores. The two post types exhibited similar properties in core and root canal retention, however, the IntegraPost was significantly less rigid than the ParaPost. PMID:11350574

  7. Optodynamic Phenomena During Laser-Activated Irrigation Within Root Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Gregorčič, Peter; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-07-01

    Laser-activated irrigation is a powerful endodontic treatment for smear layer, bacteria, and debris removal from the root canal. In this study, we use shadow photography and the laser-beam-transmission probe to examine the dynamics of laser-induced vapor bubbles inside a root canal model and compare ultrasonic needle irrigation to the laser method. Results confirm important phenomenological differences in the two endodontic methods with the laser method resulting in much deeper irrigation. Observations of simulated debris particles show liquid vorticity effects which in our opinion represents the major cleaning mechanism.

  8. Evaluation of root morphology and root canal configuration of premolars in the Turkish individuals using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Duygu Goller; Kose, Emre; Ozcan, Gozde; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Canger, Emin Murat; Sisman, Yıldıray

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to assess the root and root canal morphology of maxillary and mandibular premolars in a Turkish population by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this study, CBCT images of 2134 premolars (987 maxillary, 1147 mandibular) were obtained from 404 patients. Details of gender, age, number of roots and canals, and canal configuration in each root were recorded. The canal configuration was classified and evaluated according to Vertucci's criteria. Results: The majority of maxillary premolars had two separate roots; although, three roots were identified in 1% of maxillary first premolars. However, most of the mandibular premolars had a single root. The two canals (69.9%) and type I (62.6%) and type II (34.1%) configuration for upper first premolar, one canal (82.1%) and type I (77.6%) canal configuration for second premolar was the most prevalent root canal frequency. The most prevalent root canal frequency was the one canal (96.2%) and type I (94.2%) and type V (3.2%) configuration for mandibular first premolar, one canal (98.9%) and type I (98.9%) canal configuration for second premolar. There was no difference in the root canal configurations and the numbers of canals between the left and the right side of both females and males (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Recognition of morphology and anatomy of the root canal system is one of the most important factors for successful endodontic treatment. Preoperative CBCT examination allows determination of root canal configuration of premolar teeth and helps clinicians in root canal treatment. PMID:26929695

  9. Antibacterial Efficacy of Super-Oxidized Water on Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms in Root Canal

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Recai; Alacam, Tayfun; Hubbezoglu, Ihsan; Tunc, Tutku; Sumer, Zeynep; Alici, Oguzhan

    2016-01-01

    Background The success of endodontic treatment depends on a few crucial factors. One of these factors is the complete chemomechanic preparation of root canal against various bacteria. In particular, the effect of resistant bacteria may cause intense pain with flare-up and formation of periapical lesions. Therefore, the strong effect of irrigants plays an important role in terms of the complete elimination of these bacteria to achieve long-term successful treatment. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of super-oxidized water (SPO) in root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Methods One hundred twenty single-root, premolar teeth were selected. Initially, the teeth were prepared and then disinfected. E. faecalis were inoculated and kept at 37°C for 24 hours in the root canals. The re-inoculation procedure was repeated on the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth days. The infected root canals were divided into one negative (saline) and one positive (sodium hypochlorite) control group and four experimental groups (super-oxidized water: 1, 2, 3, or 5 minutes) (n = 20). Paper points were placed in the root canals to control and evaluate the biofilm formation. Biofilms were counted on blood agar plates, and data was evaluated and statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results Although sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) showed no statistically significant difference when compared with three and five minutes of SPO irrigation (P > 0.05), NaOCl showed statistically significant differences among all other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions Super-oxidized water indicated a remarkable and similar bactericidal effect to that of traditional NaOCl against E. faecalis biofilms. In terms of successful endodontic treatment approaches, super-oxidized water may be used as an effective irrigation solution in clinics. PMID:27800142

  10. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Brajkovic, Denis; Ilic, Dragan; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Rakocevic, Zlatko; Djuric, Marija; Busse, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples' microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  11. Delayed tooth replantation: MTA as root canal filling.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Saito, Célia Tomiko Matida Hamata; Hamanaka, Elizane Ferreira; Poi, Wilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    MTA has been investigated as a root-end filling material. Its mechanism of action has some similarities to that of Ca(OH)2. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repair process taking place in the delayed replantation of monkey teeth using calcium hydroxide and MTA as root canal filling materials. Five monkeys had their lateral incisors extracted and bench-dried for 60 minutes. After root canal preparation, the teeth were assigned to two groups according to root canal filling material: I, calcium hydroxide; and II, MTA. The same treatment sequence was followed for both groups: coronal seal, periodontal ligament removal, immersion of the tooth in 2% acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride, irrigation of the socket with saline and replantation. Both groups exhibited replacement resorption, areas of ankylosis and absence of inflammatory root resorption. Statistically similar results (p > 0.05) were observed for both groups regarding replacement root resorption, but the groups differed significantly (p < 0.05) regarding the occurrence of ankylosis. MTA may be a viable clinical option for filling teeth submitted to delayed replantation, and is an acceptable option for treating replanted permanent teeth in order to prevent tooth resorption, particularly when dressing changes are not possible. PMID:25337936

  12. Root Canal Treatment of a Two-Rooted C-Shaped Maxillary First Molar: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Paksefat, Sara; Rahimi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The most difficult maxillary teeth for endodontic treatment are the maxillary first molars (MFM) due to their complex root canal anatomy. The presence of two roots and C-shaped canals in MFMs has been reported in rare cases. The present case reports root canal treatment of MFM with two roots, where the palatal and buccal roots were joined together in a C-shaped configuration. PMID:25386214

  13. Microhardness of different resin cement shades inside the root canal

    PubMed Central

    Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria V.; Garrido, Miguel A.; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare microhardness along the root canal post space of two resin cements in different shades and a dual-cure resin core material. Study Design: Root canals of 21 bovine incisors were prepared for post space. Translucent posts (X•Post, Dentsply DeTrey) were luted using one the following resin luting agent: Calibra (Dentsply DeTrey) in Translucent, Medium and Opaque shades, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) in Translucent, A2 and A3 shades and the dual-cure resin core material Core•X flow. All materials were applied according to manufacturers’ instructions and were all photopolymerized (Bluephase LED unit, Ivoclar Vivadent, 40s). After 24 hours, roots were transversally cut into 9 slices 1 mm thick from the coronal to apical extremes, three corresponding to each root third. Then, VHNs were recorded (100 gf, 30 s) on the resin luting materials along the adhesive interface in all sections. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and SNK tests (α=0.05). Results: A significant influence on microhardness of resin luting material in their respective shades (p<0.001), root third (p<0.001) and interactions between them was detected (p<0.001). RelyX Unicem cement showed the highest microhardness values and Calibra the lowest, regardless of the shade selected. All resin luting materials tested exhibited a significantly higher microhardness in the cervical third. Conclusions: Microhardness of resin luting agents tested inside the canal is dependent on material brand and resin cement shade seems to be a less relevant factor. Microhardness decreased along the root canal, regardless of the shade selected. Key words:Cement shade, degree of conversion, dual-cured resin cements, fiber posts, microhardness, root thirds. PMID:22322514

  14. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  15. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n = 168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz); diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p < 0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  16. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H.; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n=168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz) diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p<0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p<0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  17. Thermographic assessment of root canal obturation using thermomechanical compaction.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, J J; Biagioni, P A; Lamey, P J; Hussey, D L

    1997-05-01

    The temperature changes on the root surface of 30 extracted human premolar teeth during thermomechanical root canal obturation with gutta-percha were determined using an infrared thermal imaging camera. Three handpiece rotational speeds of 8, 12 and 16 x 10(3) r.p.m. were used, in conjunction with a Gutta Condensor. On completion of the procedure, the quality of tooth canal obturation was examined radiographically. Under the conditions of this experiment, surface root temperature rises of > 97 degrees C were recorded during all three speed settings. The radiographic quality of obturation between the groups appeared not to be significantly different. The clinical relevance of these findings is uncertain, but the temperatures reported are of a magnitude to be of biological importance.

  18. Fine-tuning of bioactive glass for root canal disinfection.

    PubMed

    Waltimo, T; Mohn, D; Paqué, F; Brunner, T J; Stark, W J; Imfeld, T; Schätzle, M; Zehnder, M

    2009-03-01

    An ideal preparation of 45S5 bioactive glass suspensions/slurries for root canal disinfection should combine high pH induction with capacity for continuing release of alkaline species. The hypothesis of this study was that more material per volume of bioactive glass slurry is obtained with a micrometric material (< 5 microm particle size) or a micrometric/ nanometric hybrid, rather than a solely nanometric counterpart. This should correlate with alkaline capacity and antimicrobial effectiveness. Slurries at the plastic limit were prepared with test and reference materials in physiological saline. Total mass and specific surface area of glass material per volume were determined. Continuous titration with hydrochloric acid was performed, and antimicrobial effectiveness was tested in extracted human premolars mono-infected with E. faecalis ATTC 29212 (N = 12 per material). While the nanometric slurry had a 12-fold higher specific surface area than the micrometric counterpart, the latter had a considerably higher alkaline capacity and disinfected significantly better (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.05). The hybrid slurry behaved similarly to the micrometric preparation.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Diode Laser and Sodium Hypochlorite in Enterococcus Faecalis-Contaminated Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Khosrow; Sooratgar, Aidin; Zolfagharnasab, Kaveh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Afkhami, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the disinfection ability of 980-nm diode laser in comparison with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as a common root canal irrigant in canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Methods and Materials: The root canals of 18 extracted single-rooted premolars were prepared by rotary system. After decoronation, the roots were autoclaved. One specimen was chosen for the negative control, and the remaining teeth were incubated with E. faecalis suspension for two weeks. Subsequently, one specimen was selected as the positive control and the remaining samples were divided into two groups (n=8). The samples of the first group were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and the second group were treated with a 980-nm diode laser. Microbial samples were taken from the root canals and bacterial cultivation was carried out. The average value and the standard deviation of colony-forming units (CFU) of each specimen were measured using descriptive statistics. The student’s t-test was used to compare the reduction in CFU in each group. The equality of variance of CFU was measured by the Levene’s test. Results: NaOCl resulted in 99.87% removal of the bacteria and showed significantly more antibacterial effect compared to the 980-nm diode laser which led to 96.56% bacterial reduction (P<0.05). Conclusion: Although 5.25% NaOCl seems to reduce E. faecalis more effectively, the diode laser also reduced the bacterial count. Therefore a 980-nm diode laser could be considered as a complementary disinfection method in root canal treatment. PMID:26843870

  20. Five root canals in peg lateral incisor with dens invaginatus: A case report with new nomenclature for the five canals

    PubMed Central

    Jaikailash, Shanmugam; Kavitha, Mahendran; Ranjani, Muthukrishnan Sudharshana; Saravanan, Balasubramaniam

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes endodontic treatment completed in a peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, with single root and five root canals of which, one is due to dens invaginatus. Cone beam computed tomogram scanning confirmed the unique morphology of the tooth. New nomenclature for the five canals is proposed. PMID:25125854

  1. A Clinical Update on the Different Methods to Decrease the Occurrence of Missed Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Asgary, Saeed; Shalavi, Sousan; V. Abbott, Paul

    2016-01-01

    One of the main causes of endodontic treatment failure is the clinician’s inability to localize all the root canals. Due to the complex anatomy of the root canal system, missed canals are not uncommon. There are several strategies to decrease the possibility of missed root canals starting with good pre-operative radiographies. In order to overcome the limitations of conventional radiographies, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be considered. A correct access cavity preparation is of pivotal importance in localizing the orifices of the root canals. Furthermore, ultrasonics are very important devices to find missed canals. Increasing magnification and illumination enhance the possibility of finding all root canals during root canal treatment. The purpose of the present paper was to review all of the above techniques and devices. PMID:27471533

  2. Bacterial penetration of the root canal of intact incisor teeth after a simulated traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-12-01

    One of the aims in treating traumatised teeth is to maintain the vitality of the pulp or allow conditions favourable for pulp revascularisation. However, infection of the pulp and root canal system may prevent this. A number of pathways have been proposed that allow bacteria to invade the root canal system, however most of these pathways cannot account for pulp infection in teeth that did not sustain injury to the periodontal attachment. Enamel/dentine cracks have been proposed as a portal for bacterial invasion of seemingly intact teeth and the aim of this study was to determine if bacteria could invade the root canal system after a simulated traumatic episode. Twenty intact and sound upper central incisors were chosen and prepared. One tooth was selected as a sterility control and the external crown surface of the remaining 19 teeth was subjected to infection with Streptococcus gordonii in a bacterial microleakage model. Over 7 days samples of growth media from the root canal system were taken and tested for bacteria. Sixteen of the teeth did not demonstrate bacterial invasion over the time frame. These teeth were then prepared for testing in a pendulum impact device and were subjected to a blow which did not fracture the crowns or dislodge the tooth from its simulated alveolus. The teeth were then prepared and tested in the bacterial microleakage model. After impact seven of the teeth demonstrated bacterial invasion of the root canal system (P = 0.002). These teeth were then reprepared for testing in the bacterial microleakage model. The crowns of five teeth, selected at random, were coated with two layers of light cured unfilled resin, the remaining two were used as positive controls. All the teeth coated with resin did not demonstrate bacterial invasion (P = 0.00), while the positive controls demonstrated invasion. The results suggested that enamel/dentine infractions were pathways for bacterial invasion of the root canal system of traumatised teeth. The

  3. Physicochemical properties and interfacial adaptation of root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, Piedad S; Berástegui, Ester; Gaton-Hernández, Patrícia; Silva, Léa A B; Leite, Giselle A; Silva, Roberto S

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the physicochemical properties and interfacial adaptation to canal walls of Endo-CPM-Sealer, Sealapex and Activ GP with the well-established AH Plus sealer. The following analyses were performed: radiopacity, pH variation and solubility using samples of each material and scanning electron microscopy of root-filled bovine incisors to evaluate the interfacial adaptation. Data were analyzed by the parametric and no-parametric tests (α=0.05). All materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA requirements for radiopacity. Endo-CPM-Sealer presented the lowest radiopacity values and AH Plus was the most radiopaque sealer (p=0.0001). Except for ActiV GP, which was acidic, all other sealers had basic chemical nature and released hydroxyl ions. Regarding solubility, all materials met the ANSI/ADA recommendations, with no statistically significant difference between the sealers (p=0.0834). AH Plus presented the best adaptation to canal walls in the middle (p=0.0023) and apical (p=0.0012) thirds, while the sealers Activ GP and Endo-CPM-Sealer had poor adaptation to the canal walls. All sealers, except for ActiV GP, were alkaline and all of them fulfilled the ANSI/ADA requirements for radiopacity and solubility. Regarding the interfacial adaptation, AH Plus was superior to the others considering the adaptation to the bovine root canal walls.

  4. Quality improvement of photopolimerizable-cement root canal obturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis A.; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto; Kuranaga, Carlos; Dias da Silva, Marcos; do Carmo de Andrade Nono, Maria; Cerquiera Rezende, Mirabel

    2003-06-01

    The sealing cements commonly used for endodontic applications are of the type cured through chemical reactions. During the polymerization process, mechanical contractions are not uncommon, leading to a non-perfect sealing. Photopolymerizable cements usually presents superior performance as compared to those chemically activated. However, difficulties in carrying the light to difficult-to-reach regions like the dental apex preclude those material of being accepted in the dental office routine. This work reports on a novel technique which allow the light curing of photopolymerizable cements in endodontic applications. A special light guide had been developed to allow the curing light to reach and polymerize the sealing cement in the apex region. The technique was tested by using single-root human teeth with normal canal morphology. The Ultradent EndoREZ root canal sealer and a resin-based photopolymerizable filler specially developed for the current application had been used. The cone-shaped light guide was introduced into treated canals filled with the photopolymerizable material, up to the apical region. Light from an argon laser was launched onto the light guide for polymerization. All test samples were immersed in methylene-blue solution for microleakage testing. All samples treated with the self-polymerizable material presented dye penetration to some extent. No sample within the group which had the filling material polymerized by using the light guide presented dye penetration through the canal wall.

  5. 3D root canal modeling for advanced endodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shane Y.; Dong, Janet

    2002-06-01

    More than 14 million teeth receive endodontic (root canal) treatment annually. Before a clinician's inspection and diagnosis, destructive access preparation by removing teeth crown and dentin is usually needed. This paper presents a non-invasive method for accessing internal tooth geometry by building 3-D tooth model from 2-D radiographic and endoscopic images to be used for an automatic prescription system of computer-aided treatment procedure planning, and for the root canal preparation by an intelligent micro drilling machine with on-line monitoring. It covers the techniques specific for dental application in the radiographic images acquirement, image enhancement, image segmentation and feature recognition, distance measurement and calibration, merging 2D image into 3D mathematical model representation and display. Included also are the methods to form references for irregular teeth geometry and to do accurately measurement with self-calibration.

  6. Photoactivated disinfection (PAD) of dental root canal system – An ex-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Dennis; Maruthingal, Sunith; Indira, Rajamani; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Durgesh, B.H.; Basavarajappa, Santhosh; John, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the efficacy of photo activated disinfection (PAD) in reducing colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) in infected dental root canals. The study compared the efficacy of PAD with conventional endodontic treatment (CET) and also a combination of CET along with PAD. Material and Methods 53 maxillary incisors were taken for the study. Teeth were divided into 3 groups, CET (Group I) (n = 11), PAD (Group II) (n = 21), and a combination of CET and PAD (Group III) which consisted of (n = 21) samples, Group II and Group III were further divided into 2 subgroups, Group IIa, IIb and Group IIIa, IIIb. Strains of E. faecalis were inoculated in all the root canals. CET group samples were treated by chemo-mechanical preparation (CMP) alone, PAD samples were treated with laser alone at 2 different exposure time (4 min and 2 min). In the combination treatment, samples were treated initially by CET and then by PAD for a time period of 4 min and 2 min. Contents of the root canal were aspirated, diluted and plated in Tryptone Soya Broth (TSB) and plates were incubated for 24 h to observe the bacterial regrowth. Results Showed PAD used along with CMP reduced the bacterial load of E. faecalis by 99.5% at 4 min and 98.89% at 2 min. Conclusion PAD may be an adjunctive procedure to kill residual bacteria in the dental root canal systems after standard endodontic root canal preparation. PMID:26858548

  7. Bacterial penetration after obturation with four different root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Ali Cağin; Güler, Eda; Güler, Ahmet Umut; Ertaş, Ertan

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare bacterial penetration after obturation with lateral compaction technique using four different root canal sealers. This study was performed on 100 teeth including negative control (n = 10), positive control (n = 10), and experimental groups (n = 80). 80 teeth were randomly divided into five groups of 20 teeth each and obturated with AH 26 (A), AH Plus (AP), Sealapex (S), Ketac-Endo (K) root canal sealers. Evaluation was carried out for 60 days. After 30 days of comparing the bacterial penetration values, total penetration was observed in 85% of the Group AP, and group K, 80% of the group S, and 75% of the group A. According to the results of chi(2) test, there was no statistically significant difference observed between any groups (p > 0.05). After 60 days of comparing the bacterial penetration values, total penetration was observed in 100% of the group AP, group K, and group S and 95% of the group A. It may be concluded that under the conditions of this study, there was no difference in the bacterial penetration of the four root canal sealers tested at 30 and 60 days.

  8. [Treatment of a fractured endodontical instrument in the root canal].

    PubMed

    Schipper, M; Peters, L B

    2015-12-01

    A 53-year-old woman with continuing pain coming from a lower first molar was diagnosed with apical periodontitis, with a retained fractured instrument in the root canal. There are a variety of treatment options for dealing with a corpus alienum in a root canal. In this case it was decided to treat the tooth endodontically, and leave the fractured instrument fragment in situ. The selection of this treatment option was made on the basis of knowledge of the original diagnosis and the success rates of the various treatment options as described in the relevant literature, weighed against the possible risks and their effects on the prognosis. This suggested that the use of a dental operating microscope has a positive impact on the success rates of endodontic treatment The prognosis for endodontic treatment when a fractured instrument fragment is left within the root canal, as in this case, is not significantly reduced. The presence of preoperative periapical pathology, however, is a more clinically significant prognostic indicator. PMID:26665200

  9. Comparing irradiation parameters on disinfecting enterrecoccus faecalis in root canal disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarp, Ayşe. S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Although conventional method carries all the debris, studies on persisting infections in root canals show bacteria and their toxins spread from the root canal and contaminate the apical region. Thus developes apical periodontitis or symptoms, and loss of tooth. Even if the treatment has adequate success, anatomy of root canal system can be very complexwith accessory canals. The disinfecting effect of laser radiation has only recently been used in dentistry. Laser irradiation has a bactericidal effect. Each wavelength has its own advantages and limitations according to their different absorption characteristics, depending on their 'absorption coefficient'. The sterilizing efficiency of two types of wavelengths, a new fiber laser 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser and an 2940 nm Er:YAG Laser were compared in this study. Irradiation with a power of 0.50 W with 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser disinfected 95,15% of bacteria, however irradiation with same laser power with Er:YAG Laser caused a reduction of 96,48 %. But there was no significant difference in the disinfection effect of two different laser groups ( p < 0.05, Mann- U-Whitney Test). In addition to this, Er :YAG Laser caused three times more reduction from its own positive control group where 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser caused 2,5 times effective disinfection.

  10. Monoblocks in root canals - a hypothetical or a tangible goal

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2007-01-01

    The term “monoblock” has become a familiar term in the endodontic literature with recent interest in the application of dentin adhesive technology to endodontics. Endodontic “monoblocks” have generated controversial discussions among academicians and clinicians as to whether they are able to improve the quality of seal in root fillings and to strengthen roots. This review attempts to provide a broader meaning to the term “monoblock” and see how this definition may be applied to the materials that have been used in the past and present for rehabilitation of the root canal space. The potential of currently available bondable materials to achieve mechanically homogeneous units with root dentin is then discussed in relation to the classical concept in which the term “monoblock” was first employed in restorative dentistry, and subsequently in endodontics. PMID:17368325

  11. Three-dimensional analysis of mesiobuccal root canal of Japanese maxillary first molar using Micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masashi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Matsunaga, Satoru; Kato, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to three-dimensionally observe the morphological characteristics of mesiobuccal root canals of Japanese maxillary first molars using microcomputed tomography (Micro-CT) and classify root canal variations. This study used 90 maxillary first molars. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed using data obtained by Micro-CT, and cross-sections of the root canals were observed. Moreover, the root canal morphology was classified by the configuration and root canal diameter, and was evaluated for occurrence using the classification by Weine et al. (1969) as a reference. Overall, single root canals were observed in 44.4%, incomplete separation root canals in 22.3%, and completely separate root canals (upper and lower separation root canals) in 33.3%. Mesiobuccal root canals often had intricate configurations, and accessory root canals (lateral canals and apical ramifications) were observed in most of the mesiobuccal root canals (76.7%), irrespective of whether there were ramifications of the main root canals. While there were no marked differences in the incidence of root canal ramifications between this study and earlier reports, the incidence of accessory root canals was higher in this study. This result may be explained by the far more superior visualization ability of Micro-CT than conventional methods, which allowed the detection of microscopic apical ramifications previously difficult to observe. PMID:21701120

  12. Rare Root Canal Configuration of Bilateral Maxillary Second Molar Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Scanning.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang; Shen, Ya; Guan, Xiaoyue; Wang, Xin; Fan, Mingwen; Li, Yuhong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article was to present a right maxillary second molar with an unusual root canal morphology of 4 roots and 5 canals as confirmed by cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. The tooth had a C-shaped mesiobuccal root (CBCT imaging revealed that the root was closer to the palate than the buccal side) with 2 canals, 2 fused distobuccal roots with 2 separate canals, and 1 normal bulky palatal root with 1 canal. After thoroughly examining the rare anatomy, root canal treatment was applied on the tooth. This article shows the complexity of maxillary second molar variation and shows the significance of CBCT imaging in the confirmation of the 3-dimensional anatomy of teeth and endodontic treatment.

  13. Endodontic management of permanent mandibular molars with 6 root canals: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Amit; Ahlawat, Jyoti; Bansal, Chirag; Tahiliani, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Aberrations in the internal dental anatomy present challenges for clinicians performing endodontic therapy. These challenges have been partly resolved in recent years by a more comprehensive knowledge of root canal anatomy as well as advancements in the endodontic armamentarium. The aim of this case series is to describe successful root canal treatment, under magnification, in 3 cases of mandibular first molars with 6 root canals. Two of these teeth had 2 roots (mesial and distal) with 3 canals in each root; the third tooth had 3 root canals located mesially and 3 present distally as well as a radix entomolaris. A distal root with 3 canals is rare; however, it is important to look for such anatomical variations to ensure successful endodontic therapy. PMID:27599288

  14. Discrimination potential of root canal treated tooth in forensic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Khalid, K; Yousif, S; Satti, A

    2016-07-01

    Forensic Odontology is a vital component of forensic science and one branch involves the application of dental science to the identification of unknown human remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the discriminatory potential for identification of the radiographic morphology of obturated single root canals. Thirty periapical radiographs of patients having endodontic treatment of single rooted canals were selected randomly from the data bank of the digital X- ray system present in the restorative department, University of Science and Technology, Sudan. The post-operative radiographs were considered as an ant-mortem data "Set 1". Ten radiographs from the thirty were reprinted, labelled from (A-J) and considered as a post-mortem data "Set 2". This post-mortem group of 10 radiographs "Set 2" would be compared with the ante-mortem group of 30 radiographs comprising "Set 1". These two sets of radiographs would be examined by 40 dentally trained personnel. The thirty radiographs comprising "Set 1" and the 10 radiographs comprising "Set 2" were provided to each of the examiners who were asked to match the individual post-mortem radiographs ("Set 2") with the ante-mortem radiographs ("Set1"). The result demonstrated that 34 examiners achieved a success rate of 100%, 4 examiners achieved a success rate of 97.5% (1 mismatch) and 2 examiners achieved a success rate of 95% (2 mismatches). The radiographic images of obturated single-rooted teeth in this study were shown to have highly- specific morphological features. It is proposed that, in cases where the ante and post-mortem radiographs of a single-rooted obturated canal show similar morphology, this commonality of morphology can be used as a tool in the identification process.

  15. Root and Canal Morphology of Mandibular Third Molars in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Kuzekanani, Maryam; Haghani, Jahangir; Nosrati, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims A through knowledge of the root canal morphology is required for successful endodontic ther-apy. The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of mandibular third molars in Kerman, a prov-ince in southeast of Iran. Materials and methods One-hundred-fifty extracted mandibular third molars were collected randomly from different dental clinics in Kerman. The root canal anatomy and morphology of each tooth was carefully studied using a clearing tech-nique. Root number and morphology, number of canals per root, root canal configuration according to Vertucci classifica-tion, and incidence of dilacerated roots and C-shaped canals in mandibular third molars were evaluated under stereomicro-scope with ×2 to ×3 magnifications. Results From the total of 150 mandibular third molars studied, 21% had one root. The majority of teeth (73%) had two roots. 5.5% of the teeth had three roots. The incidence of C-shaped canal was 3.5% in this study and 8% of the teeth had at least one dilacerated root. Conclusion Although root canal anatomy and morphology of mandibular third molars is very variable having two roots seems to be the normal anatomy for these teeth. PMID:22991643

  16. An update on the antibiotic-based root canal irrigation solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotics are a valuable addition to health practitioners for the management of bacterial infections. During endodontic treatment and when managing trauma to the teeth, antibiotics may be applied systemically or locally. Due to the potential risk of adverse effects of systemic applications, and the ineffectiveness of systemic prescribed antibiotics in necrotic or pulpless teeth and the periradicular tissues, the local application of antibiotics may be a more effective mode for delivering antibiotics to infected root canals. The purpose of this article is to review the history, rationale, and applications of antibiotics and antibiotic-containing irrigants in endodontics. PMID:24171012

  17. Bilateral presence of two root canals in maxillary central incisors: A rare case study.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, M; Gokul, Kannan; Ramaprabha, B; Lakshmi, Amudha

    2014-04-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning and shaping followed by complete obturation of the canal system. Therefore, endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy, and its variations in presentation. The internal anatomy of the maxillary central incisor is well-known and usually presents one root canal system. This case report describes an endodontic treatment of traumatized both maxillary central incisors with two canal systems. Knowledge of dental anatomy is fundamental for proper endodontic practice. When root canal treatment is performed, the clinician should be aware that both external and internal anatomy may be abnormal.

  18. Regional variation in root dentinal tubule infection by Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules at different regions in human roots. Specimens were obtained from single-rooted teeth that had their root canals prepared in a standard manner. Roots were then sectioned longitudinally through the canals and the resulting specimens chemically treated to remove the smear layers. Specimens were immersed in a suspension of Streptococcus gordonii for 3 weeks and then prepared for histological analysis. Sections from the cervical, midroot, and apical areas were examined. The pattern of bacterial infection of the cervical and midroot areas was similar, characterized as a heavy infection with bacteria penetrating as deep as 200 microns. Invasion of the apical dentin was significantly different, with a mild infection and maximum penetration of 60 microns. PMID:8934987

  19. In vitro comparison of passive and continuous ultrasonic irrigation in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Varela-Patiño, Purificación; Cantatore, Giuseppe; Domínguez-Perez, Ana; Ruíz-Piñón, Manuel; Martín-Biedma, Benjamín

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of endodontic irrigation procedures can be compromised by the complexity of the root canal system. Delivering irrigants to the apical third of curved canals presents a particular challenge to endodontists. This study compared the effects of two ultrasonic irrigation techniques on the penetration of sodium hypochlorite into the main canal and simulated lateral canals of curved roots in extracted teeth. Material and Methods Two sets of simulated lateral canals were created at 2, 4, and 6 mm from the working length in 60 single-rooted teeth (6 canals/tooth, n = 360 canals). The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental irrigation groups: group 1 (n = 20), positive pressure irrigation (PPI); group 2 (n = 20), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI); and group 3 (n = 20), continuous ultrasonic irrigation (CUI). To assess the irrigation solution penetration, 20% Chinese ink (Sanford Rotring GmbH, Hamburg, Germany) was added to a 5% sodium hypochlorite solution and delivered into the curved root canals. The penetration of contrast solution into the simulated lateral canals was scored by counting the number of lateral canals (0-2) penetrated to at least 50% of the total length. Results The CUI group showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) irrigant penetration into the lateral canals and into the apical third of the main canals. The PPI group showed significantly lower sodium hypochlorite penetration (P < 0.001) into the main and lateral canals compared with that in the CUI and PUI groups. Significantly higher irrigant penetration was observed in the PUI group than the PPI group. Conclusions Using CUI as the final rinse significantly increased the penetration of irrigant solution into the simulated lateral canals and apical third of curved roots. Key words:Continuous ultrasonic irrigation, curved root canals, passive ultrasonic irrigation, positive pressure irrigation, root canal irrigation. PMID:27703613

  20. Reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in curved root canals after various sizes and tapers of canal preparation

    PubMed Central

    Moshari, Amir Abbas; Akhlaghi, Nahid Mohammadzadeh; Rahimifard, Nahid; Darmiani, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in curved root canals after various sizes and tapers of the canal preparation. Materials and Methods: Mandibular first molars (n = 103) with curved mesiobuccal canals were divided into one control (n = 5) and 7 experimental (n = 14) groups, were inoculated with E. faecalis (ATTC 29212) and prepared with the following RaCe files (FKG Dentaire) as master apical file: Groups: 25.04, 25.06, 30.04, 30.06, 35.04, 35.06 and 40.06. All the experimental groups were irrigated with 2 mL of 1% sodium hypochlorite during instrumentation and finally rinsed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (2 mL) followed by 5.25% NaOCl (2 mL) and sterile distilled water. Colony counting was performed after incubation. Statistical Analysis Used: Resulting data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, (P < 0.05). Results and Conclusions: All the experimental groups showed significant bacterial reduction (P < 0.001). Although the greater the size/taper or both led to more decreased amount of bacteria, differences between the groups with the identical size and different tapers, and among the groups with the same taper and different sizes were not significant. Based on this study, 25.04 along with using 2 mL of 1% NaOCl during instrumentation, and using 17% EDTA and 5.25% NaOCl as final rinse successively after the termination of preparation, can effectively reduce intra-canal bacteria and preserve root structure. PMID:26180416

  1. Photodynamic therapy with water-soluble phtalocyanines against bacterial biofilms in teeth root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergova, Raina; Georgieva, Tzvetelina; Angelov, Ivan; Mantareva, Vanya; Valkanov, Serjoga; Mitov, Ivan; Dimitrov, Slavcho

    2012-06-01

    The study presents the PDT with metal phthalocyanines on biofilms grown in root canals of ten representatives of the Gram-positive and the Gram-negative bacterial species and a fungus Candida albicans which cause aqute teeth infections in root canals.. The extracted human single-root teeth infected for 48 h with microorganisms in conditions to form biofilms of the above pathogens were PDT treated. The stage of biofilm formation and PDT effect of the samples of the teeth were determined by the scaning electron microscopy and with standard microbial tests. The PDT treating procedure included 10 min incubation with the respected phthalocyanine and irradiated with 660 nm Diode laser for 10 min. The most strongly antibacterial activity was achieved with zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. The other Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans were 10-100 times more resistant than the Gram-positive species. The Gram-negative Moraxella catarrhalis and Acinetobacter baumannii were more sensitive than the enterobacteria, but eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilm was insignificant. The influence of the stage of biofilm formation and the initial conditions (bacterial density, photosensitizer concentration and energy fluence of radiation) to the obtained level of inactivation of biofilms was investigated. The PDT with ZnPc photosensitizers show a powerful antimicrobial activity against the most frequent pathogens in endodontic infections and this method for inactivation of pathogens may be used with sucsses for treatment of the bacterial biofilms in the root canals.

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of root canal geometry by high-resolution computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Peters, O A; Laib, A; Rüegsegger, P; Barbakow, F

    2000-06-01

    A detailed understanding of the complexity of root canal systems is imperative to ensure successful root canal preparation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential and accuracy of a three-dimensional, non-destructive technique for detailing root canal geometry by means of high-resolution tomography. The anatomy of root canals in 12 extracted human maxillary molars was analyzed by means of a micro-computed tomography scanner (microCT, cubic resolution 34 microm). A special mounting device facilitated repeated precise repositioning of the teeth in the microCT. Surface areas and volumes of each canal were calculated by triangulation, and means were determined. Model-independent methods were used to evaluate the canals' diameters and configuration. The calculated and measured volumes and the areas of artificial root canals, produced by the drilling of precision holes into dentin disks, were well-correlated. Semi-automated repositioning of specimens resulted in near-perfect matching (< 1 voxel) when outer canal contours were assessed. Root canal geometry was accurately assessed by this innovative technique; therefore, variables and indices presented may serve as a basis for further analyses of root canal anatomy in experimental endodontology. PMID:10890720

  3. Saliva, supragingival biofilm and root canals can harbor gene associated with resistance to lactamic agents.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Ludmila Coutinho; Fatturi-Parolo, Clarissa Cavalcanti; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Montagner, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the presence of Prevotella strains and genes associated with resistance to lactamics in different oral niches from patients with/without primary endodontic infections. Saliva (S) and supragingival biofilm (SB) were collected from three patient groups: Group I - no endodontic infection (n = 15); Group II - acute endodontic infection (n = 12); and Group III - chronic endodontic infection (n = 15). Root canal (RC) samples were collected from Groups II and III. The presence of P. intermedia, P nigrescens, P. tannerae and cfxA/cfxA2 gene was assessed by PCR. The cfxA/cfxA2 gene was not detected in all environments within the same patient. The cfxA/cfxA2 gene was present in 23.81% of S samples, 28.57% of SB samples, and 7.41% of RC samples. Prevotella species were detected in 53.97%, 47.62% and 34.56% of the S, SB, and RC samples, respectively. P. intermedia had a high frequency in saliva samples from Group 3. Saliva samples from Group 1 had higher detection rates of P. nigrescens than did Groups 2 and 3. Patients without endodontic disease had high frequencies of P. nigrescens in the SB samples. The presence or absence of spontaneous symptoms was not related to the detection rates for resistance genes in the RC samples. Saliva, supragingival biofilm and root canals can harbor resistant bacteria. The presence of symptomatology did not increase the presence of the cfxA/cfxA2 gene in the supragingival biofilm and inside root canals. PMID:25789508

  4. Various Strategies for Pain-Free Root Canal Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; V. Abbott, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Achieving successful anesthesia and performing pain-free root canal treatment are important aims in dentistry. This is not always achievable and therefore, practitioners are constantly seeking newer techniques, equipments, and anesthetic solutions for this very purpose. The aim of this review is to introduce strategies to achieve profound anesthesia particularly in difficult cases. Materials and Methods: A review of the literature was performed by electronic and hand searching methods for anesthetic agents, techniques, and equipment. The highest level of evidence based investigations with rigorous methods and materials were selected for discussion. Results: Numerous studies investigated to pain management during root canal treatment; however, there is still no single technique that will predictably provide profound pulp anesthesia. One of the most challenging issues in endodontic practice is achieving a profound anesthesia for teeth with irreversible pulpitis especially in mandibular posterior region. Conclusion: According to most investigations, achieving a successful anesthesia is not always possible with a single technique and practitioners should be aware of all possible alternatives for profound anesthesia. PMID:24396370

  5. Outcomes of root canal treatment in Dental PBRN practices

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H.; Tilashalski, Ken R.; Litaker, Mark S.; McNeal, Sandre F.; Boykin, Michael J.; Kessler, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the incidence of root canal treatment (RCT) failure and identify its predictors in root canals done in or referred from general dentistry practices in a practice-based research network (PBRN). A retrospective cohort study of 174 endodontically-treated teeth was conducted. Mean duration of follow-up was 8.6 years. Permanent restorations were ultimately placed in 89% of teeth; mean (S.D.) number of days to permanent restoration was 215.4 (609.1). Although RCT had been completed, 18% of teeth were ultimately extracted anyway. Receipt of a permanent restoration was a significant predictor of treatment failure, whether it was determined clinically or radiographically. This study of PBRN practices suggests a higher failure rate than reported from studies in highly-controlled environments or populations with high levels of dental insurance. Also, the probability of receipt of a permanent restoration is not optimal -- and strongly predicts RCT failure. Appropriately, no RCT was done on teeth with severe periodontal bone loss. PMID:20129890

  6. Anatomic and Diagnostic Challenges of C-Shaped Root Canal System

    PubMed Central

    Raisingani, Deepak; Gupta, Shailendra; Mital, Prachi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful root canal treatment depends on the thorough management of the canal anatomy. The use of periapical radiographs is essential to identify and monitor the canal's morphological variations. The C-shaped single canaled man-dibular 2nd molar probably requires a different regimen of treatment from the two rooted, three canaled version, as it is rare. Because of the importance of its true diagnosis and treatment, a comprehensive review of published information and investigations about it in addition to approaches for its treatment is necessary. In this article, a detailed review and three case reports with different C-shaped canal configurations have been described which were successfully negotiated, pre­pared and obturated. How to cite this article: Raisingani D, Gupta S, Mital P, Khullar P. Anatomic and Diagnostic Challenges of C-Shaped Root Canal System. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):35-39. PMID:25206235

  7. Maxillary lateral incisors with two canals and two separate curved roots

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ajit George; Rajesh, Ebenezar A. V.; George, Liza; Sujathan; Josy, Susan Ann

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the roots and root canal anatomy seems to be the norm rather than an exception. For a successful endodontic treatment, a clinician should have a thorough knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy and its variations. Maxillary lateral incisors usually exhibit single canal with a single root. In this case, clinical examination and radiographs clearly demonstrates the presence of two root canals with two separate curved roots. This case report emphasizes the need for attention during endodontic management of maxillary lateral incisors. PMID:23633825

  8. A comparison in vitro of two ultrasonic root canal preparation techniques.

    PubMed

    Yap, S Y; Stock, C J

    1992-11-01

    Two ultrasonic techniques were compared for their ability to clean and shape root canals in extracted human teeth. One technique was recommended by the manufacturer (Cavi-Endo, Dentsply), while the other was a modification by the authors of the stepdown technique. Mesiobuccal root canals of molars were instrumented using these techniques, after which a silicone impression material was injected into the prepared canals. The roots were then split longitudinally and one half was stained for debris scoring while the silicone impressions were assessed for shape. The results showed that the modified technique produced significantly cleaner canals than the recommended technique. The shaping ability of both techniques was difficult to evaluate because of the complex morphology of molar root canals. The final shape of the prepared canal depended more on the initial shape than on the instrumentation technique. PMID:1306862

  9. Bacterial penetration and proliferation in root canal dentinal tubules after applying dentin adhesives in vitro.

    PubMed

    Assouline, L S; Fuss, Z; Mazor, Y; Weiss, E I

    2001-06-01

    Endodontic treatment is aimed at eliminating infection and preventing bacterial regrowth in the root canal and dentinal tubules. In the present study the ability of two dentin adhesives to prevent bacterial penetration and subsequent proliferation in dentinal tubules was evaluated. Cylindrical root specimens prepared from freshly extracted bovine teeth were used in an in vitro model of dentinal tubule infection. After removal of the smear layer the intracanal dentinal tubules of the specimens were acid-etched and treated with either Gluma or EBS. Untreated specimens served as controls. Specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated in Brain Heart Infusion for 21 days. Powder dentin samples obtained from within the canal lumina, using ISO 025 to 033 burs, were examined for the presence of vital bacteria by inoculating on agar plates and counting colony-forming units. A significant difference was found between the experimental groups and the untreated group. After application with Gluma specimens showed the least viable bacteria in dentinal tubules. Data suggested that dentin adhesives reduced bacterial invasion into dentin and therefore have a potential role in endodontic treatment.

  10. Retreatment of a Maxillary Lateral Incisor With Two Separate Root Canals Confirmed With Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Seda; Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Sinanoglu, Alper; Ozel, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a maxillary lateral incisor exhibiting two separate root canals confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 65-year-old female patient with an esthetic complaint regarding her maxillary left lateral incisor was referred to our clinic. During a radiographical examination, an endodontically treated root canal and an extra root canal with an apical lesion were observed. The retreatment was performed. CBCT findings confirmed the root canal mophology of the maxillary left lateral with two distinct canals. We conclude that the CBCT imaging is an adjunctive tool for better assessment of complex root canal systems. PMID:26015823

  11. Reaction of inflamed periapical tissue to intracanal medicaments and root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Tepel, J; Darwisch el Sawaf, M; Hoppe, W

    1994-10-01

    The effects of different intracanal medicaments and zinc oxide-eugenol based root canal sealers on an experimentally induced apical periodontitis were studied histologically in mesial roots of lower molars of Wistar rats. After root canal instrumentation each canal was filled either with an intracanal medicament twice for 3 days each time or with a sealer for 21 days. The intracanal medicament chlorophenol caused periapical tissue damage. P-chloroxylenol-camphor lead to periapical improvement as did 5% sodium-hypochlorite. 12% sodium-hypochlorite gave tissue damage. After intracanal medication with an aqueous suspension of calcium hydroxide periapical repair was clearly visible. A combination of a corticoid and an antibiotic appeared to induce damage of the periapical tissues. The root canal sealers Endomethasone and N2 essentially impaired periapical repair. The results were acceptable for Aptal-Zink-Harz root canal fillings after 21 days as well as after 56 days.

  12. Presence of Candida albicans in Root Canals of Teeth with Apical Periodontitis and Evaluation of their Possible Role in Failure of Endodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jay; Sharma, Rohit; Sharma, Madhurima; Prabhavathi, V; Paul, John; Chowdary, Chava Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candidal organisms are commensals of the oral cavity and their opportunistic infection depends on the interplay of local and systemic factors. Endodontic treatment failure has been associated with the persistence of microbial flora following therapy in the root canal system, and this includes fungi like Candida, which are resistant to conventional root canal irrigants. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 mandibular molars were included in the study of which 15 were primary randomized controlled trial cases, whereas 5 were retreatment cases. The patient’s saliva, as well as the root canal flora, were examined for the presence of Candida organisms and further confirmed for the presence of Candida albicans. Results: Of the 20 samples comprising the study group, the saliva culture revealed 11 of them to have a colony forming unit (CFU) >400 and 9 of the 20 canals microbiology showed CFU >400. Among the 15 first-time root canal treatment cases, saliva examination these revealed 8 of them to have CFU >400 and the canal microbiology of these showed 6 of them to have CFU >400. Among the retreatment cases, 3 of the 5 cases showed CFU >400 in both the saliva DN canal culture. Conclusion: Candidal contamination of the root canals could be the cause of endodontic treatment failure and thus emphasizes the importance of rubber dam isolation and the use of irrigants with antifungal properties for sufficient duration during treatment. PMID:25859106

  13. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis in saliva and filled root canals of teeth associated with apical periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Chu, Chun-Hung; Zhu, Xiao-Fei

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis in saliva and filled root canals of patients requiring endodontic retreatment for apical periodontitis. Patients with apical periodontitis who were referred for endodontic retreatment were examined. The type and quality of the restoration, symptoms, quality of obturation were recorded. During retreatment, an oral rinse sample and root canal sample were cultured using brain-heart infusion agar and bile esculinazide agar to select for E. faecalis. The 16S rRNA technique was used to identify E. faecalis. A total of 32 women and 22 men (mean age: 38 years; s.d.: 11 years) and 58 teeth were studied. The prevalence of E. faecalis was 19% in the saliva and 38% in the root canals. The odds that root canals harbored E. faecalis were increased if the saliva habored this bacterium (odds ratio=9.7; 95% confidence interval=1.8–51.6; P<0.05). Teeth with unsatisfactory root obturation had more cultivable bacterial species in root canals than teeth with satisfactory root obturation (P<0.05). E. faecalis is more common in root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis than in saliva. The prevalence of E. faecalis in root canals is associated with the presence of E. faecalis in saliva. PMID:22422085

  14. Flexural and fatigue strengths of root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1990-12-01

    This study measured the flexural and fatigue strengths of root canal posts of different alloy, design, and diameter. Fixed posts were loaded up to a preset force and the number of loadings endured until fracture was recorded at each loading force. The flexural strength was defined as the maximum force a post could endure before fracture when loaded once. The fatigue strength was determined as the maximum force a post could endure when loaded 10,000 times. Both modes of strength were found to increase with increasing diameter. Aluminum posts had lower flexural and fatigue strengths than posts of titanium, stainless steel, and a Ag-Pd alloy, all of which had strength values of about the same magnitude. Among the investigated brands, Triax and Radix were stronger than the others at comparable diameters. The high strength of Triax may be explained by the design of the post, whereas a superior alloy may account for the high strength of Radix.

  15. Influence of root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques on intra-operative pain during endodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martín-González, Jenifer; Echevarría-Pérez, Marta; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Tarilonte-Delgado, Maria L.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; López-Frías, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques on intra-operative pain experienced by patients during endodontic therapy. Method and Materials: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in Ponferrada and Sevilla, Spain, including 80 patients (46 men and 34 women), with ages ranged from 10 to 74 years, randomly recruited. Patient gender and age, affected tooth, pulpal diagnosis, periapical status, previous NSAID or antibiotic (AB) treatment, and root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques were recorded. After root canal treatment (RCT), patients completed a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) that ranked the level of pain. Results were analysed statistically using the Chi-square and ANOVA tests and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean pain level during root canal treatment was 2.9 ± 3.0 (median = 2) in a VAS between 0 and 10. Forty percent of patients experienced no pain. Gender, age, arch, previous NSAIDs or AB treatment and anaesthetic type did not influence significantly the pain level (p > 0.05). Pain during root canal treatment was significantly greater in molar teeth (OR = 10.1; 95% C.I. = 1.6 - 63.5; p = 0.013). Root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques did not affect significantly patient’s pain during root canal treatment (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Patients feel more pain when RCT is carried out on molar teeth. The root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques do not affect significantly the patients’ pain during RCT. Key words:Anaesthesia, endodontic pain, pulpitis, root canal instrumentation, root canal obturation, rotary files. PMID:22549694

  16. Extraoral Retrograde Root Canal Filling of an Orthodontic-induced External Root Resorption Using CEM Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kheirieh, Sanam; Fazlyab, Mahta; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Eghbal, Mohamad Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory external root resorption (IERR) after orthodontic treatments is an unusual complication. This case report describes a non-vital maxillary premolar with symptomatic extensive IERR (with a crown/root ratio of 1:1) after receiving orthodontic treatment. The first appointment included drainage, chemo-mechanical preparation of the canal and intra-canal medication with calcium hydroxide (CH) along with prescription of analgesic/antibiotic. The subsequent one-week follow-up revealed the persistence of symptoms and formation of a sinus tract. Finally, extraoral endodontic treatment was planned; the tooth was atraumatically extracted and retrograde root canal filling with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed followed by tooth replantation. Clinical signs/symptoms subsided during 7 days postoperatively. The sinus tract also resolved after one week. Six-month and one-year follow-ups revealed complete healing and a fully functional asymptomatic tooth. This case study showed favorable outcomes in a refractory periapical lesion associated with orthodontically induced extensive IERR. The chemical as well as biological properties of CEM cement may be a suitable endodontic biomaterial for these cases. PMID:24688586

  17. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper and K3XF groups when compared to LSX group. Canal transportation was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper group when compared to K3XF and LSX groups. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems.

  18. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper and K3XF groups when compared to LSX group. Canal transportation was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper group when compared to K3XF and LSX groups. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems. PMID:27656062

  19. A comparison of molar root canal preparations using six instruments and instrumentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Roig-Cayón, M; Basilio-Monné, J; Abós-Herrándiz, R; Brau-Aguadé, E; Canalda-Sahli, C

    1997-06-01

    Six different instruments (Flexofile, Canal Master U, Heliapical, Flexogate, Ultraflex, and Lightspeed) were evaluated in 240 mesial canals of extracted mandibular molars (40 canals per instrument type). After instrumentation, the roots were cross-sectioned 2, 5, and 9 mm from the apex. The cross sections were evaluated to determine the quality of canal preparation (round, oval, irregular). The best results were obtained with nickel-titanium, a short cutting blade and a rotary rather than a filing motion. The Canal Master U, Flexogate, and Lightspeed instruments had significantly more round canals than the Flexofile, Heliapical and Ultraflex instruments at all levels. The Lightspeed had the largest number of round canals at all levels. Instrumentation time was also recorded. The Canal Master U and Flexogate were significantly slower than the Flexofile, heliapical, Ultraflex, and Lightspeed instruments. There were no statistically significant differences within the faster group.

  20. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended.

  1. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended. PMID:11203820

  2. Bacterial leakage of GuttaFlow-filled root canals compared with Resilon/Epiphany and Gutta-percha/AH26-filled root canals.

    PubMed

    Kangarlou, Ali; Dianat, Omid; Esfahrood, Zeinab Rezaei; Asharaf, Hengameh; Zandi, Babak; Eslami, Gita

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bacterial apical leakage in root canals obturated with GuttaFlow and compare this with the leakage of root canals obturated with Resilon/Epiphany or Gutta-percha/AH26. A total of 55 single-rooted human teeth were divided randomly into three experimental (n = 15) and two control groups (n = 5). Following a standardised preparation, the teeth were obturated with either GuttaFlow, Resilon/Epiphany or Gutta-percha/AH26. A two-chamber bacterial model using Enterococcus faecalis was employed to assess bacterial apical leakage for a period of 60 days. A Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant differences between the seal of root canals obturated with GuttaFlow, Resilon/Ephiphany or Gutta-percha/AH26. PMID:22432820

  3. The Use of Lasers in Disinfection and Cleanliness of Root Canals: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Anić, Ivica

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of root canal treatment is based on efficient disinfection of the root canal system and prevention of reinfection. Current chemomechanical cleaning methods do not always achieve these goals, and insufficient root canal disinfection is the main reason for endodontic failure. Due to high energy content and specific characteristics of laser light, laser treatment has been proposed for cleaning and disinfecting the root canal system. This paper reviews the literature covering the effect of Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG, Nd:YAG and diode laser on the root canal wall in the removal of smear layer and against intracanal bacteria. Recently, the use of laser energy to induce cavitation and acoustic streaming of intracanal irrigants has been investigated. Based on recent literature, it can be concluded that lasers have bactericidal effects. However, they still cannot replace sodium hypochlorite and should be considered as an adjunct to the current chemical root canal disinfection protocols. Certain lasers can help in removing the smear layer and debris and can modify the morphology of the root canal wall. Unfortunately, there have not been enough randomized clinical studies evaluating endodontic treatment outcome following the use of laser.

  4. A computerized method for mathematical description of three-dimensional root canal axis.

    PubMed

    Dobó-Nagy, C; Keszthelyi, G; Szabó, J; Sulyok, P; Ledeczky, G; Szabó, J

    2000-11-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of root canals is important for successful endodontic treatment. The objective of the present study was to determine the 3D root canal axis mathematically. Two views (mesiodistal and buccolingual) of digitized images were taken from extracted natural human teeth. Geometric reconstruction to standardize projection geometry was conducted on images. Because 90-degree turn-around image pairs are Monge images of a given root canal, these Monge images were positioned using photogrammetric methods. Each well-ordered axis pair of a given root canal was put into a common coordinate system resulting in 3D polynomial function of the actual root canal. On the basis of the results gained using 10 samples evaluated with the Friedman statistical test, this description seems to be reproducible. The 3D representation of the root canal may help the clinicians in choosing the optimal instruments and shaping techniques. The root canal axis that is described by the 3D function forms a basis for determination of curvature values and torsion values in each of the axis points. Evaluating these values may also yield a new type of classification. PMID:11469291

  5. Root surface temperature rises in vitro during root canal obturation using hybrid and microseal techniques.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Mariusz

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to measure the temperature rise on the outer surface of roots during filling with hybrid technique and Microseal. Twenty extracted human maxillary and mandibular premolars with a single canal were randomly divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. In the first group, the teeth were filled with hybrid technique (thermomechanical compaction with Engine Plugger used following lateral condensation of the apical part of the canal), the second group was filled using Microseal. After root canal obturation the filling material was removed and the obturation procedure was repeated. A total of 20 obturations in each group were performed. Temperature changes were measured using a thermal imaging camera. The temperature of certain regions of the mesial surface was analyzed and the highest temperature values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. The mean increase of temperature during the hybrid technique with Engine Plugger was 23.8 degrees C, while during Microseal it was significantly lower (p = 0.000001) at 5.5 degrees C. The temperature rise generated by Microseal was below the critical level and should not damage supporting structures, however, the hybrid technique generated a relatively high temperature rise that may cause periodontal tissue damage.

  6. Antimicrobial efficacy of different root canal sealers by using real-time polymerase chain reaction: An ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, R Gnana; Kumar, A Arvind; Emil Sam, R Jonathan; Maheswari, S Uma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Root canal sealers help to minimize leakage, provides antimicrobial activity to reduce the possibility of residual bacteria, and to resolve periapical lesion. Aim: To compare five different root canal sealers against Enterococcus faecalis in an infected root canal model by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Settings and Design: Sixty human mandibular premolars were sectioned to standardize a uniform length of 14 mm. Fifty microliters of the inoculum containing E. faecalis were transferred into each microcentrifuge tube (n = 60). The samples were divided into six groups Tubli-Seal, Apexit Plus, Fillapex, AH Plus, RoekoSeal, and Positive control, respectively. Materials and Methods: Five groups after the incubation with the microorganism E. faecalis were coated with different root canal sealers and obturated using F3 ProTaper Gutta-percha point. The dentinal shavings were collected and analyzed for RT-PCR. Statistical Analysis: The mean difference between six groups was calculated using analysis of variance and post-hoc test. Results: The highest antibacterial activity was achieved with Tubli-Seal (1938.13 DNA in pictogram [pg]) and least by RoekoSeal (3034.54 DNA in pg). Conclusion: The maximum antimicrobial activity was achieved AH Plus and Tubli-Seal. RT-PCR can be used as a valuable and accurate tool for testing antimicrobial activity. PMID:26752843

  7. Microleakage of adhesive resinous materials in root canals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason Gilbert; Caputo, Angelo Anthony; Li, Ping; White, Shane Newport

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro micro-leakage resistance of adhesive resin materials to long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers. Materials and Methods: Seven materials, five test (Real Seal, Real Seal XT, Panavia F 2.0, Infinity Syringeable, GCEM) and two controls (Tubliseal, AH Plus), were evaluated for micro-leakage resistance in a bovine incisor root model, with 12 roots per material. Teeth were root canal treated, stored in water, artificially aged by thermal-cycling, stained with silver nitrate, sectioned to yield eight measurement points per tooth (four coronal and four apical), giving 672 measurement points. Stain penetration was measured using digital positioners and a toolmakers microscope; then analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons testing (P < 0.05). Results: All modern adhesive resinous materials leaked significantly less than long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers (P < 0.05). Mean leakage values and their associated (standard deviations) in mm were: Infinity Syringeable 2.5 (1.5), Real Seal XT 3.2 (1.4), Real Seal 3.4 (1.6), Panavia F 2.0 3.8 (2.7), GCEM 4.2 (1.8), Tubli-seal 5.4 (2.8), AH Plus 6.3 (2.3). Overall, more leakage occurred apically than coronally (P < 0.0001). Many materials exhibited dimensional instability: Marked contraction, expansion, or lack of cohesion. Conclusion: A variety of adhesive resinous materials, endodontic sealers and crown cements, reduced micro-leakage in comparison to long and widely used zinc oxide- eugenol and epoxy sealers. PMID:23833453

  8. Effect of Peracetic Acid as A Final Rinse on Push Out Bond Strength of Root Canal Sealers to Root Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Gaddala, Naresh; Veeramachineni, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Smear layer which was formed during the instrumentation of root canals hinders the penetration of root canal sealers to root dentin and affect the bond strength of root canal sealers to root dentin. Final irrigant such as demineralizing agents are used to remove the inorganic portion of the smear layer. In the present study, peracetic acid used as a final rinse, to effect the bond strength of root canal sealers to root dentin. Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of peracetic acid as a final irrigant on bond strength of root canal sealers to root dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty six freshly extracted human single rooted mandibular premolars were used for this study. After decoronation the samples were instrumented with Protaper upto F3 and irrigated with 5.25% NaOcl. The teeth were then divided into three groups based on final irrigant used: Group-1(control group) Canals were irrigated with distilled water. Group-2: Canals were irrigated with peracetic acid. Group-3: Canals were irrigated with smear clear. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=30) based on the sealer used to obturate the canals. Subgroup-1: kerr, Subgroup-2: Apexit plus, Subgroup-3: AH PLUS. Each sealer was mixed and coated to master cone and placed in the canal. The bonding between sealer and dentin surface was evaluated using push out bond strength by universal testing machine. The mean bond strength values of each group were statistically evaluated using Two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc test. Results Significant difference was found among the bond strength of the sealers. But, there is no statistically significant difference between the groups irrigated with peracetic acid and smear clear compared to control group. AH Plus showed highest bond strength irrespective of the final irrigant used. Conclusion Peracetic acid when employed as final irrigant improved the bond strength of root canal sealers compared to control group but

  9. Microorganism penetration in dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal walls. In vitro SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Alaa; Al-Rasheed, Fellwa; Alnajjar, Fatimah; Al-Abdulwahab, Bander; Al-Badah, Abdulhakeem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This in vitro study aimed to investigate the ability of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) to penetrate dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal surface of split human teeth. Materials and Methods Sixty intact extracted human single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 groups, negative control, positive control without canal instrumentation, instrumented, and retreated. Root canals in the instrumented group were enlarged with endodontic instruments, while root canals in the retreated group were enlarged, filled, and then removed the canal filling materials. The teeth were split longitudinally after canal preparation in 3 groups except the negative control group. The teeth were inoculated with both microorganisms separately and in combination. Teeth specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the depth of penetration into the dentinal tubules was assessed using the SMILE view software (JEOL Ltd). Results Penetration of C. albicans and E. faecalis into the dentinal tubules was observed in all 3 groups, although penetration was partially restricted by dentin debris of tubules in the instrumented group and remnants of canal filling materials in the retreated group. In all 3 groups, E. faecalis penetrated deeper into the dentinal tubules by way of cell division than C. albicans which built colonies and penetrated by means of hyphae. Conclusions Microorganisms can easily penetrate dentinal tubules of root canals with different appearance based on the microorganism size and status of dentinal tubules. PMID:25383343

  10. [A Phd completed 4. Interactions between root canal irrigants, sealers and dentin].

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, P; Shemesh, H; Wesselink, P

    2016-09-01

    In the field of endodontology, antibacterial activity of irrigants has been investigated many times. The influence of these solutions on the bonding of root canal sealers, however, has hardly been studied. The objective of this doctoral research was to determine the interactions between root canal sealers and root dentin, and to determine the influence of irrigants on these interactions. The various studies revealed that irrigants have an influence on the bonding of sealers based on epoxy resin, calcium hydroxide, silicones and calcium silicate. In the case of a sealer based on epoxy resin (AH Plus), the irrigation protocol had an influence on the bond strength (adhesion) on dentin, by means of which the seal was also improved. The results of this research produced better insights into the mechanisms at play in the adhesive properties of root canal sealers. Eventually, this might result in improved treatment outcomes of root canal treatments. PMID:27643496

  11. The Effect of Smear Layer on Antimicrobial Efficacy of Three Root Canal Irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Nazanin; Dianat, Omid; Asnaashari, Mohammad; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Zadsirjan, Saeede

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the main goals of endodontic treatment is to decrease the harboring bacteria within the root canal system and dentinal tubules. This experimental study attempted to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of three root canal irrigants in the presence and absence of smear layer (SL). Methods and Materials: A total of 210 sound extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared. After creating the SL and its removal in half of the samples, they were infected with Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Actinomyces israelii (A. israelii). A total of 180 specimen were used to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of the three irrigants in presence and absence of SL, 24 specimen were placed in the positive and negative controls, 2 samples were utilized for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and 2 were used for Gram staining. Then, they were exposed to irrigants including 2.61% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and 1% povidone-iodine (PI) for 5, 30 and 60 min. Presence/absence of test microorganisms was determined by incubation of specimens in test tubes containing brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth and then measuring the colony forming units (CFU) on BHI agar. A cumulative logistic model was used to analyze the ordinal response. Results: The 2.61% solution of NaOCl was significantly more effective than 0.2% CHX and the latter was more efficient than 1% PI for decreasing fungal and microbial infection of dentinal tubules in the presence and absence of SL. Conclusion: The presence of smear layer decreased the efficacy of antimicrobial irrigants. The minimum time required for elimination of fungal/microbial infection was 30 min. PMID:26213540

  12. Reinforcement of thin-walled root canal structures for placement of esthetic dowels: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-01-01

    Thin-walled root canals always present a challenge to dentists to select a restorative treatment that does not further weaken the thin tooth structure. The prognosis of dowel and core restorations can be unpredictable. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with extensive caries extending into the root canal of an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor. The use of a flowable composite resin in combination with a quartz fiber reinforced post is described, resulting in the rehabilitation of a structurally compromised root canal with satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes.

  13. Fluoride Varnish as Root Canal Sealer: A Scanning Electron Microscopy and Bacterial Penetration Study

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; Talebizad, Mohammad; Forghani, Farshid Reza; Haghdoost, Ali Akabar; Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Goddousi, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was carried out to evaluate the bacterial leakage of root canal fillings when cavity varnish containing 5% fluoride (Duraflur) was used as root canal sealer. Methods and Materials: Root canals of 88 straight single-rooted teeth were prepared. Eighty teeth were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=20) and two positive and negative control groups of ten each. The roots in group I and II were obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer using lateral condensation technique. The root canal walls in group II were coated with a layer of varnish before obturation. In group III the canals were obturated with gutta-percha and fluoride varnish as the sealer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) was used to determine the bacterial leakage during 90 days. The Kaplan Meier survival analysis was used for assessing the leakage and log rank test was used for pairwise comparison. The rest of eight single rooted teeth were selected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation with 5000× magnification. Results: Leakage occurred between 20 to 89 days. Group III showed significantly less bacterial penetration than groups I and II (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between group I and II (P>0.05). SEM evaluation showed that the varnish had covered all dentinal tubules. Conclusion: The present study showed promising results for the use of fluoride varnish as root canal sealer but further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed. PMID:25598813

  14. Rigidity and retention of carbon fibre versus stainless steel root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M

    1996-07-01

    Two of the main requirements of a root canal post are that it is rigid so as to resist flexing under functional load, and that it is well retained in the root. This study compared these properties in two different 1-mm diameter root canal posts--smooth carbon fibre posts (Endopost) and serrated stainless steel posts (Parapost). Ten posts of each type were tested for rigidity in a three-point bend test. Ten posts of each type were cemented with resin cement into the roots of endodontically treated, extracted teeth. The tensile force required to remove the posts was recorded. The Paraposts proved to be significantly more rigid under load (P < 0.001) and significantly more strongly retained in the tooth roots (P < 0.005). The Parapost appears to be a mechanically superior post for the restoration of root-filled teeth with narrow diameter root canals. PMID:9206443

  15. Surface modification of tooth root canal after application of an X-ray opaque waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, T.; Jelínková, H.; Šulc, J.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Bartoňová, M.; Radina, P.; Miyagi, M.; Shi, Y.-W.; Matsuura, Y.

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems has been increasing. With the development of thin and flexible delivery systems for various wavelengths, laser applications in endodontics may become even more desirable. The aim of this study is to check the X-ray opacity of a hollow waveguide and to observe the results after laser root canal treatment. The root canal systems of 10 molars were treated endodontically by laser. For the laser radiation source, an Er:YAG laser system generating a wavelength of 2940 nm and an Alexandrite laser system generating a wavelength of 375 nm were used. The hollow waveguide used was checked under X-ray . A root canal surface treated by laser radiation was analyzed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The special hollow glass waveguide used was visible in the root canal system under X-ray imaging. Surface modification of the root canal after laser treatment was not found. After conventional treatment the root canal was enlarged. The surface was covered with a smear layer. After application of both laser systems, the smear layer was removed. The resulting canal surface was found to be clean and smooth. Under SEM observation open dentinal tubules were visible. No cracks were present, nor were surface modifications observed.

  16. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz‐MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  17. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan-based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Shon, Won-Jun; Woo, Kyung-Mi; Lee, WooCheol

    2016-01-01

    The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan-based (Pz-) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and Pz-MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz-MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin-material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz-MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45-1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350-400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre-crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra- and/or inter-tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz-MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment.

  18. Effectiveness of three methods for evaluating root canal anatomy of mandibular incisors.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marina C; Gusman, Heloisa; Belladonna, Felipe G; Prado, Maíra; Ormiga, Fabíola

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of clinical observation, clinical microscopic observation, and tooth-clearing technique in determining the number of canals in mandibular incisors. Root canal ramifications were also analyzed. Using clinical and microscopic analyses, we determined the number of canal entrances in 277 mandibular incisors. In addition, tooth-clearing technique was used to determine the number of canals and frequency of ramifications in the samples. The kappa coefficient was used to compare the different methods with regard to frequency of canals. Most teeth had one canal entrance. The proportion of teeth with two canals was 23.5% by tooth-clearing analysis, 5.8% by clinical microscopy, and 1.1% by clinical analysis. A large number of samples had some type of ramification (40.1%), and most ramifications were present in teeth with two canals. The most frequent ramification was lateral canals (8.3%). Clinical microscopy improved identification of a second canal in mandibular incisors. However, it did not identify second canals in all teeth with two canals. (J Oral Sci 58, 347-351, 2016). PMID:27665973

  19. Management of incompletely developed teeth requiring root canal treatment.

    PubMed

    Harlamb, S C

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic management of the permanent immature tooth continues to be a challenge for both clinicians and researchers. Clinical concerns are primarily related to achieving adequate levels of disinfection as 'aggressive' instrumentation is contraindicated and hence there exists a much greater reliance on endodontic irrigants and medicaments. The open apex has also presented obturation difficulties, notably in controlling length. Long-term apexification procedures with calcium hydroxide have proven to be successful in retaining many of these immature infected teeth but due to their thin dentinal walls and perceived problems associated with long-term placement of calcium hydroxide, they have been found to be prone to cervical fracture and subsequent tooth loss. In recent years there has developed an increasing interest in the possibility of 'regenerating' pulp tissue in an infected immature tooth. It is apparent that although the philosophy and hope of 'regeneration' is commendable, recent histologic studies appear to suggest that the calcified material deposited on the canal wall is bone/cementum rather than dentine, hence the absence of pulp tissue with or without an odontoblast layer. PMID:26923451

  20. Physicochemical Properties of Root Canal Filling Materials for Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Segato, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Pucinelli, Carolina Maschietto; Ferreira, Danielly Cunha Araújo; Daldegan, Andiara De Rossi; Silva, Roberto S da; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Léa A B da

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated physiochemical proprieties of a calcium hydroxide-based paste (Calen®) combined with a zinc oxide cement at different ratios (1:0.5, 1:0.65, 1:0.8 and 1:1). Materials were compared regarding setting time, pH variation, radiopacity, solubility, dimensional changes, flow and release of chemical elements. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Longer setting time and higher dimensional changes and solubility values were exhibited by 1:0.65 and 1:0.5 ratios (p<0.05). The 1:0.5 and 1:0.65 ratios exhibited the highest pH values at all time points. All materials exhibited high radiopacity values. Significant differences were found only between 1:0.5 and 1:1 ratios for calcium and zinc release (p<0.05), whereas the amount of zirconium was similar among all groups (p>0.05). Considering the evaluated proprieties, combinations of Calen® paste with ZO at 1:0.5 and 1:0.65 ratios had the best results as root canal filling materials for use in primary teeth. PMID:27058384

  1. Detection of Enterococcus faecalis in Necrotic Teeth Root Canals by Culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cogulu, Dilsah; Uzel, Atac; Oncag, Ozant; Aksoy, Semiha C.; Eronat, Cemal

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Enterococcus faecalis in endodontic infections in both deciduous and permanent teeth by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Methods A total of 145 children aged 5–13 years old were involved in this study. The presence of E. faecalis in necrotic deciduous and permanent teeth root canals was studied using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods. Results Among 145 molar teeth, 57% (n=83) presented necrotic asymptomatic pulp tissues and were included in this study. Culture and PCR methods detected the test species in 18 and 22 of 83 teeth involved, respectively. E. faecalis was cultured from 8 (18%) of 45 necrotic deciduous teeth and from 10 (26%) of 38 necrotic permanent teeth. PCR detection identified the target species in 10 (22%) and 12 (32%) of necrotic deciduous and permanent teeth respectively. Statistically significant difference in the presence of E. faecalis in deciduous and permanent teeth was found by culture and PCR methods (P=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The difference in the presence of E. faecalis between two different methods was not statistically significant (P>.05). Conclusions The results of the present study confirm that both culture and PCR methods are sensitive to detect E. faecalis in root canals. PMID:19212470

  2. [Mathematical description of the three-dimensional axis of the root canal of human teeth].

    PubMed

    Dobó, Nagy Csaba; Keszthelyi, Gusztáv; Sulyok, Péter; Ledeczky, Gábor; Szabó, József

    2002-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to describe root canal axes of natural human teeth mathematically. Two views (clinical and proximal) radiographs were taken from extracted human teeth. Geometry defines the 90-degree turn-around image pairs as Monge images. These Monge images of the root canals were positioned using photogrammetric methods. Each well-ordered axis pair of a given root canal was put into a common coordinate system resulting in three-dimensional polynomial function of the actual root canal. Testing differences between determined and repeatedly determined axes of ten samples by statistical analysis did not show any significant differences. Evaluation of data gained on a large number of samples may also yield a new type of classification. PMID:12236090

  3. Evaluation of Microbial Reduction in Root Canals Instrumented with Reciprocating and Rotary Systems

    PubMed Central

    DE OLIVEIRA, BRUNA PALOMA; AGUIAR, CARLOS MENEZES; CÂMARA, ANDRÉA CRUZ; DE ALBUQUERQUE, MIRACY MUNIZ; CORREIA, ANA CRISTINA REGIS DE BARROS; SOARES, MONICA FELTS DE LA ROCA

    2015-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the disinfection of root canal systems carried out with ReciprocTM and ProTaper UniversalTM systems using 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Methods Forty human single-rooted mandibular premolars were infected with Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, and twenty were not infected. The specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10): Group 1: ProTaper UniversalTM + 1% NaOCl; Group 2 (positive control): ProTaper UniversalTM + saline; Group 3 (negative control without microorganisms): ProTaper UniversalTM + saline; Group 4: ReciprocTM + 1% NaOCl; Group 5 (positive control): ReciprocTM + saline; Group 6 (negative control without microorganisms): ReciprocTM + saline. Samples were collected before and after the completion of specific treatments, and plated in specific media cultures. The Fisher exact test was used for the statistical analysis of differences in terms of presence or absence of microbial growth among groups. For all tested pathogens, significant differences (p < 0.001) were verified between the instrumentation systems used. Results ProTaper UniversalTM associated with 1% NaOCl completely eliminated all microorganisms. Microbial growth, however, was observed when ReciprocTM was used associated with 1% NaOCl. Conclusion According to the protocol executed for this study, the ReciprocTM system associated with 1% NaOCl was not able to completely eliminate E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and C. albicans from the root canal systems.

  4. Evaluation of Microbial Reduction in Root Canals Instrumented with Reciprocating and Rotary Systems

    PubMed Central

    DE OLIVEIRA, BRUNA PALOMA; AGUIAR, CARLOS MENEZES; CÂMARA, ANDRÉA CRUZ; DE ALBUQUERQUE, MIRACY MUNIZ; CORREIA, ANA CRISTINA REGIS DE BARROS; SOARES, MONICA FELTS DE LA ROCA

    2015-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the disinfection of root canal systems carried out with ReciprocTM and ProTaper UniversalTM systems using 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Methods Forty human single-rooted mandibular premolars were infected with Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, and twenty were not infected. The specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10): Group 1: ProTaper UniversalTM + 1% NaOCl; Group 2 (positive control): ProTaper UniversalTM + saline; Group 3 (negative control without microorganisms): ProTaper UniversalTM + saline; Group 4: ReciprocTM + 1% NaOCl; Group 5 (positive control): ReciprocTM + saline; Group 6 (negative control without microorganisms): ReciprocTM + saline. Samples were collected before and after the completion of specific treatments, and plated in specific media cultures. The Fisher exact test was used for the statistical analysis of differences in terms of presence or absence of microbial growth among groups. For all tested pathogens, significant differences (p < 0.001) were verified between the instrumentation systems used. Results ProTaper UniversalTM associated with 1% NaOCl completely eliminated all microorganisms. Microbial growth, however, was observed when ReciprocTM was used associated with 1% NaOCl. Conclusion According to the protocol executed for this study, the ReciprocTM system associated with 1% NaOCl was not able to completely eliminate E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and C. albicans from the root canal systems. PMID:27688413

  5. Wavelength dependence of photon-induced photoacoustic streaming technique for root canal irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Zadravec, Jure; Gregorčič, Peter; Lukač, Matjaž; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-07-01

    Laser-enhanced irrigation of complex root canals appears to be a very promising technique to improve the outcome of root canal treatment. This applies, in particular, if the technique can be effective at very low laser energies in irrigating not only the main canal but also the small lateral canals. This is important in order to avoid potential undesirable effects at higher laser energies such as temperature increase, dentin ablation, or extrusion of irrigating solution beyond the apical foramen. An improved understanding of the role of laser parameters, such as laser wavelength and pulse duration, in irrigation of lateral canals is therefore desired in order to optimize treatment efficacy. The influence of laser wavelength and pulse duration on cavitation phenomena was studied using shadow photography and a method of measuring fluid flow in lateral canals based on tracking of movements of small air bubbles naturally forming in liquid as a result of laser agitation. A simulated model of a root canal including a narrow lateral canal designed to represent typical root canal morphology was used for the water flow measurements. The following three laser wavelengths with relatively high absorption in water were studied: Er:YAG (2.94 μm), Er,Cr:YSGG (2.73 μm), and Nd:YAP (1.34 μm). Among the three wavelengths studied, the Er:YAG laser wavelength was found to be the most effective in formation of cavitation bubbles and in generating fluid motions within narrow lateral canals. A comparison between the shadow photography and fluid motion data indicates that it is the bubble's radius and not the bubble's volume that predominantly influences the fluid motion within lateral canals. Based on the results of our study, it appears that effective minimally invasive laser-assisted irrigation can be performed with low Er:YAG laser pulse energies below 10 mJ.

  6. Efficacy of laser-based irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

    PubMed

    Deleu, Ellen; Meire, Maarten A; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2015-02-01

    In root canal therapy, irrigating solutions are essential to assist in debridement and disinfection, but their spread and action is often restricted by canal anatomy. Hence, activation of irrigants is suggested to improve their distribution in the canal system, increasing irrigation effectiveness. Activation can be done with lasers, termed laser-activated irrigation (LAI). The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of different irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities. Twenty-five straight human canine roots were embedded in resin, split, and their canals prepared to a standardized shape. A groove was cut in the wall of each canal and filled with dentin debris. Canals were filled with sodium hypochlorite and six irrigant activation procedures were tested: conventional needle irrigation (CI), manual-dynamic irrigation with a tapered gutta percha cone (manual-dynamic irrigation (MDI)), passive ultrasonic irrigation, LAI with 2,940-nm erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser with a plain fiber tip inside the canal (Er-flat), LAI with Er:YAG laser with a conical tip held at the canal entrance (Er-PIPS), and LAI with a 980-nm diode laser moving the fiber inside the canal (diode). The amount of remaining debris in the groove was scored and compared among the groups using non-parametric tests. Conventional irrigation removed significantly less debris than all other groups. The Er:YAG with plain fiber tip was more efficient than MDI, CI, diode, and Er:YAG laser with PIPS tip in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

  7. Root and canal symmetry in the mandibular anterior teeth of patients attending a dental clinic: CBCT study.

    PubMed

    Kayaoglu, Guven; Peker, Ilkay; Gumusok, Mustafa; Sarikir, Cigdem; Kayadugun, Aylin; Ucok, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the number of roots/root canals in the mandibular anterior teeth of a Turkish population, to assess the relationship between gender or age and the frequency of two canals in a single root, and to determine the symmetry in root/root canal numbers between contralateral sides among patients. Cone-beam computed tomography images (n = 1128; 6253 teeth) taken at the Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology of the Faculty of Dentistry of Gazi University were examined by three observers and a supervisor, all of whom were blinded to patient gender and age. Axial, sagittal, and cross-sectional slices with a thickness of 1 mm were used. Numbers of roots and canals for each type of tooth were recorded. Most teeth had a single root and single root canal. Roots with two canals were more frequent in the incisors (14.9%, 17.2%, and 6.1% of the central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines, respectively). Teeth with two roots were more frequent in the canines (3.1% vs. 0% or 0.1%). Females more often had canines with double root canals (p < 0.001). When at least one tooth had two root canals, bilateral symmetry between contralateral teeth was found in 45.0%, 29.0%, and 28.0% of cases for central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines, respectively. Patients older than 56 years had fewer teeth with double root canals (p ≤ 0.001). A small proportion of the mandibular anterior teeth had two roots or root canals. Double root canals were mostly unilateral. Age and gender were associated with the number of root canals.

  8. Role of the confinement of a root canal on jet impingement during endodontic irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, B.; Boutsioukis, C.; Heijnen, G. L.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Versluis, M.

    2012-12-01

    During a root canal treatment the root canal is irrigated with an antimicrobial fluid, commonly performed with a needle and a syringe. Irrigation of a root canal with two different types of needles can be modeled as an impinging axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric jet. These jets are investigated experimentally with high-speed Particle Imaging Velocimetry, inside and outside the confinement (concave surface) of a root canal, and compared to theoretical predictions for these jets. The efficacy of irrigation fluid refreshment with respect to the typical reaction time of the antimicrobial fluid with a biofilm is characterized with a non-dimensional Damköhler number. The pressure that these jets induce on a wall or at the apex of the root canal is also measured. The axisymmetric jet is found to be stable and its velocity agrees with the theoretical prediction for this type of jet, however, a confinement causes instabilities to the jet. The confinement of the root canal has a pronounced influence on the flow, for both the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric jet, by reducing the velocities by one order of magnitude and increasing the pressure at the apex. The non-axisymmetric jet inside the confinement shows a cascade of eddies with decreasing velocities, which at the apex does not provide adequate irrigation fluid refreshment.

  9. Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Mandibular Premolars in Iranian Population: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Sepanta; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Khayat, Akbar; Naseri, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is essential for clinicians to have knowledge about root canal configuration, although its morphology varies largely in different ethnicities and even in different individuals within the same ethnic group. The current study reviewed the root canal configuration of root canals in mandibular first and second premolars among Iranian population based on independent epidemiological studies. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive search was conducted on retrieved articles related to root canal configuration and prevalence of each types of root canal in mandibular premolars based on Vertucci’s classification. An electronic search was conducted in Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar from January 1984 to September 2015. Results: In eleven studies conducted in eight provinces, 1644 mandibular first premolars and 1268 second premolars were investigated. Within mandibular first premolars, 70.9% were Vertucci's type I, followed by 10.4% type III, 7.18% type IV, 5.23% type II and 5.16% type V. In addition, among mandibular second premolars, 82.86% were type I, 6.25 type III, 5.32% type II, 4.27% type IV, and 0.69% type V. Conclusion: These results highlight the necessity of searching for additional possible root canals by clinicians. Moreover, these results indicated the ethnical characteristics of Iranian population regarding the morphology of mandibular premolars compared to other populations. PMID:27471522

  10. LPS levels in root canals after the use of ozone gas and high frequency electrical pulses.

    PubMed

    Melo, Tiago André Fontoura de; Gründling, Grasiela Sabrina Longhi; Montagner, Francisco; Scur, Alcione Luiz; Steier, Liviu; Scarparo, Roberta Kochenborger; Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli de; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana Vieira

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to verify the effect of ozone gas (OZY® System) and high frequency electric pulse (Endox® System) systems on human root canals previously contaminated with Escherichia colilipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fifty single-rooted teeth had their dental crowns removed and root lengths standardized to 16 mm. The root canals were prepared up to #60 hand K-files and sterilized using gamma radiation with cobalt 60. The specimens were divided into the following five groups (n = 10) based on the disinfection protocol used: OZY® System, one 120-second-pulse (OZY 1p); OZY® System, four 24-second-pulses (OZY 4p); and Endox® System (ENDOX). Contaminated and non-contaminated canals were exposed only to apyrogenic water and used as positive (C+) and negative (C-) controls, respectively. LPS (O55:B55) was administered in all root canals except those belonging to group C-. After performing disinfection, LPS samples were collected from the canals using apyrogenic paper tips. Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) was used to quantify the LPS levels, and the data obtained was analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The disinfection protocols used were unable to reduce the LPS levels significantly (p = 0.019). The use of ozone gas and high frequency electric pulses was not effective in eliminating LPS from the root canals. PMID:26981752

  11. Evaluation of Root Canal Preparation Using Rotary System and Hand Instruments Assessed by Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Stavileci, Miranda; Hoxha, Veton; Görduysus, Ömer; Tatar, Ilkan; Laperre, Kjell; Hostens, Jeroen; Küçükkaya, Selen; Muhaxheri, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete mechanical preparation of the root canal system is rarely achieved. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the root canal shaping efficacy of ProTaper rotary files and standard stainless steel K-files using micro-computed tomography. Material/Methods Sixty extracted upper second premolars were selected and divided into 2 groups of 30 teeth each. Before preparation, all samples were scanned by micro-computed tomography. Thirty teeth were prepared with the ProTaper system and the other 30 with stainless steel files. After preparation, the untouched surface and root canal straightening were evaluated with micro-computed tomography. The percentage of untouched root canal surface was calculated in the coronal, middle, and apical parts of the canal. We also calculated straightening of the canal after root canal preparation. Results from the 2 groups were statistically compared using the Minitab statistical package. Results ProTaper rotary files left less untouched root canal surface compared with manual preparation in coronal, middle, and apical sector (p<0.001). Similarly, there was a statistically significant difference in root canal straightening after preparation between the techniques (p<0.001). Conclusions Neither manual nor rotary techniques completely prepared the root canal, and both techniques caused slight straightening of the root canal. PMID:26092929

  12. Fracture strength of roots instrumented with three different single file systems in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Nur, Bilge Gulsum; Ok, Evren; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Tanriver, Mehmet; Capar, Ismail Davut

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strength of roots instrumented with three different single file rotary systems in curved mesial root canals of maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: Curvatures of 25°–35° on mesial roots of 60 maxillary molar teeth were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction to obtain roots 11 mm in length. The roots were balanced with respect to buccolingual and mesiodistal diameter and weight. They were distributed into three experimental groups and one control group (no instrumentation) (n = 15): Reciproc rotary file (R25, VDW, Munich, Germany), WaveOne Primary rotary file (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, UK) and OneShape (Micro-Mega, Besancon, France) rotary file. Vertical load was applied until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance test (P < 0.05). Results: The mean fracture load was 412 ± 72 Newton (N) for the control group, 395 ± 69 N for the Reciproc group, 373 ± 63 N for the WaveOne group and 332 ± 68 N for the OneShape group. The fracture load differences among three experimental groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05.) Whereas, the fracture loads of control and OneShape groups were significantly different (P = 0.012). Conclusions: Fracture resistance of the roots instrumented with WaveOne and Reciproc file systems were similar to the control group whereas it was observed that OneShape rotary file systems enhance the fracture strength of standardized curved roots when compared with the control group. PMID:26038648

  13. Stereomicroscopic Evaluation of Sealing Ability of Four Different Root Canal Sealers- An invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Chandak, Manoj; Jain, Pradeep; Patni, Mona Jain; Jain, Sumeet; Mishra, Prashant; Jain, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most commonly used core material for root canal filling is gutta-percha and as the gutta-percha by itself cannot obturate the complete root canal system, owing to its poor sealing properties hence, a sealer is used in combination with root filling material. Sealer is more important than the core obturating material. Sealer plays a secondary role by merely reinforcing (binding or luting) the gutta-percha to the canal walls, however, it is now confirmed that the sealer has a prime role in sealing the canal by blocking the irregularities between the canal space and the core filling material. Aim To investigate the effectiveness of the apical seal obtained by different sealers used in conjugation with cold lateral condensation technique of obturation using gutta-percha under stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods One hundred single-rooted extracted human permanent teeth with a single root canal were used in this in-vitro study. The sealers tested were conventional Zinc oxide eugenol sealer, Apexit, AH-Plus and Roekoseal Automix (RSA). The specimens were examined under a stereomicroscope. For the analysis of data Snedocor’s F test for the quality of variances among the experimental group and control group (One-Way ANOVA) were employed. Results The polydimethylsiloxane endodontic root canal sealer RSA provided a significantly better apical seal followed by AH plus and Apexit whereas conventional zinc oxide eugenol showed the lowest sealing ability. Conclusion It was concluded that there were statistically significant differences amongst the experimental groups. The shrinkage related to setting and potential dissolution might risk the proper seal of the root canal leading to treatment failure. PMID:27656560

  14. CBCT-Aided Microscopic and Ultrasonic Treatment for Upper or Middle Thirds Calcified Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Ming; Guo, Bin; Guo, Li-Yang; Yang, Yan; Hong, Xiao; Pan, Hong-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Root canal calcification is considered a great challenge during root canal treatment. Although the application of ultrasonic instruments and dental operating microscope (DOM) has advantages, dealing with calcified root canals still suffers a great risk of failure because of limited information about the location, length, and direction of obliteration on periapical radiographs. In this work, a cone-beam computed tomography- (CBCT-) aided method aimed at solving complicated calcified root canals in which conventional approaches could not work was proposed. Thirteen teeth with sixteen calcified canals (12 calcified in the upper third, 4 calcified in the middle third), which cannot be negotiated with conventional methods, were treated with the aid of CBCT. The location of calcification and depth of instrumentation and operating direction were calculated and assessed in three dimensions with ultrasonic instruments under DOM. In all thirteen teeth, canals with upper and middle thirds calcification were treated successfully. Finally, a guideline was proposed to help achieve consistent apical patency in calcified canals. PMID:27525269

  15. Rhizobial infection in Adesmia bicolor (Fabaceae) roots.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Luciana

    2014-09-01

    The native legume Adesmia bicolor shows nitrogen fixation efficiency via symbiosis with soil rhizobia. The infection mechanism by means of which rhizobia infect their roots has not been fully elucidated to date. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify the infection mechanism in Adesmia bicolor roots. To this end, inoculated roots were processed following conventional methods as part of our root anatomy study, and the shape and distribution of root nodules were analyzed as well. Neither root hairs nor infection threads were observed in the root system, whereas infection sites-later forming nodules-were observed in the longitudinal sections. Nodules were found to form between the main root and the lateral roots. It can be concluded that in Adesmia bicolor, a bacterial crack entry infection mechanism prevails and that such mechanism could be an adaptive strategy of this species which is typical of arid environments.

  16. Does MTA affect fiber post retention in repaired cervical root canal perforations?

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Guimarães, Karine Rodrigues; Mendes, Laís de Oliveira; Soares, Carlos José; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on the retention of fiber posts in repaired root canal perforations. Ten-millimeter post spaces were prepared in 60 endodontically treated bovine incisors. Root perforations were created in half of the root canals in the cervical area prior to being filled with white MTA-Angelus. Fiber posts were luted into the root canals with two self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem or Set) or self-etching (Panavia F) resin cements. The posts were submitted to a pull-out test, and the data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). The fiber posts exhibited reduced retention in MTA-repaired root canal perforations, regardless of the type of resin cement that was used (p < 0.001). Self-adhesive resin cements provided higher bond strength values than Panavia F, while no difference was observed between RelyX Unicem and Set (p > 0.05). The presence of MTA in repaired root perforations negatively affected post retention. In addition, self-adhesive cements seemed to be the best option to lute fiber posts within a root canal in these cases.

  17. Changes in root canal geometry after preparation assessed by high-resolution computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Peters, O A; Laib, A; Göhring, T N; Barbakow, F

    2001-01-01

    Root canal morphology changes during canal preparation, and these changes may vary depending on the technique used. Such changes have been studied in vitro by measuring cross-sections of canals before and after preparation. This current study used nondestructive high-resolution scanning tomography to assess changes in the canals' paths after preparation. A microcomputed tomography scanner (cubic resolution 34 microm) was used to analyze 18 canals in 6 extracted maxillary molars. Canals were scanned before and after preparation using either K-Files, Lightspeed, or ProFile .04 rotary instruments. A special mounting device enabled precise repositioning and scanning of the specimens after preparation. Differences in surface area (deltaA in mm2) and volume (deltaV in mm3) of each canal before and after preparation were calculated using custom-made software. deltaV ranged from 0.64 to 2.86, with a mean of 1.61 +/- 0.7, whereas deltaA varied from 0.72 to 9.66, with a mean of 4.16 +/- 2.63. Mean deltaV and deltaA for the K-File, ProFile, and Lightspeed groups were 1.28 +/- 0.57 and 2.58 +/- 1.83; 1.79 +/- 0.66 and 4.86 +/- 2.53; and 1.81 +/- 0.57 and 5.31 +/- 2.98, respectively. Canal anatomy and the effects of preparation were further analyzed using the Structure Model Index and the Transportation of Centers of Mass. Under the conditions of this study variations in canal geometry before preparation had more influence on the changes during preparation than the techniques themselves. Consequently studies comparing the effects of root canal instruments on canal anatomy should also consider details of the preoperative canal geometry. PMID:11487156

  18. Primary Mandibular First Molar with Single Root and Single Canal: A Case Report of a Rare Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Ghafourifard, Roya; Soleimani, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Single rooted primary mandibular first molar is a rare developmental anomaly. Literatures reveal that failure of invagination of Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath leads to this unusual root form. Thorough knowledge of root canal morphology and anatomical variations of primary teeth can help a pediatric dentist in successful root canal treatment. Hereby, we describe two cases of primary mandibular first molars with an unusual morphology as a single root called pyramidal molar. PMID:25628671

  19. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to ‘endodontic triad’. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. Aim To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each – a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL –1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by ‘Phi’ and ‘Cramers’ test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at p< 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Stainless steel hand file group showed most cracks followed by ProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed

  20. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to ‘endodontic triad’. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. Aim To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each – a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL –1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by ‘Phi’ and ‘Cramers’ test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at p< 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Stainless steel hand file group showed most cracks followed by ProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed

  1. Endodontic Treatment of the Mandibular First Molar with Six Roots Canals – Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The most common configuration of the mandibular first molar is the presence of two roots and three root canals. The objective of this work is to present two rare anatomic configurations with six root canals on two mandibular left first molars diagnosed during endodontic therapy. Root canal therapy was performed using a dental operating microscope. Ultrasonic troughing in the grooves in between the mesial root canals and in between the distal root canals was able to show the middle root canals. Large samples population characterization researches and systematic reviews were unable to detect a single case of six root canals configuration in a mandibular first molar in their investigations. Although it is a rare configuration, a six root canal configuration is possible to be found in the mandibular first molar. Three different pulp chamber configurations are possible to be found. Two or three roots may be present and the root configuration more common in the mesial root is the Type 8 and Type 12 for the distal root. Some concepts about the required technique to approach these cases are also debated. PMID:26023651

  2. Endodontic treatment of the mandibular first molar with six roots canals - two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Martins, Jorge N R; Anderson, Craig

    2015-04-01

    The most common configuration of the mandibular first molar is the presence of two roots and three root canals. The objective of this work is to present two rare anatomic configurations with six root canals on two mandibular left first molars diagnosed during endodontic therapy. Root canal therapy was performed using a dental operating microscope. Ultrasonic troughing in the grooves in between the mesial root canals and in between the distal root canals was able to show the middle root canals. Large samples population characterization researches and systematic reviews were unable to detect a single case of six root canals configuration in a mandibular first molar in their investigations. Although it is a rare configuration, a six root canal configuration is possible to be found in the mandibular first molar. Three different pulp chamber configurations are possible to be found. Two or three roots may be present and the root configuration more common in the mesial root is the Type 8 and Type 12 for the distal root. Some concepts about the required technique to approach these cases are also debated.

  3. Comparison of vertical forces during root canal filling with three different obturation techniques.

    PubMed

    Katalinić, Ivan; Baraba, Anja; Glavicić, Snjezana; Segović, Sanja; Anić, Ivica; Miletić, Ivana

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and compare vertical forces exerted during root canal obturation with the cold lateral condensation technique, Thermafil technique and ProTaper guttapercha. Fourty-five single-rooted permanent teeth were used in the study. All specimens were instrumented using the ProTaper rotating technique and were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 per group). In the first group, root canals were obturated using the cold lateral condensation technique. In the second group, the Thermafil technique was used to obturate root canals. In the last group, a ProTaper gutta-percha of the same taper as the instrumented root canals was used for root canal obturation. Vertical forces were measured using the device developed for simulation of endodontic treatment. The results showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0001) for vertical forces when cold lateral condensation obturation technique was used in comparison to other techniques. No statistically significant difference was found for vertical forces during obturation with Thermafil and ProTaper gutta-percha (p = 0.16). The cold lateral condensation technique exerted higher vertical forces in comparison to the Thermafil and ProTaper obturation techniques.

  4. Shaping Ability of Nickel-Titanium Rotary Instruments in Curved Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Ali; Moradi, Saeed; Forghani, Maryam; Monajemzadeh, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Disinfection and subsequent obturation of the root canal space require adequate mechanical enlargement of the canals. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shaping ability of Mtwo, RaCe and Medin rotary instruments during the preparation of curved root canals. Materials and Methods Sixty mesiobuccal root canals of mandibular molars with severe curvatures between 25-35° and radius of 4-9 mm were randomly divided into three groups of 20 canals each. Using pre- and post-instrumentation radiographs, straightening of the canal and the apical transportation were determined with AutoCAD software. The data were analyzed using Chi square, analysis of variance, and post-hoc tests and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results Mtwo instruments maintained the canal curvature significantly better than Race and Medin instruments (P<0.05). There was significant difference between the rotary instruments for iatrogenic transportation of the major foramen (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the conditions of this in vitro study, Mtwo instruments seemed superior to the two other rotary instruments. PMID:23717330

  5. Prevalence of C-Shaped Root Canals in Iranian Population: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mandana; Haghighi, Ali Kangarlou; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Khavid, Atefeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because of the great challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of “C” configuration and lack of any systematic information about its occurrence, the purpose of the present study is to determine the prevalence of C shaped root canals in Iranian population. Methodology: An exhaustive search was undertaken to identify published and unpublished researches related to the C-shaped canals by using key words. The search of the MEDLINE database included all publications from 1966 to May 2012.Then selected articles were obtained and reviewed. Data evaluated and summarized in the data sheet included methodology, population, number of teeth per study (power), number of root canals, type of root canal configuration, and c-shaped canals. Results: Six studies were included with total of 1062 teeth, all in mandibular second molars. The total incidence of C-shaped canals in Iranian population was obtained 6.96%. Conclusions: The incidence of C-shaped canals in Iranian population is 6.96%, which seems much less than Asian populations but nearer to Middle East countries. PMID:23724219

  6. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth. PMID:24474359

  7. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  8. [Step-back method for intracanal preparation with multiple length determination of the tooth root canal].

    PubMed

    Tamarut, T; Blasković, V; Cindrić, N; Maricić, B

    1989-01-01

    A procedure of intracanal preparation of a cuneiform with cervical extension using a step-back technique is described. The length of the root canal is determined by multiple electric measurement. First, the initial measurement of the canal length (I1) is performed. The measured length is then transferred to the initial extender (No. 15), whereafter extirpation of the pulp and removal of circumpulpal dentin begin. Then the extender NO. 20 is reduced by 1 mm, and the extender No. 25 by 2 mm. When the canal have been narrowed and bent, further extenders are used to additionally reduce the working length by 1 mm more. When the pulp has been extirpated, the second canal length measurement (12) is performed, then starting to form the canal. In phase 1, the apical third from the initial (IAF) to the leading file (MAF) is treated and the cervical extension of the canal prepared by a bur drill. In further instrumentation, each next file is reduced by 1 mm of the measured canal length (12), thus shaping the canal by filling, using a step-back method. Files according to Hedström should be used thereby. Shaping of the canal is completed by a file by four numbers greater than the leading (MAF) one.

  9. Minimizing Concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite in Root Canal Irrigation by Combination of Ultrasonic Irrigation with Photodynamic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhuang; Xiao, Suli; Ma, Dianfu; Huang, Xiaojing; Cai, Zhiyu

    2015-01-01

    Concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is positively correlated with its effectiveness in root canal disinfection but negatively correlated with its biocompatibility. The objective of this in vitro study was to compare the bactericidal effects among ultrasonic irrigation with different concentration of NaOCl alone or together with photodynamic treatment (PDT) against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) in infected root canals. One hundred and twenty bovine root canals contaminated with E. faecalis were randomly distributed into 12 groups treated with different disinfection methods: PDT, ultrasonic irrigation with NaOCl at different concentrations (0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 2.5% and 5.25%), and ultrasonic irrigation with NaOCl at different concentrations plus PDT. Data of microorganism load were collected before and after disinfection and analyzed by one-way ANOVA and LSD tests. Significantly enhanced antibacterial effects were noticed in groups treated by PDT plus 2.0% or 2.5% NaOCl irrigation (P < 0.05). No statistical differences existed in bactericidal efficacy among groups of PDT plus ultrasonic irrigation with 2.0%, 2.5% or 5.25% NaOCl, and ultrasonic irrigation with 5.25% NaOCl alone (P > 0.05). Our study confirmed the feasibility to reduce the concentration of NaOCl to a safer level while maintaining its antibacterial efficiency through synergistic effect of PDT with NaOCl ultrasonic irrigation.

  10. Shaping Ability of the Fifth Generation Ni-Ti Rotary Systems for Root Canal Preparation in Curved Root Canals using Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepak; Medha, Ashish; Patil, Neelam; Kadam, Nilam; Yadav, Vandana; Jagadale, Harshal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various root canal systems are available commercially with each manufacturer stating superior characteristics of their respective systems. The fifth generation root canal systems claim to have better flexibility and superior debris elimination due to their offset design. This study aims to compare the effects of fifth generation rotary systems on canal curvature, transportation and centering ratio of curved mesial root canals of mandibular molar via cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. Materials and Methods: With curvature ranging from 20° to 40°, 60 mandibular first molars with mesiobuccal root angle were divided into three groups with 20 canals each. Before instrumentation, the groups were balanced with respect to the angle of canal curvature based on CBCT images taken. All root canals were shaped to an apical size of 25: OneShape (OS) (Micro Mega, Besancon, France), ProTaper Next (PTN) (Dentsply Maillefer), Revo S (RS) (Micro Mega, Besancon, France). CBCT assessment was done post instrumentation. SPSS version 16 software was used for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at P = 0.05. Results: The RS system maintained better canal centricity and less transportation as compared to PTN and OS. There was no significant difference among the three groups in canal curvature after instrumentation. Conclusions: All file systems used straightened the root canal curvature similarly. RS instrumentation exhibited superior performance compared with the OS and PTN systems with respect to transportation and centering ratio. PMID:26225107

  11. Morphological changes related to age in mesial root canals of permanent mandibular first molars.

    PubMed

    Gani, Omar A; Boiero, Claudio F; Correa, Carolina; Masin, Ivana; Machado, Ricardo; Silva, Emmanuel J N L; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related morphological canal changes in mesial root canals of mandibular first molars of known ages. Fifty-six specimens were selected for this study and distributed into the following four age groups (n. 14): a) Group of children under 13 years, b) Group of adolescents (from 14 to 19 years), c) Group of young adults (from 20 to 39 years) and d) Group of older adults (over 40 years). The specimens were in perfect condition because after extraction they were carefully cleaned, sterilized, identified and stored in water. In order to improve the cleaning, they were placed in 1% sodium hypochlorite solution for four hours and rinsed in 10 vol. hydrogen peroxide for 8 hours. After that, a clearing technique was performed to illustrate root canal anatomy. Digitalized images of all samples were obtained by use of a stereomicroscope. Canals were noticeably simpler in older adults: they were sharply defined and narrow, sometimes too narrow. Calcification nuclei were not found and there were only a few remains of internuclear spaces. The canal system appeared cleaner, clearer and more sharply defined than in the other age groups. It may be concluded that there is a correlation between aging and morphological changes in the mesial root canals of mandibular first molars.

  12. Morphological changes related to age in mesial root canals of permanent mandibular first molars.

    PubMed

    Gani, Omar A; Boiero, Claudio F; Correa, Carolina; Masin, Ivana; Machado, Ricardo; Silva, Emmanuel J N L; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related morphological canal changes in mesial root canals of mandibular first molars of known ages. Fifty-six specimens were selected for this study and distributed into the following four age groups (n. 14): a) Group of children under 13 years, b) Group of adolescents (from 14 to 19 years), c) Group of young adults (from 20 to 39 years) and d) Group of older adults (over 40 years). The specimens were in perfect condition because after extraction they were carefully cleaned, sterilized, identified and stored in water. In order to improve the cleaning, they were placed in 1% sodium hypochlorite solution for four hours and rinsed in 10 vol. hydrogen peroxide for 8 hours. After that, a clearing technique was performed to illustrate root canal anatomy. Digitalized images of all samples were obtained by use of a stereomicroscope. Canals were noticeably simpler in older adults: they were sharply defined and narrow, sometimes too narrow. Calcification nuclei were not found and there were only a few remains of internuclear spaces. The canal system appeared cleaner, clearer and more sharply defined than in the other age groups. It may be concluded that there is a correlation between aging and morphological changes in the mesial root canals of mandibular first molars. PMID:25560687

  13. The effect of chloroform, orange oil and eucalyptol on root canal transportation in endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    Karataş, Ertuğrul; Kol, Elif; Bayrakdar, İbrahim Şevki; Arslan, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of solvents on root canal transportation in endodontic retreatment. Sixty extracted human permanent mandibular first molars with curved root canals were selected. All of the root canals were prepared using Twisted File Adaptive instruments (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) and filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) using the cold lateral compaction technique. The teeth were assigned to four retreatment groups as follows (n = 15): eucalyptol, chloroform, orange oil and control. The canals were scanned using cone-beam computed tomography scanning before and after instrumentation. The chloroform group showed a significantly higher mean transportation value than the orange oil and control groups at the 3 and 5 mm levels (P = 0.011 and P = 0.003, respectively). There was no significant difference among the orange oil, eucalyptol and control groups in terms of canal transportation (P > 0.61). The chloroform led to more canal transportation than the eucalyptol and orange oil during endodontic retreatment. PMID:26420757

  14. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis based on overextension of root canal filling material].

    PubMed

    Badarne, O; Koudstaal, M J; van Elswijk, J F A; Wolvius, E B

    2012-10-01

    In a 48-year-old woman and a 35-year-old man, a sinusitis maxillaris resulting from overextension of root canal filling material after an endodontic treatment ofa maxillary molar could be diagnosed through computed tomography. The woman complained of nasal congestion and in the man 2 radiopaque abnormalities in the maxillary sinus were discovered coincidentally. The corpora aliena were removed surgically. Root canal filling materials containing zinc oxide or hydrocortisone may cause aspergillosis of the maxillary sinus because they encountergrowth of Aspergillus species. In case ofmaxillary sinusitis, surgical removal of overextended root canal filling material from the maxillary sinus is indicated. No treatment consensus consists for cases without maxillary sinusitis symptoms.

  15. Root canal anatomy of mandibular first premolars in an Emirati subpopulation: A laboratory study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sheela Balu; Gopinath, Vellore Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the root canal anatomy of mandibular first premolar teeth in an Emirati subpopulation using a decalcification and clearing method. Materials and Methods: One hundred permanent mandibular first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes from an Emirati subpopulation from the United Arab Emirates were used for this study. They were subjected to decalcification and clearing. The tooth length, the canal orifice shape, mesial invagination, canal pattern, the location of apex, presence of lateral canals, and intercanal communications were determined. Results: The most common canal pattern was the Vertucci Type I (65%) followed by Type V (14%) and Type IV (13%). The most common type of canal orifice seen was the oval shape (36%) followed by the round shape (25%). Mesial invaginations were seen in 44% of the teeth. The mean tooth length was 19.9 mm, and apical deltas were seen in 24% of teeth. Conclusion: The Vertucci Type I canal pattern was the most prevalent in the mandibular first premolars while the occurrence of multiple canals was noted in 35% of this population. PMID:26929684

  16. Effect of postmilking teat antisepsis on teat canal infections in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, S C; Watts, J L; Boddie, R L; Ray, C H

    1990-02-01

    Effects of a .18% iodophor teat dip and a fatty acid plus lactic acid teat dip on teat canal infections were studied in two separate trials under experimental challenge procedures using Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. The iodophor teat dip was 90% effective in preventing new S. aureus teat canal infections and 95.6% effective in reducing progression of S. aureus teat canal infections to intramammary infections. The dip also reduced persistence of S. aureus teat canal colonizations from week to week by 94.4%. The fatty acid plus lactic acid dip had no effect on preventing S. aureus teat canal infections but reduced progression of S. aureus teat canal infections to intramammary infections by 43.8%. The fatty acid plus lactic acid dip also reduced the persistence of S. aureus teat canal infections by 39%. An insufficient number of Strep. agalactiae teat canal infections was detected in both trials for valid analyses. Neither dip had any effect on prevalence of naturally occurring, coagulase-negative staphylococcal teat canal infections or on teat canal infections by other organisms. PMID:2184176

  17. Effectiveness of castor oil extract on Escherichia coli and its endotoxins in root canals.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Maekawa, Lilian Eiko; Chung, Adriana; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias; Carvalho, Claudio Antonio Talge; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of castor oil extract used as an irrigating solution on Escherichia coli and its endotoxins in root canals. Sixty single-rooted teeth were prepared (using castor oil extract as irrigating solution) and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 samples were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), Group 2 samples were treated with polymyxin B, Group 3 samples were treated with Ca(OH)2 and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX), and Group 4 samples were treated with castor oil extract. A control group used physiological saline solution as an irrigant. Canal content samples were collected at four different times: immediately after instrumentation, seven days after instrumentation, after 14 days of intracanal medication, and seven days after removal of intracanal medication. A plating method was used to assess antimicrobial activity and the quantification of endotoxins was evaluated by the chromogenic Limulus lysate assay. Data were submitted to ANOVA and a Dunn test (a = 5%). Irrigation with castor oil extract decreased E. coli counts but had no effect on the level of endotoxins. Samples taken seven days after removal of medication revealed a significant reduction in endotoxin levels in Groups 3 and 4. Compared to the saline solution irrigation, castor oil extract decreased microorganism counts in root canals immediately after canal preparation. None of the medications used completely eliminated endotoxins in the root canal.

  18. Endodontic treatment of a maxillary first molar with seven root canals confirmed with cone beam computer tomography - case report.

    PubMed

    Martins, Jorge N R

    2014-06-01

    The most common configuration of the maxillary first molar is the presence of three roots and four root canals, although the presence of several other configurations have already been reported. The objective of this work is to present a rare anatomic configuration with seven root canals diagnosed during an endodontic therapy. Endodontic treatment was performed using a dental operating microscope. Exploring the grooves surrounding the main canals with ultrasonic troughing was able expose unexpected root canals. Instrumentation with files of smaller sizes and tapers was performed to prevent root physical weakness. The anatomic configuration was confirmed with a Cone Beam Computer Tomography image analysis which was able to clearly show the presence of seven root canals. An electronic database search was conducted to identify all the published similar cases and the best techniques to approach them are discussed.

  19. Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary First Molar with Seven Root Canals Confirmed with Cone Beam Computer Tomography – Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common configuration of the maxillary first molar is the presence of three roots and four root canals, although the presence of several other configurations have already been reported. The objective of this work is to present a rare anatomic configuration with seven root canals diagnosed during an endodontic therapy. Endodontic treatment was performed using a dental operating microscope. Exploring the grooves surrounding the main canals with ultrasonic troughing was able expose unexpected root canals. Instrumentation with files of smaller sizes and tapers was performed to prevent root physical weakness. The anatomic configuration was confirmed with a Cone Beam Computer Tomography image analysis which was able to clearly show the presence of seven root canals. An electronic database search was conducted to identify all the published similar cases and the best techniques to approach them are discussed. PMID:25121069

  20. Detection and management of a complex canal configuration in mesiobuccal root of maxillary first molar using three dimensional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L.; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Yadla, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    This case report discusses the identification and management of complex canal configuration of 3-2-1 in the mesiobuccal (MB) root of the maxillary left first molar. Careful attention to details of the pulpal floor and applying the knowledge of the laws of orifice location along with deepening the subpulpal groove with ultrasonic tips helped in identifying the three MB canals. Manual scouting helped in understanding the anatomic configuration; the use of three-dimensional imaging technique and spiral computed tomography (SCT) confirmed the same. SCT images showed buccolingually wide and bulbous mesiobuccal root with three separate canals at coronal third that merged into two canals in the middle and exited as a single canal at the apex. This article highlights the role of SCT in three-dimensionally analyzing the unseen rarest canal configurations that ultimately enabled the clinician to thoroughly explore, debride, and obturate the entire root canal system. PMID:27195233

  1. Apical crown technique to model canal roots. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tortini, D; Colombo, M; Gagliani, M

    2007-09-01

    The goals of endodontic therapy are to shape and clean the root canal system in order to receive a three-dimensional and hermetic filling of the entire endodontic space. The aim of this review is to analyze the development of the different canal shaping techniques from the manual stainless-steel instruments to the recently developed rotary Ni-Ti systems. The need to provide instruments of a suitable size to reach the apex of curved root canals drove the development of preparation techniques with a greater focus on the apical part. The Crown-Down technique involves the widening of the canal orifices with Gates-Glidden drills followed by the incremental removal of organic canal contents proceeding from the canal orifice to the apical portion using manual files. Files are used from larger to smaller with no apical pressure. Nevertheless, the term ''Crown-Down'' does not define the technique in the strictest sense, nor does it provide a specific sequence for the use of instruments, but rather defines a way to use the instruments. The preparation of root canals has been revolutionised by the development of Ni-Ti alloys. The features of this alloy give instruments profound flexibility and allow the manufacture of more tapered instruments compared with traditional stainless-steel instruments. In the second part of this review, numerous examples are provided concerning the comparison between different Ni-Ti systems and their techniques for use. A Crown-Down approach provides certain advantages including early organic debris removal, the creation of a large reservoir for irrigating solutions, a straighter access to the apical region of curved canals, and greater precision with regard to the exact working length and apical size.

  2. Non-Surgical Root Canal Treatment of Dens Invaginatus 3 in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Saeed; Donyavi, Zakyeh; Esmaealzade, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the clinical management of an unusual dens invaginatus type 3. A case of dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion is reported. The patient presented with pain and localized swelling. Despite the complex anatomy and diagnosis of dens invaginatus, non-surgical root canal treatment was performed successfully. Key Learning Points: - Dens invaginatus may be presented in different forms, and the etiology of this phenomenon is not fully understood. - Due to abnormal anatomical configuration, dens invaginatus presents technical difficulties in its clinical management. - Non-surgical root canal treatment can be performed successfully. PMID:24171017

  3. Laser assisted irrigation and hand irrigation for root canal decontamination: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivi, M.; Stefanucci, M.; Todea, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to compare the bactericidal efficiency of conventional method and LAI for root canal decontamination. Material and method: 22 human single root teeth, extracted for periodontal problems, mechanically prepared up to ISO 25 at the working lenght were divided in 2 groups: after sterilization, the teeth were infected with enterococcus faecalis and incubated for 4 weeks. Group A: 10 teeth were irrigated with conventional hand technique (CI): 3ml of 5% NaClO were used for two times of 30s each and after washing with sterile bi-distilled water for 20s, a final irrigation was performed with 3ml of 17% EDTA. Group B: 10 teeth were irrigated with 3ml of NaClO and activated by erbium laser, two cycles of 30s; also the final irrigation with 3ml of 17% EDTA was activated by erbium laser. In both the groups a resting time of 30s was used between the two sessions to allow the reaction rate of NaClO. The Erbium laser 2940 nm (LightWalker AT, Fotona; Lublijana, Slovenia) was used with 50microsecond pulse duration, at 15Hz, 20mJ, with a 600micron PIPS tip. Two samples were used as positive and negative control.

  4. Cutaneous Sinus Tract from Mandibular Second Molar with C-shaped Canal System and Improper Former Root Canal Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gharechahi, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the diagnosis and treatment of an extraoral cutaneous sinus tract originating in a mandibular second molar with a C-shaped root canal system. The patient was referred to our department by a dermatologist after a series of unsuccessful treatments, including antibiotics. Diffuse radiolucency on a preoperative radiograph revealed that earlier root canal treatment had been only partially successful. Consequently, we performed retreatment of the root canal comprising removal of the former restoration and gutta-percha, cleaning and shaping, and passive irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. The patient responded well, and the cutaneous lesion completely resolved uneventfully within 1 month postoperatively. Preoperative recognition and thorough knowledge of the root canal anatomy and conventional methods of obturation are necessary in performing successful endodontic treatment. PMID:27665696

  5. Effect of gutta-percha solvents on fiberglass post bond strength to root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Orlando A; Chaves, Gustavo S; Alencar, Ana H G; Borges, Alvaro H; Estrela, Cyntia R A; Soares, Carlos J; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gutta-percha solvents on the bond strength of fiberglass post to root canal dentin. Forty bovine incisors were decoronated, prepared, filled, and randomly distributed into four groups (n = 10) according to the gutta-percha solvent used: control, xylene, eucalyptol and orange oil. After root canal treatment, the posts were cemented into the prepared root canals using a resin-based cement. A micro push-out test was executed, and the patterns of failure were assessed with microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. The control group exhibited greater bond strength compared to the eucalyptol group in the cervical and middle thirds of the root (P < 0.05); however, it did not differ significantly from the xylene and orange oil groups (P > 0.05). No difference was observed in the values of the xylene, orange oil, and eucalyptol groups (P > 0.05). The cervical third had higher values than the apical third for all tested solvents (P < 0.05). Adhesive failure between resin cement and dentin was the most frequent type of failure. The use of xylene and orange oil as gutta-percha solvents did not influence the bond strength of fiberglass posts to root canal dentin.

  6. Decalcifying capability of irrigating solutions on root canal dentin mineral content

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Dagna, Alberto; Vinci, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Cucca, Lucia; Giardino, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chelating agents are believed to aid root canal irrigation and to be able to remove the inorganic smear layer. Aims: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and to compare the decalcifying capability of different irrigating solutions (Tubuliclean, Largal Ultra, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid 17%, Tetraclean, Tetraclean NA). Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary central incisors were used. Root canals were instrumented and irrigated. From each root, four comparable slices of cervical dentin were obtained. At three successive 5-min interval immersion times, the concentration of calcium extracted from root canal dentin was assessed with an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed by means of Kruskal Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Significance was predetermined at P < 0.05. Results and Conclusions: For all irrigating solutions, the maximum amount of Ca2+ extracted from root canal dentin samples was reached after 10 min contact time except for citric acid-based agents (Tetraclean and Tetraclean NA) which induced a higher and still increasing calcium release even after 10 min contact time. In order to obtain an efficient decalcifying action on dentin and to facilitate the biomechanical procedures, citric acid-based irrigants can be applied. PMID:26097355

  7. The Comparative Efficacy of Different Files in The Removal of Different Sealers in Simulated Root Canal Retreatment- An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanaparthy, Aruna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Root canal treatment enjoys a high success rate all over the world and has saved billions of teeth from extraction. However, there are instances of failure, the main causes being insufficient cleaning and inadequate obturation. In such cases the most conservative treatment option would be non-surgical retreatment. It requires regaining access to the entire root canal system through removal of the original root canal filling thus permitting further cleaning and re- obturation. Removal of gutta-percha and sealer becomes a critical step to gain access to the root canal system, remove necrotic tissue debris, bacteria and infected dentin. Aim To compare and evaluate the efficacy of manual hand Hedstrom files and two rotary retreatment file systems ProTaper Universal retreatment files and MtwoR (retreatment) files in the removal of root canal filling material during root canal retreatment and the influence of the type of sealers zinc oxide eugenol and AH plus on the presence of remaining debris in the reinstrumented canals in the apical, middle and coronal third. Materials and Methods Sixty single rooted human premolar teeth were divided into 3 Groups of 20 teeth each Group I (20 Teeth): prepared using hand K Files, Group II (20 Teeth): prepared using ProTaper rotary system and Group III (20 Teeth): prepared using Mtwo rotary system. In Groups- IA, IIA, IIIA: (10 teeth each) Obturation was done using Zinc Oxide Eugenol sealer and gutta percha. In Groups- IB, IIB, IIIB: (10 teeth each) obturation was done with AH Plus sealer and gutta percha. All the teeth were subjected to retreatment. Groups IA and IB with Hedstrom files, Groups IIA and IIB with ProTaper retreatment files and for Groups IIIA and IIIB with Mtwo retreatment Files. The roots were longitudinally split and were observed under a stereomicroscope for remaining amount of filling material on the canal walls. Statistical analysis was done using One–way ANOVA (Analysis of variance) test and Tukey

  8. EVALUATION OF THE APICAL INFILTRATION AFTER ROOT CANAL DISRUPTION AND OBTURATION

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, João Eduardo; Hopp, Renato Nicolás; Bernabé, Pedro Felício Estrada; Nery, Mauro Juvenal; Otoboni, José Arlindo; Dezan, Elói

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two root canal filling techniques used in teeth that had their apical foramen disrupted and compare the apical infiltration with an ideal clinical situation. Twenty-seven freshly extracted single-rooted teeth were selected and radiographed to confirm the existence of a single and straight root canal. The crowns were removed at a mean distance of 11 mm from the apex. The teeth had the root canals instrumented and were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=9): ND group - root canals were filled using the lateral compaction technique and no disruption was performed; DRF group - the apical constriction was disrupted by advancing a #40 K-file 1 mm beyond the original working length, the canals were reinstrumented to create an apical ledge at 1 mm from the apical foramen and were obturated with a master gutta-percha cone with same size as the last file used for reinstrumentation; DF group - the teeth had the apical constriction disrupted and the canals were obturated with a master gutta-percha cone that fit at 1 mm from the apex. The teeth were submitted to dye leakage test with Rhodamine B for 7 days, using vaccum on the initial 5 min. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally and the leakage was measured in a linear fashion from apex to crown. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between the groups that had the apical foramen disrupted (DF, DRF), but significant difference was found between the disrupted groups and the non-disrupted one (p<0.01). In conclusion, none of the evaluated techniques was able to prevent apical infiltration, so working length so the working length determination has to be established and maintained carefully. PMID:19089232

  9. Identification of incinerated root canal filling materials after exposure to high heat incineration.

    PubMed

    Bonavilla, Joseph D; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J; Pantera, Eugene A

    2008-03-01

    With the increase in global terrorism there is a higher probability of having to identify victims of incineration events secondary to incendiary explosive devices. The victims of incineration events challenge forensic odontologists when coronal restorations are no longer present to compile postmortem data. With 40 million root canals being completed annually in the United States, a very large pool of antemortem data is available to the forensic odontologist to make positive identifications. When complete and thorough dental records exist, individuals that have undergone surgical and nonsurgical root canal therapy may have materials present in the canal that may aid in identification. This study provides elemental fingerprints of root canal obturation materials to be utilized as a forensic identification aid. This study used scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) to assess the elemental composition of materials before and after high temperature incineration. Sixteen endodontic materials were analyzed pre-incineration and placed in extracted teeth. The filled teeth were subjected to incineration at 900 degrees C for 30 min to simulate incineration events or cremation. Incinerated materials were radiographed and re-analyzed to determine if they retained their original elemental composition. Endodontic sealers, gutta percha, root-end filling materials, silver points, and separated files were distinguishable in the canal and traceable after incineration. The authors present a fingerprint of the endodontic obturation materials that are capable of withstanding high heat incineration to be used as an aid for postmortem identification. This work represents the initial stage of database generation for root canal filling materials for use as an aid in forensic identification. PMID:18298492

  10. Biocompatibility of dental materials used in contemporary endodontic therapy: a review. Part 2. Root-canal-filling materials.

    PubMed

    Hauman, C H J; Love, R M

    2003-03-01

    Root-canal-filling materials are either placed directly onto vital periapical tissues or may leach through dentine. The tissue response to these materials therefore becomes important and may influence the outcome of endodontic treatment. This paper is a review of the biocompatibility of contemporary orthograde and retrograde root-canal-filling materials. PMID:12657140

  11. Evaluation of the Root and Canal Morphology of Maxillary Permanent Molars and the Incidence of the Second Mesiobuccal Root Canal in Greek Population Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nikoloudaki, Georgia E.; Kontogiannis, Taxiarchis G.; Kerezoudis, Nikolaos P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography is an alternative imaging technique which has been recently introduced in the field of Oral & Maxillofacial Radiology. It has rapidly gained great popularity among clinicians due to its ability to detect lesions and defects of the orofacial region and provide three-dimensional information about them. In the field of Endodontics, CBCT can be a useful tool to reveal tooth morphology irregularities, additional root canals and vertical root fractures. The objective of this study is to evaluate the root and root canal morphology of the maxillary permanent molars in Greek population using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography. Materials and Methods : 273 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were examined. The number of roots and root canals of the first and second maxillary molars were evaluated. Root canal configuration was classified according to Weine’s classification by two independent examiners and statistical analysis was performed. Results : A total of 812 molars (410 first and 402 second ones) were evaluated. The vast majority of both first and second molars had three roots (89.26% and 85.07%, respectively). Most first molars had four canals, while most second molars had three. In the mesiobuccal roots, one foramen was recorded in 80.91% of all teeth. Other rare morphologic variations were also found, such as fusion of a maxillary second molar with a supernumerary tooth. Conclusion : Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that more attention should be given to the detection of additional canals during root canal treatment in maxillary permanent molars. Towards this effort, CBCT can provide the clinician with supplemental information about the different root canal configurations for successful Root Canal Treatment. PMID:26464594

  12. Canals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkleman, Michael

    1974-01-01

    In the mid-1800's, the canal system in the U.S. was thriving. But, by the end of that century, roads and railways had replaced these commercial thoroughfares. Renewed interest in the abandoned canals is now resulting in renovation and ecological site development in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. (MA)

  13. An In Vitro Comparison of Root Canal Transportation by Reciproc File With and Without Glide Path

    PubMed Central

    Nazarimoghadam, Kiumars; Daryaeian, Mohammad; Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of ideal canal preparation is to prevent iatrogenic aberrations such as transportation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root canal transportation by Reciproc file with and without glide path. Materials and Methods: Thirty acrylic-resin blocks with a curvature of 60° and size#10 (2% taper) were assigned into two groups (n= 15). In group 1, the glide path was performed using stainless steel k-files size#10 and 15 at working length In group 2, canals were prepared with Reciproc file system at working length. By using digital imaging software (AutoCAD 2008), the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation digital images were superimposed over, taking the landmarks as reference points. Then the radius of the internal and external curve of the specimens was calculated at three α, β and γ points (1mm to apex as α, 3mm to apex as β, and 5mm to apex as γ). The data were statically analyzed using the independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test by SPSS version 16. Results: Glide path was found significant for only external curve in the apical third of the canal; that is, 5mm to apex (P=0.005). But in the other third, canal modification was not significant (P> 0.008). Conclusion: Canal transportation in the apical third of the canal seems to be significantly reduced when glide path is performed using reciprocating files. PMID:25628682

  14. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of resin-based root canal sealers in rat periapical tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Noriko; Satoh, Takenori; Watabe, Hirotaka; Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biocompatibility of resin-based root canal sealers (RCSs) in the periapical tissues of rats. Wistar rats underwent tooth replantation for reproducing the response of periapical tissue with RCSs. The resin-based Epipany SE, AH Plus Jet, the eugenol-based sealer (Canals) and a control group were employed. The upper right first molar was extracted and applied with RCSs on apices, and then the tooth was repositioned. Histological evaluation demonstrated that mild inflammation occurred in the periapical tissue with Epiphany and AH Plus Jet sealers on day 7, whereas Canals induced severe-to-moderate inflammation. The statistical analyses demonstrated that the significant differences were observed between Canals and the other groups on day 7 regarding inflammatory response. On day 14, the lesions induced by all sealers were healed and replaced predominantly by fibrous connective tissue. Our results suggest that Epiphany SE and AH Plus Jet are good biocompatible materials. PMID:23719002

  15. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of resin-based root canal sealers in rat periapical tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Noriko; Satoh, Takenori; Watabe, Hirotaka; Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biocompatibility of resin-based root canal sealers (RCSs) in the periapical tissues of rats. Wistar rats underwent tooth replantation for reproducing the response of periapical tissue with RCSs. The resin-based Epipany SE, AH Plus Jet, the eugenol-based sealer (Canals) and a control group were employed. The upper right first molar was extracted and applied with RCSs on apices, and then the tooth was repositioned. Histological evaluation demonstrated that mild inflammation occurred in the periapical tissue with Epiphany and AH Plus Jet sealers on day 7, whereas Canals induced severe-to-moderate inflammation. The statistical analyses demonstrated that the significant differences were observed between Canals and the other groups on day 7 regarding inflammatory response. On day 14, the lesions induced by all sealers were healed and replaced predominantly by fibrous connective tissue. Our results suggest that Epiphany SE and AH Plus Jet are good biocompatible materials.

  16. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems.

  17. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems. PMID:26465016

  18. Systemic distribution of sup 14 C-labeled formaldehyde applied in the root canal following pulpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, G.I.; Nishikawa, I.; Kawazoe, S.; Toda, T.

    1989-11-01

    The systemic distribution of {sup 14}C-labeled formaldehyde which had been placed in the root canals of the canines of cats following pulpectomies was studied using liquid scintillation counting and whole-body autoradiographic technique. Radioactive {sup 14}C which had been placed in the canals was found in the plasma 30 min after the root canal procedure. The recovery of systemic {sup 14}C radioactivity increased with time. In addition, it seemed that approximately 3% of the dose placed in the teeth was excreted in the urine within 36 h. Whole-body autoradiograms indicated extensive concentration of {sup 14}C radioactivity in tissues other than those analyzed with the liquid scintillation technique.

  19. Morphologic criteria for root canal treatment of primary molars undergoing resorption.

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1995-06-01

    The endodontic anatomy of primary molars is difficult to predict because of the balance of resorption and hard tissue deposition. In particular, the resorption causes perforating lacunae across the wall of the root, even at the furcation level, and modifies shape, dimension and position of endodontic apex. The phenomenon can be so deep as to compromise endodontic therapy. The first aim of the study was to verify if reliable criteria can be found for treatability in primary molars undergoing resorption, i.e. if it is possible to predict if perforating lacunae are present or not. The second aim of the study was to verify if other informations needed for endodontic treatment, as shape, dimension and location of the apex, and curvature of the root canal can be predicted. For the study, 80 extracted primary molars, 75 of which pulpally involved by caries, were selected. The treatability was evaluated in term of root length, root shape, dimension and shape of endodontic apex, age of the patient and X-ray index of resorption. The association between variables was performed by multiple correspondence analysis. The results suggested that root length was the most reliable criterion of the integrity of the root. The borderline of treatability was at the length of 4 mm. The position of endodontic apex related to anatomical apex, and the lingual related to the buccal root length were analyzed by linear regression analysis. The canal length was often similar to the root length (i.e. the endo and anatomical apices were very close) in lower and upper molars. However, in lower molars, if two or more canals were present in the same root, a discrepancy was observed between buccal and lingual root length. This finding was constant in first lower molars. In addition regression analysis provided a linear function between the lengths of the buccal and lingual side of the same root in lower molars. Its coefficient b was 0.73. PMID:7641630

  20. Aetiology, incidence and morphology of the C-shaped root canal system and its impact on clinical endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Ziegler, A; Higuchi, N; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2014-01-01

    The C-shaped root canal constitutes an unusual root morphology that can be found primarily in mandibular second permanent molars. Due to the complexity of their structure, C-shaped root canal systems may complicate endodontic interventions. A thorough understanding of root canal morphology is therefore imperative for proper diagnosis and successful treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding C-shaped roots and root canals, from basic morphology to advanced endodontic procedures. To this end, a systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PLoS and BioMed Central databases, and many rarely cited articles were included. Furthermore, four interactive 3D models of extracted teeth are introduced that will allow for a better understanding of the complex C-shaped root canal morphology. In addition, the present publication includes an embedded best-practice video showing an exemplary root canal procedure on a tooth with a pronounced C-shaped root canal. The survey of this unusual structure concludes with a number of suggestions concerning future research efforts. PMID:24483229

  1. Maxillary first Molar with three canal orifices in MesioBuccal root.

    PubMed

    Ayranci, Leyla B; Arslan, Hakan; Topcuoglu, H Sinan

    2011-10-01

    The present case describes root canal treatment in a maxillary first molar with unusual anatomy. A male patient was referred for the treatment of maxillary left first molar tooth. Clinical examination of the pulpal floor revealed 3 orifices in the mesio buccal root. The tooth was treated successfully. Anatomic variations must be taken into consideration in clinical and radiographic evaluation during endodontic treatment. PMID:22144820

  2. Maxillary first Molar with three canal orifices in MesioBuccal root

    PubMed Central

    Ayranci, Leyla B.; Arslan, Hakan; Topcuoglu, H Sinan

    2011-01-01

    The present case describes root canal treatment in a maxillary first molar with unusual anatomy. A male patient was referred for the treatment of maxillary left first molar tooth. Clinical examination of the pulpal floor revealed 3 orifices in the mesio buccal root. The tooth was treated successfully. Anatomic variations must be taken into consideration in clinical and radiographic evaluation during endodontic treatment PMID:22144820

  3. Endodontic management of a maxillary first molar with three roots and seven root canals with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamal Krishan; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2015-01-01

    Variation in root canal morphology, especially in maxillary first molar presents a constant challenge for a clinician in their detection and management. This case report describes the successful root canal treatment of a three rooted right maxillary first molar presenting with three canals each in the mesiobuccal and distobuccal roots and one canal in the palatal root. The clinical detection of this morphologic aberration was made using a dental operating microscope, and the canal configuration was established after correlating and computing the clinical, radiographic and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan findings. CBCT images confirmed the configuration of the canals in the mesiobuccal and distobuccal roots to be Al-Qudah and Awawdeh type (3-2) and type (3-2-1), respectively, whereas the palatal root had a Vertucci type I canal pattern. This report reaffirms the importance of careful examination of the floor of the pulp chamber with a dental operating microscope and the use of multiangled preoperative radiographs along with advanced diagnostic aids such as CBCT in identification and successful management of aberrant canal morphologies. PMID:26295029

  4. Effects of different sonic activation protocols on debridement efficacy in teeth with single-rooted canals

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-na; Luo, Xiao-juan; Li, Guo-hua; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Mao, Jing; Chen, Ji-hua; Gutmann, James L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The effects of different EndoActivator® (EA) sonic activation protocols on root canal debridement efficacy were examined. Methods Root canals in 48 single-rooted teeth were instrumented, irrigated initially with NaOCl and divided into 6 groups (N=8) based on the application time of QMix (antimicrobial calcium-chelating irrigant), and the time and sequence of EA irrigant activation - Positive Control: 90 sec QMix; Negative Control: 90 sec saline; Group 1A: 15 sec QMix + 15 sec QMix with EA-activation; Group 1B: 30 sec QMix + 30 sec of QMix with EA-activation; Group 2A: 15 sec QMix with EA-activation + 15 sec QMix; Group 2B: 30 sec QMix with EA-activation + 30 sec QMix. Split roots were examined with scanning electron microscopy for assignment of smear and debris scores in locations along the coronal, middle and apical thirds of the canals. The overall cleanliness of pooled canal locations in the Positive Control and the 4 experimental groups were compared with chi-square tests. Results Significant differences were detected among the 5 groups (p<0.001). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons indicated that the overall canal cleanliness was in the order (from best to worst): 1B = 2B > 2A > 1A > Positive Control. Completely clean canals could not be achieved due to the absence of continuous irrigant flow for EA to clear intraradicular debris. Conclusions Irrespective of the sonic activation sequence, irrigant activation for 30 seconds during a 60-second period of QMix application appears to maximize the smear layer and debris removal potential of the EndoActivator® system. PMID:24878251

  5. Root canal surface after application of an x-ray opaque waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Bartonova, Marie; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-05-01

    The success of endodontic treatment depends on the methods used for shaping, cleaning, disinfecting, and sealing of a root canal. In the last few decades, big progress has been achieved in the application of the following methods: manual instrumentation, sonic and ultrasonic devices, and rotary instruments. The procedures used in the root canal system preparation result in a smear layer creation. The aim of this study was to give more precision to the smear layer removal using laser radiation. The root canal systems of 20 human teeth were treated endodontically. As laser radiation sources, Er:YAG laser system generating a wavelength of 2940 nm (rep. rate 1.5 Hz, spot size diameter 320 um, number of pulses 55, energy 100 mJ) and Alexandrite laser system generating a wavelength of 375 nm (rep. rate 1 Hz, spot size diameter 320 um, number of pulses 200, energy 1 mJ) were used. As a delivery system, a hollow glass waveguide with the special X-ray contrast cover was used. The flexible waveguide was moved via root canal and the laser radiation cleaned the wall surface. After application of Er:YAG laser radiation, the smear layer was fully removed, the surface was clean and smooth, and in the SEM investigation the open dentinal tubules were visible. No cracks were determined. The surface modifications were also not observed after endodontic preparation as well as Alexandrite laser radiation therapy. The whole treatment can be checked by X-ray machine.

  6. Stress Distribution Changes after Root Canal Therapy in Canine Model: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Ehsani, Sara

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The fracture strength of endodontically treated teeth compared to vital ones has long been a source of controversy. It is not clear how root canal therapy affects the stress distribution in teeth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in stress distribution after root canal therapy in a human maxillary canine by finite element analysis (FEM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two 3D FEM models of a maxillary canine were created; one represented a virgin tooth and the other represented the same tooth after root canal therapy. A single force of 14.1 N was applied 45 degrees to horizontal plane to the center of the palatal surface; stress distribution was then analyzed in both models. RESULTS: SEQV (VonMises stress) analysis demonstrated an obvious decrease after root canal therapy and the regions near cementoenamel junction (CEJ) showed the highest displacement. The endodontically treated tooth demonstrated higher deflection than the vital one. CONCLUSION: Maximum stress and displacement was repeatedly found in the cervical area, hence more emphasis should be placed on the reinforcement of this region. PMID:24082903

  7. Cleaning efficacy of reciprocal and rotary systems in the removal of root canal filling material

    PubMed Central

    Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Koçak, Sibel; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of hand file, nickel titanium rotary instrument, and two reciprocating instruments for removing gutta-percha and sealer from the root canals. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight mandibular premolar teeth were used. The root canals were shaped and filled with gutta-percha and a resin-based sealer. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the technique by which the root filling material was removed: Group 1 — Wave One; Group 2 — Reciproc; Group 3 — ProTaper; and Group 4 — Gates-Glidden burs and stainless steel hand file. Then teeth were split longitudinally and photographed. The images were transferred to a computer. The ratio of remaining filling material to the root canal periphery was calculated with the aid of ImageJ software. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: A significant difference was found among all groups (P < 0.001). The WaveOne group demonstrated significantly less remaining filling material. The greatest amount of filling material was found in specimens where gutta-percha was removed with Gates-Glidden burs and stainless steel hand file. Conclusion: The reciprocating files were found to be significantly more effective in removing the filling material from the canal walls compared to the rotational file and hand file. PMID:27099429

  8. Investigation of Er:YAG laser root canal irradiation using en face OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, Carmen; Balabuc, Cosmin; Filip, Laura; Calniceanu, Mircea; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-07-01

    This pilot study was designed to investigate the quality of endodontic treatment performed with/without Er:YAG laser using en-face Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) prototype which evinced the presence of voids and microleakage within the root canal.

  9. Root Canal Shaping by Single-File Systems and Rotary Instruments: a Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Khaly; Faye, Babacar; Sarr, Mouhamed; Niang, Seydina O; Ndiaye, Diouma; Machtou, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shaping ability of two single-file systems and conventional rotary instruments in severely curved root canals of extracted human molars. Methods and Materials: Mesiobuccal canals of 120 mandibular molars with angles of curvature ranging between 25° and 35° and radii of curvature from 5 to 9 mm, were divided into three groups (n=40). In each group the canals were instrumented with either WaveOne (W), Reciproc (R) or ProTaper (P). The time required for canal shaping and the frequency of broken instruments were recorded. The standardized pre and post-instrumentation radiographs were taken to determine changes in working length (WL) and straightening of canal curvature. The presence of blockage or perforation was also evaluated. Data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey’s test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Both single-instrument systems reduced the canal preparation time by approximately 50% (P<0.05). No incidence of broken instruments from single-file systems was reported; however, two F2 instruments in the P group were broken (P<0.05). Reduction in WL and straightening of canal curvature was observed in all three systems with the highest scores belonging to P system (P<0.05). No case of blockage or perforation was found during shaping in any group. Conclusion: Single-file systems shaped curved canals with substantial saving in time and a significant decrease in incidence of instrument separation, change in WL, and straightening of canal curvature. PMID:25834600

  10. Recontamination of coronally unsealed root canals medicated with camphorated paramonochlorophenol or calcium hydroxide pastes after saliva challenge.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, J F; Lopes, H P; de Uzeda, M

    1998-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the ability of some medications to prevent recontamination of coronally unsealed root canals by bacteria from saliva. The medications tested were camphorated paramonochlorophenol (CPMC) applied in cotton pellets in the pulp chamber; calcium hydroxide/saline solution paste filling the root canal; and calcium hydroxide/CPMC/glycerin paste also filling the root canal. Medicated canals were exposed to saliva, and the number of days required for total recontamination to occur was recorded. Canals medicated with CPMC in cotton pellets were thoroughly recontaminated within an average of 6.9 days. Canals filled with calcium hydroxide/saline solution and calcium hydroxide/CPMC/glycerin showed entire recontamination within an average of 14.7 and 16.5 days, respectively. Calcium hydroxide pastes were significantly more effective than CPMC (p < 0.05). PMID:9487858

  11. Effects of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on the root canal wall dentin of human teeth: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Kaitsas, V; Signore, A; Fonzi, L; Benedicenti, S; Barone, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological and histological changes on the root canal walls after Nd:YAG laser application. Twenty vital, recently extracted single-rooted human teeth were used for this study. Root canals were cleaned and shaped by a conventional step-back technique--by means of k files up to a 20 k-file type at working length--and subsequently shaped by Ni-Ti root-canal rotary instrumentation up to 30/06 and irrigated with 2.5% hypochlorite solution. Ten teeth (control group) were left unlased, while the other ten teeth were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser by means of a 320 microns fibre inserted in the root canal at 1 mm from the apex with a power of 1.5 Watt and a frequency of 15 pps for five seconds in retraction with rotating movements. The control specimen showed debris and smear layer on the root canal surface obscuring the dentin tubules. The root canal walls irradiated with Nd:YAG laser showed a clear glazed surface, some open dentinal tubules and some surface craters with cracks. Such results confirm that smear layer and debris are removable with Nd:YAG laser, however clearing all root canal walls is still difficult and, if the energy level and duration of application are inadequate, a certain degree of thermal damage and morphological changes in dentin structure are observable. PMID:11938590

  12. Human tooth and root canal morphology reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    DRĂGAN, OANA CARMEN; FĂRCĂŞANU, ALEXANDRU ŞTEFAN; CÂMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU; TURCU, ROMULUS VALERIU FLAVIU

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Visualization of the internal and external root canal morphology is very important for a successful endodontic treatment; however, it seems to be difficult considering the small size of the tooth and the complexity of the root canal system. Film-based or digital conventional radiographic techniques as well as cone beam computed tomography provide limited information on the dental pulp anatomy or have harmful effects. A new non-invasive diagnosis tool is magnetic resonance imaging, due to its ability of imaging both hard and soft tissues. The aim of this study was to demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging to be a useful tool for imaging the anatomic conditions of the external and internal root canal morphology for endodontic purposes. Methods The endodontic system of one freshly extracted wisdom tooth, chosen for its well-known anatomical variations, was mechanically shaped using a hybrid technique. After its preparation, the tooth was immersed into a recipient with saline solution and magnetic resonance imaged immediately. A Bruker Biospec magnetic resonance imaging scanner operated at 7.04 Tesla and based on Avance III radio frequency technology was used. InVesalius software was employed for the 3D reconstruction of the tooth scanned volume. Results The current ex-vivo experiment shows the accurate 3D volume rendered reconstruction of the internal and external morphology of a human extracted and endodontically treated tooth using a dataset of images acquired by magnetic resonance imaging. The external lingual and vestibular views of the tooth as well as the occlusal view of the pulp chamber, the access cavity, the distal canal opening on the pulp chamber floor, the coronal third of the root canals, the degree of root separation and the apical fusion of the two mesial roots, details of the apical region, root canal curvatures, furcal region and interradicular root grooves could be clearly bordered. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging offers 3

  13. Root canal disinfection of immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis: Comparison of three different protocols

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Benítez, Soledad; Stambolsky Guelfand, Carlos; Martín-Jiménez, Milagros

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present in vivo study was designed to assess the efficacy of 3 root canal disinfection protocols in immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis (AP). Material and Methods: Forty immature premolars with pulp necrosis and AP of five Beagle dogs were used. Three experimental disinfection protocols were established. After irrigation with 40 ml 5.25% sodium hypochlorite using the Endovac system, in Group 1 canals were flushed with QMix solution; in Group 2, canals were flushed with QMix solution and 2% chlorhexidine gel dressing was placed for two weeks; and in Group 3, triantibiotic paste dressing was placed for two weeks. Canals were sampled after periapical lesions were radiographically visible (S1), after the first disinfection session (S2) and, in groups 2 and 3, after dressing (S3). Results: After the first session of the disinfection protocol (S2), there was significant (p < 0.05) bacterial reduction in the three experimental groups. Microorganisms were absent in 100% of S2 samples in groups 1 and 2, and in 75% of group 3 (p > 0.05). After dressing, 87.5% of the S3 samples showed increased bacterial count: in group 2, CFU counts (median = 891) were significantly higher than in group 3 (median = 18) (p = 0.03). Conclusions: In immature dog teeth with AP, root canal irrigation using QMix solution, with or without chlorhexidine gel dressing, or a triantibiotic paste dressing, provides the same level of disinfection than irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite alone in only one session. Key words:Apical periodontitis, chlorhexidine, Endovac, immature teeth, QMix solution, root canal disinfection, triantibiotic paste. PMID:25593656

  14. Reliability of assessing dye penetration along root canal fillings using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Souza, Erick Miranda; Pappen, Fernanda Geraldes; Shemesh, Hagay; Bonanato-Estrela, Cristiane; Bonetti-Filho, Idomeo

    2009-12-01

    Methylene blue (MB) remains the most frequently used tracer for dye penetration tests of endodontic fillings, despite its chemical reactions with different materials. This study checked whether dye penetration displayed by MB is comparable to Rhodamine B (RB). One hundred and seventy-two root canals were filled with gutta-percha and six sealers. Samples were covered with nail varnish except for the apical area, and immersed in MB or RB solutions under negative pressure. After 24 h, roots were bisected, photographed and the maximal dye penetration recorded. Dye penetrations displayed by MB and RB were compared (Newman-Keuls test). MB and RB displayed comparable results for groups filled with AH Plus, EndoREZ and Polifil (P > 0.05). For Endofill, Sealer 26 and Sealapex, a significant lower dye penetration was observed when MB was used (P < 0.05). Laboratory tests using MB for measuring dye penetration through filled root canals can result in misleading conclusions.

  15. Measurement and modeling of temperature distribution for Er:YAG laser root canal sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Stock, Karl; Keller, Ulrich

    1999-02-01

    Based on the bactericidal effect of subablative irradiation the Er:YAG laser can be used for root canal sterilization in endodontics. For this, an optical fiber will be inserted into the root canal down to a depth of about 1 mm in front of the apex, and then removed while activating the laser. In order to avoid heat accumulation which could be harmful to the desmodont or periodont, repetition rate and fiber withdrawal velocity must be kept within certain limits. These limits were determined by calculations based on a 1-dim, cylindrical model and related temperature measurements on half cutted teeth. The calculations agree well to the control measurements and are used to derive a complete set of application parameters in dependence on the expected root thickness.

  16. In vitro cleaning ability of root canal irrigants with and without endosonics.

    PubMed

    Cheung, G S; Stock, C J

    1993-11-01

    A variety of methods have been used to evaluate the cleanliness of root canals after endodontic preparation and irrigation. Few irrigation agents other than sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) have been tested in conjunction with endosonics. The purpose of this study was to examine the cleaning ability of water, NaOCl, Hibiscrub and a biological washing liquid when used as intracanal irrigants, with and without endosonics. Two methods of evaluation were employed to assess the root canal cleanliness after endodontic preparation. A total of 56 teeth, divided into eight groups, were prepared manually using the step-down technique. Each irrigating agent was used in two experimental groups, with and without endosonics. Two additional teeth which received neither instrumentation nor irrigation served as the controls. The teeth were split longitudinally and the state of cleanliness of the root canal was assessed by scoring the amount of stained organic debris and smear layer. It was demonstrated that the results of debris and smear layer scoring were significantly influenced by the type of irrigant and whether endosonics had been used. All agents exhibited similar cleaning ability when introduced manually. With endosonics, NaOCl yielded significantly less stainable debris (P < 0.05) than the other groups which showed no significant difference. The ability to remove the smear layer was enhanced, but at some distance short of the working length, by endosonics for all irrigants tested. None of the solutions tested was able to produce a canal wall that was free of smear layer. PMID:8144242

  17. Diode laser irradiation effects on the sealing ability of root canal sealers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. C.; Nogueira, G. E. C.; Mayer, M. P. A.; Antoniazzi, J. H.; Zezell, D. M.

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that dentine alterations induced by 810 nm-diode laser may affect the interaction between root canal sealers and the dentin wall. Seventy-two single root human teeth were selected and root canals were enlarged with K-files. Dentine was treated with 0.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA-T and irradiated (laser group) by diode laser (810 nm/ P = 2.5W/ I = 1989 W/cm2) or remained non-irradiated (control group). Six samples per group were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining samples of each group were divided into three subgroups ( n = 10) and sealed with one of the tested sealers (N-Rickert/AHPlus™/Apexit®). Apical leakage was estimated by evaluating penetration of 0.5% methylene-blue dye. SEM analysis revealed that dentine at the apical third in irradiated samples was melted and fusioned whereas non-irradiated samples exhibited opened dentinal tubules. Despite the morphological changes induced by irradiation, laser did not affect the sealing ability of N-Rickert and AHPlusTM sealers. However, the length of apical leakage in roots filled with Apexit® was lower in irradiated root canals than in non-irradiated samples ( p < 0.05). Morphological changes of root canal walls promoted by diode laser irradiation may improve de sealing ability of Apexit®, a calcium hydroxide-based sealer, suggesting that improved sealing promoted by irradiation may represent an additional factor contributing to the endodontic clinical outcome.

  18. Antibacterial Activity of MTA Fillapex and AH 26 Root Canal Sealers at Different Time Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Farnaz; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Jafari, Sanaz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Momeni, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The main goal of endodontic treatment is elimination of bacteria and their by-products from infected root canals. This study compared the antibacterial effect of two different sealers, AH 26 and MTA Fillapex, on 4 microorganisms 24, 48 and 72 h and 7 days after mixing. Methods and Materials: The microorganisms used in this study consisted of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). This test is based on the growth of bacteria and turbidity measurement technique using a spectrophotometer, and direct contact was conducted. Multiple comparisons were carried out using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test and student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The antibacterial activity in the indirect technique was more than the technique with both sealers. In the direct technique the antibacterial activity on all microorganisms were lower for MTA Fillapex sealer. In the indirect technique, both sealers exhibited similar antibacterial properties. Conclusion: The antibacterial effect of MTA Fillapex sealer was significantly less than that of AH 26 sealer in the direct technique. The antibacterial effects of both sealers were similar in the indirect technique. PMID:27471530

  19. Centering and transportation: in vitro evaluation of continuous and reciprocating systems in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Navós, Beatriz Vilas; Hoppe, Carolina Bender; Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Böttcher, Daiana Elizabeth; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2016-01-01

    Context: One of the goals of endodontic therapy is the shaping and cleaning of the root canal system. In recent years, there has been multiple systems instrumentation, and changes in their dynamics are central to maintain the original shape of the canal after preparation. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate centering and transportation in curved root canals after using ProTaper® and MTwo® in continuous rotation, Reciproc® in reciprocating motion, and a step-down manual instrumentation technique. Settings and Design: Mesiobuccal roots of human extracted the first and second maxillary molars were selected and the canals (n = 60) were divided into four groups according to the preparation techniques: PT-ProTaper®; MT-MTwo®; RE-Reciproc®; MI-manual instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: The final apical diameter was standardized to a size 25. Centering and transportation were evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography and Adobe Photoshop 8.0 software. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. Results: Results of transportation showed no statistical differences (P > 0.05) between groups, and significantly, difference (P < 0.05) between ProTaper® and Reciproc® was found when evaluating centering ability in the apical third. Conclusions: We concluded that there were no differences in transportation between the evaluated systems for the preparation of curved root canals with an apical instrumentation diameter of #25. For centering ability, in the apical third, ProTaper® presented worst behavior when compared to Reciproc®. PMID:27656071

  20. Centering and transportation: in vitro evaluation of continuous and reciprocating systems in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Navós, Beatriz Vilas; Hoppe, Carolina Bender; Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Böttcher, Daiana Elizabeth; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2016-01-01

    Context: One of the goals of endodontic therapy is the shaping and cleaning of the root canal system. In recent years, there has been multiple systems instrumentation, and changes in their dynamics are central to maintain the original shape of the canal after preparation. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate centering and transportation in curved root canals after using ProTaper® and MTwo® in continuous rotation, Reciproc® in reciprocating motion, and a step-down manual instrumentation technique. Settings and Design: Mesiobuccal roots of human extracted the first and second maxillary molars were selected and the canals (n = 60) were divided into four groups according to the preparation techniques: PT-ProTaper®; MT-MTwo®; RE-Reciproc®; MI-manual instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: The final apical diameter was standardized to a size 25. Centering and transportation were evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography and Adobe Photoshop 8.0 software. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. Results: Results of transportation showed no statistical differences (P > 0.05) between groups, and significantly, difference (P < 0.05) between ProTaper® and Reciproc® was found when evaluating centering ability in the apical third. Conclusions: We concluded that there were no differences in transportation between the evaluated systems for the preparation of curved root canals with an apical instrumentation diameter of #25. For centering ability, in the apical third, ProTaper® presented worst behavior when compared to Reciproc®.

  1. A microcomputed tomography scanning study of root canal space: changes after the ultrasonic removal of fractured files.

    PubMed

    Madarati, Ahmad A; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Watts, David C

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effect of ultrasonic removal of endodontic fractured files on tooth structure. Fifty-three canine roots were cleaned and weighed. They were scanned by a microcomputed tomography scanner producing two-dimensional images that were reconstructed into two-dimensional slices, and, finally, the canal volume was measured. In a control group, canals were prepared to F5-size ProTaper (Dentsply Ltd, Surrey, UK). In three experimental groups, F5-fractured files were ultrasonically removed from three root canal locations: coronal, middle, and apical. All roots were reweighed and rescanned. Reconstruction and analysis were performed to remeasure the canal volume. The differences in root mass (weight) and canal volume between before and after treatment were calculated. The highest change increase in canal volume was found when fractured files were removed from the apical part followed by middle and coronal. A positive correlation existed between canal volume and root mass changes. Microcomputed tomography scanning can reliably determine changes in canal volume resulting from fractured-file removal.

  2. Comparison of root canal filling quality by mineral trioxide aggregate and gutta percha cones/AH plus sealer.

    PubMed

    Jho, Wonkyung; Park, Jeong-Won; Kim, Euiseong; Song, Minju; Seo, Deok-Gyu; Yang, Dong-Kyu; Shin, Su-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of canal filling using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and gutta-percha (GP) in root canals, and to investigate the differences in the percentage of voids between mesial and distal canals by using microcomputed tomography. Twenty-two extracted human mandibular molars were instrumented using rotary files. Two teeth without canal fillings served as negative controls, and the other teeth were obturated with either ProRoot(®) MTA or gutta-percha and AH Plus(®) sealer. Obturated teeth were scanned with microcomputed tomography, and the percentage of voids (V%) was calculated. These specimens were also examined under a scanning electron microscope. The MTA group showed a significantly higher V% than the GP groups (p<0.05). The mesial canal groups showed significantly higher V% than did the distal canal groups (p<0.05). In orthograde filling, MTA exhibited significantly lower filling quality than did GP.

  3. Morphometric analysis of root canal cleaning after rotary instrumentation with or without laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesan, Melissa A.; Geurisoli, Danilo M. Z.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Barbin, Eduardo L.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2002-06-01

    The present study examined root canal cleaning, using the optic microscope, after rotary instrumentation with ProFile.04 with or without laser application with different output energies. Cleaning and shaping can be accomplished manually, with ultra-sonic and sub-sonic devices, with rotary instruments and recently, increasing development in laser radiation has shown promising results for disinfection and smear layer removal. In this study, 30 palatal maxillary molar roots were examined using an optic microscope after rotary instrumentation with ProFile .04 with or without Er:YAG laser application (KaVo KeyLaser II, Germany) with different output energies (2940 nm, 15 Hz, 300 pulses, 500 milli-sec duration, 42 J, 140 mJ showed on the display- input, 61 mJ at fiberoptic tip-output and 140 mJ showed on the display-input and 51 mJ at fiberoptic tip-output). Statistical analysis showed no statistical differences between the tested treatments (ANOVA, p>0.05). ANOVA also showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) between the root canal thirds, indicating that the middle third had less debris than the apical third. We conclude that: 1) none of the tested treatments led to totally cleaned root canals; 2) all treatments removed debris similarly, 3) the middle third had less debris than the apical third; 4) variation in output energy did not increase cleaning.

  4. Long-term outcome of non-surgical root canal treatment: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Chiara; Chersoni, Stefano; Montebugnoli, Lucio; Prati, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the long-term clinical outcome of root canal treatment. 240 root-treated teeth (n = 61 patients) were initially classified on the basis of radiographic presence/absence of initial apical periodontitis (IAP) and clinical data. The final outcome measure was the periapical healing (healed/disease). The outcome at 6-9 months was correlated with the outcome at 10 years following treatment. Prognostic factors for the periapical healing were assessed. Extraction data were recorded. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk indicators for apical periodontitis (AP) development. Chi-square analysis was performed to evaluate a possible relationship between the 6-9 months outcome and the final outcome related to IAP. Mean observation time was 14 ± 3.7 years. Survival rate was 84.6% and healing rate was 79% (10-19 years). Predictors of outcome (p < .05) were considered statistically significant. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that initial pulpal and periapical status and the quality of root canal filling as assessed two-dimensionally were independent predictors of outcome. The 6-9 months evaluation appears to be an indicator for the final outcome of primary root canal treatment both in the presence and in the absence of IAP. An initial radiolucency associated with an unsatisfactory quality and extent of root canal filling significantly diminishes the possibility of achieving long-term radiographic success. For those with uncertain healing at 6-9 months (91%), clinicians should consider the high healing rate when estimating the prognosis and adjust the decision making accordingly.

  5. Root Canal Cleaning Efficacy of Rotary and Hand Files Instrumentation in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Nazari Moghaddam, Kiumars; Mehran, Majid; Farajian Zadeh, Hamideh

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pulpectomy of primary teeth is commonly carried out with hand files and broaches; a tricky and time consuming procedure. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the cleaning efficacy and time taken for instrumentation of deciduous molars using hand K-files and Flex Master rotary system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, 68 canals of 23 extracted primary molars with at least two third intact roots and 7-12 mm length were selected. After preparing an access cavity, K-file size #15 was introduced into the root canal and India ink was injected with an insulin syringe. Sixty samples were randomly divided in to experimental groups in group I (n=30), root canals were prepared with hand K-files; in group II (n=30), rotary Flex Master files were used for instrumentation, and in group III 8 remained samples were considered as negative controls. After clearing and root sectioning, the removal of India ink from cervical, middle, and apical thirds was scored. Data was analyzed using student's T-test and Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between experimental groups cleaning efficacy at the cervical, middle and apical root canal thirds. Only the coronal third scored higher in the hand instrumented group (P<0.001). Instrumentation with Flex Master rotary files was significantly less time consuming (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Although there was no difference in cleanliness efficacy at the apical and middle thirds, the coronal third was more effectively cleaned with hand files. Predictably, time efficiency was a significant advantage with rotary technique. PMID:23940486

  6. Presence of Candida Albicans in Root Canal System of Teeth Requiring Endodontic Retreatment with and without Periapical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Samiee, Mohammad; Eslami, Gita; Ghodse Hosseini, Mohammad Reza

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important consideration in endodontic treatment is the elimination of microorganisms, including fungi, from the complex three- dimensional root canal system. Candida Albicans (CA) has a major role in endodontic treatment failure as the most important fungus isolated from the root canal system. The present study was carried out to evaluate the presence of CA in the teeth requiring endodontic retreatment, with or without periapical lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was carried out on 60 root canals from human molars requiring endodontic retreatment. The root canals were randomly divided into two equal groups of 30 canals with versus without periapical lesions. Samples were collected from the root canals and cultured on MacConkey and blood agar culture media. The samples suspected of having CA were streaked on Sabouraud’s Dextrose Agar (SDA) and evaluated under a light microscope. Data was analyzed and compared using Chi- square and Kappa tests. RESULTS: CA was found in 11 patients (36.7%) with periapical lesions. In the patients without periapical lesions only 4 samples demonstrated CA in the root canal systems (13.3%). The difference between the two groups as to the presence of CA was statistically significant (p<0.037). In addition, evaluation of salivary samples revealed 15 cases (50%) of CA presence in the patients with periapical lesions and 16 cases (53.3%) of CA in the patients without periapical lesions, demonstrating no statistically significant difference between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Considering the fact that the presence of CA in the root canal systems of teeth with periapical lesions was more noticeable and statistically significant compared to the teeth without periapical lesions, the elimination of this microorganism from the root canal system, using appropriate intracanal solutions and medications is of utmost importance. PMID:24348654

  7. In vitro evaluation of efficacy of different rotary instrument systems for gutta percha removal during root canal retreatment

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Mercy; Malhotra, Amit; Rao, Murali; Sharma, Abhimanyu; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Complete removal of old filling material during root canal retreatment is fundamental for predictable cleaning and shaping of canal anatomy. Most of the retreatment methods tested in earlier studies have shown inability to achieve complete removal of root canal filling. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of three different rotary nickel titanium retreatment systems and Hedstrom files in removing filling material from root canals. Material and Methods Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were decoronated to leave 15 mm root. Specimen were hand instrumented and obturated using gutta percha and AH plus root canal sealer. After storage period of two weeks, roots were retreated with three (Protaper retreatment files, Mtwo retreatment files, NRT GPR) rotary retreatment instrument systems and Hedstroem files. Subsequently, samples were sectioned longitudinally and examined under stereomicroscope. Digital images were recorded and evaluated using Digital Image Analysing Software. The retreatment time was recorded for each tooth using a stopwatch. The area of canal and the residual filling material was recorded in mm2 and the percentage of remaining filling material on canal walls was calculated. Data was analysed using ANOVA test. Results Significantly less amount of residual filling material was present in protaper and Mtwo instrumented teeth (p < 0.05) compared to NRT GPR and Hedstrom files group. Protaper instruments also required lesser time during removal of filling material followed by Mtwo instruments, NRT GPR files and Hedstrom files. Conclusions None of the instruments were able to remove the filling material completely from root canal. Protaper universal retreatment system and Mtwo retreatment files were more efficient and faster compared to NRT GPR fles and Hedstrom files. Key words:Gutta-percha removal, nickel titanium, root canal retreatment, rotary instruments. PMID:27703601

  8. Indirect longitudinal cytotoxicity of root canal sealers on L929 cells and human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Araki, K; Suda, H; Spångberg, L S

    1994-02-01

    The cytotoxicity of two root canal sealers was evaluated in vitro. The powder components of both sealers, mainly zinc, were the same. The liquid for one sealer, Canals, was clove oil (included eugenol in more than 80%) and other materials. For the other, Canals-N, the liquid was composed of higher fatty acids and glycol. The experiments included two cell lines, heteroploid L929 mouse fibroblasts and diploid human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the radiochromium release method with 4-h exposure time. The assay involved using insert chambers in multiwell arrays to produce indirect contact of materials with the cell monolayer at a controlled distance of approximately 1 mm. This model also allowed for the longitudinal study of the same material sample to assess time-dependent changes in toxicity. Freshly mixed Canals was highly toxic (p < 0.01) to both cell lines. On and after 24 h of setting no toxicity was detected. At no time could cytotoxicity be observed when experimenting with Canals-N. These results indicate that both materials have a low content of water diffusible toxic components. Substituting eugenol can further decrease the toxicity of the sealer. PMID:8006567

  9. Evaluation of the radiopacity of root canal sealers by digitization of radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Tanomaru, Juliane Maria Guerreiro; Cezare, Luciana; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Tanomaru Filho, Mário

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of a zinc oxide and eugenol-based (Endofill), a calcium hydroxide-based (Sealapex), two resin-based (Sealer 26 and AH Plus), and a silicone-based root canal sealer (Roeko Seal). Specimens, measuring 10mm in diameter and 1mm in thickness, were radiographed simultaneously with an aluminum step wedge using occlusal films, according to ISO 6876/2001 standards. Radiographs were digitized, and the radiopacity of sealers was compared to the different thicknesses of the aluminum step wedge, using the VIXWIN 2000 software. Results demonstrated that AH Plus was the most radiopaque sealer, while Sealapex was the least radiopaque (p<0.05). Roeko Seal, Endofill and Sealer 26 presented intermediate radiopacity values. Sealapex presented less radiopacity than the other types of root canal sealers. PMID:20976411

  10. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident-An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina; Cristache, Corina Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur. PMID:27672458

  11. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur. PMID:27672458

  12. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Mohsen; zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  13. Ag-loaded mesoporous bioactive glasses against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm in root canal of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Daming; Ma, Tengjiao; Fan, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Ag-loaded mesoporous bioactive glass (Ag-MBG) powders were synthesized and characterized. The ions release of Ag-MBGs in Tris-HCl and the pH stability of simulated body fluids after immersing Ag-MBGs were tested. Root canals were inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 4 weeks, and the antibacterial activity of MBGs, Ag-MBGs and calcium hydroxide against E. faecalis biofilm were evaluated. Results showed that Ag-MBGs possessed highly ordered mesoporous structure with silver nanoparticles deposited in the mesopores, which enabled a sustained Ag ions released. The biofilms treated with Ag-MBGs showed a significant structural disruption compared with MBGs. These results indicated that Ag-MBGs possess a potent antibacterial effect against E.faecalis biofilm in root canal, and the antibacterial activity was induced by the release of Ag ions from Ag-MBGs.

  14. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur.

  15. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Mohsen; Zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  16. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth. PMID:26767238

  17. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1:13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2:17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth. PMID:26591249

  18. Up-regulation of gelatinases and tissue type plasminogen activator by root canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2008-03-01

    Histologic investigations have demonstrated that root canal sealers can induce mild to severe inflammatory alternations. However, there is little information on the precise mechanisms about root canal sealer-induced inflammatory reaction. The proteolysis of extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and plasminogen activators (PAs) seems to be a key initiating event for the progression of the inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH26 and zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer Canals and one paste sealer N2 on the expression of MMPs and PAs in human osteoblastic cell line U2OS cells. The levels of gelatinolytic and caseinolytic activities were measured by gelatin and casein zymography. The results showed that AH26, Canals, and N2 were cytotoxic to U2OS cells in a concentration-dependent manner (P < .05). The gelatin zymograms revealed that MMP-2 (72 kd) and MMP-9 (92 kd) were secreted by U2OS cells. The exposure of U2OS cells to root canal sealers resulted in the up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression (P < .05). Casein zymography exhibited a caseinolytic band with a molecular weight of 70 kd, indicative of the presence of tissue type plasminogen activators (t-PA). t-PA was also found to be up-regulated by root canal sealers (P < .05). Taken together, the activation of gelatinases and t-PA might play an important role in the pathogenesis of root canal sealer-induced periapical inflammation.

  19. Treatment of large periapical lesions by inserting a drainage tube into the root canal.

    PubMed

    Tsurumachi, T; Saito, T

    1995-02-01

    Long-term drainage and depressurization is performed by inserting a stainless steel tube into the root canal of teeth with persisting periapical exudation. This article presents 2 cases of large periapical lesions showing a complete healing of bone after the drainage tube procedure. The tube allows lasting drainage, relieves the pressure and modifies the local apical environment so the host defense mechanism can exert repair process.

  20. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šnjarić, Damir; Čarija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kovačević, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  1. Hollow glass waveguide: x-ray image in root canal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2002-06-01

    Objective of the study was the evaluation of X-ray image quality of cyclic olefin polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide (COP/Ag) in root canal, using a dental digital radiography method for an endodontic treatment. Er:YAG laser system was used. The wavelength generated was 2.94 micrometers and the length of the generated pulses was around 250 usec. The radiation was delivered to the investigated tissue by a cyclic olefin polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide (COP/Ag) with an inner diameter equal to 700 micrometers and the length of 10 cm. The fluence used in the experiments was in the range of 19 up to 45 J/cm2. The root canal systems of 10 extracted premolars and molars were treated endodontically using a step-back technique with K-type endodontic files. Isometric X-ray images were captured via fixed-point measurement method. Digital images were taken before treatment, with conventional files and with an insertion of the COP/Ag hollow glass waveguide. A density histogram, characterizing the density spread across the image was established. An aluminum step wedge, 50 mm long x 20 mm wide, having thickness range from 0.5 mm to 5 mm was used as a marker to check the quality of radiopacity. The overall dimensions were adjusted in relation to the sensor size as a control. COP/Ag hollow glass waveguide was slightly visible in root canal system. An isometric image, histogram, and pseudocolor picture help to detect the position of waveguide in the root canal.

  2. Microbiome in the Apical Root Canal System of Teeth with Post-Treatment Apical Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, José F.; Antunes, Henrique S.; Rôças, Isabela N.; Rachid, Caio T. C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bacteria present in the apical root canal system are directly involved with the pathogenesis of post-treatment apical periodontitis. This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in cryopulverized apical root samples from root canal-treated teeth with post-treatment disease. Methods Apical root specimens obtained during periradicular surgery of ten adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis were cryogenically ground. DNA was extracted from the powder and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. Results All samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 11 phyla and 103 genera composed by 538 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% of dissimilarity. Over 85% of the sequences belonged to 4 phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria. In general, these 4 phyla accounted for approximately 80% of the distinct OTUs found in the apical root samples. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in 6/10 samples. Fourteen genera had representatives identified in all cases. Overall, the genera Fusobacterium and Pseudomonas were the most dominant. Enterococcus was found in 4 cases, always in relatively low abundance. Conclusions This study showed a highly complex bacterial community in the apical root canal system of adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. This suggests that this disease is characterized by multispecies bacterial communities and has a heterogeneous etiology, because the community composition largely varied from case to case. PMID:27689802

  3. Efficacy of different techniques for removal of calcium hydroxide-chlorhexidine paste from root canals.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Leal, Flávia Martins; Silva, Gleyce Oliveira; de Oliveira, Tatiana Rocha; Madureira, Paloma Grasso; Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different techniques for removal of combined calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] and chlorhexidine paste from root canals. Fifty single-rooted human teeth were prepared by oscillatory and rotary systems and filled with a paste of Ca(OH)2 and 2% chlorhexidine gel. After incubation for 14 days, the specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10), and the medication was removed by 1 of 5 different procedures. In group 1 (control), removal procedures involved a master apical file, foraminal debridement, and 5 mL of saline solution applied with the NaviTip irrigation needle. Group 2 was treated the same as group 1, but in addition 0.5 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was used for 3 minutes. In group 3, ultrasonic agitation was performed for 1 minute. Group 4 was treated as group 2, but the NaviTip FX needle was used for irrigation. In group 5, a master apical file, foraminal debridement, and 3-minute application of 5 mL of citric acid were used. After the root-cleaning procedures, the crowns were removed at the cementoenamel junction, and the roots were split longitudinally into halves. The success of intracanal medicament removal was observed under stereoscopic microscope and scanning electron microscope. Remnants of Ca(OH)2 were found in all experimental groups, regardless of the removal technique used. There was no statistically significant difference in cleanliness in the apical third of the root canal among groups 1, 2, and 3. Group 4 showed the best and group 5 the worst results with statistically significant differences. Overall, the NaviTip FX irrigation needle technique was more efficient in removing a Ca(OH)2-chlorhexidine paste from the root canal. PMID:26943099

  4. [Deformations occurring in the apical third of curved root canals during biomechanical preparation using manual impulsion-traction techniques].

    PubMed

    Roig Cayón, M; Basilio Monné, J; Canalda Sahli, C

    1990-01-01

    Apical deformations, specially zips and elbows, during instrumentation of the root canals, are studied. The authors study why do they appear, their effect on endodontic therapy, and the way of avoiding them.

  5. [Deformations occurring in the apical third of curved root canals during biomechanical preparation using manual impulsion-traction techniques].

    PubMed

    Roig Cayón, M; Basilio Monné, J; Canalda Sahli, C

    1990-01-01

    Apical deformations, specially zips and elbows, during instrumentation of the root canals, are studied. The authors study why do they appear, their effect on endodontic therapy, and the way of avoiding them. PMID:1964069

  6. Root surface temperature rise of mandibular first molar during root canal filling with high-temperature thermoplasticized Gutta-Percha in the dog.

    PubMed

    Lipski, M; Woźniak, K; Lichota, D; Nowicka, A

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the temperature rise on the outer root surface of the mandibular first molar following root canal filling using the high-temperature, thermoplasticized, Gutta-Percha technique (HTTG) (BeeFill) in the dog. Twelve extracted dog mandibular first molars were used. After root canal preparation, the teeth were filled with thermoplasticized Gutta-Percha and root canal sealer. Temperature changes on the vestibular surfaces of the mesial and distal roots of mandibular first molars were measured using a thermal imaging camera. The results of this in vitro study showed that using HTTG to fill mandibular first molars in dogs produces a safe temperature rise on the root surface and, therefore, should not damage the periodontal ligament and/or surrounding tissues.

  7. Apical extrusion of debris: a literature review of an inherent occurrence during root canal treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanalp, J; Güngör, T

    2014-03-01

    Extrusion of intracanal debris as well as irrigants is a common occurrence during root canal treatment, and no instrument or technique has thoroughly solved this problem. Because flare-ups may arise with any irritation directed towards periapical tissues, a shaping or irrigation technique should minimize the risk of apical extrusion, even though it may not be prevented. There has been a rapid evolution of root canal instruments and irrigation systems through the last decade, and many have been assessed for their debris extrusion potential. The purpose of this review was to identify publications regarding the evaluation of debris, bacteria and irrigant extrusion during root canal treatment. A PubMed, Ovid and MEDLINE search was conducted using the keywords "apical extrusion", "debris extrusion" and "endodontic treatment". The literature search extended over a period of more than 30 years up to 2012. Content of the review was limited to apical extrusion of debris and irrigants, extrusion of liquid by irrigation methods and bacterial extrusion. Issues relevant to apical extrusion were obtained by further search in the reference sections of the retrieved articles. The review provides an update on the current status of apical extrusion.

  8. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    PubMed Central

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the “zone of dead bacteria” (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Results: Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. Conclusion: E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules.

  9. Root canal retreatment using reciprocating and continuous rotary nickel-titanium instruments

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Patricia Fonseca; Oliveira Goncalves, Leonardo Cantanhede; Franco Marques, Andre Augusto; Sponchiado Junior, Emilio Carlos; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; de Carvalho, Fredson Marcio Acris

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The complete filling material removal during endodontic retreatment is a clinical procedure difficult to achieve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of reciprocating and continuous rotary nickel-titanium instruments used in root canal retreatment. Materials and Methods: Forty freshly extracted human premolars were cleaned and shaped by the crown-down technique, followed by filling by the lateral compaction technique. The teeth were randomly separated into two groups (n = 20), according to the system used for filling material removal: G1 - Reciproc and G2 - ProTaper Universal Retreatment System. The teeth were photographed under operating microscope at ×8 magnification; and the total area of the root canal and remaining filling material were quantified. Results: No statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) in residual filling material was observed between groups; however, the time required for filling removal was significantly shorter for Reciproc system (P < 0.05). Conclusions: It was observed remaining filling material in all teeth, irrespective of the system used; however, root canal retreatment was faster when reciprocating motion was used. PMID:26038656

  10. Shaping Ability of Reciproc, UnicOne, and Protaper Universal in Simulated Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Matos Maia Filho, Etevaldo; de Castro Rizzi, Cláudia; Bandeca Coelho, Matheus; Freitas Santos, Sara; Mayanne Oliveira Costa, Luzia; Nunes Carvalho, Ceci; Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez, Rudys; Alves Soares, Janir

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the shaping effects, preservation of the original curvature, and transportation of the apical foramen of Reciproc (VDW, Munich, Germany), UnicOne (Medin, Nové Město na Moravě, Czech Republic), and Protaper Universal (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) in simulated root canals. Thirty resin blocks with simulated curved root canals were distributed into three groups (n = 10), and prepared using Reciproc (RCp), UnicOne (UnO) and the Protaper Universal (PTu). Standardized photographs were taken before and after the instrumentation, after which they were superimposed. Measurements were taken of the quantity of resin removed from the inner and outer walls of the curvature at 6 levels, the curvature angles before and after instrumentation, and the transportation of the apical foramen. RCp obtained the highest values for amount of resin removed from the inner wall while UnO demonstrated similar shaping on both the inner and outer walls. PTu produced the greatest transportation of foramen when compared to the reciprocating instruments. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the change in angle (P > 0.05). All the instruments were capable of maintaining the original curvature of the root canal; however, the UnO, which used reciprocating movement, produced more conservative shapes with lower foramen transportation. PMID:25950022

  11. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    PubMed Central

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the “zone of dead bacteria” (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Results: Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. Conclusion: E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules. PMID:27656064

  12. Factors affecting irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boutsioukis, C; Psimma, Z; van der Sluis, L W M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and critical analysis of published data on irrigant extrusion to identify factors causing, affecting or predisposing to irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation of human mature permanent teeth. An electronic search was conducted in Cochrane Library, LILACS, PubMed, SciELO, Scopus and Web of Knowledge using a combination of the terms 'irrigant', 'rinse', 'extrusion', 'injection', 'complication', 'accident', 'iatrogenic', 'root canal', 'tooth' and 'endodontic'. Additional studies were identified by hand-searching of six endodontic journals and the relevant chapters of four endodontic textbooks, resulting in a total of 460 titles. No language restriction was imposed. After applying screening and strict eligibility criteria by two independent reviewers, 40 case reports and 10 ex vivo studies were included in the review. A lack of clinical studies focusing on irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation was evident. The reviewed case reports focused mainly on the clinical manifestations and management of the accidents and did not provide adequate details on the possible factors that may influence irrigant extrusion. The data from the included ex vivo studies were inconclusive due to major methodological limitations, such as not simulating the presence of periapical tissues and not assessing the validity of irrigant detection methods. The extensive variability in the protocols employed hindered quantitative synthesis. The choice of factors investigated in ex vivo studies seems not to have been driven by the available clinical evidence. These issues need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:23289914

  13. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Mendonça, Adriano Augusto Melo; Garcez, Rosa Maria Viana de Bragança; Oliveira, Aline da Silva de; Moreira, Andressa Goicochea; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10): SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC); AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP) activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem). Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05). The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  14. The effect of essential oil type on the setting time of Grossman's sealer and Roth root canal cement.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G L

    1991-06-01

    Setting times were determined for mixtures consisting of the powder components of Grossman's sealer or Roth root canal cement with either eugenol, oil of pimento or oil of Melaleuca. The powder component of Grossman's sealer, when mixed with eugenol or oil of pimento, had a significantly shorter setting time than did the powder component of Grossman's sealer mixed with oil of Melaleuca or Roth root canal cement mixed with eugenol, oil of pimento, or oil of Melaleuca.

  15. Retrieval of Iatrogenically Pushed Pulp Stone From Middle Third of Root Canal in Permanent Maxillary Central Incisor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Suruchi; Randhawa, Sohajpreet; Dhebar, Tejal Malay; Raheja, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The pulp stones are the discrete nodular calcified masses commonly existing in coronal and occasionally in radicular pulp, placed freely, attached or embedded into the dentine. The present case report revealed the iatrogenic pushing of pulp stone and blockage of root canal that caused endodontic failure. The case enlightens the proper use of ultrasonic instruments with irrigating solutions to manage the calcifications in root canal for successful endodontic therapy. PMID:26266224

  16. Evaluation of Root Canal Configuration of Mandibular First Molars in a Palestinian Population by Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Mukhaimer, Raed Hakam

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to investigate the number of canals and variations in root canal configuration in the mandibular permanent first molar teeth of a Palestinian population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods. A sample of 320 extracted double-rooted mandibular permanent first molars from Palestinian population was collected for this study and scanned with CBCT scanner. The following observations were made: number of root canals per root and canal configuration in each root based on Vertucci's classification. Results. Of the 320 mandibular first molars analyzed, 174 (54.4%) had three canals, 132 teeth (41.3%) had four canals, and only four teeth had two canals. The most common canal configuration in the mesial roots was Vertucci type IV (53.8%) followed by type II (38.8%). In the distal roots, the most prevalent canal configuration was Vertucci type I (57.5%) followed by type II ( 22.5%) and type III (10.6%). Conclusion. Our results showed that the number of canals and canal configuration in Palestinian population were consistent with previously reported data. The present study also indicates that CBCT is helpful as a diagnostic tool for the investigation of root canal morphology. PMID:27379321

  17. Marginal adaptation of newer root canal sealers to dentin: A SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Polineni, Swapnika; Bolla, Nagesh; Mandava, Pragna; Vemuri, Sayesh; Mallela, Madhusudana; Gandham, Vijaya Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro study evaluated and compared the marginal adaptation of three newer root canal sealers to root dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human single-rooted teeth with completely formed apices were taken. Teeth were decoronated, and root canals were instrumented. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10) based upon the sealer used. Group 1 - teeth were obturated with epoxy resin sealer (MM-Seal). Group 2 - teeth were obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) based sealer (MTA Fillapex), Group 3 - teeth were obturated with bioceramic sealer (EndoSequence BC sealer). Later samples were vertically sectioned using hard tissue microtome and marginal adaptation of sealers to root dentin was evaluated under coronal and apical halves using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and marginal gap values were recorded. Results: The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple post hoc test. The highest marginal gap was seen in Group 2 (apical-16680.00 nm, coronal-10796 nm) and the lowest marginal gap was observed in Group 1 (apical-599.42 nm, coronal-522.72 nm). Coronal halves showed superior adaptation compared to apical halves in all the groups under SEM. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study epoxy resin-based MM-Seal showed good marginal adaptation than other materials tested. PMID:27563187

  18. Washout resistance of fast-setting pozzolan cement under various root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ga-Yeon; Park, Su-Jung; Heo, Seok-Mo; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Fast-setting pozzolan cement (Endocem, Maruchi) was recently developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various root canal irrigants on the washout of Endocem in comparison to the previously marketed mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot; Dentsply) in a furcal perforation model. Materials and Methods ProRoot and Endocem were placed into acrylic molds on moist Oasis. Each mold was then immediately exposed to either physiologic saline, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) under gentle shaking for five minutes. Washout testing was performed by scoring scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Results Endocem exhibited higher washout resistance compared to ProRoot, especially in the NaOCl group. Conclusions These results suggest that Endocem can be considered a useful repair material for furcal perforation, especially in a single-visit scenario. PMID:24303361

  19. Retrospective study of root canal configurations of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone beam computed tomography Part- I

    PubMed Central

    Rawtiya, Manjusha; Somasundaram, Pavithra; Wadhwani, Shefali; Munuga, Swapna; Agarwal, Manish; Sethi, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of 116 maxillary third molars were observed, and data regarding the number of roots, the number of canals, and Vertucci's Classification in each root was statistically evaluated. Results: Majority of Maxillary third molars had three roots (55.2%) and three canals (37.9%). Most MB root (43.8%), DB root (87.5%), and palatal root (100%) of maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I. Mesiobuccal root of three-rooted maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I (43.8%) and Type IV (40.6%) configuration. Overall prevalence of C-shaped canals in maxillary third molars was 3.4%. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of three-rooted maxillary molars with three canals. PMID:27011747

  20. The effect of different root canal medicaments on the elimination of Enterococcus faecalis ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dammaschke, Till; Jung, Nina; Harks, Inga; Schafer, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine gel (CHX-G) 2%, chlorhexidine powder (CHX-P) 1%, povidone-iodine (PVP-I), polyhexanide and camphorated-and-mentholated chlorophenol (ChKM) ex vivo. Materials and Methods: For every medicament group 10 root segments (15 mm long) of extracted human teeth were prepared to ISO-size 45 and sterilized (n = 50). The root segments were then inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and aerobically incubated at 37°C. After 1 week, ten root canals were filled with one of the medicaments, respectively and aerobically incubated at 37°C for another week. Ten teeth served as positive controls and were filled with sterile saline solution. After 7 days, the medicaments were inactivated and all root canals were instrumented to ISO-size 50. The obtained dentin samples were dispersed in Ringer solution followed by the preparation of serial dilutions. 10 μl per sample were applied to an agar plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colony forming units were counted and the reduction factors (RFs) were calculated and statistically analyzed. Results: Compared with the positive controls all medicaments exhibited an antibacterial effect against E. faecalis. The RFs for CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were significantly higher compared to PVP-I and polyhexanide (P < 0.05). In contrast to PVP-I and polyhexanide, CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were able to eliminate E. faecalis from all dentin samples. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this ex vivo investigation, 2% CHX-G and CHX-P were as effective as ChKM against E. faecalis. Thus, when choosing a root canal medicament the better biocompatibility of CHX compared with ChKM should be taken in consideration. PMID:24932119

  1. Effect of intracanal medicament on the sealing ability of root canals filled with Resilon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching S; Debelian, Gilberto J; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of the use of calcium hydroxide as an intracanal dressing on the sealing ability of a thermoplastic synthetic polymer-based root filling (Resilon). Forty-seven single rooted teeth were decoronated and instrumented to ISO sizes 40. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups of 15 roots each. Group 1 was immediately filled. Group 2 and group 3 had calcium hydroxide paste placed with lentulo-spiral filler. After 7 days, calcium hydroxide was removed from the canals with two different techniques: #15 K-file agitated irrigation with 17% Ethylenediaminetetracitic acid (EDTA) (group 2) or ultrasonically agitated irrigation with 17% EDTA (group 3) for 2 min. All teeth were filled with Resilon points and the resin sealer (Ephiphany root canal sealant) using lateral condensation technique. Two teeth were immediately filled with Resilon master point size 40/.04 without sealer to act as a positive control. A split chamber microbial leakage model using Streptococcus mutans was used and the leakage was evaluated daily for a period of 30 days. Overall, 6 of 44 (14%) of samples filled with Resilon points and the resin sealer had microbial leakage. Three samples in group 1 (21%), two samples in group 2 (13%), and one specimen in group 3 (7%) had bacterial leakage. Using the Fisher's Exact test, there was no statistically significant difference in leakage between the groups with calcium hydroxide dressing and the group without calcium hydroxide (p > 0.05). Under the condition of this study, calcium hydroxide did not adversely affect the seal of the root-canal system filled with Resilon. PMID:16728244

  2. Endodontic Treatment of Maxillary Premolar with Three Root Canals Using Optical Microscope and NiTi Rotatory Files System.

    PubMed

    Relvas, João Bosco Formiga; de Carvalho, Fredsom Marcio Acris; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to report a clinical case of endodontic treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three root canals using an optical microscope and rotary instrumentation technique. The main complaint of the patient, a 16-year-old girl, was pain in tooth 14. After clinical and radiographic examination, irreversible pulpitis was diagnosed. An alteration in the middle third of the pulp chamber radiographically observed suggested the presence of three root canals. Pulp chamber access and initial catheterization using size number 10 K-files were performed. The optical microscope and radiographic examination were used to confirm the presence of three root canals. PathFiles #13, #16, and #19 were used to perform catheterization and ProTaper files S1 and S2 for cervical preparation. Apical preparation was performed using F1 file in the buccal canals and F2 in the palatal canal up to the working length. The root canals were filled with Endofill sealer by thermal compaction technique using McSpadden #50. The case has been receiving follow-up for 12 months and no painful symptomatology or periapical lesions have been found. The use of technological tools was able to assist the endodontic treatment of teeth with complex internal anatomy, such as three-canal premolars.

  3. Tooth discoloration induced by a novel mineral trioxide aggregate-based root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Lim, Myung-Jin; Choi, Yoorina; Rosa, Vinicius; Hong, Chan-Ui; Min, Kyung-San

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate tooth discoloration caused by contact with a novel injectable mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based root canal sealer (Endoseal; Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) compared with a widely used resin-based root canal sealer (AHplus; Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany) and conventional MTA (ProRoot; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK, USA). Materials and Methods: Forty standardized bovine tooth samples were instrumented and divided into three experimental groups and one control group (n = 10/group). Each material was inserted into the cavity, and all specimens were sealed with a self-adhesive resin. Based on CIE Lab system, brightness change (ΔL) and total color change (ΔE) of each specimen between baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks were obtained. Results: At all time points, Endoseal showed no significant difference in ΔL and ΔE compared to AHplus and control group (P > 0.05), whereas the ProRoot group showed significantly higher ΔL and ΔE values than the Endoseal group at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Therefore, Endoseal showed less discoloration than conventional MTA and a similar color change to AHplus. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, our data indicate that the MTA-based sealer produces a similar amount of tooth discoloration as AHplus which is considered to be acceptable. PMID:27403062

  4. Analysis of kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic patterns during root canal preparation with rotary and manual instruments

    PubMed Central

    PASTERNAK-JÚNIOR, Braulio; de SOUSA NETO, Manoel Damião; DIONÍSIO, Valdeci Carlos; PÉCORA, Jesus Djalma; SILVA, Ricardo Gariba

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the muscular activity during root canal preparation through kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (EMG). Material and Methods The operators prepared one canal with RaCe rotary instruments and another with Flexo-files. The kinematics of the major joints was reconstructed using an optoelectronic system and electromyographic responses of the flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, brachioradialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius were recorded. The joint torques of the shoulder, elbow and wrist were calculated using inverse dynamics. In the kinematic analysis, angular movements of the wrist and elbow were classified as low risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. With respect to the shoulder, the classification was medium-risk. Results There was no significant difference revealed by the kinetic reports. The EMG results showed that for the middle deltoid and upper trapezius the rotary instrumentation elicited higher values. The flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis, as well as the brachioradialis showed a higher value with the manual method. Conclusion The muscular recruitment for accomplishment of articular movements for root canal preparation with either the rotary or manual techniques is distinct. Nevertheless, the rotary instrument presented less difficulty in the generation of the joint torque in each articulation, thus, presenting a greater uniformity of joint torques. PMID:22437679

  5. Effect of Zingiber officinale and propolis on microorganisms and endotoxins in root canals

    PubMed Central

    MAEKAWA, Lilian Eiko; VALERA, Marcia Carneiro; de OLIVEIRA, Luciane Dias; CARVALHO, Cláudio Antonio Talge; CAMARGO, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of glycolic propolis (PRO) and ginger (GIN) extracts, calcium hydroxide (CH), chlorhexidine (CLX) gel and their combinations as ICMs (ICMs) against Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and endotoxins in root canals. Material and Methods: After 28 days of contamination with microorganisms, the canals were instrumented and then divided according to the ICM: CH+saline; CLX, CH+CLX, PRO, PRO+CH; GIN; GIN+CH; saline. The antimicrobial activity and quantification of endotoxins by the chromogenic test of Limulus amebocyte lysate were evaluated after contamination and instrumentation at 14 days of ICM application and 7 days after ICM removal. Results and Conclusion: After analysis of results and application of the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn statistical tests at 5% significance level, it was concluded that all ICMs were able to eliminate the microorganisms in the root canals and reduce their amount of endotoxins; however, CH was more effective in neutralizing endotoxins and less effective against C. albicans and E. faecalis, requiring the use of medication combinations to obtain higher success. PMID:23559108

  6. Effect of diode laser radiation in root canal wall dentine: a microbiological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, Norbert; Conrads, Georg; Apel, Christian; Schubert, Claus; Lampert, Friedrich

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effect of a diode laser in deep root canal dentine. The microbial colonization of root canal dentine can lead to failures in conventional endodontic treatment if only an inadequate bacterial reduction is achieved through canal treatment and chemical disinfection. 100 micrometer, 300 micrometer and 500 micrometer bovine dentine slices obtained by longitudinal sections were sterilized and inoculated on one side with an Enterococcus faecalis suspension. Laser radiation was performed on the opposite side with the diode laser, emits light at 810 nm and operates in the continuous wave mode (cw). Radiation was performed using a 400 micrometer tapered fiber tip at an angle of approx. 5 degrees to the surface over a period of 30 s. The output power at the distal end of the tip was 0.6 watt. The bacteria were then eluted through vibration and cultured on blood agar plates. The colony count reflected the antibacterial effect of laser radiation as a function of the layer thickness. A mean bacterial reduction of 74% was achieved even with a 500 micrometer thick slice. This investigation indicates that the diode laser can support the bacterial reduction in endodontic treatment.

  7. In vivo antimicrobial efficacy of 6% Morinda citrifolia, Azadirachta indica, and 3% sodium hypochlorite as root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Podar, Rajesh; Kulkarni, Gaurav P.; Dadu, Shifali S.; Singh, Shraddha; Singh, Shishir H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of 6% Morinda citrifolia, Azadirachta indica, and 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as root canal irrigants. Materials and Methods: Thirty nonvital maxillary anteriors were randomly assigned to one of the three groups corresponding to the irrigant to be tested; 6% Morinda citrifolia juice (MCJ) (n = 10), A. indica (n = 10) and 3% NaOCl (n = 10). After the root canal access opening a root canal culture sample was taken with two paper points and cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Cleaning and shaping were completed with irrigation by 10 mL of respective irrigants and 5 mL of final rinse. The patients were recalled after 3 days and canals were rinsed again with 5 mL of the test irrigants. This was followed by obtaining a posttreatment root canal culture sample and culturing and analyzed by counting the colony forming units (CFUs). Results: Six percentage MCJ, A. indica, and 3% NaOCl showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the mean CFU counts for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria between baseline and 3 days. Conclusion: There was no difference in the antimicrobial efficacy of 6% M. citrifolia, A. indica, and 3% NaOCl as root canal irrigants. PMID:26929692

  8. Efficacy of different treatments of root canal walls on the pull-out bond strength of the fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Yılmaz, Cenk Burak; Karatas, Ertugrul; Barutcigil, Cagatay; Topcuoglu, Hüseyin Sinan; Yeter, Kübra Yesildal

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different irrigation protocols, including laser, on the retention of the fiber-reinforced composite posts to root canal dentinal walls using pull-out tests. Root canals of 60 single-rooted human teeth were filled and post spaces were prepared. Finally, specimens were divided randomly into five groups, each consisting of 12 specimens as follows: 5% NaOCl (control group), 17% EDTA, ultrasonic with 17% EDTA, single 1.5-W Er:YAG laser application, and the combined use of Er:YAG laser and 17% EDTA. After the root canal procedures, fiber posts were cemented to the root canal. Pull-out tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. The data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test (p = 0.05). Irradiation by the Er:YAG laser with/without EDTA positively affected the pull-out bond strength (p < 0.001). The pull-out strength was significantly higher in the ultrasonic group than that of the single irrigation with NaOCl or EDTA (p < 0.001). Er:YAG laser irradiation with/without EDTA enhanced the bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin walls. Additionally, ultrasonic-EDTA combination increased the bond strength.

  9. Gender difference and root canal morphology in mandibular premolars: A cone-beam computed tomography study in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Kazemipoor, Maryam; Hajighasemi, Afrooz; Hakimian, Roqayeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mandibular premolars are of the most difficult teeth to treat endodontically. Aims: To compare the root canal morphology of mandibular premolars between two genders in an Iranian population. Settings and Design: Totally, 230 cone-beam computed tomography images of the mandibles belonged to 115 males and 115 females were evaluated in the three spatial planes. Materials and Methods: The total number of roots and canals in the mandibular premolars was counted, and the difference between males and females were analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi-square test. The significance level was set as P < 0.05. Results: The majority of mandibular first and second premolars had one root (85.7% and 94.8%, respectively) and one canal (63.9% and 78.3%, respectively). The number of roots in the mandibular first premolars had statistically significant difference between two genders (P = 0.001). There was no significant difference between two genders in the number of roots (P = 0.208) and canals (P = 0.498) in the mandibular second premolars. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the root canal morphology in the mandibular first premolars had statistically significant difference between two genders. PMID:26321843

  10. Ability of New Obturation Materials to Improve the Seal of the Root Canal System – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Olsen, Mark; De-Deus, Gustavo; Eid, Ashraf A.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives New obturation biomaterials have been introduced over the past decade to improve the seal of the root canal system. However, it is not clear whether they have really produced a three-dimensional impervious seal that is important for reducing diseases associated with root canal treatment. Methods A review of the literature was performed to identify models that have been employed for evaluating the seal of the root canal system. Results and Significance In-vitro and in-vivo models are not totally adept at quantifying the seal of root canals obturated with classic materials. Thus, one has to resort to clinical outcomes to examine whether there are real benefits associated with the use of recently-introduced materials for obturating root canals. However, there is no facile answer because endodontic treatment outcomes are influenced by a host of other predictors that are more likely to take precedence over the influence of obturation materials. From the perspective of clinical performance, classic root filling materials have stood the test of time. Because many of the recently-introduced materials are so new, there is not enough evidence yet to support their ability to improve clinical performance. This emphasizes the need to translate anecdotal information into clinically relevant research data on new biomaterials. PMID:24321349

  11. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE ASSOCIATED WITH INTRACANAL MEDICATION FOR Candida albicans AND Enterococcus faecalis INOCULATED IN ROOT CANALS

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; da Silva, Katy Costa Godinho; Maekawa, Lilian Eiko; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Silva e Lima, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the action of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) associated with an intracanal medication against Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. Material and Methods: Thirty-six human single-rooted teeth with single root canals were used. The canals were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days and were then instrumented with 1% NaOCl. The roots were divided into 3 groups (n=12) according to the intracanal medication applied: calcium hydroxide paste, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel, and 2% CHX gel associated with calcium hydroxide. The following collections were made from the root canals: a) initial sample (IS): 21 days after contamination (control), b) S1: after instrumentation, c) S2: 14 days after intracanal medication placement; S3: 7 days after intracanal medication removal. The results were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test at 5% significance level. Results and Conclusions: Both 1% NaOCl irrigation and the intracanal medications were effective in eliminating E. faecalis and C. albicans inoculated in root canals. PMID:20027425

  12. Clinical microscopic analysis of ProTaper retreatment system efficacy considering root canal thirds using three endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; De Figueiredo, Jose Antônio Poli; Freitas Fachin, Elaine Vianna; Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antônio; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ProTaper Universal rotary retreatment system and the influence of sealer type on the presence of filling debris in the reinstrumented canals viewed in an operative clinical microscope. Forty-five palatal root canals of first molars were filled with gutta-percha and one of the following sealers: G1, EndoFill; G2, AH Plus; G3, Sealapex. The canals were then reinstrumented with ProTaper Universal rotary system. Roots were longitudinally sectioned and examined under an operative clinical microscope (10×), and the amount of filling debris on canal walls was analyzed using the AutoCAD 2004 software. A single operator used a specific software tool to outline the canal area and the filling debris area in each third (cervical, middle, and apical), as well as the total canal area. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Tukey test at P < 0.05. Sealapex demonstrated significant differences in the average of filling debris area/canal among the 3 thirds. This group revealed that apical third showed more debris than the both cervical and middle third (P < 0.0001). Endofill presented significantly more filling debris than Sealapex in the cervical third (P < 0.05). In the middle (P = 0.12) and apical third (P = 0.10), there were no differences amongst groups. Debris was left in all canal thirds, regardless of the retreatment technique. The greatest differences between techniques and sealers were found in the cervical third.

  13. Theoretical distribution of gutta-percha within root canals filled using cold lateral compaction based on numeric calculus.

    PubMed

    Min, Yi; Song, Ying; Gao, Yuan; Dummer, Paul M H

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to present a new method based on numeric calculus to provide data on the theoretical volume ratio of voids when using the cold lateral compaction technique in canals with various diameters and tapers. Twenty-one simulated mathematical root canal models were created with different tapers and sizes of apical diameter, and were filled with defined sizes of standardized accessory gutta-percha cones. The areas of each master and accessory gutta-percha cone as well as the depth of their insertion into the canals were determined mathematically in Microsoft Excel. When the first accessory gutta-percha cone had been positioned, the residual area of void was measured. The areas of the residual voids were then measured repeatedly upon insertion of additional accessary cones until no more could be inserted in the canal. The volume ratio of voids was calculated through measurement of the volume of the root canal and mass of gutta-percha cones. The theoretical volume ratio of voids was influenced by the taper of canal, the size of apical preparation and the size of accessory gutta-percha cones. Greater apical preparation size and larger taper together with the use of smaller accessory cones reduced the volume ratio of voids in the apical third. The mathematical model provided a precise method to determine the theoretical volume ratio of voids in root-filled canals when using cold lateral compaction.

  14. Theoretical distribution of gutta-percha within root canals filled using cold lateral compaction based on numeric calculus.

    PubMed

    Min, Yi; Song, Ying; Gao, Yuan; Dummer, Paul M H

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to present a new method based on numeric calculus to provide data on the theoretical volume ratio of voids when using the cold lateral compaction technique in canals with various diameters and tapers. Twenty-one simulated mathematical root canal models were created with different tapers and sizes of apical diameter, and were filled with defined sizes of standardized accessory gutta-percha cones. The areas of each master and accessory gutta-percha cone as well as the depth of their insertion into the canals were determined mathematically in Microsoft Excel. When the first accessory gutta-percha cone had been positioned, the residual area of void was measured. The areas of the residual voids were then measured repeatedly upon insertion of additional accessary cones until no more could be inserted in the canal. The volume ratio of voids was calculated through measurement of the volume of the root canal and mass of gutta-percha cones. The theoretical volume ratio of voids was influenced by the taper of canal, the size of apical preparation and the size of accessory gutta-percha cones. Greater apical preparation size and larger taper together with the use of smaller accessory cones reduced the volume ratio of voids in the apical third. The mathematical model provided a precise method to determine the theoretical volume ratio of voids in root-filled canals when using cold lateral compaction. PMID:27465338

  15. Accuracy of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Determining the Root Canal Morphology of Mandibular First Molars

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Hadi; Niknami, Mahdi; Mokhtari Zonouzi, Hamid Reza; Sohrabi, Aydin; Ghasemi, Negin; Akbari Golzar, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in determining root canal morphology of mandibular first molars in comparison with staining and clearing technique. Methods and Materials: CBCT images were taken from 96 extracted human mandibular first molars and the teeth were then evaluated based on Vertucci’s classification to determine the root canal morphology. Afterwards, access cavities were prepared and India ink was injected into the canals with an insulin syringe. The teeth were demineralized with 5% nitric acid. Finally, the cleared teeth were evaluated under a magnifying glass at 5× magnification to determine the root canal morphology. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software. The Fisher’s exact test assessed the differences between the mesial and distal canals and the Cohen’s kappa test was used to assess the level of agreement between the methods. Statistical significance was defined at 0.05. Results: The Kappa coefficient for agreement between the two methods evaluating canal types was 0.346 (95% CI: 0.247-0.445), which is considered a fair level of agreement based on classification of Koch and Landis. The agreement between CBCT and Vertucci’s classification was 52.6% (95% CI: 45.54-59.66%), with a significantly higher agreement rate in the mesial canals (28.1%) compared to the distal canals (77.1%) (P<0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, clearing technique was more accurate than CBCT in providing accurate picture of the root canal anatomy of mandibular first molars. PMID:27141216

  16. Antral bony wall erosion, trigeminal nerve injury, and enophthalmos after root canal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eduardo; Antunes, Luís; Dinis, Paulo Borges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The frequently used irrigant in dental surgery, sodium hypochlorite, is occasionally the cause of minor, usually circumscribed, adverse effects. Severe, extensive complications, with lasting sequelae, however, also can occur, as in the case we report herein. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman underwent an endodontic procedure on a maxillary molar, whose roots, unknown to the surgeon, were protruding into the maxillary sinus. After sodium hypochlorite root canal irrigation, the patient immediately developed intense facial pain, facial edema, and periorbital cellulitis. An emergency department evaluation diagnosed an intense inflammatory disease of the maxillary sinus, with significant destruction of its bony walls, accompanied by midface paraesthesia due to infraorbital nerve injury. In the following weeks, the patient slowly developed enophthalmos due to bone erosion of the orbit floor. Treatment, besides prolonged oral steroids, required the endoscopic endonasal opening of the maxillary sinus for profuse irrigation. Two years later, the patient maintained a complete loss of function of the maxillary sinus, anesthesia-paraesthesia of the midface, and inferior dystonia of the eye with an enophthalmos. Conclusion: Dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, and otorhinolaryngologists should all be aware of the whole spectrum of complications of even the simplest dental work. Sodium hypochlorite irrigations should be used cautiously in root canal surgery, with the full awareness of its potential for causing soft-tissue damage. PMID:27465790

  17. Effect of 95% Ethanol as a Final Irrigant before Root Canal Obturation in Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thiruvenkadam, G; John, Baby; Priya, PR Geetha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Successful obturation in the primary teeth demands complete dryness of the root canal system. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 95% ethanol as the final irrigant before root canal obturation in primary teeth. Materials and methods: A total of 20 extracted primary mandibular canines were biomechanically prepared and pre-obturated volume of each tooth was assessed using spiral computed tomography (CT). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 10): group 1, Metapex group; group 2, zinc oxide eugenol group. Each group was further divided randomly into two subgroups (n = 5): subgroup 1, canals were dried with 95% ethanol; subgroup 2, canals were blot dried with paper points with the last one appearing dry. All canals were obturated and the postobturated volume of each tooth was measured. The percentage of obturated volume (POV) was calculated using the formula: (postobturated volume/preobturated volume) × 100. The POV between the groups was statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon Signed rank test appropriately. Results: Root canals that were dried with ethanol showed better obturation than using paper points alone and the difference was statistically significant in both group 1 (p < 0.001) and group 2 (p < 0.002). Conclusion: Drying of the root canal system with 95% ethanol can result in better obturation in the primary teeth. How to cite this article: Thiruvenkadam G, Asokan S, John B, Geetha Priya PR. Effect of 95% Ethanol as a Final Irrigant before Root Canal Obturation in Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):21-24. PMID:27274150

  18. [Behavior of different strains of Staphylococcus aureus against root canal filling cements].

    PubMed

    Pumarola, J; Berástegui, E; Canalda, C; Brau, E

    1991-01-01

    The mean goal of this study is the determination of the conduct of 120 strains of Staphylococcus aureus against seven root canal sealers: Traitement Spad, Endométhasone, N2 Universal, AH26 with silver, Diaket-A, Tubli Seal and Sealapex. The agar diffusion test was employed in the determination of its bacterial growth inhibition. The results obtained have demonstrated values very different between the tested strains. Therefore we recommended to employ strains with reference in the investigation of the bacterial growth inhibition in order to repeat equal experimentation conditions.

  19. [Behavior of different strains of Staphylococcus aureus against root canal filling cements].

    PubMed

    Pumarola, J; Berástegui, E; Canalda, C; Brau, E

    1991-01-01

    The mean goal of this study is the determination of the conduct of 120 strains of Staphylococcus aureus against seven root canal sealers: Traitement Spad, Endométhasone, N2 Universal, AH26 with silver, Diaket-A, Tubli Seal and Sealapex. The agar diffusion test was employed in the determination of its bacterial growth inhibition. The results obtained have demonstrated values very different between the tested strains. Therefore we recommended to employ strains with reference in the investigation of the bacterial growth inhibition in order to repeat equal experimentation conditions. PMID:1659856

  20. Influence of low-intensity laser radiation upon the microflora of carious cavities and root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Nekrylov, Valery; Mazo, Leonid

    1995-04-01

    Laser stomatology- a relatively young branch of stomatology -has been developing actively lately. Bactericidal action of laser radiation enables to use it widely for processing carious cavities and root canals in the treatment of caries and its complications. 113 patients were studied by us. The 40 patients had antiseptic procedure of the caries cavity and then the procedure of laser therapy, so micro-organisms were found out in 26% cases. The 63 patients had antiseptic procedure only, so micro-organisms were found out in 70% cases. Control group were consisted of patients, where laser therapy was carried out without antiseptic remedies.

  1. Endodontic treatment of a C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four root canals and three apical foramina: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Thikamphaa

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a unique C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four canals and three apical foramina and its endodontic management with the aid of cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT). C-shaped root canal morphology with four canals was identified under a dental operating microscope. A CBCT scan was taken to evaluate the aberrant root canal anatomy and devise a better instrumentation strategy based on the anatomy. All canals were instrumented to have a 0.05 taper using 1.0 mm step-back filing with appropriate apical sizes determined from the CBCT scan images and filled using a warm vertical compaction technique. A C-shaped mandibular second premolar with multiple canals is an anatomically rare case for clinicians, yet its endodontic treatment may require a careful instrumentation strategy due to the difficulty in disinfecting the canals in the thin root area without compromising the root structure. PMID:26877993

  2. High speed imaging of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a model of a root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; Blanken, Jan; van Heeswijk, Hans; de Roode, Rowland; Klaessens, John

    2007-02-01

    Laser systems of various wavelengths and pulse characteristics have been introduced in dentistry. At present, the range of applications for the different systems is being investigated mainly differentiating between soft and hard tissue applications. For the preparation of root canals both hard and soft tissues are involved. Ideally, one would like to use one laser system for the whole treatment. In this study, we studied the characteristics of the pulsed 2,78 Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase, Waterlase Millenium), in view of root canal cleaning and desinfection. The laser energy was fiber delivered with fiber tip diameters from 400 μm down to 200 μm. Special thermal and high speed imaging techniques were applied in a transparent model of a tapered root canal and slices cut from human teeth. High speed imaging revealed the dynamics of an explosive vapor bubble at the tip of the Er laser in water and the root canal model. Typically for Erbium lasers, within a time span of several hundred μs, a longitudinal bubble expanded to maximum size of 5 mm length and 2 mm diameter at 100 mJ and imploded afterwards. In the root canal, the explosive bubble created turbulent high speed water streaming which resects soft tissue from the hard tissue. Thermal imaging showed the dynamics of all lasers heating of the canal wall up to several mm depending on the wavelength and energy settings. The mechanism of smear layer removal and sterilization in the root canal, is attributed to cavitation effects induced by the pulsed laser. The heat generation into the dentine wall was minimal.

  3. An experimental analysis of stresses in simulated flared root canals subjected to various post-core applications.

    PubMed

    Yoldas, O; Akova, T; Uysal, H

    2005-06-01

    Cervical root fracture is a major clinical problem in flared root canals treated with different post and core applications. This in vitro study evaluated the stress transfer of different post and core systems to the cervical part of the artificially created flared root canals, by using strain gauges. The post-core systems investigated were: (a) cast post-core system without resin reinforcement, (b) cast post-core system with resin reinforcement, (c) pre-fabricated post and resin core with resin reinforcement. The post-core systems which were cemented on simulated roots were subjected to a load applied at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the simulated roots. The strain gauges which were cemented to the cervical part of simulated roots were connected to the data acquisition module to measure and record the changes in strain data. Specimens restored with resin reinforcement either with cast post-core or pre-fabricated post and resin core transferred the stress to the cervical part of the artificial roots at a rate lower than conventional cast post-core system (P = 0.001; anova and Tukey's post hoc test). It was concluded that the resin reinforcement of root canals before post-core applications reduces the stresses at the cervical part of the root surfaces.

  4. Optical properties of root canal irrigants in the 300-3,000-nm wavelength region.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Poelman, Dirk; De Moor, Roeland J

    2014-09-01

    In root canal therapy, irrigating solutions are essential to assist in debridement and disinfection. Their spread and action is often restricted by canal anatomy, requiring some form of activation. Lasers have been shown to be promising tools for this purpose (laser-activated irrigation (LAI)). For LAI to be effective, high absorption of radiation in the irrigant is essential. Although the absorption spectrum of water is well established, little is known about the optical properties of other irrigating solutions. Therefore, root canal irrigants (sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), citric acid (CA), chlorhexidine (CHX), ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), water) were subjected to UV/Vis spectrophotometry in the 300-3,000-nm region using synthetic quartz cells with an optical path length of 1 mm. Transmission data were used to plot the transmission spectrum and calculate the absorption coefficient (α) of each irrigant. The transmission spectra of the tested solutions proved to follow the spectrum of pure water to a large extent. All tested solutions displayed absorption peaks around 1,450 nm (α ≈ 14 cm(-1)), 1,950 nm (α > 30 cm(-1)), and above 2,500 nm (α > 30 cm(-1)). NaOCl showed higher absorption than water in the UV region. Slightly higher absorption than water was noted for CHX (Corsodyl) around 513 nm and for CA between 1,600 and 1,800 nm and around 2,200 nm. The absorption in all tested solutions for wavelengths greater than 2,500 nm is very high, meaning a great potential for laser-activated irrigation. Other wavelengths eligible for LAI are located around 1,450 and 2,000 nm but require further investigation.

  5. Physicochemical and biological properties of a novel injectable polyurethane system for root canal filling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Zuo, Yi; Zhao, Minghui; Jiang, Jiaxing; Man, Yi; Wu, Jun; Hu, Yunjiu; Liu, Changlei; Li, Yubao; Li, Jidong

    2015-01-01

    A root canal sealer with antibacterial activity can be efficacious in preventing reinfection that results from residual microorganisms and/or the leakage of microorganisms. In the present study, a series of injectable, self-curing polyurethane (PU)-based antibacterial sealers with different concentrations of silver phosphate (Ag3PO4) were fabricated. Subsequently, their physicochemical properties, antibacterial abilities, and preliminary cytocompatibilities were evaluated. The results indicated that the fabricated PU-based sealers can achieve a high conversion rate in a short amount of time. More than 95% of the isocyanate group of PU sealers with 3 wt% (PU3) and 5 wt% (PU5) concentrations of Ag3PO4 were included in the curing reaction after 7 hours. With the exception of those for film thickness for PU5, the results of setting time, film thickness, and solubility were able to meet the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization. The antibacterial tests showed that PU3 and PU5 exhibit stronger antimicrobial effects than that achieved with 1 wt% Ag3PO4 (PU1) and AH Plus (positive control) against Streptococcus mutans. The cytocompatibility evaluation revealed that the PU1 and PU3 sealers possess good cytocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that the PU3 sealer offers good physicochemical and antimicrobial properties along with cytocompatibility, which may hold great application potential in the field of root canal fillings. PMID:25653518

  6. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, P.; Gonçalves, T.; Palma, P.; Santos, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT) improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48%) showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5–6% concentration) used alone and 2 (7%) revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias. PMID:26783392

  7. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Diogo, P; Gonçalves, T; Palma, P; Santos, J M

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT) improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48%) showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5-6% concentration) used alone and 2 (7%) revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias.

  8. Numerical investigation of root canal irrigation adopting innovative needles with dimple and protrusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Di; Xie, Yonghui; Lan, Jibing

    2013-01-01

    As important passive flow control methods, dimples and protrusions have been successfully implemented via geometric modifications to manipulate flow fields to get a desired flow parameters enhancement. In this research, two novel needles were proposed based on a prototype by means of the dimple and protrusion, and flow patterns within a root canal during final irrigation with these needles were numerically investigated. The calculation cases consistent with the clinically realistic irrigant flow rates, which are 0.02, 0.16 and 0.26 mL s(-1) are marked as case A, B and C, respectively. The characteristic parameters to estimate irrigation efficiency, such as shearing effect, mean apical pressure, irrigation replacement and fluid agitation, were compared and the optimal geometry in every calculation case was obtained. As shown from the results, flow rates and needle geometries were the causes of irrigation parameters variations. The sum of shear stress, irrigation replacement and fluid agitation were equal in the low flow rate case A, however, the needle with a protrusion on its tip had advantages in the three irrigation characteristic parameters above in calculation case B, and the needle with a dimple on its tip had advantages in calculation case C. Furthermore, the needles proposed did not give rise to the risk of irrigant extrusion. These needles can be better choices at larger flow rates. Therefore, needle geometry optimizations utilizing passive flow control methods are worthy to be investigated in the root canal irrigation enhancement. PMID:23957591

  9. Biotoxicity of commonly used root canal sealers: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amandeep; Shah, Naseem; Logani, Ajay; Mishra, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of a root canal sealer is to provide a fluid tight seal. The purpose of this systematic meta-analysis was to determine the relative toxicity of commonly used root canal sealers like zinc oxide eugenol, calcium hydroxide, and resin-based sealers. Materials and Methods: An online search was conducted in peer-reviewed journals listed in PubMed, Cochrane, EBSCO, and IndMed databases between 2000 and 2012). Statistical analysis was carried out by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post-hoc comparison by Bonferroni method. The comparison between toxicity at 24 h and between 3 and 7 days was done by using paired t-test for each sealer. Results: At 24 h, the relative biotoxicity of the three sealers reported was insignificant (P- value 0.29), but the difference in toxicity was found significant (P < 0.001) after 3 days. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxide sealer and zinc oxide eugenol were found to be significantly biotoxic as compared to resin-based sealers after 3 days. PMID:25829682

  10. Influence of antimicrobial solutions in the decontamination and adhesion of glass-fiber posts to root canals

    PubMed Central

    HARAGUSHIKU, Gisele Aihara; BACK, Eduardo Donato Eing Engelke; TOMAZINHO, Paulo Henrique; BARATTO, Flares; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of root canal disinfectants on the elimination of bacteria from the root canals, as well as their effect on glass-fiber posts bond strength. Material and Methods Fifty-three endodontically treated root canals had post spaces of 11 mm in length prepared and contaminated with E. faecalis. For CFU/ml analysis, eight teeth were contaminated for 1 h or 30 days (n=4). Teeth were decontaminated with 5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or distilled water. As control, no decontamination was conducted. After decontamination, sterile paper points were used to collect samples, and CFU/ml were counted. For push-out, three groups were evaluated (n=15): irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or sterile distilled water. A bonding agent was applied to root canal dentin, and a glass-fiber post was cemented with a dual-cured cement. After 24 h, 1-mm-thick slices of the middle portion of root canals were obtained and submitted to the push-out evaluation. Three specimens of each group were evaluated in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s T3 test (α=0.05). Results The number of CFU/ml increased from 1 h to 30 days of contamination in control and sterile distilled water groups. Decontamination with NaOCl was effective only when teeth were contaminated for 1 h. CHX was effective at both contamination times. NaOCl did not influence the bond strength (p>0.05). Higher values were observed with CHX (p<0.05). SEM showed formation of resin tags in all groups. Conclusion CHX showed better results for the irrigation of contaminated root canals both in reducing the bacterial contamination and in improving the glass-fiber post bonding. PMID:26398518

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in Teeth with Apical Periodontitis Is Differentially Modulated by the Modality of Root Canal Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; da Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra; Kapila, Yvonne Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in apical periodontitis and during the periapical healing phase following root canal treatment. Methods Apical periodontitis was induced in dog teeth and root canal treatment was performed in a single visit or using an additional calcium hydroxide root canal dressing. One hundred and eighty days following treatment the presence of inflammation was examined and tissues were stained to detect bacteria. Bacterial status was correlated to the degree of tissue organization, and to further investigate molecules involved in this process, tissues were stained for MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, and MMP-9. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test or Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn. Results Teeth with apical periodontitis that had root canal therapy performed in a single visit presented an intense inflammatory cell infiltrate. Periapical tissue was extremely disorganized, and this was correlated with the presence of bacteria. Higher MMP expression was evident, similar to teeth with untreated apical periodontitis. In contrast, teeth with apical periodontitis submitted to root canal treatment using calcium hydroxide presented a lower inflammatory cell infiltrate. This group had a moderately organized connective tissue, a lower prevalence of bacteria, and a lower number of MMP-positive cells, similar to healthy teeth submitted to treatment. Conclusion Teeth treated with calcium hydroxide root canal dressing exhibited a lower percentage of bacterial contamination, a lower MMP expression, and a more organized ECM, unlike those treated in a single visit. This suggests that calcium hydroxide may be beneficial in tissue repair processes. PMID:20113780

  12. Infection of Citrus Roots by Tylenchulus semipenetrans Reduces Root Infection by Phytophthora nicotianae

    PubMed Central

    El-Borai, F. E.; Duncan, L. W.; Graham, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Bioassays and whole-plant experiments were conducted to investigate the interaction between Tylenchulus semipenetrans and Phytophthora nicotianae. Both organisms are parasites of the citrus fibrous root cortex. Nematode-infected and non-infected root segments were excised from naturally infected field roots and placed on water agar in close proximity to agar plugs of P. nicotianae and then transferred to a Phytophthora-selective medium. At 10 and 12 days, 50% fewer nematode-infected segments were infected by P. nicotianae than non-infected segments. In whole-plant experiments in glass test tubes, sour orange seedlings were inoculated with two densities (8,000 or 80,000 eggs and second-stage juveniles) of T. semipenetrans, and after establishment of infection were inoculated with two densities (9,000 and 90,000 zoospores) of P. nicotianae. In the first experiment, fungal protein was 53% to 65% lower in the roots infected by both organisms than in roots infected by the fungus only. Compared to plants infected only by P. nicotianae, shoot weights were 33% to 50% greater (P ≤ 0.05) in plants infected by both parasites, regardless of inoculum density. Fibrous and tap root weights were 5% to 23% and 19% to 34% greater (P ≤ 0.05), respectively, in nematode-fungus combination treatments compared to the fungus alone. A second experiment was conducted, where plants were infected by the fungus, the nematode, both organisms, or neither organism. The soil mixture pH for 50% of the plants was adjusted from 4.5 to 7.0 to favor nematode infection. A higher rate of nematode infection of plants growing at pH 7.0 compared to pH 4.5 resulted in greater suppression of fungal development and greater inhibition of fungal damage to the plant. Compared to plants infected only by P. nicotianae, shoot and root weights were 37% and 33% greater (P ≤ 0.05), respectively, in plants infected by both parasites. These experiments have revealed antagonism between T. semipenetrans and P

  13. Regional bond strengths to root canal dentin of fiber posts luted with three cementation systems.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, João Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the cementation system on the regional push-out bond strength and failure pattern of fiber posts to radicular dentin. The roots of 48 extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16), according to the cementation system: AdperScotchbond Multi-Purpose + resin cement RelyX ARC (SBMP+ARC); Adper SingleBond 2 + RelyX ARC (SB+ARC) and; RelyX U100 self-adhesive resin cement (U100). The posts were cemented as per manufacturer's instructions for each cementation system. After 1 week, the roots were sectioned transversely into 6 discs. Two discs were obtained from the cervical, middle and apical thirds and the push-out test was carried out. The failure pattern was examined on all debonded specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test. When U100 was used, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was observed among the different root regions. Statistically higher push-out bond strength values were detected in the cervical third for SBMP+ARC and SB+ARC (p<0.05). The U100 showed significantly more mixed failures than SBMP+ARC in the apical third (p<0.05). In conclusion, the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 was the only cement not sensitive to the root canal region.

  14. Clinical efficiency and reusability of the reciprocating nickel-titanium instruments according to the root canal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Kyung; Kim, Young-Jae; Shon, Won-Jun; You, Sung-Yeop; Moon, Young-Mi; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, WooCheol

    2014-01-01

    The application of the single-file technique using the reciprocating motion is gaining concern in root canal preparation. The purpose of this research is to compare the efficiency of the reciprocating motion-employing files (RECIPROC and WaveOne) by measuring the working time for complete canal shaping, and to evaluate their reusability under scanning examinations. One hundred curved root canals of the extracted molars were used. The working length was determined and the glide path was confirmed using a #15 K-file. Canals shaping was completed to the length either with RECIPROC R25 file (n = 50), or with WaveOne Primary file (n = 50). The time taken for the file to reach the working length was also measured. Each file was repeatedly used in a maximum of 10 canals for comparing the change of the efficiency (shaping time) according to the working length, canal curvature, and number of file re-use. The deformations or surface defects of the files after the in vitro use were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). There was no difference under the SEM between the 2 file groups with no initiation of micro-cracks until they were re-used up to 5 canals. WaveOne Primary file showed significantly shorter working time than RECIPROC R25 (p < 0.05). There was a statistically significant correlation between the working time and three variables. As the working length and the curvature of the canal increased, the shaping time was increased in both file systems. Reusability of these reciprocating instruments might be maximum 5 canals with minimal surface deformations.

  15. Cervical microleakage in root canals treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponchiado, Emilio C., Jr.; Azevedo, Lidiany K.; Marchesan, Melissa; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Silva-Sousa, Yara T.; Alfredo, Edson; Sousa Neto, Manoel D.

    2005-03-01

    Cervical microleakage was evaluated in sealed root canals previously treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers. Ninety-two single-rooted maxillary human canines were prepared with the crown-down technique and irrigated with distilled and deionized water. The samples were distributed randomly into 9 groups of 10 teeth each. One tooth was used as a positive control and one as a negative control. In group I, 1.2 ml of EDTAC was applied during 5 min. In groups II to V, radicular dentine was irradiated with Er:YAG laser (Opus 20, Opus Dent, Israel) at the following parameters: 200 mJ and 8 Hz, 200 mJ and 16 Hz, 400 mJ and 8 Hz, or 400 mJ and 16Hz, respectively, for 60 s. In groups VI to IX, radicular dentine was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser (Fotona Medical Lasers, Slovenia) at 10 Hz and 1 W, 10 Hz and 2 W, 15 Hz and 1 W, or 15 Hz and 2 W, respectively, for 60 s. The canals were then sealed by the lateral condensation technique with an epoxy resin-based sealer. The roots were immersed in India ink for 15 days and then cleared to visualize the level of cervical microleakage with a measurement microscope. The results were evaluated by the Kruskal-Wallis test, which showed no statistical significance (p>0.01) for parameter variations of the Er:YAG laser when compared to the control group. However, the increase in frequency and potency for Nd:YAG laser decreased the microleakage when compared to the control group.

  16. Effect of final irrigating solution on smear layer removal and penetrability of the root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Amarnath; Ahmaduddin; Bolla, Nagesh; Raj, Sarath; Mandava, Pragna; Nayak, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of final rinsing solution on smear layer removal through penetrability of the root canal sealer. Materials and Methods: Each of the 30 teeth selected was decoronated and the root length standardized at 16 mm measured from the apex of the tooth to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). A size 10-k file was used and working length was determined by subtracting 1mm from the measured length so that the length of the sample was 15mm. A combination of step back and crown down technique was done and apical portion was prepared till H-file no. 30. 3% NaOCl was used during cleaning and shaping of the canals. Finally the teeth were divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. Group-I was irrigated with 17% EDTA, Group-II with TUBLICID plus, and Group-III with Biopure MTAD®. ISO 30 size gutta-percha points were selected as master cones. The Acroseal sealer was mixed with approximated concentration 0.1% fluorescent rhodamine B isothiocyanate dye. Obturation was done and after 48 hours, the roots were sectioned and subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: Comparisons among the three groups were done by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Newman-Keuls multiple post-hoc procedures. The two-way ANOVA showed statistically highly significant results. The maximum depth of sealer penetration was observed in Group II followed by Group III and Group I. Conclusion: The use of -Tubulicid plus as a final irrigant provided better smear layer removal than Biopure a mixture of doxicycline, citric acid and a detergent (Tween 80) (MTAD®) and 17% EDTA. PMID:24554859

  17. Efficacy of different solvents in removing gutta-percha from curved root canals: a micro-computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Sağlam, Baran Can; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Koçak, Sibel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the root filling material that remained after retreatment of curved root canals with chloroform and Endosolv R as solvents. The evaluation employed micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Thirty-six extracted molar teeth with curved roots were selected. After preparation with ProTaper rotary instruments, the canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to solvent used (n = 12) as follows: group 1: chloroform; group 2: Endosolv R; group 3: no solvent (negative control). ProTaper Universal Retreatment files were used to remove each root canal filling and then the self-adjusting file was applied for two minutes. Preoperative and postoperative micro-CT images were used to assess the percentage of residual filling material. The mean percentage of residual filling material was quantified. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of percentage volume of residual root canal filling.

  18. Root canal morphology of Chalcolithic and early bronze age human populations of El Mirador Cave (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Ceperuelo, Dolors; Lozano, Marina; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Mercadé, Montse

    2014-12-01

    This study provides a morphological characterization of the inner anatomy of the root canals of permanent first and second molars in Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age human fossils using cone-beam computed tomography. The general evolutionary trend in present-day human dentition is related to morphological simplification. As little is known about when this trend appeared in Homo sapiens populations, the aim of this work is to test the presence of modern radicular morphology 4,400 years ago. Fifty-four permanent first and second maxillary and mandibular molars of 17 individuals were included in the study. All maxillary first and second molars showed three separate roots. Almost all the lower molars analyzed (100% of first molars and 75% of second molars) had two separate roots. More differences in the canal system configuration were documented in the maxillary mesiobuccal roots than in the palatal or distobuccal roots. The most variable tooth in root and canal configuration is the maxillary second molar. It should be pointed out that 12.5% of the teeth analyzed showed a C-shaped root configuration. PMID:24943458

  19. Accuracy of CBCT, Digital Radiography and Cross-Sectioning for the Evaluation of Mandibular Incisor Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Hadi; Dabbaghi, Arash; Gooran, Morteza; Eftekhar, Behrouz; Sharifi, Sanaz; Shams, Nassim; Dehghani Najvani, Ali; Tabesh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), digital radiography and tooth sectioning in evaluating root canal morphology of mandibular incisors in an in vitro setting. Methods and Materials: A total of 76 samples were imaged using CBCT, and digital radiography in straight and angled views. The samples were then sectioned at different distances from the apex for further visualization under stereomicroscope. The agreement between the observers was statistically analyzed by kappa correlation coefficient and the chi-square test. Results: The results showed that the majority of the samples had a single canal (Vertucci’s Type I). CBCT analysis reported more frequent multi-canal roots in comparison with the other techniques. In pairwise comparisons, the highest agreement was found between digital radiographic imaging and microscopic cross-sectioning both in terms of canal configuration and the number of root canals. Conclusion: None of the used imaging techniques per se could adequately show the exact internal anatomical configuration in accordance with the gold standard. PMID:27141217

  20. Effect of root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers.

    PubMed

    Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza, Angélica Moreira; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Silva, Bruno Marques; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers. Sixty single-rooted canines were prepared using ProTaper (F5) and divided into the following groups based on the root filling technique: Lateral Compaction (LC), Single Cone (SC), and Tagger Hybrid Technique (THT). The following subgroups (n = 10) were also created based on sealer material used: AH Plus and Sealer 26. Two-millimeter-thick slices were cut from all the root thirds and subjected to push-out test. Data (MPa) was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The push-out values were significantly affected by the sealer, filling technique, and root third (p < 0.05). AH Plus (1.37 ± 1.04) exhibited higher values than Sealer 26 (0.92 ± 0.51), while LC (1.80 ± 0.98) showed greater bond strength than THT (1.16 ± 0.50) and SC (0.92 ± 0.25). The cervical (1.45 ± 1.14) third exhibited higher bond strength, followed by the middle (1.20 ± 0.72) and apical (0.78 ± 0.33) thirds. AH Plus/LC (2.26 ± 1.15) exhibited the highest bond strength values, followed by AH Plus/THT (1.32 ± 0.61), Sealer 26/LC (1.34 ± 0.42), and Sealer 26/THT (1.00 ± 0.27). The lowest values were obtained with AH Plus/SC and Sealer 26/SC. Thus, it can be concluded that the filling technique affects the bond strength of sealers. LC was associated with higher bond strength between the material and intra-radicular dentine than THT and SC techniques. PMID:26910020

  1. Bond strength and fracture analysis between resin cements and root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Ballarin, Andressa; Baratieri, Luiz N

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate bond strength between translucent fibre posts (White Post DC, FGM or FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar/Vivadent) and intraradicular dentin at three different levels (cervical, middle and apical) using a dual-cure (AllCem, FGM) or self-curing (Multilink, Ivoclar/Vivadent) resin cement. Also, the fracture type after push-out test was analysed under SEM. Thirty-two extracted single-root teeth were selected. After undergoing endodontic therapy, they were randomly divided into four groups according to their post type and resin cement. Root canals were etched using 37% phosphoric acid, and Excite DSC adhesive (Ivoclar/Vivadent) was applied in all groups. The root was sectioned to obtain nine 1-mm-thick slices (three per third: coronal, middle, apical). All slices were subjected to push-out tests. Data were analysed using two-way anova. The mean bond strengths vary from 6.6 (4.6) MPa [apical] to 11.9 (5.9) MPa [cervical]. There were no significant differences between groups. Pearson χ(2)-test revealed significant differences in fracture types for all groups (P < 0.0001). The apical third had the lowest bond strengths and it was also shown to be the most critical region for luting fibre posts. PMID:22432821

  2. Bond strength and fracture analysis between resin cements and root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Ballarin, Andressa; Baratieri, Luiz N

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate bond strength between translucent fibre posts (White Post DC, FGM or FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar/Vivadent) and intraradicular dentin at three different levels (cervical, middle and apical) using a dual-cure (AllCem, FGM) or self-curing (Multilink, Ivoclar/Vivadent) resin cement. Also, the fracture type after push-out test was analysed under SEM. Thirty-two extracted single-root teeth were selected. After undergoing endodontic therapy, they were randomly divided into four groups according to their post type and resin cement. Root canals were etched using 37% phosphoric acid, and Excite DSC adhesive (Ivoclar/Vivadent) was applied in all groups. The root was sectioned to obtain nine 1-mm-thick slices (three per third: coronal, middle, apical). All slices were subjected to push-out tests. Data were analysed using two-way anova. The mean bond strengths vary from 6.6 (4.6) MPa [apical] to 11.9 (5.9) MPa [cervical]. There were no significant differences between groups. Pearson χ(2)-test revealed significant differences in fracture types for all groups (P < 0.0001). The apical third had the lowest bond strengths and it was also shown to be the most critical region for luting fibre posts.

  3. Clinical microscopic analysis of ProTaper retreatment system efficacy considering root canal thirds using three endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; De Figueiredo, Jose Antônio Poli; Freitas Fachin, Elaine Vianna; Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antônio; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ProTaper Universal rotary retreatment system and the influence of sealer type on the presence of filling debris in the reinstrumented canals viewed in an operative clinical microscope. Forty-five palatal root canals of first molars were filled with gutta-percha and one of the following sealers: G1, EndoFill; G2, AH Plus; G3, Sealapex. The canals were then reinstrumented with ProTaper Universal rotary system. Roots were longitudinally sectioned and examined under an operative clinical microscope (10×), and the amount of filling debris on canal walls was analyzed using the AutoCAD 2004 software. A single operator used a specific software tool to outline the canal area and the filling debris area in each third (cervical, middle, and apical), as well as the total canal area. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Tukey test at P < 0.05. Sealapex demonstrated significant differences in the average of filling debris area/canal among the 3 thirds. This group revealed that apical third showed more debris than the both cervical and middle third (P < 0.0001). Endofill presented significantly more filling debris than Sealapex in the cervical third (P < 0.05). In the middle (P = 0.12) and apical third (P = 0.10), there were no differences amongst groups. Debris was left in all canal thirds, regardless of the retreatment technique. The greatest differences between techniques and sealers were found in the cervical third. PMID:22496039

  4. Ability of Three Endodontic Sealers to Fill the Root Canal System in Association with Gutta-Percha

    PubMed Central

    Ormiga, Fabiola; Ferreira de Assis, Danielle; de Andrade Risso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study compared the ability of the endodontic sealers AH Plus, Pulp Canal Sealer and EndoREZ to fill the root canal system in association with gutta-percha. Methods: Ninety mandibular premolars were accessed, prepared and divided into three groups of 30 teeth each, according to the sealer used to fill the canals: AH Plus, Pulp Canal Sealer and EndoREZ. All the teeth were filled using the continuous wave of condensation technique. The specimens were then decalcified, dehydrated, rendered transparent, and analyzed by three independent evaluators with 8x magnification. Chi-squared test (χ2, p < 0.05) was used to compare the groups in relation to the totally filled, the partially filled and the non filled ramifications. The same test was used to compare the directions of filled ramifications and the number of ramifications among the three thirds of the roots. Results: EndoREZ filled a significantly higher number of ramifications than AH Plus and Pulp Canal Sealer (χ2, p < 0.05). All the groups showed higher number of totally filled ramifications than partially filled and unfilled ramifications. The ramifications were more frequently detected in the apical third, followed by medium and coronal thirds, respectively (χ2, p < 0.05). The ramifications were more frequently detected towards lingual direction (χ2, p < 0.05). Conclusion: EndoREZ presented higher ability to fill the root canal system in association with gutta-percha when compared to AH Plus and Pulp Canal Sealer. The ramifications were more frequently detected in the apical third, running in a lingual direction. PMID:27006719

  5. Interrelationships in the Variability of Root Canal Anatomy among the Permanent Teeth: A Full-Mouth Approach by Cone-Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ove A.; Maury, Elisabeth; Telmon, Norbert; Georgelin-Gurgel, Marie; Maret, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In endodontic practice, clinicians should be aware of possible root canal anatomic variations. The aim of this study was to assess using CBCT acquisitions regarding whether one root canal anatomy of a tooth is associated with a specific anatomy of another tooth. Methods A total of 106 CBCT acquisitions were obtained using a CBCT scanner with 200μm voxel size. Numbers of roots and canals of the entire dentition were described. Bivariate analyses and logistic regressions were conducted to explore root canal anatomy on one tooth according to age, gender, jaw, side and the others teeth. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was performed to correlate the different numbers of canals profiles. Results A total of 2424 teeth were analyzed. Independently from the other variables, the presence of an additional root canal on a mandibular incisor increases the risk of having an additional root canal on a mandibular premolar (OR [95%] 3.7 [1.0;13.2]). The mandibular molar variability increases in women compared to men (OR [95%] 0.4 [0.1; 0.9]). MCA showed correspondence between 2-canals maxillary incisor and canines and 5-canals maxillary molars, and some correlation between additional canal on maxillary and mandibular premolars. Conclusions Although CBCT examinations are conducted in the first intention of making a diagnosis or prognostic evaluation, medium FOV acquisitions could be used as an initial database thus furnishing preliminary evaluations and information. In endodontic practice, clinicians should be aware of possible root canal anatomic variations. The visualization of all canals is considered essential in endodontic therapy. The use of multi-correspondence analysis for statistics in endodontic research is a new approach as a prognostic tool. PMID:27764246

  6. The impact of pH on cytotoxic effects of three root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Delvarani, Abbas; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Nikoo, Mohsen; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Karamifar, Kasra; Asgar, Kamal; Dadvand, Sahar

    2011-01-01

    Aim Cytotoxicity of root canal irrigants is important due to their close contact with host tissues. This study was to assess the possible impact of pH on cytotoxic effects of MTAD, 17% EDTA, and 2.6% NaOCl on the human gingival fibroblasts using MTT assay. Materials and methods Human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to the irrigants and their viability was assessed after 1, 6, and 12 h. The pH of the medium was measured in each interval. Light absorption values were measured for each culture medium using Elisa Reader device. Results NaOCl had significantly less cytotoxicity than EDTA and MTAD. Also irrigants cytotoxicity decreased in 12, 1, and 6 h, respectively. Conclusion It seems that variation of the pH resulted in variation in the cytotoxicity of solutions; i.e., it follows the pattern of the pH variation. PMID:23960509

  7. [Clinical and laboratory rationale for galvanophoresis of hydroxide copper-calcium by root canals treatment].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, V A; Bordina, G E; Ol'khovskaia, A V; Opeshko, V V; Nekrasov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Double blind study presents clinical and laboratory estimation of root canal system (RC) cleaning by endodontic treatment of apical periodontitis by means of galvanophoresis of hydroxide copper-calcium (GP HCC). In 60 patients the amount and composition of RC fluid from incisors and canines by GP HCC were estimated within 2 weeks with three different galvano-pair and the efficiency of RC decontamination were compared by standard report irrigation and GP HCC. The intensity of electroosmotic allocation of RC liquid by GP HCC is gradually increased at 4-5 day, and then slowly reduced at 10-12 day. The RC liquid contained proteins and carbohydrates - typical rests of pulp and biofilm. GP HCC suppresses aerobic and anaerobic microflora in RC 65.5% more effectively than standard irrigation and may be seen as an alternative method of endodontic treatment of apical periodontitis. PMID:25909607

  8. Misdiagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia leading to unnecessary root canal treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jong-Ki; Shin, Su-Jung

    2013-08-01

    This case report demonstrates an unnecessary endodontic treatment of teeth with florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) due to a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis and emphasizes the importance of correct diagnosis to avoid unnecessary treatment. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our institution for apicoectomies of the mandibular left canine and both the lateral incisors. The periapical lesions associated with these teeth had failed to resolve after root canal treatment over a 3-year period. Radiographic examinations revealed multiple lesions on the right canine, the second premolar, and both first molars as well as the anterior region of the mandible. Based on clinical, radiographic and histological evaluations, the patient condition was diagnosed as FCOD. The patient has been monitored for 2 years. To avoid unnecessary invasive treatment, accurate diagnosis is essential before treatment is carried out in managing FCOD. PMID:24010083

  9. An Update on the Management of Endodontic Biofilms Using Root Canal Irrigants and Medicaments

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Soltani, Mohammad Karim; Shalavi, Sousan

    2014-01-01

    Microbial biofilm is defined as a sessile multicellular microbial community characterized by cells that are firmly attached to a surface and enmeshed in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms play a very important role in pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the role of endodontic biofilms and the effects of root canal irrigants, medicaments as well as lasers on biofilms A Medline search was performed on the English articles published from 1982 to 2013 and was limited to papers published in English. The searched keywords were “Biofilms AND endodontics”, “Biofilms AND sodium hypochlorite”, "Biofilms AND chlorhexidine", "Biofilms AND MTAD", "Biofilms AND calcium hydroxide", “Biofilms AND ozone”, “Biofilms AND lasers” and "Biofilms AND nanoparticles". The reference list of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. PMID:24688576

  10. Misdiagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia leading to unnecessary root canal treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jong-Ki; Shin, Su-Jung

    2013-08-01

    This case report demonstrates an unnecessary endodontic treatment of teeth with florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) due to a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis and emphasizes the importance of correct diagnosis to avoid unnecessary treatment. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our institution for apicoectomies of the mandibular left canine and both the lateral incisors. The periapical lesions associated with these teeth had failed to resolve after root canal treatment over a 3-year period. Radiographic examinations revealed multiple lesions on the right canine, the second premolar, and both first molars as well as the anterior region of the mandible. Based on clinical, radiographic and histological evaluations, the patient condition was diagnosed as FCOD. The patient has been monitored for 2 years. To avoid unnecessary invasive treatment, accurate diagnosis is essential before treatment is carried out in managing FCOD.

  11. Quality of Root Canals Performed by the Inaugural Class of Dental Students at Libyan International Medical University

    PubMed Central

    Elemam, Ranya F.; Abdul Majid, Ziad Salim; Groesbeck, Matt; Azevedo, Álvaro F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to radiographically evaluate technical quality of root canal fillings performed by dental undergraduates at Libyan International Medical University in Libya. Methods. Root canal cases were treated at university dental clinic from the fall of 2012 to the fall of 2013 by the fourth and fifth year dental students. Students used step-back preparation and cold lateral compaction in the treatment. Radiographs were reviewed over a two-year period from initial procedure to final restoration. Radiographs were evaluated for adequacy or inadequacy by length, density, and taper. Length inadequacy was classified as short or overextended. Overall quality was considered “adequate” based on all three variables. Chi-square tested differences between teeth groupings and adequacy classification. Significant p value results were adjusted by Bonferroni correction. Results. Adequate length of root canal fillings were observed in roughly half of all samples (48.6%). Density was adequate in 75.8% of the samples. Taper was observed as adequate in 68.8%. Higher quality was evident in anterior teeth (plus premolars) versus molars (65.6% versus 43.3%, resp.; p < 0.04). Conclusion. Overall quality of endodontic treatment performed by undergraduate dental students was adequate in 53.9% of the cases. Significant opportunity exists to improve the quality of root canals provided by dental students. PMID:26124834

  12. Application of 17% EDTA Enhances Diffusion of (45)Ca-labeled OH(-) and Ca(2+) in Primary Tooth Root Canal.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Marcos; Cavalcanti Taguchi, Carolina Mayumi; Triches, Thaisa Cezaria; Sartori, Neimar; Pereira Dias, Luis Alberto; de Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti; Cardoso, Mariane

    2016-01-01

    Proper cleaning of the root canal is key to the success of endodontic treatment as it allows more effective diffusion of medication throughout the dentinal tubules. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the efficacy of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in enhancing diffusion of hydroxyl (OH(-)) and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) throughout the root canal in primary teeth. The canals of 25 primary tooth roots were cleaned with endodontic files and 1% sodium hypochlorite. Three groups (G) were then established: GI, in which final irrigation was performed with 1% sodium hypochlorite; GII, in which 17% EDTA was used; and GIII, in which no irrigation was performed. The roots canals in GI and GII were filled with a calcium hydroxide-based paste labeled with the radioisotope calcium-45. Diffusion of OH(-) was detected with pH strips and Ca(2+) analyzed by measuring radioactivity in counts per min. Group II differed statistically from the other groups in diffusion of OH(-) at 24 hr (p<0.05), but no significant difference among groups was found at the day 7 evaluation; GII also differed statistically from the other groups in diffusion of Ca(2+) at 24 hr (p<0.05). These results suggest that application of 17% EDTA in primary tooth enhances diffusion of OH(-) and Ca(2+). PMID:26961333

  13. Induction of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 gene expression by root canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2005-09-01

    Histological investigations have demonstrated that root canal sealers can induce mild to severe inflammatory alternations. However, there is little information on the precise mechanisms about root canal sealers-induced inflammatory reaction. Dysregulated cytokine productions at local disease sites have been considered to be major contributors to the development of inflammatory diseases. Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 released have been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of root canal sealers N2 (zinc-oxide eugenol based) and AH Plus (epoxy resin based) on the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA gene in human osteoblastic cell line U2OS cells. The levels of mRNAs were measured by the semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. The exposure of quiescent U2OS cells to N2 and AH Plus resulted in the induction of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA gene expression (p < 0.05). The intensity of IL-8 mRNA gene was found to be significant higher than IL-6 mRNA gene (p < 0.05). Taken together, the activation of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA gene expression may be one of the pathogenesis of zinc oxide-eugenol based and epoxy resin based root canal sealers-induced periapical inflammation.

  14. Effect of energy (J) on temperature changes at apical root surface when using Er:YAG laser to enlarge root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Jesus D.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Daghastanli, Naser A.; Silva, Reginaldo S.

    2000-03-01

    The use of lasers for cleaning, shaping and disinfecting root canals must not produce heat which damages periapical tissue and alveolar bone. The aim of the present study was to determine the increase of external temperature at the apical surface of the root canal after Er:YAG laser irradiation with a 250 micrometer diameter fiberoptic guide with and without distilled and deionized water at 3 different total energies. Thirty single-rooted teeth were instrumented to #25 K-file using distilled and deionized water for irrigation. They were divided into three groups according to total energy (15J, 30J and 45J with 15 Hz and 140 mJ per pulse). Each group was irradiated with water and then without water. The increase in temperature at the apical root surface was measured with a multimeter and a thermocouple. Changes in apical temperature were significantly different in all groups (p less than 0.01; 15 J less than 45 J less than 30 J). Less time was necessary for return to initial room temperature at 15 J. We conclude that in vitro use of the Er:YAG laser (total energy of 15, 30, and 45 J) increased external apical root temperature and that the root canal must be filled with distilled and deionized water to reduce the risk of an increase in temperature.

  15. Premolar root and canal variation in South African Plio-Pleistocene specimens attributed to Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Moore, N Collin; Thackeray, J Francis; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Skinner, Matthew M

    2016-04-01

    South African hominin fossils attributed to Australopithecus africanus derive from the cave sites of Makapansgat, Sterkfontein, and Taung, from deposits dated between about 2 and 3 million years ago (Ma), while Paranthropus robustus is known from Drimolen, Kromdraai, and Swartkrans, from deposits dated between about 1 and 2 Ma. Although variation in the premolar root complex has informed taxonomic and phylogenetic hypotheses for these fossil hominin species, traditionally there has been a focus on external root form, number, and position. In this study, we use microtomography to undertake the first comprehensive study of maxillary and mandibular premolar root and canal variation in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus (n = 166 teeth) within and between the species. We also test for correlations between premolar size and root morphology as predicted under the 'size/number continuum' (SNC) model, which correlates increasing root number with tooth size. Our results demonstrate previously undocumented variation in these two fossil hominin species and highlight taxonomic differences in the presence and frequency of particular root types, qualitative root traits, and tooth size (measured as cervix cross-sectional area). Patterns of tooth size and canal/root number are broadly consistent with the SNC model, however statistically significant support is limited. The implications for hominin taxonomy in light of the increased variation in root morphology documented in this study are discussed. PMID:27086055

  16. The influence of sodium hypochlorite and root canal sealers on post retention in different dentin regions.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and root canal sealers on post retention in different dentin regions. Seventy-two human incisors were decoronated at the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into six groups (n=12) according to irrigant and sealer technique: G1-Distilled water (DW) without sealer; G2-DW + AH Plus (Dentsply/Maillefer); G3-DW + Endofill (Dentsply/Maillefer); G4-5.251%NaOCl without sealer; G5-5.25% NaOCl + AH Plus; G6-5.25% NaOCl + Endofill. Specimens were stored in a humid environment for 30 days at 37 degrees C and were prepared with FRC Postec's drills for post insertion. The posts were cemented with Excite DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar/Vivadent). The specimens were sectioned through their long axis into three dental slices approximately 2.5 mm each, representing the cervical (C), middle (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root preparation. After calculating the adhered area of the specimens, they were submitted to the push-out test in a universal testing machine. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a 5% significance level and to the Tukey test (p<0.05). The mean values (MPa) obtained for cervical, middle and apical areas of the root preparation, respectively, were: G1=8.6; 12.5 and 14.3, G2=13.5; 15.4 and 16.9; G3=6.9; 10.0 and 12.1; G4=13.0; 14.9 and 15.4; G5=11.3; 13.5 and 18.0; and G6=11.0; 11.8 and 11.5. Based on the results, the eugenol-based sealer (Endofill) resulted in significantly lower mean retention strength values compared with the resin-based sealer (AH Plus). The apical region showed the greatest retention. The lowest resistance to dislodgment was found in the cervical region, mainly in the groups that used distilled water for irrigating the root canal.

  17. Effect of root canal treatments on quartz fiber posts bonding to root dentin.

    PubMed

    Baldissara, Paolo; Zicari, Francesca; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Scotti, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of irrigants and endodontic sealers on fiber post push-out strength in both fatigue cycling and no-cycling conditions. Fifty single-rooted human teeth received five endodontic treatments. The posts were cemented using a flowable composite and a three-steps adhesive. Five specimens from each group were subjected to 2 x 10(6) cycles of 37.5 N. There were 200 sections obtained for the push-out test. Fatigue cycled groups treated with an eugenol-containing sealer showed the lowest push-out strength (p < 0.001). No significant differences were found among no-cycled groups (p = 0.665). The post-cement interface was found to be weaker than the cement-dentin one. However, fatigue cycles increased the occurrence of cement-dentin failures (p = 0.001). The eugenol-containing sealer reduced the bonding of fiber posts when mechanically cycled, thus the use of a resin-based sealer is advisable.

  18. Comparison of bacterial leakage resistance of various root canal filling materials and methods: Confocal laser-scanning microscope study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji Hee; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eunjoo; Kwak, Sangwon; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the bacterial leakage resistance and root canal lining efficacy of various root canal filling materials and methods by using confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM). Sixty extracted human premolars with mature apex and single root canal were randomly divided into 2 control groups and 4 experimental groups. Group CW was filled with continuous wave technique using gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. Group GC was coated with AH-Plus sealer and then obturated with soften GuttaCore. Group GF was obturated using GuttaFlow and gutta-percha. Group EM was filled with EndoSeal MTA and gutta-percha using ultrasonic vibration. The AH-Plus, GuttaFlow, and EndoSeal were labeled with Hoechst 33342 to facilitate fluorescence. The obturated root tip was incubated with Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-stained E. faecalis for 14 days. CLSM was performed to evaluate the sealer distribution and bacterial leakage for the apical 1-, 2-, 3-mm specimens. Statistically significant differences were determined by 1-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test and Pearson's correlation analysis. Group EM showed the better sealer distribution score than the other groups (p < 0.05). Group CW and group GC exhibited the less bacterial leakage than the group GF, while group EM showed the similar bacterial leakage score with the groups CW and GC. There was no significant correlation between the sealer distribution and bacterial leakage (p > 0.05). Under the conditions of this study, different root canal filling materials and methods showed different efficacy for canal distribution and bacterial leakage resistance.

  19. Incidence of Postoperative Pain after Single Visit and Two Visit Root Canal Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonal B.; Bhagwat, S.V; Patil, Sanjana A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Root Canal Treatment (RCT) has become a mainstream procedure in dentistry. A successful RCT is presented by absence of clinical signs and symptoms in teeth without any radiographic evidence of periodontal involvement. Completing this procedure in one visit or multiple visits has long been a topic of discussion. Aim To evaluate the incidence of postoperative pain after root canal therapy performed in single visit and two visits. Material and Methods An unblinded/ open label randomized controlled trial was carried out in the endodontic department of the Dental Institute, where 78 patients were recruited from the regular pool of patients. A total of 66 maxillary central incisors requiring root canal therapy fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Using simple randomization by biased coin randomization method, the selected patients were assigned into two groups: group A (n=33) and group B (n=33). Single visit root canal treatment was performed for group A and two visit root canal treatment for group B. Independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Thirty three patients were allotted to group A where endodontic treatment was completed in single visit while 33 patients were allotted to group B where endodontic treatment was completed in two visits. One patient dropped-out from Group A. Hence in Group A, 32 patients were analysed while in Group B, 33 patients were analysed. After 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours of obturation, pain was significantly higher in Group B as compared to Group A. However, there was no significant difference in the pain experienced by the patients 48 hours after treatment in both the groups. Conclusion Incidence of pain after endodontic treatment being performed in one-visit or two-visits is not significantly different. PMID:27437339

  20. Influence of the length of remaining root canal filling and post space preparation on the coronal leakage of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Mozini, Alexandra Conca Alves; Vansan, Luis P.; Sousa Neto, Manoel D.; Pietro, Rosimeire

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the sealing ability of different lengths of remaining root canal filling and post space preparation against coronal leakage of Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-one roots of maxillary incisors were biomechanically prepared, maintaining standardized canal diameter at the middle and coronal thirds. The roots were autoclaved and all subsequent steps were undertaken in a laminar flow chamber. The canals of 33 roots were obturated with AH Plus sealer and gutta-percha. The root canal fillings were reduced to 3 predetermined lengths (n=11): G1=6 mm, G2=4 mm and G3=2 mm. The remaining roots served as positive and negative controls. Bacterial leakage test apparatuses were fabricated with the roots attached to Eppendorf tubes keeping 2 mm of apex submerged in BHI in glass flasks. The specimens received an E. faecalis inoculum of 1 x 107 cfu/mL every 3 days and were observed for bacterial leakage daily during 60 days. Data were submitted to ANOVA, Tukey’s test and Fisher’s test. At 60 days, G1 (6 mm) and G2 (4 mm) presented statistically similar results (p>0.05) (54.4% of specimens with bacterial leakage) and both groups differed significantly (p<0.01) from G3 (2 mm), which presented 100% of specimens with E. faecalis leakage. It may be concluded that the shortest endodontic obturation remnant leaked considerably more than the other lengths, although none of the tested conditions avoids coronal leakage of E. faecalis. PMID:24031339

  1. Shaping ability of Lightspeed rotary nickel-titanium instruments in simulated root canals. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S A; Dummer, P M

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the shaping ability of Lightspeed nickel-titanium rotary instruments in simulated canals. Forty canals consisting of four different shapes in terms of angle and position of curvature were prepared by Lightspeed instruments using the technique recommended by the manufacturer. This report describes the efficacy of the instruments in terms of preparation time, instrument failure, canal blockages, loss of canal length, and three-dimensional canal form. Overall, the mean preparation time for all canals was 8.12 min with canal shape having no significant effect on the speed of preparation. No instruments deformed or separated during the study, and none of the canals became blocked with debris. Seventeen canals retained their original working length, but 16 gained in length and 7 lost length. There was no significant difference between the canal shapes in terms of the mean loss of distance or category of distance change. Apical stops as judged from intracanal impressions were present in 23 of the canals but they were all judged to be of poor quality. The canals were found to be smooth in the apical half of the canal in 36 specimens and in the coronal half of 24 specimens. All the canals had poor taper characteristics, and only 16 specimens showed good flow characteristics. Under the conditions of this study, Lightspeed instruments prepared canals rapidly, with no fractures, canal blockages, and with minimal change in working length. The three dimensional form of the canals was compromised as flow and taper were less than ideal, presumably as a result of an ineffective stepback procedure. The results imply that either the stepback sequence should be modified or another instrument with increased taper should be used to refine the canal walls before obturation. PMID:9587312

  2. Root canals decontamination by coherent photons initiated photoacustic streaming (PIPS) of irrigants: an ex-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedullà, E.; Genovese, C.; Scolaro, C.; Cutroneo, M.; Tempera, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Torrisi, L.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to assess the antibacterial effectiveness of coherent photon initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) of irrigants using an Er:YAG laser equipped with a newly designed, stripped and tapered, tip in extracted teeth with infected root canals. One hundred-forty-eight single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared using a rotary abrasive instrument providing a root channel with a suitable size. The samples were sterilized and all teeth except ten (negative control group) were inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated in a CO2 chamber at 37°C for 15 days in Eppendorff tubes filled with trypticase soy broth medium changed every 2 days. Infected teeth were then randomly divided into 4 test groups (n=32 for each): pulsed erbium:YAG laser at non-ablative settings for 30 seconds with sterile bi-distilled water (Group A) or 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (Group B); without laser activated sterile bi-distilled water irrigation for 30 seconds (Group C) or 5% NaOCl irrigation for 30 seconds (Group D); the positive control group received no treatment in infected teeth (n=10). Colony-forming units (CFUs) were counted from bacteriologic samples taken before (S1) and after treatment (S2). Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc Dunn's multiple comparison tests. CFU counts were significantly lower in groups B and D than in group C (P<0.001). Moreover, there was a significant difference between Group A and C (P<0.001). Group B showed the highest CFU reduction, which was significantly greater than that evident in groups A or C (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences between group B and D (P>0.05). None of the four groups predictably generated negative samples. Under the conditions of this ex vivo study, statistically significant difference wasn't found in planktonic bacteria reduction between the laser and NaOCl or NaOCl alone groups.

  3. ANATOMO-MORPHOLOGICAL FEUTURES OF THE ROOT CANAL SYSTEM IN GEORGIAN POPULATION - CONE-BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY.

    PubMed

    Beshkenadze, E; Chipashvili, N

    2015-10-01

    Incomplete and superficial knowledge of morphological types and anatomical variations of the root canal system will become the reason leading to the failure of endodontic treatment. cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) - it is a technologically more sophisticated, interesting, reliable, non-invasive imaging technique with high degree of visualization, considered as a particularly important and useful tool to study complexity and variability of canal system. 2753 teeth of 228 patients have been studied by CT. Ages of the patients varied within 25-55 years. Among them 122 men and 106 women. Maxillary teeth - 1394 and mandibular - 1359, respectively. The aim of our study was investigation and evaluation of: tooth length, number of roots and canals, type of configuration, root canal curvature and degree of curvature in Georgian population. The results of the study revealed interesting data and anatomical characteristics, those replicating the racial signs and differs from the data recorded by the other researchers, became evident. In studying of dental form variations were interested anatomists (description and comparison) anthropologists, biologists, palaeontologists and stomatologists. The field of human dental anatomy has not been completely explored so, the modern human teeth still remain a matter of continual curiosity and research. The knowledge of anatomical characteristics of dental root canals will help clinicians to optimize the algorithm of endodontic treatment. Thus, statistic data are not the universal criterias, however, basing on these indicators anthropometrical data of roots and canals vary according to the geographic zones and nationalities. The study of variations in tooth form has interested anatomists (description and comparison), anthropologists, biologists, palaeontologists and dentists. The field of human dental anatomy has not been completely explored and the dentition of modern man still remains a matter of continual curiosity and research

  4. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Root Canal Transportation by Neoniti and Reciproc Single-File Systems

    PubMed Central

    Moazzami, Fariborz; Khojastepour, Leila; Nabavizadeh, Mohammadreza; Seied Habashi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the canal transportation of two single-file engine-driven systems, Neoniti and Reciproc, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Forty-five non-calcified roots with mature apices and apical curvature of 15-30 degrees were selected from extracted human maxillary molars for this study. Samples were randomly divided into two groups (n=20) and a control group (n=5) and canal preparation with either system was performed according to manufacturers' instructions. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were captured and the amount of canal transportation within the files was calculated at levels of 3, 4, and 5 mm from the apex. The independent sample t-test was used to analyze the statistical significance between the two groups. The level of significance was defined at 0.05. Results: Reciproc created more canal transportation compared to Neoniti in both mesiodistal and buccolingual directions. The difference between the two systems was statistically significant in all evaluated distances from the apex (P<0.001). During this study fracture of one file (25/0.08) in the Neoniti group occurred. Conclusion: Neoniti and Reciproc systems have significant difference in terms of creating canal transportation. Reciproc created more canal transportation in buccolingual and mesiodistal dimensions. PMID:27141215

  5. IS GUTTACORE MORE EASILY REMOVED FROM THE ROOT CANAL THAN THERMAFIL? AN EX-VIVO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Nevares, Giselle; de Albuquerque, Diana Santana; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2015-01-01

    GuttaCore is a new cross-linked gutta-percha carrier. Its handling time and ease of removal were compared with those of a plastic carrier (Thermafil) and the continuous wave of condensation technique (control). Forty-five maxillary central incisors were randomly divided 3 groups according to filling technique and retreatment was carried out in all samples with NiTi rotary files, hand files and ultrasonic inserts. Time required for filling removal was recorded. Roots were then split longitudinally and photographed under 5x magnification, and residual filling material was quantified. Removal time was significantly longer for Thermafil (7.10 minutes) than GuttaCore (2.91 minutes) and the control group (1.93 minutes) (p < 0.001). The amount of residual filling material did not differ among the groups: Thermafil 8.31%, GuttaCore 6.27 and control 8.68% (p > 0.05). In conclusion, replacing plastic core with cross-linked gutta-percha allows easier removal of carrier from the root canal. The remnants of filling material in all samples illustrate that retreatment remains a challenge in endodontics.

  6. Mechanical Behavior of a NiTi Endodontic File During Insertion in an Anatomic Root Canal Using Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, V.; Moyne, S.; Pino, L.; Arbab Chirani, S.; Calloch, S.; Chevalier, V.; Arbab Chirani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) have biomedical applications including rotary endodontic files. These alloys are used thanks to their flexibility, which is due to solid-solid martensitic transformation. Unfortunately, the intracanal file separation can occur during canal preparation. To avoid this problem and to have a good idea of the mechanical behavior of these instruments, finite elements simulations taking into account the real shape of root canals are proposed in this study. This is possible by using a well-adapted model describing all the particularities of SMA and representative limit conditions. The behavior model has been validated in previous studies under complex loadings. It is implemented in ABAQUS® finite elements software. The anatomic shapes of root canals are extracted by microtomography using a real tooth. They are applied as limit conditions in realized simulations to be as near as possible to clinical conditions. The mechanical behavior of an endodontic file is then simulated during insertion in a root canal without and with rotation. This permits to obtain different information like the loading applied to the instrument during its use, the stress, and the phase transformation fields through the file. This is useful not only for clinical use but also for new NiTi endodontic instruments design.

  7. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein expression by epoxy resin and zinc oxide-eugenol based root canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2003-05-01

    An ideal root canal sealer should be nonirritating to the surrounding tissues. Unfortunately, all histological investigation demonstrated that all types of root canal sealer can induce mild to severe inflammatory alternations. However, there is little information on the precise mechanisms about root canal sealers-induced inflammatory reaction. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme believed to be responsible for prostaglandin synthesis at site of inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epoxy resin (AH26) and zinc oxide-eugenol based (Endomethansone and N2) root canal sealers on the expression of COX-2 mRNA gene and protein in cultured human osteoblastic cells. Investigations of the time dependence of COX-2 mRNA expression in root canal sealer-treated human osteoblastic cells revealed a rapid accumulation of the transcript, a significant signal first detectable within 2h and diminished to control level after 24h. In addition, all root canal sealers also induced COX-2 protein expression in human osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, to elucidate whether induction of COX-2 is associated with cytotoxicity, NS-398 (a selective COX-2 inhibitor), was added to test its protective effects. NS-398 at non-cytotoxic dose is not able to prevent root canal sealers-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, the activation of COX-2 expression may be one of the pathogenesis of root canal sealers-induced periapical inflammation. In addition, root canal sealers-induced cytotoxicity is not directly via the induction of COX-2 expression.

  8. Retreatability of Root Canals Obturated Using Gutta-Percha with Bioceramic, MTA and Resin-Based Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Yilmaz, Zeliha; Sungur, Derya Deniz; Altundasar, Emre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the retreatability of root canals obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and three different endodontic sealers [iRoot SP (bioceramic sealer), MTA Fillapex (MTA-based sealer) and AH-26 (epoxy resin-based sealer)] using the ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR) system. Methods and Materials: Forty extracted single-rooted human teeth were prepared with universal ProTaper files up to F4 (40/0.06). Specimens were randomly divided into four groups according to obturation technique/material: single-cone GP/AH-26, lateral compaction of GP/AH-26, single-cone GP/iRoot SP, and single-cone GP/MTA Fillapex. Root fillings were removed with PTR. The time taken to reach the working-length (TWL) was recorded. Roots were longitudinally sectioned and each half was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Three observers scored each third of all specimen. Obtained data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Welch and Games-Howell tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: In single-cone GP/MTA Fillapex group the TWL was significantly shorter. The remnant of filling material in the apical and middle thirds of groups was similar and higher than the coronal thirds. Conclusion: None of the tested sealers were completely removed from the root canal system. PMID:25834591

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography study of the root and canal morphology of mandibular permanent anterior teeth in a Chongqing population

    PubMed Central

    Zhengyan, Yang; Keke, Lu; Fei, Wang; Yueheng, Li; Zhi, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the root and canal morphology of permanent mandibular anterior teeth in a Chongqing population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods CBCT images of 1,725 patients in a Chongqing population were selected, and a total of 9,646 mandibular anterior teeth were analyzed. The number of root canals and the canal configurations were investigated. Results In total, 0.3% (11/3,257) of lateral incisors and 0.8% (26/3,014) of canines had double roots, and 3.8% (127/3,375) of central incisors, 10.6% (345/3,257) of lateral incisors, and 4.2% (127/3,014) of canines had multi-root canals. The difference in the incidence of multi-canals in lateral incisors between female and male was statistically significant. The frequency of multi-canals in the different age groups was 5.0% for central incisors for ages 21–30 years, 14.7% for lateral incisors for ages 41–50 years, and 8.1% for canines for ages 41–50 years. Conclusion With the limitations of the current study, we found that a high percentage of mandibular anterior teeth had multiple canals in the studied Chinese Chongqing population. The current data may provide clinicians practicing in Chongqing with a more thorough understanding of root canal morphology. PMID:26730198

  10. Reciprocating vs Rotary Instrumentation in Pediatric Endodontics: Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analysis of Deciduous Root Canals using Two Single-file Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Attiguppe R; Yavagal, Chandrashekar; Naik, Saraswathi V

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Primary root canals are considered to be most challenging due to their complex anatomy. "Wave one" and "one shape" are single-file systems with reciprocating and rotary motion respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare dentin thickness, centering ability, canal transportation, and instrumentation time of wave one and one shape files in primary root canals using a cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis. Study design: This is an experimental, in vitro study comparing the two groups. Materials and methods: A total of 24 extracted human primary teeth with minimum 7 mm root length were included in the study. Cone beam computed tomographic images were taken before and after the instrumentation for each group. Dentin thickness, centering ability, canal transportation, and instrumentation times were evaluated for each group. Results: A significant difference was found in instrumentation time and canal transportation measures between the two groups. Wave one showed less canal transportation as compared with one shape, and the mean instrumentation time of wave one was significantly less than one shape. Conclusion: Reciprocating single-file systems was found to be faster with much less procedural errors and can hence be recommended for shaping the root canals of primary teeth. How to cite this article: Prabhakar AR, Yavagal C, Dixit K, Naik SV. Reciprocating vs Rotary Instrumentation in Pediatric Endodontics: Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analysis of Deciduous Root Canals using Two Single-File Systems. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):45-49. PMID:27274155

  11. Ex Vivo Comparison of Mtwo and RaCe Rotary File Systems in Root Canal Deviation: One File Only versus the Conventional Method

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Nozari, Solmaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cleaning and shaping of the root canal system is an important step in endodontic therapy. New instruments incorporate new preparation techniques that can improve the efficacy of cleaning and shaping. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Mtwo and RaCe rotary file systems in straightening the canal curvature using only one file or the conventional method. Materials and Methods: Sixty mesial roots of extracted human mandibular molars were prepared by RaCe and Mtwo nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary files using the conventional and only one rotary file methods. The working length was 18 mm and the curvatures of the root canals were between 15–45°. By superimposing x-ray images before and after the instrumentation, deviation of the canals was assessed using Adobe Photoshop CS3 software. Preparation time was recorded. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test. Results: There were no significant differences between RaCe and Mtwo or between the two root canal preparation methods in root canal deviation in buccolingual and mesiodistal radiographs (P>0.05). Changes of root canal curvature in >35° subgroups were significantly more than in other subgroups with smaller canal curvatures. Preparation time was shorter in one file only technique. Conclusion: According to the results, the two rotary systems and the two root canal preparation methods had equal efficacy in straightening the canals; but the preparation time was shorter in one file only group. PMID:26877736

  12. C-shaped mandibular primary first molar diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography: A novel case report and literature review of primary molars' root canal systems.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Gozde; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Kocoglu, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different anatomical variations in root canal system of dedicious dentition will improve the practice of the pediatric dentists. The teeth with C-shaped root canal configurations are definitely a problem in endodontic treatment. Dentists who are specialists of endodontics must have adequate knowledge about various root canal morphologies of primary tooth that have a tendency for rapid progression of dental caries to achieve a technically satisfactory outcome. This report presents an extraordinary case of unusual tooth morphology involving the mandibular first primary molar with a C-shaped configuration which has not yet been reported. PMID:27681406

  13. Root surface temperature rises in vitro during root canal obturation with thermoplasticized gutta-percha on a carrier or by injection.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Mariusz

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to measure the temperature rise on the outer root surfaces of teeth during four different root canal obturation techniques. Sixty extracted human maxillary and mandibular premolars with a single canal were used. After root canal cleaning and shaping, the teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 15 teeth each and obturated with Thermafil obturators or Soft-Core obturators using Ultrafil or Trifecta low-temperature thermoplasticized gutta-percha techniques. Temperature changes on the external mesial root surfaces were measured using a thermal imaging camera. Lower temperature rises were found for Ultrafil and Trifecta techniques (2.14 degrees C and 2.03 degrees C, respectively) than for Thermafil and Soft-Core techniques (3.87 degrees C and 3.67 degrees C, respectively). These findings suggest that solid core gutta-percha combined with low-temperature injectable gutta-percha obturation techniques may impose less risk for thermal damage to the surrounding periradicular tissues.

  14. [The influence of the difference of caries detective methods on the bond strength for caries affected root canal dentin].

    PubMed

    Otake, Shiho

    2010-03-01

    Firm adhesion of composite resin and dentin is the basic premise for building up resin composite cores successfully. To assess the efficacy of several caries detective methods (stained with Caries Detector and probing with sharp probe) for caries affected root canal dentin, microtensile bond strengths of resin composite to caries-affected root canal dentin and failure mode distribution were analyzed in this study. Color and hardness were used for assessment of root caries as follows: Dye stain group (pale pink stained with Caries Detector), Probing group (probing with sharp probe) and Sound dentin group (Control). The bond strengths (mean +/- standard deviation) of the Probing group (64.6 +/- 11.9 MPa) and the Sound dentin group (68.7 +/- 11.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those of the Dye stain group (46.9 +/- 7.9 MPa, p<0.05). However, there is no significant difference in fracture mode between the Dye stain group and the Probing group (p<0.05). This could be attributed to that the thick smear layer caused a loss of hybrid layer strength. In conclusion, the caries removal technique of the root canal dentin affected the bond strength of the resin composite.

  15. A comparative evaluation of electronic and radiographic determination of root canal length in primary teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Iyer Satishkumar; Sreedharan, Sheela

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the root canal length determination by Electronic apex locator (EAL) (Raypex 5) and conventional radiography, and then compare them with the actual measurements obtained by direct visualization. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Subjects and Methods: One hundred single rooted primary teeth extracted due to extensive caries, trauma, serial extraction or unwillingness of the parent to save the teeth were selected. The teeth were numbered and root canal length was determined using the visual, electronic and the radiographic methods. The actual, electronic and the radiographic measurements were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using Intraclass correlation test and linear regression analysis. Results: The accuracy of EAL and radiographic methods were 92% and 72%, respectively within + 0.5 mm. Both the electronic and conventional radiographic methods showed a high correlation and agreement (ICC intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.99 and 0.98 respectively) with the actual measurements. Conclusions: EALs proved to be more accurate in determining the root canal length than the radiographic method. PMID:23633801

  16. Dentinal defects before and after rotary root canal instrumentation with three different obturation techniques and two obturating materials

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Ponnuswamy; Sivapriya, Elangovan; Indhramohan, Jamuna; Gopikrishna, Velayutham; Savadamoorthi, K Subramani; Pradeepkumar, Angambakkam Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of rotary root canal instrumentation followed by obturation with three different techniques and two different materials on the incidence of dentinal defects. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty mandibular premolars were divided into eight groups (n = 20). Group I was left untreated and served as control. The other seven groups were prepared with profile rotary instruments till #40.06 taper. After preparation, group II was left unfilled, groups III, IV, and V were obturated with Gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer using passive technique, lateral compaction and warm vertical compaction, respectively. Groups VI, VII, and VIII were obturated with Resilon and Realseal sealer using passive technique, lateral compaction, and warm vertical compaction, respectively. Roots were then sectioned at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex and inspected under a stereomicroscope (50×) for dentinal defects. Chi-square test was performed to compare the incidence of dentinal defects between the groups (P < 0.05). Results: The unprepared control group had no dentinal defects. The instrumentation group (group II) and the obturation group (groups III-VIII) showed significantly more defects than the uninstrumented control group (group I) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the root canal obturating techniques (group III-VIII) when compared with the instrumentation group (group II). On inter group comparison among the obturation groups the number of defects after lateral compaction with Gutta-percha (group IV) was significantly larger than passive Gutta-percha obturation (group III) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that root canal instrumentation significantly influenced the incidence of dentinal defects or fracture. Dentinal defects were more significantly attributed to the role of root canal instrumentation rather than the type of obturation technique or material. Lateral compaction with Gutta-percha significantly produces more

  17. In Vitro Comparison of Apically Extruded Debris during Root Canal Preparation of Mandibular Premolars with Manual and Rotary Instruments.

    PubMed

    Soi, Sonal; Yadav, Suman; Sharma, Sumeet; Sharma, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. During root canal preparation, debris extruded beyond the apical foramen may result in periapical inflammation and postoperative pain. To date no root canal preparation method has been developed that extrudes no periapical debris. The purpose of this study was to identify a system leading to minimal extrusion of debris from the apical foramen. The study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the amount of apical extrusion of debris during root canal preparation using hand ProTaper and GT rotary and RaCe rotary instruments using crown-down technique. Materials and methods. Ninety freshly extracted human single-rooted mandibular premolars were equally assigned to three groups (n=30). The root canals were instrumented using hand ProTaper, GT rotary and RaCe rotary systems. Debris and irrigant extruded from the apical foramen were collected into vials. The mean weight of the remaining debris was calculated for each group and subjected to statistical analysis. Results. ANOVA was used to compare the mean dry weights of the debris extruded in the three groups, followedby post hoc Tukey tests for multiple comparisons the between groups. Highly significant differences were found in the amount of debris extruded among all the groups (P<0.001). The ProTaper group exhibited the highest mean debris weight (0.8293±0.05433 mg) and the RaCe system exhibited the lowest mean debris weight (0.1280±0.01606 mg). Conclusion. All the systems tested resulted in apical extrusion of debris. However, the hand ProTaper files extruded a significantly higher amount of debris than GT and RaCe systems. PMID:26697144

  18. In Vitro Comparison of Apically Extruded Debris during Root Canal Preparation of Mandibular Premolars with Manual and Rotary Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Soi, Sonal; Yadav, Suman; Sharma, Sumeet; Sharma, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. During root canal preparation, debris extruded beyond the apical foramen may result in periapical inflammation and postoperative pain. To date no root canal preparation method has been developed that extrudes no periapical debris. The purpose of this study was to identify a system leading to minimal extrusion of debris from the apical foramen. The study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the amount of apical extrusion of debris during root canal preparation using hand ProTaper and GT rotary and RaCe rotary instruments using crown-down technique. Materials and methods. Ninety freshly extracted human single-rooted mandibular premolars were equally assigned to three groups (n=30). The root canals were instrumented using hand ProTaper, GT rotary and RaCe rotary systems. Debris and irrigant extruded from the apical foramen were collected into vials. The mean weight of the remaining debris was calculated for each group and subjected to statistical analysis. Results. ANOVA was used to compare the mean dry weights of the debris extruded in the three groups, followedby post hoc Tukey tests for multiple comparisons the between groups. Highly significant differences were found in the amount of debris extruded among all the groups (P<0.001). The ProTaper group exhibited the highest mean debris weight (0.8293±0.05433 mg) and the RaCe system exhibited the lowest mean debris weight (0.1280±0.01606 mg). Conclusion. All the systems tested resulted in apical extrusion of debris. However, the hand ProTaper files extruded a significantly higher amount of debris than GT and RaCe systems. PMID:26697144

  19. Analysis of C-shaped root canal configuration in maxillary molars in a Korean population using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyoung-Hoon; Min, Jeong-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of root fusion and C-shaped root canals in maxillary molars, and to classify the types of C-shaped canal by analyzing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a Korean population. Materials and Methods Digitized CBCT images from 911 subjects were obtained in Chosun University Dental Hospital between February 2010 and July 2012 for orthodontic treatment. Among them, a total of selected 3,553 data of maxillary molars were analyzed retrospectively. Tomography sections in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were displayed by PiViewstar and Rapidia MPR software (Infinitt Co.). The incidence and types of root fusion and C-shaped root canals were evaluated and the incidence between the first and the second molar was compared using Chi-square test. Results Root fusion was present in 3.2% of the first molars and 19.5% of the second molars, and fusion of mesiobuccal and palatal root was dominant. C-shaped root canals were present in 0.8% of the first molars and 2.7% of the second molars. The frequency of root fusion and C-shaped canal was significantly higher in the second molar than the first molar (p < 0.001). Conclusions In a Korean population, maxillary molars showed total 11.3% of root fusion and 1.8% of C-shaped root canals. Furthermore, root fusion and C-shaped root canals were seen more frequently in the maxillary second molars. PMID:26877991

  20. Survey of Anatomy and Root Canal Morphology of Maxillary First Molars Regarding Age and Gender in an Iranian Population Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mandana; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Khayat, Akbar; Eftekhar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary first molars with regards to patients’ age and gender with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: A total of 149 CBCT scans from 92 (67.1%) female and 57 (31.3%) male patients with mean age of 40.5 years were evaluated. Tooth length, presence of root fusion, number of the roots and canals, canal types based on Vertucci’s classification, deviation of root and apical foramen in coronal and sagittal planes and the correlation of all items with gender and age were recorded. The Mann Whitney U, Kruskal Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests were used to analyze these items. Results: The rate of root fusion was 1.3%. Multiple canals were present in the following frequencies: four canals 78.5%, five canals 11.4% and three canals 10.1%. Additional canal was detected in 86.6% of mesiobuccal roots in which Vertucci’s type VI configuration was the most prevalent followed by type II and I. Type I was the most common one in distobuccal and palatal roots. There was no statistically significant difference in the canal configurations in relation to gender and age as well as the incidence root or canal numbers (P>0.05). The mean tooth length was 19.3 and 20.3 mm in female and male patients, respectively which was statistically significant (P<0.05). Evaluation of root deviation showed that most commonly, a general pattern of straight-distal in the mesiobuccal and straight-straight for distobuccal and palatal roots occurred. In mesiobuccal roots, straight and distal deviations were more dominant in male and female, respectively (P<0.05). The prevalence of apical foramen deviation in mesiobuccal and palatal roots statistically differed with gender. Conclusion: The root and canal configuration of Iranian population showed different features from those of other populations. PMID:27790259

  1. Efficiency of the Self Adjusting File, WaveOne, Reciproc, ProTaper and hand files in root canal debridement

    PubMed Central

    Topcu, K. Meltem; Karatas, Ertugrul; Ozsu, Damla; Ersoy, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the canal debridement capabilities of three single file systems, ProTaper, and K-files in oval-shaped canals. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human mandibular central incisors with oval-shaped root canals were selected. A radiopaque contrast medium (Metapex; Meta Biomed Co. Ltd., Chungcheongbuk-do, Korea) was introduced into the canal systems and the self-adjusting file (SAF), WaveOne, Reciproc, ProTaper, and K-files were used for the instrumentation of the canals. The percentage of removed contrast medium was calculated using pre- and post-operative radiographs. Results: An overall comparison between the groups revealed that the hand file (HF) and SAF groups presented the lowest percentage of removed contrast medium, whereas the WaveOne group showed the highest percentage (P < 0.001). The ProTaper group removed more contrast medium than the SAF and HF groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: None of the instruments was able to remove the contrast medium completely. WaveOne performed significantly better than other groups. PMID:25202211

  2. Evaluation of the Root and Canal Morphology of Mandibular Permanent Anterior Teeth in an Iranian Population by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Sadegh, Mona; Meraji, Naghmeh; Razmi, Hasan; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences in the root and canal configurations of mandibular permanent anterior incisors and canines in an Iranian population by means of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images. Materials and Methods: Four hundred CBCT images of mandibular permanent incisors and canines that met the inclusion criteria were evaluated. Vertucci’s classification was used to evaluate the number of roots, number of root canals, root lengths, root curvatures and canal types. Results: Totally 632 central incisors, 614 lateral incisors and 608 canines were evaluated. The average length of the mandibular central, lateral incisors and canines was 21.3±0.10, 21.9± 0.13 and 25.1± 0.11 mm, respectively. All of the mandibular central and lateral incisors had one root, but the incidence of single-rooted mandibular canines and two-rooted mandibular canines was 96.3% and 4.7%, respectively. The majority of mandibular central, lateral incisors and canines had one canal (72.7%, 70.6% and 71.8%, respectively). Five types of Vertucci canal configurations were seen in the evaluated teeth. Type 1 Vertucci configuration was the most prevalent configuration (72.3%, 70.6% and 71.8% for the central, lateral incisors and canines, respectively)), and type 5 Vertucci canal configuration was the least prevalent type seen (3.3%, 3.2% and 2.3% for the central, lateral incisors and canines, respectively). The most frequent root curvatures in these teeth were distally and buccally. No significant difference was seen between male and female patients regarding any of the parameters evaluated in this study (p>0.05). Conclusion: More attention should be given to the detection of additional canals and the recognition of canal curvature in Iranian patients. PMID:24396355

  3. A Systematic Review of Root Canal Filling Materials for Deciduous Teeth: Is There an Alternative for Zinc Oxide-Eugenol?

    PubMed Central

    Barja-Fidalgo, Fernanda; Moutinho-Ribeiro, Michele; Oliveira, Maria Angelina Amorim; de Oliveira, Branca Heloísa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether there is a root canal filling for deciduous teeth equally or more effective than zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE). Six clinical trials selected for inclusion were independently reviewed by two researchers. Only two showed statistically significant different success rates between the test and the control groups. One found that an iodoform paste with calcium hydroxide (IP + Ca) performed better than ZOE, and the other found that ZOE performed similarly to IP + Ca. The other four studies compared ZOE with an iodoform paste (IP), a calcium hydroxide cement (Ca(OH)2), or IP + Ca. In these trials, the success rates in the ZOE groups were slightly lower than in the other groups. There seems to be no convincing evidence to support the superiority of any material over ZOE, and both ZOE and IP + Ca appear to be suitable as root canal fillings for deciduous teeth. PMID:21991471

  4. SEM evaluation of smear layer removal by Er:YAG laser in root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Roe, Iain M.; Guerisoli, Danilo M.; Barbizam, Joao Vicente B.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2002-06-01

    The effects of two endodontic irrigants associated or not with Er:YAG laser on a smear layer created by hand instrumentation were evaluated in vitro in the middle and apical thirds of root canals. Twenty five human maxillary canines with a single root were distributed randomly into five groups of five teeth each. Group 1 was irrigated with sodium hypochlorite 1.0%, Group 2 received EDTAC 15% as irrigating solution and Group 3 received both NaClO 1.0% and EDTAC 15%. Group 4 was irrigated with distilled water and irradiated with Er:YAG laser. Group 5 received NaClO 1.0% as irrigating solution and was irradiated with Er:YAG laser. Teeth were split longitudinally and prepared for examination under scanning electron microscopy. The teeth irrigated with NaClO (Group 1) showed the higher amount of smear layer, with statistically significant differences (p<0.05) from the teeth irrigated with distilled water and irradiated with Er:YAG laser (Group 4), which showed intermediate amounts of smear layer. The teeth irrigated with EDTAC 15%, NaClO 1.0% associated with EDTAC 15% and NaClO 1.0% with Er:YAG laser (Groups 2,3 and 5) showed the lowest amounts of smear layer, being statistically similar between them and different (p<0.05) from Groups 1 and 4. There were no differences between the radicular thirds. It can be concluded that irradiation with Er:YAG laser can be as effective as EDTAC 15% when used associated with 1.0% sodium hypochlorite, but not as effective when used together with distilled water.

  5. Evaluation of the Apical Sealability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement as Root Canal Filling Cements: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Rekab, M.S.; Ayoubi, H. Rushdi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: One of the principle purposes of root canal obturation is to obtain hermetic sealing of the root canal system. According to the development of technology, many materials are now used in root canal filling. An in vitro dye leakage study was performed to evaluate the apical sealability of White-colored Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA) and Gray-colored Portland Cement (GPC) when used alone or as a sealer with gutta-percha points in root canal filling. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five single-rooted extracted human teeth were used in this study. After cleaning and shaping, the teeth were randomly divided into five equal groups of 15 teeth each based on the root canal filling material used; Group 1, (WMTA) alone; Group 2, (GPC) alone; Group 3, (Gutta-percha points + WMTA); Group 4, (Gutta-percha points + GPC); Group 5, (Gutta-percha points + AH26). Methylene blue was used to determine the apical leakage. After sectioning the teeth longitudinally, linear dye penetration was measured with a caliper under the stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and one-way ANOVA tests with (P ≤ 0.05) as the level of significance. Results: The results showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the materials of five groups. Conclusion: (WMTA) alone, (Gutta-percha points + WMTA), (GPC) alone and (Gutta-percha points + GPC) may be used in the root canal filling. PMID:21998797

  6. Epiphany root canal sealer prepared with resinous solvent is irritating to rat subcutaneous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Daleffe, Élcio; Vieira-Ozório, José E.; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the biocompatibility of the Epiphany endodontic sealer prepared with resinous solvent of Epiphany system (Thinning resin) in rat subcutaneous tissues. Study Design: Polyethylene tubes were filled with the sealer and 4 groups were established: GI, Epiphany prepared with 1 drop of resinous solvent (RS); GII, Epiphany prepared with 1 drop of RS and photoactivated; GIII, Epiphany associated with self-etch primer and prepared with 1 drop of RS; GIV, Epiphany associated with self-etch primer, prepared with 1 drop of RS and photoactivated. The filled tubes were implanted into 4 different regions of the dorsum of 20 adult male rats. Results: After 7, 14 and 21 days, all groups presented a moderate to severe chronic inflammation, necrosis and foreign-body giant cells. At 42 days, although the intensity of chronic inflammatory reaction decreased, the other features still were observed. Conclusion: The Epiphany sealer prepared with the RS was irritating to rat subcutaneous tissues. Key words:Biocompatibility, Epiphany, methacrylate resin sealer, resinous solvent, root canal sealer. PMID:22322512

  7. A novel vending machine for supplying root canal tools during surgery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carl A; Hossain, S G M; Al-Okaily, Ala'a; Ong, Jason

    2012-02-01

    A root canal surgery involves the successive use of several tools one after another. Typically dozens of tools are laid out for possible use, and the process of tool selection is done manually. This is a rather inefficient process and uses up a large area on the mobile cart or cabinet of the dental chair due to the large number of tools. In this article, a novel 'tool vending machine' is introduced which will be capable of solving those problems and at the same time move a step closer to robot-assisted dental surgery. The tool vending machine was designed considering the needs of the dentists and also from the perspective of the entire product life cycle. For these reasons the design process was implemented using a rigorous analysis of effective manufacturing processes and product quality. To show the feasibility of using such a machine in improving work efficiency during operations, a study of the associated motion patterns and the required time increments were demonstrated.

  8. Shear modulus and thermal properties of gutta percha for root canal filling.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, G; Tanaka, T; Torii, M; Inoue, K

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the rheological properties of four commercially available gutta perchas for root canal filling. The relaxation modulus [Gr(0): instantaneous shear modulus] and specific volume of their materials were examined. In addition, the quantity of heat was also studied by differential scanning calorimeter. In a lower temperature range than the first-order transition temperature (melting point), the Gr(0) values of each material were almost identical. A marked decrease of Gr(0) was observed at the melting point, and the range of the first-order transition temperature at heating was from 42.0 to 60.0 degrees C. At higher temperatures than the first-order transition temperature of each material, a considerable difference in Gr(0) values was observed. The transition temperatures obtained by the results of the Gr(0), specific volume and quantity of heat agreed with one another. A marked specific volume change was observed at the first-order transition temperature. The technique using melted gutta percha may not be favourable compared with the conventional lateral condensation technique because melted gutta percha undergoes a large amount of shrinkage during setting. PMID:15525394

  9. Push-out strength of fiber posts depending on the type of root canal filling and resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dimitrouli, Maria; Günay, Hüsamettin; Geurtsen, Werner; Lührs, Anne-Katrin

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the push-out strength of two fiber post systems/resin cements (RelyX Unicem/RelyX Fiber Post (RLX) and Variolink II/DT Light SL (VL)) depending on the root canal filling (RF). One hundred sixty extracted human teeth were divided into four groups: gutta-percha/AH Plus (GP), gutta-percha/Guttaflow (GF), pre-existing root canal filling (PRF), and without root canal filling (WRF). After root canal treatment, fiber posts were inserted using either RelyX® or Variolink II®/Excite DSC®. Half of the specimens were thermocycled (TC, 5,000 cycles, 5-55°C). All specimens were subjected to the push-out test (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Three-way ANOVA showed a significant influence of either the RF or the resin cement/post system (p < 0.001). The highest bond strength was measured for VL-WRF without TC (16.5 ± 6.4 MPa). TC had no significant influence within the RLX groups. For groups PRF and WRF, significant differences were documented between VL and RLX (PRF 16.3 ± 6.0 vs 7.0 ± 2.4 MPa, p = 0.001; WRF 16.5 ± 6.4 vs 8.0 ± 5.0, p = 0.004) before TC. No differences were found after TC. The fracture mode analysis for VL showed mainly adhesive fractures between post and cement. For RLX, mixed fractures between post and tooth and between tooth and cement were predominantly determined. The adhesion of resin cements/post systems could be dependent on the type of RF. Higher bond strength values were found for the conventional ("etch and rinse") adhesive than for the "self-adhesive resin cement."

  10. Apical microleakage of different root canal sealers after use of maleic acid and EDTA as final irrigants.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Ozgür Ilke; Nayir, Yelda; Celik, Kezban; Yaman, Sis Darendeliler

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and maleic acid (MA) on the sealing ability of various root canal sealers. Eighty root canals were instrumented and irrigated with either EDTA or MA. They were divided into eight experimental groups and obturated as follows: Group 1: MA + Hybrid Root SEAL/gutta-percha. Group 2: EDTA + Hybrid Root SEAL/gutta-percha. Group 3: MA + iRoot SP/gutta-percha. Group 4: EDTA + iRoot SP/gutta-percha. Group 5: MA + EndoREZ/EndoREZ points. Group 6: EDTA + EndoREZ/EndoREZ points. Group 7: MA + AH Plus/gutta-percha. Group 8: EDTA + AH Plus/gutta-percha. Another ten roots were used as negative and positive controls. The microleakage of each sample was measured at 2-min intervals for 8 min using the fluid filtration method. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey, and paired-samples t tests. The minimum microleakage values were obtained from the teeth obturated with AH Plus and EndoREZ selaers (p < 0.001). The samples with Hybrid Root SEAL showed the maximum leakage (p < 0.001). There were significant differences between the groups irrigated with MA or EDTA in terms of microleakage (p < 0.05). Use of MA resulted in higher microleakage values compared with those using EDTA. The type of final irrigation solution seems to influence the postobturation apical seal. Use of AH Plus and EndoREZ sealers showed better sealing ability compared with IRoot SP and Hybrid Root SEAL.

  11. Alteration in the inherent metallic and surface properties of nickel-titanium root canal instruments to enhance performance, durability and safety: a focused review.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, J L; Gao, Y

    2012-02-01

    The expanded use of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments in root canal procedures has led to the development of a wide variety of shapes, designs and applications. Root canal anatomy has not changed, however, and the same challenges exist in both initial treatment and the revision of unacceptable treatment. These challenges include application with high levels of achievement and low to no levels of adverse effects, such as instrument fracture, root canal wall ledging, dentine wall perforation and so forth. To that end, many manufacturers have been seeking ways to alter the presently available and wide range of root canal instrument designs, with a focus on altering the surface of the alloy or altering the alloy microstructure with post-machining or post-twisting heat treatment. This focused review will address the impact that these modifications have had on instrument flexibility, resistance to cyclic fatigue and cutting efficiency.

  12. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial effect of herbal root canal irrigants (Morinda citrifolia, Azadirachta indica, Aloe vera) with sodium hypochlorite: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Babaji, Prashant; Jagtap, Kiran; Lau, Himani; Bansal, Nandita; Thajuraj, S.; Sondhi, Priti

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Successful root canal treatment involves the complete elimination of microorganism from the root canal and the three-dimensional obturation of the canal space. Enterococcus faecalis is the most commonly found bacteria in failed root canal. Chemical irrigation of canals along with biomechanical preparation helps in the elimination of microorganisms. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of herbal root canal irrigants (Morinda citrifolia, Azadirachta indica extract, Aloe vera) with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Materials and Methods: The bacterial E. faecalis (ATCC) culture was grown overnight in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and inoculated in Mueller–Hinton agar plates. Antibacterial inhibition was assessed using agar well diffusion method. All five study irrigants were added to respective wells in agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Bacterial inhibition zone around each well was recorded. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software for Windows, version 19.0. (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY. Results: Highest inhibitory zone against E. faecalis was seen in NaOCl fallowed by M. citrifolia and A. indica extract, and the least by A. vera extract. Conclusion: Tested herbal medicine (A. indica extract, M. citrifolia, A. vera) showed inhibitory zone against E. faecalis. Hence, these irrigants can be used as root canal irrigating solutions. PMID:27382533

  13. An in vitro comparative study of the adaptation and sealing ability of two carrier-based root canal obturators.

    PubMed

    Alkahtani, Ahmed; Al-Subait, Sara; Anil, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    The study was done to assess the sealing ability and adaptation of RealSeal 1, and to compare it with Thermafil. 65 single-rooted extracted teeth were selected and root canal treatment was performed. Root canals were obturated with RealSeal 1 or Thermafil. A double chamber bacterial leakage model using E. faecalis was developed to assess the sealing ability. Samples were monitored daily for 60 days. After the bacterial leakage test, samples were embedded in resin and sectioned horizontally at 2 and 4 mm from the apical foramen. Specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope and digitally photographed. AutoCAD software was used to measure the gap between the canal surface and obturation material. Results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for the bacterial leakage and t-test to compare the means of gap in RealSeal 1 and Thermafil at 2 and 4 mm. There was no significant difference between the RealSeal 1 and Thermafil with respect to leakage over time. At 2 mm and 4 mm, RealSeal 1 had significantly more gaps than Thermafil. From the observations it can be concluded that RealSeal 1 and Thermafil have comparable performance in terms of adaptation and sealing ability. PMID:23710141

  14. An in vitro comparative study of the adaptation and sealing ability of two carrier-based root canal obturators.

    PubMed

    Alkahtani, Ahmed; Al-Subait, Sara; Anil, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    The study was done to assess the sealing ability and adaptation of RealSeal 1, and to compare it with Thermafil. 65 single-rooted extracted teeth were selected and root canal treatment was performed. Root canals were obturated with RealSeal 1 or Thermafil. A double chamber bacterial leakage model using E. faecalis was developed to assess the sealing ability. Samples were monitored daily for 60 days. After the bacterial leakage test, samples were embedded in resin and sectioned horizontally at 2 and 4 mm from the apical foramen. Specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope and digitally photographed. AutoCAD software was used to measure the gap between the canal surface and obturation material. Results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for the bacterial leakage and t-test to compare the means of gap in RealSeal 1 and Thermafil at 2 and 4 mm. There was no significant difference between the RealSeal 1 and Thermafil with respect to leakage over time. At 2 mm and 4 mm, RealSeal 1 had significantly more gaps than Thermafil. From the observations it can be concluded that RealSeal 1 and Thermafil have comparable performance in terms of adaptation and sealing ability.

  15. Er:YAG and alexandrite laser radiation propagation in the root canal and its effect on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shoji, Shigeru; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal

    1999-05-01

    The goal of the study was to verify differences between the alexandrite and Er:YAG laser energy distribution in the root canal and in the surrounding dentin and bone tissues. For the experiment, two lasers were prepared: the Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm) with a delivery system fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide ended by a special sapphire tip and the alexandrite laser (λ=0.75 μm) with a silicon fiber. The Er:YAG laser was operated in a free-running mode, the length of the generated pulses was 250 μsec and the output energy ranged from 100 to 350 mJ. The pulse length of the free- running alexandrite laser was 70 μsec and the output energy was ranged from 80 up to 200 mJ. For the experiment prepared root canals of molars were used. It was ascertained that the radiation of the alexandrite laser passes through the root canal and hits the surrounding tissue. Nocardia asteroids, Filaments, Micrococcus albus, Lactobacillus sp and Streptococcus sanguis colonies were treated by the Er:YAG or alexandrite laser radiation. The surface was checked by scanning electron microscopy. From the result it follows that the Er:YAG laser destroyed microbial colonies but the differences is in the depth of the affected area.

  16. Preparation time and perceptions of Brazilian specialists and dental students regarding simulated root canals for endodontic teaching: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    dos S Luz, Diandra; de S Ourique, Fernanda; Scarparo, Roberta K; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana V; Morgental, Renata D; Waltrick, Silvana B G; de Figueiredo, José A P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the desirability of alternative models of artificial teeth versus extracted natural teeth for use in preclinical dental education. Specifically, the study was designed to compare the preparation time and perceptions of difficulty of undergraduate dental students and endodontists in carrying out root canal preparations on resin models (both clear and opaque) and extracted natural teeth. Twenty participants-ten fifth-year students at a Brazilian dental school and ten endodontists with at least five years' experience in the specialty-performed root canal instrumentation on two samples of each model. Preparation times were recorded, and the participants completed a questionnaire about the anatomical and physical characteristics of these models. The results showed that the time required for performing endodontic procedures in the natural teeth was higher than in the alternative models. The perceptions of the students and specialists regarding some topics on the questionnaire were significantly different. The students had more positive opinions about artificial teeth made of opaque resin, while the specialists had more positive opinions about simulated root canals in clear resin blocks. This study suggests that neither of the alternative models fulfilled requirements to replace natural teeth in endodontic teaching; improvements are still necessary to accomplish this goal.

  17. Different ultrasonic vibration protocols and their effects on retention of post-and-core to root canal.

    PubMed

    Braga, Neilor Mateus Antunes; Brito, Manoel; da Silva, Juliana Monteiro; Miranda, Lilian Souto; de Carvalho, Jacy Ribeiro; Faria-e-Silva, Andre Luis

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different ultrasonic vibration protocols on custom cast post-and-cores' retention to the root canal. Post holes were placed in the root canals of human maxillary canines, and post-and-core sets were luted, using zinc phosphate cement. The samples were divided into 5 groups (n = 8). Group 1 (control) received no ultrasonic vibration. For the other samples, the tip of the ultrasonic device was positioned either over the incisal face of the core (Group 2), over the lateral core surfaces and close to the incisal edge (Group 3), over the lateral face of the core but close to the line of cementation (Group 4), or over the lateral face of the core but with the end of the mouth mirror handle positioned on the opposite surface of the core (Group 5). After a tensile test, data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (P < 0.05). The control group showed higher values than all of the groups that were submitted to ultrasonic vibration. Bond strength was similar for Groups 2 and 3. Bond strength was lower in Groups 4 and 5; no statistical difference was observed between these 2 groups. Based on these results, both positioning the tip of the ultrasonic device near the cement line and placing a mouth mirror handle on the opposite surface of the core, are effective ways to reduce the retention of a cast post-and-core within a root canal.

  18. An In Vitro Comparative Study of the Adaptation and Sealing Ability of Two Carrier-Based Root Canal Obturators

    PubMed Central

    Alkahtani, Ahmed; Al-Subait, Sara; Anil, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    The study was done to assess the sealing ability and adaptation of RealSeal 1, and to compare it with Thermafil. 65 single-rooted extracted teeth were selected and root canal treatment was performed. Root canals were obturated with RealSeal 1 or Thermafil. A double chamber bacterial leakage model using E. faecalis was developed to assess the sealing ability. Samples were monitored daily for 60 days. After the bacterial leakage test, samples were embedded in resin and sectioned horizontally at 2 and 4 mm from the apical foramen. Specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope and digitally photographed. AutoCAD software was used to measure the gap between the canal surface and obturation material. Results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for the bacterial leakage and t-test to compare the means of gap in RealSeal 1 and Thermafil at 2 and 4 mm. There was no significant difference between the RealSeal 1 and Thermafil with respect to leakage over time. At 2 mm and 4 mm, RealSeal 1 had significantly more gaps than Thermafil. From the observations it can be concluded that RealSeal 1 and Thermafil have comparable performance in terms of adaptation and sealing ability. PMID:23710141

  19. Incidence of post obturation pain following single and multi visit root canal treatment in a teaching hospital of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, S; Khurshiduzzaman, M

    2014-04-01

    Post obturation pain is the pain of any degree after endodontic treatment. There are different opinions regarding incidence of post obturation pain related to single and multi visit root canal treatment. This prospective study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of post obturation pain in single visit and multi visit root canal treatment and to compare the incidence of pain between the two treatment groups. A total of 120 cases of endodontically involved asymptomatic non vital single rooted teeth were selected for this study. The patients were assigned and divided in to two treatment groups, sixty patients each. In single visit group, all teeth were prepared and filled using the standardized preparation and lateral condensation filling technique. In the multi visit treatment group, at the first appointment, the teeth were prepared, and dressed with calcium hydroxide paste for 7 days. At the second appointment, the teeth were prepared and obturated by using lateral condensation technique. The frequency of post obturation pain was recorded as no pain, slight, moderate and severe pain and evaluated at the day 1 and at the day 7 after obturation. The data were analyzed statistically by using SPSS version-12. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. The study showed that the post obturation pain in the single visit treatment group was more than multi visit treatment group, which is significant (p value <0.044). Out of the 120 patients, 86(71.7%) patients had no pain, 19(15.8%) had slight pain and 15(12.5%) patients had moderate pain at the day 1 after obturation. At the day 7 after obturation, 108(90%) patients had no pain, 9(7.5%) had slight pain and 3(2.5%) patients had moderate pain. No patient noticed severe pain during the follow up period. Older patient had significantly more post obturation pain than the younger patient. There was higher incidence of post obturation pain following the single visit root canal treatment. In multi visit root canal treatment with

  20. In vitro study of the apical microleakage with resilon root canal filling using different final endodontic irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Farré, Magí; Pumarola, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background Endodontic microleakage or microfiltration refers to the percolation of fluids and micro-organisms at the interface of the obturation material and the walls of the root canal system. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare apical microfiltration of Resilon root canal filling by employing three different final irrigant solutions. Material and Methods 128 single-rooted teeth were employed. The crowns were sectioned horizontally at the cemento-enamel junction and instrumented with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% EDTA gel to obtain an instrumented 040 apical caliber. An intermediate irrigation was performed with distilled water. The roots were then randomly assigned to three experimental groups with three different final irrigants: (A) 20% citric acid (CA); (B) 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX); and (C) 5.25% NaOCl, plus two control groups (positive and negative). They were then dried, obturated with RealSeal™, and cleared by Robertson’s technique. Apical microleakage was measured by the dye penetration method and assessed with a 4.5x stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA and post hoc analysis for multiple comparisons. Results Mean and standard deviations for apical microleakage were: 2% CHX (0.24 mm ± 0.22), 20% CA (0.25 mm ± 0.20), and 5.25% NaOCl (0.87 mm ± 0.32). Significant differences were reported among the group irrigated with NaOCl, CHX and CA (P<0.001). Conclusions A higher rate of apical microleakage was observed when the final irrigation was performed with NaOCl whilst lower rates were reported for CHX and CA. Key words:Apical filtration, endodontic irrigation, resin-based sealers, adhesion, root canal filling. PMID:26155335

  1. Photodynamic Inactivation of Root Canal Bacteria by Light Activation through Human Dental Hard and Simulated Surrounding Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Pummer, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Regensburger, Johannes; Schmalz, Gottfried; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) may be a supportive antimicrobial approach for use in endodontics, but sufficient activation of photosensitizers (PS) in root canals is a critical point. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of PS absorbing blue (TMPyP) or red light (Methylene Blue; MB) for light activation through human dental hard and simulated surrounding tissue to inactivate root canal bacteria. Methods: A tooth model was fabricated with a human premolar and two molars in an acrylic resin bloc simulating the optical properties of a porcine jaw. The distal root canal of the first molar was enlarged to insert a glass tube (external diameter 2 mm) containing PS and stationary-phase Enterococcus faecalis. Both PS (10 μM) were irradiated for 120 s with BlueV (20 mW/cm2; λem = 400–460 nm) or PDT 1200L (37.8 mW/cm2; λem = 570–680 nm; both: Waldmann Medizintechnik), respectively. Irradiation parameters ensured identical numbers of photons absorbed by each PS. Three setups were chosen: irradiating the glass pipette only (G), the glass pipette inside the single tooth without (GT) and with (GTM) simulated surrounding tissues. Colony forming units (CFU) were evaluated. Transmission measurements of the buccal halves of hemisected mandibular first molars were performed by means of a photospectrometer. Results: PIB with both PS led to reduction by ≥ 5 log10 of E. faecalis CFU for each setup. From transmission measurements, a threshold wavelength λth for allowing an amount of light transmission for sufficient activation of PS was determined to be 430 nm. Conclusion: This study can be seen as proof of principle that light activation of given intra-canal PS from outside a tooth may be possible at wavelengths ≥ 430 nm, facilitating clinical application of PIB in endodontics. PMID:27379059

  2. Effect of diode laser and ultrasonics with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on smear layer removal from the root canals: A scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Khalid; Masoodi, Ajaz; Nabi, Shahnaz; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Farooq, Riyaz; Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of diode laser and ultrasonics with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the smear layer removal from root canals. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 mandibular premolars were decoronated to working the length of 12 mm and prepared with protaper rotary files up to size F3. Group A canals irrigated with 1 ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group B canals irrigated with 1 ml of 17% EDTA followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group C canals lased with a diode laser. Group D canals were initially irrigated with 0.8 ml of 17% EDTA the remaining 0.2 ml was used to fill the root canals, and diode laser application was done. Group E canals were irrigated with 1 ml distilled water with passive ultrasonic activation, followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group F canals were irrigated with 1 ml EDTA with passive ultrasonic activation, followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Scanning electron microscope examination of canals was done for remaining smear layer at coronal middle and apical third levels. Results: Ultrasonics with EDTA had the least smear layer scores. Conclusion: Diode laser alone performed significantly better than ultrasonics. PMID:27656060

  3. Effect of diode laser and ultrasonics with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on smear layer removal from the root canals: A scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Khalid; Masoodi, Ajaz; Nabi, Shahnaz; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Farooq, Riyaz; Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of diode laser and ultrasonics with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the smear layer removal from root canals. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 mandibular premolars were decoronated to working the length of 12 mm and prepared with protaper rotary files up to size F3. Group A canals irrigated with 1 ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group B canals irrigated with 1 ml of 17% EDTA followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group C canals lased with a diode laser. Group D canals were initially irrigated with 0.8 ml of 17% EDTA the remaining 0.2 ml was used to fill the root canals, and diode laser application was done. Group E canals were irrigated with 1 ml distilled water with passive ultrasonic activation, followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group F canals were irrigated with 1 ml EDTA with passive ultrasonic activation, followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Scanning electron microscope examination of canals was done for remaining smear layer at coronal middle and apical third levels. Results: Ultrasonics with EDTA had the least smear layer scores. Conclusion: Diode laser alone performed significantly better than ultrasonics.

  4. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of different root canal sealers and their effect on cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Kangarloo, Ali; Sattari, Mandana; Rabiee, Faranak; Dianat, Seyed Omid

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Endodontic sealers are in direct contact with periradicular tissues and play a critical role in regeneration and pathogenesis of periradicular diseases. The aim of this study was to compare cytotoxicity of four different types of sealers including AH plus, Sankin, Tubliseal EWT and Apexit as well as their effect on cytokine release of L929 fibroblasts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this experimental study, cells were cultured in Complete Medium Culture (CMC) and then divided into two test groups. In group 1, sealers were added to cell culture wells immediately after mixing. In group 2, sealers were added to cell cultures 3 hours after mixing. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay after 4, 24 and 168 hours. The amount of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) released in response to the sealers was also evaluated by ELISA technique on fibroblasts after 24 hour period. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitey-U tests. RESULTS: Significant differences were seen in cytotoxicity in both groups (P<0.001). The least cytotoxic sealers were AH Plus and Sankin respectively, whereas Tubliseal EWT showed the greatest cytotoxicity. Production of IL-6 was significantly different among studied groups (P<0.001). The highest IL-6 level was observed in Tubliseal EWT and Sankin groups; which was statistically significant (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: AH plus has less cytotoxicity and induces less IL-6 release. Tubliseal EWT has greater cytotoxicity and induces more IL-6 release than other sealers. This should be considered during their routine use in root canal treatments. PMID:23864874

  5. Differential Diagnoses for Persistent Pain Following Root Canal Treatment: A Study in the National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Law, Alan S.; John, Mike T.; Sobieh, Radwa M.; Kohli, Richie; Nguyen, Ruby H.N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pain present 6 months following root canal treatment (RCT) may be either of odontogenic or nonodontogenic origin. This is importance because treatments and prognoses are different; therefore the aim of this study was to provide specific diagnoses of patients reporting pain 6 months after receiving initial orthograde RCT. Methods We enrolled patients from the Midwest region of an existing prospective observational study of pain after RCT. Pain at 6 months was defined as ≥1 day of pain and average pain intensity of at least 1/10 over the preceding month. An Endodontist and an Orofacial Pain practitioner independently performed clinical evaluations, which included periapical and cone-beam CT radiographs, to determine diagnoses. Results Thirty-eight out of the 354 eligible patients in the geographic area (11%) met the pain criteria, with 19 (50%) consenting to be clinically evaluated. As the sole reason for pain, 7 patients (37%) were given odontogenic diagnoses (4 involving the RCT tooth, 3 involving an adjacent tooth). Eight patients (42%) were given nonodontogenic pain diagnoses (7 from referred temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain, 1 from persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder (PDAP)). Two patients (11%) had both odontogenic and nonodontogenic diagnoses, while 2 (11%) no longer fit the pain criteria at the time of the clinical evaluation. Conclusion Patients reporting “tooth” pain 6 months following RCT had a nonodontogenic pain diagnosis accounting for some of this pain, with TMD being the most frequent nonodonotgenic diagnosis. Dentists should have the necessary knowledge to differentiate between these diagnoses to adequately manage their patients. PMID:25732400

  6. Root Canal Therapy Reduces Multiple Dimensions of Pain: A National Dental PBRN Study

    PubMed Central

    Law, Alan S.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Rabinowitz, Ira; Reams, Gregory J.; Smith, James A.; Torres, Anibal V.; Harris, D. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Initial orthograde root canal therapy (RCT) is used to treat dentoalveolar pathosis. The affect RCT has on pain intensity has been frequently reported, but the affect on other dimensions of pain has not. Also, the lack of large prospective studies involving diverse groups of patients and practitioners that are not involved in data collection suggest that there are multiple opportunities for bias to be introduced when this data is systematically aggregated. Method This prospective observational study assessed pain intensity, duration, and its interference with daily activities among RCT patients. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists, 16 endodontists) in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients requiring RCT. Patient reported data were collected before, immediately following, and one week after treatment using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Results Enrollment of 708 patients was completed over 6 months with 655 patients (93%) providing one-week follow-up data. Prior to treatment, patients reported a mean (±standard deviation) worst pain intensity of 5.3±3.8 (0-10 scale), 50% had “severe” pain (≥7), and mean days in pain and days pain interfered with activities were 3.6±2.7 and 0.5±1.2, respectively. Following treatment, patients reported a mean worst pain intensity of 3.0±3.2, 19% had “severe” pain, and mean days in pain and days with pain interference were 2.1±2.4 and 0.4±1.1, respectively. All changes were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusions RCT is an effective treatment for patients experiencing pain, significantly reducing pain intensity, duration, and related interference. Further research is needed to reduce the proportion of patients reporting “severe” post-operative pain. PMID:25190605

  7. Frequency, impact, and predictors of persistent pain after root canal treatment: a national dental PBRN study.

    PubMed

    Nixdorf, Donald R; Law, Alan S; Lindquist, Kimberly; Reams, Gregory J; Cole, Emery; Kanter, Keith; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Harris, D Robert

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment (RCT) is commonly performed surgery and persistent pain is known to occur, but little is known about how these patients are affected by this pain. Although biopsychosocial mechanisms are thought to be associated with the development of such pain, similar to persistent pain after surgery in other body sites, little is known about the baseline predictors for persistent pain. We assessed the frequency of persistent pain 6 months after RCT, measured the impact this pain had on patients, and determined predictive factors for persistent tooth pain in a multicenter prospective cohort study conducted within the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. Of 708 patients enrolled, 651 (91.9%) provided follow-up data, with 65 (10.0%) meeting criteria for pain 6 months after RCT. On average, these patients reported their pain as mild to moderate in intensity, present for approximately 10 days in the preceding month, and minimally interfered with daily activities. After adjusting for the type of dental practitioner and patient age, gender, and household income, pain duration over the week before RCT significantly increased the risk of developing persistent pain (odds ratio = 1.19 per 1 day increase in pain duration, 95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.33), whereas optimism about the procedure reduced the risk (odds ratio = 0.39, 95% confidence interval: 0.22-0.67). Our data suggest that persistent pain 6 months after RCT is fairly common, but generally does not have a large impact on those experiencing it. Furthermore, patient age and gender did not predict persistent pain, whereas preoperative pain duration and the patient's expectation did. PMID:26335907

  8. Frequency, impact, and predictors of persistent pain after root canal treatment: a national dental PBRN study.

    PubMed

    Nixdorf, Donald R; Law, Alan S; Lindquist, Kimberly; Reams, Gregory J; Cole, Emery; Kanter, Keith; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Harris, D Robert

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment (RCT) is commonly performed surgery and persistent pain is known to occur, but little is known about how these patients are affected by this pain. Although biopsychosocial mechanisms are thought to be associated with the development of such pain, similar to persistent pain after surgery in other body sites, little is known about the baseline predictors for persistent pain. We assessed the frequency of persistent pain 6 months after RCT, measured the impact this pain had on patients, and determined predictive factors for persistent tooth pain in a multicenter prospective cohort study conducted within the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. Of 708 patients enrolled, 651 (91.9%) provided follow-up data, with 65 (10.0%) meeting criteria for pain 6 months after RCT. On average, these patients reported their pain as mild to moderate in intensity, present for approximately 10 days in the preceding month, and minimally interfered with daily activities. After adjusting for the type of dental practitioner and patient age, gender, and household income, pain duration over the week before RCT significantly increased the risk of developing persistent pain (odds ratio = 1.19 per 1 day increase in pain duration, 95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.33), whereas optimism about the procedure reduced the risk (odds ratio = 0.39, 95% confidence interval: 0.22-0.67). Our data suggest that persistent pain 6 months after RCT is fairly common, but generally does not have a large impact on those experiencing it. Furthermore, patient age and gender did not predict persistent pain, whereas preoperative pain duration and the patient's expectation did.

  9. Physical-mechanical properties of Bis-EMA based root canal sealer with different fillers addition

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Marcela Oliveira; Branco Leitune, Vicente Castelo; Bohn, Priscila Veit; Werner Samuel, Susana Maria; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate influence of three different filler particles on an experimental Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA) based root filling material. Materials and Methods: Resin-based endodontic sealers were produced using Bis-EMA, camphorquinone, ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB), N, N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and benzoyl peroxide. The experimental groups were formulated adding 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% of calcium tungstate (CaWO4), ytterbium trifluoride(YbF3), and tantalum oxide(Ta2O5). Flow, thickness, and radiopacity tests were conducted in accordance with ISO 6876. Sorption and solubility (SL) tests were conducted in accordance with ISO 4049, pH was measured with a pH meter, and degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For radiopacity, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed. For DC analysis, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed. All statistical analyses were performed with a significance level of 5%. Results: All groups showed lower flow with increased filler concentration. All groups showed film thickness values lower than 50μm, as ISO recommends, except CaWO450% group (76.7μm). pH values varied from 5.95 (± 0.07) in YbF340% group to 6.90 (± 0.07) in Ta2O540% group. In the radiopacity test, YbF330%, Ta2O540%, and Ta2O550% groups showed no statistical significant difference to 3mmAl. Ta2O5 and YbF3 groups in 10, 20, and 30% concentrations presented sorption and SL values as ISOrecommendation. Addition ofTa2O5 and CaWO4 decreased DC after 14 days. YbF3 addition showed no difference in DC from control group. Conclusion: YbF3 filler addition promoted higher properties compared to CaWO4 and Ta2O5 on Bis-EMA based root canal sealer. PMID:26069410

  10. Incidence of C-shaped root canal systems in mandibular second molars in the native Chinese population by analysis of clinical methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Guo, Jing; Yang, Hai-Bing; Han, Xuan; Yu, Ying

    2012-09-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate the incidence of C-shaped root canal systems in mandibular second molars in a native Chinese population using radiography and clinical examination under microscope and to compare the relative efficacies of these methods. For the recognition of C-shaped root canal system, 1 146 mandibular second molars were selected and examined. Teeth with C-shaped canal systems were categorized by using the radiographic classification criteria and the modified Melton's method. C-shaped canals were identified in 397 (34.64%) mandibular second molars by radiography (type I, 31.23%; type II, 38.29%; type III, 30.48%). Clinical examination showed that 449 (39.18%) cases exhibited C-shaped canal systems (C1, 22.94%; C2, 48.11%; C3a, 15.59%; C3b, 13.36%). As for the result of the radiographic and clinical combined examination, C-shaped root canals were found in 473 (41.27%) mandibular second molars (C1, 21.78%; C2, 45.67%; C3a, 16.70%; C3b, 15.86%). The incidence of C-shaped root canal diagnosed by radiographic method was statistically different from that by clinical examination and the combined examination (P<0.05). The study indicated a high incidence of C-shaped canal system in a Chinese population. The combination of microscopic and radiographic examination is an effective method in identifying the C-shaped root canal system.

  11. Comparative evaluation of apically extruded debris during root canal preparation using ProTaper™, Hyflex™ and Waveone™ rotary systems

    PubMed Central

    Surakanti, Jayaprada Reddy; Venkata, Ravi Chandra Polavarapu; Vemisetty, Hari Kumar; Dandolu, Ram Kiran; Jaya, Nagendra Krishna Muppalla; Thota, Shirisha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Extrusion of any debris during endodontic treatment may potentially cause post-operative complications such as flare-ups. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the amount of apically extruded debris during the root canal preparation using rotary and reciprocating nickel-titanium instrumentation systems. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 human mandibular first premolars were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n = 20 teeth/group). The root canals were instrumented according to the manufacturers’ instructions using the Reciprocating single-file system WaveOne™ (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and full-sequence rotary Hyflex CM™ (Coltene Whaledent, Allstetten, Switzerland) and ProTaper™ (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) instruments. The canals were then irrigated using bidistilled water. The debris that was extruded apically was collected in preweighed eppendorf tubes and assessed with an electronic balance and compared. Statistical Analysis Used: The debris extrusion was compared and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test. Results: The WaveOne™ and ProTaper™ rotary instruments produced significantly more debris compared with Hyflex CM™ rotary instruments (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, all systems that were used resulted in extrusion of apical debris. Full-sequence rotary instrumentation was associated with less debris extrusion compared with the use of reciprocating single-file systems. PMID:24778507

  12. Measurement of the percentage of root filling in oval-shaped canals obturated with Thermafil Obturators and Beefill 2in1: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Castellanos, Nicolás; Alegre-Domingo, Teresa; Dolz-Solsona, María; Faus-Matoses, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to measure the percentage of root canal fillings in long oval canals obturated with thermoplasticized gutta-percha techniques, Beefill 2in1® and Thermafil Obturators®. Material and Methods Fifty four mandibular incisors were selected after bucco-lingual and mesio-distal radiographs showed at 5 mm from apex an internal long:short diameter ≥2. Teeth were instrumented with Protaper Universal and divided in two groups of 27. Group 1 was obturated with Thermafil Obturators® and group 2 with Beefill 2in1®. Two horizontal sections were cut at 5 and 7 mm from the apex and photographed in a stereo-microscope. The total area of the canal and filled canal in cross-sections were measured with AutoCad and the percentages of gutta-percha-sealer and voids in the canal were obtained. Results Both systems achieved high percentage of filled canal, Thermafil 96.8% and Beefill 2in1 98.9%. The percentages of voids in both groups were very low. No significant differences were found between the two groups . The percentage obtained at 5 and 7 mm from the apex in both groups showed no significant difference. Conclusions The percentages of filled canal (gutta-percha-sealer) were high and these two thermoplasticized techniques are suitable for long oval canals obturation. Key words:Long oval canal, oval canal, thermoplasticized obturation. PMID:26155350

  13. A comparative evaluation of root canal area increase using three different nickel-titanium rotary systems: An ex vivo cone-beam computed tomographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Adrija; Bhuyan, A.C.; Bhuyan, Darpana

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the area increase of root canals with ProTaper, iRaCe and Revo-S systems using cone beam computed tomography for analysis. Materials and Methodology: Forty five extracted human mandibular premolars having single canal and straight root were collected. Teeth were randomly assigned to three groups (n=15). Samples were decoronized by maintaining root length at 14 mm. Pre-instrumentation cone beam computed tomography scan was done after stabilizing the samples on wax blocks. The working length was determined at 1 mm short from the apical foramen by using a ISO 15 K-file tip protruding at apical foramen. Preparation was carried out according to the manufacturer's instructions. Finally, canals were instrumented upto 30/.06 apically for each group. After each instrumentation, root canals were irrigated with 2ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite solution followed by 2 ml of 17% EDTA solution. Final irrigation was done with 5ml of saline. Post instrumentation cone beam computed tomography scans of all samples in the 3 groups were acquired. Results: Mean percentage of area increase in different thirds of the canal was highest for ProTaper followed by i-RaCe and Revo-s system which was statistically significant. Interpretation and Conclusion: Root canal area increase was highest for ProTaper followed by i-Race and Revo-S systems. PMID:25684917

  14. Combination of an optic system and Er:YAG laser in root canal preparation: study in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Marina C.; Botticelli, Annibale R.; Zaffe, Davide; Cisternino, Aurelia; Scarpelli, Francesco

    2001-04-01

    The effect of Er:YAG laser in debris removing after conventional root preparation was tested by optical system in vivo and scanning electron microscope in vitro. The root canal of fifty permanent molars was cleaned in vivo and Er:YAG laser treated. Flexiscope system was used to evaluate the efficacy of laser cleansing at the different stages of endodontic therapy. Forty permanent teeth, extracted for orthodontic or periodontal purposes, were treated in vitro using the same technique an instruments. The in vitro treated teeth were also examined under the SEM. The result of our investigation show an effective improvement of the cleansing of the endodontic surface from pulpal remaining and a smear layer after laser irradiation in vivo and in vitro. The use of Er:YAG laser in organic debris removing and the consequent optical system analysis of the quality of root preparation in vivo seem to be a reliable technique particularly useful in clinical application.

  15. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

  16. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

  17. Induction of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes expression by formaldehyde-releasing and epoxy resin-based root-canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tai, Kuo-Wei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2002-03-01

    An important requirement for a root-canal sealer is biologic compatibility; most evaluations have focused on general toxicological and local tissue irritating properties. There is only scant information about mutagenicity or carcinogenicity testing for root-canal sealer. It has been shown that c-fos and c-jun are induced rapidly by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli. Numerous works have extensively investigated the induction mechanisms of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes by these agents; however, little is known about the induction of cellular signaling events and specific gene expression after cell exposure to root-canal sealers. Therefore, we used osteoblastic cell line U2-OS to examine the effect of zinc-oxide eugenol-based (N2 and Endomethasome), epoxy resin-based (AH Plus), and calcium hydroxide-based (Sealapex) root-canal sealers on the expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes to understand in more detail the molecular mechanisms of root-canal sealer-induced genotoxicity. The cytotoxicity decreased in an order of N2 > Endomethasome > AH Plus > Sealapex. In addition, N2, Endomethasome, and AH Plus rapidly induced c-jun and c-fos mRNA levels in cells. However, Sealapex did not induce c-jun and c-fos mRNA expression at detectable levels all time points. Taken together, persistent induction of c-jun and c-fos protooncogenes by formaldehyde-releasing and epoxy resin-based root-canal sealers may be distributed systemically via apex to cause some unexpected adverse effects on human beings. These data should be taken into consideration when choosing a root-canal sealer.

  18. A comparative study of the effects of two nickel-titanium preparation techniques on root canal geometry assessed by microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexios L; Kakavetsos, Vasilios D; Tzanetakis, Giorgos N; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G; Eliades, George

    2007-12-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating and comparing the effects of a new Hero group (Endoflare, Hero-shaper, and Hero-apical; Micro-Mega, Besancon, France) and Protaper Ni-Ti rotary instruments (Dentsply/Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) on root canal geometry in extracted human teeth using microcomputed tomography (muCT). Twenty-two mesial root canals of mandibular first molars were randomly divided into two groups. Canals were scanned before and after preparation with both systems. Cross-sectional images of each canal were obtained at 2-mm intervals. Differences in canal roundness, cross-sectional area, perimeter of each canal before and after instrumentation, and the extent of root canal transportation were calculated using image analysis software. There was no difference between the two rotary systems in regards to working time. Both systems create a similar round shape after instrumentation regardless of the initial root canal's shape. The Hero instruments showed a greater cutting efficiency compared with the ProTaper at the levels of 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm but not at the level of 2 mm. On the other hand, the ProTaper seems to have a similar cutting efficiency at all levels. However, the ProTaper showed a tendency toward apical transportation. Under the conditions of the present study, both preparation techniques prepared the canals rapidly with a sufficient round shape. Despite that, it seems that there is a great potential for the improvement of shaping ability of rotary instruments. Hybrid instrumentation techniques should be evaluated by future studies in order to provide better results regarding the shaping ability of rotary instruments. PMID:18037058

  19. Root canal centering ability of rotary cutting nickel titanium instruments: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gundappa, Mohan; Bansal, Rashmi; Khoriya, Sarvesh; Mohan, Ranjana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To systematically review articles on canal centering ability of endodontic rotary cutting Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments and subject results to meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive search was initiated on canal centering ability of different rotary cutting Ni-Ti files such as Protaper, Hero Shaper, K3, Mtwo, Race, Wave One by selecting articles published in peer reviewed journals during 1991-2013 using “Pub Med” database. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. A data was created by tabulating: Author name, publication year, sample size, number of experimental groups, methods to evaluate canal centering ability, instrument cross section, taper, tip design, rake angle, mean and standard deviation. The data generated was subjected to meta-analysis. Results: Maximum studies were found to be conducted on mesiobuccal canal of mandibular 1st molar with curvature ranging from 15-60°. The difference in canal centering ability of different rotary cutting Ni-Ti instruments was not statistically significant. Conclusion: All endodontic rotary cutting Ni-Ti instruments are capable of producing centered preparations. Protaper depicted the best centering ability. Computed tomography is an effective method of evaluating canal centering ability. PMID:25506134

  20. The effect of root canal sealers and timing of cementation on the microlekage of the parapost luted with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Al Kahtani, Ahmed M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of the study were to study the effect of root canal sealers either eugenol or non-eugenol and timing of cementation on microleakage of the parapost luted with resin cement. Materials and methods Seventy extracted human, single-rooted teeth were instrumented using a crown-down technique. All teeth were instrumented up to a size 50 .04 taper ProFile followed by the use of Gates Glidden drills from size 2 up to 5. Following instrumentation, the teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups of fifteen teeth each, based on type of root canal sealer (eugenol or non-eugenol sealer) and timing of post cementation (immediate or delayed). The remaining ten teeth were divided into two control groups with five teeth per group. All teeth were tested for microleakage using a fluid filtration method. Results The microleakage of the paraposts luted with resin cement increased over time, irrespective of sealer type or timing of post cementation. Immediate post cementation following obturation with AH26 (non-eugenol sealer) produced the least microleakage at all three time periods at 24 h, 2 months and 3 months. Conclusions The microleakage paraposts luted with resin cement was not influenced by either sealer type or timing of post placement. All experimental groups demonstrated a significant increase in microleakage over time as well as the presence of voids at the resin–dentin interface. PMID:24109165

  1. Dentinal crack formation during root canal preparations by the twisted file adaptive, Reciproc and WaveOne instruments

    PubMed Central

    Gergi, Richard M.; Osta, Nada E.; Naaman, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the frequency of dentinal microcracks after root canal shaping with 2 reciprocating (Reciproc and WaveOne) and 1 combined continuous reciprocating motion twisted files adaptive (TFA) rotary system. Materials and Methods: Ninety molars were chosen and divided into three groups of 30 each. Root canal preparation was achieved by using Reciproc R25, Primary WaveOne and TFA systems. All the roots were horizontally sectioned at 15, 9, and 3 mm from the apex. The slices were then viewed each under a microscope at × 25 magnification to determine the presence of cracks. The absence/presence of cracks was recorded, and the data were analyzed with a Chi-square test. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results: Instrumentation with Reciproc produced significantly more complete cracks than WaveOne and TFA (P = 0.032). The TFA system produced significantly less cracks then the Reciproc and WaveOne systems apically (P = 0.004). Conclusions: Within the limits of this study, the TFA system caused less cracks then the full reciprocating system (Reciproc and WaveOne). Single-file reciprocating files produced significantly more incomplete dentinal cracks than full-sequence adaptive rotary motion. PMID:26929688

  2. An in vitro comparison of root canal length determination by DentaPort ZX and iPex apex locators

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Nikhil; Chadha, Rupali; Kumar, Pragya; Puri, Komal

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate and to compare the accuracy of two electronic apex locators (EALs): DentaPort ZX and iPex, at a position 0.5 mm short of the apical foramen. Materials and Methods: Thirty single-rooted, mandibular premolar teeth were selected. Standard access cavities were prepared and the actual length (AL) was calculated. The samples were then embedded in alginate and the electronic measurements were determined and recorded. Results: The results obtained showed that in determining the root canal length with a tolerance level of ±0.5 mm, i.e., AL ± 0.5 mm, DentaPort ZX was accurate in 93.3% of the samples and iPex was accurate in 90% of the samples at a position 0.5 mm short of the apical foramen. Conclusion: A strong correlation was seen between the two electronic methods and AL and also in between the two EALs, showing the possibility of their use to measure the root canal length. No statistically significant difference was found between both the apex locators. PMID:24347893

  3. Prevention of the ingress of a known virulent bacterium into the root canal system by intracanal medications.

    PubMed

    Roach, R P; Hatton, J F; Gillespie, M J

    2001-11-01

    Contamination of the root canal system by persistent, enteric bacteria via leakage through interim restorations has been well documented. This in vitro study evaluated the ability of interappointment medications to prevent contamination of the root canal system by Enterococcus faecalis. Coronally unsealed, medicated tooth roots fixed in a closed system were contaminated daily with a standardized, aerobic, broth culture of E. faecalis. Four medications were evaluated (n = 15): group A, calcium hydroxide/methylcellulose paste; group B, camphorated parachlorophenol/calcium hydroxide paste; group C, 1% chlorhexidine/methylcellulose gel; and group D, calcium hydroxide points. The mean number of days to contamination as indicated by turbidity in the closed system was the following: group A, 37; group B, 46; group C, 16; group D, 5; and a positive control (no medication), 3. A one-way analysis of variance with a Scheffe post hoc test (p = 0.05) detected significant differences in effectiveness with A and B superior to C and D, and C superior to D. PMID:11716075

  4. Evaluation of dentinal defect formation after root canal preparation with two reciprocating systems and hand instruments: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Aydemir, Seda; Yilmaz, Ayca

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of dentinal defects after root canal preparation with hand instruments and two different reciprocating instruments. Sixty freshly extracted mandibular incisor teeth were selected for this in vitro study. On the basis of root length, mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions, the teeth were allocated into three identical experimental groups (n = 15) and one control group (n = 15). The teeth in the control group were left unprepared. The other groups were: stainless steel hand instruments, WaveOne® Primary instruments and RECIPROC® R25 instruments. The reciprocating instruments were used with a reciprocating gentle in-and-out motion in a torque-limited electric motor at the appropriate preset mode. Horizontal sections were made 3, 6 and 9 mm from the apex. Samples were stained with methylene blue and viewed through a stereomicroscope. The presence of dentinal defects (fractures, incomplete cracks and craze lines) and their locations were investigated by two endodontists. These data were analysed statistically by Fisher's exact and chi-square tests. No defects were observed in the unprepared group. All instruments caused dentinal defects, with no significant differences between the instrument systems. All experimental groups demonstrated significantly more defects at the 3-mm level in comparison with the unprepared group (p = 0.032). At the other levels, there was no significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group. The use of hand or reciprocating instruments could induce the formation of dentinal defects during root canal preparation. PMID:26019654

  5. Predicting severe pain after root canal therapy in the National Dental PBRN.

    PubMed

    Law, A S; Nixdorf, D R; Aguirre, A M; Reams, G J; Tortomasi, A J; Manne, B D; Harris, D R

    2015-03-01

    Some patients experience severe pain following root canal therapy (RCT) despite advancements in care. We sought to identify factors, which can be measured preoperatively, that predict this negative outcome so that future research may focus on preemptive steps to reduce postoperative pain intensity. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists and 16 endodontists) who are members of the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients receiving RCT for this prospective observational study. Baseline data collected from patients and dentists were obtained before treatment. Severe postoperative pain was defined based on a rating of ≥7 on a scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (pain as bad as can be) for the worst pain intensity experienced during the preceding week, and this was collected 1 wk after treatment. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to develop and validate the model. A total of 708 patients were enrolled during a 6-m period. Pain intensity data were collected 1 wk postoperatively from 652 patients (92.1%), with 19.5% (n = 127) reporting severe pain. In multivariable modeling, baseline factors predicting severe postoperative pain included current pain intensity (odds ratio [OR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 1.25; P = 0.0003), number of days in the past week that the subject was kept from their usual activities due to pain (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.55; P = 0.0005), pain made worse by stress (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.22 to 5.35; P = 0.0130), and a diagnosis of symptomatic apical periodontitis (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.64; P = 0.0452). Among the factors that did not contribute to predicting severe postoperative pain were the dentist's specialty training, the patient's age and sex, the type of tooth, the presence of swelling, or other pulpal and apical endodontic diagnoses. Factors measured preoperatively were found to predict severe postoperative pain following RCT. Practitioners could use this information to better

  6. Predicting severe pain after root canal therapy in the National Dental PBRN.

    PubMed

    Law, A S; Nixdorf, D R; Aguirre, A M; Reams, G J; Tortomasi, A J; Manne, B D; Harris, D R

    2015-03-01

    Some patients experience severe pain following root canal therapy (RCT) despite advancements in care. We sought to identify factors, which can be measured preoperatively, that predict this negative outcome so that future research may focus on preemptive steps to reduce postoperative pain intensity. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists and 16 endodontists) who are members of the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients receiving RCT for this prospective observational study. Baseline data collected from patients and dentists were obtained before treatment. Severe postoperative pain was defined based on a rating of ≥7 on a scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (pain as bad as can be) for the worst pain intensity experienced during the preceding week, and this was collected 1 wk after treatment. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to develop and validate the model. A total of 708 patients were enrolled during a 6-m period. Pain intensity data were collected 1 wk postoperatively from 652 patients (92.1%), with 19.5% (n = 127) reporting severe pain. In multivariable modeling, baseline factors predicting severe postoperative pain included current pain intensity (odds ratio [OR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 1.25; P = 0.0003), number of days in the past week that the subject was kept from their usual activities due to pain (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.55; P = 0.0005), pain made worse by stress (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.22 to 5.35; P = 0.0130), and a diagnosis of symptomatic apical periodontitis (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.64; P = 0.0452). Among the factors that did not contribute to predicting severe postoperative pain were the dentist's specialty training, the patient's age and sex, the type of tooth, the presence of swelling, or other pulpal and apical endodontic diagnoses. Factors measured preoperatively were found to predict severe postoperative pain following RCT. Practitioners could use this information to better

  7. Predicting Severe Pain after Root Canal Therapy in the National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Law, A.S.; Nixdorf, D.R.; Aguirre, A.M.; Reams, G.J.; Tortomasi, A.J.; Manne, B.D.; Harris, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Some patients experience severe pain following root canal therapy (RCT) despite advancements in care. We sought to identify factors, which can be measured preoperatively, that predict this negative outcome so that future research may focus on preemptive steps to reduce postoperative pain intensity. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists and 16 endodontists) who are members of the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients receiving RCT for this prospective observational study. Baseline data collected from patients and dentists were obtained before treatment. Severe postoperative pain was defined based on a rating of ≥7 on a scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (pain as bad as can be) for the worst pain intensity experienced during the preceding week, and this was collected 1 wk after treatment. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to develop and validate the model. A total of 708 patients were enrolled during a 6-m period. Pain intensity data were collected 1 wk postoperatively from 652 patients (92.1%), with 19.5% (n = 127) reporting severe pain. In multivariable modeling, baseline factors predicting severe postoperative pain included current pain intensity (odds ratio [OR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 1.25; P = 0.0003), number of days in the past week that the subject was kept from their usual activities due to pain (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.55; P = 0.0005), pain made worse by stress (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.22 to 5.35; P = 0.0130), and a diagnosis of symptomatic apical periodontitis (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.64; P = 0.0452). Among the factors that did not contribute to predicting severe postoperative pain were the dentist’s specialty training, the patient’s age and sex, the type of tooth, the presence of swelling, or other pulpal and apical endodontic diagnoses. Factors measured preoperatively were found to predict severe postoperative pain following RCT. Practitioners could use this information to better

  8. Radiographic method for anatomic study of the teat canal: characteristics related to resistance to new intramammary infection during lactation and the early dry period.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J S

    1975-10-01

    An in vivo radiographic method to determine teat canal anatomy has shown that resistant quarters had teat canals with a smaller diameter than that of susceptible quarters. The length of the teat canal did not appear to be related to resistance to new intramammary infections. These findings relate to new infection caused by Aerobacter aerogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Quarters guarded by teat canals with larger diameter were less resistent to new infection during both lactation and the early dry period compared with quarters guarded by teat canals with small diameter.

  9. Efficacy of ProTaper and Mtwo Retreatment Files in Removal of Gutta-percha and GuttaFlow from Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Khedmat, Sedigheh; Azari, Abbas; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Fadae, Mehdi; Bashizadeh Fakhar, Hoorieh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of ProTaper retreatment (ProTaper R) and Mtwo retreatment (Mtwo R) files in removing gutta-percha and GuttaFlow from endodontically treated straight root canals. Methods and Materials: The root canals of 60 human mandibular single-rooted premolars were prepared and randomly divided into two groups (n=30). In groups A and B the root canals were obturated using lateral condensation of gutta-percha plus AH 26 and GuttaFlow, respectively. The canal orifices were temporarily sealed and the roots were incubated for 3 months at 37ºC and 100% humidity. Primary cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were taken after incubation period. The specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups (n=15). ProTaper R files (D1, D2, and D3) were used in groups A1 and B1 while Mtwo R files (25/0.05 and 15/0.05) were used in groups A2 and B2. The time required to extirpate the root filling was also recorded. After retreatment, another CBCT scan was taken at the same position. The volume of remaining filling materials inside the canals was calculated before and after retreatment. The data was analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and independent t-test. Results: The remaining filling materials in the canals treated with ProTaper were less than Mtwo. The remaining volume of GuttaFlow was less than gutta-percha regardless of the system applied. Mtwo R files removed root fillings faster than ProTaper R. Conclusion: ProTaper R removed filling material more efficiently compared to Mtwo R which required less time to remove root filling material. PMID:27471528

  10. Conventional versus storage phosphor-plate digital images to visualize the root canal system contrasted with a radiopaque medium.

    PubMed

    Naoum, Hani J; Chandler, Nicholas P; Love, Robert M

    2003-05-01

    The pulp tissue was removed from 20 mandibular first molar teeth using 2.5% NaOCl irrigation and hand files. The dried canals were infused with radiopaque contrast medium. Standardized conventional and Digora digital images were obtained of each tooth positioned in a dried mandible at 0- and 30-degree horizontal angulations. Three evaluators rated the image clarity of the 0- and 30-degree original, enhanced, three-dimensional, zoom, and reverse digital image modes as superior, equal, or inferior to corresponding 0- and 30-degree conventional radiographs. The ratings were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The original, three-dimensional, zoom, or reverse digital images were inferior to the conventional radiographs for clarity of canal anatomy. The enhanced digital images were not always inferior to the conventional radiographs and were the only images superior to the original digital images. Overall, evaluators rated the image clarity of root canal anatomy on conventional radiographs better than on Digora images. However, factors in the experimental design may have contributed to this result. PMID:12775009

  11. Quality of Obturation Achieved by an Endodontic Core-carrier System with Crosslinked Gutta-percha Carrier in Single-rooted Canals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-hua; Niu, Li-na; Selem, Lisa C.; Eid, Ashraf A.; Bergeron, Brian E.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The present study examined the quality of obturation in root canals obturated by GuttaCore, a gutta-percha-based core-carrier system with a cross-linked thermoset gutta-percha carrier, by comparing the incidence of gaps and voids identified from similar canals obturated by cold lateral compaction or warm vertical compaction. Methods Thirty single-rooted premolars with oval-shaped canals were shaped and cleaned, and obturated with one of the three obturation techniques (N=10): GuttaCore, warm vertical compaction or cold lateral compaction. Filled canals were scanned with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT); reconstructed images were analysed for the volumetric percentage of gaps and voids at 3 canal levels (0-4 mm, 4-8 mm and 8-12 mm from working length). The roots were subsequently sectioned at the 4-mm, 8-mm and 12-mm levels for analyses of the percentage of interfacial gaps, and area percentage of interfacial and intracanal voids, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine negative replicas of root sections. Data were analysed with parametric or non-parametric statistical methods at α=0.05. Results Both micro-CT and SEM data indicated that canals obturated with GuttaCore core-carriers had the lowest incidence of interfacial gaps and voids, although the results were not significantly different from canals obturated by warm vertical compaction. Both the GuttaCore and the warm vertical compaction groups, in turn, had significantly lower incidences of gaps and voids than the cold lateral compaction group. Conclusions Because of the similarity in obturation quality between GuttaCore and warm vertical compaction, practitioners may find the GuttaCore core-carrier technique a valuable alternative for obturation of oval-shaped canals. PMID:24769108

  12. Influence of the glide path on various parameters of root canal prepared with WaveOne reciprocating file using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Anil; Nagar, Nidhi; Sapra, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nickel–titanium (NiTi) rotary instrumentation carries a risk of fracture, mainly as a result of flexural (fatigue fracture) and torsional (shear failure) stresses. This risk might be reduced by creating a glide path before NiTi rotary instrumentation. The aim of this study was to compare various root canal parameters with the new WaveOne single-file reciprocating system in mesial canals of mandibular molars with and without glide path using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: One hundred mandibular molar teeth with canal curvature between 20° and 30° were divided into two groups of 50 teeth each. In Group 1, no glide path was created, whereas in Group 2, a glide path was created with PathFiles at working length (WL). In both groups, canals were shaped with WaveOne primary reciprocating files to the WL. Canals were scanned in a CBCT unit before and after instrumentation. Postinstrumentation changes in canal curvature, cross-sectional area, centric ability, residual dentin thickness, and the extent of canal transportation were calculated using image analysis software and subjected to statistical analysis. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test (P < 0.05). Results: The mean difference of root canal curvature, cross-sectional area, centric ability, and residual dentin thickness increased, whereas it reduced significantly for canal transportation in Group 2. Conclusion: WaveOne NiTi files appeared to maintain the original canal anatomy and the presence of a glide path further improves their performance and was found to be beneficial for all the parameters tested in this study. PMID:26759589

  13. Comparative efficiency of final endodontic cleansing procedures in removing a radioactive albumin from root canal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cecic, P.A.; Peters, D.D.; Grower, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    Fifty-six teeth were initially instrumented, with the use of seven irrigants or irrigant combinations, and filled with radioactive albumin. The study then showed the relative ability of three final endodontic procedures (copious reirrigation with saline solution, drying with paper points, and reassuring patency of the canal with the final instrument) to remove the albumin. Even after copious irrigation, each additional procedure removed statistically significant amounts of albumin. Alternating an organic solvent and an inorganic solvent did appear to leave the canal system in the optimal condition for final cleansing procedures. The study then correlated the relative efficiency of irrigation alone versus instrumentation plus irrigation in removing the remaining albumin from the canal systems. Reinstrumentation plus copious irrigation removed significantly more albumin than copious irrigation alone.

  14. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of miswak, propolis, sodium hypochlorite and saline as root canal irrigants by microbial culturing and quantification in chronically exposed primary teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Shingare, Poonam; Chaugule, Vishwas

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: One of the essential factors for successful root canal therapy is elimination of bacterial contaminants using an effective root canal chemical irrigant such as sodium hypochlorite which inherently possesses certain disadvantages like irritation to periapical tissues, staining of the instruments, burning of surrounding tissues etc. The aim of the study was to explore newer irrigant agents which would probably be as effective or more and at the same time less irritating to the tissues than sodium hypochlorite. Our search included two such agents, propolis and miswak. Methods: The study was performed on 40 infected primary teeth (20 male and 20 female patients). The subjects were divided into 4 groups of 10 children. Group 1 received 3% sodium hypochlorite as irrigating solution, group 2 received 12.5% alcoholic extract of miswak, group 3 received 11% alcoholic extract of propolis and group 4, 0.9% saline. We used the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite as gold standard for comparing the activities of both propolis and miswak. We collected pre- and post-irrigation samples using sterile paper points. Samples were cultured on tryptose soya agar at a temperature of 37oC for 24-48 hours. The colonies were counted with a digital colony counter. For the statistical analysis, we used the unpaired t test at level of significance 0.05 and the ANOVA test for analysis of variance. Results: The differences in pre- and post- irrigation values were calculated for each group, the greatest difference being seen in group 1 (95.549%) followed by group 2 (89.794%), group 3 (34.735%) and group 4 (28.087%). When comparing the results between groups, there was no statistically significant difference between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The statistically analyzed results suggested that miswak could be a good natural substitute to sodium hypochlorite, while propolis showed results comparable to those of the negative control. PMID:24432254

  15. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Three Different Irrigating Solution on Microorganisms in the Root Canal: An Invivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Garg, Nishita; Mayall, Sandeep; Rallan, Mandeep; Gupta, Swarnika; Pathivada, Lumbini

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An infected root canal system either due to caries exposure or trauma cannot be eliminated by the host defense mechanisms alone or in combination with systemic antibiotic therapy. It can be treated through professional endodontic intervention using both chemical and mechanical procedures. Aim To suggest triple antibiotic solution containing tetracycline, ornidazole and ciprofloxacin as a new endodontic irrigant that may possess superior antibacterial activity in comparison with chlorhexidine solution. Materials and Methods This study was carried out on 60 teeth from 40 children with anterior tooth fracture, asymptomatic, non-vital and necrotic in nature. Patients were randomly divided into three groups of 20 teeth each depending upon the type of irrigant. After access opening microbial samples were obtained: a) Pre- irrigation i.e. sample after pulp extirpation and before irrigation, b) Post-irrigation i.e. sample after irrigation, stored in sterile containers and immediately transferred to microbiological laboratory. After incubation of samples aerobically at 370C for 24 hours, the samples were streaked on blood agar culture media and incubated for 48 hours. After 48 hours, the colony forming units were counted using a colony counter. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxson signed rank test and Mann-Whitney test. Results On intra group comparison, highly significant differences in the colony forming units were found between pre-irrigation and post-irrigation sample for all the three groups. On inter group comparison, statistical difference was found between saline and chlorhexidine (p ≤ 0.001), saline and triple antibiotic paste (p< 0.001). The greatest percentage decrease was obtained in samples treated with Chlorhexidine solution (Group 2) i.e.73.91. The triple antibiotic irrigating solution group showed percentage decrease of 66.22 followed by Group 1 (Saline) 15.04. The difference found amongst the groups was

  16. The efficacy of the self-adjusting file and ProTaper for removal of calcium hydroxide from root canals

    PubMed Central

    FARIA, Gisele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; RUY, Alessandra Camila; ARANDA-GARCIA, Arturo Javier; BONETTI-FILHO, Idomeo; GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; LEONARDO, Renato Toledo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Self-Adjusting File (SAF) and ProTaper for removing calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] from root canals. Material and Methods Thirty-six human mandibular incisors were instrumented with the ProTaper system up to instrument F2 and filled with a Ca(OH)2-based dressing. After 7 days, specimens were distributed in two groups (n=15) according to the method of Ca(OH)2 removal. Group I (SAF) was irrigated with 5 mL of NaOCl and SAF was used for 30 seconds under constant irrigation with 5 mL of NaOCl using the Vatea irrigation device, followed by irrigation with 3 mL of EDTA and 5 mL of NaOCl. Group II (ProTaper) was irrigated with 5 mL of NaOCl, the F2 instrument was used for 30 seconds, followed by irrigation with 5 mL of NaOCl, 3 mL of EDTA, and 5 mL of NaOCl. In 3 teeth Ca(OH)2 was not removed (positive control) and in 3 teeth canals were not filled with Ca(OH)2 (negative control). Teeth were sectioned and prepared for the scanning electron microscopy. The amounts of residual Ca(OH)2 were evaluated in the middle and apical thirds using a 5-score system. Results None of the techniques completely removed the Ca(OH)2 dressing. No difference was observed between SAF and ProTaper in removing Ca(OH)2 in the middle (P=0.11) and the apical (P=0.23) thirds. Conclusion The SAF system showed similar efficacy to rotary instrument for removal of Ca(OH)2 from mandibular incisor root canals. PMID:24037074

  17. Evaluation physical characteristics and comparison antimicrobial and anti-inflammation potentials of dental root canal sealers containing hinokitiol in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yin-Hua; Lin, Dan-Jae; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Hsia, Shih-Min; Ko, Shun-Yao; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Hsue, Shui-Sang; Wang, Tong-Hong; Chen, Yi-Ling; Shieh, Tzong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Hinokitiol displays potent antimicrobial activity. It has been used in toothpaste and oral-care gel to improve the oral lichen planus and reduce halitosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 3 different dental root canal sealers with hinokitiol (sealers+H) and their physical and biological effects. AH Plus (epoxy amine resin-based, AH), Apexit Plus (calcium-hydroxide-based, AP), and Canals (zinc-oxide-eugenol-based, CA), were used in this study. The original AH and CA exhibited strong anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA) activity, but AP did not. The setting time, working time, flowability, film thickness, and solubility of each sealer+0.2%H complied with ISO 6876:2001. CA+0.2%H exhibited high cytotoxicity, but the others sealers+0.2%H did not. Because hinokitiol combined with Zn2+ in CA creates a synergistic effect. The physical tests of AP+0.5%-1%H complied with ISO 6876:2001, improved antimicrobial activity, inhibited inflammation genes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mRNA in MG-63 cells and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF), and down-regulated lysyl oxidase (LOX) mRNA of HGF. In summary, AH and CA demonstrated strong antimicrobial activity, but AP did not. Application of hinokitiol increases AH anti-MRSA activity should less than 0.2% for keep well flowability. AP+0.5%-1% hinokitiol exhibited strong physical, antibacterial, and anti-inflammation potentials, and inhibited S. aureus abscess formation. Applying an appreciable proportion of hinokitiol to epoxy-amine-resin-based and calcium-hydroxide-based root canal sealers is warranted, but the enhanced cytotoxicity and synergistic effect must be considered.

  18. Antimicrobial effect of Lippia sidoides and thymol on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm of the bacterium isolated from root canals.

    PubMed

    Veras, H N H; Rodrigues, F F G; Botelho, M A; Menezes, I R A; Coutinho, H D M; da Costa, J G M

    2014-01-01

    The species Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) is utilized in popular medicine as a local antiseptic on the skin and mucosal tissues. Enterococcus faecalis is the bacterium isolated from root canals of teeth with persistent periapical lesions and has the ability to form biofilm, where it is responsible for the failure of endodontic treatments. Essential oil of L. sidoides (EOLS) and its major component, thymol, were evaluated for reducing the CFU in biofilms of E. faecalis in vitro. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and examined with respect to the chemical composition, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The GC-MS analysis has led to the identification of thymol (84.9%) and p-cymene (5.33%). EOLS and thymol reduced CFU in biofilms of E. faecalis in vitro (time of maturation, 72 h), with an exposure time of 30 and 60 min at concentrations of 2.5 and 10%. There was no statistical difference in effect between EOLS and thymol, demontrating that this phenolic monoterpene was the possible compound responsible for the antimicrobial activity of EOLS. This study provides a basis for the possible utilization of EOLS as an adjuvant in the treatment of root canals that show colonization by E. faecalis. PMID:24683344

  19. Root canal filling in primary molars without successors: Mineral trioxide aggregate versus gutta-percha/AH-Plus.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Tugba; Ozgul, Betul Memiş; Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographical success of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and gutta-percha/AH-Plus used as a root canal filling material in primary second molars without successors. A total of 16 patients (9 girls, 7 boys) aged 6-13 years (mean: 10.5) were selected and randomly distributed into the treatment groups. Children were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Differences in treatment outcomes were analysed using chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Clinically, there was no significant difference in the success rates between the groups at the end of a 3-year follow-up period (MTA: 100%; Gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 70%) (P > 0.05). However, radiographically, there was a significant difference between the groups (MTA: 80%; gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 30%) (P < 0.05). The present study showed that MTA can be recommended for use in root canal treatment of primary molars without successors based on better radiographic success.

  20. High conversion self-curing sealer based on a novel injectable polyurethane system for root canal filling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Zuo, Yi; Li, Jidong; Wang, Li; Tang, Kuangyun; Huang, Di; Du, Jingjing; Luo, Peipei; Li, Yubao

    2013-08-01

    Low monomer-polymer conversion is the key factor leading to cytotoxicity for resin-containing restorative materials. This paper provides a new root canal filling system based on self-curing injectable polyurethane which can achieve high conversion in a short time. Traced FTIR spectra show more than 90% NCO group participated in the curing reaction after 4h, and only about 5% remained after 24h. The calculated data also testified the curing process supports a third-order reaction, and this efficient and sufficient reaction is postulated to weaken the toxic stimulation. By culturing with L929 murine fibroblasts, the PU sealer is shown to be favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. Then physicochemical properties of the injectable PU-based sealer were evaluated according to the Standard [ISO 6876:2001 (E)] for clinical application. A series of physicochemical properties of PU sealer have been tested comparing with AH Plus and Apexit Plus. And the results present that the self-curing PU sealer could not only match the clinic requirements, but even has better properties than the other two commercial sealers. We expect the high conversion PU sealer has a tremendous potential in the field of root canal filling after further biological evaluation.

  1. Effect of root canal sealers and irrigation agents on retention of preformed posts luted with a resin cement.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, J T; Windchy, A M; Goldsmith, L J; Gettleman, L

    2000-06-01

    This study examined the effect of three sealers and four irrigants on retention of Dentatus preformed posts luted with Panavia 21 resin cement. Gutta-percha with one of the following sealers--EWT, AH26, Nogenol, or no sealer (control)--was used to fill the root canals of 160 autoclaved incisor and premolar tooth roots. After 72 hr 8 mm post spaces were created with Dentatus Probos Pathfinders and Dentatus reamers. After irrigating the post spaces with saline, 5.25% NaOCl, 50% citric acid followed by NaOCl, or 40% H3PO4, followed by NaOCl, Panavia 21 TC cement was introduced into the canal on the Dentatus #4 stainless steel post's threads. An up-and-down and counterclockwise motion and then a forward twist seated the posts without engaging dentin. Mesiodistal and faciolingual radiographs visualized the chambers. After 72 hr posts were removed axially with an Instron at 5 mm/min. Surprisingly, using Nogenol sealer reduced post retention whereas EWT and AH26 increased retention compared with no sealer. Post retention improved after acid etchants, especially for AH26.

  2. Antimicrobial Effect of Lippia sidoides and Thymol on Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm of the Bacterium Isolated from Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Veras, H. N. H.; Rodrigues, F. F. G.; Botelho, M. A.; Menezes, I. R. A.; Coutinho, H. D. M.; da Costa, J. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    The species Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) is utilized in popular medicine as a local antiseptic on the skin and mucosal tissues. Enterococcus faecalis is the bacterium isolated from root canals of teeth with persistent periapical lesions and has the ability to form biofilm, where it is responsible for the failure of endodontic treatments. Essential oil of L. sidoides (EOLS) and its major component, thymol, were evaluated for reducing the CFU in biofilms of E. faecalis in vitro. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and examined with respect to the chemical composition, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The GC-MS analysis has led to the identification of thymol (84.9%) and p-cymene (5.33%). EOLS and thymol reduced CFU in biofilms of E. faecalis in vitro (time of maturation, 72 h), with an exposure time of 30 and 60 min at concentrations of 2.5 and 10%. There was no statistical difference in effect between EOLS and thymol, demonstrating that this phenolic monoterpene was the possible compound responsible for the antimicrobial activity of EOLS. This study provides a basis for the possible utilization of EOLS as an adjuvant in the treatment of root canals that show colonization by E. faecalis. PMID:24683344

  3. The determination of the initial straight length in root canals of mandibular premolars -an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present roentgenographic in vitro study was to determine the initial straight length from the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) to the appearance of a root canal curvature in human mandibular premolars. A total number of 282 mandibular premolars were examined. Exclusion criteria comprised root caries, extensive restorations and endodontically treated teeth. The teeth were fixed and digitally radiographed by means of a specially developed fixation device with standardized and reproducible distances with the parallel technique (Heliodent MD; Merlin 2.1). The distances from the CEJ to the first curvature (> 5°) (distance I), from the first curvature to a second curvature (distance II), and from the first or second curvature to the radiological apex (distance III) were recorded. The lengths of the initial straight distance and the appearance of a curvature were statistically analyzed and related to each other. In first mandibular premolars, the mean value for distance I was 10.9 mm, for distance II 3.7 mm and for distance III 3.04 mm. The mean values for the second mandibular premolars were 1.1 mm in distance I, 4.3 mm in distance II and 3.1 mm in distance III. No statistically significant differences between left and right mandibular premolars could be observed regarding the canal curvature location and the angle values. The results of this investigation show that curvatures are increasingly observed 9 to 12 mm from the original path in mandibular premolars. PMID:19258218

  4. Endodontic and Esthetic Management of a Dilacerated Maxillary Central Incisor Having Two Root Canals Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography as a Diagnostic Aid

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Mittal, Meenu

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the primary dentition are quite common. When primary teeth are subjected to trauma, force transmission and/or invasion of the underlying tooth germs lying in close proximity can result in a variety of disturbances in the permanent successors. Few of these disturbances include hypoplasia, dilaceration, or alteration in the eruption sequence and pattern. Dilaceration is defined as an angulation or sharp bend or curve in the linear relationship of the crown of a tooth to its root. A rare case of maxillary left central incisor having crown dilaceration and Vertucci's type II canal configuration with symptomatic periapical periodontitis is reported. Cone beam computed tomography was used for better understanding of the anomaly and complicated root canal morphology. The tooth was successfully managed by nonsurgical root canal therapy and restoration with resin composite to restore esthetics. PMID:24955260

  5. Comparison of the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Two Antibiotics Sparfloxacin and Augmentin as Experimental Root Canal Irrigating Solutions against Enterococcus faecalis - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Surakanti, Jayaprada Reddy; Thumu, Jayaprakash; Chennamaneni, Krishna Chaitanya; Kalluru, Rama S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the main goals of endodontic treatment is root canal disinfection and to prevent subsequent chances of reinfection. Adjuvant to instrumentation, root canal irrigants are required to eliminate the bacteria found on the root canal walls and lateral canals within the dentinal tubules. Aim To measure and compare the antibacterial efficacy of two antibiotics as experimental root canal irrigating solutions against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Materials and Methods Fifteen Brain Heart Infusion agar plates were inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis-American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 29212. 5 micrograms (mcg) Sparfloxacin discs, 30mcg Augmentin discs, and sterile paper test discs saturated with 2% Chlorhexidine (CHX), 3% Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 5% NaOCl solutions were placed on agar plates. Sodium Chloride 0.9% (NaCl) paper discs were used as controls. Fifteen plates were incubated aerobically at 37°C. Results were expressed as per the terms of the diameter of the inhibition zone. Results Results suggested a statistically significant difference in the zones of inhibition between five irrigating solutions (p < 0.001). Conclusion Although, zones of inhibition were found in all the groups, 5mcg Sparfloxacin and 30mcg Augmentin showed maximum antimicrobial activity against E.faecalis. PMID:27135003

  6. Adhesion to root canal dentine using one and two-step adhesives with dual-cure composite core materials.

    PubMed

    Foxton, R M; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J; Miura, H

    2005-02-01

    The regional tensile bond strengths of two dual-cure composite resin core materials to root canal dentine using either a one or two-step self-etching adhesive were evaluated. Extracted premolar teeth were decoronated and their root canals prepared to a depth of 8 mm and a width of 1.4 mm. In one group, a one-step self-etching adhesive (Unifil Self-etching Bond) was applied to the walls of the post-space and light-cured for 10 s. After which, the post-spaces were filled with the a dual-cure composite resin (Unifil Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. In the second group, a self-etching primer (ED Primer II) was applied for 30 s, followed by an adhesive resin (Clearfil Photo Bond), which was light-cured for 10 s. The post-spaces were filled with a dual-cure composite resin (DC Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. Chemical-cure composite resin was placed on the outer surfaces of all the roots, which were then stored in water for 24 h. They were serially sliced perpendicular to the bonded interface into 8, 0.6 mm-thick slabs, and then transversely sectioned into beams, approximately 8 x 0.6 x 0.6 mm, for the microtensile bond strength test (muTBS). Data were divided into two (coronal/apical half of post-space) and analysed using three-way anova and Scheffe's test (P < 0.05). Failure modes were observed under an scanning electron microscope (SEM) and statistically analysed. Specimens for observation of the bonded interfaces were prepared in a similar manner as for bond strength testing, cut in half and embedded in epoxy resin. They were then polished to a high gloss, gold sputter coated, and after argon ion etching, observed under an SEM. For both dual-cure composite resins and curing strategies, there were no significant differences in muTBS between the coronal and apical regions (P > 0.05). In addition, both dual

  7. The effect of serrations on carbon fibre posts-retention within the root canal, core retention, and post rigidity.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Purton, D G

    1996-01-01

    The retention in root canals of serrated carbon fibre Composiposts and stainless steel Paraposts was tested under tensile load. Twenty unrestored human roots were endodontically prepared and root filled. Two groups of 10 roots received 1.4-mm Composiposts or 1.25-mm Paraposts luted with a resin cement. The specimens were then embedded in acrylic resin and mounted in an Instron machine. The tensile force (kg) required to dislodge the posts was recorded and analysed with Student's test. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in the retention of either post (P > .05). The rigidty of 10 1.4-mm serrated Composiposts was tested in a three-point bend test in an Instron machine, and the retention of composite cores to 10 of these posts under tensile force was also tested. The results from these tests were compared to previous data from the authors' laboratory and revealed that the serrations significantly reduced the rigidity of the post (P < .001) and increased the retention of a core material (P < .001). PMID:9108751

  8. Peculiarities of the anatomo-morphological parameters of teeth and root canals in permanent dentition in Georgian population.

    PubMed

    Chipashvili, N; Beshkenadze, E

    2011-03-01

    One of the main reasons that cause the failure of endodontic treatment is the lack of knowledge of complex anatomy of the tooth cavity. Numerous studies over the years have established a complex structure of the tooth root system, a particular configuration of which determines the uniqueness of each tooth.Numerous researches have laid the foundation for anatomical and morphological peculiarities of root system of the tooth, their classification and nomenclature indices. The anatomical picture of the tooth, its shape, root length - the "norms" have been established in the course of years. Statistical indices do not represent universal criteria due to the fact that anthropometric data are subjected to variations in accordance with national and geographic zones. The aim of our study is to establish anatomo-morphological peculiarities of the groups of teeth, roots and canals in Georgian population and to develop statistically reliable indicators on the basis of anthropological and clinical data. The obtained data will help to improve the effective endodontic treatment and avoid complications after obturation. PMID:21525536

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography study of prevalence and location of MB2 canal in the mesiobuccal root of the maxillary second molar

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Pablo; Navarro, Pablo; Cantín, Mario; Fuentes, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary second molar (2 MM) has the most complex root canal system, and a high percentage of treatment failures is due to the impossibility of locating, instrumenting and obturating the second mesiobuccal canal (MB2). The aim of this study was to describe in vivo the prevalence and location of the MB2 canal in the mesiobuccal root of the permanent maxillary second molar through CBCT image analysis. Two hundred twenty five CBCT images of 2 MM were studied. In the presence of the MB2 canal, the floor of the coronal cavity was located and advanced every 1 mm apically to standardize observation. The geometric location in relation to the primary mesiobuccal (MB1) and palatal (P) canals was done by locating the central points of the canal and projecting a line between them, together with a perpendicular line between MB1-P (point T). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, with a value of P < 0.05 being statistically significant. The MB2 canal was identified in 48% of the cases. It was located 2.2 ± 0.54 mm palatally and 0.98 ± 0.35 mesially to the MB1 canal. The average age of the subjects where it was found was 26.36 ± 10.85 years. Its location was more frequent in men (63%), and no differences were observed in its appearance in the hemi-arch. It is necessary to know the high probability of finding the MB2 canal in the maxillary second molar, and the CBCT is a good diagnostic tool for its detection and exploration. PMID:26309568

  10. Efficacy of Different Methods for Removing Root Canal Filling Material in Retreatment - An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mariswamy, Annapoorna Ballagere

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although success of endodontic therapy has significantly improved in the last few decades due to the introduction of novel materials and techniques, failures of endodontic therapy requiring re-treatment still comprise a significant percentage of patients requiring root canal treatment. Aim To evaluate and compare the effective removal of gutta percha and sealer, amount of apical debris extrusion and time required for gutta percha removal using various endodontic files. Materials and Methods Total 48 extracted mandibular premolars were mounted on acrylic blocks and endodontic procedure was carried out using size 40 K file and obturated using guttapercha and zinc oxide eugenol sealer. After one month storage, samples were decoronated, mounted on screw capped vials and subjected to removal of obturated material by four instruments: H files, safe sided H files, protaper universal retreatment rotary system and ultrasonic retreatment tip, grouped as 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. Only 2mm of obturated material from the coronal part was removed using no. 3 Gates Glidden drill, guttapercha was softened with a drop of xylene for 2 mins for each canal and retreatment was performed. The retreatment procedure was said to be complete when no visible debris were observed on the instrument flutes. The samples split into two halves and examined under stereomicroscope, photographed, assessed using AUTOCAD software and percentage of remaining filling material in coronal, middle, apical thirds of the canal was calculated in mm2. Retreatment time was recorded in seconds and apically extruded debris was assessed by microbalance in grams for each tooth. The data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics, ANOVA and Scheffe’s post hoc test through SPSS for windows (v 16.0). Results The ultrasonic retreatment tip had less percentage of residual guttapercha/sealer, shorter mean operating time and little apical extrusion with a significant difference (p<0.05) between the

  11. Are bovine teeth a suitable substitute for human teeth in in vitro studies to assess endotoxin load in root canals?

    PubMed

    Melo, Tiago André Fontoura de; Gründling, Grasiela Sabrina Longhi; Montagner, Francisco; Scarparo, Roberta Kochenborger; Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli de; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the feasibility of using bovine teeth as a suitable alternative for human teeth, in experiments involving in vitro endotoxin contamination. Twenty bovine central incisors and 20 human single-root premolars had their dental crowns removed and root lengths set at 16 mm. Root canals were prepared up to #60 K-file size and sterilized with cobalt-60 gamma irradiation (20 kGy, 6 h). The teeth were randomly divided into four groups: G1-bovine teeth (bovine negative control, n = 10), G2-human teeth (human negative control, n = 10), G3-bovine teeth, inoculated with Escherichia coli (055:B55) LPS, and G4-human teeth inoculated with E. coli LPS. The G1 and G2 groups were exposed to apyrogenic water. After the teeth had been incubated at 37 °C and atmospheric humidity for 24 h, the samples of solutions in the main canals were collected with apyrogenic absorbent paper tips. LPS levels were quantified using Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, with a significance level of 5%. A high amount of endotoxin was detected in the inoculated human teeth (G4) when compared to the sterilized teeth (G2), as well as in the inoculated bovine teeth (G3) when compared to the inoculated human teeth (G4). However, there was no statistical difference between bovine teeth before and after the E. coli endotoxin inoculation. Therefore, under the mentioned experimental conditions, the use of bovine teeth should not be a choice for laboratory research on endotoxin contamination. PMID:26154374

  12. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  13. Tissue specific localization of root infection by fungal pathogens: role of root border cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Uvini; Hawes, Martha C

    2002-11-01

    When roots of pea seedlings were inoculated uniformly with spores of Nectria haematocca or other pea pathogenic fungi, more than 90% developed lesions in the region of elongation within 3 days. More mature regions of most roots as well as the tip showed no visible signs of infection. Yet, microscopic observation revealed that 'mantles,' comprised of fungal hyphae intermeshed with populations of border cells, covered the tips of most roots. After physical detachment of the mantle, the underlying tip of most roots was found to be free of infection. Mantle-covered root tips did not respond to invasion of their border cells by activation of known defense genes unless there was invasion of the tip itself, as revealed by the presence of a lesion. Concomitant with the activation of defense genes was the induction of a cell-wall degrading enzyme whose expression is a marker for renewed production of border cells. Mantle formation did not occur in response to nonpathogens. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that border cells serve as a host-specific 'decoy' that protects root meristems by inhibiting fungal infection of the root tip.

  14. Combinatorially selected defense peptides protect plant roots from pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhiwei David; Laskey, James G.; Huang, Shaoxing; Bilyeu, Kristin D.; Morris, Roy O.; Schmidt, Francis J.; English, James T.

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural productivity and sustainability are continually challenged by emerging and indigenous pathogens. Currently, many pathogens can be combated only with biocides or environmentally dangerous fumigants. Here, we report a rapid and pathogen-specific strategy to reduce infection by organisms that target plant roots. Combinatorially selected defense peptides, previously shown to effect premature encystment of Phytophthora capsici zoospores, were fused to maize cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase as a display scaffold. When expressed in tomato roots, the peptide-scaffold constructs were secreted and accumulated to sufficient concentrations in the rhizosphere to induce zoospore encystment and thereby deter taxis to the root surface. Pathogen infection was significantly inhibited in roots expressing bioactive peptides fused to the maize cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase scaffold. This peptide-delivery technology is broadly applicable for rapid development of plant defense attributes against plant pathogens. PMID:17030803

  15. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P<0.001). Rinsing protocol and cement type resulted in similar variations in the mean bond strength in all tests (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium

  16. In vitro comparison of antimicrobial effect of sodium hypochlorite solution and Zataria multiflora essential oil as irrigants in root canals contaminated with Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh-Shams, Mahdi; Badiee, Parisa; Adl, Alireza; Sarab, Milad Dadollahi; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Nabavizadeh, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study compared the antifungal effect of Zataria multiflora essential oil (EO) with that of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as an irrigant for root canals infected with Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular premolars were infected with C. albicans suspension. After 72 h of incubation, the samples were divided into four groups. Teeth in Group 1 were irrigated with minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of Z. multiflora EO, in Group 2 with twice the MFC of Z. multiflora, in Group 3 with MFC of NaOCl, and in Group 4 with distilled water (DW). Pre- and post-operative samples were cultured, and fungal colony count of each specimen was obtained. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (P < 0.05). Results: NaOCl at MFC and Z. multiflora EO at twice the MFC showed the highest antifungal efficacy, with no significant difference (P > 0.05). However, antifungal efficacies of these irrigants were significantly different from those of Z. multiflora EO at MFC and DW (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed that Z. multiflora EO at twice the MFC had the same antifungal efficacy as NaOCl at MFC. PMID:26957804

  17. Assessment Using AutoCAD Software of the Preparation of Dentin Walls in Root Canals Produced by 4 Different Endodontic Instrument Systems.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Cristina; Monterde, Manuel; Pallarés, Antonio; Aranda, Susana; Montes, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of four instrument systems for preparing oval root canals: manual instrumentation (Step-Back technique), ProTaper Universal, ProTaper Next, and Wave One. Material and Methods. For the purpose of this assessment, 60 teeth extracted for orthodontic or periodontal reasons, specifically canines and premolars with full coronal and root anatomy, were used and 15 samples were assigned to each group. The section of the canals was compared before and after instrumenting and the section of untouched canal wall was measured using AutoCAD software. The data was analysed by means of Shapiro-Wilk, ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In the apical third, 100% of the canals were prepared with all the systems. In the middle third, a p value of 0.5989 in the Kruskal-Wallis test was obtained, which indicates no significant difference between the groups. At the coronal third level, the results obtained revealed that Wave One had a significantly lower mean average than the rest (p < 0.05). Conclusions. There are no differences between the various root canal instrument systems in the apical and middle thirds. At the coronal third level, Wave One system showed performance significantly worse than the rest, among which there were no differences. PMID:26664361

  18. Assessment Using AutoCAD Software of the Preparation of Dentin Walls in Root Canals Produced by 4 Different Endodontic Instrument Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Cristina; Monterde, Manuel; Pallarés, Antonio; Aranda, Susana; Montes, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of four instrument systems for preparing oval root canals: manual instrumentation (Step-Back technique), ProTaper Universal, ProTaper Next, and Wave One. Material and Methods. For the purpose of this assessment, 60 teeth extracted for orthodontic or periodontal reasons, specifically canines and premolars with full coronal and root anatomy, were used and 15 samples were assigned to each group. The section of the canals was compared before and after instrumenting and the section of untouched canal wall was measured using AutoCAD software. The data was analysed by means of Shapiro-Wilk, ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In the apical third, 100% of the canals were prepared with all the systems. In the middle third, a p value of 0.5989 in the Kruskal-Wallis test was obtained, which indicates no significant difference between the groups. At the coronal third level, the results obtained revealed that Wave One had a significantly lower mean average than the rest (p < 0.05). Conclusions. There are no differences between the various root canal instrument systems in the apical and middle thirds. At the coronal third level, Wave One system showed performance significantly worse than the rest, among which there were no differences. PMID:26664361

  19. Assessment Using AutoCAD Software of the Preparation of Dentin Walls in Root Canals Produced by 4 Different Endodontic Instrument Systems.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Cristina; Monterde, Manuel; Pallarés, Antonio; Aranda, Susana; Montes, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of four instrument systems for preparing oval root canals: manual instrumentation (Step-Back technique), ProTaper Universal, ProTaper Next, and Wave One. Material and Methods. For the purpose of this assessment, 60 teeth extracted for orthodontic or periodontal reasons, specifically canines and premolars with full coronal and root anatomy, were used and 15 samples were assigned to each group. The section of the canals was compared before and after instrumenting and the section of untouched canal wall was measured using AutoCAD software. The data was analysed by means of Shapiro-Wilk, ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In the apical third, 100% of the canals were prepared with all the systems. In the middle third, a p value of 0.5989 in the Kruskal-Wallis test was obtained, which indicates no significant difference between the groups. At the coronal third level, the results obtained revealed that Wave One had a significantly lower mean average than the rest (p < 0.05). Conclusions. There are no differences between the various root canal instrument systems in the apical and middle thirds. At the coronal third level, Wave One system showed performance significantly worse than the rest, among which there were no differences.

  20. Histological changes induced by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe especially designed for root canal sterilization: an in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Gal, Rivka

    1998-04-01

    Until now, no suitable delivery fiber existed for CO2 laser endodontic radiation in the apical region where it is most difficult to eliminate the pulp tissue using conventional methods. To overcome this problem, we designed a microprobe that reaches closer to the apex, distributing the energy density to a smaller area of the root canal, thus favorably increasing the thermal effects. The 15 F CO2 microprobe is a flexible, hollow, metal fiber, 300 micrometer in diameter and 20 mm in length, coupled onto a handpiece, with the following radiation parameters: wavelength -- 10.6 micrometer; pulse duration -- 50m/sec; energy per pulse 0.25 joule; energy density -- 353.7J/cm2 per pulse; power on tissue -- 5 W. The study was conducted on 30 vital maxillary or mandibulary; central, lateral, or premolar teeth destined for extraction due to periodontal problems. Twenty were experimentally treated with pulsed CO2 laser delivered by this newly developed fiber after conventional root canal preparation. Temperature measured at three points on the root surface during laser treatment did not exceed 38 degrees Celsius. Ten teeth represented the control group in which only root canal preparation was performed in the conventional method. Histological examination of the laser treated teeth showed coagulation necrosis and vacuolization of remaining pulp tissue in the root canal periphery. Primary and secondary dentin appeared normal, in all cases treated with 15 F CO2 laser. Gramm stain and bacteriologic examination revealed complete sterilization. These results demonstrate the unique capabilities of this special microprobe in sterilization of the root canal, and no thermal damage to the surrounding tissue.

  1. General Dentists’ Use of Isolation Techniques During Root Canal Treatment: from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Eleazer, Paul D.; Benjamin, Paul L.; Worley, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A preliminary study done by a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network precursor observed that 44% of general dentists (GDs) reported always using a rubber dam (RD) during root canal treatment (RCT). This full-scale study quantified use of all isolation techniques, including RD use. Methods Network practitioners completed a questionnaire about isolation techniques used during RCT. Network Enrollment Questionnaire data provided practitioner characteristics. Results 1,490 of 1,716 eligible GDs participated (87%); 697 (47%) reported always using a RD. This percentage varied by tooth type. These GDs were more likely to always use a RD: do not own a private practice; perform less than 10 RCT/month; have postgraduate training. Conclusions Most GDs do not use a RD all the time. Ironically, RDs are used more frequently by GDs who do not perform molar RCT. RD use varies with tooth type and certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. PMID:26015159

  2. Choice of Treatment Plan Based on Root Canal Therapy versus Extraction and Implant Placement: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Parirokh, Masoud; Zarifian, Ahmadreza; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    Case selection and treatment plan are important aspects of endodontic treatment. Dentists should organize the treatment plan based on their knowledge, abilities, skills and more importantly the patients' preference and dentition. Indubitably, the treatment plan for each patient is exclusive and "tailor-made" and cannot be used for all patients. Dentists' selfestimation of their abilities opens up treatment options; however, in difficult or complicated cases it is advisable to refer to a specialist. Currently, one of the most challenging aspects in dentistry is the choice between extraction and placement of implant (EPI) instead of a complicated root canal treatment (RCT). Overemphasis on one treatment plan while neglecting other options, not only mislead the dentist but also impose unnecessary charges to the patients. This mini-review compares RCT to EPI from various aspects to help practitioners in routine decision making.

  3. Value added cleaning and disinfection of the root canal: laser-activated irrigation and laser-induced photoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moor, Roeland J. G.; Meire, Maarten A.

    2016-03-01

    Among present-day marketed systems ultrasonic activation appears to be the best way to activate and potentiate endodontic irrigants. An alternative for ultrasonic activation of irrigants is laser activated irrigation (LAI) or photoninitiated acoustic streaming. Based on present-day research it appears that LAI (especially with Erbium lasers) can be more efficient for debris removal out of root canals and interaction with the endodontic biofilms thanks to the induction of specific cavitation phenomena and acoustic streaming. Other wavelengths are now explored to be used for LAI. Another way to interact with biofilms is to rely on laser-induced photoporation in combination with gold nanoparticles ( AuNPs). The latter is an alternative physical method for delivering macromolecules in cells. Nanosized membrane pores can be created upon pulsed laser illumination. Depending on the laser energy, pores are created through either direct heating of the AuNPs or by vapour nanobubbles that can emerge around the AuNPs.

  4. Choice of Treatment Plan Based on Root Canal Therapy versus Extraction and Implant Placement: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; Zarifian, Ahmadreza; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    Case selection and treatment plan are important aspects of endodontic treatment. Dentists should organize the treatment plan based on their knowledge, abilities, skills and more importantly the patients’ preference and dentition. Indubitably, the treatment plan for each patient is exclusive and “tailor-made” and cannot be used for all patients. Dentists’ selfestimation of their abilities opens up treatment options; however, in difficult or complicated cases it is advisable to refer to a specialist. Currently, one of the most challenging aspects in dentistry is the choice between extraction and placement of implant (EPI) instead of a complicated root canal treatment (RCT). Overemphasis on one treatment plan while neglecting other options, not only mislead the dentist but also impose unnecessary charges to the patients. This mini-review compares RCT to EPI from various aspects to help practitioners in routine decision making. PMID:26213535

  5. Micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy comparisons of two nickel-titanium rotary root canal instruments used with reciprocating motion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Chul; Hwang, You-Jeong; Jung, Da-Woon; You, Sung-Yeop; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, WooCheol

    2013-01-01

    The single-file root canal instrumentation technique using reciprocating motion has been gaining concern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the shaping ability of single ProTaper F2 file and WaveOne Primary file when they were used in the curved root canal with reciprocation motion and to investigate the durability of the file after use with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in structure model index (SMI), root canal volume, curvature, surface area, and degree of transportation were measured from the cross-sectional images of the prepared canals using the micro-CT system with an isotropic resolution of 16 μm. Results showed that there were no differences in the changes of root canal volume, surface area, and SMI between the two file groups after the preparation (p > 0.05). The ProTaper group showed a curvature straightening value of 25.45 ± 12.51%, while the WaveOne group showed 27.30 ± 10.91%, and there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). The transportation values between the two groups showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). SEM revealed that 60% of ProTaper files showed initiation of microcracks on the surface while those were detected on the only one WaveOne file. The single-file technique using either WaveOne Primary or ProTaper F2 can be safely used under each reciprocating motion without creating an increased apical transportation in curved canals. However, the metallurgic property resists cyclic fatigue was more favorable with WaveOne under the scanning evaluation.

  6. Visualization of removal of trapped air from the apical region in simulated root canals by laser-activated irrigation using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G; Suharto, Djoko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this visualization study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism by which trapped air is removed from the apical region of simulated root canals by activation of an irrigant using an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser during endodontic procedures. A high-speed imaging system with high temporal and spatial resolution was used to visualize laser-induced shock waves in a resin block model with a curved root canal (inner diameter at the apex 0.08 mm, taper 4 %, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm) and a glass cylinder model with a straight root canal (inner diameter 1 mm, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm). The study utilized MZ3 and RFT3 tips in each model, without water or air spray, and with an average power of 1 W at 35 Hz. Laser-activated irrigation overcame the airlock effect by releasing air trapped in the air column. The mechanism underlying the removal of trapped air from the apical region using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a dry root canal is via the disruption of the surface tension at the solution-air interface. This disruption, caused by bubble implosion (cavitation), displaces air in the form of bubbles from the apical region toward the solution, which allows the solution to travel apically.

  7. Endodontic Treatment of a Double-Rooted Maxillary Second Molar with Four Canals: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Dianat, Omid; Hajrezai, Reihaneh; Paymanpour, Payam; Azadnia, Sina

    2014-01-01

    A healthy female was referred to Endodontic Department. The referral letter from her dentist expressed that an emergency pulpotomy of tooth #27 had been carried out with probable perforation of the chamber floor which was due to the unusual anatomy of the chamber. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed that the tooth had two mesial and two distal canals. Perforation site was repaired and endodontic treatment was completed. At 24-month follow-up, patient was asymptomatic and clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful outcomes. PMID:25386215

  8. Push-out bond strength and SEM evaluation of a new bonding approach into the root canal

    PubMed Central

    CARVALHO, Carlos Augusto; BRESCHI, Lorenzo; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela; ATTA, Maria Teresa; FERRARI, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the performance of different adhesive systems in fiber post placement aiming to clarify the influence of different hydrophobic experimental blend adhesives, and of one commercially available adhesive on the frictional retention during a luting procedure. Material and Methods One luting agent (70 Wt% BisGMA, 28.5% TEGDMA; 1.5% p-tolyldiethanolamine) to cement fiber posts into root canals was applied with 4 different adhesive combinations: Group 1: The etched roots were rinsed with water for 30 s to remove the phosphoric acid, then rinsed with 99.6% ethanol for 30 s, and blotdried. A trial adhesive (base to catalyst on a 1:1 ratio) was used with an experimental luting agent (35% Bis-GMA, 14.37% TeGDMA, 0.5% eDMAB, 0.13% CQ); Group 2: A trial adhesive (base to catalyst on a 1:2 ratio) was luted as in Group 1; Group 3: One-Step Plus (OSP, Bisco Inc.) following the ethanol bonding technique in combination with the luting agent as in Group 1; Group 4: OSP strictly following the manufacturer's instructions using the luting agent as in Group 1. The groups were challenged with push-out tests. Posted root slices were loaded until post segment extrusion in the apical-coronal direction. Failure modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Results Push-out strength was not significantly influenced by the luting agent (p>0.05). No statistically significant differences among the tested groups were found as Group 1 (exp 1 - ethanol-wet bonding technique)=Group 2 (exp 2 - ethanol-wet bonding technique)=Group 3 (OSP - ethanol-wet bonding technique)=Group 4 (control, OSP - water-wet bonding technique) (p>0.05). The dominating failure modes in all the groups were cohesive/adhesive failures, which were predominantly observed on the post/luting agent interface. Conclusions The results of this study support the hypothesis that the proposal to replace water with ethanol to bond fiber posts to the root canal using highly hydrophobic resin is

  9. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P < 0.05). The Multlink™ showed between RelyX™ ARC and RelyX™ U100 (GI to GIII; GII to GV) ( P < 0.05). The ANOVA showed significant statistical similar ( P > 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC

  10. Antimicrobial Efficacy and Cytocompatibility of Calcium Hypochlorite Solution as a Root Canal Irrigant: An in Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh-Shams, Mahdi; Gholami, Ahmad; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Yazdanparast, Roohollah; Saberi Nejad, Milad; Safari, Azam; Nabavizadeh, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (SH) and calcium hypochlorite (CH) against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis and also to compare their cytocompatibility on L929 murine fibroblasts using Mossman’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: A broth micro-dilution susceptibility test was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each irrigant against E. faecalis. Then, the root canals of 50 mature extracted human mandibular premolars were contaminated with E. faecalis and were randomly divided into three groups according to the irrigant used (n=20). Canals were irrigated with SH in group I (n=20) and CH in group II (n=20) at their obtained MIC. In group III (n=10), sterile saline was used. Microbial sampling was performed before and after biomechanical preparation. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify E. faecalis in the root canal samples. For cytocompatibility assessment, L929 murine fibroblasts were exposed to various concentrations of the irrigants. Results: Irrigation with test materials resulted in significant reduction in colony forming units (CFU) in post-instrumentation samples (with the MIC values of SH and CH against E. faecalis being 0.5% and 5%, respectively). However, the reduction in the normal saline group was not significant (P=0.203). In addition, 5% CH was more effective than 0.5% SH (P=0.006) in eliminating E. faecalis. Among the different concentrations of tested irrigants, 0.5% CH and 5% SH showed the least and the most cytotoxicity, respectively (P<0.001). The cytotoxicity of 5% CH and 0.5% SH was similar (P=0.99), and lower than 2.5% SH (P<0.001). Conclusion: CH at an MIC of 5% was effective in eliminating E. faecalis in planktonic state and also its biofilm and exhibited comparable cytocompatibility to that of 0.5% SH. PMID:27471525

  11. Effects of Clinical Training and Case Difficulty on the Radiographic Quality of Root Canal Fillings Performed by Dental Students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Reem Siraj; Al-Manei, Kholod Khalil; A. Alsubait, Sara; AlAqeely, Razan Shafik; A. M. Al-Shehri, Sharifa; M. Al-Madi, Ebtissam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of training duration and case difficulty on the radiographic quality of root canal fillings performed by dental students in Saudi Arabia. Methods and Materials: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted at King Saud University. Root canal treatments performed by 55 dental students from 2012-2014 were included in the study. Each student treated at least five teeth during the first year of clinical endodontic training and another five teeth during the second year. Case difficulty was assessed based on tooth position in the dental arch and preoperative conditions. The radiographic quality of the root canal filling was evaluated by two endodontists blinded to treatment completion date. The evaluation criteria were adequate obturation, presence of mishaps and preparation taper. The data were statistically analysed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses; and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Inadequate obturation and mishaps were significantly less prevalent in teeth treated after 2 years of clinical training. The odds ratios for inadequate obturation and mishaps increased significantly as tooth position moved posteriorly. Inadequate obturation and more mishaps were significantly more prevalent in teeth with preoperative conditions. Preparation taper was not significantly affected by training duration or case difficulty. Conclusion: The quality of root canal fillings performed by Saudi students was adversely affected by case difficulty. The radiographic quality of root canal fillings improved significantly after 2 years of clinical training. Preparation taper outcome is likely dependent on the preparation technique and instrument taper. PMID:26523143

  12. The effect of an Nd-YAG pulsed laser on the cleaning of the root canal and the formation of a fused apical plug.

    PubMed

    Saunders, W P; Whitters, C J; Strang, R; Moseley, H; Payne, A P; McGadey, J

    1995-07-01

    A Neodymium-yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) pulsed laser was used in vitro to determine whether various laser energy levels from 0.75 W to 1.7 W at 15 pulses s(-1) (pps) were able to (i) remove debris from the walls of prepared root canals (ii) remove pulpal tissue from unprepared canals and (iii) create a fused apical plug from dentine chips, hydroxyapatite (HAP) or low-fusing dental porcelain. Single-rooted teeth were sectioned at the amelocemental junction and the crowns discarded. The root canals of 50 teeth were prepared chemomechanically and allocated to four groups of 10 teeth for laser treatment. One group was left unlased as a control. After lasing, the teeth were split longitudinally, stained and examined for residual debris. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups (P<0.05). A further 20 teeth were not prepared and lased in the coronal one-third of the root canal at different energy levels; five teeth were not lased. The teeth were split and examined as previously. The results showed that lasing cleaned the coronal part of the root canal almost completely of pulpal tissue. In the final part of the study laser energy was applied to dentine chips, HAP and low-fusing porcelain in an attempt to produce a fused apical plug. The laser was unable to melt the dentine chips but some hardening of HAP occurred when combined with blue food-colouring, with or without glycerine, at energy levels of 1.0 W, at 15 pps for 30 s. Superficial hardening of low-fusing porcelain occurred at 1.0 W, 15 pps for 30 s.

  13. Root vs pod infection by root-knot nematodes on aflatoxin contamination of peanut.

    PubMed

    Timper, P; Holbrook, C; Wilson, D

    2007-01-01

    Aflatoxins are potent carcinogens produced by some Aspergillus spp. Infection of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) by root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria) can lead to an increase in aflatoxin contamination of kernels when the plants are subjected to drought stress during pod maturation. It is not clear whether the increased aflatoxin contamination is primarily due to greater invasion of the galled pods by toxigenic Aspergillus spp. or whether root galling is also involved. Our objective was to determine the contribution of root and pod galling caused by root-knot nematodes to the increase in aflatoxin contamination in peanut. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted in which pods and roots were physically separated. Pod set was restricted to soil-filled pans (41 cm dia. x 10 cm depth), while the roots grew underneath the pan into a pot. The experiments had a factorial arrangement of treatments: pod zone with and without nematodes, and root zone with and without nematodes. In Experiment 1, 5000 eggs of M. arenaria were added to the root zone14 days after planting (DAP) and 8000 eggs were added to the pod zone 60 and 80 DAP. In Experiment 2, 3000 eggs were added to the root zone 30 DAP and 8000 eggs were added to the pod zone every week starting 60 DAP. The four treatment combinations were replicated 10 to 13 times. Conidia of Aspergillus flavus/A. parasiticus was added to the soil surface (pods zone) at mid bloom. Plants were subjected to drought stress 40 days before harvest. In Experiment 1, adding nematodes to the pod zone had no effect on aflatoxin concentrations in the peanut kernel. However, the lack of an effect may have been to due to the low occurrence of galling on the hulls. In pots where nematodes were added to the root zone, 50 to 80% of the root system was galled. Adding nematodes to the root zone increased aflatoxin concentrations in the peanut kernels from 34 ppb in the control to 71 ppb. In Experiment 2, there was heavy pod galling with galls present

  14. An in-vitro comparative study for assessment of apical sealing ability of Epiphany/AH Plus sealer with Resilon/gutta-percha root canal filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Meraj; Musani, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Iffat M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Endodontic treatment is directed to eliminate microbial challenges from the root canal system and to create a complete seal. The aim of this study was to assess the apical sealing ability of resin-based Epiphany-Resilon root canal filling system and to compare it with the sealing abilities of different combinations of AH Plus, gutta-percha, Epiphany, and Resilon. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted human maxillary incisor roots were treated endodontically. The samples were divided into groups A, B, C, and D, with each group containing 25 samples. Group A: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer; Group B: Canals obturated with Resilon and Epiphany; Group C: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and Epiphany; Group D: Control group canals obturated with gutta-percha without a sealer. The sealing ability of each of the obturation techniques was tested using the dye penetration method followed by the clearing method using alcohol. Stereo microscope was used to measure the extent of dye penetration. Statistical data analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all the four groups. Apical extent of mean microleakage was maximum for gutta-percha, followed by Gutta-percha + AH-plus and Gutta-percha + Epiphany, and the least with Resilon + Epiphany. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.01) was seen in the apical leakage. Conclusion: All the samples tested showed microleakage. The “Epiphany soft resin endodontic obturation system” showed a superior result compared to other obturation materials. PMID:27583220

  15. Q-switched versus free-running Er:YAG laser efficacy on the root canal walls of human teeth: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Khabbaz, Marouan G; Makropoulou, Mersini I; Serafetinides, Alexandros A; Papadopoulos, Dimitris; Papagiakoumou, Eirini

    2004-08-01

    Twenty-one teeth with one root canal were prepared by the step-back technique, divided into three groups, and split longitudinally. Group A served as a control. In group B, 20 to 150 pulses of 100 micros, 30 to 70 mJ per pulse at 1 to 4 Hz from a free-running Er:YAG laser were applied to the root-canal dentin. In group C, the Q-switched Er:YAG laser, with the same energy parameters and a 190-ns pulse duration was used. Scanning electron microscopy examination revealed that control specimens had debris and smear layer obscuring the dentinal tubules at all levels in the canals without crack formation. Both groups of laser-treated dentin were clean with opened dentinal tubules except around the lased area in which there was an intact smear layer. Cracks were observed in both laser groups with higher frequency in group C. In group B, craters with different depth levels at the root canal walls were produced and the energy apparently was distributed equally, because craters were well-shaped. In contrast, the ablation efficiency in group C was questionable with the parameters used in this study. Consequently, suitable parameters of the free-running Er:YAG laser must be found before its careful use as an adjunct in endodontic therapy. PMID:15273641

  16. Surface change of root canal dentin after the use of irrigation activation protocols: electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Capar, Ismail Davut; Aydinbelge, Hale Ari

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the mineral contents of root-canal dentin after treatment with different irrigation activation protocols. One hundred and eight maxillary lateral incisor teeth were randomly divided into eight experimental groups and one control group. Root canals were prepared using ProTaper rotary files, with the exception of the Self-Adjusting File (SAF) group. Canals were irrigated with 2 mL of 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) at each instrument change, and received a final flush with 10 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 10 mL of 5% NaOCl for 1 min. The control group was irrigated with distilled water. Group I (GI): Needle syringe irrigation; Group II (GII): NaviTip FX; Group III (GIII): CanalBrush; Group IV (GIV): Manual dynamic activation with gutta-percha; Group V (GV): Passive ultrasonic irrigation; Group VI (GVI): EndoActivator; Group VII (GVII): EndoVac; Group VIII (GVIII): SAF. The level of elemental composition was analyzed by a scanning electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) system. The results were then statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Ca/P ratio was changed after treatment with SAF and EndoActivator. The Ca, P, Mg, and S level changes were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Final irrigation activation protocols did not alter the mineral level of root dentin surface.

  17. Validity of the vertical tube-shift method in determining the relationship between the mandibular third molar roots and the inferior alveolar nerve canal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the validity of the vertical tube-shift method using intraoral periapical radiography (IOPAR) for determining the relationship between the mandibular third molar roots and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) canal in comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Fifty impacted mandibular third molars were analyzed using the IOPAR vertical tube-shift method and CBCT. The relationship of the IAN canal to the impacted mandibular third molar was recorded as buccal, lingual or in line with the apex and was compared with CBCT findings. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the vertical tube-shift method in depicting the relationship (buccal/lingual/in line with the apex) of the IAN canal to the third molar root apex was calculated. Results The sensitivity and specificity PPV and NPV of the IOPAR vertical tube-shift technique was found to be highest for a lingual relationship (100%) followed by buccal (94.4%, 92.3%, 97.1%, and 85.7%) and in line with the apex relationship (88.9%, 95.0%, 80.0%, and 97.4%) of the IAN canal with the third molar root apex, respectively. A statistically significant association was observed between the IOPAR vertical tube-shift method and the CBCT with a P-value <0.01. Conclusion The vertical tube-shift method can be used as an effective diagnostic tool in assessing the relationship of the IAN canal to the third molar root apex with high sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. PMID:25922817

  18. Comparison between two methods of working length determination and its effect on radiographic extent of root canal filling: a clinical study [ISRCTN71486641

    PubMed Central

    Smadi, L

    2006-01-01

    Background Obtaining a correct working length is critical to the success of endodontic therapy. Different methods have been used to identify this crucial measurement. The Aim of this clinical study was to compare the effect of working length determination using apex locator alone or in combination with working length radiograph on the apical extent of root canal filling. Methods A total number of 66 patients, 151 canals were randomized into two groups, In group (I) working length was determined by apex locator alone, while in group (II) working length was determined by apex locator confirmed by working length radiograph, length of obturation was assessed, and the total number of radiographs was recorded. The data were analyzed using SAS system and T. tests were carried out. Statistical significance was considered to be P ≤ 0.05. Results Sixty seven canals in group I were treated with a mean distance from the tip of root canal filling to radiographic apex -0.5 mm ± 0.5 and a mean of a total number of radiographs of 2.0, while in group II eighty four canals were treated with a mean distance from the tip of root canal filling to radiographic apex -0.4 mm ± 0.5 and a mean of a total number of radiographs of 3.2. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean distance from the tip of root filling to radiographic apex between group I and group II (P > 0.05). Conclusion The practice of using electronic apex locator in the determination of working length is useful and reliable with no statistical difference of the radiographic extent of root canal filling when using apex locator alone or in combination with working length radiograph. Under the clinical conditions of this study, it is suggested that the correct use of an apex locator alone could prevent the need for further diagnostic radiographs for determination of working length. This method can be useful in patients who need not to be exposed to repeated radiation because of mental, medical or oral

  19. Push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of different root canal sealers used with coated core materials

    PubMed Central

    Purali, Nuhan; Coşgun, Erdal; Calt, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of root canal sealers used with coated core materials and conventional gutta-percha. Materials and Methods A total of 72 single-rooted human mandibular incisors were instrumented with NiTi rotary files with irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl. The smear layer was removed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Specimens were assigned into four groups according to the obturation system: Group 1, EndoRez (Ultradent Product Inc.); Group 2, Activ GP (Brasseler); Group 3, SmartSeal (DFRP Ltd. Villa Farm); Group 4, AH 26 (Dentsply de Trey)/gutta-percha (GP). For push-out bond strength measurement, two horizontal slices were obtained from each specimen (n = 20). To compare dentinal tubule penetration, remaining 32 roots assigned to 4 groups as above were obturated with 0.1% Rhodamine B labeled sealers. One horizontal slice was obtained from the middle third of each specimen (n = 8) and scanned under confocal laser scanning electron microscope. Tubule penetration area, depth, and percentage were measured. Kruskall-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. Results EndoRez showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than the others (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found amongst the groups in terms of percentage of sealer penetration. SmartSeal showed the least penetration than the others (p < 0.05). Conclusions The bond strength and sealer penetration of resin-and glass ionomer-based sealers used with coated core was not superior to resin-based sealer used with conventional GP. Dentinal tubule penetration has limited effect on bond strength. The use of conventional GP with sealer seems to be sufficient in terms of push-out bond strength. PMID:27200279

  20. Three-dimensional evaluation of root canal morphology in lower second premolars of early and middle Pleistocene human populations from Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain).

    PubMed

    Prado-Simón, Leyre; Martinón-Torres, María; Baca, Pilar; Olejniczak, Anthony J; Gómez-Robles, Aida; Lapresa, María; Luis Arsuaga, Juan; María Bermúdez de Castro, José

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the morphology of the roots and root canals of permanent lower second premolars (LP4s) with fully developed roots of five hominin groups: Homo sp. (ATE9-1 specimen) from Atapuerca-Sima del Elefante locality, H. antecessor (ATD6-4 and ATD6-125) from Atapuerca-Gran Dolina TD6 locality, H. heidelbergensis from Atapuerca-Sima de los Huesos locality, H. neanderthalensis from Krapina, Regourdou, and Abri Bourgeois-Delaunay localities, and two contemporary H. sapiens groups. The teeth were scanned by means of microtomography. The roots were divided into three virtual segments by three planes: cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), mid-root (MR), and mid-apex (MA). Volumetric and planar direct measurements of the whole teeth and each segment were taken. Descriptive statistical analyses and nonparametric Mann-Whiney test were performed to test for significant differences (P < 0.025) between groups. ATE9-1 and Gran Dolina-TD6 fossils present intricate radicular complexes that might be transitional between the morphologies of Australopithecus robustus and African early Homo and the derived conditions typically found in later Homo. In H. neanderthalensis and H. heidelbergensis, the root canals are wide, with small apical convergence. This trait is particularly pronounced in the Sima de los Huesos sample which may reflect a particularity of this population. Our study demonstrates the potential of hominin roots and root canals as untapped sources of taxonomic information when the tooth crown is fragmented. Future studies, including more fossil specimens and species will shed light in the polarity of the morphologies observed.

  1. An in vitro comparison of penetration depth of two root canal sealers: An SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chandra Vijay; Rao, S Anitha; Chandrashekar, V

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine in vitro penetration depth of two resin-based sealers (AH plus and Resino Seal) and Zinc Oxide Eugenol sealer into the dentinal tubules after removing smear layer by passive ultrasonic irrigation. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were used. The teeth were decoronated, working length established and prepared upto size 40 file. Each root was subjected to passive ultrasonic irrigation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. Three different sealers and gutta-percha were used for obturation. Roots were sectioned using hard tissue microtome. These sections were gold sputtered and examined under scanning electron microscope. Results: Statistical analyses of the data were performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Statistically significant difference was found between AH Plus sealer and Resino Seal sealer and Zinc Oxide Eugenol sealer. Conclusion: The results showed that AH Plus had maximum penetration depth into dentinal tubules. PMID:22876015

  2. Optical characterization of a light guide for the polymerization of root canal fillers: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munin, Egberto; Lupato Conrado, Luis A.; Alves, Leandro P.; Zangaro, Renato A.

    2004-05-01

    The sealing cements used in endodontics are commonly of the type activated by chemical reactions. During polymerization, mechanical contractions are not uncommon, leading to non-perfect sealing or treatment failure. Photopolymerizable cements usually presents superior performance as compared to those chemically activated. However, difficulties in carrying-up the light to difficult-to-reach regions like the dental apex preclude those material of being accepted in the dental office routine. Recently, a novel technique for the light curing of photopolymerizable cements in endodontic applications has been proposed. Such a technique makes use of a polymeric light guide to deliver the curing light to the apex region, for a single step polymerization of the canal filler. For this work, a 28 mm long polymer light-guide, has been produced. The polymer surface was roughened to produce light scattering and allow the light to escape from the guide. The light scattering profile along the body of the guide is an important property for the proposed application. We used an integrating sphere to measure the irradiation profile for the proposed endodontic device. It was found that the experimental data for the amount of light coupled into the integrating sphere as a function of the length of the cone inside the sphere fits to a double exponential model.

  3. In vitro study of the erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser cleaning of root canal by the use of shadow photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorčič, Peter; Lukač, Nejc; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser cleaning is a promising technique in endodontic treatment. In our in vitro study, we measured th