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Sample records for infection historical review

  1. Roentgen therapy for infections: an historical review.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, L. B.; Hodes, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation was used extensively for the treatment of all types of infections before the advent of antibiotics. Although this mode of therapy is now in disrepute, radiation therapists of that era were firm believers in the ability of radiation to cure infections. A review of the literature suggests, but certainly does not prove, that low-dose local radiation, in the range of 75 to 300 roentgens, is an effective treatment modality for a wide variety of infections. Two then-prevailing rationales held that the effect was due either to radiation damage to the immune cells, causing stimulation of the immune response, or to the increase in local inflammation with resultant increased blood flow. Modern research has been limited but provides support for both arguments. Although there are no present indications for using radiation as therapy for infectious disease, a reasonable argument can be made from the available data that radiation is effective for the treatment of localized infections. The mechanisms of low-dose radiation as a treatment for infections remain unclear. The known and probable long-term sequelae of low-dose local irradiation preclude its common use for this condition. Nevertheless, it is hoped that this review will stimulate investigations into this relatively unexplored area of radiobiology. PMID:1750226

  2. Public health policy for management of hepatitis B virus infection: historical review of recommendations for immunization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeok; Park, Wanju

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of cirrhosis, liver failure, and liver cancer, and an estimated 620,000 persons die annually from HBV-related liver disease (Goldstein et al., 2005; World Health Organization, 2000). Immunization with the HBV vaccine is the most effective means of preventing HBV infection and its consequent acute and chronic liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HBV vaccine has been used against HBV in the United States since 1982 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1982); during the last 25 years, HBV vaccine policy continued to evolve in response to public health issues and epidemiologic data. Although the number of newly acquired HBV infections has substantially declined as a result of implementation of a national immunization program, the prevalence of chronic HBV infection remains high. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology of HBV, provide a historical review of health policies for HBV immunization, and summarize the recent evidence-based public health guidelines for management of HBV infection in the United States.

  3. Diagnosis of children’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its association with cytomegalovirus infection with ADHD: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Xia, Qun; Shen, Huaiyun; Yang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yongli; Xu, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    As the most common mental disorder identified in children and teenagers, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects millions of children and their families, making it a critical health issue worldwide. This article reviewed the historical opinions about the diagnosis of ADHD and defined different subtypes of this disorder. It also summarized the current diagnostic criteria and available medications. After re-visiting the etiology of ADHD in the sense of both genetic and environment factors, it was further hypothesized that viral infection might be involved in ADHD pathogenesis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection may be associated with ADHD, although both clinical observations and animal studies need to be performed for validation. PMID:26550354

  4. Mineralogy: A Historical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews changing concepts of the origins, properties, and classification of minerals. Emphasis is placed on developments of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, during which time the interwoven advances of chemistry, physics, crystallography, and high-temperature, high-pressure studies transformed mineralogy from a qualitative to a…

  5. DNA multigene characterization of Fasciola hepatica and Lymnaea neotropica and its fascioliasis transmission capacity in Uruguay, with historical correlation, human report review and infection risk analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gayo, Valeria; Sanchis, Jaime; Artigas, Patricio; Khoubbane, Messaoud; Birriel, Soledad; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Background Fascioliasis is a pathogenic disease transmitted by lymnaeid snails and recently emerging in humans, in part due to effects of climate changes, anthropogenic environment modifications, import/export and movements of livestock. South America is the continent presenting more human fascioliasis hyperendemic areas and the highest prevalences and intensities known. These scenarios appear mainly linked to altitude areas in Andean countries, whereas lowland areas of non-Andean countries, such as Uruguay, only show sporadic human cases or outbreaks. A study including DNA marker sequencing of fasciolids and lymnaeids, an experimental study of the life cycle in Uruguay, and a review of human fascioliasis in Uruguay, are performed. Methodology/Principal findings The characterization of Fasciola hepatica from cattle and horses of Uruguay included the complete sequences of the ribosomal DNA ITS-2 and ITS-1 and mitochondrial DNA cox1 and nad1. ITS-2, ITS-1, partial cox1 and rDNA 16S gene of mtDNA were used for lymnaeids. Results indicated that vectors belong to Lymnaea neotropica instead of to Lymnaea viator, as always reported from Uruguay. The life cycle and transmission features of F. hepatica by L. neotropica of Uruguay were studied under standardized experimental conditions to enable a comparison with the transmission capacity of F. hepatica by Galba truncatula at very high altitude in Bolivia. On this baseline, we reviewed the 95 human fascioliasis cases reported in Uruguay and analyzed the risk of human infection in front of future climate change estimations. Conclusions/Significance The correlation of fasciolid and lymnaeid haplotypes with historical data on the introduction and spread of livestock into Uruguay allowed to understand the molecular diversity detected. Although Uruguayan L. neotropica is a highly efficient vector, its transmission capacity is markedly lower than that of Bolivian G. truncatula. This allows to understand the transmission and

  6. [Historical aspects, maternity and HIV infection in women].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Torres; Piccinini, Cesar Augusto

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article was to examine historical aspects related to the feminine and to being a mother for deepening the comprehension of motherhood in the context of HIV/Aids infection. We reviewed the traditional role of the woman in society, showing the historical division between the mother, deserving respect and consideration, and the prostitute, marginalized and not worth of respect. In this context, we discuss the sexually transmitted diseases and the social reactions toward these infections in women, especially as refers to motherhood in the context of HIV/Aids infection. The paper emphasizes the presence of socially constructed beliefs about women's behaviors as a factor hampering an effective prevention of STD/HIV/AIDS in women and the great need for reflecting about the strategies for prevention and care.

  7. Internal fixation: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Greenhagen, Robert M; Johnson, Adam R; Joseph, Alison

    2011-08-01

    Internal fixation has become a pillar of surgical specialties, yet the evolution of these devices has been relatively short. The first known description of medical management of a fracture was found in the Edwin Smith Papyrus of Ancient Egypt (circa 2600 bc). The first description of internal fixation in the medical literature was in the 18th century. The advancement of techniques and technology over the last 150 years has helped to preserve both life and function. The pace of advancement continues to accelerate as surgeons continue to seek new technology for osseous fixation. The authors present a thorough review of the history of internal fixation and the transformation into a multibillion dollar industry.

  8. Historical review of bone prefabrication.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, Claudia; Lucarelli, Enrico; Donati, Davide

    2008-09-01

    Prefabricated tissue represents a bridge between traditional reconstructive surgery and tissue engineering. Initially used in the 1960s in reconstructive plastic surgery, in the 1980s it was also used in orthopedics. The term "prefabricated" indicates a process of neovascularization of a tissue by implanting a vascular pedicle inside the tissue itself; this tissue can be then reimplanted either at a short distance through the pedicle itself, or as a free graft by microvascular anastomosis. The purpose of prefabrication is to build a tissue (muscle, bone, skin, or composite) with characteristics as similar as possible to those of the defect to fill, thus minimizing morbidity in the donor site and improving the reconstructive effectiveness. We present a review of the literature that includes the main experiments performed until now in which a bone segment has been reconstructed using scaffolds and growth factors in relationship to the local blood supply or to the use of a vascular pedicle.

  9. Historical Review of Environmental Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qing, Tian

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the historical review of environmental education in China. As China's economy began to grow, environmental pollution and ecological destruction initially appeared locally in the early 1980s. These local environmental issues were primarily managed and controlled by state and local environmental protection agencies. In…

  10. Indians of Ontario (An Historical Review).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The booklet presents an historical review and a description of the 2 cultural groups of Indians--Iroquoian and Algonkian--which inhabited Ontario in pre-European times. According to the document, the Iroquoian culture evolved over a period of at least 2000 years in the fertile land of the eastern Great Lakes region; the Algonkians inhabited the…

  11. An Observation: Historical Review of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ruby D.

    Presenting an historical review of American Indian education, this document includes the following: (1) Introduction (identifies the educational anthropologist as one who investigates the learner's and the educator's cultural orientation to better facilitate the continuity of educational content and method); (2) Definition of Terms (culture,…

  12. Mendelian controversies: a botanical and historical review.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, D J; Rytting, B

    2001-05-01

    Gregor Mendel was a 19(th) century priest and botanist who developed the fundamental laws of inheritance. The year 2000 marked a century since the rediscovery of those laws and the beginning of genetics. Although Mendel is now recognized as the founder of genetics, significant controversy ensued about his work throughout the 20(th) century. In this paper, we review five of the most contentious issues by looking at the historical record through the lens of current botanical science: (1) Are Mendel's data too good to be true? (2) Is Mendel's description of his experiments fictitious? (3) Did Mendel articulate the laws of inheritance attributed to him? (4) Did Mendel detect but not mention linkage? (5) Did Mendel support or oppose Darwin?A synthesis of botanical and historical evidence supports our conclusions: Mendel did not fabricate his data, his description of his experiments is literal, he articulated the laws of inheritance attributed to him insofar as was possible given the information he had, he did not detect linkage, and he neither strongly supported nor opposed Darwin.

  13. Controversies in nursing ethics: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Olsen, D P

    1992-09-01

    The author critiques the dialectic between justice-based ethics and an ethic of caring from a historical perspective (by analogy with the dialectic between agape and friendship). Justice-based ethics have been problematic for nursing because of the decontextualized approach. The ethic of caring is problematic because caring, being contextual, is particularistic and therefore can be based on morally irrelevant factors, such as liking. There is a tradition of writing which seeks to reconcile the particularistic obligations of friendship with the moral duty to all others equally. Ideas from the following authors are reviewed for relevance to nursing: Aristotle, Aelred of Rievaulx, Augustine, John Cassian, Cicero, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, Michel de Montaigne, Jeremy Taylor and Max Weber. The authors concludes by noting that both sides of the dialectic are synthesized in the lived experience of individuals. A synthesis in thought is called for on this basis.

  14. T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection: historical overview and goals for future research.

    PubMed

    Holz, Lauren; Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T cells are key factors in the outcome of acute HCV infection and in protective immunity. This review recapitulates the steps that immunologists have taken in the past 25years to dissect the role of T cell responses in HCV infection. It describes technical as well as disease-specific challenges that were caused by the inapparent onset of acute HCV infection, the difficulty to identify subjects who spontaneously clear HCV infection, the low frequency of HCV-specific T cells in the blood of chronically infected patients, and the lack of small animal models with intact immune systems to study virus-host interaction. The review provides a historical perspective on techniques and key findings, and identifies areas for future research.

  15. The oath of Hippocrates: an historical review.

    PubMed

    Davey, L M

    2001-09-01

    This presentation is designed to share with fellow neurosurgeons a topic, namely the oath of Hippocrates, that has been a subject of fascination to physicians, scholars, historians, and even the public for the past 2500 years. Its moral and ethical message has exhibited remarkable resiliency through the ages, in varied cultures. Although its language may appear odd, its precepts are as valid today as they were in Hippocrates' time. This can be best understood through an historical review of the oath's transmission and acceptance in different eras of western history. The longevity of the oath, however, is clearly attributable to its intrinsic merit, its high moral reverent tone, and a literary eloquence that placed Hippocrates among the best writers of antiquity. Despite the fame of its author, the oath has experienced a life of its own, from relative obscurity during the Dark Ages to reverential study since the Renaissance. Five aspects are considered in this discussion, i.e., 1) oaths in antiquity; 2) a biographical sketch of Hippocrates; 3) the chain of transmission from antiquity to modern times; 4) comments on other oaths, prayers, codes, and credos; and 5) an analysis and some personal views of the oath.

  16. Historical monthly energy review, 1973--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Historical Monthly Energy Review (HMER) presents monthly and annual data from 1973 through 1992 on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. This edition of the HMER extends the original HMER in several ways: (1) Four additional years of monthly data, 1989--1992, have been added. (2) This report fully replaces the earlier one; each data cell that has been revised since the original HMER is marked with an ``R`` so that changes can be quickly noted. (3) Section 1 has been expanded to include Tables 1.7--1.13, which were not available in the first HMER. (4) Tables 3.9 on propane and Table 4.3 on natural gas trade, which have been added to the MER since the release of the first HMER, are included in this edition. In addition, Table 10.4 on nuclear electricity gross generation has been reorganized to align more closely with the current presentation in the MER.

  17. Historical review of the causes of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackadar, Clarke Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1900s, numerous seminal publications reported that high rates of cancer occurred in certain occupations. During this period, work with infectious agents produced only meager results which seemed irrelevant to humans. Then in the 1980s ground breaking evidence began to emerge that a variety of viruses also cause cancer in humans. There is now sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans for human T-cell lymphotrophic virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human papillomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpes virus 8 according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Many other causes of cancer have also been identified by the IARC, which include: Sunlight, tobacco, pharmaceuticals, hormones, alcohol, parasites, fungi, bacteria, salted fish, wood dust, and herbs. The World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research have determined additional causes of cancer, which include beta carotene, red meat, processed meats, low fibre diets, not breast feeding, obesity, increased adult height and sedentary lifestyles. In brief, a historical review of the discoveries of the causes of human cancer is presented with extended discussions of the difficulties encountered in identifying viral causes of cancer. PMID:26862491

  18. Congenital parasitic infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine; Deloron, Philippe; Peyron, François

    2012-02-01

    This review defines the concepts of maternal-fetal (congenital) and vertical transmissions (mother-to-child) of pathogens and specifies the human parasites susceptible to be congenitally transferred. It highlights the epidemiological features of this transmission mode for the three main congenital parasitic infections due to Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium sp. Information on the possible maternal-fetal routes of transmission, the placental responses to infection and timing of parasite transmission are synthesized and compared. The factors susceptible to be involved in parasite transmission and development of congenital parasitic diseases, such as the parasite genotypes, the maternal co-infections and parasitic load, the immunological features of pregnant women and the capacity of some fetuses/neonates to overcome their immunological immaturity to mount an immune response against the transmitted parasites are also discussed and compared. Analysis of clinical data indicates that parasitic congenital infections are often asymptomatic, whereas symptomatic newborns generally display non-specific symptoms. The long-term consequences of congenital infections are also mentioned, such as the imprinting of neonatal immune system and the possible trans-generational transmission. The detection of infection in pregnant women is mainly based on standard serological or parasitological investigations. Amniocentesis and cordocentesis can be used for the detection of some fetal infections. The neonatal infection can be assessed using parasitological, molecular or immunological methods; the place of PCR in such neonatal diagnosis is discussed. When such laboratory diagnosis is not possible at birth or in the first weeks of life, standard serological investigations can also be performed 8-10 months after birth, to avoid detection of maternal transmitted antibodies. The specific aspects of treatment of T. gondii, T. cruzi and Plasmodium congenital infections are

  19. Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Following previous observations a statistically significant association between various types of spirochetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) fulfilled Hill’s criteria in favor of a causal relationship. If spirochetal infections can indeed cause AD, the pathological and biological hallmarks of AD should also occur in syphilitic dementia. To answer this question, observations and illustrations on the detection of spirochetes in the atrophic form of general paresis, which is known to be associated with slowly progressive dementia, were reviewed and compared with the characteristic pathology of AD. Historic observations and illustrations published in the first half of the 20th Century indeed confirm that the pathological hallmarks, which define AD, are also present in syphilitic dementia. Cortical spirochetal colonies are made up by innumerable tightly spiraled Treponema pallidum spirochetes, which are morphologically indistinguishable from senile plaques, using conventional light microscopy. Local brain amyloidosis also occurs in general paresis and, as in AD, corresponds to amyloid beta. These historic observations enable us to conclude that chronic spirochetal infections can cause dementia and reproduce the defining hallmarks of AD. They represent further evidence in support a causal relationship between various spirochetal infections and AD. They also indicate that local invasion of the brain by these helically shaped bacteria reproduce the filamentous pathology characteristic of AD. Chronic infection by spirochetes, and co-infection with other bacteria and viruses should be included in our current view on the etiology of AD. Prompt action is needed as AD might be prevented. PMID:25932012

  20. Khadira (Acasia Catechu Linn.) - A medico-historical review.

    PubMed

    Narayana, A

    1996-01-01

    Indigenous Medical wisdom in India known as Ayurveda goes back to a hoary past. We find references in Vedas not only to medical science but to various drugs also. The medico-historical review of Khadira (Acasia Catechu linn.) including the historical perspectives, identity, varieties, formulae and therapeutic usage etc. is presented here, based on the classical treatises, medical lexicons, commentaries and other compilations, covering the from Vedic period to present times.

  1. Neuroinflammation and brain infections: historical context and current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mariotti, Raffaella; Bertini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-07

    An overview of current concepts on neuroinflammation and on the dialogue between neurons and non-neuronal cells in three important infections of the central nervous systems (rabies, cerebral malaria, and human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness) is here presented. Large numbers of cases affected by these diseases are currently reported. In the context of an issue dedicated to Camillo Golgi, historical notes on seminal discoveries on these diseases are also presented. Neuroinflammation is currently closely associated with pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Neuroinflammatory signaling in brain infections is instead relatively neglected in the neuroscience community, despite the fact that the above infections provide paradigmatic examples of alterations of the intercellular crosstalk between neurons and non-neuronal cells. In rabies, strategies of immune evasion of the host lead to silencing neuroinflammatory signaling. In the intravascular pathology which characterizes cerebral malaria, leukocytes and Plasmodium do not enter the brain parenchyma. In sleeping sickness, leukocytes and African trypanosomes invade the brain parenchyma at an advanced stage of infection. Both the latter pathologies leave open many questions on the targeting of neuronal functions and on the pathogenetic role of non-neuronal cells, and in particular astrocytes and microglia, in these diseases. All three infections are hallmarked by very severe clinical pictures and relative sparing of neuronal structure. Multidisciplinary approaches and a concerted action of the neuroscience community are needed to shed light on intercellular crosstalk in these dreadful brain diseases. Such effort could also lead to new knowledge on non-neuronal mechanisms which determine neuronal death or survival.

  2. Historical Review: Problematic Malaria Prophylaxis with Quinine.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis

    2016-08-03

    Quinine, a bitter-tasting, short-acting alkaloid drug extracted from cinchona bark, was the first drug used widely for malaria chemoprophylaxis from the 19th century. Compliance was difficult to enforce even in organized groups such as the military, and its prophylaxis potential was often questioned. Severe adverse events such as blackwater fever occurred rarely, but its relationship to quinine remains uncertain. Quinine prophylaxis was often counterproductive from a public health viewpoint as it left large numbers of persons with suppressed infections producing gametocytes infective for mosquitoes. Quinine was supplied by the first global pharmaceutical cartel which discouraged competition resulting in a near monopoly of cinchona plantations on the island of Java which were closed to Allied use when the Japanese Imperial Army captured Indonesia in 1942. The problems with quinine as a chemoprophylactic drug illustrate the difficulties with medications used for prevention and the acute need for improved compounds.

  3. Medico-historical review of drug Kustha.

    PubMed

    Prasad, P V V; Subhaktha, P K J P

    2002-01-01

    Kustha is well known for its cures since ancient times. Atharvaveda considers this as a potent plant next to Soma (a divine plant) in curing several diseases. It is also called Takmanashana (which cures fevers) in Atharvaveda. It grows in Himalayas and Kasmir. In Ayurveda, root of Kustha is used for fevers, skin diseases, headache etc. Almost all Nighantus carry the description of Kustha with several synonyms. Some scholars consider two varieties of Kustha i.e. sweetish and bitter, but one with bitter taste is the real Kustha. Pushkarmool (Inula recemosa Hook.f.) is available in the market as sweet variety of Kustha. Thus its medico-historical importance and other details have been presented in this article.

  4. An Historical Review of Liberal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoerner, James L.

    Section I of this paper presents a brief history of liberal education and reviews some of the ideas that have been expressed about its origin, and some of the ideas that have influenced liberal education throughout history. The definition of the purpose of liberal education is Woodring's: "It is the education that liberates men from the bondage of…

  5. A Historical Review of WIPP Backfill Development

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, L.H.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Molecke, M.A.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-15

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. It's introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  6. Historical and Critical Review on Biophysical Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adigüzel, Yekbun

    2016-07-01

    Biophysical economics is initiated with the long history of the relation of economics with ecological basis and biophysical perspectives of the physiocrats. It inherently has social, economic, biological, environmental, natural, physical, and scientific grounds. Biological entities in economy like the resources, consumers, populations, and parts of production systems, etc. could all be dealt by biophysical economics. Considering this wide scope, current work is a “biophysical economics at a glance” rather than a comprehensive review of the full range of topics that may just be adequately covered in a book-length work. However, the sense of its wide range of applications is aimed to be provided to the reader in this work. Here, modern approaches and biophysical growth theory are presented after the long history and an overview of the concepts in biophysical economics. Examples of the recent studies are provided at the end with discussions. This review is also related to the work by Cleveland, “Biophysical Economics: From Physiocracy to Ecological Economics and Industrial Ecology” [C. J. Cleveland, in Advances in Bioeconomics and Sustainability: Essay in Honor of Nicholas Gerogescu-Roegen, eds. J. Gowdy and K. Mayumi (Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, England, 1999), pp. 125-154.]. Relevant parts include critics and comments on the presented concepts in a parallelized fashion with the Cleveland’s work.

  7. Toxins as Weapons: A Historical Review.

    PubMed

    Pita, R; Romero, A

    2014-07-01

    This review article summarizes the use of toxins as weapons dating from the First World War until today, when there is a high concern of possible terrorist attacks with weapons of mass destruction. All through modern history, military programs and terrorist groups have favored toxins because of their high toxicity. However, difficulties of extraction or synthesis, as well as effective dissemination to cause a large number of casualties, have been the most important drawbacks. Special emphasis is focused on ricin and botulinum toxin, the most important toxins that have attracted the attention of military programs and terrorist groups. Other toxins like trichothecenes, saxitoxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are also discussed. A short section about anthrax is also included: Although Bacillus anthracis is considered a biological weapon rather than a toxin weapon, it produces a toxin that is finally responsible for the anthrax disease.

  8. Feral and Isolated Children: Historical Review and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Mary Charles; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An historical review of the documented cases of feral and other environmentally deprived children is presented. Discussion focuses on four groups of atypically reared children: animal-reared children, children isolated in wilderness, children confined in isolation, and children confined with limited human contact. (Author/CL)

  9. Patella instability: building bridges across the ocean a historic review.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A; Dejour, David

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of and treatment for musculoskeletal disease and injuries have seen an explosion of new knowledge. More precise imaging, correlative injury anatomy, more focused physical examination features, among others, have led this upsurge of current insight. Crucial to this knowledge revolution is the expansion of international knowledge, which is aided by an adoption of a universal scientific language, electronic transfer of information, and personal communication of surgeons and scientists across national boundaries. One area where this is particularly evident is in our knowledge and treatment for patellofemoral disorders. This article will review the developments in the management of patellar dislocations by tracing their historical roots. This is not meant to be a comprehensive review, but rather to give current readers a "historical memory" upon which to judge and interpret our present-day bridge of knowledge. Level of evidence V.

  10. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Hobizal, Kimberlee B.; Wukich, Dane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage. PMID:22577496

  11. Anthropometric Studies on the Turkish Population - A Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Neyzi, Olcay; Saka, Hatice Nurçin; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    A historical review of anthropometric studies conducted on Turkish children and adults is presented. In view of observed differences in growth status between children of different societies, the need for local reference standards and the methodology to be used for such studies have been stressed. The importance of local studies in reflecting the state of health and nutrition both in children and adults has also been mentioned. While a number of studies in children cited in this paper are designed to compare the growth of children from different socioeconomic levels, other studies aim to establish local reference data for Turkish children. While the historical studies in adults aim to define racial characteristics, the more recent studies aim to bring out nutritional characteristics with emphasis on increasing frequency of obesity. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419421

  12. Statistical Techniques Used in Published Articles: A Historical Review of Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Susan Troncoso; Thompson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to provide a historical account and metasynthesis of which statistical techniques are most frequently used in the fields of education and psychology. Six articles reviewing the "American Educational Research Journal" from 1969 to 1997 and five articles reviewing the psychological literature from 1948 to 2001…

  13. Chlamydial Infection in Animals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shewen, Patricia E.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the literature concerning chlamydial infection in birds and animals, particularly domestic animals is presented. Following a general discussion of the agent, the nature of chlamydial infection and diagnostic criteria, information regarding disease is summarized for each species. The possibility of zoonotic transmission is also discussed. PMID:6988075

  14. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves.

  15. Historical ESWT Paradigms Are Overcome: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Korakakis, Vasileios; Malliaropoulos, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a conservative treatment modality with still growing interest in musculoskeletal disorders. This narrative review aims to present an overview covering 20-year development in the field of musculoskeletal ESWT. Eight historical paradigms have been identified and put under question from a current perspective: energy intensity, focus size, anesthesia, imaging, growth plates, acuteness, calcifications, and number of sessions. All paradigms as set in a historical consensus meeting in 1995 are to be revised. First, modern musculoskeletal ESWT is divided into focused and radial technology and the physical differences are about 100-fold with respect to the applied energy. Most lesions to be treated are easy to reach and clinical focusing plays a major role today. Lesion size is no longer a matter of concern. With the exception of nonunion fractures full, regional, or even local anesthesia is not helpful in musculoskeletal indications. Juvenile patients can also effectively be treated without risk of epiphyseal damage. Further research is needed to answer the question about if and which acute injuries can be managed effectively. Treatment parameters like the number of sessions are still relying on empirical data and have to be further elucidated.

  16. Historical ESWT Paradigms Are Overcome: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Nauck, Tanja; Korakakis, Vasileios; Malliaropoulos, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a conservative treatment modality with still growing interest in musculoskeletal disorders. This narrative review aims to present an overview covering 20-year development in the field of musculoskeletal ESWT. Eight historical paradigms have been identified and put under question from a current perspective: energy intensity, focus size, anesthesia, imaging, growth plates, acuteness, calcifications, and number of sessions. All paradigms as set in a historical consensus meeting in 1995 are to be revised. First, modern musculoskeletal ESWT is divided into focused and radial technology and the physical differences are about 100-fold with respect to the applied energy. Most lesions to be treated are easy to reach and clinical focusing plays a major role today. Lesion size is no longer a matter of concern. With the exception of nonunion fractures full, regional, or even local anesthesia is not helpful in musculoskeletal indications. Juvenile patients can also effectively be treated without risk of epiphyseal damage. Further research is needed to answer the question about if and which acute injuries can be managed effectively. Treatment parameters like the number of sessions are still relying on empirical data and have to be further elucidated. PMID:27493955

  17. Historical review of die drool phenomenon during plastics extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Jan; Zatloukal, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Die drool phenomenon is defined as unwanted spontaneous accumulation of extruded polymer melt on open faces of extrusion die during extrusion process. Such accumulated material builds up on the die exit and frequently or continually sticks onto the extruded product and thus damages it. Since die drool appears, extrusion process must be shut down and die exit must be manually cleaned which is time and money consuming. Although die drool is complex phenomenon and its formation mechanism is not fully understood yet, variety of proposed explanations of its formation mechanism and also many ways to its elimination can be found in open literature. Our review presents in historical order breakthrough works in the field of die drool research, shows many ways to suppress it, introduces methods for its quantitative evaluation and composition analysis and summarizes theories of die drool formation mechanism which can be helpful for extrusion experts.

  18. A historical review of the classification of Erebinae (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Homziak, Nicholas T; Breinholt, Jesse W; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2016-11-10

    Erebidae is one of the most diverse families within the order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), with nearly 25,000 described species. The nominal subfamily Erebinae is among the most species rich and taxonomically complex. It reaches its highest diversity in the tropics, where much of the fauna remains undescribed. Species in this subfamily feed on a broad range of host plants, with associated radiations on grasses and legumes, and some species are pests of agriculture and forestry. The Erebinae, as defined today, comprises a large portion of the former noctuid subfamily Catocalinae. However, many lineages have tenuous or uncertain systematic placement. Here, we review the complex historical classification of Erebinae, and discuss the possible placement of some of these lineages in light of traditional morphological groupings and recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. We present an updated list of named erebine tribes and their relationships, and identify morphological traits from literature used to group genera within these tribes.

  19. Treatment of Hepatitis C Infections with Interferon: A Historical Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular transformation [24]. The resistance of HCV to IFN resides in a nonstructural viral protein NS3/4A, a serine protease...and inactivated influenza virus system [1]. The inactivated virus induced a protein that had a broad spectrum of antiviral activity, which...leukemia viruses [9] prompted addi- tional studies employing interferon as therapy for human chronic hepatitis B virus ( HBV ) infections. These had very

  20. Animal models of henipavirus infection: a review.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Berhane, Yohannes; Czub, Markus

    2009-09-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) form a separate genus Henipavirus within the family Paramyxoviridae, and are classified as biosafety level four pathogens due to their high case fatality rate following human infection and because of the lack of effective vaccines or therapy. Both viruses emerged from their natural reservoir during the last decade of the 20th century, causing severe disease in humans, horses and swine, and infecting a number of other mammalian species. The current review summarises current published data relating to experimental infection of small and large animals, including the natural reservoir species, the Pteropus bat, with HeV or NiV. Susceptibility to infection and virus distribution in the individual species is discussed, along with the pathogenesis, pathological changes, and potential routes of transmission.

  1. Microwave interferometric radiometry in remote sensing: An invited historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Neira, M.; LeVine, D. M.; Kerr, Y.; Skou, N.; Peichl, M.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Hallikainen, M.; Font, J.; Wu, J.; Mecklenburg, S.; Drusch, M.

    2014-06-01

    The launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission on 2 November 2009 marked a milestone in remote sensing for it was the first time a radiometer capable of acquiring wide field of view images at every single snapshot, a unique feature of the synthetic aperture technique, made it to space. The technology behind such an achievement was developed, thanks to the effort of a community of researchers and engineers in different groups around the world. It was only because of their joint work that SMOS finally became a reality. The fact that the European Space Agency, together with CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico e Industrial), managed to get the project through should be considered a merit and a reward for that entire community. This paper is an invited historical review that, within a very limited number of pages, tries to provide insight into some of the developments which, one way or another, are imprinted in the name of SMOS.

  2. Historical Review about Research on "Bonghan System" in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Ling; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Shi, Hong; Chen, Shu-Ping; He, Wei; Bai, Wan-Zhu; Zhu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The meridian-collateral theory is the theoretical basis of acupuncture-moxibustion therapy. Professor Bonghan Kim, a professor of the Pyongyang Medical University of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, claimed that he found the anatomical structure of meridian-collaterals, named Bonghan corpuscles (BHCs) and Bonghan ducts (BHDs) system or primo vascular system (PVS), in 1962. From 1963 to 1965, researchers from our institute conducted a series of comparative anatomical experiments, trying to reproduce the so-called BHC- and BHD-like structures in different strains of animals. In the present paper, the authors introduced their research findings about BHC- and BHD-like structures in the young rabbit's umbilicus including its external appearance, ectoplasm and endoplasm, and about strip-like and node-like objects in the blood vessels and lymph vessels near the larger abdominal and cervical blood vessels and chromaffin tissue in the back wall of the rabbit's abdominal cavity and between the bilateral kidneys. In spite of existence of the BHC- and BHD-like structures in the rabbit, there has been no proved evidence for their association with the meridian-collateral system described in acupuncture medicine. In the present historical review, the authors also make a discussion about the significance of those findings.

  3. Historical literature review on waste classification and categorization

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Richmond, A.A.; Williams, J.P.

    1995-03-01

    The Staff of the Waste Management Document Library (WMDL), in cooperation with Allen Croff have been requested to provide information support for a historical search concerning waste categorization/classification. This bibliography has been compiled under the sponsorship of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Chemical Technology Division to help in Allen`s ongoing committee work with the NRC/NRCP. After examining the search, Allen Croff saw the value of the search being published. Permission was sought from the database providers to allow limited publication (i.e. 20--50 copies) of the search for internal distribution at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and for Allen Croff`s associated committee. Citations from the database providers who did not grant legal permission for their material to be published have been omitted from the literature review. Some of the longer citations have been included in an abbreviated form in the search to allow the format of the published document to be shortened from approximately 1,400 pages. The bibliography contains 372 citations.

  4. Microwave Interferometric Radiometry in Remote Sensing: an Invited Historical Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Neira, M.; LeVine, D. M.; Kerr, Y.; Skou, N.; Peichl, M.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Hallikainen, M.; Font, J.; Wu, J.; Mecklenburg, S.; Drusch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission on 2 November 2009 marked a milestone in remote sensing for it was the first time a radiometer capable of acquiring wide field of view images at every single snapshot, a unique feature of the synthetic aperture technique, made it to space. The technology behind such an achievement was developed, thanks to the effort of a community of researchers and engineers in different groups around the world. It was only because of their joint work that SMOS finally became a reality. The fact that the European Space Agency, together with CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico e Industrial), managed to get the project through should be considered a merit and a reward for that entire community. This paper is an invited historical review that, within a very limited number of pages, tries to provide insight into some of the developments which, one way or another, are imprinted in the name of SMOS.

  5. Historical Review of the Fluid-Percussion TBI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lyeth, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern worldwide. Laboratory studies utilizing animal models of TBI are essential for addressing pathological mechanisms of brain injury and development of innovative treatments. Over the past 75 years, pioneering head injury researchers have devised and tested a number of fluid percussive methods to reproduce the concussive clinical syndrome in animals. The fluid-percussion brain injury technique has evolved from early investigations that applied a generalized loading of the brain to more recent computer-controlled systems. Of the many preclinical TBI models, the fluid-percussion technique is one of the most extensively characterized and widely used models. Some of the most important advances involved the development of the Stalhammer device to produce concussion in cats and the later characterization of this device for application in rodents. The goal of this historical review is to provide readers with an appreciation for the time and effort expended by the pioneering researchers who have led to today’s state of the art fluid-percussion animal models of TBI. PMID:27994570

  6. Reducing Surgical Site Infections: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, David E; Greenberg, James A

    2009-01-01

    Infection at or near surgical incisions within 30 days of an operative procedure contributes substantially to surgical morbidity and mortality each year. The prevention of surgical site infections encompasses meticulous operative technique, timely administration of appropriate preoperative antibiotics, and a variety of preventive measures aimed at neutralizing the threat of bacterial, viral, and fungal contamination posed by operative staff, the operating room environment, and the patient’s endogenous skin flora. It is the latter aspect of contamination, and specifically mechanical methods of prevention, on which this review focuses. PMID:20111657

  7. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  8. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. RESULTS In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma) have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. CONCLUSION The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms), which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising. PMID:26735605

  9. Advancing the management and control of typhoid fever: a review of the historical role of human challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Claire S; Darton, Thomas C; Woodward, William E; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Typhoid infection causes considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in settings where lack of clean water and inadequate sanitation facilitate disease spread through faecal-oral transmission. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis, immune control and microbiology of Salmonella Typhi infection can help accelerate the development of improved vaccines and diagnostic tests necessary for disease control. S. Typhi is a human-restricted pathogen; therefore animal models are limited in their relevance to human infection. During the latter half of the 20th century, induced human infection ("challenge") studies with S. Typhi were used effectively to assess quantitatively the human host response to challenge and to measure directly the efficacy of typhoid vaccines in preventing clinical illness. Here, the findings of these historic challenge studies are reviewed, highlighting the pivotal role that challenge studies have had in improving our understanding of the host-pathogen interaction, and illustrating issues relevant to modern typhoid challenge model design.

  10. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  11. Scandinavian mutation research in barley - a historical review.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Udda

    2014-12-01

    In 1928, the Swedish geneticists Hermann Nilsson-Ehle and Åke Gustafsson started on their suggestion experiments with induced mutations using the barley crop. In 1953, at the instigation of the Swedish Government, the 'Group for Theoretical and Applied Mutation Research' was established. Its aim was to study basic research problems in order to influence and improve methods for breeding cultivated plants. The research was non-commercial, even if some mutants were of practical importance. The peaks of activities occurred during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Applying X-rays and UV-irradiation very soon the first chlorophyll mutations were obtained followed by the first viable mutations 'Erectoides'. Soon the X-ray experiments expanded with other types of irradiation such as neutrons etc. and finally with chemical mutagens, starting with mustard gas and concluding with the sodium azide. The research brought a wealth of observations of general biological importance, high increased mutation frequencies, difference in the mutation spectrum and to direct mutagenesis for specific genes. A rather large collection of morphological and physiological mutations, about 12 000 different mutant alleles, with a very broad variation were collected and incorporated into the Nordic Genetic Resource Center (NordGen) Sweden. Barley, the main experimental crop has become one of the few higher plants in which biochemical genetics and molecular biological studies are now feasible. The collection is an outstanding material for mapping genes and investigating the barley genome. Several characters have been studied and analyzed in more detail and are presented in this historical review.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electronic portal imaging devices: a review and historical perspective of contemporary technologies and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.

    2002-03-01

    A review of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) used in external beam, megavoltage radiation therapy is presented. The review consists of a brief introduction to the definition, role and clinical significance of portal imaging, along with a discussion of radiotherapy film systems and the motivations for EPIDs. This is followed by a summary of the challenges and constraints inherent to portal imaging along with a concise, historical review of the technologies that have been explored and developed. The paper then examines, in greater depth, the two first-generation technologies that have found widespread clinical use starting from the late 1980s. This is followed by a broad overview of the physics, operation, properties and advantages of active matrix, flat-panel, megavoltage imagers, presently being commercially introduced to clinical environments or expected to be introduced in the future. Finally, a survey of contemporary research efforts focused on improving portal imaging performance by addressing various weaknesses in existing commercial systems is presented.

  13. Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions" examines the ways in which historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions have used the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) funds to enhance the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  14. Treatment of Rickettsia spp. infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Human rickettsioses caused by intracellular bacteria of the genus Rickettsia are distributed worldwide and are transmitted by arthropod vectors such as ticks, fleas, mites and lice. They have a wide range of manifestations from benign to life-threatening diseases. Mortality rates of up to 30% have been reported for some rickettsioses. Here, the authors will review in vitro and human studies of the various compounds that have been used for the treatment of Rickettsia spp. infections. The authors will also provide recommendations for the treatment of spotted fever and typhus group rickettsioses.

  15. Supernatural impotence: historical review with anthropological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Margolin, J; Witztum, E

    1989-12-01

    The historical and cultural background of the belief in supernatural impotence is presented, emphasizing its possible implications for clinical practice. A brief historical survey of the concept in Judaism and Christianity is followed by a short anthropological survey of supernatural impotence in different ethnic subcultures in Israel. A case demonstration exemplifies the connection between understanding the patient's cultural background and beliefs and the clinical competence of the therapist. The relationship between the clinical-therapeutic process in psychiatric practice and knowledge of the patient's cultural background and beliefs is stressed.

  16. Emerging flavobacterial infections in fish: A review

    PubMed Central

    Loch, Thomas P.; Faisal, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Flavobacterial diseases in fish are caused by multiple bacterial species within the family Flavobacteriaceae and are responsible for devastating losses in wild and farmed fish stocks around the world. In addition to directly imposing negative economic and ecological effects, flavobacterial disease outbreaks are also notoriously difficult to prevent and control despite nearly 100 years of scientific research. The emergence of recent reports linking previously uncharacterized flavobacteria to systemic infections and mortality events in fish stocks of Europe, South America, Asia, Africa, and North America is also of major concern and has highlighted some of the difficulties surrounding the diagnosis and chemotherapeutic treatment of flavobacterial fish diseases. Herein, we provide a review of the literature that focuses on Flavobacterium and Chryseobacterium spp. and emphasizes those associated with fish. PMID:26257926

  17. Student Outcomes Assessment: A Historical Review and Guide to Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Serbrenia J.

    This book provides a brief historical review of outcomes assessment in higher education and a general guide to designing, implementing, and evaluating assessment programs. Chapter 1 provides several definitions of commonly used terms and a review of the major actors and the political context. It identifies factors contributing to the recent push…

  18. Historical and critical review of the development of nonholonomic mechanics: the classical period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexey V.; Mamaev, Ivan S.; Bizyaev, Ivan A.

    2016-07-01

    In this historical review we describe in detail the main stages of the development of nonholonomic mechanics starting from the work of Earnshaw and Ferrers to the monograph of Yu. I.Neimark and N.A. Fufaev. In the appendix to this review we discuss the d'Alembert-Lagrange principle in nonholonomic mechanics and permutation relations.

  19. HIV infection and HERV expression: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The human genome contains multiple copies of retrovirus genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) that have entered the germ-line at some point in evolution. Several of these proviruses have retained (partial) coding capacity, so that a number of viral proteins or even virus particles are expressed under various conditions. Human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the beta-, gamma-, or spuma- retrovirus groups. Endogenous delta- and lenti- viruses are notably absent in humans, although endogenous lentivirus genomes have been found in lower primates. Exogenous retroviruses that currently form a health threat to humans intriguingly belong to those absent groups. The best studied of the two infectious human retroviruses is the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which has an overwhelming influence on its host by infecting cells of the immune system. One HIV-induced change is the induction of HERV transcription, often leading to induced HERV protein expression. This review will discuss the potential HIV-HERV interactions. Several studies have suggested that HERV proteins are unlikely to complement defective HIV virions, nor is HIV able to package HERV transcripts, probably due to low levels of sequence similarity. It is unclear whether the expression of HERVs has a negative, neutral, or positive influence on HIV-AIDS disease progression. A positive effect was recently reported by the specific expression of HERVs in chronically HIV-infected patients, which results in the presentation of HERV-derived peptides to CD8+ T-cells. These cytotoxic T-cells were not tolerant to HERV peptides, as would be expected for self-antigens, and consequently lysed the HIV-infected, HERV-presenting cells. This novel mechanism could control HIV replication and result in a low plasma viral load. The possibility of developing a vaccination strategy based on these HERV peptides will be discussed. PMID:22248111

  20. Male sexual disorders in Indian traditional medicine- a historical review.

    PubMed

    Padhi, M M

    1989-10-01

    The description of male sexual disorders by ancient authors of Indian medicine is praiseworthy. Effort has been made to describe the standard of approach with reference to certain books on Ayurveda and astrology. The development of administration of mineral medicines has added a new aspect in their treatment, but the description regarding their forms, etiopathogenesis, prognosis and the principle of treatment has remained unchanged. The opinions of various authors have been presented historically from vedic age up to the modern era. The present status of treatment and the role of Ayurveda in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions have been highlighted here.

  1. Cocoa and Heart Health: A Historical Review of the Science

    PubMed Central

    Pucciarelli, Deanna L.

    2013-01-01

    The medicinal use of cocoa has a long history dating back almost five hundred years when Hernán Cortés’s first experienced the drink in Mesoamerica. Doctors in Europe recommended the beverage to patients in the 1700s, and later American physicians followed suit and prescribed the drink in early America―ca. 1800s. This article delineates the historic trajectory of cocoa consumption, the linkage between cocoa’s bioactive-mechanistic properties, paying special attention to nitric oxides role in vasodilation of the arteries, to the current indicators purporting the benefits of cocoa and cardiovascular health. PMID:24077240

  2. Historical review of pandemic influenza A in Taiwan, 2009.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tzong-Shiann; Wang, Shih-Min; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2010-04-01

    Influenza is an important disease in children. In April 2009, human infections caused by a novel swine H1N1 virus were reported in Mexico, followed by a pandemic. As of 14 March 2010, more than 213 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory-confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 16,813 deaths. This influenza pandemic is unique in many respects. Large outbreaks occurred outside the usual season for influenza infection. The virus also caused severe illnesses and deaths in younger people, with many deaths caused by severe pneumonia. A comprehensive approach to pandemic control has been launched, including infection control interventions, antiviral drugs and vaccines. Vaccination is the most efficient way to control morbidity and mortality resulting from influenza infections in humans. For the first time, an influenza vaccine against a pandemic strain became available before the winter. However, the initially smooth influenza vaccination program was disturbed by the fear of possible adverse events following immunization. In Taiwan, mistrust of the influenza vaccination has also caused significant social impacts towards the end of 2009. Lessons learned from this pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 might help health authorities and physicians shape their preparedness for the next pandemic.

  3. Investigating landslides caused by earthquakes - A historical review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefer, D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Post-earthquake field investigations of landslide occurrence have provided a basis for understanding, evaluating, and mapping the hazard and risk associated with earthquake-induced landslides. This paper traces the historical development of knowledge derived from these investigations. Before 1783, historical accounts of the occurrence of landslides in earthquake are typically so incomplete and vague that conclusions based on these accounts are of limited usefulness. For example, the number of landslides triggered by a given event is almost always greatly underestimated. The first formal, scientific post-earthquake investigation that included systematic documentation of the landslides was undertaken in the Calabria region of Italy after the 1783 earthquake swarm. From then until the mid-twentieth century, the best information on earthquake-induced landslides came from a succession of post-earthquake investigations largely carried out by formal commissions that undertook extensive ground-based field studies. Beginning in the mid-twentieth century, when the use of aerial photography became widespread, comprehensive inventories of landslide occurrence have been made for several earthquakes in the United States, Peru, Guatemala, Italy, El Salvador, Japan, and Taiwan. Techniques have also been developed for performing "retrospective" analyses years or decades after an earthquake that attempt to reconstruct the distribution of landslides triggered by the event. The additional use of Geographic Information System (GIS) processing and digital mapping since about 1989 has greatly facilitated the level of analysis that can applied to mapped distributions of landslides. Beginning in 1984, synthesis of worldwide and national data on earthquake-induced landslides have defined their general characteristics and relations between their occurrence and various geologic and seismic parameters. However, the number of comprehensive post-earthquake studies of landslides is still

  4. Predicting and reducing cranioplasty infections by clinical, radiographic and operative parameters - A historical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kimchi, Gil; Stlylianou, Petros; Wohl, Anton; Hadani, Moshe; Cohen, Zvi R; Zauberman, Jacob; Feldman, Zeev; Spiegelmann, Roberto; Nissim, Ouzi; Zivly, Zion; Penn, Mark; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-12-01

    Cranioplasty is a relatively straightforward and common procedure, yet it carries a substantial rate of infection that causes major morbidity and mortality. The authors' objective was to assess the effect of various variables on the risk of developing post-cranioplasty infections, and to enable the prediction and reduction of its incidence, contributing to an improved patient-selection. The medical records, microbiologic cultures, imaging studies and operative reports of patients who have undergone cranioplasty between the years 2008-2014 at Sheba Medical Center, a tertiary care teaching hospital in Tel-Hashomer, Israel, were reviewed and evaluated for potential predictive factors of infection. Cox regression was applied for uni- as well as multi-variate analyses, and a Kaplan-Meier curve and Log-Rank test were used to describe the association between neurological deficit prior to operation and occurrence of infection. Eighty-eight patients who had undergone cranioplasties using autologous as well as various artificial materials were included in the study. The overall rate of infection was 13.6%; median time to infection was 30.5 days (interquartile range: 17.35-43.5). Pre-operative degree of neurological disability was the strongest predictor for infection in both uni- and multi-variate analyses (Hazard ratio [HR]=18.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-187 p=0.014). Patients admitted due to trauma (HR=7.04 CI: 0.9-54.6, p=0.062) and autologous graft material (HR=2.88, 95% CI: 0.92-9.09, p=0.07) were associated with a trend toward a higher risk for infection. In conclusion, careful patient selection is a key concept in avoiding harmful post-cranioplasty infections. Modified Rankin Score yields a well-established tool that predicts the risk of infection.

  5. Post partum infections: A review for the non-OBGYN

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, E

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of infections in the puerperium (post partum period) is not well understood and remains underestimated because surveillance systems are often limited to the acute care setting. The most common source of persistent fever after delivery is genital tract infection for which diagnosis remains mostly clinical and antibiotic treatment empiric. This review will emphasize surgical site infections (SSIs) and endometritis. Septic thrombo-phlebitis, mastitis, urinary tract infections and rare infections will be covered in less detail. Puerperal sepsis will not be reviewed. PMID:27512432

  6. A Historical Review of English in Japan (1600-1880).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Minoru

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the early history of the English language in Japan, from its introduction in the early 17th century through the 20th century, focusing on the role of English in regard to education, nationalism, and modernization. Also discussed is the current status of English instruction in Japan. (16 references) (MDM)

  7. Historical Review of Californium-252 Discovery and Development

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stoddard, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed. (PLG)

  8. Historical review of californium-252 discovery and development

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving /sup 252/Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed. (PLG)

  9. Historical review of californium-252 discovery and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, D. H.

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving (252)Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed.

  10. Historical review of C-5A lift distribution control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disney, T. E.; Eckholdt, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental development work on various load alleviation systems for the C-5A is reviewed to trace the development of the technical and hardware concepts to the present time. Variations in system objectives, means of implementation and effects on loads and airplane performance, stability and control are discussed.

  11. A half century historical review of the k-omega model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, David C.

    1991-01-01

    A brief historical review is presented tracing evolution of the k-omega two-equation turbulence model. The review compares the various k-omega models developed since 1942, and contrasts them to the well-known k-epsilon model. Straight-forward results based on perturbation analysis illustrate advantages offered by k-omega models for flows with adverse pressure gradient and for integration through the sublayer. As part of the historical perspective, the paper shows that Kolmogorov did remarkably well in formulating his model without the aid of a computer.

  12. Review of historical monitoring data on Techa River contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorobiova, M. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Burmistrov, D. S.; Safronova, N. G.; Kozheurov, V. P.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, B. A.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The Mayak Production Association was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. The extensive increase in plutonium production during 1948-1955, as well as the absence of reliable waste-management technology, resulted in significant releases of liquid radioactive effluent into the rather small Techa River. This resulted in chronic external and internal exposure of about 30,000 residents of riverside communities; these residents form the cohort of an epidemiologic investigation. Analysis of the available historical monitoring data indicates that the following reliable data sets can be used for reconstruction of doses received during the early periods of operation of the Mayak Production Association: Temporal pattern of specific beta activity of river water for several sites in the upper Techa region since July 1951; average annual values of specific beta activity of river water and bottom sediments as a function of downstream distance for the whole river since 1951; external gamma-exposure rates near the shoreline as a function of downstream distance for the whole Techa River since 1952; and external gamma-exposure rate as a function of distance from the shoreline for several sites in the upper and middle Techa since 1951.

  13. A historical review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant backfill development

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; BRUSH,LAURENCE H.

    2000-06-05

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. Its introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  14. Genetic counseling and testing for Huntington's disease: A historical review.

    PubMed

    Nance, Martha A

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes the ways in which genetic counseling has evolved since John Pearson and Sheldon Reed first promoted "a genetic education" in the 1950s as a voluntary, non-directive clinical tool for permitting individual decision making. It reviews how the emergence of Huntington's disease (HD) registries and patient support organizations, genetic testing, and the discovery of a disease-causing CAG repeat expansion changed the contours of genetic counseling for families with HD. It also reviews the guidelines, outcomes, ethical and laboratory challenges, and uptake of predictive, prenatal, and preimplantation testing, and it casts a vision for how clinicians can better make use of genetic counseling to reach a broader pool of families that may be affected by HD and to ensure that genetic counseling is associated with the best levels of care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Discoveries of rhythms in human biological functions: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Björn

    2009-08-01

    Though there are very early and ancient observations on the daily variation in physiological and pathophysiological functions (e.g., bronchial asthma), more detailed and scientific reports were not published until the beginning of the 17th century. The aim of this review is to bring those reports to the attention of researchers of chronobiology and chronopharmacology. The ancient books and their contents, which constitute the basis for this review, are part of the personal library collection of the author; numerous observations and reports on biologic rhythms in man are presented here for the first time. The intent of this review is to demonstrate that the fields of chronobiology and chronopharmacology are not only a new and modern branch of science, but that it stands on the shoulders of wonderful and insightful observations and explanations made by our scientific forefathers. It is the hope that the reader will enjoy the richness of the ancient reports that contribute to our present knowledge achieved through astute early biologic rhythm research.

  16. Historical trauma as public narrative: a conceptual review of how history impacts present-day health.

    PubMed

    Mohatt, Nathaniel Vincent; Thompson, Azure B; Thai, Nghi D; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2014-04-01

    Theories of historical trauma increasingly appear in the literature on individual and community health, especially in relation to racial and ethnic minority populations and groups that experience significant health disparities. As a consequence of this rapid growth, the literature on historical trauma comprises disparate terminology and research approaches. This critical review integrates this literature in order to specify theoretical mechanisms that explain how historical trauma influences the health of individuals and communities. We argue that historical trauma functions as a public narrative for particular groups or communities that connects present-day experiences and circumstances to the trauma so as to influence health. Treating historical trauma as a public narrative shifts the research discourse away from an exclusive search for past causal variables that influence health to identifying how present-day experiences, their corresponding narratives, and their health impacts are connected to public narratives of historical trauma for a particular group or community. We discuss how the connection between historical trauma and present-day experiences, related narratives, and health impacts may function as a source of present-day distress as well as resilience.

  17. Historical trauma as public narrative: A conceptual review of how history impacts present-day health

    PubMed Central

    Mohatt, Nathaniel Vincent; Thompson, Azure B.; Thai, Nghi D.; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Theories of historical trauma increasingly appear in the literature on individual and community health, especially in relation to racial and ethnic minority populations and groups that experience significant health disparities. As a consequence of this rapid growth, the literature on historical trauma comprises disparate terminology and research approaches. This critical review integrates this literature in order to specify theoretical mechanisms that explain how historical trauma influences the health of individuals and communities. We argue that historical trauma functions as a public narrative for particular groups or communities that connects present-day experiences and circumstances to the trauma so as to influence health. Treating historical trauma as a public narrative shifts the research discourse away from an exclusive search for past causal variables that influence health to identifying how present-day experiences, their corresponding narratives, and their health impacts are connected to public narratives of historical trauma for a particular group or community. We discuss how the connection between historical trauma and present-day experiences, related narratives, and health impacts may function as a source of present-day distress as well as resilience. PMID:24561774

  18. Determination of phosphorus in natural waters: A historical review.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Paul; McKelvie, Ian; Monbet, Phil

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a virtual special issue that reviews the development of analytical approaches to the determination of phosphorus species in natural waters. The focus is on sampling and sample treatment, analytical methods and quality assurance of the data. The export of phosphorus from anthropogenic activities (from diffuse and point sources) can result in increased primary production and eutrophication, and potentially the seasonal development of toxic algal blooms, which can significantly impact on water quality. Therefore the quantification of phosphorus species in natural waters provides important baseline data for studying aquatic phosphorus biogeochemistry, assessing ecosystem health and monitoring compliance with legislation.

  19. Water hammer with column separation: A historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergant, A.; Simpson, A. R.; Tijsseling, A. S.

    2006-02-01

    Column separation refers to the breaking of liquid columns in fully filled pipelines. This may occur in a water-hammer event when the pressure in a pipeline drops to the vapor pressure at specific locations such as closed ends, high points or knees (changes in pipe slope). The liquid columns are separated by a vapor cavity that grows and diminishes according to the dynamics of the system. The collision of two liquid columns, or of one liquid column with a closed end, may cause a large and nearly instantaneous rise in pressure. This pressure rise travels through the entire pipeline and forms a severe load for hydraulic machinery, individual pipes and supporting structures. The situation is even worse: in one water-hammer event many repetitions of cavity formation and collapse may occur. This paper reviews water hammer with column separation from the discovery of the phenomenon in the late 19th century, the recognition of its danger in the 1930s, the development of numerical methods in the 1960s and 1970s, to the standard models used in commercial software packages in the late 20th century. A comprehensive survey of laboratory tests and field measurements is given. The review focuses on transient vaporous cavitation. Gaseous cavitation and steam condensation are beyond the scope of the paper.

  20. Review of HIV Testing Efforts in Historically Black Churches

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Latrice Crystal; Powell, Terrinieka Williams

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to critically assess the state of HIV testing in African American churches. A comprehensive review of peer-reviewed publications on HIV testing in church-based settings was conducted by two independent coders. Twenty-six papers published between 1991 and 2015, representing 24 unique projects, were identified addressing at least one dimension of HIV testing. Thirteen faith-based projects have implemented HIV testing events or had clergy promote the importance of testing and knowing one’s HIV status, but empirical data and rigorous study designs were limited. Only eight papers reported onsite HIV testing in churches. Less than 5% of the studies reported the percentage of congregants who returned for their test results. Finally, no study has examined at baseline or post-intervention behavioral intentions to be screened for HIV. Future research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of HIV testing in churches and to explore the possibilities of the role of the church and leadership structure in the promotion of HIV treatment and care. PMID:26030470

  1. Transportation during periods of mobilization: a historical review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, D.P.; Johnson, L.R.

    1984-07-01

    The effects of the US transportation system of military preparations for war are compounded by the concurrent transportation requirements of economic mobilization to support a war effort. Several studies of military logistics have concluded that the transportation system may be the limiting factor in determining whether there is a successful operation. The responsiveness of the US transportation system during recent military conflicts is reviewed, beginning with the Spanish-American War and continuing through the Korean War. The nature and scope of each war is characterized, and the associated mobilization is described. Technological developments and regulatory changes in the transportation system since World War II are also reviewed in terms of their implications for the response capability of the nation. The dominant theme that emerges from this study is the overriding need for close coordination between modes and appropriate setting of priorities for shipments. The lack of an efficient system ultimately results in severe congestion at ports and terminals. The critical importance of the merchant marine fleet in overseas conflicts during the previous wars is also identified.

  2. Federal incentives for industrial modernization: Historical review and future opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Sandra C.; Batson, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    Concerns over the aging of the U.S. aerospace industrial base led DOD to introduce first its Technology Modernization (Tech Mod) Program, and more recently the Industrial Modernization Incentive Program (IMIP). These incentives include productivity shared savings rewards, contractor investment protection to allow for amortization of plant and equipment, and subcontractor/vendor participation. The purpose here is to review DOD IMIP and to evaluate whether a similar program is feasible for NASA and other non-DOD agencies. The IMIP methodology is of interest to industrial engineers because it provides a structured, disciplined approach to identifying productivity improvement opportunities and documenting their expected benefit. However, it is shown that more research on predicting and validating cost avoidance is needed.

  3. Selection of Journals for Index Medicus: A Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Karel, Leonard

    1967-01-01

    From the inception of the first Index Medicus, published in 1879, to the present, the National Library of Medicine has been concerned with the quality of journals in the Index. The Library has, therefore, sought advice repeatedly on how best to maintain currency of the Index without sacrificing quality and subject matter balance. Responding to suggestions, the Library decided in June 1964 to base its selection of journals on recommendations made by a panel consisting primarily of extramural consultants widely regarded as specialists in the totality of biomedical literature. Beginning with its first meeting in September 1964, this panel has been fortified in its reviews by advice from subject matter specialists. The panel, by its own wishes, which bear the endorsement of the Board of Regents of the Library, will continue to rely heavily on such expert advice in future evaluations of journals. PMID:6072093

  4. [Historical review on changes in the concept of COPD].

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke

    2007-04-01

    A brief review of changes in the concept of COPD was made based on records of mile stone articles and prestigious international lung conferences. A major innovation in the definition of COPD was presented by the 'GOLD WORKSHOP REPORT' published in 2001. It introduced a concept of inflammatory response of the lung to toxic gas/particles as the most significant pathogenesis of the disease, eliminating the definition of COPD being a syndrome of 'emphysema plus chronic bronchitis'. Both CIBA Guest Symposium and Aspen Emphysema Conference contributed in the evolution of COPD concept. Also discussed in brief are the impacts of 'Small Airway Disease Theory' and British bronchitis hypothesis. The GOLD revision 2006 may be highly appreciated among practicing clinicians world wide with key features; 'COPD is preventable and treatable accompanied by significant systemic effects'.

  5. 77 FR 71447 - Notice of Fee Schedule for Reviewing Historic Preservation Certification Applications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... Instructions. SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) is revising the fees it charges for reviewing Historic... 67.11(a) (2011). This rule authorizes the NPS to make the changes it is now implementing. The NPS...) effectively balances these goals. It would preserve the long-standing NPS practice of not charging for...

  6. Freud on Sexual Trauma: An Historical Review of Seduction and Betrayal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerlund, Elaine

    1986-01-01

    An historical review of the development and rejection of Freud's seduction theory. Freud's interpretation of seduction as real sexual acts gave way to his conclusion that his patients' reports derived from fantasy, though his view of the significance of childhood sexual trauma in the etiology of neurosis remained steady. Examines the relationship…

  7. A Historical Review of Leadership Development in the FFA and 4-H

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Tracy S.; Scholl, Jan F.; Dunigan, Anne H.; Mamontova, Nadezhda

    2007-01-01

    FFA and 4-H are two youth-based organizations that cite leadership development as a key foundational component. The purpose of this study was to review and document the historical development of leadership events and activities in both programs. Evidence can be found of leadership development in schools, conferences, and camps. Leadership-related…

  8. 33 CFR 137.50 - Reviews of historical sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reviews of historical sources of information. 137.50 Section 137.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL...

  9. 33 CFR 137.50 - Reviews of historical sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reviews of historical sources of information. 137.50 Section 137.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL...

  10. 33 CFR 137.50 - Reviews of historical sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reviews of historical sources of information. 137.50 Section 137.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL...

  11. Global Childhood Deaths From Pertussis: A Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Maria Yui Kwan; Khandaker, Gulam; McIntyre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Impact of pertussis vaccines on mortality is a key World Health Organization indicator, and trends in mortality rates and age distribution can inform maternal immunization strategies. We systematically reviewed studies reporting pertussis mortality rates (PMRs) per million population, identifying 19 eligible studies. During a prevaccine observation period of ≥50 years in high-income countries (HICs), PMRs reduced in both infants and 1- to 4-year-olds by >80%, along with improvements in living conditions. In studies in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), PMRs resembled highest prevaccine HIC rates. Postvaccine in HICs, significant further reduction in deaths (>98%) occurred, but with a large left shift in age of onset among residual deaths. Postvaccine in LMICs, limited data also show large and rapid decreases in PMRs, first in older infants and children, but long-term data fully enumerating residual deaths are lacking. In Sweden, large increases in the prevalence of undetectable pertussis antibodies were found at 10 years after high childhood coverage of acellular pertussis vaccines. Such data are not available from LMICs using whole-cell vaccines in a primary schedule without boosters. Data on residual infant deaths and maternal seroprevalence would be valuable inputs into consideration of pertussis vaccination in pregnancy in LMIC settings, especially if more precise immune correlates of infant protection against death from pertussis were known. PMID:27838665

  12. Review of bacterial and viral zoonotic infections transmitted by dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh, I; Namazi, SH

    2015-01-01

    Dogs are a major reservoir for zoonotic infections. Dogs transmit several viral and bacterial diseases to humans. Zoonotic diseases can be transmitted to human by infected saliva, aerosols, contaminated urine or feces and direct contact with the dog. Viral infections such as rabies and norovirus and bacterial infections including Pasteurella, Salmonella, Brucella, Yersinia enterocolitica, Campylobacter, Capnocytophaga, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira, Staphylococcus intermedius and Methicillin resistance staphylococcus aureus are the most common viral and bacterial zoonotic infections transmitted to humans by dogs. This review, focused on the mentioned infectious diseases by describing general information, signs and symptoms, transmission ways, prevention and treatment of the infection. As far as the infections are concerned, the increase of the knowledge and the awareness of dog owners and the general population regarding zoonotic infections could significantly mitigate zoonoses transmission and consequently their fatal complications. PMID:28316698

  13. Gyrodactylid developmental biology: historical review, current status and future trends.

    PubMed

    Cable, J; Harris, P D

    2002-03-01

    In the viviparous gyrodactylids, embryos develop one inside another within the parental uterus, a phenomenon with major implications for the biology of this species-rich group. Development occurs via two routes: first-born daughters develop at the centre of an embryo cluster in utero, whereas all other daughters develop from oocytes. The resulting offspring are, however, morphologically indistinguishable. We review here the history of gyrodactylid embryology in the context of current knowledge and, present additional cytogenetic and ultrastructural observations of embryonic development. These progenetic parasites are highly modified for viviparity; oocyte maturation and sperm storage occur in a single chamber, the Egg Cell Forming Region, and a mature oocyte passes into the uterus after the birth of the preceding, fully developed offspring. The uterus has a syncytial lining derived from anterior and posterior cap cells. These cells are the first to differentiate in the female reproductive system and may be involved in controlling development. Embryos receive nutrients via the uterus rather than from vitelline cells. Traditionally, development of the first-born daughter has been considered a form of polyembryony, although paedogenesis has also been suggested. In contrast to previous studies, we could not trace lineage of the first-born daughter to a single quiescent macromere. However, only mitotic divisions have been conclusively observed in the intraembryonic generation, indicating an asexual origin. All other daughters are formed from meiotically derived oocytes by sexual reproduction or automictic parthenogenesis. The latter may involve pre-meiotic doubling of chromosomes, but the precise mechanism and the relative proportion of sexual and parthenogenetic offspring are unknown. Exceptionally, cleavage in Gyrodactylus spp. occurs by duets rather than quartets (a pattern previously only recorded in acoels) and is characterised by extensive cell rearrangements

  14. Infections and their control: a historical perspective Swb Newsom Infections and their control: a historical perspective Sage/Infection Prevention Society £17.95 235pp 9781849204538 1849204535 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2010-10-27

    BILL NEWSOM, an eminent, but now retired, medical microbiologist, provides a personal but engaging review of infections and our attempts to control them. it is a fascinating social history of what has become an essential service, and Newsom highlights the need to be aware of past struggles and avoid repeating mistakes.

  15. [25 years "Anesthesiology and Reanimation"--a historical review].

    PubMed

    Benad, G

    2000-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the foundation of the journal "Anaesthesiology und Reanimation" seems to be a good occasion, first of all, to look back at the special situation regarding the opportunities open to East German anaesthetists for publishing anaesthesiological papers before and after the Berlin Wall was built and then to give a review of the history of this journal. As the author's own publication list shows, East Germans could publish papers in West German journals without any problems before a major reform of the universities, bringing drastic changes, was introduced in East Germany in 1969. It became practically impossible to publish papers in West German journals because the "Directorates of International Relations", which had been installed at all universities in 1969, supervised the entire correspondence with persons and institutions in all foreign countries, in particular West Germany, the other West European countries and the countries of North and South America. Thus, East German anaesthetists were forced to publish in non-anaesthesiological East German journals because there was no journal of anaesthesiology in East Germany until "Anaesthesiologie und Reanimation" was founded as journal of the "Society of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation of the GDR" in 1976. The problems arising from the introduction of this journal under socialist conditions, including political pressure and control through the "General Secretariat of the Medical Scientific Societies of the Ministry of Health of the GDR" as well as technical problems with the publisher and the printers, are described. In spite of all these problems, which were overcome by the editor-in-chief with the aid of his colleagues on the editorial board and the scientific advisory council, this journal was initially published with a circulation of 1,200 copies in 1976 and its circulation increased to 1,600 copies in 1989. The journal proved to be of great benefit to East German anaesthetists and anaesthetists

  16. Radionuclide Imaging of Musculoskeletal Infection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    There are numerous imaging tests for diagnosing musculoskeletal infection. Radiographs are routinely performed, because even when not diagnostic, they provide an anatomic overview of the region of interest that could influence subsequent procedure selection and interpretation. MRI is sensitive and provides superb anatomic detail. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. (67)Ga is used primarily for spondylodiskitis. Although in vitro labeled leukocyte imaging is the radionuclide test of choice for complicating osteomyelitis such as diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection, it is not useful for spondylodiskitis. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments have limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for spondylodiskitis. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of the antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin are promising infection-specific agents. (18)F-FDG is the radiopharmaceutical of choice for spondylodiskitis. Its role in diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection is not established. Preliminary data suggest (68)Ga may be useful in musculoskeletal infection. (124)I-fialuridine initially showed promise as an infection-specific radiopharmaceutical, but subsequent investigations were disappointing. The development of PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging systems, which combine anatomic and functional imaging, has revolutionized diagnostic imaging. These hybrid systems are redefining the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected or known infection and inflammation by improving diagnostic accuracy and influencing patient management.

  17. Candida infections in newborns: a review.

    PubMed

    Khoory, B J; Vino, L; Dall'Agnola, A; Fanos, V

    1999-10-01

    Despite adequate treatment, nosocomial fungal infections have become an increasingly important cause of morbidity, extended hospitalization, and mortality in critically ill newborn babies. Furthermore, the high incidence of central nervous system involvement in septic newborns frequently results in serious neurological damage and psychomotorial sequelae. The prevention of fungal colonization in the population at risk, together with prompt diagnosis and treatment, are an efficient combination which lead to a better outcome of neonatal fungal infections. New drugs characterized by great efficacy and tolerance have recently been employed in clinical practice. This article summarizes certain aspects of Candida spp. infections in the neonatal period with regard to multisystemic presentation and involvement.

  18. Infective Endocarditis by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus (former name, Haemophilus paraphrophilus) is a normal inhabitant of the naso- and oropharynx and has been rarely reported as a cause of human infections. A case of infective endocarditis by this organism is being reported and literature of endocarditis cases caused by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus is being reviewed. PMID:24392406

  19. Spinal infections in children: A review.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Spinal infections are uncommon but significant causes of morbidity and hospitalization in the paediatric population. These infections encompass a broad range of conditions, from discitis to osteomyelitis and spinal epidural and intramedullary abscesses. Paediatric spinal infections can be caused by a range of bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic agents. Ultrastructural differences of the vertebrae and associated structures result in distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis of spinal infections in children compared to adults. The non-specific nature of symptoms produced by them can cause considerable diagnostic delays. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging can facilitate early identification of the disease, and distinguish it from other spinal pathologies. The association of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains from some of the cases appears worrisome; as is the increasing incidence of Kingella kingae infections causing spinal infections. Rest and immobilization are the general treatment, and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is warranted to ensure optimal clinical outcome. Most patients generally have a good prognosis; however, early identification and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential to achieve the best therapeutic response.

  20. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Ocular Infections: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Wajiha J.; Sheheitli, Huda; Abdul Fattah, Maamoun; Hamam, Rola N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous or atypical mycobacterial ocular infections have been increasing in prevalence over the past few decades. They are known to cause periocular, adnexal, ocular surface and intraocular infections and are often recalcitrant to medical therapy. These infections can potentially cause detrimental outcomes, in part due to a delay in diagnosis. We review 174 case reports and series on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) ocular infections and discuss etiology, microbiology, risk factors, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment of these infections. History of interventions, trauma, foreign bodies, implants, contact lenses, and steroids are linked to NTM ocular infections. Steroid use may prolong the duration of the infection and cause poorer visual outcomes. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with multiple antibiotics are necessary to achieve the best visual outcome. PMID:26106601

  1. A Scoping Review and Prevalence Analysis of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ana Lourdes; Gabrie, José Antonio; Rueda, María Mercedes; Mejia, Rosa Elena; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Canales, Maritza

    2014-01-01

    Background Honduras is endemic for soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, but critical information gaps still remain on the prevalence and intensity of these infections as well as on their spatial distribution at subnational levels. Objectives Firstly, to review the research activity on STH infections in Honduras and secondly, to carry out a national prevalence analysis and map the geographical distribution of these infections in children. Methods A systematic search was conducted of the published and grey literature to identify scientific work on the impact and prevalence of STH infections done between May 1930 and June 30, 2012. International databases and Honduran journals were searched. Grey literature was gleaned from local libraries and key informants. Select studies conducted between 2001 and 2012 were used to produce prevalence maps and to investigate association between STH prevalence and socio-economic and environmental factors. Results Of 257 identified studies, 211 (21.4% peer-reviewed) were retained for analysis and categorized as clinical research (10.9%), treatment efficacy studies (8.1%) or epidemiological studies (81%). Prevalence analysis and geographical mapping included 36 epidemiological studies from Honduras's 18 departments and 23% of its municipalities. Overall STH prevalence was >50% in 40.6% of municipalities. Prevalences above 20% for each trichuriasis, ascariasis, and hookworm infection were found in 68%, 47.8%, and 7.2% of studied municipalities, respectively. Municipalities with lower human development index, less access to of potable water, and with higher annual precipitation showed higher STH prevalences. Conclusions This is the first study to provide a comprehensive historic review of STH research activity and prevalence in Honduras, revealing important knowledge gaps related to infection risk factors, disease burden, and anti-parasitic drug efficacy, among others. Our decade-long prevalence analysis reveals geographical

  2. A review of the clinical implications of anti-infective biomaterials and infection-resistant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Campoccia, Davide; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2013-11-01

    Infection is currently regarded as the most severe and devastating complication associated to the use of biomaterials. The important social, clinical and economic impacts of implant-related infections are promoting the efforts to obviate these severe diseases. In this context, the development of anti-infective biomaterials and of infection-resistant surfaces is being regarded as the main strategy to prevent the establishment of implant colonisation and biofilm formation by bacteria. In this review, the attention is focused on the biomaterial-associated infections, from which the need for anti-infective biomaterials originates. Biomaterial-associated infections differ markedly for epidemiology, aetiology and severity, depending mainly on the anatomic site, on the time of biomaterial application, and on the depth of the tissues harbouring the prosthesis. Here, the diversity and complexity of the different scenarios where medical devices are currently utilised are explored, providing an overview of the emblematic applicative fields and of the requirements for anti-infective biomaterials.

  3. Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shany; Eytan, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection has been reported many times in the literature since the mid 1980s – mainly in case reports and in small case series, but also in four controlled studies. Still, many physicians are unaware of this association although acute cytomegalovirus infection diagnosis in a thrombosis patient may warrant antiviral therapy and may affect anticoagulation therapy duration. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics of patients with thrombosis and acute cytomegalovirus infection are reviewed, and the current knowledge concerning this unique association is presented herein. We believe it is time to add acute cytomegalovirus infection to the list of thrombosis triggers. PMID:25624857

  4. Review article: Paediatric bone and joint infection.

    PubMed

    Stott, N Susan

    2001-06-01

    Paediatric musculoskeletal infection remains an important cause of morbidity. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus is still the most common organism although the incidence of methicillin resistant S. aureus in the community is rising. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to Haemophilus influenzae is decreasing in incidence secondary to immunisation and in some units has been replaced by infections with the gram negative bacillus, Kingella kingae. Recent prospective studies indicate that uncomplicated osteomyelitis can be treated by three to four weeks of antibiotics. However, there is still a small group of children who will have overwhelming disseminated infection. These children require aggressive surgical and medical intervention. Two recent reports have identified an increased incidence of septic arthritis in children who have hemophilia and are HIV positive.

  5. Review of adolescent urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Mark; Cohen, Jacob

    2007-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of adolescent urinary tract infection (UTI) share some of the clinical features seen in infections of the young and old. Whereas most infections in the young patient demand an extensive radiologic work-up, the teenager with a UTI is not so straightforward. The clinician must balance being too aggressive with being too conservative in the diagnosis and management of these patients. UTIs occur most frequently among adolescent females and are usually uncomplicated and not associated with underlying anatomic abnormalities. Smaller numbers of adolescent males suffer from UTIs, and the need to search for underlying abnormalities is not clear. Adolescent UTI is associated with nascent sexual activity and is also more common in voiding/elimination syndromes. Future studies examining UTI, specifically in the adolescent age group, will help provide clinicians with a more focused algorithm in the diagnosis and management of adolescent UTIs.

  6. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: a review.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-29

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) in adult horses are hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment, although sporadically, cases of CDAD can occur in horses that have not received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. The most common antibiotics associated with CDAD in horses are erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfonamides, β-lactam antimicrobials, clindamycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin. Clinical signs and intestinal lesions of CDAD infection are not specific and they cannot be used to distinguish infections by C. difficile from infections by other agents, such as Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella sp. The distribution of lesions throughout the intestinal tract seems to be age-dependent. Small intestine is invariably affected, and colon and cecum may or may not have lesions in foals<1-month old. Naturally acquired disease in older foals and adult horses has a more aboral distribution, affecting colon and sometimes cecum, but rarely the small intestine. Detection of toxin A, toxin B or both in intestinal contents or feces is considered the most reliable diagnostic criterion for CDAD in horses. Isolation of toxigenic strains of C. difficile from horses with intestinal disease is highly suggestive of CDAD. A better understanding of pathogenesis, reservoirs of infection, and vaccines and other methods of control is needed. Also further studies are recommended to investigate other possible predisposing factors and/or etiological agents of enteric diseases of horses.

  7. A Comprehensive Review of Portosystemic Collaterals in Cirrhosis: Historical Aspects, Anatomy, and Classifications

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Rajesh; Kasana, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic collateral formation in cirrhosis plays an important part in events that define the natural history in affected patients. A detailed understanding of collateral anatomy and hemodynamics in cirrhotics is essential to envisage diagnosis, management, and outcomes of portal hypertension. In this review, we provide detailed insights into the historical, anatomical, and hemodynamic aspects to portal hypertension and collateral pathways in cirrhosis with emphasis on the various classification systems. PMID:28074159

  8. A Historical Review of Brayton and Stirling Power Conversion Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic power conversion technologies, such as closed Brayton and free-piston Stirling, offer many advantages for space power applications including high efficiency, long life, and attractive scaling characteristics. This paper presents a historical review of Brayton and Stirling power conversion technology for space and discusses on-going development activities in order to illustrate current technology readiness. The paper also presents a forecast of potential future space uses of these power technologies.

  9. A Comprehensive Review of Portosystemic Collaterals in Cirrhosis: Historical Aspects, Anatomy, and Classifications.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Arora, Ankur; Shetty, Rajesh; Kasana, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic collateral formation in cirrhosis plays an important part in events that define the natural history in affected patients. A detailed understanding of collateral anatomy and hemodynamics in cirrhotics is essential to envisage diagnosis, management, and outcomes of portal hypertension. In this review, we provide detailed insights into the historical, anatomical, and hemodynamic aspects to portal hypertension and collateral pathways in cirrhosis with emphasis on the various classification systems.

  10. Health and Wellness Technology Use by Historically Underserved Health Consumers: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Perchonok, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Background The implementation of health technology is a national priority in the United States and widely discussed in the literature. However, literature about the use of this technology by historically underserved populations is limited. Information on culturally informed health and wellness technology and the use of these technologies to reduce health disparities facing historically underserved populations in the United States is sparse in the literature. Objective To examine ways in which technology is being used by historically underserved populations to decrease health disparities through facilitating or improving health care access and health and wellness outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic review in four library databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Engineering Village) to investigate the use of technology by historically underserved populations. Search strings consisted of three topics (eg, technology, historically underserved populations, and health). Results A total of 424 search phrases applied in the four databases returned 16,108 papers. After review, 125 papers met the selection criteria. Within the selected papers, 30 types of technology, 19 historically underserved groups, and 23 health issues were discussed. Further, almost half of the papers (62 papers) examined the use of technology to create effective and culturally informed interventions or educational tools. Finally, 12 evaluation techniques were used to assess the technology. Conclusions While the reviewed studies show how technology can be used to positively affect the health of historically underserved populations, the technology must be tailored toward the intended population, as personally relevant and contextually situated health technology is more likely than broader technology to create behavior changes. Social media, cell phones, and videotapes are types of technology that should be used more often in the future. Further, culturally informed health information

  11. Treatment of oral fungal infections using antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: a systematic review of currently available evidence.

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Romanos, Georgios E

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to review the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of oral fungal infections. To address the focused question "Should PDT be considered a possible treatment regimen for oral fungal infections?" PubMed/Medline and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1997 up to March 2014 using various combinations of the following key words: "Candida albicans"; "Candidiasis"; "Candidosis"; "denture stomatitis"; "oral" and "photodynamic therapy". Original studies, experimental studies and articles published solely in English language were sought. Letters to the editor, historic reviews and unpublished data were excluded. Pattern of the present literature review was customized to mainly summarize the pertinent information. Fifteen studies (3 clinical and 12 experimental) were included. All studies reported antimicrobial PDT to be an effective antifungal treatment strategy. One study reported PDT and azole therapy to be equally effective in the treatment of oral fungal infections. Methylene blue, toluidine blue and porphyrin derivative were the most commonly used photosensitizers. The laser wavelengths and power output ranged between ∼455 nm-660 nm and 30 mW-400 mW. The energy fluence ranged between 26-245 J cm(-2) and the duration or irradiation ranged between 10 seconds and 26 minutes. Clinical effectiveness of antimicrobial PDT as a potent therapeutic strategy for oral fungal infections requires further investigations.

  12. [Historical review on the development of medical parasitology in China during the years of 1871-2006].

    PubMed

    Qu, Feng-yi

    2007-08-01

    The present review deals with the representative research papers on human parasites and parasitic diseases in China over the past hundred years (1871-2006). As the views focused on the development of the medical parasitology, the historical background and progressive characters in the period of fermentation, origination, and expansion have been discussed. The check list of the first cases of human parasitic diseases reported in China during 1871-2006 contained 128 species of parasitic pathogens, and among them 38 species were the newly revisional records. The citation from Faust's paper (1923) proved that previous record of "the first case of Eurytrema pancreaticum from Hongkong" was an absurdly mistake. The human infections of Diphyllobothrium latum, Toxocara canis, and Triodontophorus minor discovered by Lin (1924) from Beijing were the first records in the country. A doubtful malaria case reported from Chongqing by Hung (1944) should be revised as the first case of babesiosis in China. The above-presented examples suggest that the truthful record of parasitic pathogens is an important base for the discovery history of parasitic diseases. With comments on the research progress of human parasitic diseases in different historical stages, it seems that the trends of medical parasitology development in China have been synchronous with the research activities in the area.

  13. Historical Perspectives: A Review and Evaluation of 76 Studies of the Defense Research Enterprise, 1945-2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    challenges and policy options. The most profound insights gleaned from historical analysis will not come as a surprise to many: 1. DoDs actual future needs... HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES: A REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF 76 STUDIES OF THE DEFENSE RESEARCH ENTERPRISE, 1945-2015 CAMERON KEYS PRESIDENTIAL...relevant historical detail, and prominent policy tensions are emphasized. Views expressed in summaries and evaluations represent only those of the

  14. For Researchers on Obesity: Historical Review of Extra Body Weight Definitions.

    PubMed

    Komaroff, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Rationale. The concept of obesity has been known since ancient world; however, the current standard definition of obesity was endorsed only about a decade ago. There is a need for researches to understand multiple approaches to defining obesity and how and why the standard definition was developed. The review will help to grasp the complexity of the problem and can lead to novel hypotheses in obesity research. Objective. This paper focuses on the objective to understand historical background on the development of "reference and standard tables" of weight as a platform for normal versus abnormal body weight definition. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed to chronologically summarize the definition of body weight from time of Hippocrates till the year of 2010. Conclusion. This paper presents the historical background on the development of "reference and standard tables" of weight as a platform for normal versus abnormal body weight definition. Knowledge of historical approaches to the concept of obesity can motivate researchers to find new hypotheses and utilize the appropriate obesity assessments to address their objectives.

  15. For Researchers on Obesity: Historical Review of Extra Body Weight Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Komaroff, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Rationale. The concept of obesity has been known since ancient world; however, the current standard definition of obesity was endorsed only about a decade ago. There is a need for researches to understand multiple approaches to defining obesity and how and why the standard definition was developed. The review will help to grasp the complexity of the problem and can lead to novel hypotheses in obesity research. Objective. This paper focuses on the objective to understand historical background on the development of “reference and standard tables” of weight as a platform for normal versus abnormal body weight definition. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed to chronologically summarize the definition of body weight from time of Hippocrates till the year of 2010. Conclusion. This paper presents the historical background on the development of “reference and standard tables” of weight as a platform for normal versus abnormal body weight definition. Knowledge of historical approaches to the concept of obesity can motivate researchers to find new hypotheses and utilize the appropriate obesity assessments to address their objectives. PMID:27313875

  16. [Infective endocarditis: review of 36 cases].

    PubMed

    Lupis, Francesco; Giordano, Salvatore; Pampinella, Diego; Scarlata, Francesco; Romano, Amelia

    2009-09-01

    In a retrospective study of cases of infective endocarditis (IE) observed in adult patients, the data of patients hospitalized for definite IE in the Cardiosurgery Unit of ARNAS-Civico in Palermo (Italy) from March 2003 to September 2006 were analysed. All cases were classified according to the modified Duke criteria. In all, 36 immunocompetent patients with "definite" IE were included (20 males and 16 females with a median age of 54 years). The aortic valve (23/36, 64%) was the most commonly involved, followed by the mitral (19/36, 52.7%) and tricuspid valve (4/36, 11%). In 10 patients (27.7%), a double localization was observed. Blood culture yielded a positive result in 15 cases. Staphylococci and enterococci were the pathogens most commonly identified. Valvular diseases and previous cardiosurgical procedures were the risk factors most commonly noted. Four patients developed complications during the course of the disease, one of whom died. In patients with positive blood culture, antibiotics were prescribed on the basis of susceptibility test results. In patients with negative blood culture, empiric therapy was directed against Gram+ bacteria (glycopeptides, aminoglycosides and betalactams). Surgical therapy was necessary in 25 patients (69.4%). The patients were subsequently enrolled in a cardiological and infectivological follow-up. Our results showed that rapid diagnosis, correct antibiotic therapy and early surgical treatment improve the outcome in patients with infective endocarditis.

  17. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  18. Management of supraventricular tachycardia using the Valsalva manoeuvre: a historical review and summary of published evidence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gavin

    2012-12-01

    Use of the Valsalva manoeuvre (VM) as a first-line management tool for the reversion of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) in both emergency medicine and prehospital emergency-care settings has presented challenges, requiring continuous examination and refinement to define both its appropriateness and effectiveness. This report details the evolution of knowledge related to SVT and the historical evolution and controversies associated with VM; it also highlights the ongoing development of an evidence-based model of practice for the management of SVT in the emergency medicine and prehospital emergency-care settings. A two-part review of the literature using electronic medical databases was conducted. Other relevant texts or articles unavailable within the electronic search were also identified. Part 1 of the search criteria identified the historical evolution of the pathophysiology of SVT, whereas part 2 identified the use of VM for the clinical management of SVT. Part 1 of the review identified a total of 38 articles with eight meeting the inclusion criteria, and part 2 of the review identified a total of 44 articles with 17 meeting the inclusion criteria. An evidence-based model of practice requires clarification. The differentiation of nodal re-entrant tachycardias may, with further research, lead to identification of the specificity of VM in reversion of SVT during the early stages of arrhythmia. There is a need for further prehospital and emergency department research to quantify an evidence-based approach to VM.

  19. Sociopolitical development of the nursing profession in Iran: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Fooladi, Marjaneh; Parvizy, Soroor

    2016-01-01

    Significant sociopolitical changes in recent decades have not only influenced the nursing profession, but also the entire Iranian healthcare system. This study describes the historical evolution of the nursing profession within a sociopolitical context. This historical review of unpublished and published literature endorsed personal accounts of historic events by 14 of the oldest nurses in Iran chosen through purposive sampling method, as they shared their nursing experiences. Individual recollections were collected through in-depth and semi-structured interviews and later analyzed through oral history analysis method. From the results, the 3 categories of the White Revolution, the Islamic Revolution, and Iran-Iraq war and 8 subcategories emerged, where participants identified factors that fundamentally changed the Iranian nursing profession. The nursing profession continues to develop and help revise policies to improve the healthcare system and quality of care. The findings of this study facilitate the better understanding of the influence of sociopolitical events on the nursing profession and guide the revision or development of new healthcare policies.

  20. Sociopolitical development of the nursing profession in Iran: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Fooladi, Marjaneh; Parvizy, Soroor

    2016-01-01

    Significant sociopolitical changes in recent decades have not only influenced the nursing profession, but also the entire Iranian healthcare system. This study describes the historical evolution of the nursing profession within a sociopolitical context. This historical review of unpublished and published literature endorsed personal accounts of historic events by 14 of the oldest nurses in Iran chosen through purposive sampling method, as they shared their nursing experiences. Individual recollections were collected through in-depth and semi-structured interviews and later analyzed through oral history analysis method. From the results, the 3 categories of the White Revolution, the Islamic Revolution, and Iran-Iraq war and 8 subcategories emerged, where participants identified factors that fundamentally changed the Iranian nursing profession. The nursing profession continues to develop and help revise policies to improve the healthcare system and quality of care. The findings of this study facilitate the better understanding of the influence of sociopolitical events on the nursing profession and guide the revision or development of new healthcare policies. PMID:28050243

  1. The human impact of tsunamis: a historical review of events 1900-2009 and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Dick, Anna; Kirsch, Thomas D

    2013-04-16

    Introduction. Although rare, tsunamis have the potential to cause considerable loss of life and injury as well as widespread damage to the natural and built environments. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of tsunamis on human populations in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of tsunamis were compiled using two methods, a historical review from 1900 to mid 2009 of tsunami events from multiple databases and a systematic literature review to October 2012 of publications. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between tsunami mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. There were 255,195 deaths (range 252,619-275,784) and 48,462 injuries (range 45,466-51,457) as a result of tsunamis from 1900 to 2009. The majority of deaths (89%) and injuries reported during this time period were attributed to a single event -the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Findings from the systematic literature review indicate that the primary cause of tsunami-related mortality is drowning, and that females, children and the elderly are at increased mortality risk. The few studies that reported on tsunami-related injury suggest that males and young adults are at increased injury-risk. Conclusions. Early warning systems may help mitigate tsunami-related loss of life.

  2. The Human Impact of Tsunamis: a Historical Review of Events 1900-2009 and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Dick, Anna; Kirsch, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Although rare, tsunamis have the potential to cause considerable loss of life and injury as well as widespread damage to the natural and built environments. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of tsunamis on human populations in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of tsunamis were compiled using two methods, a historical review from 1900 to mid 2009 of tsunami events from multiple databases and a systematic literature review to October 2012 of publications. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between tsunami mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. There were 255,195 deaths (range 252,619-275,784) and 48,462 injuries (range 45,466-51,457) as a result of tsunamis from 1900 to 2009. The majority of deaths (89%) and injuries reported during this time period were attributed to a single event –the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Findings from the systematic literature review indicate that the primary cause of tsunami-related mortality is drowning, and that females, children and the elderly are at increased mortality risk. The few studies that reported on tsunami-related injury suggest that males and young adults are at increased injury-risk. Conclusions. Early warning systems may help mitigate tsunami-related loss of life. PMID:23857277

  3. A Detailed Historical Review of Propellant Management Devices for Low Gravity Propellant Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive background and historical review of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) used throughout spaceflight history. The purpose of a PMD is to separate liquid and gas phases within a propellant tank and to transfer vapor-free propellant from a storage tank to a transfer line en route to either an engine or receiver depot tank, in any gravitational or thermal environment. The design concept, basic flow physics, and principle of operation are presented for each type of PMD. The three primary capillary driven PMD types of vanes, sponges, and screen channel liquid acquisition devices are compared and contrasted. For each PMD type, a detailed review of previous applications using storable propellants is given, which include space experiments as well as space missions and vehicles. Examples of previous cryogenic propellant management are also presented.

  4. A historical review of perceptions of key aspects of spirituality and religion within alcoholics anonymous.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Janice Cooke

    2013-01-01

    This historical research aimed to develop an accurate perception of the role of spirituality and religion within the history of Alcoholics Anonymous. Primary and secondary sources were reviewed. The study identified that Bill W. and Dr. Bob established the format for the support group based on the ideas of William James, which formed the base for the Oxford Groups. Alcoholics Anonymous was clearly viewed as a spiritual group and not a religion. The review also showed that the two founders had each experienced one of the two types of spiritual awakenings that James had addressed. These findings will help nurses clarify their own perceptions of this organization so they may accurately educate individuals who they are encouraging to participate in this program while recovering from an addiction.

  5. Coxiella burnetii infections in sheep or goats: an opinionated review.

    PubMed

    Van den Brom, R; van Engelen, E; Roest, H I J; van der Hoek, W; Vellema, P

    2015-12-14

    Q fever is an almost ubiquitous zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, which is able to infect several animal species, as well as humans. Cattle, sheep and goats are the primary animal reservoirs. In small ruminants, infections are mostly without clinical symptoms, however, abortions and stillbirths can occur, mainly during late pregnancy. Shedding of C. burnetii occurs in feces, milk and, mostly, in placental membranes and birth fluids. During parturition of infected small ruminants, bacteria from birth products become aerosolized. Transmission to humans mainly happens through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In the last decade, there have been several, sometimes large, human Q fever outbreaks related to sheep and goats. In this review, we describe C. burnetii infections in sheep and goats, including both advantages and disadvantages of available laboratory techniques, as pathology, different serological tests, PCR and culture to detect C. burnetii. Moreover, worldwide prevalences of C. burnetii in small ruminants are described, as well as possibilities for treatment and prevention. Prevention of shedding and subsequent environmental contamination by vaccination of sheep and goats with a phase I vaccine are possible. In addition, compulsory surveillance of C. burnetii in small ruminant farms raises awareness and hygiene measures in farms help to decrease exposure of people to the organism. Finally, this review challenges how to contain an infection of C. burnetii in small ruminants, bearing in mind possible consequences for the human population and probable interference of veterinary strategies, human risk perception and political considerations.

  6. The human impact of tropical cyclones: a historical review of events 1980-2009 and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Doocy, Shannon; Dick, Anna; Daniels, Amy; Kirsch, Thomas D

    2013-04-16

    Background. Cyclones have significantly affected populations in Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and the Americas over the past quarter of a century. Future vulnerability to cyclones will increase due to factors including population growth, urbanization, increasing coastal settlement, and global warming. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of cyclones on human populations in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of cyclones were compiled using two methods, a historical review from 1980 to 2009 of cyclone events from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between cyclone characteristics and mortality using Stata 11.0. Findings. There were 412,644 deaths, 290,654 injured, and 466.1 million people affected by cyclones between 1980 and 2009, and the mortality and injury burden was concentrated in less developed nations of Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific. Inconsistent reporting suggests this is an underestimate, particularly in terms of the injured and affected populations. The primary cause of cyclone-related mortality is drowning; in developed countries male gender was associated with increased mortality risk, whereas females experienced higher mortality in less developed countries. Conclusions. Additional attention to preparedness and early warning, particularly in Asia, can lessen the impact of future cyclones.

  7. The Human Impact of Tropical Cyclones: a Historical Review of Events 1980-2009 and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doocy, Shannon; Dick, Anna; Daniels, Amy; Kirsch, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cyclones have significantly affected populations in Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and the Americas over the past quarter of a century. Future vulnerability to cyclones will increase due to factors including population growth, urbanization, increasing coastal settlement, and global warming. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of cyclones on human populations in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of cyclones were compiled using two methods, a historical review from 1980 to 2009 of cyclone events from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between cyclone characteristics and mortality using Stata 11.0. Findings. There were 412,644 deaths, 290,654 injured, and 466.1 million people affected by cyclones between 1980 and 2009, and the mortality and injury burden was concentrated in less developed nations of Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific. Inconsistent reporting suggests this is an underestimate, particularly in terms of the injured and affected populations. The primary cause of cyclone-related mortality is drowning; in developed countries male gender was associated with increased mortality risk, whereas females experienced higher mortality in less developed countries. Conclusions. Additional attention to preparedness and early warning, particularly in Asia, can lessen the impact of future cyclones. PMID:23857074

  8. Secondary infection as a risk factor for dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: an historical perspective and role of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria G; Alvarez, Mayling; Halstead, Scott B

    2013-07-01

    Today, dengue viruses are the most prevalent arthropod-borne viruses in the world. Since the 1960s, numerous reports have identified a second heterologous dengue virus (DENV) infection as a principal risk factor for severe dengue disease (dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, DHF/DSS). Modifiers of dengue disease response include the specific sequence of two DENV infections, the interval between infections, and contributions from the human host, such as age, ethnicity, chronic illnesses and genetic background. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection has been proposed as the early mechanism underlying DHF/DSS. Dengue cross-reactive antibodies raised following a first dengue infection combine with a second infecting virus to form infectious immune complexes that enter Fc-receptor-bearing cells. This results in an increased number of infected cells and increased viral output per cell. At the late illness stage, high levels of cytokines, possibly the result of T cell elimination of infected cells, result in vascular permeability, leading to shock and death. This review is focused on the etiological role of secondary infections (SI) and mechanisms of ADE.

  9. Bacterial, Fungal, and Parasitic Infections of the Central Nervous System: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation and Historical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shih, Robert Y; Koeller, Kelly K

    2015-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in prevention and treatment, infectious diseases affecting the central nervous system remain an important source of morbidity and mortality, particularly in less-developed countries and in immunocompromised persons. Bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens are derived from living organisms and affect the brain, spinal cord, or meninges. Infections due to these pathogens are associated with a variety of neuroimaging patterns that can be appreciated at magnetic resonance imaging in most cases. Bacterial infections, most often due to Streptococcus, Haemophilus, and Neisseria species, cause significant meningitis, whereas the less common cerebritis and subsequent abscess formation have well-documented progression, with increasingly prominent altered signal intensity and corresponding contrast enhancement. Atypical bacterial infections are characterized by the development of a granulomatous response, classically seen in tuberculosis, in which the tuberculoma is the most common parenchymal form of the disease; spirochetal and rickettsial diseases are less common. Fungal infections predominate in immunocompromised hosts and are caused by yeasts, molds, and dimorphic fungi. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal infection, whereas candidiasis is the most common nosocomial infection. Mucormycosis and aspergillosis are characterized by angioinvasiveness and are associated with high morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In terms of potential exposure in the worldwide population, parasitic infections, including neurocysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, echinococcosis, malaria, and schistosomiasis, are the greatest threat. Rare amebic infections are noteworthy for their extreme virulence and high mortality. The objective of this article is to highlight the characteristic neuroimaging manifestations of bacterial, fungal, and parasitic diseases, with emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation and historical perspectives.

  10. Enterovirus Infections of the Central Nervous System Review

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Ross E.; Tabor-Godwin, Jenna M.; Tsueng, Ginger; Feuer, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) frequently infect the central nervous system (CNS) and induce neurological diseases. Although the CNS is composed of many different cell types, the spectrum of tropism for each EV is considerable. These viruses have the ability to completely shut down host translational machinery and are considered highly cytolytic, thereby causing cytopathic effects. Hence, CNS dysfunction following EV infection of neuronal or glial cells might be expected. Perhaps unexpectedly given their cytolytic nature, EVs may establish a persistent infection within the CNS, and the lasting effects on the host might be significant with unanticipated consequences. This review will describe the clinical aspects of EV-mediated disease, mechanisms of disease, determinants of tropism, immune activation within the CNS, and potential treatment regimes. PMID:21251690

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Eye Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Saccà, Sergio Claudio; Vagge, Aldo; Pulliero, Alessandra; Izzotti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The connection between Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and eye diseases has been increasingly reported in the literature and in active research. The implication of this bacterium in chronic eye diseases, such as blepharitis, glaucoma, central serous chorioretinopathy and others, has been hypothesized. Although the mechanisms by which this association occurs are currently unknown, this review describes shared pathogenetic mechanisms in an attempt to identify a lowest common denominator between eye diseases and Hp infection. The aim of this review is to assess whether different studies could be compared and to establish whether or not Hp infection and Eye diseases share common pathogenetic aspects. In particular, it has been focused on oxidative damage as a possible link between these pathologies. Text word search in Medline from 1998 to July 2014. 152 studies were included in our review. Were taken into considerations only studies that related eye diseases more frequent and/or known. Likely oxidative stress plays a key role. All of the diseases studied seem to follow a common pattern that implicates a cellular response correlated with a sublethal dose of oxidative stress. These alterations seem to be shared by both Hp infections and ocular diseases and include the following: decline in mitochondrial function, increases in the rate of reactive oxygen species production, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations, increases in the levels of oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids, and decreases in the capacity to degrade oxidatively damaged proteins and other macromolecules. This cascade of events appears to repeat itself in different diseases, regardless of the identity of the affected tissue. The trabecular meshwork, conjunctiva, and retina can each show how oxidative stress may acts as a common disease effector as the Helicobacter infection spreads, supported by the increased oxidative damage and other inflammation. PMID:25526440

  12. Consequence of Maternal Zika Virus Infection: A Narrative review.

    PubMed

    Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-10-18

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a deadly flavivirus that has spread from Africa to Asia and European countries. The virus is associated with other viruses in the same genus or family, transmitted by the same mosquito species with known history of fatality. A sudden increase in the rate of infection from ZIKV has made it a global health concern, which necessitates close symptom monitoring, enhancing treatment options, and vaccine production. This paper reviewed current reports on birth defects associated with ZIKV, mode of transmission, body fluids containing the virus, diagnosis , possible preventive measures or treatments, and vaccine development. Google scholar was used as the major search engine for research and review articles, up to July, 2016. Search terms such as "ZIKV", "ZIKV infection", "ZIKV serotypes", "treatment of ZIKV infection", "co-infection with zika virus", "flavivirus", "microcephaly and zika", "birth defects and Zika", as well as "ZIKV vaccine" were used. ZIKV has been detected in several body fluids such as saliva, semen, blood, and amniotic fluid. This reveals the possibility of sexual and mother to child transmission. The ability of the virus to cross the placental barrier and the blood brain barrier (BBB) has been associated with birth defects such as microcephaly, ocular defects, and Guillian Barre syndrome (GBS). Preventive measures can reduce the spread and risk of the infection. Available treatments only target symptoms while vaccines are still under development. Birth defects are associated with ZIKV infection in pregnant women; hence the need for development of standard treatments, employment of strict preventive measures and development of effective vaccines.

  13. Health-care-associated infection in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Nejad, Sepideh; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Ellis, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the epidemiology of endemic health-care-associated infection (HAI) in Africa. Methods Three databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the WHO regional medical database for Africa) were searched to identify studies published from 1995 to 2009 on the epidemiology of HAI in African countries. No language restriction was applied. Available abstract books of leading international infection control conferences were also searched from 2004 to 2009. Findings The eligibility criteria for inclusion in the review were met by 19 articles, only 2 of which met the criterion of high quality. Four relevant abstracts were retrieved from the international conference literature. The hospital-wide prevalence of HAI varied between 2.5% and 14.8%; in surgical wards, the cumulative incidence ranged from 5.7% to 45.8%. The largest number of studies focused on surgical site infection, whose cumulative incidence ranged from 2.5% to 30.9%. Data on causative pathogens were available from a few studies only and highlighted the importance of Gram-negative rods, particularly in surgical site infection and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Conclusion Limited information is available on the endemic burden of HAI in Africa, but our review reveals that its frequency is much higher than in developed countries. There is an urgent need to identify and implement feasible and sustainable approaches to strengthen HAI prevention, surveillance and control in Africa. PMID:22084514

  14. The Human Impact of Earthquakes: a Historical Review of Events 1980-2009 and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Packer, Catherine; Dick, Anna; Kirsch, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Population growth and increasing urbanization in earthquake-prone areas suggest that earthquake impacts on human populations will increase in the coming decades. Recent large earthquakes affecting large populations in Japan, Haiti, Chile and New Zealand are evidence of this trend and also illustrate significant variations in outcomes such damage and mortality levels. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of earthquakes on human populations in terms of mortality, injury and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of earthquakes were compiled using two methods, a historical review from 1980 to mid 2009 of earthquake events from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications, ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between earthquake mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. From 1980 through 2009, there were a total of 372,634 deaths (range 314,634-412,599), 995,219 injuries (range: 845,345-1,145,093), and more than 61 million people affected by earthquakes, and mortality was greatest in Asia. Inconsistent reporting across data sources suggests that the numbers injured and affected are likely underestimates. Findings from a systematic review of the literature indicate that the primary cause of earthquake-related death was trauma due to building collapse and, the very young and the elderly were at increased mortality risk, while gender was not consistently associated with mortality risk. Conclusions. Strategies to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes should include improvements to the built environment and a focus on populations most vulnerable to mortality and injury. PMID:23857161

  15. Review: Occult hepatitis C virus infection: still remains a controversy.

    PubMed

    Vidimliski, Pavlina Dzekova; Nikolov, Igor; Geshkovska, Nadica Matevska; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Rostaing, Lionel; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the presence of HCV RNA in the liver cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the patients whose serum samples test negative for HCV RNA, with or without presence of HCV antibodies. The present study reviews the existing literature on the persistence of occult hepatitis C virus infection, with description of the clinical characteristics and methods for identification of occult hepatitis C. Occult hepatitis C virus infection was detected in patients with abnormal results of liver function tests of unknown origin, with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA negativity in serum, and also in patients with spontaneous or treatment-induced recovery from hepatitis C. The viral replication in the liver cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells was present in all clinical presentations of occult hepatitis C. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells represent an extra-hepatic site of HCV replication. The reason why HCV RNA was not detectable in the serum of patients with occult hepatitis C, could be the low number of circulating viral particles not detectable by the diagnostic tests with low sensitivity. It is uncertain whether occult hepatitis C is a different clinical entity or just a form of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Data accumulated over the last decade demonstrated that an effective approach to the diagnosis of HCV infection would be the implementation of more sensitive HCV RNA diagnostic assays, and also, examination of the presence of viral particles in the cells of the immune system.

  16. [Conjugal leprosy infection in Japan--case report and review].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Motoaki; Tomoda, Masakazu

    2012-04-01

    The authors reported a conjugal leprosy infection observed in Japan. The husband, index case, first noticed sensory disturbance at the lower right leg in his forties. He developed edematous swelling with redness of the right hand and forearm at the age of 72 (1989), and then developed multiple erythema and hypesthesia at the extremities. He was diagnosed as BL type leprosy (reactional stage) and treated with multi-drug therapy. His 71-year-old wife developed a few erythema at the right forearm in 1993. She was classified as BT type. The duration of their marriage life was over forty years. The couple did not have consanguinity. No other leprosy patients were found in their lineage. From their clinical courses the authors concluded that the husband infected his wife. According to Japanese literatures, the frequency of conjugal leprosy among new patients in Japan was approximately 1%. There were worldwide observations that the husband often infected the wife, and mostly the index case was multibacillary and the secondary case paucibacillary. The authors reviewed definition and frequency of conjugal leprosy, factors in conjugal infection and leprosy infection among the adults.

  17. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  18. Sleep, dreaming, and mental health: a review of historical and neurobiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Palagini, Laura; Rosenlicht, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    Theories as to the function of sleep and dreaming and their relationship to emotions have been studied since the beginning of recorded history. Earliest historical records show the predominant view to be that dreams were considered divine in origin and only later did dream theory become linked with the functioning of the brain, perhaps most famously in psychoanalytic theory. The development of sleep laboratory techniques ushered in a new era of the dream study and their relationship to mental health. In this review we outline the history of theories about the genesis and function of dreams and sleep and their relationship to mental illness from ancient mythic and religious views to the first tentative scientific approaches to the ascendency of psychoanalysis and ultimately to the modern era of neuroscience.

  19. A Brief Historical Review of Specific Religious Denominations: How History Influences Current Medical-Religious Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Galiatsatos, Panagis; Lehmijoki-Gardner, Maiju; Daniel Hale, W

    2016-04-01

    Improving health care in the twenty-first century will require new and creative approaches, with special attention given to health literacy and patient engagement since these two variables play a significant role in chronic health issues and their management. In order to better improve these key variables, strong partnerships between patients, their communities, and medical institutions must be developed. One way of facilitating these relationships is through medical-religious partnerships. Religious leaders are in regular contact with people who need education about and support with health issues. However, identifying the most effective way to approach specific congregations can pose a challenge to healthcare providers and institutions. In this paper, we provide a brief historical review of certain religious traditions and how their history plays a role in current medical-religious partnerships.

  20. From A-4 to Explorer 1. [U.S. rocket and missile technology historical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debus, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Historical review of the development of rocket and missile technology in the United States over the period from 1945 to 1958. Attention is given to the organization of activities, the launch facilities, and the scope of test rocket firings at the White Sands Proving Ground area during the initial phase of research with captured German V2 rockets. The development of the Redstone missiles is outlined by discussing aspects of military involvement, cooperation with industrial suppliers, details of ground support equipment, and results of initial test firings. Subsequent development of the Jupiter missiles is examined in a similar manner, and attention is given to activities involved in the launching of the Explorer 1 satellite.

  1. Computer validation in toxicology: historical review for FDA and EPA good laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Brodish, D L

    1998-01-01

    The application of computer validation principles to Good Laboratory Practice is a fairly recent phenomenon. As automated data collection systems have become more common in toxicology facilities, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have begun to focus inspections in this area. This historical review documents the development of regulatory guidance on computer validation in toxicology over the past several decades. An overview of the components of a computer life cycle is presented, including the development of systems descriptions, validation plans, validation testing, system maintenance, SOPs, change control, security considerations, and system retirement. Examples are provided for implementation of computer validation principles on laboratory computer systems in a toxicology facility.

  2. Historical Review of Uncommanded Lateral-Directional Motions at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Joseph R.; Hall, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of past experiences with uncommanded lateral-directional motions at transonic speeds during specific military aircraft programs. The effort was undertaken to provide qualitative and quantitative information on past airplane programs that might be of use to the participants in the joint NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program. The AWS Program was initiated because of the experiences of the F/A-l8E/F development program, during which unexpected, severe wing-drop motions were encountered by preproduction aircraft at transonic conditions. These motions were judged to be significantly degrading to the primary mission requirements of the aircraft. Although the problem was subsequently solved for the production version of the F/A-l8E/F, a high-level review panel emphasized the poor understanding of such phenomena and issued a strong recommendation to: "Initiate a national research effort to thoroughly and systematically study the wing drop phenomena." A comprehensive, cooperative NASA/Navy/Air Force AWS Program was designed to respond to provide the required technology requirements. As part of the AWS Program, a work element was directed at a historical review of wing-drop experiences in past aircraft development programs at high subsonic and transonic speeds. In particular, information was requested regarding: specific aircraft configurations that exhibited uncommanded motions and the nature of the motions; geometric characteristics of the air- planes; flight conditions involved in occurrences; relevant data, including wind-tunnel, computational, and flight sources; figures of merit used for analyses; and approaches used to alleviate the problem. An attempt was also made to summarize some of the more important lessons learned from past experiences, and to recommend specific research efforts. In addition to providing technical information to assist the AWS research objectives, the study produced fundamental

  3. Historical Review of Uncommanded Lateral-Directional Motions At Transonic Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Joseph R.; Hall, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of past experiences with uncommanded lateral-directional motions at transonic speeds during specific military aircraft programs. The effort was undertaken to provide qualitative and quantitative information on past airplane programs that might be of use to the participants in the joint NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program. The AWS Program was initiated because of the experiences of the F/A-18E/F development program, during which unexpected, severe wing-drop motions were encountered by preproduction aircraft at transonic conditions. These motions were judged to be significantly degrading to the primary mission requirements of the aircraft. Although the problem was subsequently solved for the production version of the F/A-l8E/F, a high-level review panel emphasized the poor understanding of such phenomena and issued a strong recommendation to: Initiate a national research effort to thoroughly and systematically study the wing drop phenomena. A comprehensive, cooperative NASA/Navy/Air Force AWS Program was designed to respond to provide the required technology requirements. As part of the AWS Program, a work element was directed at a historical review of wing-drop experiences in past aircraft development programs at high subsonic and transonic speeds. In particular, information was requested regarding: specific aircraft configurations that exhibited uncommanded motions and the nature of the motions; geometric characteristics of the air- planes; flight conditions involved in occurrences; relevant data, including wind-tunnel, computational, and flight sources; figures of merit used for analyses; and approaches used to alleviate the problem. An attempt was also made to summarize some of the more important lessons learned from past experiences, and to recommend specific research efforts. In addition to providing technical information to assist the AWS research objectives, the study produced fundamental information

  4. Infective endocarditis complicated by aortic graft infection and osteomyelitis: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zouein, Elie; Wetz, Robert; Mobarakai, Neville; Hassan, Samer; Tong, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Primary aortic graft infection early after aortic graft insertion is well described in the literature. Here, we present a unique case of late aortic graft infection 5 years after insertion secondary to mitral valve endocarditis, resulting from cellulitis in a patient with severe venous varicosities. A 63-year-old male presented for severe low back pain, constipation, and low-grade fever. An abdominal computed tomography scan with oral and intravenous contrast showed a normal spine and urinary tract. Blood and urine cultures, done at the same time, grew Staphylococcus aureus. A transesophageal echocardiogram confirmed the diagnosis of endocarditis. Subsequently, a gallium scan showed increased uptake in the vertebral bodies, aortic graft, left patella, and left ankle. After 3 months of antibiotic therapy, the patient’s low back pain resolved with normalization of his laboratory values. He remained free of infection at a 2-year follow-up. We reviewed the literature concerning the atypical presentation of infective endocarditis, with a focus on distant metastases at initial presentation, such as osteomyelitis and aortic graft infection, as well as the different treatment modalities. This report describes successful medical treatment with intravenous followed by oral antibiotics for an infected endovascular graft without any surgical intervention. PMID:22866008

  5. Development of the S3Pvac vaccine against porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Hernández, Marisela; Rosas, Gabriela; Martínez, José J; Fleury, Agnès; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Aluja, Aline; Larralde, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Herein we present a review of our research dealing with vaccination against experimental and naturally acquired porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis using Taenia crassiceps-derived antigens. Results strongly support that the different versions of S3Pvac vaccine are indeed effective against porcine T. solium cysticercosis. Immunological results related to vaccination prove that protection is at least partially mediated by specific immunity. The data also support the validity of T. crassiceps murine cysticercosis as an effective tool to identify vaccine candidates against some metacestode infections.

  6. The Human Impact of Floods: a Historical Review of Events 1980-2009 and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Murray, Sarah; Kirsch, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Floods are the most common natural disaster and the leading cause of natural disaster fatalities worldwide. Risk of catastrophic losses due to flooding is significant given deforestation and the increasing proximity of large populations to coastal areas, river basins and lakeshores. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of flood events on human populations in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters Methods. Data on the impact of floods were compiled using two methods, a historical review of flood events from 1980 to 2009 from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics, bivariate tests for associations and multinomial logistic regression of flood characteristics and mortality using Stata 11.0. Findings. There were 539,811 deaths (range: 510,941 to 568,680), 361,974 injuries and 2,821,895,005 people affected by floods between 1980 and 2009. Inconsistent reporting suggests this is an underestimate, particularly in terms of the injured and affected populations. The primary cause of flood-related mortality is drowning; in developed countries being in a motor-vehicle and male gender are associated with increased mortality, whereas female gender may be linked to higher mortality in low-income countries. Conclusions. Expanded monitoring of floods, improved mitigation measures, and effective communication with civil authorities and vulnerable populations has the potential to reduce loss of life in future flood events. PMID:23857425

  7. The human impact of volcanoes: a historical review of events 1900-2009 and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Dooling, Shayna; Gorokhovich, Yuri

    2013-04-16

    Introduction. More than 500 million people live within the potential exposure range of a volcano. The risk of catastrophic losses in future eruptions is significant given population growth, proximities of major cities to volcanoes, and the possibility of larger eruptions. The objectives of this review are to describe the impact of volcanoes on the human population, in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of volcanoes were compiled using two methods, a historical review of volcano events from 1900 to 2009 from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between volcano mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. There were a total of 91,789 deaths (range: 81,703-102,372), 14,068 injuries (range 11,541-17,922), and 4.72 million people affected by volcanic events between 1900 and 2008. Inconsistent reporting suggests this is an underestimate, particularly in terms of numbers injured and affected. The primary causes of mortality in recent volcanic eruptions were ash asphyxiation, thermal injuries from pyroclastic flow, and trauma. Mortality was concentrated with the ten deadliest eruptions accounting for more than 80% of deaths; 84% of fatalities occurred in four locations (the Island of Martinique (France), Colombia, Indonesia, and Guatemala). Conclusions. Changes in land use practices and population growth provide a background for increasing risk; in conjunction with increasing urbanization in at risk areas, this poses a challenge for future volcano preparedness and mitigation efforts.

  8. The Human Impact of Volcanoes: a Historical Review of Events 1900-2009 and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Dooling, Shayna; Gorokhovich, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. More than 500 million people live within the potential exposure range of a volcano. The risk of catastrophic losses in future eruptions is significant given population growth, proximities of major cities to volcanoes, and the possibility of larger eruptions. The objectives of this review are to describe the impact of volcanoes on the human population, in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of volcanoes were compiled using two methods, a historical review of volcano events from 1900 to 2009 from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between volcano mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. There were a total of 91,789 deaths (range: 81,703-102,372), 14,068 injuries (range 11,541-17,922), and 4.72 million people affected by volcanic events between 1900 and 2008. Inconsistent reporting suggests this is an underestimate, particularly in terms of numbers injured and affected. The primary causes of mortality in recent volcanic eruptions were ash asphyxiation, thermal injuries from pyroclastic flow, and trauma. Mortality was concentrated with the ten deadliest eruptions accounting for more than 80% of deaths; 84% of fatalities occurred in four locations (the Island of Martinique (France), Colombia, Indonesia, and Guatemala). Conclusions. Changes in land use practices and population growth provide a background for increasing risk; in conjunction with increasing urbanization in at risk areas, this poses a challenge for future volcano preparedness and mitigation efforts. PMID:23857374

  9. Integrating probabilistic models of perception and interactive neural networks: a historical and tutorial review

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, James L.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to establish a rapprochement between explicitly Bayesian models of contextual effects in perception and neural network models of such effects, particularly the connectionist interactive activation (IA) model of perception. The article is in part an historical review and in part a tutorial, reviewing the probabilistic Bayesian approach to understanding perception and how it may be shaped by context, and also reviewing ideas about how such probabilistic computations may be carried out in neural networks, focusing on the role of context in interactive neural networks, in which both bottom-up and top-down signals affect the interpretation of sensory inputs. It is pointed out that connectionist units that use the logistic or softmax activation functions can exactly compute Bayesian posterior probabilities when the bias terms and connection weights affecting such units are set to the logarithms of appropriate probabilistic quantities. Bayesian concepts such the prior, likelihood, (joint and marginal) posterior, probability matching and maximizing, and calculating vs. sampling from the posterior are all reviewed and linked to neural network computations. Probabilistic and neural network models are explicitly linked to the concept of a probabilistic generative model that describes the relationship between the underlying target of perception (e.g., the word intended by a speaker or other source of sensory stimuli) and the sensory input that reaches the perceiver for use in inferring the underlying target. It is shown how a new version of the IA model called the multinomial interactive activation (MIA) model can sample correctly from the joint posterior of a proposed generative model for perception of letters in words, indicating that interactive processing is fully consistent with principled probabilistic computation. Ways in which these computations might be realized in real neural systems are also considered. PMID:23970868

  10. Spa Treatment (Balneotherapy) for Fibromyalgia—A Qualitative-Narrative Review and a Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ablin, Jacob N.; Buskila, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To perform a narrative review of spa therapy for management of the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), evaluating this traditional time-honored form of therapy in a historical perspective. Methods. Medline was searched using the terms “Spa therapy,” “Balneotherapy,” and “Fibromyalgia” between 1990 (year of ACR fibromyalgia criteria publication) and April 2013. The Cochrane database was also searched. Publications relating to the implementation of spa therapy and related practices over the centuries were identified through references, searched, and reviewed. Results. Reports of balneotherapy were described from diverse locations throughout Europe and Asia, and various forms of water-related therapy have been incorporated for many musculoskeletal indications. In the management of FMS, spa therapy has generally been shown to be well accepted and moderately effective for symptom reduction. Conclusion. While achieving high-quality evidence-based conclusions is difficult for complex natural therapies such as spa therapy, the existing evidence indicates a positive effect in management of FMS. In view of the long history of this modality in the management of rheumatic pain as well as the inherent difficulties related to pharmacological treatment, the role of spa therapy should currently be recognized as part of a therapeutic program for FMS. PMID:23983795

  11. [Empacho: An historical review of popular Chilean childhood disease (1674-2014)].

    PubMed

    Campos Navarro, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    "Empacho" (abdominal pain and bloating), "mal de ojo" (evil eye), "los aires" (illnesses said to be caught by catching draughts), "el susto" or "espanto" (fright or panic), are the principal and most well-known popular Latin American illnesses. As regards empacho, the medical, historical and ethnographic information is extensive and detailed, since there documents recording it from the 16th century until recent times (2014), and in the case of Chile since 1674. For this review, 109 source documents from libraries in Chile, including some foreign ones, were consulted. It was found that the illness is known all over the country. It is a digestive system disorder caused by over-eating and the ingestion of products difficult to digest or indigestible, which cause problems in gastrointestinal transit. The most significant clinical data are gastralgia, diarrhoea or constipation, vomiting, fever, and other discomforts. The illness is treated at home, and if necessary, popular specialists are employed, with a visit to a qualified doctor being exceptional. There are many complex and combined treatments, which go from herbal products to ritual elements, not forgetting the so-called "quebradura del empacho". This review summary of empacho in Chile should enable the paediatrician to enter the world of popular knowledge and practices with the aim of improving the care of child patients and their families. It should also lead to the serious and systematic study of this nosological condition that will continue to exist in the future.

  12. Education for Work: A Review Essay of Historical, Cross-Cultural, and Disciplinary Perspectives on Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinke, K. Peter

    2013-01-01

    In this review essay, K. Peter Kuchinke uses three recent publications to consider the question of how to educate young people for work and career. Historically, this question has been central to vocational education, and it is receiving renewed attention in the context of concerns over the ability of schools to provide adequate preparation for…

  13. Background review for diagnostic test development for Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Charrel, Rémi N; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Pas, Suzan; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the state of knowledge about diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection and identify areas of research needed to address the current gaps in knowledge. Methods We made a non-systematic review of the published literature about Zika virus and supplemented this with information from commercial diagnostic test kits and personal communications with researchers in European preparedness networks. The review covered current knowledge about the geographical spread, pathogen characteristics, life cycle and infection kinetics of the virus. The available molecular and serological tests and biosafety issues are described and discussed in the context of the current outbreak strain. Findings We identified the following areas of research to address current knowledge gaps: (i) an urgent assessment of the laboratory capacity and capability of countries to detect Zika virus; (ii) rapid and extensive field validation of the available molecular and serological tests in areas with and without Zika virus transmission, with a focus on pregnant women; (iii) monitoring the genomic diversity of circulating Zika virus strains; (iv) prospective studies into the virus infection kinetics, focusing on diagnostic sampling (specimen types, combinations and timings); and (v) developing external quality assessments for molecular and serological testing, including differential diagnosis for similar viruses and symptom clusters. The availability of reagents for diagnostic development (virus strains and antigens, quantified viral ribonucleic acid) needs to be facilitated. Conclusion An international laboratory response is needed, including preparation of protocols for prospective studies to address the most pressing information needs. PMID:27516635

  14. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  15. A Review of Clinical Cases of Infection with Photorhabdus Asymbiotica.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, John G; Stevens, Robert P

    2017-03-17

    The three recognised Photorhabdus species are bioluminescent Gram-negative bacilli of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are all pathogenic to insects and form a symbiotic relationship with nematodes of the genus Heterorhabditis. P. luminescens and P. temperata are both harmless to humans whilst P. asymbiotica, on the other hand, is a human pathogen that is a symbiont of the newly described nematode vector, Heterorhabditis gerrardi. In this chapter, we review the epidemiological and clinical features of eighteen human cases of P. asymbiotica infection including fifteen from the published literature and three previously unreported cases. Human infection has been reported in the USA and Australia and probably occurs in other parts of Asia where it remains undocumented. Infection occurs most commonly in warmer months particularly after rainfall. Patients may have a history of recent exposure to sand or sandy soil. P. asymbiotica causes both locally invasive soft tissue infection and disseminated disease with bacteraemia. Soft tissue infection may be multifocal with involvement of more than one limb and the trunk. The organism is sensitive to a number of antibiotics in vitro, but treatment failures have been associated with the use of beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. We suggest treatment with a four-week course of an oral fluoroquinolone such as ciprofloxacin. The organism grows readily on standard media from specimens such as wound swabs, pus, blood and even sputum and can be identified in a clinical microbiology laboratory but the diagnosis needs to be considered. The correct diagnosis is most likely to be made where there is close cooperation between clinician and microbiologist.

  16. Cultures of control: A historical analysis of the development of infection control nursing in Ireland.

    PubMed

    McNamra, Martin S; Fealy, Gerard M; Geraghty, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Responses to the rise of antimicrobial resistance in Europe and North America included establishment of special hospital infection control teams of a microbiologist and a nurse. Based on the testimonies of seven infection control nurses in Irish hospitals appointed during 1979-1990, this article examines the early development and expressions of their disciplinary practice. Fairman's model of collaborative practice was used to examine the context in which the role emerged, the places practice was negotiated and mutually constructed, and exemplars of collaborative practice. Aspects of the relationship between theory and method in Wengraf's biographical narrative interpretive method (BNIM) used to generate the nurses' accounts of their early experiences in the role are highlighted. Practice was contingent on effective negotiation of places of practice, and disciplinary practice bore hallmarks of collaborative practice. The infection control nurse transitioned from conspicuous outsider and object of suspicion to valued resource for patients and staff. Infection control nursing came to be a prototype for new specialist nursing roles in hospitals.

  17. A review of historical exposures to asbestos among skilled craftsmen (1940-2006).

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela R D; Phelka, Amanda D; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a review and synthesis of the published and selected unpublished literature on historical asbestos exposures among skilled craftsmen in various nonshipyard and shipyard settings. The specific crafts evaluated were insulators, pipefitters, boilermakers, masons, welders, sheet-metal workers, millwrights, electricians, carpenters, painters, laborers, maintenance workers, and abatement workers. Over 50 documents were identified and summarized. Sufficient information was available to quantitatively characterize historical asbestos exposures for the most highly exposed workers (insulators), even though data were lacking for some job tasks or time periods. Average airborne fiber concentrations collected for the duration of the task and/or the entire work shift were found to range from about 2 to 10 fibers per cubic centimeter (cm3 or cc) during activities performed by insulators in various nonshipyard settings from the late 1960s and early 1970s. Higher exposure levels were observed for this craft during the 1940s to 1950s, when dust counts were converted from millions of particles per cubic foot (mppcf) to units of fibers per cubic centimeter (fibers/cc) using a 1:6 conversion factor. Similar tasks performed in U.S. shipyards yielded average fiber concentrations about two-fold greater, likely due to inadequate ventilation and confined work environments; however, excessively high exposure levels were reported in some British Naval shipyards due to the spraying of asbestos. Improved industrial hygiene practices initiated in the early to mid-1970s were found to reduce average fiber concentrations for insulator tasks approximately two- to five-fold. For most other crafts, average fiber concentrations were found to typically range from <0.01 to 1 fibers/cc (depending on the task or time period), with higher concentrations observed during the use of powered tools, the mixing or sanding of drywall cement, and the cleanup of asbestos insulation or lagging

  18. Antioxidant Therapy Against Trypanosome Infections: A Review Update.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Bindawa Isah, Murtala; Abdullahi Salman, Abdulmalik

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis is a serious parasitic disease that affects humans and animals resulting in heavy health and economic burdens. Disturbance of redox equilibrium represents a classical challenge for both the host and the parasite during infections with either extracellular African or intracellular American trypanosomes species. This is in spite of existing detoxification mechanisms in both the host and the parasite for maintaining oxidative balance. However, oxidative stress still plays vital roles in the induction of numerous host-associated pathological damages such as anemia, hepatic and renal damages as well as cardiomyopathy while on the other hand, drugs that specifically induce oxidative stress to the parasite have been effective. Therefore, antioxidants have been deemed to play a role in modulating trypanosome infections. This review provides a current update on most of the studies conducted on the potential use of antioxidants as therapeutic agents against trypanosomes. The most frequently studied plant-derived phenolic antioxidants are resveratrol, cucurmin, gallic acid and quercetin while other antioxidants such as vitamins (A, C, E) and trace elements (selenium and iron) have been investigated. Some of the investigations monitored the direct trypanocidal or trypanostatic effects of the antioxidants while others studied the potentials of the antioxidants as adjuncts to trypanocidal drugs. So far, none of these approaches has sufficient data to allow a definite statement on the actual therapeutic potential of antioxidants in the treatment of clinical trypanosomiasis. Therefore, suggestions are made on the most therapeutically and clinically relevant role of antioxidants in trypanosome infections.

  19. A Review of Preventative Methods against Human Leishmaniasis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stockdale, Lisa; Newton, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is an intracellular parasitic infection transmitted to humans via the sandfly. Approximately 350 million people are at risk of contracting the disease and an estimated 1.6 million new cases occur annually. Of the two main forms, visceral and cutaneous, the visceral form is fatal in 85–90% of untreated cases. Aims This literature review aims to identify and evaluate the current evidence base for the use of various preventative methods against human leishmaniasis. Methods A literature search was performed of the relevant database repositories for primary research conforming to a priori inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 84 controlled studies investigating 12 outcome measures were identified, implementing four broad categories of preventative interventions: animal reservoir control, vector population control, human reservoir control and a category for multiple concurrently implemented interventions. The primary studies investigated a heterogeneous mix of outcome measures using a range of different methods. Conclusions This review highlights an absence of research measuring human-specific outcomes (35% of the total) across all intervention categories. The apparent inability of study findings to be generalizable across different geographic locations, points towards gaps in knowledge regarding the biology of transmission of Leishmania in different settings. More research is needed which investigates human infection as the primary outcome measure as opposed to intermediate surrogate markers, with a focus on developing a human vaccine. PMID:23818997

  20. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chao; Cao, Xue-Feng; Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Huang, Xiang-Ming; Lan, Jing-Chao; Xiao, Qi-Cheng; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Wen-Bo; Guo, Ping; Wu, Kong-Ju; Peng, Guang-Neng

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5%) was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%), postweaned juveniles (9.0%), and adult cattle (4.94%). The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis) were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease. PMID:28098070

  1. Historical review: Molecular and cellular mechanisms of opiate and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse was founded in 1974, and since that time there have been significant advances in understanding the processes by which drugs of abuse cause addiction. The initial protein targets for almost all drugs of abuse are now known. Animal models that replicate key features of addiction are available, and these models have made it possible to characterize the brain regions that are important for addiction and other drug effects, such as physical dependence. A large number of drug-induced changes at the molecular and cellular levels have been identified in these brain areas and rapid progress is being made in relating individual changes to specific behavioral abnormalities in animal models of addiction. The current challenges are to translate this increasingly impressive knowledge of the basic neurobiology of addiction to human addicts, and to identify the specific genes that make some individuals either particularly vulnerable or resistant to addiction. In this article, I present a historical review of basic research on opiate and cocaine addiction.

  2. Historical Review about Research on “Bonghan System” in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Ling; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Shi, Hong; Chen, Shu-Ping; He, Wei; Bai, Wan-Zhu; Zhu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The meridian-collateral theory is the theoretical basis of acupuncture-moxibustion therapy. Professor Bonghan Kim, a professor of the Pyongyang Medical University of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, claimed that he found the anatomical structure of meridian-collaterals, named Bonghan corpuscles (BHCs) and Bonghan ducts (BHDs) system or primo vascular system (PVS), in 1962. From 1963 to 1965, researchers from our institute conducted a series of comparative anatomical experiments, trying to reproduce the so-called BHC- and BHD-like structures in different strains of animals. In the present paper, the authors introduced their research findings about BHC- and BHD-like structures in the young rabbit's umbilicus including its external appearance, ectoplasm and endoplasm, and about strip-like and node-like objects in the blood vessels and lymph vessels near the larger abdominal and cervical blood vessels and chromaffin tissue in the back wall of the rabbit's abdominal cavity and between the bilateral kidneys. In spite of existence of the BHC- and BHD-like structures in the rabbit, there has been no proved evidence for their association with the meridian-collateral system described in acupuncture medicine. In the present historical review, the authors also make a discussion about the significance of those findings. PMID:23861708

  3. A visual historical review of exposure to asbestos at puget sound naval shipyard (1962-1972).

    PubMed

    Hollins, Dana M; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Clark, Katherine; Mangold, Carl A

    2009-02-01

    The study of occupational exposure to asbestos has been an ongoing activity for at least 75 years, dating back to the papers of Merewether and Price (1930). Since that time, literally tens of thousands of air samples have been collected in an attempt to characterize the concentration of asbestos associated with various activities. Many of the individuals who developed diseases from the 1970s to the current day were often exposed to very high airborne concentrations because of direct or indirect exposure to either raw asbestos fiber or insulation during the approximate 1940-1970 time period. Often, these high exposures were associated with work in shipyards during and after World War II and the Korean War, as well as with decommissioning, which continued into the mid-1970s. This study reviews the historical asbestos concentrations measured in shipyards and presents a visual illustration of typical conditions and work practices. A majority of the photographs presented in this article depict work conditions at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, circa 1940-1965, which is representative of other military shipyards of the time.

  4. Timeline historical review of income and financial transactions: a reliable assessment of personal finances.

    PubMed

    Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Ablondi, Karen M; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    The need for accurate and reliable information about income and resources available to individuals with psychiatric disabilities is critical for the assessment of need and evaluation of programs designed to alleviate financial hardship or affect finance allocation. Measurement of finances is ubiquitous in studies of economics, poverty, and social services. However, evidence has demonstrated that these measures often contain error. We compare the 1-week test-retest reliability of income and finance data from 24 adult psychiatric outpatients using assessment-as-usual (AAU) and a new instrument, the Timeline Historical Review of Income and Financial Transactions (THRIFT). Reliability estimates obtained with the THRIFT for Income (0.77), Expenses (0.91), and Debt (0.99) domains were significantly better than those obtained with AAU. Reliability estimates for Balance did not differ. THRIFT reduced measurement error and provided more reliable information than AAU for assessment of personal finances in psychiatric patients receiving Social Security benefits. The instrument also may be useful with other low-income groups.

  5. Fissile material holdup measurement systems: an historical review of hardware and software

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Smith, Steven E; Rowe, Nathan C

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of fissile material holdup is accomplished by passively measuring the energy-dependent photon flux and/or passive neutron flux emitted from the fissile material deposited within an engineered process system. Both measurement modalities--photon and neutron--require the implementation of portable, battery-operated systems that are transported, by hand, from one measurement location to another. Because of this portability requirement, gamma-ray spectrometers are typically limited to inorganic scintillators, coupled to photomultiplier tubes, a small multi-channel analyzer, and a handheld computer for data logging. For neutron detection, polyethylene-moderated, cadmium-back-shielded He-3 thermal neutron detectors are used, coupled to nuclear electronics for supplying high voltage to the detector, and amplifying the signal chain to the scaler for counting. Holdup measurement methods, including the concept of Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH), are well presented by T. Douglas Reilly in LA-UR-07-5149 and P. Russo in LA-14206, yet both publications leave much of the evolutionary hardware and software to the imagination of the reader. This paper presents an historical review of systems that have been developed and implemented since the mid-1980s for the nondestructive assay of fissile material, in situ. Specifications for the next-generation holdup measurements systems are conjectured.

  6. Gastrointestinal Infections in Deployed Forces in the Middle East Theater: An Historical 60 Year Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Mark S.; Savarino, Stephen J.; Sanders, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea has been among the most common maladies of military deployments throughout time. The U.S. military experienced a significant burden from this disease in the middle eastern and north African campaigns of World War II (WWII). This article compares patterns of disease experienced in WWII with the recent military deployments to the same region for Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). Remarkable similarities in the prevalence and risk factors were noted, which belie the assumed improvements in prevention against these infections. In both campaigns, peaks of diarrhea occurred shortly after arrival of new personnel, which were seasonally associated and were linked to initial lapses in field sanitation and hygiene. It is important to reassess current strategies, especially, in light of emerging evidence of the chronic sequelae of these common infections to include a reemphasis on or reexamination of vaccine development, rapid field diagnostics, treatment algorithms, and antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26350450

  7. Gastrointestinal Infections in Deployed Forces in the Middle East Theater: An Historical 60 Year Perspective.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Mark S; Savarino, Stephen J; Sanders, John W

    2015-11-01

    Infectious diarrhea has been among the most common maladies of military deployments throughout time. The U.S. military experienced a significant burden from this disease in the middle eastern and north African campaigns of World War II (WWII). This article compares patterns of disease experienced in WWII with the recent military deployments to the same region for Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). Remarkable similarities in the prevalence and risk factors were noted, which belie the assumed improvements in prevention against these infections. In both campaigns, peaks of diarrhea occurred shortly after arrival of new personnel, which were seasonally associated and were linked to initial lapses in field sanitation and hygiene. It is important to reassess current strategies, especially, in light of emerging evidence of the chronic sequelae of these common infections to include a reemphasis on or reexamination of vaccine development, rapid field diagnostics, treatment algorithms, and antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  8. [Historical consideration of the widespread infection of the hepatitis C virus in Japan and use of a fishbone diagram to investigate the cause].

    PubMed

    Haga, Haruko; Fukushima, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    About 75% of Japanese liver cancer is caused by hepatitis C. Widespread infection of the virus resulted from inadequate medical knowledge, as well as the political, economic and administrative conditions of the time. We investigated the association between the widespread infection of the hepatitis C virus and the historical events. We used a fishbone diagram to investigate the cause of widespread infection of the hepatitis C virus and considered the issue from a historical standpoint. We found causes including treatment (medical care), transfusion (medicine), economy (expense) and people (infection route). These causes are explained in further detail below. 1) Treatment (medical care). The initial large-scale infection occurred following attempts to eradicate Schistosoma japonicum involving mass vaccination in schools and public health centers. 2) Transfusion (medicine). The use of non-heated fibrinogen for massive postpartum hemorrhage spread the virus further. In 1987, it resulted in a mass outbreak of hepatitis in Aomori Prefecture. 3) Economy (expense). Recognition of the benefit of disposable syringes was delayed. As a result, disposable syringes were too expensive to be widely available, and did not become low-priced. 4) People (infection route). The second wave of dissemination of the hepatitis C virus was stimulant abuse after World War II. Prior to the discovery of the hepatitis C virus, transmission resulted from repeated use of contaminated syringes. Although we initially thought that these four causes occurred independently on a historical chronology, associations between the causes were found when we investigated the problem with a fishbone diagram.

  9. Archival search for historical atypical scrapie in sheep reveals evidence for mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Chong, Angela; Kennedy, Iain; Goldmann, Wilfred; Green, Andrew; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-10-01

    Natural scrapie in sheep occurs in classical and atypical forms, which may be distinguished on the basis of the associated neuropathology and properties of the disease-associated prion protein on Western blots. First detected in 1998, atypical scrapie is known to have occurred in UK sheep since the 1980s. However, its aetiology remains unclear and it is often considered as a sporadic, non-contagious disease unlike classical scrapie which is naturally transmissible. Although atypical scrapie tends to occur in sheep of prion protein (PRNP) genotypes that are different from those found predominantly in classical scrapie, there is some overlap so that there are genotypes in which both scrapie forms can occur. In this search for early atypical scrapie cases, we made use of an archive of fixed and frozen sheep samples, from both scrapie-affected and healthy animals (∼1850 individuals), dating back to the 1960s. Using a selection process based primarily on PRNP genotyping, but also on contemporaneous records of unusual clinical signs or pathology, candidate sheep samples were screened by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and strain-typing methods using tg338 mice. We identified, from early time points in the archive, three atypical scrapie cases, including one sheep which died in 1972 and two which showed evidence of mixed infection with classical scrapie. Cases with both forms of scrapie in the same animal as recognizable entities suggest that mixed infections have been around for a long time and may potentially contribute to the variety of scrapie strains.

  10. [Roles of phosphatases in pathogen infection: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Li, Xinqiang; Li, Zhenlun

    2012-02-01

    Phosphatases play a key role not only in cell physiological functions of an organism, but also in host-pathogen interactions. Many studies demonstrated that some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria could evade host immunity and promote pathogenicity by injecting phosphatases into host cells through type III secretion system. However, there were few reports about pathogenic fungi evading the immunity of hosts. Our researches indicated that the entomogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae could dephosphorylate the signal transduction substance of locust humoral immunity specifically in vitro by secreting extracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase, which implied that the fungus might interfere with the immune defense of locust. To provide reference for further studies of the functions of phosphatases, we reviewed the types of phosphatases and their roles in pathogen infection.

  11. Clinical review: Update of avian influenza A infections in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Christian; Kelly, Terra

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses have a wide host range for infection, from wild waterfowl to poultry to humans. Recently, the cross-species transmission of avian influenza A, particularly subtype H5N1, has highlighted the importance of the non-human subtypes and their incidence in the human population has increased over the past decade. During cross-species transmission, human disease can range from the asymptomatic to mild conjunctivitis to fulminant pneumonia and death. With these cases, however, the risk for genetic change and development of a novel virus increases, heightening the need for public health and hospital measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, host range, human disease, outcome, treatment, and prevention of cross-transmission of avian influenza A into humans. PMID:17419881

  12. The Eastern heart and Galen's ventricle: a historical review of the purpose of the brain.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza N; Chishty, Faheem; Immesoete, Phillip; Karas, Chris S

    2007-01-01

    The seat of consciousness has not always been thought to reside in the brain. Its "source" is as varied as the cultures of those who have sought it. At present, although most may agree that the central nervous system is held to be the root of individualism in much of Western philosophy, this has not always been the case, and this viewpoint is certainly not unanimously accepted across all cultures today. In this paper the authors undertook a literary review of ancient texts of both Eastern and Western societies as well as modern writings on the organic counterpart to the soul. The authors have studied both ancient Greek and Roman material as well as Islamic and Eastern philosophy. Several specific aspects of the human body have often been proposed as the seat of consciousness, not only in medical texts, but also within historical documents, poetry, legal proceedings, and religious literature. Among the most prominently proposed have been the heart and breath, favoring a cardiopulmonary seat of individualism. This understanding was by no means stagnant, but evolved over time, as did the role of the brain in the definition of what it means to be human. Even in the 21st century, no clear consensus exists between or within communities, scientific or otherwise, on the brain's capacity for making us who we are. Perhaps, by its nature, our consciousness--and our awareness of our surroundings and ourselves--is a function of what surrounds us, and must therefore change as the world changes and as we change.

  13. Historical review of the List of Occupational Diseases recommended by the International Labour organization (ILO)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The list of occupational diseases established in the international and national legal system has played important roles in both prevention of and compensation for workers’ diseases. This report reviewed the historical development in the ILO list of occupational diseases and suggested implications of the trends. Since the first establishment of the ILO list of occupational diseases in 1925, the list has played a key role in harmonizing the development of policies on occupational diseases at the international level. The three occupational diseases (anthrax, lead poisoning, and mercury poisoning) in the first ILO list of occupational diseases, set up in 1925 as workmen’s compensation convention represented an increase of occupational diseases from the Industrial Revolution. Until the 1960s, 10 occupational diseases had been representative compensable occupational diseases listed in Convention No. 121, which implies that occupational diseases in this era were equated to industrial poisoning. Since 1980, with advancements in diagnostic techniques and medical science, noise-induced hearing loss, and several bronchopulmonary diseases have been incorporated into the ILO occupational list. Since 2002, changes in the structure of industries, emerging new chemicals, and advanced national worker’s compensation schemes have provoked the ILO to revise the occupational disease list. A new format of ILO list appended in Recommendation 194 (R194) was composed of two dimensions (causes and diseases) and subcategories. Among 50 member states that had provided their national lists of occupational diseases, until 2012 thirty countries were found to have the list occupational diseases having similar structure to ILO list in R194. PMID:24472440

  14. [Diagnostic tests for amniotic infection: review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Damián, R; Garduño-Espinosa, J

    1997-01-01

    The diagnosis of intraamniotic infection (IAI) is not difficult when clinical manifestations are present, but there are patients with subclinical infections, in these cases the examination of the amniotic fluid is the most important diagnostic procedure. We made a critical review of the medical literature of diagnostic tests of IAI, according to the analysis criterion of the medical articles of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology of the McMaster University. The articles were identified looking for in the MEDLINE-CD ROOM and INDEX MEDICUS from 1991 to 1995. We identified 19 articles, none of them complied with all of the analysis criterion, none of the studies were blinded nor independently compared with a gold standard test and only five articles studied a full spectrum of patients. The articles with better methodologic design were those that studied the interleukin-6 role as diagnostic test for IAI; they showed a sensibility between 75 to 89% and a specificity of 97 to 100%; nevertheless it is still necessary to standardize the cut-off point of the interleukin-6 levels.

  15. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Africa: a review.

    PubMed

    Karoney, Mercy Jelagat; Siika, Abraham Mogisi

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a viral pandemic and a leading cause of chronic liver disease. This review highlights the epidemiology and management of Hepatitis C in Africa. We searched for articles on medline using the terms, "Hepatitis C", "Prevalence", "Epidemiology", "Africa" and "Treatment". The bibliographies of the articles found were used to find other references. We included articles published after 1995 only. The data was summarized and presented in tables and figures. Africa has the highest WHO estimated regional HCV prevalence (5.3%). Egypt has the highest prevalence (17.5%) of HCV in the world. Genotypes commonly found in Africa are 1, 4 and 5. Genotype 3 is found in Egypt and parts of Central Africa. Blood transfusion is a major means of acquisition of HCV infection. While treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin is recommended for patients with chronic HCV, no data were found on their use in Africa. Neither were there any data on definitive management (liver transplantation) for those with end stage disease. Data on HCV infection in Africa are scarce. This suggests that hepatitis C is still a neglected disease in many countries. Limited data exist in literature on HCV in Africa.

  16. The Role of Current and Historical Alcohol Use in Hepatic Fibrosis Among HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Kim, H Nina; Crane, Heidi M; Rodriguez, Carla V; Van Rompaey, Stephen; Mayer, Kenneth H; Christopoulos, Katerina; Napravnik, Sonia; Chander, Geetanjali; Hutton, Heidi; McCaul, Mary E; Cachay, Edward R; Mugavero, Michael J; Moore, Richard; Geng, Elvin; Eron, Joseph J; Saag, Michael S; Merrill, Joseph O; Kitahata, Mari M

    2016-12-29

    We examined risk factors for advanced hepatic fibrosis [fibrosis-4 (FIB)-4 >3.25] including both current alcohol use and a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder among HIV-infected patients. Of the 12,849 patients in our study, 2133 (17%) reported current hazardous drinking by AUDIT-C, 2321 (18%) had a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder, 2376 (18%) were co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV); 596 (5%) had high FIB-4 scores >3.25 as did 364 (15%) of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. In multivariable analysis, HCV (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.2-7.5), chronic hepatitis B (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.8), diabetes (aOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.8-2.9), current CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 4.2-6.9) and HIV RNA >500 copies/mL (aOR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6) were significantly associated with advanced fibrosis. A diagnosis of an alcohol use disorder (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.3) rather than report of current hazardous alcohol use was associated with high FIB-4. However, among HIV/HCV coinfected patients, both current hazardous drinkers (aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4) and current non-drinkers (aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.0) were more likely than non-hazardous drinkers to have high FIB-4, with the latter potentially reflecting the impact of sick abstainers. These findings highlight the importance of using a longitudinal measure of alcohol exposure when evaluating the impact of alcohol on liver disease and associated outcomes.

  17. Detection of hepatitis B virus infection: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mallika; Nandi, Srijita; Dutta, Shrinwanti; Saha, Malay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review published methods for detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS: A thorough search on Medline database was conducted to find original articles describing different methods or techniques of detection of HBV, which are published in English in last 10 years. Articles outlining methods of detection of mutants or drug resistance were excluded. Full texts and abstracts (if full text not available) were reviewed thoroughly. Manual search of references of retrieved articles were also done. We extracted data on different samples and techniques of detection of HBV, their sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp) and applicability. RESULTS: A total of 72 studies were reviewed. HBV was detected from dried blood/plasma spots, hepatocytes, ovarian tissue, cerumen, saliva, parotid tissue, renal tissue, oocytes and embryos, cholangiocarcinoma tissue, etc. Sensitivity of dried blood spot for detecting HBV was > 90% in all the studies. In case of seronegative patients, HBV DNA or serological markers have been detected from hepatocytes or renal tissue in many instances. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and Chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) are most commonly used serological tests for detection. CLIA systems are also used for quantitation. Molecular techniques are used qualitatively as well as for quantitative detection. Among the molecular techniques version 2.0 of the CobasAmpliprep/CobasTaqMan assay and Abbott’s real time polymerase chain reaction kit were found to be most sensitive with a lower detection limit of only 6.25 IU/mL and 1.48 IU/mL respectively. CONCLUSION: Serological and molecular assays are predominant and reliable methods for HBV detection. Automated systems are highly sensitive and quantify HBV DNA and serological markers for monitoring. PMID:26483870

  18. Foot Infection by Clostridium sordellii: Case Report and Review of 15 Cases in France

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  19. Historical trends in the production and consumption of illicit drugs in Mexico: Implications for the prevention of blood borne infections

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Jesus; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Ramos, Rebeca; Fraga, Miguel; Perez, Saida G.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2007-01-01

    Mexico has cultivated opium poppy since before the 1900’s and has been an important transit route for South American cocaine for decades. However, only recently has drug use, particularly injection drug use, been documented as an important problem. Heroin is the most common drug used by Mexican injection drug users (IDUs). Increased cultivation of opium poppy in some Mexican states, lower prices for black tar heroin and increased security at U.S.-Mexican border crossings may be contributing factors to heroin use, especially in border cities. Risky practices among IDUs, including needle sharing and shooting gallery attendance are common, whereas perceived risk for acquiring blood borne infections is low. Although reported AIDS cases attributed to IDU in Mexico have been low, data from sentinel populations, such as pregnant women in the Mexican-U.S. border city of Tijuana, suggest an increase in HIV prevalence associated with drug use. Given widespread risk behaviors and rising numbers of blood borne infections among IDUs in Mexican-U.S. border cities, there is an urgent need for increased disease surveillance and culturally appropriate interventions to prevent potential epidemics of blood borne infections. We review available literature on the history of opium production in Mexico, recent trends in drug use and its implications, and the Mexican response, with special emphasis on the border cities of Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana. PMID:16102372

  20. [Book review] The biogeography of fire in the San Bernardino Mountains of California---A historical study, by R.A. Minnich

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Review of: The Biogeography of Fire in the San Bernardino Mountains of California--A Historical Study. By Richard A. Minnich. University of California Publications in Geography Volume 28, University of California Press, Berkeley. 120 pp. plus plates, soft cover.

  1. Pasteurella multocida infected total knee arthroplasty: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, KB; Bharadwaj, R; MacDonald, A; Syme, B

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of prosthetic joint infection. This infection generally follows significant animal contact, usually licks and scratches. We report a case of P multocida infection that was treated with linezolid with salvage of the implant. Linezolid is generally active against Gram-positive organisms only with the exception of Pasteurella, which is Gram-negative. We extensively review the previous reported cases of implant infection with P multocida. PMID:24780653

  2. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: A critical review and practical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Chamroonkul, Naichaya; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is common and accounts for major morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are immunocompromised and increased susceptibility to develop spontaneous bacterial infections, hospital-acquired infections, and a variety of infections from uncommon pathogens. Once infection develops, the excessive response of pro-inflammatory cytokines on a pre-existing hemodynamic dysfunction in cirrhosis further predispose the development of serious complications such as shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure, renal failure, and death. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and bacteremia are common in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and are important prognostic landmarks in the natural history of cirrhosis. Notably, the incidence of infections from resistant bacteria has increased significantly in healthcare-associated settings. Serum biomarkers such as procalcitonin may help to improve the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Preventive measures (e.g., avoidance, antibiotic prophylaxis, and vaccination), early recognition, and proper management are required in order to minimize morbidity and mortality of infections in cirrhosis. PMID:26962397

  3. Common infections in nursing homes: a review of current issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Ana; Mody, Lona

    2012-01-01

    Over 1.5 million people live in 16,000 nursing homes in the USA and experience an average of 2 million infections a year. Infections have been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, rehospitalization, extended hospital stay and substantial healthcare expenses. Emerging infections and antibiotic-resistant organisms in an institutional environment where there is substantial antimicrobial overuse and the population is older, frailer and sicker, create unique challenges for infection control. This review discusses the common infections, challenges, and a framework for a practical infection prevention program. PMID:23264804

  4. Historic and pre-historic tsunamis in the Mediterranean and its connected seas: a review on documentation, geological signatures, generation mechanisms and coastal impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Urgeles, Roger; Sallares, Valenti; De Martini, Paolo Marco; Pantosti, Daniela; González, Mauricio; Yalciner, Ahmet C.; Mascle, Jean; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Salamon, Amos; Tinti, Stefano; Fokaefs, Anna; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Novikova, Tatyana; Papageorgiou, Antonia

    2013-04-01

    The origin of tsunamis in the Mediterranean region and its connected seas is reviewed. A variety of historical documentary sources combined with evidence from on-shore and off-shore geological signatures, geomorphological imprints, observations from selected coastal archaeological sites, as well as from instrumental records, clearly indicate that seismic and non-seismic (e.g. volcanism, landslides) tsunami sources can be found in all the seas of the region. Local, regional and basin-wide tsunamis have been documented. An improved map of 22 tsunamigenic zones and their relative potential for tsunami generation is presented. From west to east, the most tsunamigenic zones are situated offshore SW Iberia, in North Algeria, in the Tyrrhenian Calabria and Messina Straits, in the western and eastern segments of the Hellenic Arc, in Corinth Gulf (Central Greece), in the Levantine Sea off-shore the Dead Sea Transform Fault and in the eastern Marmara Sea. The mean recurrence of large (intensity≥8) tsunamis in the entire region is ~90 yrs and in the Mediterranean basin ~102 yrs. However, for most of the historical events it is still doubtful which one was the causative seismic fault and if the tsunami was caused by co-seismic fault dislocation or by earthquake-triggered submarine landslides or by a combined source mechanism (e.g. Lisbon 1755). Instrumentally recorded seismic tsunamis (e.g. Messina 1908, S. Aegean 1956) are still with debatable sources. Calculation of seismic slip slowness factor does not indicate that the 1908 and 1956 events were "tsunami earthquakes". In pre-historical times large tsunamis were caused by volcanic processes in Thera and Etna. A tsunami was supposedly generated in the Holocene by the so-called BIG'95 large submarine landslide in W. Mediterranean. The AD 1650 eruption of the submarine Columbo volcano, off-shore Thera, caused an important tsunami but very little is known about its source mechanism. We concluded that investigating further the

  5. The immunopathogenesis of staphylococcal skin infections - A review.

    PubMed

    Hill, P B; Imai, A

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and S. pseudintermedius are the major causes of bacterial skin disease in humans and dogs. These organisms can exist as commensals on the skin, but they can also cause severe or even devastating infections. The immune system has evolved mechanisms to deal with pathogenic microorganisms and has strategies to combat bacteria of this type. What emerges is a delicate "peace" between the opposing sides, but this balance can be disrupted leading to a full blown "war". In the ferocious battle that ensues, both sides attempt to get the upper hand, using strategies that are comparable to those used by modern day armies. In this review article, the complex interactions between the immune system and the organisms are described using such military analogies. The process is described in a sequential manner, starting with the invasion itself, and progressing to the eventual battlezone in which there are heavy casualties on both sides. By the end, the appearance of a simple pustule on the skin surface will take on a whole new meaning.

  6. 40 CFR 312.24 - Reviews of historical sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... objectives and performance factors of § 312.20(e) and (f). Historical documents and records may include, but are not limited to, aerial photographs, fire insurance maps, building department records, chain of..., industrial, or governmental purposes. For the purpose of achieving the objectives and performance factors...

  7. On Applications of Rasch Models in International Comparative Large-Scale Assessments: A Historical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Heike; Bos, Wilfried; Goy, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Several current international comparative large-scale assessments of educational achievement (ICLSA) make use of "Rasch models", to address functions essential for valid cross-cultural comparisons. From a historical perspective, ICLSA and Georg Rasch's "models for measurement" emerged at about the same time, half a century ago. However, the…

  8. Glass Science tutorial lecture No. 5: Historical review of USDOE tank waste management

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E.W.

    1995-02-01

    This is a two day course whose objective is to present an unbiased historical overview of the DOE tank waste activities. World events which impacted the US nuclear program (or vise versa) will be presented. Liquid, mostly tank waste, and sludge are the primary concerns of this course.

  9. Risk Factors of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections in China: A Systematic Review of Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William Chi Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are a global challenge. China, once said to have eradicated STIs, is now facing a rapid rise in the prevalence of HIV/STIs. This review of reviews aims to map HIV/STI risk factors among the Chinese population, with the objective of identifying risk factors to inform the formulation of effective prevention strategies. Methods A systematic search using key terms related to HIV/STIs, risk factors and the Chinese population in both English and Chinese databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library; Wanfang data, CNKI, VIP and SINOMED) was conducted, and peer-reviewed systematic reviews on the topic from 1991 to 2014 were selected. Identified risk factors were grouped into different level determinants based on the HIV Social Epidemiology Model, and then evaluated and reported based on the PRISMA checklist. Findings Of the twenty-eight reviews included, the majority were focused on well-established, individual level risk factors within key populations, with some highlighting the complexity of interacting factors (e.g., alcohol use and higher income in male migrants). While twenty-two reviews covered individual factors, only ten mentioned social factors and five had contents on structural factors. There are gaps in the evidence on social and structural level impacts of HIV/STIs, such as on stigma, discrimination, health policy, access to care, and illicit drug control policies. Migration and social expectation appear to pose a significant threat in aggravating the HIV/STI situation in China; for example, incarceration patterns indicated a significant risk of HIV/STIs for female sex workers. Conclusions Since international guidelines recommend an integrated and multi-level approach to HIV/STI prevention, a comprehensive approach targeting interventions at all levels along the continuum of care is needed to effectively curtail HIV/STI transmission in China. More research is needed to better understand the impact of socio

  10. Historic Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Reviews some of the efforts of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (SPNEA) to preserve, conserve, and interpret historic houses to the public. Examines the history and some of the specific preservation problems concerning the Beauport Cottage, the Sayward-Wheeler House, and the Gropius House. (MJP)

  11. The incidence of deep brain stimulator hardware infection: the effect of change in antibiotic prophylaxis regimen and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Robin; Dalton, Arthur; Richards, Mike; Hopkins, Chris; Aziz, Tipu; Nandi, Dipankar

    2011-10-01

    The complication of hardware infection related to deep brain stimulator implantation (or revision) varies between 0 and 15.2% in the literature. However, no national guidelines exist at present to define an average or acceptable rate of infection associated with, nor the preferred antibiotic prophylaxis required for, this procedure. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of changing the antibiotic prophylaxis regimen used in a single neurosurgical centre on the incidence and outcome of hardware infection. A prospective cohort of 38 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation or internal pulse generator (IPG) replacement and receiving perioperative vancomycin (including intravenous gentamicin on induction) and pouch-installed gentamicin, was compared to a historical cohort of 35 patients receiving perioperative cefuroxime in the same unit. The infection rate over 2 years in the prospective group for DBS surgery was 0 compared to 1 (5.6%) in the historical cohort (p = 0.11, χ(2)); the infection rate for IPG replacements was 1(3.6%) in the prospective cohort, versus 3 (17.6%) in the historical (p = 0.44, χ(2)). In this article, we have also systematically reviewed the literature to date and derived an average infection rate of 4.7% (PI 0.9-22%, Random Effects Meta-analysis, Stata) for 35 studies comprising 3550 patients. There is no significant difference in infection rates between DBS procedures that are primarily internalised (n = 9) compared to those in which there is a period of electrode externalisation (n = 23) (p = 0.9, Meta-regression analysis, Stata).

  12. Meningitis and bacteremia due to Bacillus cereus. A case report and a review of Bacillus infections.

    PubMed

    Siegman-Igra, Y; Lavochkin, J; Schwartz, D; Konforti, N

    1983-06-01

    A patient with meningitis and bacteremia due to Bacillus cereus is described. The patient had transsphenoidal hypophysectomy for chromophobe adenoma, complicated by rhinorrhea, which was corrected by subarachnoid drainage. Three weeks after removal of the drain, the patient presented with meningitis and died the following day. The causative organism was identified as B. cereus. The literature on Bacillus infections is reviewed with special attention to severe infections. A modified classification is proposed, dividing infections into superficial, closed-space and systemic ones. Sixty-one previously reported cases of systemic Bacillus infections are reviewed according to type of infection (endocarditis, meningitis or pulmonary infection), and the underlying conditions, ways of acquiring the infection, clinical picture and mortality are discussed.

  13. [Significance of infection control in dentistry: a review].

    PubMed

    Györfi, Adrienne; Fazekas, Arpad

    2007-08-01

    Dental care is a field of high priority regarding the risk of infections. Since many carriers are not aware of their infection, it may happen that the dentist meets a patient, in whom an earlier infection can be proven by serology, but the patient is not aware of it and the clinical signs and symptoms are missing, as well. For this reason, the dentist has to consider every patient potentially infected. On the other hand, health-care workers are not only susceptible persons to infections but they can also be sources of infections. In order to prevent the nosocomial infections the dentist has to ensure the hygienic protection of both the patients and the health-care workers. All the health-occupational measures have to be known and have to be kept by the dental personnel. The health personnel has to be informed on the risk and how to prevent infections. The essential importance of hygiene, the role of protective equipment and all the duties connected with should be emphasized. Furthermore, the continuing education of health-care workers is indispensable regarding the infectious diseases. In order to reduce the risk of nosocomial infections the authors summarize the state-of-the-art knowledge of infection control.

  14. Infections in Cancer Patients with Solid Tumors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Rolston, Kenneth V I

    2017-03-01

    Solid tumors are much more common than hematologic malignancies. Although severe and prolonged neutropenia is uncommon, several factors increase the risk of infection in patients with solid tumors, and the presence of multiple risk factors in the same patient is not uncommon. These include obstruction (most often caused by progression of the tumor), disruption of natural anatomic barriers such as the skin and mucosal surfaces, and treatment-related factors such as chemotherapy, radiation, diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures, and the increasing use of medical devices such as various catheters, stents, and prostheses. Common sites of infection include the skin and skin structures (including surgical site infections), the bloodstream (including infections associated with central venous catheters), the lungs, the hepato-biliary and intestinal tracts, and the urinary tract, and include distinct clinical syndromes such as post-obstructive pneumonia, obstructive uropathy, and neutropenic enterocolitis. The epidemiology of most of these infections is changing with resistant organisms [MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing organisms] being isolated more often than in the past. Polymicrobial infections now predominate when deep tissue sites are involved. Conservative management of most of these infections (antibiotics, fluid and electrolyte replacement, bowel rest when needed) is generally effective, with surgical intervention being reserved for the drainage of deep abscesses, or to deal with complications such as intestinal obstruction or hemorrhage. Infected prostheses often need to be removed. Reactivation of certain viral infections (HBV, HCV, and occasionally CMV) has become an important issue, and screening, prevention and treatment strategies are being developed. Infection prevention, infection control, and antimicrobial stewardship are important strategies in the overall management of infections in patients with

  15. Does the Congressional Budget Office underestimate savings from reform? A review of the historical record.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Jon R

    2010-01-01

    When the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) "scores" legislation, or assesses the likely cost impact, it requires substantial evidence that a cost-saving initiative has historically achieved savings. The agency has difficulty addressing the impact of multiple changes made simultaneously without historical precedent where there is an interaction effect among proposed changes. This study examines CBO scoring of major reform legislation enacted during each of the past three decades, including the prospective payment system for hospitals in the 1980s, the Balanced Budget Act of the 1990s, and the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. In contrasting actual spending with predicted spending, CBO, in all three cases, substantially underestimated savings from these reform measures.

  16. Systematic review of the treatment of upper respiratory tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, T.; Stocks, N.; Thomas, T.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the risks and benefits of antibiotic treatment in children with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI).
DESIGN—Quantitative systematic review of randomised trials that compare antibiotic treatment with placebo.
DATA SOURCES—Twelve trials retrieved from a systematic search (electronic databases, contact with authors, contact with drug manufacturers, reference lists); no restriction on language.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The proportion of children in whom the clinical outcome was worse or unchanged; the proportion of children who suffered complications or progression of illness; the proportion of children who had side effects.
RESULTS—1699 children were randomised in six trials that contributed to the meta-analysis. Six trials were not used in the meta-analysis because of different outcomes or incomplete data. Clinical outcome was not improved by antibiotic treatment (relative risk 1.01,95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.13), neither was the proportion of children suffering from complications or progression of illness (relative risk 0.71, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.12). Complications from URTI in the five trials that reported this outcome was low (range 2-15%). Antibiotic treatment was not associated with an increase in side effects compared with placebo (relative risk 0.8, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.21).
CONCLUSIONS—In view of the lack of efficacy and low complication rates, antibiotic treatment of children with URTI is not supported by current evidence from randomised trials.

 PMID:9875017

  17. [New drugs against tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections: a review].

    PubMed

    Amitani, R; Kuze, F

    1994-11-01

    The number of cases with tuberculosis is again increasing in many countries, and recently several nosocomial outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis have occurred in the United States. The number of patients with disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections in AIDS population, and patients with MAC pulmonary disease unassociated with HIV seem to be also increasing. It takes at least 6 to 9 months for an initial treatment of active tuberculosis due to drug-sensitive strains with the standard regimen which includes isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP). Treatment for the diseases caused by drug-resistant M. tuberculosis and MAC is much more time-consuming and more toxic than for the diseases caused by drug-sensitive strains, and often unsuccessful. For the reasons described above, the developments of new agents with potent antimycobacterial activities are highly desired. The new agents should also be useful for treating patients who have acquired resistance to many of the currently available drugs. In this review the new antimycobacterial drugs are summarized. Some of them have already been used clinically, but many are still in experimental evaluations. 1) Rifamycin derivatives: rifabutin (RBT), KRM-1648 (KRM), rifapentin (RPT), FCE-22250, FCE-22807, CGP-7040, SPA-S-565 and other rifamycin derivatives. New rifamycin derivatives including RBT, KRM have increased in vitro antimycobacterial activities. RBT and KRM are much more active in vitro and in vivo than RFP against both M. tuberculosis and MAC. KRM seems to be more potent than RBT against MAC in experimental studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Infective Endocarditis Epidemiology Over Five Decades: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Slipczuk, Leandro; Codolosa, J. Nicolas; Davila, Carlos D.; Romero-Corral, Abel; Yun, Jeong; Pressman, Gregg S.; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To Assess changes in infective endocarditis (IE) epidemiology over the last 5 decades. Methods and Results We searched the published literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception until December 2011. Data From Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA were also included. Criteria for inclusion in this systematic review included studies with reported IE microbiology, IE definition, description of population studied, and time frame. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed manuscript quality. One hundred sixty studies (27,083 patients) met inclusion criteria. Among hospital-based studies (n=142; 23,606 patients) staphylococcal IE percentage increased over time, with coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS) increasing over each of the last 5 decades (p<0.001) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) in the last decade (21% to 30%; p<0.05). Streptococcus viridans (SV) and culture negative (CN) IE frequency decreased over time (p<0.001), while enterococcal IE increased in the last decade (p<0.01). Patient age and male predominance increased over time as well. In subgroup analysis, SA frequency increased in North America, but not the rest of the world. This was due, in part, to an increase in intravenous drug abuse IE in North America (p<0.001). Among population-based studies (n=18; 3,477 patients) no significant changes were found. Conclusion Important changes occurred in IE epidemiology over the last half-century, especially in the last decade. Staphylococcal and enterococcal IE percentage increased while SV and CN IE decreased. Moreover, mean age at diagnosis increased together with male:female ratio. These changes should be considered at the time of decision-making in treatment of and prophylaxis for IE. PMID:24349331

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis in children with relapsing urinary tract infections: review.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pizzini, C; Fanos, V

    2000-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are observed in 30-50% of children after the first UTI. Of these, approximately 90% occur within 3 months of the initial episode. The basic aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in children with malformative uropathy and/or recurrent UTIs, is to reduce the frequency of UTIs. The bacteria most frequently responsible for UTI are gram-negative organisms, with Escherichia coli accounting for 80% of urinary tract pathogens. In children with recurrent UTIs and in those treated with antibiotic prophylaxis there is a greater incidence of UTI due to Proteus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp., whereas Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp. and Candida spp. are more frequent in children with urogenital abnormalities and/or undergoing invasive instrumental investigations. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of UTI, the main ones being circumcision, periurethral flora, micturition disorders, bowel disorders, local factors and hygienic measures. Several factors facilitate UTI relapse: malformative uropathies, particularly of the obstructive type; vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR); previous repeated episodes of cystitis and/or pyelonephritis (3 or more episodes a year), even in the absence of urinary tract abnormalities; a frequently catheterized neurogenic bladder; kidney transplant. The precise mechanism of action of low-dose antibiotics is not yet fully known. The characteristics of the ideal prophylactic agent are presented in this review, as well as indications, dosages, side effects, clinical data of all molecules. While inappropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis encourages the emergence of microbial resistance, its proper use may be of great value in clinical practice, by reducing the frequency and clinical expression of UTIs and, in some cases such as VUR, significantly helping to resolve the underlying pathology.

  20. Historical data review and source analysis of PCBs/Arochlors in the Lower Leon Creek Watershed.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Heather J; Sokoly, Diana; Johnson, Drew W

    2017-02-01

    PCBs have been banned since the late 1970s, but concentrations still exist in sediments and riverine fish and continue to exceed regulatory limits which can result in negative health effects. This study looks at historical records of PCB and Arochlor concentrations in surface water, sediments, and fish tissue for the Lower Leon Creek, Bexar County in Texas. Temporal analysis on the concentrations of PCBs and Arochlors was conducted for detection and exceedance of selected screening criteria. In addition, the half-lives of select PCB congeners were calculated for 2007-2012 data to ascertain differences in PCB concentrations with their hydrophobicity. Source analysis was conducted to determine the potential contributing sources of PCB contamination using source data (landfills, outfalls, etc.) and the PCB exceedance data. For sediment and fish tissue sampling results, historic data shows high concentrations of PCB/Arochlors over the course of several decades. The historical data is characterized as being widely variable for detections in Arochlors and concentrations between years, with a dramatic drop in concentrations detected starting in 2009. Overall, the sampling locations adjacent to and downstream from the former Kelly Air Force Base have the highest concentrations of PCB/Arochlors over the longest period of time. The results of this work will aid regulatory agencies in addressing impairment.

  1. A historical review of portable health physics instruments and their use in radiation protection programs at Hanford, 1944 through 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Kress, M.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Corbit, C.D.; Zuerner, L.V.; Fleming, D.M.; DeHaven, H.W.

    1989-09-01

    This historical review covers portable health physics instruments at Hanford from an applications viewpoint. The review provides information on specific instruments and on the general kinds of facility work environments in which the instruments have been and are being used. It provides a short, modestly technical explanation of the types of nuclear radiations, the way radiation units are quantified, and the types of nuclear radiations, the way radiation units are quantified, and the types of detection media used in portable health physics instruments. This document does not, however, cover the history of the entire Hanford program that was required to develop and/or modify the subject instruments. 11 refs., 34 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program has proposed changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year Rates: Proposed Rule CMS 1488-P-Healthcare-associated infection. Payment will be linked to performance. Under the new rule, payment will be withheld from hospitals for care associated with treating certain catheter-associated urinary tract infections, vascular catheter-associated infections, and mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Infection-prevention strategies are essential. In the healthcare setting, the infection control department is categorized as non-revenue-producing. Funds dedicated to resources such as staff, educational programs, and prevention measures are vastly limited. Hospital leaders will need to balance the upfront cost needed to prevent hospital-related infections with the non-reimbursed expense accrued secondary to potentially preventable infections. The purpose of this paper is to present case studies and cost analysis of hospital-acquired infections and present strategies that reduce infections and cost. PMID:21603406

  3. Historical review of long-term soil sampling for environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site and vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Price, K.R.; Rickard, W.H.

    1997-08-01

    Soil samples have been collected routinely from the environs of the Hanford Site and analyzed since 1971. Correct interpretation of results depends on samples being collected from the same locations, the locations remaining relatively undisturbed, and collection and analytical procedures remaining the same or being equivalent. Historical files, documents, and annual environmental reports were reviewed to evaluate these factors. It was determined that 20 soil sampling locations, 11 onsite and 9 offsite, were established between 1971 and 1977 and represent long-term sampling locations. Sample collection and analytical procedures have remained essentially the same since 1971. The physical ecological attributes of each long-term soil sampling location were evaluated. During the review of historical records, a few results for 1970, 1971, and 1972 were noted as previously unreported in annual or special reports. These results are included in Appendix A. To complete the record, results previously reported in annual environmental reports are given in Appendix B. Global Positioning System (GPS) reading for 20 long-term soil sampling locations are provided in Appendix C.

  4. A Historical Review of Cermet Fuel Development and the Engine Performance Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand Cermet engine performance, examined historical material development reports two issues: High vaporization rate of UO2, High temperature chemical stability of UO2. Cladding and chemical stabilizers each result in large, order of magnitude improvements in high temperature performance. Few samples were tested above 2770 K. Results above 2770 K are ambiguous. Contemporary testing may clarify performance. Cermet sample testing during the NERVA Rover era. Important properties, melting temperature, vaporization rate, strength, Brittle-to-Ductile Transition, cermet sample test results, engine performance, location, peak temperature.

  5. Catatonia and autism: a historical review, with implications for electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Dhossche, Dirk M; Reti, Irving M; Wachtel, Lee E

    2009-03-01

    Current autism research is historically separated from catatonia and other childhood psychotic disorders, although catatonia and autism share several common symptoms (mutism, echolalia, stereotypic speech and repetitive behaviors, posturing, grimacing, rigidity, mannerisms, and purposeless agitation). Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) effectively treats catatonia and catatonia-related conditions of intractable compulsions, tics, and self-injury in people with autism. We assess the incidence of catatonic symptoms in autism, examine emerging ECT indications in people with autism and related developmental disorders, and encourage ethical debate and legal-administrative action to assure equal access to ECT for people with autism.

  6. Historical Review of Electric Household Appliances using Induction-Heating and Future Challenging Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Izuo; Yamashita, Hidekazu; Omori, Hideki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents historical progress on technology evolution of the electric and electronic household appliances using the inverter, especially for Induction-Heating applications, which have been put in practical use as the desk-top cooker for the first time at home in 1974 until being applied to the rice cooker and the multi-burner cooking heater. It also describes the future innovative evolution of the power semiconductor switching devices and the inverter circuit topologies supporting its progressive developments. Looking back its progress, the future trends on consumer power electronics is discussed on the practical problem in the future.

  7. Surgical site infection after hand surgery outside the operating theatre: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, N A; Ibish, S; Furniss, D

    2017-03-01

    We carried out a systematic review to determine the incidence of infection for hand surgery done in settings other than the operating theatre. Databases were searched and a PRISMA chart created by three independent reviewers. From 1200 studies identified, 46 full text articles were reviewed and six were included (two Level 3 studies and four Level 4). In three studies there were no infections after surgery in an office, procedure room or emergency department. Two studies with a combined number of 1962 procedures reviewed carpal tunnel decompressions and reported identical infection rates of 0.4%. Although the current evidence is of poor quality, it suggests that some types of hand surgery may be done outside the operating theatre without increasing the risk of infection.

  8. Culture Teaching in Historical Review: On the Occasion of ASOCOPI's Fiftieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This literature review surveys fifty years of English language teaching scholarship on the topic of culture teaching. The review segments the available literature according to decade and applies two guiding questions to each resource found: "How is culture defined" and "What does culture teaching look like." The report of…

  9. IMMUNOGENETIC FACTORS INFLUENCING CLINICAL COURSE OF HCV INFECTION (REVIEW).

    PubMed

    Kamkamidze, G; Butsashvili, M; Gendzekhadze, K

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains one of the most important blood-borne diseases worldwide with about 130-170 million people chronically infected with hepatitis C virus, and more than 350 000 people die from hepatitis C-related liver diseases each year. Infection with HCV becomes chronic in approximately 80% of cases, while in up to 20% of cases hepatitis C virus is cleared from the human organism. Chronic infections of hepatitis C often leads to the end-stage liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The clinical course and the outcome of the HCV infection is determined by the complex interplay between the viral replication and the host defense mechanisms. Several recent studies have shown that MHC class I and class II as well as natural killer (NK) cell's immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) loci can be associated with the HCV protection and clearance as well as with disease progression and responsiveness to antiviral treatment. Current status of our knowledge about the influence of immunogenetic factors on the clinical course of HCV infection is presented in the paper. Plans to investigate these factors among HCV infected patients enrolled in the HCV Elimination Program (launched in April 2015 in Georgia) are discussed.

  10. Gonococcal arthritis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sena Corrales, Gabriel; Mora Navas, Laura; Palacios Muñoz, Rosario; García López, Victoria; Márquez Solero, Manuel; Santos González, Jesús

    We report a case of gonococcal arthritis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and review 17 previously published cases; only one patient presented urethritis, and blood cultures were positive in one case. Gonococcal arthritis is rare in HIV-infected patients and is not usually associated with other symptoms. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute arthritis in patients with HIV infection.

  11. Clinical manifestations of Kingella kingae infections: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Morrison, V A; Wagner, K F

    1989-01-01

    A patient with antecedent coccidioidal pulmonary cavitary disease who developed an empyema due to Kingella kingae prompted our analysis of the literature regarding this unusual bacterial pathogen. Formerly classified among other genera and considered a nonpathogen, K. kingae has been increasingly recognized as a cause of human infection. While the most commonly diagnosed infections due to this organism are endocarditis and septic arthritis, there have also been isolated reports of bacteremia, diskitis, abscesses, meningitis, and oropharyngeal infections. The treatment of choice is penicillin, to which K. kingae strains are uniformly susceptible. Recognition of the potential pathogenicity of this microorganism in appropriate clinical settings will probably result in more prompt and specific therapy.

  12. Role of Combination Antimicrobial Therapy for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Infections: Review of the Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Yim, Juwon; Smith, Jordan R; Rybak, Michael J

    2017-03-08

    Enterococcus species are the second most common cause of nosocomial infections in the United States and are particularly concerning in critically ill patients with preexisting comorbid conditions. Rising resistance to antimicrobials that were historically used as front-line agents for treatment of enterococcal infections, such as ampicillin, vancomycin, and aminoglycosides, further complicates the treatment of these infections. Of particular concern are Enterococcus faecium strains that are associated with the highest rate of vancomycin resistance. The introduction of antimicrobial agents with specific activity against vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) faecium including daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tigecycline did not completely resolve this clinical dilemma. In this review, the mechanisms of action and resistance to currently available anti-VRE antimicrobial agents including newer agents such as oritavancin and dalbavancin will be presented. In addition, novel combination therapies including β-lactams and fosfomycin, and the promising results from in vitro, animal studies, and clinical experience in the treatment of VRE faecium will be discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Review: apoptotic mechanisms in bacterial infections of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Philipp, Mario T.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we review the apoptotic mechanisms most frequently encountered in bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). We focus specifically on apoptosis of neural cells (neurons and glia), and provide first an overview of the phenomenon of apoptosis itself and its extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. We then describe apoptosis in the context of infectious diseases and inflammation caused by bacteria, and review its role in the pathogenesis of the most relevant bacterial infections of the CNS. PMID:23060884

  14. [Psychiatry and occupational diseases act in Chile: historical and critical review of a complex relationship].

    PubMed

    Almonte, Juan C; Mena, Cristián; Ortiz, Sofía; Osorio, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The Work Accidents and Occupational Diseases Act exists in Chile since 1968. It uses a single model for the understanding and management of both somatic diseases like silicosis and psychiatric disorders. During the last decade in Chile, the consultation rates due to psychiatric conditions of probable labor origin has rose over 1,000%, a factor that underscored the deficiencies of this model. The aim of this paper is to analyze the consequences of the application of this act in the psychiatric field for almost 50 years after its promulgation. This article contains an historical overview and an epistemological debate based on the authors’ experience dealing with clinical and administrative work both in occupational psychiatry departments and in regulatory entities. The development of occupational mental health in Chile is examined as part of an historical process that initially did not consider the relationship between work and mental suffering as relevant. The application of a single causality model in psychiatry, as well as the effects of building a psychiatric nosology upon legal rather than medical criteria is contested.

  15. The pituri story: a review of the historical literature surrounding traditional Australian Aboriginal use of nicotine in Central Australia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The harmful outcomes of nicotine self administration have been the focus of sustained global health education campaigns that have targeted tobacco smoking and to a lesser extent, smokeless tobacco use. 'Smokeless tobacco' infers that the nicotine is not burnt, and administration can be through a range of methods including chewing. The chewing of wild tobacco plants (Nicotiana spp.) is practiced across a broad inland area of Central Australia by traditional Aboriginal groups. Collectively these plants are known by a variety of names - one common name being 'pituri'. This is the first paper to examine the historical literature and consider the linkage between pituri use and health outcomes. Using a narrative approach, this paper reviews the literature generated since 1770 surrounding the term pituri and the behaviours associated with its use. The review examines the scientific literature, as well as the diaries and journals of nineteenth century explorers, expedition notes, and early Australian novels to expound the scientific evidence and broaden the sense of understanding related to pituri, particularly the behavioural elements. The evaluation considers the complexities of ethnobotany pertaining to language and distance and the ethnopharmacology of indigenous plant usage. The review compares the use of burnt and smokeless tobacco to pituri and establishes the foundation for research into the clinical significance and health outcomes of pituri use. Additionally, this review provides contemporary information for clinicians providing care for patients who chew pituri. PMID:20831827

  16. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  17. Fungal infection involvement in primary biliary cirrhosis: A review of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Zhao, Zheng; Lu, Hui; Zhang, Jianglin; Huang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the imaging, clinical and pathological features of fungal infection involvement in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) by retrospectively analyzing and reviewing the features of two patients with fungal infection involvement in PBC. Both patients were female. One patient had a confirmed diagnosis of PBC. The other patient had confirmed Sjogren syndrome and PBC. The two cases of PBC were infected with fungal infection after treatment with hormonal and immunosuppressive agents. RCR of sputum confirmed Pneumocystis spp. infection in the patient with PBC alone. The mucormycosis infection was confirmed in the other patient after pathological examination of a renal biopsy. The state of the illnesses progressed quickly and both patients ultimately succumbed to their conditions. The patient prognosis of fungal infection involvement PBC is poor. Patients treated with long-term hormone and immunosuppressive agents should be monitored. PMID:28352320

  18. 33 CFR 137.50 - Reviews of historical sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be reviewed for the purposes of achieving the objectives and performance factors of § 137.30(a) and... insurance maps, building department records, chain of title documents, and land use records. (b)...

  19. 33 CFR 137.50 - Reviews of historical sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be reviewed for the purposes of achieving the objectives and performance factors of § 137.30(a) and... insurance maps, building department records, chain of title documents, and land use records. (b)...

  20. Physician training in aerospace medicine--an historical review in the United States.

    PubMed

    Doarn, Charles R; Mohler, Stanley R

    2013-02-01

    The training of U.S. physicians in aviation medicine closely followed the development of reliable airplanes. This training has matured as aviation and space travel have become more routine over the past several decades. In the U.S., this training began in support of military pilots who were flying increasingly complex aircraft in the early part of the 20th century. As individuals reached into the stratosphere, low Earth orbit, and eventually to the Moon, physicians were trained not only through military efforts but in academic settings as well. This paper provides an historical summary of how physician training in aerospace medicine developed in the U.S., citing both the development of the military activities and, more importantly, the perspectives of the academic programs. This history is important as we move forward in the development of commercial space travel and the needs that such a business model will be required to meet.

  1. Historical reconstruction of contamination using sediment cores: A review. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Valette-Silver, N.

    1992-03-01

    Historical reconstructions of contamination using cored sediments have been performed in the United States and abroad, in marine as well as freshwater environments. Most studies have dealt with trace metals, while a few reported results for organic contaminants. With some exceptions, these studies show an increase in sediment contamination during the late 1800s, followed by an acceleration in the rate of contamination in the 1940s, and a plateau or a maximum in the 1960-1970s. Little is known about the trends of coastal pollution over the last decade, as only a few studies have been carried out since 1980. From these studies, however, it appears that Pb concentrations have decreased in most areas of the world following the implementation of laws regulating the use of leaded gasoline in automobiles.

  2. Getting From A to IRB: Developing an Institutional Review Board at a Historically Black University

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Daniel L.; Boyd, Carlton L.; Nelson, Daniel K.; Godley, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Shaw University, the oldest historically black college or university in the southern USA, recently partnered with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a major research institution in North Carolina, to further develop Shaw’s research infrastructure. One aim of the partnership involved establishing a human research ethics committee and an accompanying administrative structure and research ethics education program. This paper describes the process of developing an entire human research protection program de novo through collaboration with and mentoring by the members of the human research protection program at a nearby major research institution. This paper provides a detailed description of the aims, procedures, accomplishments, and challenges involved in such a project, which may serve as a useful model for other primarily teaching institutions wishing to develop research infrastructure and ethical capacity. PMID:20235865

  3. Fish-based remedies in Spanish ethnomedicine: a review from a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fish-based therapeutics is fundamentally based on a dietary use, but these vertebrates have also been employed in the treatment of infectious and parasitic diseases, during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum and to deal with diseases of the different systems. Methods An overview of the ethnomedical and historical Spanish literature has been carried out. Automated searches in the most important national and international databases have been performed. All related works have been thorough examined. Results We examine the historical use of 54 medicinal fish species, 48 marine and six from inland waters. As useful, in Ancient times 39 species have been recorded (of which only 21 have been collected in subsequent periods), seven in the Middle Ages, 18 in Modern times and 17 in the contemporary period. Anguilla anguilla, Engraulis encrasicolus or Scyliorhinus canicula are species that have survived over time as an ingredient in Spanish folk remedies. Most remedies used in the last century and currently are empirical remedies based on the humorism theory and the principle of contraria contrariis curantur (74%), and the rest (26%) are magical type remedies that complete the popular therapeutic arsenal. Conclusions In the last century we find a progressive decrease in the number of fish species used in ethnomedicine. Only seven taxa have been documented as surviving therapeutic resources since centuries ago. The existence of a dynamic Spanish ethnomedicine has also been detected which has managed to generate new therapeutic resources in recent times. It is important to validate the remedies by ethnopharmacology and evidence-based medicine. In order to recover as much data as possible, it will be necessary to draw up an inventory of ethnoichthyological uses. PMID:24885245

  4. Host response to Brucella infection: review and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Elfaki, Mohamed G; Alaidan, Alwaleed Abdullah; Al-Hokail, Abdullah Abdulrahman

    2015-07-30

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic and contagious infectious disease caused by infection with Brucella species. The infecting brucellae are capable of causing a devastating multi-organ disease in humans with serious health complications. The pathogenesis of Brucella infection is influenced largely by host factors, Brucella species/strain, and the ability of invading brucellae to survive and replicate within mononuclear phagocytic cells, preferentially macrophages (Mf). Consequently, the course of human infection may appear as an acute fatal or progress into chronic debilitating infection with periodical episodes that leads to bacteremia and death. The existence of brucellae inside Mf represents one of the strategies used by Brucella to evade the host immune response and is responsible for treatment failure in certain human populations treated with anti-Brucella drugs. Moreover, the persistence of brucellae inside Mf complicates the diagnosis and may affect the host cell signaling pathways with consequent alterations in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, there is an urgent need to pursue the development of novel drugs and/or vaccine targets against human brucellosis using high throughput technologies in genomics, proteomics, and immunology.

  5. Diabetic foot infections: a team-oriented review of medical and surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Claire M; Stapleton, John J

    2010-01-01

    As the domestic and international incidence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome continues to rise, health care providers need to continue improving management of the long-term complications of the disease. Emergency department visits and hospital admissions for diabetic foot infections are increasingly commonplace, and a like-minded multidisciplinary team approach is needed to optimize patient care. Early recognition of severe infections, medical stabilization, appropriate antibiotic selection, early surgical intervention, and strategic plans for delayed reconstruction are crucial components of managing diabetic foot infections. The authors review initial medical and surgical management and staged surgical reconstruction of diabetic foot infections in the inpatient setting. PMID:22396806

  6. Pan-spinal infection: a case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Chien Yew; Etherington, Greg; Ton, Lu; Liew, Susan; Cheng, Allen C.; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Panspinal infection usually presents with fever, back pain, neurological deficit, and in advanced cases multi-organ failure and septic shock. The choice of treatment for panspinal infection is challenging because these patients are usually medically unstable with severe neurological compromise. The objective of this study is to review management and long term outcomes for patients with panspinal infection. Methods A retrospective review of patients with panspinal infection treated in our center over a 5-year period [Jan 2010–Dec 2014] and a review of the current published literatures was undertaken. Results We identified 4 patients with panspinal infection. One case was managed medically due to high perioperative risk, whilst the other three were managed surgically whilst on antibiotic therapy. All 3 cases managed surgically improved neurologically and infection subsided, whereas the patient managed medically did not change neurologically and infection subsided. Conclusions Patients with panspinal infection should be treated surgically unless the medical risk of surgery or anaesthesia is prohibitive. PMID:27757433

  7. An historical review of malaria, kala-azar and filariasis in Bangladesh in relation to the Flood Action Plan.

    PubMed

    Birley, M H

    1993-08-01

    This paper reviews the evidence of a link between flood control and vector-borne disease in Bengal/Bangladesh. Malaria is historically associated with reduced flooding and embankment construction in the flood plains of Bengal. The land west and south of the Jamuna river was highly malarious in 1916 but is not so today. The lands east of the Jamuna now have a higher, though still small, risk. The reduction in health risk can be attributed to the intensification of land use and human population density. Although there are many mosquito species, the abundance of the former malaria vector appears to have declined as environmental change removed its breeding sites. Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) is a serious disease which is fatal if left untreated. It occurs in irregular, periodic epidemics and is currently increasing in Bangladesh. In the past, malaria and kala-azar were confused and the prevalence of both may have been increased by embankment programmes. Both diseases are unstable and there is insufficient historical information to predict, with certainty, the consequences of environmental change. Reduced flooding accompanied by increased pollution will probably control the malaria vector. More information is needed about the response of the kala-azar vector to flooding. Bancroftian filariasis is non-fatal but causes chronic morbidity. It has had a widespread but usually low prevalence in Bangladesh, with both rural and urban foci. There are few recent data. Increasing organic pollution and drainage obstruction are expected to favour the vector and increase transmission.

  8. Infections in patients with diabetes mellitus: A review of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Casqueiro, Juliana; Casqueiro, Janine; Alves, Cresio

    2012-01-01

    In general, infectious diseases are more frequent and/or serious in patients with diabetes mellitus, which potentially increases their morbimortality. The greater frequency of infections in diabetic patients is caused by the hyperglycemic environment that favors immune dysfunction (e.g., damage to the neutrophil function, depression of the antioxidant system, and humoral immunity), micro- and macro-angiopathies, neuropathy, decrease in the antibacterial activity of urine, gastrointestinal and urinary dysmotility, and greater number of medical interventions in these patients. The infections affect all organs and systems. Some of these problems are seen mostly in diabetic people, such as foot infections, malignant external otitis, rhinocerebral mucormycosis, and gangrenous cholecystitis. In addition to the increased morbidity, infectious processes may be the first manifestation of diabetes mellitus or the precipitating factors for complications inherent to the disease, such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hypoglycemia. Immunization with anti-pneumococcal and influenza vaccines is recommended to reduce hospitalizations, deaths, and medical expenses. PMID:22701840

  9. Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Gavito-Higuera, Jose; Mullins, Carola Birgit; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Olivas Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Hakim, Nawar; Palacios, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a threat to especially immunocompromised patients and their development is primarily determined by the immune status of the host. With an increasing number of organ transplants, chemotherapy, and human immunodeficiency virus infections, the number of immunocompromised patients as susceptible hosts is growing and fungal infections of the CNS are more frequently encountered. They may result in meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation, cryptococcoma, and meningeal vasculitis with rapid disease progression and often overlapping symptoms. Although radiological characteristics are often nonspecific, unique imaging patterns can be identified through computer tomography as a first imaging modality and further refined by magnetic resonance imaging. A rapid diagnosis and the institution of the appropriate therapy are crucial in helping prevent an often fatal outcome.

  10. Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavito-Higuera, Jose; Mullins, Carola Birgit; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Olivas Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Hakim, Nawar; Palacios, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a threat to especially immunocompromised patients and their development is primarily determined by the immune status of the host. With an increasing number of organ transplants, chemotherapy, and human immunodeficiency virus infections, the number of immunocompromised patients as susceptible hosts is growing and fungal infections of the CNS are more frequently encountered. They may result in meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation, cryptococcoma, and meningeal vasculitis with rapid disease progression and often overlapping symptoms. Although radiological characteristics are often nonspecific, unique imaging patterns can be identified through computer tomography as a first imaging modality and further refined by magnetic resonance imaging. A rapid diagnosis and the institution of the appropriate therapy are crucial in helping prevent an often fatal outcome. PMID:27403402

  11. The genetic analysis of tolerance to infections: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kause, Antti; Ødegård, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance to infections is defined as the ability of a host to limit the impact of a given pathogen burden on host performance. Uncoupling resistance and tolerance is a challenge, and there is a need to be able to separate them using specific trait recording or statistical methods. We present three statistical methods that can be used to investigate genetics of tolerance-related traits. Firstly, using random regressions, tolerance can be analyzed as a reaction norm slope in which host performance (y-axis) is regressed against an increasing pathogen burden (x-axis). Genetic variance in tolerance slopes is the genetic variance for tolerance. Variation in tolerance can induce genotype re-ranking and changes in genetic and phenotypic variation in host performance along the pathogen burden trajectory, contributing to environment-dependent genetic responses to selection. Such genotype-by-environment interactions can be quantified by combining random regressions and covariance functions. To apply random regressions, pathogen burden of individuals needs to be recorded. Secondly, when pathogen burden is not recorded, the cure model for time-until-death data allows separating two traits, susceptibility and endurance. Susceptibility is whether or not an individual was susceptible to an infection, whereas endurance denotes how long time it took until the infection killed a susceptible animal (influenced by tolerance). Thirdly, the normal mixture model can be used to classify continuously distributed host performance, such as growth rate, into different sub-classes (e.g., non-infected and infected), which allows estimation of host performance reduction specific to infected individuals. Moreover, genetics of host performance can be analyzed separately in healthy and affected animals, even in the absence of pathogen burden and survival data. These methods provide novel tools to increase our understanding on the impact of parasites, pathogens, and production diseases on host

  12. A historical review and bibliometric analysis of research on lead in drinking water field from 1991 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Liang; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2010-03-01

    A bibliometric analysis based on Science Citation Index (SCI) published by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) was carried out to identify the global research related to lead in drinking water field from 1991 to 2007 and to improve the understanding of research trends in the same period. The results from this analysis indicate that there have been an increasing number of annual publications mainly during two periods: from 1992 to 1997 and from 2004 to 2007. United States produced 37% of all pertinent articles followed by India with 8.0% and Canada with 4.8%. Science of the Total Environment published the most articles followed by Journal American Water Works Association and Toxicology. Summary of the most frequently used keywords are also provided. "Cadmium" was the most popular author keyword in the 17 years. Furthermore based on bibliometric results four research aspects were summarized in this paper and the historical research review was also presented.

  13. Infections and inflammatory diseases as risk factors for venous thrombosis. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tichelaar, Y I G Vladimir; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke J C; Meijer, Karina

    2012-05-01

    Inflammation and venous thrombosis are intertwined. Only in the recent 15 years clinical epidemiological studies have focussed on inflammatory or infectious diseases as risk factors for venous thrombosis. Although a few reviews and many case reports or studies on these topic has been written, a review reporting relative or absolute risks for venous thrombosis has not been published yet. We performed a systematic review using Medline, Pubmed and Embase and found 31 eligible articles. Inflammatory bowel disease, ANCA-associated vasculitis, infections in general and more specifically, human immunodeficiency virus, pneumonia and urinary tract infections are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis.

  14. Ecological research and management of intermittent rivers: an historical review and future directions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rivers and streams that do not flow permanently (herein intermittent rivers; IRs) make up a large proportion of the world's inland waters and are gaining widespread attention. We review the research on IRs from its early focus on natural history through to current application in ...

  15. The "American" (North American) Model of Constitutional Review: Historical Background and Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klishas, Andrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper explores the impact of the continental system exerted on the constitutional and political evolution of both the United States and individual states and tries to characterize the development of constitutional review phenomenon within the framework of the continental legal system and the Anglo-Saxon legal system. The research stands on the…

  16. A Historical Review of "Contemporary Educational Psychology" from 1995 to 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anita Witt; McConnell, John Robert, III

    2012-01-01

    The major themes and trends represented by the articles published in "Contemporary Educational Psychology" (CEP) from 1995 to 2010 are reviewed in this paper. Included are the major topics, theoretical perspectives, participant characteristics, research methods and statistics used, and highly cited papers. The most frequently occurring topic…

  17. James Clerk Maxwell and the Kinetic Theory of Gases: A Review Based on Recent Historical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Stephen G.

    1971-01-01

    Maxwell's four major papers and some shorter publications relating to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics are discussed in the light of subsequent research. Reviews Maxwell's ideas on such topics as velocity, distribution law, the theory of heat conduction, the mechanism of the radiometer effect, the ergodic hypothesis, and his views on the…

  18. A Historical Review of the Evolution of Early Childhood Care and Education in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Rose

    This paper reviews the development of early childhood care and education in the Caribbean region since World War II. Despite the growth of private early childhood facilities throughout the region in the immediate post-war period, supply was inadequate to satisfy demand. Governments, pressured by rising social and economic problems, were to varying…

  19. Historical review of lung counting efficiencies for low energy photon emitters

    DOE PAGES

    Jeffers, Karen L.; Hickman, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This publication reviews the measured efficiency and variability over time of a high purity planar germanium in vivo lung count system for multiple photon energies using increasingly thick overlays with the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. Furthermore, the measured variations in efficiency are compared with the current requirement for in vivo bioassay performance as defined by the American National Standards Institute Standard.

  20. Mycobacterium abscessus ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Montero, Jose A; Alrabaa, Sally F; Wills, Todd S

    2016-04-01

    A 30-year-old man with history of neonatal hydrocephalus requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement presented with Mycobacterium abscessus shunt infection despite no shunt manipulation over 10 years prior to presentation. Cure was not achieved until complete removal of all CNS shunt foreign body was performed despite initial adequate antimicrobial therapy.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a review with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Hemmige, Vagish; Tanowitz, Herbert; Sethi, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, an infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by the Reduuvid insect vector, remains a major cause of morbidity in Central and South America over a century after its discovery in 1909. Though major advances in preventing the spread of this disease have been made in recent decades, millions of individuals remain chronically infected due to prior exposure to T. cruzi and are at risk for future complications from the disease. Dermatologic manifestations of acute infection may include localized swelling at the site of inoculation (chagoma), conjunctivitis (Romaña’s sign), and a generalized morbilliform eruption (schizotrypanides). Reactivation of quiescent infection in immunocompromised hosts due to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or organ transplantation can present with fever and skin lesions including panniculitis. The wide-spread emigration of chronic carriers of T. cruzi to North America, Europe, and Australia makes it imperative that dermatologists worldwide be familiar with this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22515575

  2. Fungal Infections of the Ear in Immunocompromised Host: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Borlingegowda; Naseeruddin, Khaja

    2011-01-01

    Otomycosis is a fungal infection of the external ear; middle ear and open mastoid cavity.1 Meyer first described the fungal infection of the external ear canal in 1884. External ear canal has an ideal warm humid environment for the proliferation of fungus.2 Although this disease is rarely life threatening, it can presents a challenging and frustrating situation for the otologist and patients due to long term treatment and high rate of recurrence.3 Otomycosis is seen more frequently in immunocompromised patients as compared to immunocompetent persons. Recurrence rate is high in immunocompromised patients and they need longer duration treatment and complications are more frequent in immunocompromised patients. In the recent years; opportunistic fungal infections are gaining greater importance in human medicine as a result of possibly huge number of immunocompromised patients.4 In immunocompromised patients, it is important that the treatment of otomycosis be vigorous, to minimize complications such as hearing loss, tympanic membrane perforations and invasive temporal bone infection.5 Fungal cultures are essential to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological investigations play a very important role in confirming the diagnosis and immunity status of the patients. In diabetic patients with otomycosis, along with antifungal therapy, blood sugar levels should be controlled with medical therapy to prevent complications. PMID:21625307

  3. Disharmony between society and environmental carrying capacity: a historical review, with an emphasis on China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shixiong; Chen, Li; Liu, Zhande

    2007-07-01

    Nature can survive without humans, but humans cannot survive without nature. Despite a clear understanding of this dependency, humans continue to exist in disharmony with nature, and our current environmental and human dilemmas reflect old problems with a long history. Societies have historically experienced many transitions from harmony between nature and society to a crisis of disharmony, followed by a subsequent transition from crisis to harmony. Such ecological crises arise when society no longer practices sustainable consumption of resources within the limits imposed by the environmental carrying capacity. Over the long term, the growth in human desires has always exceeded the growth in the environmental carrying capacity. Science, technology, and social institutions must all be improved to resolve the ecological crises that arise from this imbalance. This paper discusses how increasing understanding of the problem by the public and by decision makers is the key to minimizing the undesirable impacts of the coming bottleneck for sustainable development. Furthermore, we emphasize how this awareness must be translated into fundamental political and economic changes.

  4. [Historical review of the plague in South America: a little-known disease in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Sotomayor, Hugo A

    2013-01-01

    The plague is an infectious disease that has transcended through history and has been responsible for three pandemics with high mortality rates. During the third pandemic that started in Hong Kong (1894), the disease spread through maritime routes to different regions in the world, including South America. In this region, approximately 16 million people are thought to be at risk in relation to this disease due to specific situations like human-rodent coexistence inside houses in rural areas, homes built with inadequate materials that are vulnerable to invasion by these animals, inappropriate storage of crops and an increase in rainfall and deforestation, which allows for the displacement of wild fauna and man invasion of the natural foci of the disease. Between 1994 and 1999, five countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru and the United States of America, reported approximately 1,700 cases with 79 related deaths. In Colombia we have historical data about an "infectious pneumonia" with high mortality rates that occurred during the same months, for three consecutive years (1913 to 1915) in the departments of Magdalena, Atlántico and Bolívar, located in the Colombian Atlantic coast, which suggested plague, but could not be confirmed.

  5. Vectorcardiographic diagnostic & prognostic information derived from the 12-lead electrocardiogram: Historical review and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Man, Sumche; Maan, Arie C; Schalij, Martin J; Swenne, Cees A

    2015-01-01

    In the course of time, electrocardiography has assumed several modalities with varying electrode numbers, electrode positions and lead systems. 12-lead electrocardiography and 3-lead vectorcardiography have become particularly popular. These modalities developed in parallel through the mid-twentieth century. In the same time interval, the physical concepts underlying electrocardiography were defined and worked out. In particular, the vector concept (heart vector, lead vector, volume conductor) appeared to be essential to understanding the manifestations of electrical heart activity, both in the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and in the 3-lead vectorcardiogram (VCG). Not universally appreciated in the clinic, the vectorcardiogram, and with it the vector concept, went out of use. A revival of vectorcardiography started in the 90's, when VCGs were mathematically synthesized from standard 12-lead ECGs. This facilitated combined electrocardiography and vectorcardiography without the need for a special recording system. This paper gives an overview of these historical developments, elaborates on the vector concept and seeks to define where VCG analysis/interpretation can add diagnostic/prognostic value to conventional 12-lead ECG analysis.

  6. [Earthquakes--a historical review, environmental and health effects, and health care measures].

    PubMed

    Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Doko Jelinić, Jagoda; Žuškin, Eugenija; Kratohvil, Mladen

    2013-06-01

    Earthquakes are natural disasters that can occur at any time, regardless of the location. Their frequency is higher in the Circum-Pacific and Mediterranean/Trans-Asian seismic belt. A number of sophisticated methods define their magnitude using the Richter scale and intensity using the Mercani-Cancani-Sieberg scale. Recorded data show a number of devastating earthquakes that have killed many people and changed the environment dramatically. Croatia is located in a seismically active area, which has endured a series of historical earthquakes, among which several occurred in the Zagreb area. The consequences of an earthquake depend mostly on the population density and seismic resistance of buildings in the affected area. Environmental consequences often include air, water, and soil pollution. The effects of this kind of pollution can have long-term health effects. The most dramatic health consequences result from the demolition of buildings. Therefore, quick and efficient aid depends on well-organized health professionals as well as on the readiness of the civil defence, fire department, and Mountain Rescue Service members. Good coordination among these services can save many lives Public health interventions must include effective control measures in the environment as secondary prevention methods for health problems caused by unfavourable environmental factors. The identification and control of long-term hazards can reduce chronic health effects. The reduction of earthquake-induced damages includes setting priorities in building seismically safe buildings.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  8. Glass/ceramic/refractory techniques, their development and introduction into dentistry: A historical literature review.

    PubMed

    Wildgoose, David G; Johnson, Anthony; Winstanley, Raymond B

    2004-02-01

    This review considered the development of glass, ceramic, refractory materials, and techniques over a period of 25,000 years, from the time of stone-age man to their introduction into dentistry. Currently a wide variety of all-ceramic dental restorations are provided using alumina-reinforced, leucite-forming, and novel glass and ceramic materials along with a range of refractory materials and associated techniques. However, some of the problems of dimensional and thermal change experienced by early craftsmen still persist during current laboratory fabrication techniques. Early English archaeological and dental publications were obtained through the Archaeology Education Department of the British Museum in London and the Archives of the British Dental Association Library. More recent peer-reviewed articles published from 1966 to the present were obtained through MEDLINE.

  9. Damaged goods: return to sender. A review of the historical medical records of repatriated Chinese miners.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, Ntombizodwa; Murray, Jill; Seopela, Simon

    2006-01-01

    After the Anglo-Boer (South African) War (1899-1902), there was a shortage of unskilled labor on the South African gold mines. Chinese men were imported to make up for the deficit. This article reviews the records of indentured Chinese mine workers examined for repatriation in 1905. The records tell of high proportions of social disorders, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, opium addiction, and injury. These reflect the social and physical conditions to which these men were exposed in the mines.

  10. Diagnosis and prognosis of congenital CMV infection: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Gabrielli, Liliana; Guerra, Brunella; Cervi, Francesca; Piccirilli, Giulia; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Bellini, Francesca; Landini, Maria Paola

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading non-genetic cause of sensori-neural hearing loss and neurodevelopmental sequelae. Despite these alarming facts, the general public healthcare system is often not aware of CMV and not enough is done to prevent congenital CMV infection.We describe the clinical and laboratory monitoring of a case with primary CMV infection occurring before the first trimester of gestation. Specific literature review is included in order to point out major goals achieved in the diagnosis and prognosis of congenital CMV infection and the many questions still unanswered. Serological diagnosis of primary CMV infection was performed based on serum-CMV specific-IgM antibodies, combined with low avidity anti-CMV IgG antibodies. The maternal infection was asymptomatic, as it is for most infections in immunocompetent patients. Therefore, disclosing primary infection depended on specific serological tests during the initial period of pregnancy (before weeks 12-16 of gestation). The invasive (amniocentesis) and non-invasive (ultrasonographic examination) prenatal tests, carried out at 21 weeks gestation, revealed a severe CMV infection in a fetus small for gestational age with ventriculomegaly. The presence of overt ultrasound abnormalities combined with high viral load in the amniotic fluid sampled at the appropriate times was highly suggestive of an unfavourable prognosis. The autopsy performed on the fetus confirmed severe disseminated CMV infection with histological brain damage.

  11. Noncongenital central nervous system infections in children: radiology review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Jorge Humberto Davila; Rantes, Claudia Isabel Lazarte; Arbelaez, Andres; Restrepo, Feliza; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are a very common worldwide health problem in childhood with significant morbidity and mortality. In children, viruses are the most common cause of CNS infections, followed by bacterial etiology, and less frequent due to mycosis and other causes. Noncomplicated meningitis is easier to recognize clinically; however, complications of meningitis such as abscesses, infarcts, venous thrombosis, or extra-axial empyemas are difficult to recognize clinically, and imaging plays a very important role on this setting. In addition, it is important to keep in mind that infectious process adjacent to the CNS such as mastoiditis can develop by contiguity in an infectious process within the CNS. We display the most common causes of meningitis and their complications.

  12. Sinonasal Fungal Infections and Complications: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavito-Higuera, Jose; Mullins, Carola Birgit; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Sandoval, Hugo; Akle, Nassim; Figueroa, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses can be categorized into invasive and non-invasive forms. The clinical presentation and course of the disease is primarily determined by the immune status of the host and can range from harmless or subtle presentations to life threatening complications. Invasive fungal infections are categorized into acute, chronic or chronic granulomatous entities. Immunocompromised patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, HIV and patients receiving chemotherapy or chronic oral corticosteroids are mostly affected. Mycetoma and Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis are considered non-invasive forms. Computer tomography is the gold-standard in sinonasal imaging and is complimented by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as it is superior in the evaluation of intraorbital and intracranial extensions. The knowledge and identification of the characteristic imaging patterns in invasive – and non- invasive fungal rhinosinusitis is crucial and the radiologist plays an important role in refining the diagnosis to prevent a possible fatal outcome. PMID:27403401

  13. Ciclopirox for the treatment of superficial fungal infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Skinner, Alayne R

    2003-09-01

    Ciclopirox is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent that also exhibits anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activity. The lotion and cream formulations of ciclopirox are effective in many types of infection, including tinea corporis/cruris, tinea pedis, cutaneous candidiasis, pityriasis (tinea) versicolor, and seborrheic dermatitis. The new ciclopirox gel 0.77% formulation is also indicated for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp, interdigital tinea pedis and tinea corporis.

  14. Year in review 2013: Critical Care--respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2014-10-29

    Infectious complications, particularly in the respiratory tract of critically ill patients, are related to increased mortality. Severe infection is part of a multiple system illness and female patients with severe sepsis have a worse prognosis compared to males. Kallistatin is a protective hormokine released during monocyte activation and low levels in the setting of septic shock can predict adverse outcomes. Presepsin is another biomarker that was recently evaluated and is elevated in patients with severe sepsis patients at risk of dying. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced new definitions for identifying patients at risk of ventilator-associated complications (VACs), but several other conditions, such as pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome, may cause VACs, and not all patients with VACs may have ventilator-associated pneumonia. New studies have suggested strategies to identify patients at risk for resistant pathogen infection and therapies that optimize efficacy, without the overuse of broad-spectrum therapy in patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia. Innovative strategies using optimized dosing of antimicrobials, maximizing the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs in critically ill patients, and newer routes of drug delivery are being explored to combat drug-resistant pathogens. We summarize the major clinical studies on respiratory infections in critically ill patients published in 2013.

  15. Demyelination in canine distemper virus infection: a review.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes severe immunosuppression and neurological disease in dogs, associated with demyelination, and is a model for multiple sclerosis in man. In the early stage of the infection, demyelination is associated with viral replication in the white matter. In acute demyelinating lesions there is massive down-regulation of myelin transcription and metabolic impairment of the myelin-producing cells, but there is no evidence that these cells are undergoing apoptosis or necrosis. Oligodendroglial change is related to restricted infection of these cells (transcription but no translation) and marked activation of microglial cells in acute lesions. Concomitant with immunological recovery during the further course of the disease, inflammation occurs in the demyelinating plaques with progression of the lesions in some animals. A series of experiments in vitro suggests that chronic inflammatory demyelination is due to a bystander mechanism resulting from interactions between macrophages and antiviral antibodies. Autoimmune reactions are also observed, but do not correlate with the course of the disease. The progressive or relapsing course of the disease is associated with viral persistence in the nervous system. Persistence of CDV in the brain appears to be favored by non-cytolytic selective spread of the virus and restricted infection, in this way escaping immune surveillance in the CNS. The CDV Fusion protein appears to play an important role in CDV persistence. Similarities between canine distemper and rodent models of virus-induced demyelination are discussed.

  16. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Eby, Joshua C; Hoffman, Casandra L; Gonyar, Laura A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-12-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10-14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28-35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors.

  17. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  18. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Joshua C.; Hoffman, Casandra L.; Gonyar, Laura A.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10–14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28–35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors. PMID:26432818

  19. Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David M.

    2004-07-01

    Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author's experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying the history of science. Three phases of performing literature searches with varying degrees of interaction with a research librarian are considered: do it yourself, librarian assisted, and librarian as collaborator. Examples are given for each phase: occluded fronts, conditional symmetric instability, and static instability terminology, respectively. Electronic availability of information is changing the relationship between scientists and librarians. Yet, despite these changes, books on library shelves and knowledgeable human librarians remain essential to the scientific enterprise.

  20. The development of drugs for treatment of sleeping sickness: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Only four drugs are available for the chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness; Suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine. The history of the development of these drugs is well known and documented. suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol were developed in the first half of the last century by the then recently established methods of medicinal chemistry. Eflornithine, originally developed in the 1970s as an anti-cancer drug, became a treatment of sleeping sickness largely by accident. This review summarises the developmental processes which led to these chemotherapies from the discovery of the first bioactive lead compounds to the identification of the final drugs. PMID:20219092

  1. Titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint prosthesis: historical background and a six-year clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bütow, K W; Blackbeard, G A; van der Merwe, A E

    2001-08-01

    The titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint (TTN-TMJ) prosthesis, for the combined replacement of both the joint and the glenoid fossa, was developed in 1992 and introduced clinically in 1994. This joint prosthesis is manufactured from pure titanium and the condylar surfaces, as well as the fossa, are coated with titanium nitride for hardening of the contact surfaces. In two different research projects, the joint were first placed in experimental animals, before they were successfully placed in human subjects. Twenty seven joint prostheses used in human subjects have been analysed for this review.

  2. Pertussis immunisation and control in England and Wales, 1957 to 2012: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Amirthalingam, G; Gupta, S; Campbell, H

    2013-09-19

    This review summarises the epidemiology and control of pertussis in England and Wales since the introduction of routine immunisation and considers the implications for future control. Routine infant immunisation with a whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccine was introduced in 1957 and had a marked impact on the overall disease burden. Following a fall in vaccine coverage during the 1970s and 80s linked to a safety scare with wP vaccine, there was an extended period of high coverage and pertussis incidence fell dramatically. Incidence continued to decrease with the introduction of an acellular pertussis vaccine in the pre-school booster in November 2001 and in the primary United Kingdom (UK) schedule in September 2004 but has increased since July 2011. In response to a high rate of pertussis in infants, a temporary vaccination programme for pregnant women was introduced in October 2012. The key aim of the programme is to protect vulnerable infants from birth in the first months of life, before they can be fully protected by routine infant immunisation. A review of the UK adolescent immunisation programme is currently ongoing and the inclusion of a pertussis booster is being considered.

  3. [Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review].

    PubMed

    Brachine, Juliana Dane Pereira; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2012-12-01

    This is an integrative review of literature aimed to identify evidence-based interventions which make up care bundles to reduce central venous catheter-related or associated bloodstream infections. To collect data in Brazilian and international databases were used the key word bundle and the descriptors catheter-related infection, infection control and central venous catheterization, resulting in fifteen articles, after inclusion criteria application. This work showed five interventions as those commonly employed in the bundles methods: hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate for skin antisepsis, use of maximal sterile barrier precaution during the catheter insertion, avoid the femoral access and daily review of catheter necessity with prompt removal as no longer essential. The majority of the studies showed a significant reduction in bloodstream infection related to or associated with central venous catheters.

  4. Review: phage therapy: a modern tool to control bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  5. Psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Ding, Wenyuan; Yang, Dalong

    2014-01-01

    Psoas abscesses are classified into primary or secondary according to infectious etiology. However, the psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection is very rare. Here we report a case of psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection in a young woman. The disease was treated successfully. A literature review of psoas abscess in relation to its etiology, identification, and difficulties in the treatment is also presented. PMID:25356161

  6. Unusual oral complications of herpes zoster infection: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jain, Manoj Kumar; Manjunath, K S; Jagadish, S N

    2010-11-01

    A case of herpes zoster infection with unusual oral complications involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve is presented. The post-herpetic complications of osteonecrosis, spontaneous exfoliation of teeth, and subsequent pathologic fracture of mandible in the absence of concurrent predisposing factors in a 65-year-old man are demonstrated. Forty-one cases with osteonecrosis and spontaneous exfoliation of teeth previously presented in the literature are reviewed. This is the first report of pathologic fracture after herpes zoster infection.

  7. Phage treatment of human infections

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T; Kuhl, Sarah J; Blasdel, Bob G

    2011-01-01

    Phages as bactericidal agents have been employed for 90 years as a means of treating bacterial infections in humans as well as other species, a process known as phage therapy. In this review we explore both the early historical and more modern use of phages to treat human infections. We discuss in particular the little-reviewed French early work, along with the Polish, US, Georgian and Russian historical experiences. We also cover other, more modern examples of phage therapy of humans as differentiated in terms of disease. In addition, we provide discussions of phage safety, other aspects of phage therapy pharmacology, and the idea of phage use as probiotics. PMID:22334863

  8. A Historical Review of Cermet Fuel Development and the Engine Performance Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews test data for cermet fuel samples developed in the 1960's to better quantify Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) cermet engine performance, and to better understand contemporary fuel testing results. Over 200 cermet (W-UO2) samples were tested by thermally cycling to 2500 deg (2770 K) in hydrogen. The data indicates two issues at high temperatures: the vaporization rate of UO2 and the chemical stability of UO2. The data show that cladding and chemical stabilizers each result in large, order of magnitude improvements in high temperature performance, while other approaches yield smaller, incremental improvements. Data is very limited above 2770 K, and this complicates predictions of engine performance at high Isp. The paper considers how this material performance data translates into engine performance. In particular, the location of maximum temperature within the fuel element and the effect of heat deposition rate are examined.

  9. Major contributions towards finding a cure for cancer through chemotherapy: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Masood, Imran; Kiani, Maria H; Ahmad, Mahmood; Masood, Muhammed I; Sadaquat, Hadia

    2016-01-01

    The history of cancer chemotherapy is as old as cancer itself. With the increase in the complexities of cancer and the development of resistance towards existing anticancer agents, increased attention is now being paid to the advancement of chemotherapy. Some chemotherapeutic agents were discovered by accident or trial-and-error methods while others were found to be useful for neoplasia when they were being evaluated for some other purpose. Broadly, these agents have been classified as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, platinum compounds, antitumor antibiotics and natural products. Hormones and compounds interfering with hormone metabolism are widely used in cancer treatment, besides monoclonal antibodies and small molecules targeting angiogenesis. In this review an attempt is made to discuss the major breakthroughs that have shaped the course of cancer chemotherapy, helping to decrease the mortality as well as lessen the suffering of patients.

  10. From a historic review to horizons beyond: lithium-sulphur batteries run on the wheels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Zhao, Teng; Wu, Feng

    2015-01-04

    In terms of sustainable development and environmental issues, the design and fabrication of efficient energy storage devices will be more critical in the future than at any time in the past. Li-S batteries are promising candidates for such a purpose due to their high specific capacity and low environmental impact. This review has systematically retraced the advances in the field of Li-S batteries over the past half century and highlighted the main breakthroughs in a number of areas, covering the mechanism determination, cathode engineering, theoretical simulation, and electrolyte tailoring and anode protection. Furthermore, we discuss the remaining challenges towards their practical application. It is expected that Li-S batteries with 3D inter-connected or conformal assemblies will surpass new horizons in the coming years.

  11. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  12. A Historical Review of the Representation of the Visual Field in Primary Visual Cortex with Special Reference to the Neural Mechanisms Underlying Macular Sparing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leff, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    This article comprises a historical review of the literature pertaining to the representation of the visual field in human primary visual cortex. A brief survey of the anatomy of the visual system is followed by a critical evaluation of the key studies that have informed both the issue of the disproportionate representation of central vision…

  13. Credible Leadership-In the Eyes of the Follower: A Historical Review of Leadership Theory throughout the Twentieth Century in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Sharon C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this historical review was to trace the credible leadership construct of trustworthiness, integrity, honesty, and consistency in leadership theory development during the last 100 years in the United States. Theory focus, key U.S. pivotal events, and follower importance influenced the construct's occurrence in leadership theory. …

  14. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host’s immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host’s immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23522098

  15. Role of Probiotics in Managing of Helicobacter Pylori Infection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kafshdooz, Taiebeh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Majdi Seghinsara, Abbas; Pourhassan, Moghadam; Nasrabadi, Hamid Tayefi; Milani, Morteza

    2017-02-01

    Background:Helicobacter pylori is a prevalent pathogen which is considered as an etiological cause for gastroduodenal ulcers, and a substantial risk factor for gastric malignancies. The vital factor to take into account is that roughly half of the world's population is infected with this bacterium. However, most subjects colonized remain asymptomatic and do not require any treatment. Several antimicrobial agents such as amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole are used to eradicate the infection. However, these drug regiments do not eradicate H. pylori in all patients because of the anti-drug resistance. Aim: In this review we aim to discuss the role and mechanisms of probiotics, as supportive medicines, in management of H. pylori infection. Methods: We have reviewed the published articles in PubMed and Medline databases. Also, abstracts presented in international conferences on the management of H. pylori infections and treatment protocol, have been thoroughly reviewed. Results: The overall trend in the literature indicates the usefulness of probiotics in controlling H. pylori infection. This bacterium is among the most studied human pathogens regarding the efficacy of probiotics for treating its infection. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that probiotics do not efficiently eradicate H. pylori but retain the number of this bacterium at low levels inside the human stomach. Conclusion: The analyzed literature suggest that when probiotics are consumed in conjunction with antibiotics, the eradication rate may be improved through modulating the immune response and decreasing the adverse effects of routine drugs leading to gastroprotection.

  16. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Hope; Havens, Deborah; Manda, Geoffrey; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities. Methods Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms. Results From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis. Discussion A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults. Registration number CRD42015028042. PMID:27907205

  17. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-03-22

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host's immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host's immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  18. Oral Leukoplakia as It Relates to HPV Infection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Feller, L.; Lemmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant lesion of the oral cavity and can be categorised according to its clinical appearance as homogeneous or nonhomogenous. Tobacco and areca nut use, either alone or in combination are the most common risk factors for oral leukoplakia, but some oral leukoplakias are idiopathic. Some leukoplakias arise within fields of precancerized oral epithelium in which the keratinocytes may be at different stages of cytogenetic transformation. Leukoplakias may unpredictably regress, may remain stable, or may progress to carcinoma. There is a greater risk of carcinomatous transformation of idiopathic leukoplakia, of non-homogenous leukoplakia, of leukoplakia affecting the floor of the mouth; the ventrolateral surface of the tongue and the maxillary retromolar and adjoining soft palate (collectively called high-risk sites), of leukoplakia with high-grade epithelial dysplasia, and of leukoplakia in which the keratinocytes carry cytogenetic alterations associated with carcinomatous transformation. Although there appears to be some link between human papillomavirus (HPV) and oral leukoplakia, there is little evidence to support a causal relationship either between HPV infection and oral leukoplakia or between HPV-infected leukoplakic keratinocytes and their carcinomatous transformation. PMID:22505902

  19. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  20. Review of fungal outbreaks and infection prevention in healthcare settings during construction and renovation.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hajime; Rutala, William A; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Weber, David J

    2015-08-01

    Hospital construction and renovation activities are an ever-constant phenomenon in healthcare facilities, causing dust contamination and possible dispersal of fungal spores. We reviewed fungal outbreaks that occurred during construction and renovation over the last 4 decades as well as current infection prevention strategies and control measures. Fungal outbreaks still occur in healthcare settings, especially among patients with hematological malignancies and those who are immunocompromised. The causative pathogens of these outbreaks were usually Aspergillus species, but Zygomycetes and other fungi were occasionally reported. Aspergillus most commonly caused pulmonary infection. The overall mortality of construction/renovation-associated fungal infection was approximately 50%. The minimal concentration of fungal spores by air sampling for acquisition of fungal infections remains to be determined. Performing infection control risk assessments and implementing the recommended control measures is essential to prevent healthcare-associated fungal outbreaks during construction and renovation.

  1. The birth control pill, thromboembolic disease, science and the media: a historical review of the relationship.

    PubMed

    Lackie, Elyse; Fairchild, Amy

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill (the Pill) in 1960 revolutionized the options for contraception, sparking vibrant discussion in the scientific and social science literature and in the media. Much attention focused on issues of women's rights, including ethics and personal choice. But the Pill also introduced new questions about risk. Shortly after its introduction, the risk of thromboembolic disease was recognized [1]. After more than half a century, controversies about the relationship between the Pill and thromboembolic disease have persisted. The scientific and media communities have been active in the discussion, debate and delivery of information about this risk. Scientific and public attention to thromboembolism and the Pill has had dramatic consequences, both good and bad. The spotlight on risk has helped to change norms regarding the public's right to know and assess dangers; it has sparked Pill scares linked to increased unplanned pregnancy, birth and abortion rates; and it has led to a change in federally mandated policies regarding how new contraceptive products are studied and brought to market. This paper charts the narrative of the thromboembolic risk of the Pill from its introduction in 1960 until today and reviews the corresponding media response to this history. How does the story of the thromboembolic risk of the Pill - explored through the lens of science, media and contemporary social dynamics - frame contemporary understanding of risk for researchers, clinicians, individuals and the public?

  2. Development of the S3Pvac vaccine against murine Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Hernández, Marisela; Rosas, Gabriela; Martínez, José J; Fleury, Agnès; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Aluja, Aline; Larralde, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Our work of the last 25 yr was concerned with the development of a vaccine aimed to prevent porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis and was based on cross-reacting Taenia crassiceps antigens that had proved protective against experimental intraperitoneal murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis (EIMTcC). In recent times the efficacy of the vaccine has been considered in need of confirmation, and the use of EIMTcC has been questioned as a valid tool in screening for vaccine candidates among the many antigens possibly involved. A review of our work divided in 2 parts is presented at this point, the first dealing with EIMTcC and the second with porcine T. solium cysticercosis (presented in this issue). Herein, we revise our results using EIMTcC as a measure of the protective capacity of T. crassiceps complex antigen mixtures, of purified native antigens, and of S3Pvac anti-cysticercosis vaccine composed by 3 protective peptides: GK-1, KETc1, and KETc12 either synthetic or recombinantly expressed and collectively or separately, by diverse delivery systems when administered at different doses and by different routes. Statistical analyses of the data lead confidently to the strong inference that S3Pvac is indeed an effective vaccine against EIMTcC via specific and non-specific mechanisms of protection.

  3. Salt balance: From space experiments to revolutionizing new clinical concepts on earth - A historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzer, Rupert

    2014-11-01

    For a long time, sodium balance appeared to be a “done deal” and was thought to be well understood. However, experiments in preparation of space missions showed that the concept of osmotic sodium storage and close correlations of sodium with water balance are only part of the regulatory mechanisms of body salt. By now it has turned out that the human skin is an important storage place and regulator for sodium, that sodium storage involves macrophages which in turn salt-dependently co-regulate blood pressure, that body sodium also strongly influences bone and protein metabolism, and that immune functions are also strongly influenced by sodium. In addition, the aging process appears to lead to increased body sodium storage, which in turn might influence the aging process of the human body. The current review article summarizes the developments that have led to these revolutionizing new findings and concepts as well as consequences deriving from these findings. Therefore, it is not intended in this article to give a complete literature overview over the whole field but to focus on such key literature and considerations that led to the respective developments.

  4. Inhibin at 90: From Discovery to Clinical Application, a Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Makanji, Yogeshwar; Zhu, Jie; Mishra, Rama; Holmquist, Chris; Wong, Winifred P. S.; Schwartz, Neena B.; Mayo, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    When it was initially discovered in 1923, inhibin was characterized as a hypophysiotropic hormone that acts on pituitary cells to regulate pituitary hormone secretion. Ninety years later, what we know about inhibin stretches far beyond its well-established capacity to inhibit activin signaling and suppress pituitary FSH production. Inhibin is one of the major reproductive hormones involved in the regulation of folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis. Although the physiological role of inhibin as an activin antagonist in other organ systems is not as well defined as it is in the pituitary-gonadal axis, inhibin also modulates biological processes in other organs through paracrine, autocrine, and/or endocrine mechanisms. Inhibin and components of its signaling pathway are expressed in many organs. Diagnostically, inhibin is used for prenatal screening of Down syndrome as part of the quadruple test and as a biochemical marker in the assessment of ovarian reserve. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of our current understanding of the biological role of inhibin, its relationship with activin, its signaling mechanisms, and its potential value as a diagnostic marker for reproductive function and pregnancy-associated conditions. PMID:25051334

  5. Review of macrolides and ketolides: focus on respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, G G; Dueck, M; Hoban, D J; Vercaigne, L M; Embil, J M; Gin, A S; Karlowsky, J A

    2001-01-01

    The first macrolide, erythromycin A, demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and was used primarily for respiratory and skin and soft tissue infections. Newer 14-, 15- and 16-membered ring macrolides such as clarithromycin and the azalide, azithromycin, have been developed to address the limitations of erythromycin. The main structural component of the macrolides is a large lactone ring that varies in size from 12 to 16 atoms. A new group of 14-membered macrolides known as the ketolides have recently been developed which have a 3-keto in place of the L-cladinose moiety. Macrolides reversibly bind to the 23S rRNA and thus, inhibit protein synthesis by blocking elongation. The ketolides have also been reported to bind to 23S rRNA and their mechanism of action is similar to that of macrolides. Macrolide resistance mechanisms include target site alteration, alteration in antibiotic transport and modification of the antibiotic. The macrolides and ketolides exhibit good activity against gram-positive aerobes and some gram-negative aerobes. Ketolides have excellent activity versus macrolide-resistant Streptococcus spp. Including mefA and ermB producing Streptococcus pneumoniae. The newer macrolides, such as azithromycin and clarithromycin, and the ketolides exhibit greater activity against Haemophilus influenzae than erythromycin. The bioavailability of macrolides ranges from 25 to 85%, with corresponding serum concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 12 mg/L and area under the concentration-time curves from 3 to 115 mg/L x h. Half-lives range from short for erythromycin to medium for clarithromycin, roxithromycin and ketolides, to very long for dirithromycin and azithromycin. All of these agents display large volumes of distribution with excellent uptake into respiratory tissues and fluids relative to serum. The majority of the agents are hepatically metabolised and excretion in the urine is limited, with the exception of clarithromycin. Clinical trials involving

  6. Investigating Earthquake-induced Landslides­a Historical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefer, D. K.; Geological Survey, Us; Park, Menlo; Usa, Ca

    Although earthquake-induced landslides have been described in documents for more than 3700 years, accounts from earthquakes before the late eighteenth century are incomplete concerning landslide numbers and vague concerning landslide character- istics. They are thus typically misleading concerning the true abundance of landslides and range of landslide characteristics. Beginning with studies of the 1783 Calabria, Italy earthquake, more complete and precise data concerning the occurrence of land- slides in earthquakes have become available. The historical development of knowl- edge concerning landslides triggered by earthquakes can be divided into several peri- ods. The first period, from 1783 until the first application of aerial photography, was characterized by ground-based studies of earthquake effects, typically carried out by formal scientific commissions. These formal studies typically identified a large, but not necessarily comprehensive, sampling of localities where landslides had occurred. In some, but not all cases, landslide characteristics were also described in enough de- tail that the general range of landslide characteristics could begin to be determined. More recently, some nineteenth to mid-twentieth century earthquakes have been stud- ied using retrospective analyses, in which the landslide occurrences associated with the event are inferred years to decades later, using contemporary accounts, mapping from aerial photographs, statistical studies, and (or) geotechnical analyses. The first use of aerial photographs to map earthquake effects immediately after the event prob- ably occurred in 1948. Since that time, the use of aerial photography has greatly facil- itated the compilation of post-earthquake landslide inventories, although because of the limitations of aerial photography, ground-based field studies continue to be cru- cial in preparing accurate and comprehensive landslide maps. Beginning with a small California earthquake in 1957

  7. Clostridium difficile Infection and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika; Barrett, Terrence A.; Yun, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased in the last decade in the United States adding to the health care burden of the country. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher prevalence of CDI and worse outcomes. In the past, the traditional risk factors for CDI were exposure to antibiotics and hospitalizations in elderly people. Today, it is not uncommon to diagnose CDI in a pregnant women or young adult who has no risk factors. C. difficile can be detected at the initial presentation of IBD, during a relapse or in asymptomatic carriers. It is important to keep a high index of suspicion for CDI in IBD patients and initiate prompt treatment to minimize complications. We summarize here the changing epidemiology, pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical features, and treatment of CDI in IBD. PMID:21915178

  8. A descriptive and historical review of bibliometrics with applications to medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dennis F; Walker, Cheri K

    2015-06-01

    The discipline of bibliometrics involves the application of mathematical and statistical methods to scholarly publications. The first attempts at systematic data collection were provided by Alfred Lotka and Samuel Bradford, who subsequently established the foundational laws of bibliometrics. Eugene Garfield ushered in the modern era of bibliometrics with the routine use of citation analysis and systematized processing. Key elements of bibliometric analysis include database coverage, consistency and accuracy of the data, data fields, search options, and analysis and use of metrics. A number of bibliometric applications are currently being used in medical science and health care. Bibliometric parameters and indexes may be increasingly used by grant funding sources as measures of research success. Universities may build benchmarking standards from bibliometric data to determine academic achievement through promotion and tenure guidelines in the future. This article reviews the history, definition, laws, and elements of bibliometric principles and provides examples of bibliometric applications to the broader health care community. To accomplish this, the Medline (1966-2014) and Web of Science (1945-2014) databases were searched to identify relevant articles; select articles were also cross-referenced. Articles selected were those that provided background, history, descriptive analysis, and application of bibliometric principles and metrics to medical science and health care. No attempt was made to cover all areas exhaustively; rather, key articles were chosen that illustrate bibliometric concepts and enhance the reader's knowledge. It is important that faculty and researchers understand the limitations and appropriate uses of bibliometric data. Bibliometrics has considerable potential as a research area for health care scientists and practitioners that can be used to discover new information about academic trends, pharmacotherapy, disease, and broader health sciences

  9. A review of historic and future hydrological changes in the Murray-Darling Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Marc; Tweed, Sarah; Van Dijk, Albert; Timbal, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    The Murray-Darling Basin is Australia's food bowl and home to many iconic water bodies that are culturally and ecologically highly valued. The recent Millennium Drought (from mid-1990s to 2009) was the most severe hydrological drought since records started in the late 19th century. It severely impacted on the basin and for many acted as a wake-up call. To address the ongoing declines in water resources and environmental conditions and to prepare the region for climate change, Australia's Governments are currently attempting to introduce a new comprehensive, and integrated approach to the management of the basin's water resources. In this paper, long-term time series of climate, hydrological and environmental data are used to analyze how compounding stresses have gradually affected the hydrological system and its services. Major hydroclimatic stresses considered in this paper include salinity, water use, droughts, and climate change. Other, more localized or minor stresses exist (groundwater extraction, farm dams, afforestation, bush fires, cyanobacterial blooms and pollutants) and are reviewed more briefly. The history of water policy and planning shows that Government actions have been strongly influential on the basin. A shift in the strategic goals from water development to the protection and restoration of environmental assets is noticeable since the mid 1990s. Median climate change projections by 2030 indicate smaller reductions in rainfall and runoff than those observed during the recent Millennium Drought, but have a relatively high uncertainty attached to them. The use of regional approaches to reduce that uncertainty, such as statistical downscaling, points to a sizeable decline in rainfall by the end of the century. Most climate projections used for planning consider greenhouse emission scenarios that have smaller global emission trends than the one observed over the last decade. Other, 'less optimistic' scenarios have to be considered for long-term water

  10. Review and Current Status of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection at the Community Level in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kootanavanichpong, Nusorn; Kompor, Ponthip; Chavenkun, Wasugree; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Norkaew, Jun; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Panpimanmas, Sukij; Rujirakul, Ratana; Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Pholsripradit, Poowadol; Eksanti, Thawatchai; Phatisena, Tanida; Loyd, Ryan A; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J

    2015-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is remains a public health problem in Thailand, particularly in the northeast and north regions which have the highest incidences of chonalgiocarcinoma (CCA). O. viverrini causes the disease opithorchiasis, and its has been classified as a group 1 biological carcinogen. Humans, dogs, and cats become infected with O. viverrini by ingesting raw or undercooked fish containing infective metacercariae. The first human cases of O. viverrini infection were reported in Thailand 100 years ago, and it's still a problem at the community level. Based on data for the year 2009, more than 6 million people were infected with O. viverrini. Associated medical care and loss of wages in Thailand costs about $120 million annually. This review highlights the current status of O. viverrini infection in communities of Thailand through active surveillance for the five years period from 2010 and 2015. A total of 17 community-based surveys were conducted, most in the northeast region. Some 7 surveys demonstrated a high prevalence over 20%, and the highest was 45.7%. Most commonly infection was found in age group of 35 years and older, males, and agricultural workers. Although, the national prevalence may be decreasing but the results show that the O. viverrini infection is still high in communities of the northeast region. Therefore, the focus in populations living in northeast Thailand should be screening of infection and changing their eating behavior.

  11. Ebola virus disease and Marburg disease in pregnancy: a review and management considerations for filovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bebell, Lisa M; Riley, Laura E

    2015-06-01

    The largest-ever recorded outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever is ongoing. As a result of the epidemic and rural nature of outbreaks, little is published about the Filovirus infections Ebola virus disease and Marburg disease in pregnancy. This review of viral hemorrhagic fever focusing on Marburg and Ebola uses knowledge of disease in nonpregnant individuals and pregnancy-specific data to inform management for pregnant women. Filovirus infection presentation is similar between pregnant and nonpregnant patients, although infections may be more severe in pregnancy. Although labeled as hemorrhagic fevers, Marburg and Ebola do not commonly cause gross bleeding and should be conceptualized as diseases of high gastrointestinal losses. Early, aggressive supportive care is the mainstay of Filovirus infection management with massive fluid resuscitation as the key management principle. Patients often require 5-10 L or more per day of intravenous or oral fluid to maintain circulating blood volume in the setting of ongoing gastrointestinal loss. Fluid shifts warrant aggressive monitoring and correction of potassium levels and acid-base disturbances to prevent life-threatening arrhythmias and metabolic complications. Regardless of maternal survival, fetal loss rates are nearly 100% in Filovirus infection, likely resulting from unchecked transplacental and hematogenous viral spread. High fetal loss rates support the placenta as a difficult-to-eradicate Filovirus infection reservoir. In conclusion, the management of Filovirus infection in pregnancy should focus on stabilizing the mother with intensive monitoring and aggressive fluid and electrolyte repletion as well as maintaining strict infection control to minimize transmission to others.

  12. Prisoners co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Chantal L; King, Emma J; Dolan, Kate; McKee, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Almost from the beginning of the HIV epidemic in 1981, an association with tuberculosis (TB) was recognized. This association between HIV and TB co-infection has been particularly evident amongst prisoners. However, despite this, few studies of TB in prisons have stratified results by HIV status. Given the high prevalence of HIV-positive persons and TB-infected persons in prisons and the documented risk of TB in those infected with HIV, it is of interest to determine how co-infection varies amongst prison populations worldwide. For this reason we have undertaken a systematic review of studies of co-infected prisoners to determine the incidence and/or prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection in prisons, as well as outcomes in this group, measured as treatment success or death. Methods A literature search was undertaken using the online databases PubMed, Embase, IBSS, Scopus, Web of Science, Global Health and CINAHL Plus. No restrictions were set on language or publication date for article retrieval, with articles included if indexed up to 18 October 2015. A total of 1975 non-duplicate papers were identified. For treatment and outcome data all eligible papers were appraised for inclusion; for incidence/prevalence estimates papers published prior to 2000 were excluded from full text review. After full text appraisal, 46 papers were selected for inclusion in the review, 41 for incidence/prevalence estimates and nine for outcomes data, with four papers providing evidence for both outcomes and prevalence/incidence. Results Very few studies estimated the incidence of TB in HIV positive prisoners, with most simply reporting prevalence of co-infection. Co-infection is rarely explicitly measured, with studies simply reporting HIV status in prisoners with TB, or a cross-sectional survey of TB prevalence amongst prisoners with HIV. Estimates of co-infection prevalence ranged from 2.4 to 73.1% and relative risks for one, given the other, ranged from 2.0 to 10.75, although

  13. Pasteurella multocida infections. Report of 34 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Wolfson, J S; Swartz, M N; Hooper, D C

    1984-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus , is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including the dog and cat. P. multocida is the etiologic agent in a variety of infectious disease syndromes. We have reported 34 cases of infection caused by P. multocida and have reviewed the English literature. P. multocida infections may be divided into three broad groups: 1. Infections resulting from animal bites and scratches : The most common infections caused by P. multocida are local wound infections following animal bites or scratches . Cats are the source of infection in 60 to 80% of cases and dogs in the great majority of the remainder. Local infections are characterized by the rapid appearance of erythema, warmth, tenderness, and frequently purulent drainage. The most common local complications are abscess formation and tenosynovitis. Serious local complications include septic arthritis proximal to bites or scratches , osteomyelitis resulting from direct inoculation or extension of cellulitis, and the combination of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, most commonly involving a finger or hand after a cat bite. 2. Isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract: The isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract must be interpreted differently than its isolation from other systemic sites. Most commonly P. multocida found in the respiratory tract is a commensal organism in patients with underlying pulmonary disease, but serious respiratory tract infections including pneumonia, empyema, and lung abscesses may develop. Most patients with respiratory tract colonization or infection have a history of animal exposure. 3. Other systemic infections: P. multocida is recognized as a pathogen in a variety of systemic infections including bacteremia, meningitis, brain abscess, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess. P. multocida often acts as an opportunistic pathogen with a predilection for causing bacteremia in patients

  14. A historical look at the first reported cases of Lassa fever: IgG antibodies 40 years after acute infection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew J; Bausch, Daniel G

    2013-02-01

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever.

  15. A Historical Look at the First Reported Cases of Lassa Fever: IgG Antibodies 40 Years After Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew J; Bausch, Daniel G

    2012-12-31

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever.

  16. An integrative review of guidelines for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Thomas, Tami; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-07-01

    HIV-infected individuals are 28 times more likely than the general population to be diagnosed with anal cancer. An integrative review of recommendations and guidelines for anal cancer screening was performed to provide a succinct guide to inform healthcare clinicians. The review excluded studies that were of non-HIV populations, redundant articles or publications, non-English manuscripts, or nonclinical trials. The review found no formal national or international guidelines exist for routine screening of anal cancer for HIV-infected individuals. To date, no randomized control trial provides strong evidence supporting efficaciousness and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program. The screening recommendations from seven international-, national-, and state-based reports were reviewed and synthesized in this review. These guidelines suggest anal cancer screening, albeit unproven, may be beneficial at decreasing the incidence of anal cancer. This review highlights the paucity of screening-related research and is an area of need to provide clear direction and to define standard of care for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

  17. A historical review of additives and modifiers used in paving asphalt refining processes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Diane J; Adams, Robert C; Marano, Kristin M

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. asphalt paving industry has evolved over time to meet various performance specifications for liquid petroleum asphalt binder (known as bitumen outside the United States). Additives to liquid petroleum asphalt produced in the refinery may affect exposures to workers in the hot mix paving industry. This investigation documented the changes in the composition and distribution of the liquid petroleum asphalt products produced from petroleum refining in the United States since World War II. This assessment was accomplished by reviewing documents and interviewing individual experts in the industry to identify current and historical practices. Individuals from 18 facilities were surveyed; the number of facilities reporting use of any material within a particular class ranged from none to more than half the respondents. Materials such as products of the process stream, polymers, elastomers, and anti-strip compounds have been added to liquid petroleum asphalt in the United States over the past 50 years, but modification has not been generally consistent by geography or time. Modifications made to liquid petroleum asphalt were made generally to improve performance and were dictated by state specifications.

  18. Clostridium tetani infections in newborn infants: a tetanus neonatorum review.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas de; Rodrigues, Denise Cristina; Silveira, Guilherme Lobo da; Tavares, Walter; Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    Although tetanus is a preventable disease by vaccination, it continues to claim lives around the world. Whereas cases of accidental origin reflect insufficient population immunization, tetanus neonatorum reveals a double-nature fault-poor vaccination coverage of adults coupled with difficulties accessing appropriate prenatal care; this situation is aggravated by the extreme severity of tetanus in this age group in which the mortality rate can reach up to 80%. The early detection of tetanus in neonates is essential for immediately initiating the proper therapy. Therefore, although reaching an early diagnosis of tetanus is important, the most relevant aspect is related to the appropriate management and prophylaxis of this disease. Consequently, the aim of this article is to review neonatorum tetanus with an emphasis on its therapy and prevention.

  19. Abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri infection: three case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Ho, Mao-Wang; Yang, Ya-Fei; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Wang, I-Kuan; Lin, Shin-Huang; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we present 3 cases of abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri. All infected patients recovered after initial empirical antibiotic treatment and percutaneous drainage of the abscess. We reviewed the literature and found 9 adult cases of C. koseri abscess. Most of these patients recovered after timely antibiotic treatment and drainage.

  20. Costs of infection prevention practices in long-term care settings: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Catherine C.; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Stone, Patricia W.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to identify and evaluate cost estimates reported in scientific literature regarding practices to prevent infection among residents and staff of long-term care facilities. Included papers represent diverse study designs and low methodological transparency. PMID:27055307

  1. The role of hormones on Toxoplasma gondii infection: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Ramírez, María de la Luz; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, Adrián Fernando; Verduzco-Grijalva, Fabiola; Jiménez, Judith Marcela Dueñas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasma gondii is the causal agent of toxoplasmosis in which one third of the world's population has been infected. In pregnant women, it may cause abortion and severe damage to the fetal central nervous system. During pregnancy, the prevalence of toxoplasmosis increases throughout the second and third quarter of gestation, simultaneously progesterone and 17β-estradiol also increase. Thus, it has been suggested that these hormones can aggravate or reduce parasite reproduction. The aim of this study was reviewing the relationship between hormones and infection caused by T. gondii in several experimental animal models and humans, focused mainly on: (a) congenital transmission, (b) parasite reproduction, (c) strain virulence, (d) levels of hormone in host induced by T. gondii infection, and (e) participation of hormone receptors in T. gondii infection. Are the hormones specific modulators of T. gondii infection? A systematic review methodology was used to consult several databases (Pub Med, Lilacs, Medline, Science direct, Scielo, Ebsco, Sprinker, Wiley, and Google Scholar) dated from September, 2013 to March, 2014. Results: Thirty studies were included; eight studies in humans and 22 in animals and cell cultures. In the human studies, the most studied hormones were testosterone, progesterone, prolactin, and 17β-estradiol. Type I (RH and BK) and Type II (Prugniaud, SC, ME49, T45, P78, and T38) were the most frequent experimental strains. Conclusions: Thirty-five years have passed since the first studies regarding T. gondii infection and its relationship with hormones. This systematic review suggests that hormones modulate T. gondii infection in different animal models. However, given that data were not comparable, further studies are required to determine the mechanism of hormone action in the T. gondii infectious process. PMID:25346725

  2. Honey in the Prevention and Treatment of Infection in the CKD Population: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Anna; Cho, Yeoungjee; Johnson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Multiresistant organisms are becoming increasingly common, particularly in the CKD population. Unfortunately, the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance has not been mirrored by innovation in new antibiotic agents. Novel treatments are therefore urgently needed. Honey has garnered much interest due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial properties based on extensive experimental data. Unlike conventional antibiotics, honey has an added advantage as it appears to avoid inducing antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. This review discusses the potential mechanisms of action and role of honey in infection management in the general population, epidemiology and special challenges of infections in CKD populations, and the clinical trial evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of honey for the prevention and treatment of infections in CKD population. PMID:26167189

  3. Invasive Aspergillus Sinusitis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, John M.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Aspergillus (IA) sinusitis is a life-threatening opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals, but it is uncommon in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To gain a better understanding of the characteristics of IA sinusitis in this population, we present a unique case of chronic IA sinusitis in an HIV-infected patient taking antiretroviral therapy and review the literature summarizing published cases of invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal (n = 41) and mastoid (n = 17) sinuses in HIV-infected individuals. Among these cases, only 4 were reported after 1999, and 98% of patients had acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Orbital invasion occurred in 54% of paranasal sinus cases, whereas intracranial invasion was reported in 53% of mastoid sinus cases. The overall mortality was 79%. We also discuss various clinical and immunologic factors that may play a role in the development of IA and consider the changing epidemiology of aspergillosis in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27800523

  4. Epilepsy and tropical parasitic infections in Sub-Saharan Africa: A review.

    PubMed

    Mazigo, Humphrey D; Morona, Domenica; Kweka, Eliningaya J; Waihenya, Rebecca; Mnyone, Ladslaus L; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2013-04-01

    Several reports have suggested that the high prevalence of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa is associated with the high prevalence of parasitic infections affecting the central nervous system. Though epidemiological evidence suggests an association between parasitic infections and epilepsy, the biological causal relationship has not been fully demonstrated for many of these infections. The objective of this paper is to review the available epidemiological evidence on the links between parasitic infections and epilepsy, the pathogenesis and the current gap of knowledge indicating the areas requiring further research. Data for this review were identified and collected using manual and electronic search strategies of published and unpublished sources. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the epidemiology of epilepsy remains unclear and given the differing study designs, the results of available epidemiological studies are difficult to interpret and compare. Evidence from surveys reported a median prevalence of 1.5%. Co-infection of parasitic infections and epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa are common, particularly in areas characterized by poor hygiene standards. There is an epidemiological link on the association between epilepsy and various parasitic infections. However, the biological causal relationship requires further investigation in adequately designed studies. In conclusion, although several epidemiological and case control studies indicate a relationship between parasitic agents and epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa, there is a considerable gap of knowledge on the cause and magnitude of the association. Thus, there is an urgent need for systematic epidemiological studies to understand the burden of epilepsy in areas endemic due to preventable parasitic infections, to prove a causal relationship, and to understand the impact of controlling these parasitic diseases on reduction of the burden of epilepsy.

  5. Intraoperative culture positive allograft bone and subsequent postoperative infections: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Laura; Kulyk, Paul; Woo, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Background Obtaining intraoperative cultures of allograft bone just before use in orthopedic procedures is standard practice in many centres; however, the association between positive cultures and subsequent surgical infections is unknown. Our study had 3 goals: to determine the prevalence of positive intraoperative allograft culture and subsequent infection; to determine if, in cases of subsequent infection, organisms isolated at reoperation were the same as those cultured from the allograft at the time of the index procedure; and to assess the costs associated with performing intraoperative allograft cultures. Methods In this retrospective case series, we obtained data on patients receiving allograft bone between 2009 and 2012. Patients receiving allograft with positive cultures were reviewed to identify cases of significant infection. Organisms isolated at reoperation were compared with the allograft culture taken at the time of implantation, and we performed a cost assessment. Results Of the 996 allograft bone grafts used, 43 (4.3%) had positive intraoperative cultures and significant postoperative infections developed in 2, requiring reoperation. Antibiotics based on culture results were prescribed in 24% of cases. Organisms cultured at the time of reoperation differed from those isolated initially. The cost of performing 996 allograft cultures was $169 320. Conclusion This series suggests that rates of positive intraoperative bone allograft culture are low, and subsequent infection is rare. In cases of postoperative infection, primary allograft culture and secondary tissue cultures isolated different organisms. Costs associated with performing cultures are high. Eliminating initial culture testing could save $42 500 per year in our health region. PMID:28234217

  6. Perinatally acquired HIV infection in adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa: a review of emerging challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lowenthal, Elizabeth D; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Chapman, Jennifer; Goldrath, Kathryn; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, more than three million children are infected with HIV, 90% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. As the HIV epidemic matures and antiretroviral treatment is scaled up, children with HIV are reaching adolescence in large numbers. The growing population of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection living within this region presents not only unprecedented challenges but also opportunities to learn about the pathogenesis of HIV infection. In this Review, we discuss the changing epidemiology of paediatric HIV and the particular features of HIV infection in adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Longstanding HIV infection acquired when the immune system is not developed results in distinctive chronic clinical complications that cause severe morbidity. As well as dealing with chronic illness, HIV-infected adolescents have to confront psychosocial issues, maintain adherence to drugs, and learn to negotiate sexual relationships, while undergoing rapid physical and psychological development. Context-specific strategies for early identification of HIV infection in children and prompt linkage to care need to be developed. Clinical HIV care should integrate age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health and psychological, educational, and social services. Health-care workers will need to be trained to recognise and manage the needs of these young people so that the increasing numbers of children surviving to adolescence can access quality care beyond specialist services at low-level health-care facilities. PMID:24406145

  7. Pathology and tissue tropism of natural West Nile virus infection in birds: a review.

    PubMed

    Gamino, Virginia; Höfle, Ursula

    2013-06-03

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a globally distributed arthropod-borne flavivirus capable of infecting a wide variety of vertebrates, with birds as its natural reservoir. Although it had been considered a pathogen of little importance for birds, from the 1990's, and especially after its introduction in the North American continent in 1999, thousands of birds have succumbed to West Nile infection. This review summarizes the pathogenesis and pathology of WNV infection in birds highlighting differences in lesion and antigen distribution and severity among bird orders and families. Despite significant species differences in susceptibility to infection, WNV associated lesions and viral antigen are present in the majority of organs of infected birds. The non-progressive, acute or more prolonged course of the disease accounts for part of the differences in lesion and viral antigen distribution and lesion severity. Most likely a combination of host variables and environmental factors in addition to the intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity of the infecting WNV strain influence the pathogenesis of the infection.

  8. Pathology and tissue tropism of natural West Nile virus infection in birds: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a globally distributed arthropod-borne flavivirus capable of infecting a wide variety of vertebrates, with birds as its natural reservoir. Although it had been considered a pathogen of little importance for birds, from the 1990’s, and especially after its introduction in the North American continent in 1999, thousands of birds have succumbed to West Nile infection. This review summarizes the pathogenesis and pathology of WNV infection in birds highlighting differences in lesion and antigen distribution and severity among bird orders and families. Despite significant species differences in susceptibility to infection, WNV associated lesions and viral antigen are present in the majority of organs of infected birds. The non-progressive, acute or more prolonged course of the disease accounts for part of the differences in lesion and viral antigen distribution and lesion severity. Most likely a combination of host variables and environmental factors in addition to the intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity of the infecting WNV strain influence the pathogenesis of the infection. PMID:23731695

  9. Predictors of Infections following Cranioplasty: A Retrospective Review of a Large Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Hann, Shannon; Bovenzi, Cory D.; Saigh, Mark P.; Schwartz, Eric W.; Kunkel, Emily S. I.; Efthimiadis-Budike, Alexandra S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The variables that predispose to postcranioplasty infections are poorly described in the literature. We formulated a multivariate model that predicts the risk of infection in patients undergoing cranioplasty. Method. Retrospective review of all patients who underwent cranioplasty following craniectomy from January, 2000, to December, 2011. Tested predictors were age, sex, diabetic status, hypertensive status, reason for craniectomy, urgency status of craniectomy, location of cranioplasty, reoperation for hematoma, hydrocephalus postcranioplasty, and material type. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Results. Three hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Infection rate was 26.43% (92/348). Of these cases with infection, 56.52% (52/92) were superficial (supragaleal), 43.48% (40/92) were deep (subgaleal), and 31.52% (29/92) were present in both the supragaleal and subgaleal spaces. The predominant pathogen was coagulase-negative staphylococcus (30.43%) followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (22.83%) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (15.22%). Approximately 15.22% of all cultures were polymicrobial. Multivariate analysis revealed convex craniectomy, hemorrhagic stroke, and hydrocephalus to be associated with an increased risk of infection (OR = 14.41; P < 0.05, OR = 4.33; P < 0.05, OR = 1.90; P = 0.054, resp.). Conclusion. Many of the risk factors for infection after cranioplasty are modifiable. Recognition and prevention of the risk factors would help decrease the infection's rate. PMID:25401136

  10. Preventing infection from reusable medical equipment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sopwith, Will; Hart, Tony; Garner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Background In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) had eight sets of conflicting recommendations for decontaminating medical equipment. We conducted a systematic review of observational studies to assist WHO in reconciling the various guidelines. This paper summarises the methods developed and illustrates the results for three procedures – alcohol, bleach and povidone iodine. Methods We developed a Medline search strategy and applied inclusion criteria specifying the decontamination procedures of interest and an outcome of microbial destruction for a set of marker organisms. We developed protocols to assess the quality of studies and categorised them according to the reliability of the methods used. Through an iterative process we identified best practice for the decontamination methods and key additional factors required to ensure their effectiveness. We identified 88 published papers for inclusion, describing 135 separate studies of decontamination. Results For disinfection with alcohol, best practice was identified from 23 studies as an exposure to 70–80% ethanol or isopropanol for at least 5 minutes. Bleach was effective for sterilization at a concentration of 5000 ppm for 5 minutes and for disinfection at 1000 ppm for 10 minutes (33 studies). Povidone iodine was only partially effective for disinfection at a concentration of 1% for 15 minutes (15 studies). Conclusions Our findings provide an evidence base for WHO guidelines on decontaminating medical equipment. The results support the recommended use of bleach and show that alcohol could be used more widely than current guidelines suggest, provided best practice is followed. The effectiveness of povidone iodine is uncertain. PMID:11916458

  11. Sequence-based genotyping clarifies conflicting historical morphometric and biological data for 5 Eimeria species infecting turkeys.

    PubMed

    El-Sherry, S; Ogedengbe, M E; Hafeez, M A; Sayf-Al-Din, M; Gad, N; Barta, J R

    2015-02-01

    Unlike with Eimeria species infecting chickens, specific identification and nomenclature of Eimeria species infecting turkeys is complicated, and in the absence of molecular data, imprecise. In an attempt to reconcile contradictory data reported on oocyst morphometrics and biological descriptions of various Eimeria species infecting turkey, we established single oocyst derived lines of 5 important Eimeria species infecting turkeys, Eimeria meleagrimitis (USMN08-01 strain), Eimeria adenoeides (Guelph strain), Eimeria gallopavonis (Weybridge strain), Eimeria meleagridis (USAR97-01 strain), and Eimeria dispersa (Briston strain). Short portions (514 bp) of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (mt COI) from each were amplified and sequenced. Comparison of these sequences showed sufficient species-specific sequence variation to recommend these short mt COI sequences as species-specific markers. Uniformity of oocyst features (dimensions and oocyst structure) of each pure line was observed. Additional morphological features of the oocysts of these species are described as useful for the microscopic differentiation of these Eimeria species. Combined molecular and morphometric data on these single species lines compared with the original species descriptions and more recent data have helped to clarify some confusing, and sometimes conflicting, features associated with these Eimeria spp. For example, these new data suggest that the KCH and KR strains of E. adenoeides reported previously represent 2 distinct species, E. adenoeides and E. meleagridis, respectively. Likewise, analysis of the Weybridge strain of E. adenoeides, which has long been used as a reference strain in various studies conducted on the pathogenicity of E. adenoeides, indicates that this coccidium is actually a strain of E. gallopavonis. We highly recommend mt COI sequence-based genotyping be incorporated into all studies using Eimeria spp. of turkeys to confirm species identifications and so

  12. [Embryotomy. A historical review].

    PubMed

    Thiery, M; Goossens, N

    1993-01-01

    Destructive operations are the oldest type of bloody operation in obstetrics and possibly in the (written) history of Medicine. The name "embryotomy" is already mentioned in the hippocratic literature. The indication and technique of this "two-tempi" operation (embryotomy or reduction of the fetus and embryulcia or extraction of the reduced foetus) were thoroughly mentioned, described and coded for the first time by Soranos of Ephesos. Soranos was also the first to mention clearly by their names the instruments used. Only the Arabic physicians, especially Albucasim, transmitted to us the first image of their collection of instruments. The author elucidates the many--medical and ethical--aspects relating to embryotomy, which has been practised till after W.W.II.

  13. Annual Historical Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    commented on large portions of the text. While much of the credit for producing this history belongs to the above, the responsibility cor the conclusions...Major portions of the TDP were received from Royal Ordnance. Payment was being held up pending a thorough investigation to determine completeness and...it portion of the DMWR and MWO was "-ompleted at the Fraser/Volpe plant by 23 May 1986. Training for the r-.llow-on evaluation (FOE) was conducted

  14. Lemierre's syndrome from odontogenic infection: Review of the literature and case description

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Dani; Rachmiel, Adi; Levy-Faber, Dan; Emodi, Omri

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome (LS) is a rare potentially fatal sequel of head and neck infection, classically described as thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with cervical space infection extending into the thorax. Our objective was to answer the clinical question: “Does Lemierre syndrome (LS) from odontogenic infection differ from nonodontogenic LS in regard to clinical sequence, treatment, and survival.” We reviewed the literature on the management of LS over the last two decades, with a focus on LS from odontogenic infection. Such a case is presented in order to portray the clinical sequence. Only 10 cases met the inclusion criteria (including the case presented). The recorded data were analyzed in comparison to large case series reviewing LS. Our data reflect the moderate differences in regard to IJV thrombosis and bacteriogram. There is an overall rise in published LS cases in the last 20 years. Odontogenic infection leading to LS is scarce, yet with survival rates similar to nonodontogenic LS. Repeated surgical interventions and aggressive wide spectrum antibiotic therapy remain the treatment of choice. PMID:26981474

  15. Infective endocarditis: call for education of adults with CHD: review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Hays, Laura H

    2016-03-01

    Advanced surgical repair procedures have resulted in the increased survival rate to adulthood of patients with CHD. The resulting new chronic conditions population is greater than one million in the United States of America and >1.2 million in Europe. This review describes the risks and effects of infective endocarditis - a systemic infectious process with high morbidity and mortality - on this population and examines the evidence to determine whether greater patient education on recognition of symptoms and preventative measures is warranted. The literature search included the terms "infective endocarditis" and "adult congenital heart disease". Search refinement, the addition of articles cited by included articles, as well as addition of supporting articles, resulted in utilisation of 24 articles. Infective endocarditis, defined by the modified Duke Criteria, occurs at a significantly higher rate in the CHD population due to congenitally or surgically altered cardiac anatomies and placement of prosthetic valves. This literature review returned no studies in the past five years assessing knowledge of the definition, recognition of symptoms, and preventative measures of infective endocarditis in the adult CHD population. Existing data are more than 15 years old and show significant knowledge deficits. Studies have consistently shown the need for improved CHD patient knowledge with regard to infective endocarditis, and there is no recent evidence that these knowledge deficits have decreased. It is important to address and decrease knowledge deficits in order to improve patient outcomes and decrease healthcare utilisation and costs.

  16. Association Between Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Infection and Offspring Mood Disorders: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Simanek, Amanda M; Meier, Helen C S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review of studies that have examined the association between prenatal exposure to maternal infection and development of mood disorders across the life course. Drawing from both human- and animal-based studies, we give an overview of hypothesized biological mechanisms by which exposure to maternal infection during critical periods of gestation may contribute to fetal programming of mood disorders in offspring. We discuss studies examining the association between prenatal exposure to maternal infection with pathogens including influenza as well as other respiratory viruses, herpesviruses, hepatitis viruses, and Toxoplasma gondii and mood disorders in human populations. Moreover, we outline strengths and limitations of the current body of evidence and make recommendations for future research. We also discuss findings in the context of well-documented gender and socioeconomic disparities in the prevalence and severity of mood disorders, particularly major depression, and the role that early exposure to infection may play in explaining the perpetuation of such disparities across generations. Overall, this review of the current knowledge on this topic has important implications for determining future research directions, designing interventions as well as prenatal care guidelines targeted at prevention or treatment of infection during pregnancy, and clinical practice for the identification of individuals that may be at increased risk for mood disorders beginning early in life. Importantly, such efforts may not only lower the overall burden of mood disorders but also serve to address social disparities in these adverse mental health conditions in the U.S.

  17. A review of risk factors for bovine tuberculosis infection in cattle in the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Broughan, J M; Judge, J; Ely, E; Delahay, R J; Wilson, G; Clifton-Hadley, R S; Goodchild, A V; Bishop, H; Parry, J E; Downs, S H

    2016-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is an important disease of cattle caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, a pathogen that may be extremely difficult to eradicate in the presence of a true wildlife reservoir. Our objective was to identify and review relevant literature and provide a succinct summary of current knowledge of risk factors for transmission of infection of cattle. Search strings were developed to identify publications from electronic databases to February 2015. Abstracts of 4255 papers identified were reviewed by three reviewers to determine whether the entire article was likely to contain relevant information. Risk factors could be broadly grouped as follows: animal (including nutrition and genetics), herd (including bTB and testing history), environment, wildlife and social factors. Many risk factors are inter-related and study designs often do not enable differentiation between cause and consequence of infection. Despite differences in study design and location, some risk factors are consistently identified, e.g. herd size, bTB history, presence of infected wildlife, whereas the evidence for others is less consistent and coherent, e.g. nutrition, local cattle movements. We have identified knowledge gaps where further research may result in an improved understanding of bTB transmission dynamics. The application of targeted, multifactorial disease control regimens that address a range of risk factors simultaneously is likely to be a key to effective, evidence-informed control strategies.

  18. Refractory iron deficiency anemia and Helicobacter Pylori Infection in pediatrics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gheibi, Sh; Farrokh-Eslamlou, HR; Noroozi, M; Pakniyat, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, several clinical reports have demonstrated that H. Pylori infection has emerged as a new cause of refractory iron stores in children. We carried out a systematic literature review to primarily evaluate the existing evidence on the association between childhood H. Pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and secondly, to investigate the beneficial effects of bacterium elimination. Material and Methods This review concerns important pediatric studies published from January 1991 to October 2014. Fourteen case reports and series of cases, 24 observational epidemiologic studies, seven uncontrolled trials, and 16 randomized clinical trials were included in the review. Results Although there are a few observational epidemiologic studies and some randomized trials mostly due to the potential confounders, most studies reported a positive association linking between H. Pylori infection and iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia among children. In addition, it seems that elimination of H. Pylori infection induces beneficial effects on iron deficiency. Conclusions Since the evidence for the association of H. pylori eradication therapy and refractory childhood IDA is not enough and there are contrasting data about such association, future high quality and cohort researches are needed to determine the causal association. PMID:25914802

  19. Radioactive iodine (131I) therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer in Japan: current issues with historical review and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Kudo, Takashi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2012-02-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI, (131)I) has been used as a therapeutic agent for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with over 50 years of history. Recently, it is now attracting attention in medical fields as one of the molecular targeting therapies, which is known as targeted radionuclide therapy. Radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) for DTC, however, is now at stake in Japan, because Japan is confronting several problems, including the recent occurrence of the Great East Japan Disaster (GEJD) in March 2011. RIT for DTC is strictly limited in Japan and requires hospitalization. Because of strict regulations, severe lack of medical facilities for RIT has become one of the most important medical problems, which results in prolonged waiting time for Japanese patients with DTC, including those with distant metastasis, who wish to receive RIT immediately. This situation is also due to various other factors, such as prolonged economic recession, super-aging society, and subsequent rapidly changing medical environment. In addition, due to the experience of atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japanese people have strong feeling of "radiophobia". There is fear that GEJD and related radiation contamination may worsen this feeling, which might be reflected in more severe regulation of RIT. To overcome these difficulties, it is essential to collect and disclose all information about the circumstances around this therapy in Japan. In this review, we would like to look at this therapy through several lenses, including historical, cultural, medical, and socio-economic points of view. We believe that clarifying the problems is sure to lead to the resolution of this complicated situation. We have also included several recommendations for future improvements.

  20. Deaf scholars on reading: a historical review of 40 years of dissertation research (1973-2013): implications for research and practice.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jean F; Byrne, Andrew; Clark, M Diane

    2015-01-01

    Taking a historical view, the authors reviewed 40 years of dissertation research by deaf scholars (1973-2013) related to reading. Using a qualitative interpretive analysis approach (J. Smith & Osborn, 2003), the authors selected 31 dissertations as primary texts, reviewing them for themes over five time periods. The first finding was a trend of themes on communication methodology in the 1970s (first period), to English reading skills in the 1980s (second period), to American Sign Language/English bilingualism to support acquisition of English literacy during the third, fourth and fifth periods (1990-2013). The second finding was that most of the dissertations used a combination of qualitatively similar and qualitatively different epistemologies in their research. These two findings are related to (a) the role of the deaf reading researcher, (b) historical and current trends in reading research, and (c) the qualitative similarity hypothesis (Paul, Wang, & Williams, 2013).

  1. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  2. Maraviroc: a review of its use in HIV infection and beyond.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Shawna M; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters target cells by binding its envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and/or coreceptors such as C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5; R5) and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4; X4), and R5-tropic viruses predominate during the early stages of infection. CCR5 antagonists bind to CCR5 to prevent viral entry. Maraviroc (MVC) is the only CCR5 antagonist currently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the European Commission, Health Canada, and several other countries for the treatment of patients infected with R5-tropic HIV-1. MVC has been shown to be effective at inhibiting HIV-1 entry into cells and is well tolerated. With expanding MVC use by HIV-1-infected humans, different clinical outcomes post-approval have been observed with MVC monotherapy or combination therapy with other antiretroviral drugs, with MVC use in humans infected with dual-R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, infected with different HIV-1 genotype or infected with HIV-2. This review discuss the role of CCR5 in HIV-1 infection, the development of the CCR5 antagonist MVC, its pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug-drug interactions, and the implications of these interactions on treatment outcomes, including viral mutations and drug resistance, and the mechanisms associated with the development of resistance to MVC. This review also discusses available studies investigating the use of MVC in the treatment of other diseases such as cancer, graft-versus-host disease, and inflammatory diseases.

  3. Transmission of Cyclospora cayetanensis infection: a review focusing on soil-borne cyclosporiasis.

    PubMed

    Chacín-Bonilla, Leonor

    2008-03-01

    In industrialised regions, cyclosporiasis has been most often linked with either food-borne outbreaks or foreign travel. In endemic areas, risk factors associated with the infection include contaminated water or food, contact with animals, type of sanitation and contact with soil. In a community from Venezuela, a strong association was observed between environmental contact with faecal-contaminated soil and cyclosporiasis, suggesting that contact with soil may be an important mode of transmission. This paper reviews the transmission of cyclosporiasis, focusing on soil-related infection.

  4. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jaehyung; Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-Yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo; Bae, In-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI.

  5. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI. PMID:27433385

  6. Bench-to-bedside review: Rapid molecular diagnostics for bloodstream infection - a new frontier?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Among critically ill patients, the diagnosis of bloodstream infection poses a major challenge. Current standard bacterial identification based on blood culture platforms is intrinsically time-consuming and slow. The continuous evolvement of molecular techniques has the potential of providing a faster, more sensitive and direct identification of causative pathogens without prior need for cultivation. This may ultimately impact clinical decision-making and antimicrobial treatment. This review summarises the currently available technologies, their strengths and limitations and the obstacles that have to be overcome in order to develop a satisfactory bedside point-of-care diagnostic tool for detection of bloodstream infection. PMID:22647543

  7. Myocardial abscess and bacteremia complicating Mycobacterium fortuitum pacemaker infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Al Soub, Hussam; Al Maslamani, Mona; Al Khuwaiter, Jameela; El Deeb, Yasser; Abu Khattab, Mohammed

    2009-11-01

    A case of pacemaker infection complicated by bacteremia and myocardial abscess caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum is reported and 9 other cases of pacemaker infection associated with rapidly growing mycobacteria are reviewed. Most cases developed within 6 months from implantation suggesting nosocomial acquisition. Wound discharge, fever, and pain at generator site were the most common presenting features. At presentation they had a median duration of symptoms of 34 days. Concomitant bacteremia was present in half of the cases. Antibiotics therapy and removal of the pacemaker system were needed to achieve cure in the majority of cases. Clarithromycin and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used antibiotics.

  8. Lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Lorena Gomes Cunha; Junqueira, Daniela Rezende Garcia; Perini, Edson; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a frequent and disfiguring adverse effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with HIV. It affects the quality of life of the patient and adherence to treatment, and generates new needs for comprehensive healthcare services. The aim of this study will be to conduct a systematic review of the literature from observational studies and describe lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection during current or previous use of ART. Methods and analysis A systematic review of observational studies published in MEDLINE, CINAHL, LILACS, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts will be carried out. Citations of included studies will be checked to identify additional studies not identified in the electronic searches. It will include any observational study that considered lipodystrophy as the primary or secondary outcome and that had enrolled adolescent and adult patients with HIV infection who were on current or previous ART for at least 6 months. Data extraction and analysis will be performed independently by two reviewers. The extracted data will be discussed, decisions documented and, where necessary, the authors of the studies will be contacted for clarification. Measures of frequency, prevalence and incidence of lipodystrophy will be stratified according to definition, method of diagnosis and risk factors of the outcome. Ethics and dissemination Ethics is not required given this is a protocol for a systematic review. The findings of this study will be widely disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Updates of the review will be conducted to inform and guide healthcare practice. Protocol registration PROSPERO—42013005450. PMID:24625638

  9. Qualitative Evaluation of Historical and Relational Factors Influencing Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infection Risks in Foster Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Kym R.; Spencer, Renee; Bonnar, Mavis; Coatney, Alexis; Hall, Tyson

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore how attitudes, norms, behaviors, responses to early life experiences, and protective factors influence pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection risks from the perspectives of current and former foster youth to inform the development of prevention strategies. Methods We conducted semi-structured individual qualitative interviews with a diverse sample of 22 current/former foster youth aged 15–21 years (63% female; average age = 18.6 years). We then used Theoretical Thematic Analysis to systematically analyze the data for key themes related to sexual health in four categories: 1) norms and attitudes, 2) responses to early life experiences, 3) protective factors, and 4) youth-driven intervention ideas. Results Participants reported a range of sexual experience levels, varied sexual orientations, and also reported varied life experiences prior to and during foster care. We detected several norms and attitudes that likely contribute to risks of early pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. These included that one can tell by looking whether a partner is trustworthy or has a sexually transmitted infection, that condoms aren’t necessary with long-term or infrequent partners or if birth control is used, and that teen pregnancy is an inevitable event. With respect to responses to early life experiences, youth frequently described difficulties dealing with strong emotions in the context of romantic and/or sexual relationships; many attributed these difficulties to early experiences with biological family members or in foster care. Participants linked emotion regulation difficulties with struggles in trust appraisal, effective communication, and impulsive behaviors. Youth also described a variety of protective factors that they felt helped them prevent sexual risk behaviors or improved their lives in other respects. Finally, participants endorsed factors likely to improve intervention acceptability and efficacy, including an open, non

  10. Do delayed prescriptions reduce antibiotic use in respiratory tract infections? A systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Bruce; Kenealy, Tim; Kerse, Ngaire

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about the increasing resistance of antibiotics to common bacteria. Delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections is a strategy that may reduce the use of antibiotics. AIM: To systematically review controlled trials of delayed prescriptions to establish their capacity to reduce antibiotic intake. DESIGN OF STUDY: A systematic review of the literature. SETTING: Four studies were conducted in the United Kingdom and one in New Zealand. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE from 1966 to April 2003, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register using the following terms: 'delayed', 'antibiotics', 'prescriptions', and 'back-up' (as in back-up prescription). We included controlled trials of studies in which the intervention was a delayed prescription compared to an immediate prescription for patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The studies were selected independently and the results compared. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. The data and quality of the studies were extracted and assessed independently by two of the authors. RESULTS: Four randomised controlled trials and one before-after controlled trial contributed to the review. The relative risk in the randomised trials for lower antibiotic usage when a delayed prescription was given ranged from 0.54 for the common cold to 0.25 for otitis media. CONCLUSION: The consistent reduction in antibiotic usage in the five controlled trials included in this review suggests that delayed prescription is an effective means of reducing antibiotic usage for acute respiratory infections. The duration of delay for prescriptions ranged widely, from 1 to 7 days. PMID:14702908

  11. Review of the Occurrence of Anti-infectives in Contaminated Wastewaters and Natural and Drinking Waters

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Pedro A.; François, Matthieu; Gagnon, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Objective Anti-infectives are constantly discharged at trace levels in natural waters near urban centers and agricultural areas. They represent a cause for concern because of their potential contribution to the spread of anti-infective resistance in bacteria and other effects on aquatic biota. We compiled data on the occurrence of anti-infectives published in the last 24 years in environmental water matrices. The collected information was then compared with the available ecotoxicologic values to evaluate potential environmental concerns. Data sources We used Web of Science and Google Scholar to search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals written in the English language since 1984. Data extraction Information on compound concentrations in wastewaters and natural and drinking waters, the source of contamination, country of provenance of the samples, year of publication, limits of quantification, and method of analysis was extracted. Data synthesis From the 126 different substances analyzed in environmental waters, 68 different parent compounds and 10 degradation products or metabolites have been quantified to date. Environmental concentrations vary from about 10−1 to 109 ng/L, depending on the compound, the matrix, and the source of contamination. Conclusions Detrimental effects of anti-infectives on aquatic microbiota are possible with the constant exposure of sensitive species. Indirect impact on human health cannot be ruled out when considering the potential contribution of high anti-infective concentrations to the spreading of anti-infective resistance in bacteria. PMID:19479007

  12. The role of immunoglobulin for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    O'Horo, John; Safdar, Nasia

    2009-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common infectious cause of nosocomial healthcare-associated diarrhea. The increasing prevalence of C difficile, spread in the community, virulence and frequent relapse has created an urgent need to identify new effective treatments for C. difficile infection. Among these, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used for cases of severe C. difficile infection. We undertook a systematic review to examine the published literature pertaining to the use of immunoglobulin for C. difficile infection. Four retrospective studies and five case reports that addressed the use of IVIG for the treatment of C. difficile infection were identified. One study on the use of oral immunoglobulin was identified. Although overall there appear to be benefits to using IVIG in recurrent severe disease, the small sample sizes and lack of control groups in three of the four studies do not allow recommendations to be made regarding the use of immunoglobulin in C. difficile infection. Further research is urgently needed to clarify the role of immunoglobulin--intravenous or oral--for the treatment of C. difficile infection.

  13. HUMAN TOXOPLASMOSIS OUTBREAKS AND THE AGENT INFECTING FORM. FINDINGS FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    MEIRELES, Luciana Regina; EKMAN, Claudio Cesar Jaguaribe; de ANDRADE, Heitor Franco; LUNA, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toxoplasmosis, a worldwide highly prevalent zoonotic infection, is transmitted either by the oocysts, from water and soil, or the tissue cysts, in raw or undercooked infected meat, of Toxoplasma gondii. An ongoing debate is whether there are differences between the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the outbreaks due to one or the other infective form of the agent. We performed a systematic review, recovering 437 reported outbreaks of which 38 were selected. They were complete reports containing ascribedToxoplasma infecting form, and clinical and demographic data. There was no gender or age group selection in the outbreaks, which were described more often in the Americas. A large number of individuals were affected when oocysts, associated with soil and water contaminated with cat feces, were considered the transmission source. Onset of symptoms occurred early when the infection was ascribed to meat tissue cysts (11.4 ± 6.7 days) with sharpened temporal distribution of cases, while a broader and prolonged appearance of new cases was observed when oocysts in water were the source of the infection (20 ± 7 days, p < 0.001). Such information may be useful in the design and implementation of control strategies. PMID:26603222

  14. A review of newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2016-10-17

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine.

  15. Invasive Fungal Infections Acquired from Contaminated Food or Nutritional Supplements: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Chiller, Tom M; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-07-01

    Fungi are an integral part of the natural environment and, therefore, play many roles in relation to food: some fungi are used in food production, some are food sources themselves, and some are agents of food spoilage. Some fungi that contaminate food can also be harmful to human health. The harmful but noninfectious health consequences of mycotoxins have been well-characterized, but the extent to which fungi in food pose a risk for invasive infections is unknown. We conducted a literature review to identify cases of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) believed to have resulted from ingestion or inhalation of food, beverages, or dietary supplements (excluding Saccharomyces infections). We identified 11 publications describing cases or small outbreaks of IFIs related to foods or beverages and three describing IFIs related to dietary supplements. These food-associated IFIs were predominantly mold infections, and the few yeast infections were associated with dairy products. Suspected foodborne IFIs appear to be rare, but are increasingly described in the electronically searchable literature. They are associated with a variety of foods, are due to a variety of fungal pathogens, and primarily occur in persons with immunosuppressive conditions or other predisposing factors. Various guidelines for high-risk patients recommend avoidance of certain food products that may contain high levels of fungi, but further work is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these restrictive diets in preventing fungal infections. The relationships between food spoilage, food insecurity, and IFI risk are another area that may warrant further exploration.

  16. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection. PMID:27252814

  17. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection.

  18. Incidence and Predictors of Antiretroviral Treatment Modification in HIV-Infected Adults: A Brazilian Historical Cohort from 2001 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Pinto Mendicino, Cássia Cristina; Reis, Edna Afonso; Carmo, Ricardo Andrade; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    This study estimated the incidence of and time to first antiretroviral therapy (ART) modification. This longitudinal analysis comprised a sample of 236 patients from three HIV/AIDS referral centers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil—part of a major historical cohort. Inclusion criteria were as follows: having been treatment-naive patient ≥18 years old who initiated ART between 2001 and 2005 in these three referral centers. The main endpoint was time to first ART modification. Patients were followed up for five years, covering the period 2001–2010, during which time Pearson's chi-square test was performed to compare ART modification between groups. Kaplan-Meier inverse survival curves were employed to describe the probability of ART modification and Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of ART modification. Among 247 patients from the major cohort, 236 were eligible. Median follow-up time was 37.2 months and the contribution in person-months was 7,615.4 months. A total of 108 (45.8%) patients had their ART regimen modified at least once (incidence rate: 1.42 per 100 person-months). Adverse drug reactions were the main reason for ART modification. Women (aHR = 1.62; p = 0.022) and patients on protease inhibitor- (PI-) based regimens (aHR = 2.70; p < 0.001) were at higher risk of ART modification. PMID:28348602

  19. The thin blue line: a review and discussion of aseptic technique and postprocedural infections in rodents.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M; McIver, R; Bianco, R

    2000-11-01

    A basic tenet of animal welfare philosophy is that pain and distress must be minimized whenever possible without interfering with the goals of the research. Aseptic technique during surgical procedures is essential to prevent pain and distress associated with post-procedural infections. However, many investigators have found that applying the aseptic techniques used for large animal and human surgery is not always practical when performing surgery on small rodents. Furthermore, the efficacy of some of these techniques for preventing post-procedural infections has been questioned. This review examines what is known about the development of postprocedural infections in animals and humans and the methods used to prevent them. Detection of postprocedural infections in rodents can be difficult unless objective measurements of physiologic indices are made. These measurements should be used experimentally to assess the relative benefits of various methods for preventing postprocedural infections. Measures of contamination, such as quantitative bacterial cultures, also can be used; however, they do not reliably predict infection rates. Much of the dogma about decontamination of skin and hair prior to surgery is not supported by valid experimental evidence. Hair removal may not be necessary. Alcohol may in fact be a better disinfectant than is often credited. Draping should be used when it contributes to the maintenance of the sterile field, but when it does not, modification of surgical technique may provide more protection from infection than the drape does. The contribution of surgical technique to the prevention of postprocedural infections is probably equal to that of aseptic technique. Further research needs to be done to assess various aseptic techniques for use in rodent surgery.

  20. A review of neosporosis and pathologic findings of Neospora caninum infection in wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Shannon L.; Lindsay, Scott A.; Krockenberger, Mark; Phalen, David; Šlapeta, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that is the etiologic agent of neosporosis, a devastating infectious disease regarded as a major cause of reproductive loss in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs worldwide. This protozoan pathogen is maintained in the environment by a heteroxenous life cycle that involves a definitive canid host and a wide range of intermediate hosts. In recent years, a number of wildlife species have been investigated for their possible involvement in the N. caninum life cycle and many have been implicated as intermediate hosts. However, in many instances these studies have utilized serological and molecular techniques to detect infection in clinically normal animals, and investigation of possible associated morbidity, mortality, and pathology has been neglected. As such, the occurrence and importance of Neospora-associated disease in wildlife species are unknown. In order to improve our understanding of the significance of N. caninum infection in nondomestic species, the present review provides an up-to-date summary of clinical neosporosis and N. caninum-associated pathologic lesions in naturally and experimentally infected wildlife species. We provide a list of all free-ranging and captive wildlife species identified with N. caninum infection to date using currently available diagnostic tools. The advantages and disadvantages of diagnostic methods in wildlife are addressed in order to recommend optimal diagnosis of confirming N. caninum infection and neosporosis in nondomestic species. Although current data would suggest that N. caninum infection does not adversely impact wildlife populations, there is a need for greater international uniformity in the diagnosis of N. caninum infection and neosporosis in nondomestic species in order to assess the true consequences of parasite infection. PMID:25973393

  1. Ebola Virus Disease and Marburg Disease in Pregnancy: A Review and Management Considerations for Filovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bebell, Lisa M.; Riley, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    The largest-ever recorded outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever is ongoing. Due to the epidemic and rural nature of outbreaks, little is published about the Filovirus infections Ebola virus disease and Marburg disease in pregnancy. This review of viral hemorrhagic fever focusing on Marburg and Ebola uses knowledge of disease in non-pregnant individuals and pregnancy-specific data to inform management for pregnant women. Filovirus infection presentation is similar between pregnant and non-pregnant patients, though infections may be more severe in pregnancy. Although labeled as hemorrhagic fevers, Marburg and Ebola do not commonly cause gross bleeding and should be conceptualized as diseases of high gastrointestinal losses. Early, aggressive supportive care is the mainstay of Filovirus infection management with massive fluid resuscitation as the key management principle. Patients often require 5–10 liters or more per day of intravenous or oral fluid to maintain circulating blood volume in the setting of ongoing gastrointestinal loss. Fluid shifts warrant aggressive monitoring and correction of potassium levels and acid-base disturbances to prevent life-threatening arrhythmias and metabolic complications. Regardless of maternal survival, fetal loss rates are nearly 100% in Filovirus infection, likely resulting from unchecked transplacental and hematogenous viral spread. High fetal loss rates support the placenta as a difficult-to-eradicate Filovirus infection reservoir. In conclusion, the management of Filovirus infection in pregnancy should focus on stabilizing the mother with intensive monitoring and aggressive fluid and electrolyte repletion, as well as maintaining strict infection control to minimize transmission to others. PMID:26000499

  2. American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Panama: a historical review of entomological studies on anthropophilic Lutzomyia sand fly species.

    PubMed

    Dutari, Larissa C; Loaiza, Jose R

    2014-05-11

    We review existing information on the epidemiology of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) in Panama, with emphasis on the bionomics of anthropophilic Lutzomyia sand fly species. Evidence from Panamanian studies suggests that there are six anthropophilic species in the country: Lutzomyia trapidoi, Lu. panamensis, Lu. gomezi, Lu. ylephiletor, Lu. sanguinaria and Lu. pessoana (Henceforth Lu. carrerai thula). In general, these taxa are abundant, widespread and feed opportunistically on their hosts, which make them potential transmitters of pathogens to a broad range of wildlife, domesticated animals and humans. Furthermore, nearly all man-biting species in Panama (with the exception of Lu. gomezi) expand demographically during the rainy season when transmission is likely higher due to elevated Leishmania infection rates in vector populations. Despite this, data on the distribution and prevalence of ACL suggest little influence of vector density on transmission intensity. Apart from Lu. trapidoi, anthropophilic species seem to be most active in the understory, but vertical stratification, as well as their opportunistic feeding behavior, could vary geographically. This in turn seems related to variation in host species composition and relative abundance across sites that have experienced different degrees of human alteration (e.g., deforestation) in leishmaniasis endemic regions of Panama.

  3. American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Panama: a historical review of entomological studies on anthropophilic Lutzomyia sand fly species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We review existing information on the epidemiology of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) in Panama, with emphasis on the bionomics of anthropophilic Lutzomyia sand fly species. Evidence from Panamanian studies suggests that there are six anthropophilic species in the country: Lutzomyia trapidoi, Lu. panamensis, Lu. gomezi, Lu. ylephiletor, Lu. sanguinaria and Lu. pessoana (Henceforth Lu. carrerai thula). In general, these taxa are abundant, widespread and feed opportunistically on their hosts, which make them potential transmitters of pathogens to a broad range of wildlife, domesticated animals and humans. Furthermore, nearly all man-biting species in Panama (with the exception of Lu. gomezi) expand demographically during the rainy season when transmission is likely higher due to elevated Leishmania infection rates in vector populations. Despite this, data on the distribution and prevalence of ACL suggest little influence of vector density on transmission intensity. Apart from Lu. trapidoi, anthropophilic species seem to be most active in the understory, but vertical stratification, as well as their opportunistic feeding behavior, could vary geographically. This in turn seems related to variation in host species composition and relative abundance across sites that have experienced different degrees of human alteration (e.g., deforestation) in leishmaniasis endemic regions of Panama. PMID:24886629

  4. Human infection with Shewanella putrefaciens and S. algae: report of 16 cases in Martinique and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vignier, Nicolas; Barreau, Morgane; Olive, Claude; Baubion, Emilie; Théodose, Rafaelle; Hochedez, Patrick; Cabié, André

    2013-07-01

    Shewanella spp. are saprophytic bacteria that are part of the marine microflora in warm climates and are rarely pathogenic. However, Shewanella spp. infections are being increasingly reported, and there has been no comprehensive review of the literature describing these infections. This article reports 16 cases of Shewanella spp. infections in Martinique since 1997 and reviews another 239 cases reported in the literature since 1973. Patients experienced soft tissue infections, ear infection, or abdominal and biliary tract infections. A skin or mucosal portal of entry was found for 53% of the patients and exposure to the marine environment was reported for 44%; 79% of patients had an underlying condition. Bacteriema were frequent (28%). Most (87%) patients recovered, although ear infections can become chronic. Death occurred in 13% of the patients. Most Shewanella spp. isolates are susceptible to cefotaxime (95%), piperacillin and tazobactam (98%), gentamicin (99%), and ciprofloxacin (94%).

  5. Human Infection with Shewanella putrefaciens and S. algae: Report of 16 Cases in Martinique and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vignier, Nicolas; Barreau, Morgane; Olive, Claude; Baubion, Emilie; Théodose, Rafaelle; Hochedez, Patrick; Cabié, André

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella spp. are saprophytic bacteria that are part of the marine microflora in warm climates and are rarely pathogenic. However, Shewanella spp. infections are being increasingly reported, and there has been no comprehensive review of the literature describing these infections. This article reports 16 cases of Shewanella spp. infections in Martinique since 1997 and reviews another 239 cases reported in the literature since 1973. Patients experienced soft tissue infections, ear infection, or abdominal and biliary tract infections. A skin or mucosal portal of entry was found for 53% of the patients and exposure to the marine environment was reported for 44%; 79% of patients had an underlying condition. Bacteriema were frequent (28%). Most (87%) patients recovered, although ear infections can become chronic. Death occurred in 13% of the patients. Most Shewanella spp. isolates are susceptible to cefotaxime (95%), piperacillin and tazobactam (98%), gentamicin (99%), and ciprofloxacin (94%). PMID:23690548

  6. A systematic review of probiotics as a potential intervention to restore gut health in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Natalie L; Moneyham, Linda D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics have beneficial effects on the gut in numerous conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the current literature on probiotics used in chronic illnesses exhibiting similar pathology seen in HIV gut dysfunction, in order to make recommendations for their use to promote and restore healing of the gut with subsequent reduction of ongoing inflammation caused by microbial translocation. A review of the literature was performed, focusing on probiotics as an intervention to improve gut health. Key words were searched in PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. The literature reviewed was limited to clinical trials, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines. The review provided evidence that probiotics were supportive in modulating aspects of gut physiology, barrier integrity, and immune function. Probiotic use is a supportive adjunct therapy, worthy of consideration and further research in persons infected with HIV.

  7. Hepatitis C virus infection: review and implications for the orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    McGrory, B J; Kilby, A E

    2000-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus identified in 1989, is estimated to have infected 1%-2% of the United States population. The incidence of HCV in patients requiring orthopedic surgery may be as high as 5%. Surgeons and operating room personnel are at risk for blood-borne diseases transmitted during surgery. The orthopedic surgeon must be aware of viral infection with this pathogen for the safety of the entire operating room team. Further, screening for HCV is routinely done when a patient donates autologous blood prior to elective surgery, and the orthopedic surgeon is often the first or only physician informed of a positive result. The surgeon should know how to interpret the result, advise the patient, and incorporate the diagnosis of HCV into the plan for the proposed surgery. We will review the natural history, transmission, evaluation of, and current treatment for infection with this blood-borne virus.

  8. Multiple Liver Abscesses Associated with Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscess following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting occurs very rarely. We report an unusual case of multiple liver abscesses caused by Staphylococcus capitis in a 50-year-old compromised woman due to a complicating VP shunt infection. We reviewed the nine cases of VP shunt complications reported in the English literature, and speculated that the most likely pathogenetic mechanism in our case is an infected peritoneal tip that migrated to and penetrated the liver, which subsequently caused the formation of multiple liver abscesses. The patient was successfully treated with percutaneous aspiration, drainage of the abscesses, intravenous antibiotics, and shunt revision. Awareness and vigilance of the possibility of liver abscess formation caused by VP shunt infection will help establish an early accurate diagnosis and therapeutic strategy. PMID:24379956

  9. Transfusion-transmitted infections among multitransfused patients in Iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, H; Abolghassemi, H; Kafiabad, S Amini

    2007-12-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) continue to be a major challenge for Blood transfusion organizations across the world. The problem is more serious in the developing countries with lower economic means. Multitransfused patients (MTPs) in these countries are at higher risk of infection, and studies of infection in these patients can be a useful index for examining the blood safety filters in place. The present article reviews the situation in Iran, where prevalence of the major viruses of concern, namely, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus, studied in these patients is reported over a 9-year period. It is demonstrated that HCV is the most prevalent TTI and remains a major health problem for these patients.

  10. A Comprehensive, Model-Based Review of Vaccine and Repeat Infection Trials for Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. Paul; Evans, Holly; Larsen, Sasha E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Filarial worms cause highly morbid diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. Since the 1940s, researchers have conducted vaccine trials in 27 different animal models of filariasis. Although no vaccine trial in a permissive model of filariasis has provided sterilizing immunity, great strides have been made toward developing vaccines that could block transmission, decrease pathological sequelae, or decrease susceptibility to infection. In this review, we have organized, to the best of our ability, all published filaria vaccine trials and reviewed them in the context of the animal models used. Additionally, we provide information on the life cycle, disease phenotype, concomitant immunity, and natural immunity during primary and secondary infections for 24 different filaria models. PMID:23824365

  11. The microbiologic profile of diabetic foot infections in Turkey: a 20-year systematic review: diabetic foot infections in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, M; Mutluoglu, M; Uzun, G; Karabacak, E; Turhan, V; Lipsky, B A

    2014-06-01

    The causative pathogens in diabetic foot infections differ in studies of European compared with Asian populations. The purpose of this study was to determine the causative microorganisms and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns in diabetic patients with a foot infection in Turkey, a country at the crossroads of these two continents. We performed a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies pertaining to DFIs in patients cared for in Turkey. To assess changes in causative organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns over time, we compared the results of just the most recent 5 years (2007-2011) with those of the past 20-years (1989-2011). We identified 31 studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Overall, these studies reported 2,097 patients, from whom 1,974 microorganisms were isolated. The total percentage of gram-negative and gram-positive aerobic bacteria were similar in each of the assessed periods. The rate of isolation of Staphylococcus aureus during the entire period, compared with just the past 5 years, was 23.8% and 19.1%, respectively, while the rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was 7.8% and 5.7%, respectively. The isolation rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was 13.7% for the entire period and 14.9% for the past 5 years. While linezolid, vancomycin and teicoplanin were the most active agents against gram-positive microorganisms, imipenem and cefoperazone-sulbactam were the most active against gram-negative microorganisms. This systematic review demonstrated few substantial changes in diabetic foot microbiology over the past 20 years. The data may help develop and update local clinical guidelines regarding antibiotic therapy for diabetic foot infections in Turkey. Further studies, especially with optimal culture methods, would be useful to validate these findings.

  12. Toxoplasma gondii infection among sheep and goats in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharif, M; Sarvi, Sh; Shokri, A; Hosseini Teshnizi, S; Rahimi, M T; Mizani, A; Ahmadpour, E; Daryani, A

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a cosmopolitan parasitic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is frequently found in meat-producing animals and human beings. This review and meta-analysis study was performed to evaluate the overall prevalence of T. gondii infection among sheep and goats in Iran. Data were systematically collected from 1977 to 2012 in Iran on the following electronic databases: PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science, Magiran, Irandoc, IranMedex, and Scientific Information Database (SID). Additionally, abstracts of national scientific congresses and dissertations were included. A total of 34 articles in field of sheep and 18 articles about goat toxoplasmosis, totalizing to the examination of 14,372 sheep and 3,120 goats, reporting prevalence of toxoplasmosis from different regions of Iran fulfilled our eligibility criteria. The overall prevalence rate of toxoplasmosis in Iran was estimated to be 31% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.259825 to 0.352382) in sheep and 27% (95% CI = 0.140097 to 0.424782) in goats, respectively. There was no significant difference in infection rate between males and females among sheep (odds ratio (OR) = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.59 to 1.696) and goats (OR = 1.027, 95% CI = 0.685 to 1.541). Analysis revealed that infection rate in sheep over than 1 year old was 2.4 times more than that in less than 1 year old (OR = 2.396, 95% CI = 1.050 to 5.467). This systematic review and meta-analysis study revealed that infection is widespread in Iran. Further studies are required to improve strategies for controlling infection among flocks and consequently in human population.

  13. Progress in the Discovery of Treatments for C. difficile Infection: A Clinical and Medicinal Chemistry Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Lissa S.; Owusu, Yaw B.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Sun, Dianqing

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes C. difficile infection, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in developed countries has become increasingly high due to the emergence of newer epidemic strains, a growing elderly population, extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and limited therapies for this diarrheal disease. Because treatment options currently available for C. difficile infection have some drawbacks, including cost, promotion of resistance, and selectivity problems, new agents are urgently needed to address these challenges. This review article focuses on two parts: the first part summarizes current clinical treatment strategies and agents under clinical development for C. difficile infection; the second part reviews newly reported anti-difficile agents that have been evaluated or reevaluated in the last five years and are in the early stages of drug discovery and development. Antibiotics are divided into natural product inspired and synthetic small molecule compounds that may have the potential to be more efficacious than currently approved treatments. This includes potency, selectivity, reduced cytotoxicity, and novel modes of action to prevent resistance. PMID:24236721

  14. Invasive Trichosporon Infection: a Systematic Review on a Re-emerging Fungal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Júnior, João N.; Hennequin, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review aimed to better depict the clinical features and address the issue of therapeutic management of Trichosporon deep-seated infections. Methods: We comprehensively reviewed the cases of invasive Trichosporon infection reported in the literature from 1994 (date of taxonomic modification) to 2015. Data from antifungal susceptibility testing (AST) studies were also analyzed. Results: Two hundred and three cases were retained and split into four groups: homeopathy (n = 79), other immunodeficiency conditions (n = 41), miscellaneous (n = 58) and newborns (n = 25). Trichosporon asahii was the main causative species (46.7%) and may exhibit cross-resistance to different antifungal classes. The unfavorable outcome rate was at 44.3%. By multivariate analysis, breakthrough infection (OR 2.45) was associated with unfavorable outcome, whilst the use of an azole-based therapy improved the prognosis (OR 0.16). Voriconazole-based treatment was associated with favorable outcome in hematological patients (73.6 vs. 41.8%; p = 0.016). Compiled data from AST demonstrated that (i) T. asahii exhibits the highest MICs to amphotericin B and (ii) voriconazole has the best in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates of Trichosporon spp. Conclusions: Trichosporon infection is not only restricted to hematological patients. Analysis of compiled data from AST and clinical outcome support the use of voriconazole as first line therapy. PMID:27799926

  15. Climate Variability and the Occurrence of Human Puumala Hantavirus Infections in Europe: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Roda Gracia, J; Schumann, B; Seidler, A

    2015-09-01

    Hantaviruses are distributed worldwide and are transmitted by rodents. In Europe, the infection usually manifests as a mild form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) known as nephropathia epidemica (NE), which is triggered by the virus species Puumala. Its host is the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). In the context of climate change, interest in the role of climatic factors for the disease has increased. A systematic review was conducted to investigate the association between climate variability and the occurrence of human Puumala hantavirus infections in Europe. We performed a literature search in the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science. Studies that investigated Puumala virus infection and climatic factors in any European country with a minimum collection period of 2 years were included. The selection of abstracts and the evaluation of included studies were performed by two independent reviewers. A total of 434 titles were identified in the databases, of which nine studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies were conducted in central Europe (Belgium, France and Germany), while only two came from the north (Sweden) and one from the south (Bosnia). Strong evidence was found for a positive association between temperature and NE incidence in central Europe, while the evidence for northern Europe so far appears insufficient. Results regarding precipitation were contradictory. Overall, the complex relationships between climate and hantavirus infections need further exploration to identify specific health risks and initiate appropriate intervention measures in the context of climate change.

  16. [Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and urinary tract infections: study model and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Lavigne, J-P; Bourg, G; Botto, H; Sotto, A

    2007-11-01

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. Among cranberry compounds, a group of proanthocyanidins (PACs) with A-type linkages were isolated which exhibit bacterial anti-adhesion activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. These PAC inhibit P-fimbriae synthesis and induce a bacterial deformation. This activity was demonstrated on both antibiotic susceptible and resistant bacteria. This review focused on the last discoveries in the knowledge of cranberry effects.

  17. Common Infection Control Practices in the Emergency Department: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eileen J.; Pouch, Stephanie M.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) are a major health concern, despite being largely avoidable. The emergency department (ED) is an essential component of the healthcare system and subject to workflow challenges, which may hinder ED personnel adherence to guideline based infection prevention practices. Aim The purpose of this review was to examine published literature regarding adherence rates among ED personnel to selected infection control practices, including hand hygiene (HH) and aseptic technique during the placement of central venous catheters and urinary catheters. We also reviewed studies reporting rates of ED equipment contamination. Methods PubMed was searched for studies that included adherence rates among ED personnel to HH during routine patient care, aseptic technique during the placement of central venous catheters and urinary catheters, and rates of equipment contamination. Findings A total of 853 studies were screened and 589 abstracts reviewed. The full texts of 36 papers were examined and 22 articles were identified as meeting inclusion criteria. Eight studies used various scales to measure HH compliance, which ranged from 7.7–89.7%. Seven articles examined central venous catheters inserted in the ED or by emergency medicine residents. Detail of aseptic technique practices during urinary catheterization was lacking. Four papers described equipment contamination in the ED. Conclusion Standardized methods and definitions of compliance monitoring are needed in order to compare results across settings. PMID:25179326

  18. Immune surveillance mechanisms of the skin against the stealth infection strategy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-review.

    PubMed

    Andonova, Maria; Urumova, Valentina

    2013-09-01

    The present review aims to provide insight into the complex interactions between the host and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-an opportunistic microbial agent causing skin infections. Heat, humidity and skin pH are among the factors beneficial for the development of this Gram-negative agent. To cause infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa should first overcome the primary mechanisms of defense including the cell elements and humoral factors of the skin, as well as non-specific responses-phagocytosis, inflammation, acute phase response. All they are analysed with emphasis on the fact that their detailed understanding would help revealing their potential and allow for their efficient control. The microorganism, being more alterable and more flexible than the host, uses stealth strategies and modes of life. The review goes over the arsenal of virulence factors, used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to attack the host defense mechanisms. The bacterial pathogenic strategies for invasion, resulting in collapse of skin defense are analysed. Several novel therapeutic approached to Pseudomonas aeruginosa skin infections are briefly reviewed.

  19. Review: emerging developments in the use of bioactive glasses for treating infected prosthetic joints.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Mohamed N; Bal, B Sonny; Huang, Wenhai

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial contamination of implanted orthopedic prostheses is a serious complication that requires prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy, major surgery to remove infected implants, bone reconstruction, and considerable morbidity. Local delivery of high doses of antibiotics using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cement as the carrier, along with systemic antibiotics, is the standard treatment. However, PMMA is not biodegradable, and it can present a surface on which secondary bacterial infection can occur. PMMA spacers used to treat deep implant infections must be removed after resolution of the infection. Alternative carrier materials for antibiotics that could also restore deficient bone are therefore of interest. In this article, the development of bioactive glass-based materials as a delivery system for antibiotics is reviewed. Bioactive glass is osteoconductive, converts to hydroxyapatite, and heals to hard and soft tissues in vivo. Consequently, bioactive glass-based carriers can provide the combined functions of controlled local antibiotic delivery and bone restoration. Recently-developed borate bioactive glasses are of particular interest since they have controllable degradation rates coupled with desirable properties related to osteogenesis and angiogenesis. Such glasses have the potential for providing a new class of biomaterials, as substitutes for PMMA, in the treatment of deep bone infections.

  20. A review of the biomaterials technologies for infection-resistant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Campoccia, Davide; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2013-11-01

    Anti-infective biomaterials need to be tailored according to the specific clinical application. All their properties have to be tuned to achieve the best anti-infective performance together with safe biocompatibility and appropriate tissue interactions. Innovative technologies are developing new biomaterials and surfaces endowed with anti-infective properties, relying either on antifouling, or bactericidal, or antibiofilm activities. This review aims at thoroughly surveying the numerous classes of antibacterial biomaterials and the underlying strategies behind them. Bacteria repelling and antiadhesive surfaces, materials with intrinsic antibacterial properties, antibacterial coatings, nanostructured materials, and molecules interfering with bacterial biofilm are considered. Among the new strategies, the use of phages or of antisense peptide nucleic acids are discussed, as well as the possibility to modulate the local immune response by active cytokines. Overall, there is a wealth of technical solutions to contrast the establishment of an implant infection. Many of them exhibit a great potential in preclinical models. The lack of well-structured prospective multicenter clinical trials hinders the achievement of conclusive data on the efficacy and comparative performance of anti-infective biomaterials.

  1. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the neonatal unit: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jacqueline E; McDonald, Susan J; Tan, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter infections are the leading cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections and contribute significantly to mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Moreover, infection poses significant economic consequence which increased hospital costs and increased length of hospital stay. Prevention strategies are detailed in guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States; nevertheless, recent surveys in neonatal units in the United States, and Australia and New Zealand demonstrate these are not always followed. This review discusses the numerous evidence-based strategies to prevent catheter infections including hand hygiene, maximal sterile barriers during insertion, skin disinfection, selection of insertion site, dressings, aseptic non-touch technique, disinfection of catheter hubs/ports, administration set management, prompt removal of catheter, antibiotic locks, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and chlorhexidine bathing. Furthermore, it will describe different strategies that can be implemented into clinical practice to reduce infection rates. These include the use of care bundles including checklists, education and the use of CVC teams.

  2. Isolated optic neuritis associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo-Young; Choi, You-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2017-03-20

    Mycoplasma pneumonia is a major pathogen of primary atypical pneumonia and has been known to cause various kinds of extrapulmonary manifestations involving almost all organs of the human body. Optic neuritis associated with M. pneumoniae infection has rarely been described and mostly, it combined other neurological complications including meningitis, meningoencephalitis, myelitis, and peripheral neuropathy. We report two patients who presented with isolated optic neuritis due to M. pneumoniae infection, and reviewed the literatures on five additional patients. All patients are child or young adults, and optic neuritis was unilateral (n = 3) or bilateral (n = 4). Remarkably, four patients did not have preceding history of respiratory M. pneumonia infection, and ocular pain or headache was accompanied in only three. Although initial visual acuities were severely reduced in most cases, visual outcome was excellent after systemic steroid and/or antibiotics treatment. M. pneumonia infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of isolated optic neuritis, especially when occurring in a child or young adults, even though there was no preceding pneumonia, accompanying ocular pain, or headache. Various mechanisms including direct local inflammation, vascular occlusion, or indirect immune modulation due to M. pneumonia infection can lead to isolated neurological manifestations without pneumonia.

  3. Prevention of pin site infection in external fixation: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; Fragomen, Austin T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2016-08-01

    Pin site infections are a common complication of external fixation that places a significant burden on the patient and healthcare system. Such infections increase the number of clinic visits required during a patient's course of treatment, can result in the need for additional treatment including antibiotics and surgery, and most importantly can compromise patient outcomes should osteomyelitis or instability result from pin loosening or need for pin or complete construct removal. Factors that may influence the development of pin site infections include patient-specific risk factors, surgical technique, pin design characteristics, use of prophylactic antibiotics, and the post-operative pin care protocol including cleansing, dressing changes, and showering. Despite numerous studies that work to derive evidence-based recommendations for prevention of pin site infections, substantial controversy exists in regard to the optimal protocol. This review comprehensively evaluates the current literature to provide an overview of factors that may influence the incidence of pin site infections in patients undergoing treatment with external fixators, and concludes with a description of the preferred surgical and post-operative pin site protocols employed by the senior authors (ATF and SRR).

  4. Ross River Virus Transmission, Infection, and Disease: a Cross-Disciplinary Review

    PubMed Central

    Harley, David; Sleigh, Adrian; Ritchie, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV) is a fascinating, important arbovirus that is endemic and enzootic in Australia and Papua New Guinea and was epidemic in the South Pacific in 1979 and 1980. Infection with RRV may cause disease in humans, typically presenting as peripheral polyarthralgia or arthritis, sometimes with fever and rash. RRV disease notifications in Australia average 5,000 per year. The first well-described outbreak occurred in 1928. During World War II there were more outbreaks, and the name epidemic polyarthritis was applied. During a 1956 outbreak, epidemic polyarthritis was linked serologically to a group A arbovirus (Alphavirus). The virus was subsequently isolated from Aedes vigilax mosquitoes in 1963 and then from epidemic polyarthritis patients. We review the literature on the evolutionary biology of RRV, immune response to infection, pathogenesis, serologic diagnosis, disease manifestations, the extraordinary variety of vertebrate hosts, mosquito vectors, and transmission cycles, antibody prevalence, epidemiology of asymptomatic and symptomatic human infection, infection risks, and public health impact. RRV arthritis is due to joint infection, and treatment is currently based on empirical anti-inflammatory regimens. Further research on pathogenesis may improve understanding of the natural history of this disease and lead to new treatment strategies. The burden of morbidity is considerable, and the virus could spread to other countries. To justify and design preventive programs, we need accurate data on economic costs and better understanding of transmission and behavioral and environmental risks. PMID:11585790

  5. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection Incidence and Clearance: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Wood, Zoe C; Bain, Christopher J; Smith, David D; Whiteman, David C; Antonsson, Annika

    2017-02-01

    Subclinical oral HPV infection that persists for decades is likely to precede a HPV-driven HNSCC, however little is known about the natural history of oral HPV. We systematically reviewed and abstracted data from nine manuscripts that examined HIV-negative and cancer-free subjects for oral HPV DNA to determine the pooled baseline prevalence and incidence of newly acquired oral HPV infections, and specifically for HPV-16. We also documented the clearance rate and the median time to clearance, where data existed. Of 3,762 individuals, 7.5% had an oral infection with any HPV type (1.6% for HPV-16). Meta-regression analysis estimated the 12-month cumulative incidence to be 4.8% (95% CI 3.2-7.3%). The overall oral HPV clearance was reported to be 0% to 80% between studies, and the median time to clearance from 6.5 months to 18 months. Oral HPV-16 clearance was 43%-83%, and median time to clearance for HPV-16 was 7 to 22 months. Oral HPV prevalence, incidence and clearance vary considerably between published studies from different geographical regions. Further research is required to identify predictors of persistent oral HPV infection. Measurable baseline prevalence was observed in all studies, as well non-trivial incidence of newly acquired oral HPV infections and incomplete clearance.

  6. A Review of Evidence-Based Care of Symptomatic Trichomoniasis and Asymptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis Infections.

    PubMed

    Meites, Elissa; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Hobbs, Marcia M; Kissinger, Patricia; Nyirjesy, Paul; Schwebke, Jane R; Secor, W Evan; Sobel, Jack D; Workowski, Kimberly A

    2015-12-15

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection, affecting an estimated 3.7 million women and men in the United States. Health disparities are prominent in the epidemiology of this infection, which affects 11% of women aged ≥40 years and a disproportionately high percentage of black women. Particularly high prevalences have been identified among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients and incarcerated individuals. This article reviews and updates scientific evidence in key topic areas used for the development of the 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current evidence is presented regarding conditions associated with Trichomonas vaginalis infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pregnancy complications such as preterm birth. Nucleic acid amplification tests and point-of-care tests are newly available diagnostic methods that can be conducted on a variety of specimens, potentially allowing highly sensitive testing and screening of both women and men at risk for infection. Usually, trichomoniasis can be cured with single-dose therapy of an appropriate nitroimidazole antibiotic, but women who are also infected with HIV should receive therapy for 7 days. Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging concern.

  7. A Review of Evidence-Based Care of Symptomatic Trichomoniasis and Asymptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Meites, Elissa; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Kissinger, Patricia; Nyirjesy, Paul; Schwebke, Jane R.; Secor, W. Evan; Sobel, Jack D.; Workowski, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection, affecting an estimated 3.7 million women and men in the United States. Health disparities are prominent in the epidemiology of this infection, which affects 11% of women aged ≥40 years and a disproportionately high percentage of black women. Particularly high prevalences have been identified among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients and incarcerated individuals. This article reviews and updates scientific evidence in key topic areas used for the development of the 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current evidence is presented regarding conditions associated with Trichomonas vaginalis infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pregnancy complications such as preterm birth. Nucleic acid amplification tests and point-of-care tests are newly available diagnostic methods that can be conducted on a variety of specimens, potentially allowing highly sensitive testing and screening of both women and men at risk for infection. Usually, trichomoniasis can be cured with single-dose therapy of an appropriate nitroimidazole antibiotic, but women who are also infected with HIV should receive therapy for 7 days. Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging concern. PMID:26602621

  8. Effect of BCG vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, A; Eisenhut, M; Harris, R J; Rodrigues, L C; Sridhar, S; Habermann, S; Snell, L; Mangtani, P; Adetifa, I; Lalvani, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether BCG vaccination protects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection as assessed by interferon γ release assays (IGRA) in children. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Searches of electronic databases 1950 to November 2013, checking of reference lists, hand searching of journals, and contact with experts. Setting Community congregate settings and households. Inclusion criteria Vaccinated and unvaccinated children aged under 16 with known recent exposure to patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Children were screened for infection with M tuberculosis with interferon γ release assays. Data extraction Study results relating to diagnostic accuracy were extracted and risk estimates were combined with random effects meta-analysis. Results The primary analysis included 14 studies and 3855 participants. The estimated overall risk ratio was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.92), indicating a protective efficacy of 19% against infection among vaccinated children after exposure compared with unvaccinated children. The observed protection was similar when estimated with the two types of interferon γ release assays (ELISpot or QuantiFERON). Restriction of the analysis to the six studies (n=1745) with information on progression to active tuberculosis at the time of screening showed protection against infection of 27% (risk ratio 0.73, 0.61 to 0.87) compared with 71% (0.29, 0.15 to 0.58) against active tuberculosis. Among those infected, protection against progression to disease was 58% (0.42, 0.23 to 0.77). Conclusions BCG protects against M tuberculosis infection as well as progression from infection to disease. Trial registration PROSPERO registration No CRD42011001698 (www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/). PMID:25097193

  9. A review of Gymnophalloides seoi (Digenea: Gymnophallidae) and human infections in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Chai, J Y

    2001-06-01

    Studies on Gymnophalloides seoi (Digenea: Gymnophallidae) and human infections are briefly reviewed. This minute intestinal fluke was first discovered from a Korean woman suffering from acute pancreatitis and gastrointestinal troubles. It was described as a new species by Lee, Chai and Hong in 1993. The southwestern coastal village where the patient resided was found to be a highly endemic area, and additional endemic areas have been identified. The parasite is very small, 0.33-0.50 mm long and 0.23-0.33 mm wide, and characterized by the presence of a ventral pit. The first intermediate host remains unknown, but the second intermediate host has been found to be the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Man and the Palearctic oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus have been shown to be natural definitive hosts, and wading birds including the Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus are highly susceptible to experimental infection. Gerbils, hamsters, cats, and several strains of mice were also susceptible laboratory hosts. In experimentally infected mice, the parasites inhabit the small intestine, pinching and sucking the root of villi with their large oral suckers, but they did not invade beyond the mucosa in immunocompetent mice. However, they were found to invade the submucosa in immunosuppressed mice. Human G. seoi infections have been found in at least 25 localities; 23 islands on the Yellow Sea or the South Sea, and 2 western coastal villages. The highest prevalence was found in a village on Aphaedo, Shinan-gun (49% egg positive rate); other areas showed 0.8-25.3% prevalence. Infected people complained of variable degrees of gastrointestinal troubles and indigestion. The infection can be diagnosed by recovery of eggs in the feces; however, an expert is needed to identify the eggs. Praziquantel, 10 mg/kg in single dose, is effective for treatment of human infections. Eating raw oysters in endemic areas should be avoided.

  10. Is chronic HIV infection associated with venous thrombotic disease? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Klein, S K; Slim, E J; de Kruif, M D; Keller, T T; ten Cate, H; van Gorp, E C M; Brandjes, D P M

    2005-04-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is still a major health problem world-wide. HIV infection has changed into a chronic infection with the chance of developing long-term complications. Vascular complications are frequently reported in the current literature. HIV and treatment by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are associated with many cardiovascular risk factors. An increased risk of arterial cardiovascular complications was found in a number of studies. However, data about the risk of venous thrombotic disease (VTE), including potentially fatal conditions as pulmonary embolism, were limited. In a systematic review of the literature, ten relevant epidemiological studies were identified that investigated the risk of venous thrombotic disease in HIV-infected patients. The incidence was increased two- to tenfold in comparison with a healthy population of the same age. However, these studies were mainly retrospective cohort studies that were prone to selection bias, confounding factors were not always mentioned and in all but three control populations were missing. An increased risk of venous thrombotic disease in HIV-infected patients could be explained by the presence of a hypercoagulable state, characterised by an increase in procoagulant factors, such as endothelial TF expression and thrombogenic properties of microparticles, and a decrease in anticoagulant factors, including AT III, HC II and the protein C pathway. Furthermore, the risk of VTE was associated with an increased risk of infections and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, and was weakly associated with HAART. All together, quite some evidence pointed towards a relationship between HIV infection and venous thrombotic disease, but the association still needs to be established in properly designed epidemiological studies.

  11. Decreases in human immunodeficiency virus infection rates in Kombolcha, Ethiopia: a 10-year data review

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Melashu Balew; Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe; Sinishaw, Mulusew Alemneh; Yesuf, Yohannes Amede

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is one of the most serious public health and development challenges in sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia. A particular challenge for prevention strategies has been the emergence of hotspot areas. Therefore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome programs should not be based on national level statistics, but need to be more focused geographically. Kombolcha is one of the high spot areas with different projects and development corridors. Hence, the aim of this study is to assess the trend of HIV infection rates among patients who visited Africa Service Committee clinic from 2005 to 2014. Methods An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted from January 1 to January 30, 2016. All records of new patients enrolled from February 8, 2005 to December 31, 2014 were reviewed. Data on sociodemographic information, risky sexual behavior, and HIV test result were collected from each study participant using data collection format. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify risk factors of HIV infection. Results The overall HIV infection was 10.8% (2,233/20,674). The rate of infection varied from 13.3% in 2005 to 4.5% in 2014, and its trend had significantly declined from 2008 to 2014. Urban residence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–5.25), patients who ever had intercourse with penetration (AOR: 5.62; 95% CI: 1.11–28.57), and those who had marriage experience (AOR: 11.65; 95% CI: 4.2–32.3) were more infected with HIV. Conclusion The trend of HIV infection significantly reduced in the last 10 years in Kombolcha area. However, the HIV infection still remains high (4.5%) that needs intervention of those who had marriage experience, risky sexual behavior, and urban dwellers. PMID:27462177

  12. Evidence for Infection and Inflammation in Infant Deaths in a Country with Historically Low Incidences of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Törő, Klára; Vörös, Krisztina; Mészner, Zsófia; Váradi-T, Aletta; Tóth, Adrienn; Kovács, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Total infant mortality in Hungary has been higher than other European countries; however, the reported incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been lower. The low incidence of SIDS in Hungary has been supported by evidence obtained from the high rate of scene of death investigation and medico-legal autopsy mandatory since the 1950s. In this study, we compared the incidence of explained and unexplained infant deaths in Hungary for three periods: 1979–1989 when the incidence of SIDS was high in western Europe; 1990–1999 when the incidence of infant deaths was falling following introduction of the public health campaigns to reduce the risk factors associated with SIDS; and 2000–2012 to determine if introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b or pneumococcal vaccines or introduction of an earlier immunization schedule during this period had an effect on SIDS. Explained infant deaths fell consistently during this period; however, SIDS rose during the second period when the incidence of SIDS was falling in other European countries. Evidence for infection and/or inflammation was observed for the majority of SIDS during each period. The results are discussed in relation to campaigns to reduce infant mortality in Hungary and the introduction of new vaccines and an earlier immunization schedule in 2006. PMID:26379661

  13. Impetigo - review*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Luciana Baptista

    2014-01-01

    Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children. Historically, impetigo is caused by either group A β-hemolytic streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus. Currently, the most frequently isolated pathogen is S. aureus. This article discusses the microbiologic and virulence factors of group A β-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, clinical characteristics, complications, as well as the approach to diagnosis and management of impetigo. Topical agents for impetigo therapy are reviewed. PMID:24770507

  14. Impetigo - review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciana Baptista

    2014-01-01

    Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children. Historically, impetigo is caused by either group A β-hemolytic streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus. Currently, the most frequently isolated pathogen is S. aureus. This article discusses the microbiologic and virulence factors of group A β-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, clinical characteristics, complications, as well as the approach to diagnosis and management of impetigo. Topical agents for impetigo therapy are reviewed.

  15. Extra-hepatic manifestations associated with hepatitis E virus infection: a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bazerbachi, Fateh; Haffar, Samir; Garg, Sushil K; Lake, John R

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a significant public health problem that afflicts almost 20 million individuals annually and causes acute liver injury in 3.5 million, with approximately 56 000 deaths. As with other viral hepatitides, extra-hepatic manifestations could represent an important aspect of this infection. The spectrum of these manifestations is still emerging. Acute pancreatitis and neurological, musculoskeletal, hematological, renal, and other immune-mediated manifestations have been described. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review the published literature of extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection. Data sources: We searched the PubMed database using the MeSH term “hepatitis E” and each of the extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection. No language or date restrictions were set in these searches. Searches retrieving articles with non-A, non-B hepatitis were excluded. Additional articles were identified through the reference lists of included articles. Results: Several extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection have been published. The temporal association between some extra-hepatic manifestations and HEV infection and the exclusion of other possible etiologies suggests that HEV infection could have caused some of them. According to the available data, HEV infection appears to be strongly associated with acute pancreatitis, neurological disorders (with primarily dominant peripheral nerve involvement, most commonly manifested as Guillain-Barré syndrome, followed by neuralgic amyotrophy), hematological diseases (hemolytic anemia due to glucose phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and severe thrombocytopenia), glomerulonephritis, and mixed cryoglobulinemia. More data are needed to clarify whether an association exists with musculoskeletal or other immune-mediated manifestations. Conclusions: HEV infection should be considered in patients with acute pancreatitis

  16. [Human papilloma virus and cervical cancer. An historical review on the development of research on cancer of the cervix uteri in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    García-Tamayo, Jorge; Molina, Julia; Blasco-Olaetxea, Eduardo

    2010-06-01

    The history on the relationship of VPH infection and cervical cancer was examined. Findings were initially reported in Maracaibo(1971), later in Mexico(1973) and thereafter several studies on the ultrastructure and immunohistochemistry of VPH infection and its role on cervical cancer were described. The ultrastructural findings of viral particles of HPV and their proteins, as well as their role in the incorporation of the viral genome to the human cervical cells were also described. Glycoproteins on the surface of cervical cells were reviewed and their importance on HPV infection was related to p16, blood group antigens and early genetic changes in the cell cycle with loss of heterozigocity, all of which, stimulated by the high risk HPV infection lead to cervical cancer.

  17. Dengue viral infections in Pakistan and other Asian countries: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahsan, Aitezaz; Nazir, Noor-Ul-Ain; Hanif, Hina; Khan, Haider Ali

    2016-07-01

    Infections due to Dengue virus are widespread throughout the world. Disease starts with mild flu like sickness to a severe intricate condition which results in the death of the patient. Dengue illness has high morbidity and mortality in Pakistan as well as in other Asian countries. The Review article is a discourse analysis that explores the facts about the history, emergence and impact of dengue in Pakistan and other Asian countries. Data was collected from internet sources, mainly using Science Direct and PubMed. The final literature was reviewed and summarised. About 150 articles were identified and 47 articles were shortlisted for final review. Aedesaegypti was found to be a major vector for the transmission and spread of dengue illness. Treatment comprises supportive therapy as no specific treatment was available. During the last couple of years, the incidence of dengue fever was extraordinary in metropolitan cities of Pakistan.

  18. Bloodstream infection with Oligella ureolytica in a newborn infant: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demir, Tülin; Celenk, Nuran

    2014-06-11

    Oligella species are small, Gram-negative, nonsaccharolytic aerobic rods or coccobacilli that are catalase and oxidase-positive, mostly isolated from the urinary tract and rarely from wounds, bloodstream infections, septic arthritis, or peritonitis.In this article, we report a case of O.ureolytica-related bloodstream infection in a newborn infant and we review the literature for previously reported cases of Oligella infections.

  19. A comparative review of HLA associations with hepatitis B and C viral infections across global populations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Kaul, Rashmi; Kaul, Anil; Khan, Khalid

    2007-03-28

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection or co-infection leads to risk of development of chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immigration and globalization have added to the challenges of public health concerns regarding chronic HBV and HCV infections worldwide. The aim of this study is to review existing global literature across ethnic populations on HBV and HCV related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in relation to susceptibility, viral persistence and treatment. Extensive literature search was conducted to explore the HLA associations in HBV and HCV infections reported across global populations over the past decade to understand the knowledge status, weaknesses and strengths of this information in different ethnic populations. HLA DR13 is consistently associated with HBV clearance globally. HLADRB1*11/*12 alleles and DQB1*0301 are associated with HBV persistence but with HCV clearance worldwide. Consistent association of DRB1*03 and *07 is observed with HCV susceptibility and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination across the population. HLA DR13 is protective for vertical HBV and HCV transmission in Chinese and Italian neonates, but different alleles are associated with their susceptibility in these populations. HLA class I molecule interactions with Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIR) of natural killer (NK) cells modulate HCV infection outcome via regulating immune regulatory cells and molecules. HLA associations with HBV vaccination, interferon therapy in HBV and HCV, and with extra hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis are also discussed. Systematic studies in compliance with global regulatory standards are required to identify the HLA specific viral epitope, stage specific T cell populations interacting with different HLA alleles during disease progression and viral clearance of chronic HBV or HCV infections among different ethnic populations. These studies would facilitate stage specific

  20. Economic Evaluation of Interventions for Prevention of Hospital Acquired Infections: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kwetkat, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Objective This systematic review sought to assess the costs and benefits of interventions preventing hospital-acquired infections and to evaluate methodological and reporting quality. Methods We systematically searched Medline via PubMed and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database from 2009 to 2014. We included quasi-experimental and randomized trails published in English or German evaluating the economic impact of interventions preventing the four most frequent hospital-acquired infections (urinary tract infections, surgical wound infections, pneumonia, and primary bloodstream infections). Characteristics and results of the included articles were extracted using a standardized data collection form. Study and reporting quality were evaluated using SIGN and CHEERS checklists. All costs were adjusted to 2013 US$. Savings-to-cost ratios and difference values with interquartile ranges (IQRs) per month were calculated, and the effects of study characteristics on the cost-benefit results were analyzed. Results Our search returned 2067 articles, of which 27 met the inclusion criteria. The median savings-to-cost ratio across all studies reporting both costs and savings values was US $7.0 (IQR 4.2–30.9), and the median net global saving was US $13,179 (IQR 5,106–65,850) per month. The studies’ reporting quality was low. Only 14 articles reported more than half of CHEERS items appropriately. Similarly, an assessment of methodological quality found that only four studies (14.8%) were considered high quality. Conclusions Prevention programs for hospital acquired infections have very positive cost-benefit ratios. Improved reporting quality in health economics publications is required. PMID:26731736

  1. An Historical Analysis of HRD Knowledge: A Critical Review of "The Foreman: Master and Victim of Doubletalk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storberg-Walker, Julia; Bierema, Laura L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyze the historical development of HRD knowledge. The analysis aims to use the qualitative research technique of text deconstruction on an important management text from the human relations phase of organization theory. Deconstruction is not a common method to HRD. In this paper, HRD scholars…

  2. Healthcare equipment as a source of nosocomial infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schabrun, S; Chipchase, L

    2006-07-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) result in significant financial and individual costs, with large numbers of patients acquiring infections annually. Healthcare equipment has been identified as a likely source of these infections, and research indicates that up to one-third of all NIs may be prevented by adequate cleaning of equipment. Thus, this systematic review aimed to determine levels of contamination on healthcare equipment, to identify viable cleaning protocols and to establish the methodological quality of current evidence. Published and unpublished studies from January 1972 to December 2004 were identified in eight major databases. Methodological quality was evaluated using the hierarchy of evidence and a quantitative critical appraisal tool. Data were extracted and analysed using five major outcome measures. Fifty studies were identified investigating a range of healthcare equipment, of which 23 were included in the review. Methodological quality ranged from 6.5 to 9.5 out of 14 for observational studies and from 6.5 to 9.5 out of 15 for repeated measures studies. The included studies reported that 86.8% of all sampled equipment was contaminated, with 70% alcohol reducing the levels of contamination on equipment by 82.1%. Healthcare equipment is a significant source of NI. High levels of contamination are present on a wide range of healthcare equipment. However, the majority of contamination and hence any risk of acquiring a NI can be reduced substantially by regular cleaning of equipment with 70% alcohol. Further research is required into the role of community healthcare equipment in NI.

  3. Urinary tract infections in the critical care unit: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Parida, Satyen; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar

    2013-11-01

    The use of indwelling catheters in the Critical Care Units (CCUs) has a major role in determining the incidence and the morbidity as well as mortality from hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Instituting evidence-based protocols can significantly reduce both the prevalence of indwelling catheterization as well as the incidence of hospital-acquired UTIs. The prevalence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in the CCUs is directly linked to the widespread use of indwelling catheters in these settings. CAUTIs result in significant cost escalation for individual hospitals as well as the healthcare system as a whole. A UTI is an inflammatory response to colonization of the urinary tract, most commonly by bacteria or fungi. A UTI should be differentiated from the mere detection of bacteria in the urinary tract. This condition, referred to as asymptomatic bacteriuria, is common and does not require treatment, especially in the patient with an indwelling urinary catheter. A CAUTI occurs when a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter develops 2 or more signs or symptoms of a UTI such as hematuria, fever, suprapubic or flank pain, change in urine character, and altered mental status. CAUTI is classified as a complicated UTI. The current review highlights the important management issues in critical care patients having CAUTI. We performed a MEDLINE search using combinations of keywords such as urinary tract infection, critical care unit and indwelling urinary catheter. We reviewed the relevant publications with regard to CAUTI in patients in CCU.

  4. Non-anti-infective effects of antimicrobials and their clinical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Estes, Lynn L; Steckelberg, James M

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are undoubtedly one of the key advances in the history of modern medicine and infectious diseases, improving the clinical outcomes of infection owing to their inhibitory effects on microbial growth. However, many antimicrobial agents also have biological activities stemming from their interactions with host receptors and effects on host inflammatory responses and other human or bacterial cellular biological pathways. These result in clinical uses of antimicrobial drugs that are distinct from their direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal properties. We reviewed the published literature regarding non-anti-infective therapeutic properties and proposed clinical applications of selected antimicrobials, specifically, macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and ketoconazole. The clinical applications reviewed were varied, and we focused on uses that were clinically relevant (in terms of importance and burden of disease) and where published evidence exists. Such uses include chronic inflammatory pulmonary and skin disorders, chronic periodontitis, gastrointestinal dysmotility, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Most of these potential therapeutic uses are not Food and Drug Administration approved. Clinicians need to weigh the use of antimicrobial agents for their non-anti-infective benefits, considering potential adverse effects and long-term effect on microbial resistance.

  5. Zygomycetes infections in pediatric hematology oncology patients: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dehority, Walter; Willert, Jennifer; Pong, Alice

    2009-12-01

    Fungi from the Zygomycetes class are increasingly recognized causes of infection in immunosuppressed children, but no comprehensive literature review and few case series have been published on the topic. A case series of 6 pediatric oncology patients with Zygomycetes infections cared for at our institution was constructed, and a concurrent search of the English language literature for Zygomycetes infections in children with oncologic disorders was undertaken. Our case series described 6 patients (5 male) between the ages of 2.5 and 19.5 years. One patient was diagnosed with rhinocerebral disease, 2 with rhinosinusitis, 2 with pulmonary involvement, and 1 with a gastrointestinal presentation. Five patients survived. Our literature review identified 82 cases from 61 studies. The mean subject age was 10.8 years (1.4 to 21.0 y). About 92.7% of all patients suffered from some form of leukemia, with 70.7% suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Overall, 58.5% of reported patients survived, with individuals with disseminated disease showing the worst prognosis (68.2% mortality) and those with cutaneous disease the best (14.3% mortality). Survival is increasingly reported in the literature, perhaps as a result of improved diagnostic capabilities, increased physician awareness and increased reliance on adjunctive surgical therapy.

  6. Inflammatory Mediators of Leprosy Reactional Episodes and Dental Infections: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cortela, D. C. B.; de Souza Junior, A. L.; Virmond, M. C. L.; Ignotti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Reactional episodes in leprosy are a result of complex interactions between the immune system, Mycobacterium leprae, and predisposing factors, including dental infections. To determine the main inflammatory mediators in the immunopathological process of dental infections and leprosy reactions, we conducted a systematic review of primary literature published between 1996 and 2013. A three-stage literature search was performed (Stage I, “leprosy reactions” and “inflammatory mediators”; Stage II, “dental infections” and “inflammatory mediators”; and Stage III, “leprosy reactions,” “dental infections,” and “inflammatory mediators”). Of the 911 eligible publications, 10 were selected in Stage I, 68 in Stage II, and 1 in Stage III. Of the 27 studied inflammatory mediators, the main proinflammatory mediators were IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-17; the main anti-inflammatory mediators were IL-10 and IL-4. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were significant during periodontal and reactional lesion evolution; IFN-γ and IL-1β were associated with types 1 and 2 reactions and chronic periodontal disease. The proinflammatory mediators in dental infections and leprosy reactions, especially IL-6 and TNF-α, were similar across studies, regardless of the laboratory technique and sample type. IFN-γ and IL-1β were significant for leprosy reactions and periodontal diseases. This pattern was maintained in serum. PMID:26339136

  7. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Immunocompromised Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Dong; Liu, Huan-Huan; Ma, Zhan-Xi; Ma, Hong-Yu; Li, Zhong-Yu; Yang, Zhi-Bin; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Xu, Bin; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii has been suggested as an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We conducted a global meta-analysis to assess the prevalence and odds ratios (ORs) of T. gondii infection in immunocompromised individuals. Electronic databases were reviewed for T. gondii infection in HIV/AIDS patients, cancer patients, and transplant recipients, and meta-analyses were conducted to calculate overall estimated prevalence and ORs using random or fixed-effects models. Totally, 72 eligible studies were included. The estimated pooled prevalence of T. gondii infection in immunocompromised patients and the control was 35.9 and 24.7% (p < 0.001), with an OR of 2.24, i.e., 42.1 and 32.0% for HIV/AIDS patients and the control (p < 0.05), 26.0 and 12.1% for cancer patients and the control (p < 0.001), and 42.1 and 34.5% for transplant recipients and the control (p > 0.05), whose estimated pooled ORs were 1.92 (95% CI, 1.44–2.55), 2.89 (95% CI, 2.36–3.55), and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.16–1.95), respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate that the immunocompromised patients are associated with higher odds of T. gondii infection, and appropriate prevention and control measures are highly recommended for these susceptible populations. PMID:28337191

  8. Anticipating the Unpredictable: A Review of Antimicrobial Stewardship and Acinetobacter Infections.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Eric; Goff, Debra A; Humphries, Romney; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2017-03-04

    Acinetobacter remains one of the most challenging pathogens in the field of infectious diseases owing primarily to the uniqueness and multiplicity of its resistance mechanisms. This resistance often leads to devastatingly long delays in time to appropriate therapy and increased mortality for patients afflicted with Acinetobacter infections. Selecting appropriate empiric and definitive antibacterial therapy for Acinetobacter is further complicated by the lack of reliability in commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing devices and limited breakpoint interpretations for available agents. Existing treatment options for infections due to Acinetobacter are limited by a lack of robust efficacy and safety data along with concerns regarding appropriate dosing, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets, and toxicity. Antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to combat this unpredictable pathogen through use of infection prevention, rapid diagnostics, antibiogram-optimized treatment regimens, and avoidance of overuse of antimicrobials. The drug development pipeline includes several agents with encouraging in vitro activity against Acinetobacter, but their place in therapy and contribution to the armamentarium against this pathogen remain to be defined. The objective of this review is to highlight the unique challenge of treating infections due to Acinetobacter and summarize recent literature regarding optimal antimicrobial treatment for this pathogen. The drug development pipeline is also explored for future potentially effective treatment options.

  9. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Janislei Gislei Dorociaki; Hoers, Hellen; Pott, Franciele Soares; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. Method: systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. Results: 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%), relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15) and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96). Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%), relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85) and number needed to treat 5. Conclusion: the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects. PMID:27508901

  10. Laparoscopic management of intra-abdominal infections: Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Tranà, Cristian; Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Saverio, Salomone Di; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Falcone, Chiara; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of intra abdominal infections. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed including studies where intra abdominal infections were treated laparoscopically. RESULTS: Early laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical technique for treating acute cholecystitis. The laparoscopic appendectomy has been demonstrated to be superior to open surgery in acute appendicitis. In the event of diverticulitis, laparoscopic resections have proven to be safe and effective procedures for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and may be performed without adversely affecting morbidity and mortality rates. However laparoscopic resection has not been accepted by the medical community as the primary treatment of choice. In high-risk patients, laparoscopic approach may be used for exploration or peritoneal lavage and drainage. The successful laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers for experienced surgeons, is demonstrated to be safe and effective. Regarding small bowel perforations, comparative studies contrasting open and laparoscopic surgeries have not yet been conducted. Successful laparoscopic resections addressing iatrogenic colonic perforation have been reported despite a lack of literature-based evidence supporting such procedures. In post-operative infections, laparoscopic approaches may be useful in preventing diagnostic delay and controlling the source. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy has a good diagnostic accuracy and enables to better identify the causative pathology; laparoscopy may be recommended for the treatment of many intra-abdominal infections. PMID:26328036

  11. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23(4):251-69. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) guideline. Back to Top Administration ... : Hospital Scope | Glossary | References | Site Map | Credits Freedom of ...

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis of hepatitis C virus infection and HIV viral load: new insights into epidemiologic synergy

    PubMed Central

    Petersdorf, Nicholas; Ross, Jennifer M; Weiss, Helen A; Barnabas, Ruanne V; Wasserheit, Judith N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV infection frequently co-occur due to shared transmission routes. Co-infection is associated with higher HCV viral load (VL), but less is known about the effect of HCV infection on HIV VL and risk of onward transmission. Methods We undertook a systematic review comparing 1) HIV VL among ART-naïve, HCV co-infected individuals versus HIV mono-infected individuals and 2) HIV VL among treated versus untreated HCV co-infected individuals. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis and quantified heterogeneity using the I2 statistic. We followed Cochrane Collaboration guidelines in conducting our review and PRISMA guidelines in reporting results. Results and discussion We screened 3925 articles and identified 17 relevant publications. A meta-analysis found no evidence of increased HIV VL associated with HCV co-infection or between HIV VL and HCV treatment with pegylated interferon-alpha-2a/b and ribavirin. Conclusions This finding is in contrast to the substantial increases in HIV VL observed with several other systemic infections. It presents opportunities to elucidate the biological pathways that underpin epidemiological synergy in HIV co-infections and may enable prediction of which co-infections are most important to epidemic control. PMID:27649908

  13. Beyond Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) and Delirium: A Systematic Review of UTIs and Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chae, Jung Hee Jennifer; Miller, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. Although comorbid UTI in geriatric patients with delirium or dementia is well known, the prevalence and scope of the association with other neuropsychiatric disorders is unclear. We performed a systematic review of the association between UTIs and delirium, dementia, psychotic disorders, and mood disorders in hospitalized patients. We identified studies by searching PubMed, PsycInfo, and Web of Knowledge, and the reference lists of identified studies and review papers. Seventeen publications met the inclusion criteria. The primary findings were: (1) 88% of publications reported a positive association between UTIs and neuropsychiatric disorders; (2) 47% reported that the clinical course of a neuropsychiatric disorder may be precipitated or exacerbated by a UTI; (3) the mean weighted prevalence of UTIs in subjects was 19.4% for delirium, 11.2% for dementia, 21.7% for nonaffective psychotic disorders, and 17.8% for mood disorders. Our findings, which must be interpreted carefully given the heterogeneity among the studies, suggest that UTIs are highly comorbid in hospitalized patients and may precipitate or exacerbate some neuropsychiatric disorders. The association extends beyond geriatric patients with delirium, affects males and females, and includes adults with psychotic and mood disorders. These findings underscore the important interface between physical and mental health. Potential underlying mechanisms are also reviewed, including complex interactions between the immune system and the brain.

  14. [The sexuality of HIV-infected-adolescents: literature review and thinking on the unthinkables of sexuality].

    PubMed

    Mergui, A; Giami, A

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this review was to analyze the scientific literature on the sexuality of HIV-positive adolescents. The first point was to identify how sexuality is addressed and secondly the impact of HIV infection on HIV-positive adolescents. Fifty-four articles were selected for this review. The review demonstrates that sexuality is mainly considered under the angle of sexual and reproductive behavior and preventive practices (condom use and contraception), based on questionnaire studies. Some studies investigated the physiological impact of HIV and its treatment, especially in relation to puberty. On the other hand, the subjective experience of an HIV-positive status among adolescents was rarely studied. Overall, HIV has a negative impact on the sexual life of HIV-positive adolescents. The vast majority of them practice sexual abstinence, notably adolescents infected through mother-to-child contamination, for whom the access to sexuality seems to be delayed. Among those who are sexually active, nearly one-half continue having unprotected sex. The problems related to living with HIV induce a climate of anxiety and dissatisfaction that affects behaviors and sexual practices, and disrupts the quality of sexual life. Some results suggest that the type and mode of contamination has an effect on the general sexual experience of being an HIV-positive adolescent. More research should be developed to study the subjective experience of HIV-positive adolescent sexuality and its impact on sexual experience according to the type of contamination in this population.

  15. Evidence-based measures to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Daniele Cristina; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Higashi, Giovana Dorneles Callegaro; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify evidence-based care to prevent CLABSI among adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. Method: systematic review conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf and Cochrane Studies addressing care and maintenance of central venous catheters, published from January 2011 to July 2014 were searched. The 34 studies identified were organized in an instrument and assessed by using the classification provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Results: the studies presented care bundles including elements such as hand hygiene and maximal barrier precautions; multidimensional programs and strategies such as impregnated catheters and bandages and the involvement of facilities in and commitment of staff to preventing infections. Conclusions: care bundles coupled with education and the commitment of both staff and institutions is a strategy that can contribute to decreased rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections among adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units. PMID:27598378

  16. Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Review of Current Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Johnathan; Nguyen, Douglas; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection carries a significant clinical burden in the United States, affecting more than 4.6 million Americans. Untreated chronic HCV infection can result in cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous interferon based treatment carried low rates of success and significant adverse effects. The advent of new generation oral antiviral therapy has led to major improvements in efficacy and tolerability but has also resulted in an explosion of data with increased treatment choice complexity. Treatment guidelines are constantly evolving due to emerging regimens and real world treatment data. There also still remain subpopulations for whom current treatments are lacking or unclearly defined. Thus, the race for development of HCV treatment regimens still continues. This review of the current literature will discuss the current recommended treatment strategies and briefly overview next generation agents. PMID:27293521

  17. [Prevention of surgical site infection in abdominal surgery. A critical review of the evidence].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Tovar, Jaime; Badia, Josep M

    2014-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased morbidity, mortality and sanitary costs, and reduced patients quality of life. Many hospitals have adopted guidelines of scientifically-validated processes for prevention of surgical site and central-line catheter infections and sepsis. Most of these guidelines have resulted in an improvement in postoperative results. A review of the best available evidence on these measures in abdominal surgery is presented. The best measures are: avoidance of hair removal from the surgical field, skin decontamination with alcoholic antiseptic, correct use of antibiotic prophylaxis (administration within 30-60 min before incision, use of 1(st) or 2(nd) generation cephalosporins, single preoperative dosis, dosage adjustments based on body weight and renal function, intraoperative re-dosing if the duration of the procedure exceeds 2 half-lives of the drug or there is excessive blood loss), prevention of hypothermia, control of perioperative glucose levels, avoid blood transfusion and restrict intraoperative liquid infusion.

  18. Anti-infective potential of Citrus bergamia Risso et Poiteau (bergamot) derivatives: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cirmi, Santa; Bisignano, Carlo; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Navarra, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Infectious diseases remain among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly because of the increase of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Nature is the major source of anti-infective drugs and could represent a font of medicines that may help overcome antibiotic resistance. Recently, the potential antimicrobial effect of certain plant extracts has attracted attention within the scientific community as alternatives to synthetic drugs. Here, we present a systematic review on the anti-infective properties of bergamot derivatives that highlight the activity of bergamot essential oil against bacteria, mycetes and larvae, as well as the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of bergamot juice and the antimicrobial properties of extracts from bergamot peel. Findings presented herein could be used to develop novel and alternative preventive and therapeutic strategies aimed to overcome antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Concise Review: Next-Generation Cell Therapies to Prevent Infections in Neutropenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brunck, Marion E. G.

    2014-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy is accompanied by an obligate period of neutropenia. Resulting bacterial and fungal infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients despite prophylactic antimicrobials and hematopoietic growth factor supplements. Replacing neutrophils in the patient through transfusion of donor cells is a logical solution to prevent fulminant infections. In the past, this strategy has been hampered by poor yield, inability to store collected cells, and possible donor morbidity caused by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor injections and apheresis. Today, neutrophil-like cells can be manufactured in the laboratory at the clinical scale from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells enriched from umbilical cord blood. This article reviews the rationale for focusing research efforts toward ex vivo neutrophil production and explores clinical settings for future trials. PMID:24598780

  20. The impact of multiple infections on wild animal hosts: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Frédéric; Morand, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Field parasitological studies consistently demonstrate the reality of polyparasitism in natural systems. However, only recently, studies from ecological and evolutionary fields have emphasised a broad spectrum of potential multiple infections-related impacts. The main goal of our review is to reunify the different approaches on the impacts of polyparasitism, not only from laboratory or human medical studies but also from field or theoretical studies. We put forward that ecological and epidemiological determinants to explain the level of polyparasitism, which regularly affects not only host body condition, survival or reproduction but also host metabolism, genetics or immune investment. Despite inherent limitations of all these studies, multiple infections should be considered more systematically in wildlife to better appreciate the importance of parasite diversity in wildlife, cumulative effects of parasitism on the ecology and evolution of their hosts. PMID:22957114

  1. Adiaspiromycosis Causing Respiratory Failure and a Review of Human Infections Due to Emmonsia and Chrysosporium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Deanna A.; Graybill, John R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old male who presented with respiratory distress that required mechanical ventilation. Transbronchial biopsy revealed adiaspores of the fungus Emmonsia crescens within granulomata, a condition known as adiaspiromycosis. The patient received amphotericin products and corticosteroids, followed by itraconazole, and made a full recovery. Emmonsia crescens is a saprobe with a wide distribution that is primarily a rodent pathogen. The clinical characteristics of the 20 cases of human pulmonary adiaspiromycosis reported since the last comprehensive case review in 1993 are described here, as well as other infections recently reported for the genus Emmonsia. Pulmonary adiaspiromycosis has been reported primarily in persons without underlying host factors and has a mild to severe course. It remains uncertain if the optimal management of severe pulmonary adiaspiromycosis is supportive or if should consist of antifungal treatment, corticosteroids, or a combination of the latter two. The classification of fungi currently in the genus Emmonsia has undergone considerable revision since their original description, including being grouped with the genus Chrysosporium at one time. Molecular genetics has clearly differentiated the genus Emmonsia from the Chrysosporium species. Nevertheless, there has been a persistent confusion in the literature regarding the clinical presentation of infection with fungi of these two genera; to clarify this matter, the reported cases of invasive Chrysosporium infections were reviewed. Invasive Chrysosporium infections typically occur in impaired hosts and can have a fatal course. Based on limited in vitro susceptibility data for Chrysosporium zonatum, amphotericin B is the most active drug, itraconazole susceptibility is strain-dependent, and fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine are not active. PMID:22259200

  2. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection using a multidisciplinary approach: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Kang, Evelyn; Roberts, Shelley; Lin, Frances; Morley, Nicola; Finigan, Tracey; Homer, Allison; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify and describe the strategies and processes used by multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to reduce surgical site infections (SSIs). Materials and methods An integrative review of the research literature was undertaken. Searches were conducted in April 2015. Following review of the included studies, data were abstracted using summary tables and the methodological quality of each study assessed using the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence guidelines by two reviewers. Discrepancies were dealt with through consensus. Inductive content analysis was used to identify and describe the strategies/processes used by multidisciplinary health care teams to prevent SSI. Results and discussion In total, 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 studies used quantitative methods, while a single study used qualitative interviews. The majority of the studies were conducted in North America. All quantitative studies evaluated multifaceted quality-improvement interventions aimed at preventing SSI in patients undergoing surgery. Across the 13 studies reviewed, the following multidisciplinary team-based approaches were enacted: using a bundled approach, sharing responsibility, and, adhering to best practice. The majority of studies described team collaborations that were circumscribed by role. None of the reviewed studies used strategies that included the input of allied health professionals or patient participation in SSI prevention. Conclusion Patient-centered interventions aimed at increasing patient participation in SSI prevention and evaluating the contributions of allied health professionals in team-based SSI prevention requires future research. PMID:26508870

  3. In the footsteps of Ernst Mach - A historical review of shock wave research at the Ernst-Mach-Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, H.

    The aim of this paper is to recall some of the historical work on shock waves and to give a brief survey of research activities at the Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI). Some fundamental results of Ernst Mach (1838 - 1916) are demonstrated and historical remarks are given to the shock tube as an important tool in shock wave research. The activity at EMI in this field was initiated by Prof. H. Schardin (1902 - 1965) in 1955 and has since been continued. Propagation processes of shock and blast waves, blast loading phenomena, shock attenuation, shock reflection at various surfaces, development of new types of blast simulators, electromagnetically driven T-tubes, precursor and decursor phenomena are only a few examples of research topics at EMI that will be discussed.

  4. Pulmonary tuberculosis in severely-malnourished or HIV-infected children with pneumonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A C; Faruque, Abu S G; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K; Hossain, Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-09-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/ very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  5. Epidemiological review of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans and animals in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Lopes, A P; Dubey, J P; Dardé, M-L; Cardoso, L

    2014-11-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide zoonosis. However, data from Portugal are limited and a considerable part of the literature is in Portuguese. Currently, the rate of congenital infection in Portugal is unknown, and almost nothing is known of sequelae of congenital toxoplasmosis. There is no recent general population-based serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii in humans in Portugal. In addition, there is little information on genetic characteristics of T. gondii in animals and humans. In the present paper, we review prevalence, clinical spectrum and epidemiology of T. gondii in humans and animals in Portugal. This knowledge should be useful to biologists, public health workers, physicians and veterinarians.

  6. Solitary Endobronchial Papilloma with Malignant Transformation and Concomitant TB Infection: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We are reporting a case of solitary endobronchial papilloma located in posterior segment of the left upper lobe of the lung with malignant transformation and negative human papilloma virus (HPV) strains in a 40-year-old Saudi nonsmoker man. The patient had a concomitant tuberculosis (TB) infection. The patient received appropriate treatment in the form of anti-TB medication and surgical resection of the squamous cell carcinoma followed by chemotherapy. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence, resulting in a complete cure. We are reporting the case as well as a literature review related to the topic. PMID:28270942

  7. Child sexual abuse and sexually transmitted infections: review of joint genitourinary medicine and paediatric examination practice.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, M; Long, S; Srivastava, O P

    2008-05-01

    Joint examination by doctors with complementary skills and screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are recommended in children who may have been sexually abused or have been found to have an STI. Our study showed that criminal proceedings were more likely to be brought in cases with physical signs of sexual abuse. It could be difficult to prove whether sexual abuse had taken place or not with microbiological evidence alone, in the absence of other evidence. Significance of viral STIs in the context of sexual abuse should be evaluated carefully. The review of our practice re-enforced the importance of joint examination of children with suspected STIs.

  8. Cystoisospora belli Infection of the Gallbladder in Immunocompetent Patients: A Clinicopathologic Review of 18 Cases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keith K; Goyne, Hannah E; Hernandez-Gonzalo, David; Miller, Kennon A; Tuohy, Marion; Procop, Gary W; Lamps, Laura W; Patil, Deepa T

    2016-08-01

    Cystoisospora belli, previously known as Isospora belli, is an obligate intracellular coccidian parasite that is most often associated with gastrointestinal disease in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we detail the clinicopathologic features of 18 cases of Cystoisospora infection affecting the gallbladder in immunocompetent individuals and compare them with a control group. Each case was reviewed for cholecystitis (none, acute, chronic), epithelial disarray, presence of intraepithelial lymphocytes (none, rare [≤5 per 20 epithelial cells], present [>5 per 20 epithelial cells]), architectural distortion, intramucosal eosinophilia, and mural thickening/serositis. The mean age of patients with Cystoisospora infection was 33 years and the male to female ratio 1:4.3. Cholecystectomy was performed for biliary dyskinesia (n=7), abdominal pain (n=7), suspected cholelithiasis (n=5), and cholecystitis (n=3). In 2 cases, Cystoisospora was found in donor gallbladders resected at the time of liver transplantation. Each case was characterized by eosinophilic, oval or banana-shaped intraepithelial parasites within perinuclear parasitophorous vacuoles. Most cases showed epithelial disarray and minimal intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Of the 11 cases with an average follow-up of 15 months, none had evidence of disease related to Cystoisospora infection within the biliary tract or elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We present the largest series of gallbladder cystoisosporiasis in immunocompetent patients to date. Cystoisospora infection is underrecognized in the gallbladders of immunocompetent patients, in part due to the subtle findings in routine cholecystectomy specimens. On the basis of the clinical follow-up, gallbladder cystoisosporiasis in immunocompetent individuals appears to be a self-limited infection.

  9. Common Sports-Related Infections: A Review on Clinical Pictures, Management and Time to Return to Sports

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Alijani, Neda; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    There is a relationship between exercise and changes in immunity. So athletes are prone to different medical problems such as injuries and infections. Infection is an important medical problem which could be a reason for athletes’ absence from training. The relationship between physical activity and immune system, characteristics of different types of infections in athletes with emphasis on special clinical presentations or complications, time to return to physical activity and training and strategies to prevent development and transmission of infections in athletes or physically active people are the main topics of this review. PMID:24868426

  10. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection and Jewish Ritual Circumcision With Oral Suction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Leas, Brian F; Umscheid, Craig A

    2015-06-01

    Jewish ritual circumcision rarely but occasionally includes a procedure involving direct oral suction of the wound, which can expose an infant to infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). This practice has provoked international controversy in recent years, but no systematic review of the clinical literature has previously been published. We designed this review to identify and synthesize all published studies examining the association between circumcision with direct oral suction and HSV-1 infection. Our search strategy identified 6 published case series or case reports, documenting 30 cases between 1988 and 2012. Clinical findings were consistent with transmission of infection during circumcision, although the evidence base is limited by the small number of infections and incomplete case data. Published evidence suggests that circumcision with direct oral suction has resulted in severe neonatal illness and death from HSV-1 transmission, but further research is necessary to clarify the risk of infection.

  11. Incidence of surgical site infection following caesarean section: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Richard A; Corcoran, Paul; O'Neill, Sinéad M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Caesarean section (CS) rates have increased globally during the past three decades. Surgical site infection (SSI) following CS is a common cause of morbidity with reported rates of 3–15%. SSI represents a substantial burden to the health system including increased length of hospitalisation and costs of postdischarge care. The definition of SSI varies with the postoperative follow-up period among different health systems, resulting in differences in the reporting of SSI incidence. We propose to conduct the first systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the pooled estimate for the overall incidence of SSI following CS. Methods and analysis We will perform a comprehensive search to identify all potentially relevant published studies on the incidence of SSI following CS reported from 1992 in the English language. Electronic databases including PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE and Scopus will be searched using a detailed search strategy. Following study selection, full-text paper retrieval, data extraction and synthesis, we will appraise study quality and risk of bias and assess heterogeneity. Incidence data will be combined where feasible in a meta-analysis using Stata software and fixed-effects or random-effects models as appropriate. This systematic review will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as this review will use published data. The review will evaluate the overall incidence of SSI following CS and will provide the first quantitative estimate of the magnitude of SSI. It will serve as a benchmark for future studies, identify research gaps and remaining challenges, and emphasise the need for appropriate prevention and control measures for SSI post-CS. A manuscript reporting the results of the systematic review and meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal and presented at scientific conferences

  12. College Students, Shared Decision Making, and the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyer, Kristina; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This systematic review examines shared decision making to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics for college students with respiratory tract infections. Participants/Methods: CINAL, Cochrane, PubMed, EBSCO, and PsycNET were searched in October 2014 using the following criteria: English language, human subjects, peer-reviewed, shared…

  13. Behavioural Interventions for the Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Young People Aged 13-19 Years: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picot, Joanna; Shepherd, Jonathan; Kavanagh, Josephine; Cooper, Keith; Harden, Angela; Barnett-Page, Elaine; Jones, Jeremy; Clegg, Andrew; Hartwell, Debbie; Frampton, Geoff K.

    2012-01-01

    We systematically reviewed school-based skills building behavioural interventions for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections. References were sought from 15 electronic resources, bibliographies of systematic reviews/included studies and experts. Two authors independently extracted data and quality-assessed studies. Fifteen randomized…

  14. Clinical review: Respiratory failure in HIV-infected patients - a changing picture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory failure in HIV-infected patients is a relatively common presentation to ICU. The debate on ICU treatment of HIV-infected patients goes on despite an overall decline in mortality amongst these patients since the AIDS epidemic. Many intensive care physicians feel that ICU treatment of critically ill HIV patients is likely to be futile. This is mainly due to the unfavourable outcome of HIV patients with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia who need mechanical ventilation. However, the changing spectrum of respiratory illness in HIV-infected patients and improved outcome from critical illness remain under-recognised. Also, the awareness of certain factors that can affect their outcome remains low. As there are important ethical and practical implications for intensive care clinicians while making decisions to provide ICU support to HIV-infected patients, a review of literature was undertaken. It is notable that the respiratory illnesses that are not directly related to underlying HIV disease are now commonly encountered in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. The overall incidence of P. jirovecii as a cause of respiratory failure has declined since the AIDS epidemic and sepsis including bacterial pneumonia has emerged as a frequent cause of hospital and ICU admission amongst HIV patients. The improved overall outcome of HIV patients needing ICU admission is related to advancement in general ICU care, including adoption of improved ventilation strategies. An awareness of respiratory illnesses in HIV-infected patients along with an appropriate diagnostic and treatment strategy may obviate the need for invasive ventilation and improve outcome further. HIV-infected patients presenting with respiratory failure will benefit from early admission to critical care for treatment and support. There is evidence to suggest that continuing or starting HAART in critically ill HIV patients is beneficial and hence should be considered after multidisciplinary

  15. Pro-Inflammatory Markers in Relation to Cardiovascular Disease in HIV Infection. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Alinda G.; Idris, Nikmah S.; Barth, Roos E.; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Grobbee, Diederick E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the past years many inflammatory markers have been studied in association with clinically manifest cardiovascular disease (CVD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in HIV-infected patients, to obtain insights in the increased cardiovascular risk observed in HIV infection. This systematic review provides an oversight of the current knowledge. Methods A search was performed in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane in July 2014, identifying all articles from 1996 onwards addressing the relation between inflammatory markers and CVD or CIMT in HIV-positive adults. Two authors, using predefined criteria, independently conducted the selection of articles, critical appraisal and extraction of the data. Analysis was focused on the immune markers that were most frequently assessed. The review protocol was registered in the PROSPERO database at 11 July 2014 (registration number CRD42014010516). This review was performed according to the PRISMA guideline. Findings Forty articles were selected; eight addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and thirty-two addressing CIMT. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and d-dimer were assessed most frequently in relation to the occurrence of CVD; in four out of eight studies. All three markers were positively related to CVD in three out of four studies. Studies addressing CIMT were too heterogeneous with respect to patient populations, inflammatory markers, CIMT measurement protocols and statistical methods to allow for a formal meta-analysis to obtain summary statistics. CRP, IL-6 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1) were the most studied markers in relation to CIMT. None of the inflammatory markers showed an association with CIMT. Interpretation This review showed a relation between some inflammatory markers and CVD, however, no consistent relation is observed for CIMT. Statistical approaches that yields effect estimates and standardized CIMT protocols should be chosen. Further research should focus

  16. Historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberg, H. E.

    It was a pleasure to learn, from a recent (May 4) issue of Eos, of the formation of a permanent Committee on History of Geophysics. There is a dire need for reference material, books, and articles on geophysical history.Let me recommend to them that they take a good look at the Dictionary of the History of Science (W.F. Bynum, E.J. Browne, Roy Porter (Eds.), Princeton University Press, 494 pp., 1981). What follows is not a book review, although it may appear so. It is meant to be a challenge to place geophysics on the map in historical context. In this book, hydrology is dealt with in one sentence under the heading ‘cycle,’ geomagnetism under ‘declination and dip,’ and its history ends with Edward Sabine. Seismology appears under earthquakes. No important seismologist is mentioned. In the biographical index, Wiechert is included only for a contribution to physics. Where are Sir Harold Jeffreys, Galitzin, Gutenberg, Mohorovičić, Lehman, and many others? Meteorology ends with V. Bjerknes and Solberg; Köppen, Richardson, Rossby, and other notables [of] the last century do not seem to exist.

  17. Risk of Early-Onset Neonatal Infection with Maternal Infection or Colonization: A Global Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Grace J.; Lee, Anne CC; Baqui, Abdullah H.; Tan, Jingwen; Black, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Neonatal infections cause a significant proportion of deaths in the first week of life, yet little is known about risk factors and pathways of transmission for early-onset neonatal sepsis globally. We aimed to estimate the risk of neonatal infection (excluding sexually transmitted diseases [STDs] or congenital infections) in the first seven days of life among newborns of mothers with bacterial infection or colonization during the intrapartum period. Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and the World Health Organization Regional Databases for studies of maternal infection, vertical transmission, and neonatal infection published from January 1, 1960 to March 30, 2013. Studies were included that reported effect measures on the risk of neonatal infection among newborns exposed to maternal infection. Random effects meta-analyses were used to pool data and calculate the odds ratio estimates of risk of infection. Eighty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies (8.4%) were from high neonatal mortality settings. Considerable heterogeneity existed between studies given the various definitions of laboratory-confirmed and clinical signs of infection, as well as for colonization and risk factors. The odds ratio for neonatal lab-confirmed infection among newborns of mothers with lab-confirmed infection was 6.6 (95% CI 3.9–11.2). Newborns of mothers with colonization had a 9.4 (95% CI 3.1–28.5) times higher odds of lab-confirmed infection than newborns of non-colonized mothers. Newborns of mothers with risk factors for infection (defined as prelabour rupture of membranes [PROM], preterm <37 weeks PROM, and prolonged ROM) had a 2.3 (95% CI 1.0–5.4) times higher odds of infection than newborns of mothers without risk factors. Conclusions Neonatal infection in the first week of life is associated with maternal infection and colonization. High-quality studies, particularly from settings with high

  18. Prosthetic joint infections secondary to rapidly growing mycobacteria: Two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michael W; Miller, Andy O; Kahn, Barbara; Windsor, Russel E; Brause, Barry D

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are a rare but treatable cause of prosthetic joint infections. This study reports on two patients comprising three prosthetic joint infections caused by RGM successfully treated at the institution. With removal of the infected prosthetic joint and judicious use of prolonged courses of antibiotics, patients with prosthetic joint infections secondary to RGM can both be cured and retain function of the affected joint. In addition, this study identified 40 additional cases reported during an extensive review of the literature and provide a summary of these cases. These infections can present within days of arthroplasty or can develop only decades after the index surgery. The clinical presentations often mimic those of more routine bacterial prosthetic joint infections.

  19. Infection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-16

    inapparent infection. A refeeding program may thus become complicated by the sudden appearance of a life-threatening infectious illness (3). (3) The...Beisel, W. R. 23 Unusually low serum concentrations of inorganic phosphate have been reported in patients with gram-negative sepsis and in Reye’s syndrome ...infection should be corrected by a well-managed program of convalescent-period refeeding . This aspect of nutritional support is too often ignored. On the

  20. The expanding spectrum of human infections caused by Kocuria species: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Purty, Shashikala; Saranathan, Rajagopalan; Prashanth, K; Narayanan, K; Asir, Johny; Sheela Devi, Chandrakesan; Kumar Amarnath, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Although not previously known to cause human infections, Kocuria species have now emerged as human pathogens, mostly in compromised hosts with severe underlying disease. Recently, there has been an increasing incidence of different types of Kocuria infections reported, most likely due to the adoption of better identification methods. Here, we report a case of peritonitis caused by Kocuria rosea in a diabetic nephropathy patient who was on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Sepsis and peritonitis caused by K. rosea in our case yielded two identical Kocuria isolates from the peritoneal dialysate fluid within a period of three days. The infection was subsequently resolved by antibiotic treatment and catheter removal. In addition to reporting this case, we herein review the literature concerning the emergence of Kocuria as a significant human pathogen. The majority of cases were device-related, acquired in the hospital or endogenous, and different Kocuria species appear to share a common etiology of peritonitis. The overall disease burden associated with Kocuria appears to be high, and the treatment guidelines for diseases associated with Kocuria have not yet been clearly defined. PMID:26038440

  1. Disclosure of Their HIV Status to Infected Children: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Iregui, María C.; Malow, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996, HIV-infected children often survive beyond adolescence. To assess worldwide trends in disclosure since ART was introduced, we reviewed articles that refer to disclosure of their status to HIV-infected children, and which described patient, health care provider and/or caregiver opinions about disclosure and/or reported the proportion of children who knew their diagnosis. Most studies (17 [55%]) were performed in low- or middle-income (LMI) countries. In the 21 articles that included information on whether the children knew their status, the proportion who knew ranged from 1.2 to 75.0% and was lower in LMI (median = 20.4%) than industrialized countries (43%; p = 0.04). LMI country study participants who knew their status tended to have learned it at older ages (median = 9.6 years) than industrialized country participants (median = 8.3 years; p = 0.09). The most commonly reported anticipated risks (i.e. emotional trauma to child and child divulging status to others) and benefits (i.e. improved ART adherence) of disclosure did not vary by the country’s economic development. Only one article described and evaluated a disclosure process. Despite recommendations, most HIV-infected children worldwide do not know their status. Disclosure strategies addressing caregiver concerns are urgently needed. PMID:23070738

  2. Clinical review: new technologies for prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Cicalini, Stefania; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2004-06-01

    Intravascular catheters have become essential devices for the management of critically and chronically ill patients. However, their use is often associated with serious infectious complications, mostly catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), resulting in significant morbidity, increased duration of hospitalization, and additional medical costs. The majority of CRBSIs are associated with central venous catheters (CVCs), and the relative risk for CRBSI is significantly greater with CVCs than with peripheral venous catheters. However, most CVC-related infections are preventable, and different measures have been implemented to reduce the risk for CRBSI, including maximal barrier precautions during catheter insertion, catheter site maintenance, and hub handling. The focus of the present review is on new technologies for preventing infections that are directed at CVCs. New preventive strategies that have been shown to be effective in reducing risk for CRBSI, including the use of catheters and dressings impregnated with antiseptics or antibiotics, the use of new hub models, and the use of antibiotic lock solutions, are briefly described.

  3. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A infection in a low endemicity country: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ba'; Duval, Bernard; De Serres, Gaston; Gilca, Vladimir; Tricco, Andrea C; Ochnio, Jan; Scheifele, David W

    2005-01-01

    Background In Canada – a low endemicity country, vaccines for hepatitis A virus (HAV) are currently recommended to individuals at increased risk for infection or its complications. Applying these recommendations is difficult because the epidemiology of HAV infection is poorly defined, complex, and changing. This systematic review aimed to 1) estimate age-specific prevalence of HAV antibody in Canada and 2) evaluate infection-associated risk factors. Methods MEDLINE (1966–2005) and EMBASE (1980–2005) were searched to identify relevant studies for the systematic review. Archives for the Canada Diseases Weekly Report (1975–1991) and Canada Communicable Disease Report (1992–2005) were searched for relevant public health reports. Data were abstracted for study and participants' characteristics, age-specific prevalence, and risk factors. Results A total of 36 reports describing 34 unique studies were included. The seroprevalence in Canadian-born children was approximately 1% in ages 8–13, 1–6% in 20–24, 10% in 25–29, 17% in 30–39, and increased subsequently. In age groups below 20 and 20–29, age-specific seroprevalence generally remained constant for studies conducted across geographic areas and over time. Compared to Canadian-born individuals, subjects born outside Canada were approximately 6 times more likely to be seropositive (relative risk: 5.7 [95% CI 3.6, 9.0]). Travel to high risk areas in individuals aged 20–39 was associated with a significant increase in anti-HAV seropositivity (RR 2.8 [1.4, 5.5]). Compared to heterosexuals, men having sex with men were only at a marginally higher risk (adjusted odds ratio 2.4 [0.9, 6.1]). High risk for seropositivity was also observed for Canadian First Nations and Inuit populations. Conclusion Results from the current systematic review show that in this low endemicity country, disease acquisition occurs in adulthood rather than childhood. The burden of disease is high; approximately 1 in 10 Canadians

  4. Randomized controlled trials of antibiotics for neonatal infections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kaguelidou, Florentia; Turner, Mark A; Choonara, Imti; van Anker, John; Manzoni, Paolo; Alberti, Corinne; Langhendries, Jean-Paul; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Aims Antibiotics are a key resource for the management of infectious diseases in neonatology and their evaluation is particularly challenging. We reviewed medical literature to assess the characteristics and quality of randomized controlled trials on antibiotics in neonatal infections. Methods We performed a systematic search of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library from January 1995 to March 2010. Bibliographies of relevant articles were also hand-searched. We included all randomized controlled trials that involved neonates and evaluated the use of an antibiotic agent in the context of a neonatal infectious disease. Methodological quality was evaluated using the Jadad scale and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for inclusion and evaluated methodological quality. Results A total of 35 randomized controlled trials were evaluated. The majority were conducted in a single hospital institution, without funding. Median sample size was 63 (34–103) participants. The most frequently evaluated antibiotic was gentamicin. Respectively, 18 (51%) and 17 (49%) trials evaluated the therapeutic or prophylactic use of antibiotics in various neonatal infections. Overall, the methodological quality was poor and did not improve over the years. Risk of bias was high in 66% of the trials. Conclusions Design and reporting of randomized controlled trials of antibacterial agents in neonates should be improved. Nevertheless, the necessity of implementing such trials when antibacterial efficacy has already been established in other age groups may be questioned and different methods of evaluation should be further developed. PMID:23488627

  5. A systematic review of biomarkers in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Snipsøyr, Magnus G; Ludvigsen, Maja; Petersen, Eskild; Wiggers, Henrik; Honoré, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Timely diagnosis of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE) is crucial, as mortality remains high in this severe bacterial infection, currently without any distinct biological markers. Our goal was to evaluate potential diagnostic biomarkers by reviewing current literature. The MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for articles published from 1980 through June 2015 restricted to English, Norwegian, Danish and Swedish. Eighteen studies qualified, providing a review of the most promising candidates for future studies. Several studies are inconclusive, since they are characterized by using improper control groups. Patients with IE have bacteremia, and control groups should therefore be patients with bacteremia without IE. Based on current research, N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) alone or in combination with Cystatin C (Cys C), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), troponins, aquaporin-9 (AQP9), S100 calcium binding protein A11 (S100A11), E-selectin (CD62E) and VCAM-1 (CD54) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are potential biomarkers for future studies.

  6. Histoplasmosis: a new endemic fungal infection in China? Review and analysis of cases.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Chen, Min; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2013-05-01

    Histoplasmosis occurs in specific endemic areas, including the mid-western United States, Africa and most of Latin America. Sporadic cases have also been reported in China. The aim of this study was to summarise the epidemiological and clinical data of histoplasmosis in China. We searched the PubMed, CBMdisk and CNKI databases to identify publications related to histoplasmosis in China. Case reports/series on patients with histoplasmosis were included. A comprehensive literature review identified additional cases. The relevant material was evaluated and reviewed. Overall, 300 cases of histoplasmosis were reported in China from 1990 to 2011, and 75% were from regions through which the Yangtze River flows. Most of the patients were autochthonous infections. Of these, 43 patients had pulmonary histoplasmosis and 257 patients had disseminated histoplasmosis. Common underlying diseases included HIV infection, diabetes mellitus and liver diseases. Fever was the most frequently reported clinical feature in disseminated histoplasmosis, followed by splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Cases of histoplasmosis had a prominent geographical distribution in China. Histoplasmosis should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with relevant symptoms and a history of travel to or residence in these areas.

  7. Diabetes and Risk of Surgical Site Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily T; Kaye, Keith S; Knott, Caitlin; Nguyen, Huong; Santarossa, Maressa; Evans, Richard; Bertran, Elizabeth; Jaber, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the independent association between diabetes and surgical site infection (SSI) across multiple surgical procedures. DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS Studies indexed in PubMed published between December 1985 and through July 2015 were identified through the search terms "risk factors" or "glucose" and "surgical site infection." A total of 3,631 abstracts were identified through the initial search terms. Full texts were reviewed for 522 articles. Of these, 94 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Standardized data collection forms were used to extract study-specific estimates for diabetes, blood glucose levels, and body mass index (BMI). A random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate pooled estimates, and meta-regression was used to evaluate specific hypothesized sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS The primary outcome was SSI, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria. The overall effect size for the association between diabetes and SSI was odds ratio (OR)=1.53 (95% predictive interval [PI], 1.11-2.12; I2, 57.2%). SSI class, study design, or patient BMI did not significantly impact study results in a meta-regression model. The association was higher for cardiac surgery 2.03 (95% PI, 1.13-4.05) compared with surgeries of other types (P=.001). CONCLUSIONS These results support the consideration of diabetes as an independent risk factor for SSIs for multiple surgical procedure types. Continued efforts are needed to improve surgical outcomes for diabetic patients. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):88-99.

  8. Ceftaroline fosamil for community-acquired pneumonia and skin and skin structure infections: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Turgeon, Ricky D; Wilby, Kyle John

    2017-02-01

    Background Ceftaroline is a parentally administered cephalosporin that has an in vitro expanded spectrum of activity compared with other cephalosporins yet data is conflicting regarding its place in therapy. Aim of the Review To compare the efficacy and safety of ceftaroline against standard antibiotic regimens for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Method The databases of MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Embase were searched up to June 2016. Manual review of references was completed and experts in the field were contacted for unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials of ceftaroline in CAP or cSSSI populations were included. Outcomes included clinical cure, mortality, adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Meta-analysis was used to pool results for these outcomes. We performed subgroup analyses for gram positive infections in CAP and infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in cSSSIs. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies. Results Six trials (three for each indication) were included, each of which had an unclear or high risk of bias in at least one domain. For CAP, ceftaroline was significantly more efficacious in achieving clinical cure than ceftriaxone [risk ratio (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.19; I(2) = 47%]. For cSSSIs, there was no significant difference in clinical cure between ceftaroline and vancomycin plus aztreonam (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I(2) = 0%). No differences were found for overall mortality, serious adverse events, discontinuation due to adverse events, and overall adverse events. Conclusion Ceftaroline is a viable therapeutic alternative for patients with CAP and cSSSIs, yet identified risks of bias and poor external validity preclude it from being recommended as a first-line agent.

  9. Infection prevention and control of Clostridium difficile: a global review of guidelines, strategies, and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Balsells, Evelyn; Filipescu, Teodora; Kyaw, Moe H.; Wiuff, Camilla; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of health care–associated infections. Given the high incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI) and the lack of primary prevention through immunization, health care professionals should be aware of the most current guidance, as well as strengths and limitations of the evidence base underpinning this guidance. Methods We identified publicly available national or organizational guidelines related to CDI infection and prevention control (IPC) published between 2000 and 2015 and for any health care setting through an internet search using the Google search engine. We reviewed CDI–targeted IPC recommendations and describe the assessment of evidence in available guidelines. Results We identified documents from 28 countries/territories, mainly from acute care hospitals in North America, the Western Pacific, and Europe (18 countries). We identified only a few specific recommendations for long–term care facilities (LTCFs) and from countries in South America (Uruguay and Chile), South East Asia (Thailand), and none for Africa or Eastern Mediterranean. Of 10 IPC areas, antimicrobial stewardship was universally recognized as essential and supported by high quality evidence. Five other widely reported “strong” recommendations were: effective environment cleaning (including medical equipment), case isolation, use of personal protective equipment, surveillance, and education. Several unresolved and emerging issues were documented and currently available evidence was classified mainly as of mixed quality. Conclusion Our review underlines the need for targeted CDI IPC guidelines in several countries and for LTCFs. International harmonisation on the assessment of the evidence for best practices is needed as well as more robust evidence to support targeted recommendations. PMID:28028434

  10. Use of Silver in the Prevention and Treatment of Infections: Silver Review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kristin T.; Rosenberger, Laura H.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of silver for the treatment of various maladies or to prevent the transmission of infection dates back to at least 4000 b.c.e. Medical applications are documented in the literature throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. The bactericidal activity of silver is well established. Silver nitrate was used topically throughout the 1800s for the treatment of burns, ulcerations, and infected wounds, and although its use declined after World War II and the advent of antibiotics, Fox revitalized its use in the form of silver sulfadiazine in 1968. Method Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Results Since Fox's work, the use of topical silver to reduce bacterial burden and promote healing has been investigated in the setting of chronic wounds and ulcers, post-operative incision dressings, blood and urinary catheter designs, endotracheal tubes, orthopedic devices, vascular prostheses, and the sewing ring of prosthetic heart valves. The beneficial effects of silver in reducing or preventing infection have been seen in the topical treatment of burns and chronic wounds and in its use as a coating for many medical devices. However, silver has been unsuccessful in certain applications, such as the Silzone heart valve. In other settings, such as orthopedic hardware coatings, its benefit remains unproved. Conclusion Silver remains a reasonable addition to the armamentarium against infection and has relatively few side effects. However, one should weigh the benefits of silver-containing products against the known side effects and the other options available for the intended purpose when selecting the most appropriate therapy. PMID:23448590

  11. Zika virus infection during pregnancy and microcephaly occurrence: a review of literature and Brazilian data.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, Newton Sérgio; De Carvalho, Beatriz Freitas; Fugaça, Cyllian Arias; Dóris, Bruna; Biscaia, Evellyn Silverio

    2016-01-01

    In November of 2015, the Ministry of Health of Brazil published an announcement confirming the relationship between Zika virus and the microcephaly outbreak in the Northeast, suggesting that infected pregnant women might have transmitted the virus to their fetuses. The objectives of this study were to conduct a literature review about Zika virus infection and microcephaly, evaluate national and international epidemiological data, as well as the current recommendations for the health teams. Zika virus is an arbovirus, whose main vector is the Aedes sp. The main symptoms of the infection are maculopapular rash, fever, non-purulent conjunctivitis, and arthralgia. Transmission of this pathogen occurs mainly by mosquito bite, but there are also reports via the placenta. Microcephaly is defined as a measure of occipto-frontal circumference being more than two standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. The presence of microcephaly demands evaluation of the patient, in order to diagnose the etiology. Health authorities issued protocols, reports and notes concerning the management of microcephaly caused by Zika virus, but there is still controversy about managing the cases. The Ministry of Health advises notifying any suspected or confirmed cases of children with microcephaly related to the pathogen, which is confirmed by a positive specific laboratory test for the virus. The first choice for imaging exam in children with this malformation is transfontanellar ultrasound. The most effective way to control this outbreak of microcephaly probably caused by this virus is to combat the vector. Since there is still uncertainty about the period of vulnerability of transmission via placenta, the use of repellents is crucial throughout pregnancy. More investigations studying the consequences of this viral infection on the body of newborns and in their development are required.

  12. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote. Part II: Original plant source of crude drug wood creosote].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Wood creosote is a medicine that has been listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) since the first edition published in 1886. Medicines containing wood creosote and other natural ingredients have been very popular in Japan and Southeast Asian countries. In Japan, one such medicine, named Seirogan, has been used for more than 100 years. In this paper, we report the results of our examination on the historical aspects of wood creosote. One finding was that creosote, called "kereosote" at that time, was imported to Japan for the first time to Nagasaki by Johann Erdewin Niemann, who was the Director of the Dutch Mercantile House, and prescribed by Johannes Lijdius Catharinus Pompe van Meerdervoort and Anthonius Franciscus Bauduin. From our findings, we concluded that wood creosote was one of the essential medicines for the successful introduction and progression of Western medicine in Japan. Furthermore, we found that Dutch physicians introduced wood creosote to Japanese physicians, including Taizen Sato, Dokai Hayashi, and Jun Matsumoto, and that wood creosote was subsequently popularized by Rintaro (Ogai) Mori during the Russo-Japanese war. In addition, we examined the original plant for wood creosote, and consequently confirmed that the 15th edition of the JP, Supplement Two, clarifying the original plant for wood creosote, matches the pharmaceutical and historical facts. We also provide drug information relating to distinguishing between wood creosote and the creosote bush.

  13. Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strunz, Eric C.; Addiss, David G.; Stocks, Meredith E.; Ogden, Stephanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventive chemotherapy represents a powerful but short-term control strategy for soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Since humans are often re-infected rapidly, long-term solutions require improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively summarize the relationship between WASH access or practices and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the associations of improved WASH on infection with STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm [Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus], and Strongyloides stercoralis). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and LILACS were searched from inception to October 28, 2013 with no language restrictions. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they provided an estimate for the effect of WASH access or practices on STH infection. We assessed the quality of published studies with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. A total of 94 studies met our eligibility criteria; five were randomized controlled trials, whilst most others were cross-sectional studies. We used random-effects meta-analyses and analyzed only adjusted estimates to help account for heterogeneity and potential confounding respectively. Use of treated water was associated with lower odds of STH infection (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% CI 0.36–0.60). Piped water access was associated with lower odds of A. lumbricoides (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.39–0.41) and T. trichiura infection (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.45–0.72), but not any STH infection (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.28–3.11). Access to sanitation was associated with decreased likelihood of infection with any STH (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.57–0.76), T. trichiura (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50–0.74), and A. lumbricoides (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.88), but not with hookworm infection (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.61–1.06). Wearing shoes was associated with reduced

  14. Prolongation of length of stay and Clostridium difficile infection: a review of the methods used to examine length of stay due to healthcare associated infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is believed that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) contributes to a prolongation of length of stay (LOS). Recent literature suggests that models previously used to determine LOS due to infection have overestimated LOS, compared to newer statistical models. The purpose of this review is to understand the impact that CDI has on LOS and in doing so, describe the methodological approaches used. Aim First, to investigate and describe the reported prolongation of LOS in hospitalised patients with CDI. Second, to describe the methodologies used for determining excess LOS. Methods An integrative review method was used. Papers were reviewed and analysed individually and themes were combined using integrative methods. Results Findings from all studies suggested that CDI contributes to a longer LOS in hospital. In studies that compared persons with and without CDI, the difference in the LOS between the two groups ranged from 2.8days to 16.1days. Potential limitations with data analysis were identified, given that no study fully addressed the issue of a time-dependent bias when examining the LOS. Recent literature suggests that a multi-state model should be used to manage the issue of time-dependent bias. Conclusion Studies examining LOS attributed to CDI varied considerably in design and data collected. Future studies examining LOS related to CDI and other healthcare associated infections should consider capturing the timing of infection in order to be able to employ a multi-state model for data analysis. PMID:22958238

  15. Cognitive impairment in HIV and HCV co-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Renata; Pereira, Marco; Bucur, Mihaela; Fisher, Martin; Whale, Richard; Rusted, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive impairment has been well documented in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infections. However, in the context of HIV/HCV co-infection the research is more limited. The aim of this systematic review was to describe the characteristics of cognitive impairment in HIV/HCV co-infection and to examine the differences in cognitive performance between HIV/HCV and HIV and HCV mono-infected patients. Of the 437 records initially screened, 24 papers met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis. Most studies indicated that HIV/HCV co-infected patients had a higher level of cognitive impairment than HIV mono-infected patients. Meta-analysis also indicated that HIV mono-infected patients had a significantly lower global deficit score than co-infected patients. The results also indicated that co-infected patients were more likely to be impaired in information processing speed than HIV mono-infected patients. These findings can be challenged by biasing factors such as the small number of included studies, heterogeneity of the samples and a large diversity of methodological procedures. Future research with consistent and comprehensive neuropsychological batteries and covering a greater diversity of risk factors is needed, in order to clarify the effects of both viruses on cognitive function and the mechanisms that underlie these effects. Because cognitive impairments may pose significant challenges to medication adherence, quality of life and overall functioning, such knowledge may have important implications to the planning and implementation of effective interventions aimed at optimising the clinical management of these infections.

  16. Cognitive impairment in HIV and HCV co-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Renata; Pereira, Marco; Bucur, Mihaela; Fisher, Martin; Whale, Richard; Rusted, Jennifer

    2015-11-05

    Cognitive impairment has been well documented in HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infections. However, in the context of HIV/HCV co-infection the research is more limited. The aim of this systematic review was to describe the characteristics of cognitive impairment in HIV/HCV co-infection and to examine the differences in cognitive performance between HIV/HCV and HIV and HCV mono-infected patients. Of the 437 records initially screened, 24 papers met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis. Most studies indicated that HIV/HCV co-infected patients had a higher level of cognitive impairment than HIV mono-infected patients. Meta-analysis indicated, however, that HIV mono-infected patients had a significantly higher global deficit score than co-infected patients. The results also indicated that co-infected patients were more likely to be impaired in information processing speed than HIV mono-infected patients. These findings can be challenged by biasing factors such as the small number of studies, heterogeneity of the samples, and a large diversity of methodological procedures. Future research with consistent and comprehensive neuropsychological batteries and covering a greater diversity of risk factors is needed, in order to clarify the effects of both viruses on cognitive function and the mechanisms that underlie these effects. Because cognitive impairments may pose significant challenges to medication adherence, quality of life and overall functioning, such knowledge may have important implications to the planning and implementation of effective interventions aimed at optimising the clinical management of these infections.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum Infection Status among Children with Schistosoma in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Degarege, Abraham; Degarege, Dawit; Veledar, Emir; Erko, Berhanu; Nacher, Mathieu; Beck-Sague, Consuelo M.; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that Schistosoma infection may be associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection or related reduction in haemoglobin level, but the nature of this interaction remains unclear. This systematic review synthesized evidence on the relationship of S. haematobium or S. mansoni infection with the occurrence of P. falciparum malaria, Plasmodium density and related reduction in haemoglobin level among children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methodology/Principal findings A systematic review in according with PRISMA guidelines was conducted. All published articles available in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and CINAHL databases before May 20, 2015 were searched without any limits. Two reviewers independently screened, reviewed and assessed all the studies. Cochrane Q and Moran’s I2 were used to assess heterogeneity and the Egger test was used to examine publication bias. The summary odds ratio (OR), summary regression co-efficient (β) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using a random-effects model. Out of 2,920 citations screened, 12 articles (five cross-sectional, seven prospective cohort) were eligible to be included in the systematic review and 11 in the meta-analysis. The 12 studies involved 9,337 children in eight SSA countries. Eight studies compared the odds of asymptomatic/uncomplicated P. falciparum infection, two studies compared the incidence of uncomplicated P. falciparum infection, six studies compared P. falciparum density and four studies compared mean haemoglobin level between children infected and uninfected with S. haematobium or S. mansoni. Summary estimates of the eight studies based on 6,018 children showed a higher odds of asymptomatic/uncomplicated P. falciparum infection in children infected with S. mansoni or S. haematobium compared to those uninfected with Schistosoma (summary OR: 1.82; 95%CI: 1.41, 2.35; I2: 52.3%). The increase in odds of asymptomatic/uncomplicated P. falciparum infection among

  18. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature.

  19. Historical review of personnel dosimetry development and its use in radiation protection programs at Hanford 1944 to the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1987-02-01

    This document is an account of the personnel dosimetry programs as they were developed and practiced at Hanford from their inception in 1943 to 1944 to the 1980s. This history is divided into sections covering the general categories of external and internal measurement methods, in vivo counting, radiation exposure recordkeeping, and calibration of personnel dosimeters. The reasons and circumstances surrounding the inception of these programs at Hanford are discussed. Information about these programs was obtained from documents, letters, and memos that are available in our historical records; the personnel files of many people who participated in these programs; and from the recollections of many long-time, current, and past Hanford employees. For the most part, the history of these programs is presented chronologically to relate their development and use in routine Hanford operations. 131 refs., 38 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Schistosomiasis Prevalence and Intensity of Infection in Latin America and the Caribbean Countries, 1942-2014: A Systematic Review in the Context of a Regional Elimination Goal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2012 the World Health Assembly adopted resolution WHA65.21 on elimination of schistosomiasis, calling for increased investment in schistosomiasis control and support for countries to initiate elimination programs. This study aims to analyze prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma mansoni infection in children in Latin America and the Caribbean countries and territories (LAC), at the second administrative level or lower. Methodology A systematic review of schistosomiasis prevalence and intensity of infection was conducted by searching at PubMed, LILACS and EMBASE. Experts on the topic were informally consulted and institutional web pages were reviewed (PAHO/WHO, Ministries of Health). Only SCH infection among children was registered because it can be a ‘proxi-indicator’ of recent transmission by the time the study is conducted. Principal Findings One hundred thirty two full-text articles met the inclusion criteria and provided 1,242 prevalence and 199 intensity of infection data points. Most of them were from Brazil (69.7%). Only Brazil published studies after 2001, showing several 'hot spots' with high prevalence. Brazil, Venezuela, Suriname and Saint Lucia need to update the epidemiological status of schistosomiasis to re-design their national programs and target the elimination of Schistosoma mansoni transmission by 2020. In Antigua and Barbuda, Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Montserrat and Puerto Rico schistosomiasis transmission may be interrupted. However the compilation of an elimination dossier and follow-up surveys, per WHO recommendations, are needed to verify that status. Hence, the burden of subtle SCH chronic infection may be still present and even high in countries that may have eliminated transmission. Heterogeneity in the methodologies used for monitoring and evaluating the progress of the schistosomiasis programs was found, making cross-national and chronological comparisons difficult. Conclusions There is a need for

  1. Lactobacillus coryniformis Causing Pulmonary Infection in a Patient with Metastatic Small Cell Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of Literature on Lactobacillus Pleuro-Pulmonary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varsha; Mohi, Gursimran Kaur; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacilli are normal commensals of the gastrointestinal and female genital tract. Due to its low virulence these bacteria are known to cause opportunistic infections. They cause mostly bacteraemia with or without endocarditis and rarely cause pleuro-pulmonary infection. We report a case of Lactobacillus coryniformis pleuro-pulmonary infection and review 14 previously reported cases of lactobacilli causing pleuro-pulmonary infections. Our patient had small cell carcinoma with metastasis. All the 14 cases had pre-existing risk factors like immunosuppresion, cancer or chronic disease. There was no consensus on choice of antimicrobial agents to be used. Different species of lactobacilli were involved. Available susceptibility data showed that lactobacilli species were more susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, gentamycin, and clindamycin and decreased to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim–sulphamethoxazole. Isolation of Lactobacillus species from a case of pleuro-pneumonia infection could be a marker of poor long-term prognosis. The diagnosis of these infections requires both microbiologist and clinical correlation to rule out contamination.

  2. Soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium fortuitum following acupuncture: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Patiño, Armando; Sandoval de Mora, Marisol; Farreras, Aileen; Rivera-Olivero, Ismar; Fermin, Danibeth; de Waard, Jacobus H

    2010-09-03

    We report the first case of a post-acupuncture soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium fortuitum. Two months after finishing an acupuncture treatment session, an immunocompetent 23-year-old woman developed cellulitis at the side of the needle insertions and the acid-fast bacillus was isolated from a closed abscess. The patient was successfully treated with a proper drug combination. We review the literature concerning the infection source and the risks for skin and soft tissue infection due to mycobacteria after acupuncture. The infection source in most cases is unknown but is probably associated with the inadequate sterilization of the needles or the puncture site. We show that these infections are not rare but difficult to diagnose. To avoid delays in the definitive diagnosis, infection with mycobacteria should be considered for skin and soft tissue infections, in particular late-onset infections, which are negative for routine bacterial cultures and without a clinical response to antibiotics used for acute pyogenic infections. Bacterial cultures from this lesion should be maintained for at least six weeks before discharged as negative.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and atopic diseases: Is there a relationship? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore; Lanzafame, Angela; Garozzo, Maria Teresa; Filippelli, Martina; Tomarchio, Stefania; Ferrara, Viviana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Catassi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To review and conduct a meta-analysis of the existing literature on the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), atopy and allergic diseases. METHODS: Studies published in English assessing the prevalence of atopy and/or allergic diseases in patients with H. pylori infection and the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with atopy and/or allergic diseases were identified through a MEDLINE search (1950-2014). Random-effect model was used for the meta-analysis. RESULTS: Pooled results of case-control studies showed a significant inverse association of H. pylori infection with atopy/allergic disease or with exclusively atopy, but not with allergic disease, whereas pooled results of cross-sectional studies showed only a significant association between allergic disease and H. pylori infection. CONCLUSION: There is some evidence of an inverse association between atopy/allergic diseases and H. pylori infection, although further studied are needed. PMID:25516679

  4. The molecular mechanism of human resistance to HIV-1 infection in persistently infected individuals--a review, hypothesis and implications.

    PubMed

    Becker, Yechiel

    2005-08-01

    Resistance to HIV-1 infection in Europeans is associated with a mutation in the gene that codes for the CCR5 protein that is present in Th2 cells and serves as a coreceptor for HIV-1 R5 strain. A deletion of 32 amino acids from the cytokine receptor prevents infection. This mutation prevails in Europeans and is absent in Africans. However, duplication of a gene that codes for a chemokine that binds to the CCR5 was discovered in Africans (mean gene copy 6 while in non-Africans the mean gene copy is 3). Higher expression of these genes protects T cells against HIV-1 infection in vitro. It should be noted that resistance to HIV-1 R5 variant does not protect against HIV-1 R4 variant. It was reported that a minority of highly HIV-1 exposed African professional sex workers (APSW) were resistant to the virus infection during a 10 years period. Recently, the analysis of the cytokines in the serum of the persistently infected seronegative women revealed that the latter hypo-expresses the cytokine IL-4. Since the molecular events during HIV-1 infection are associated with a marked increase in the levels of IL-4 and IgE in the sera of the infected individuals, it suggests that AIDS is an allergy. Thus, a very low level of IL-4 production may abrogate the virus infection. Studies on the human IL-4 gene revealed that together with the IL-4 mRNA a spliced variant with a deletion of exon 2 is synthesized. The latter is a natural antagonist of IL-4 and when expressed in an individual at a level higher than IL-4, the person will resist a microbial infection (e.g. Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or asthma. The present hypothesis suggests that the HIV-1 resistant APSWs produce more IL-4 delta 2 molecules than IL-4 molecules. The binding of IL-4 delta 2 to IL-4 receptors on T and B cells prevents their functions and the infection by HIV-1. The implications of these studies are that treatment of HIV-1 infected people with drugs that will block the IL-4 receptors will stop HIV-1 infections

  5. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  6. A review of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in the treatment of addictions: historical perspectives and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Liester, Mitchell B

    2014-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a semisynthetic compound with strong psychoactive properties. Chemically related to serotonin, LSD was initially hypothesized to produce a psychosislike state. Later, LSD was reported to have benefits in the treatment of addictions. However, widespread indiscriminate use and reports of adverse affects resulted in the classification of LSD as an illicit drug with no accepted medical use. This article reviews LSD's storied history from its discovery, to its use as a research tool, followed by its widespread association with the counterculture movement of the 1960s, and finally to its rebirth as a medicine with potential benefits in the treatment of addictions. LSD's pharmacology, phenomenology, effects at neurotransmitter receptors, and effects on patterns of gene expression are reviewed. Based upon a review of the literature, it is concluded that further research into LSD's potential as a treatment for addictions is warranted.

  7. Genital streptococcal infection in non-pregnant women: a case-note review.

    PubMed

    Sonnex, C

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this case-note review was to examine the clinical features and management of women with either vulval or vaginal swabs culturing positive for streptococci. Group B haemolytic streptococcus was isolated in all cases. The majority of women with vulval streptococci presented with irritation or soreness. Candidal infection was found in 43% and a dermatosis in 27%. All women with positive vaginal culture had vaginal soreness and/or discharge. Candida was isolated in 27% and there were features of desquamative vaginitis in 20%. Women treated with erythromycin failed to improve symptomatically. The findings of this study suggest that streptococci mostly play a secondary role and colonize an already damaged genital epithelium.

  8. Pharmacological therapy used in the elimination of Helicobacter pylori infection: A review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ariolana A; Carvalho, Adriana A

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection should combine a high cure rate and a short treatment duration with a favorable side-effect profile and should maintain a low cost. Several strategies have been proposed to increase the H. pylori eradication rate, including the extension of the treatment duration to 14 d, the use of a four-drug regimen (quadruple, sequential, and concomitant treatments), and the use of novel antibiotics, such as levofloxacin. However, triple therapy remains the most widely accepted first-line treatment regimen in Brazil and the United States and throughout Europe. Because this therapy is limited by resistance to clarithromycin, other therapeutic regimens have been investigated worldwide. This review describes the current literature involving studies directly comparing these different therapies and their efficacies. PMID:25574087

  9. Infection-related mental and inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia: literature review and presentation of two cases.

    PubMed

    Morse, D R

    1997-07-01

    A review of the literature on infection-related mental and inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia is given. This is followed by 2 case reports. The first case is of a mandibular left second molar in which a chloropercha overfill puff occurred in the vicinity of the inferior alveolar canal. The tooth remained asymptomatic until 2 and 1/2 yr later, when the periapical lesion enlarged and swelling, pain, and paresthesia developed. The paresthesia resolved 2 weeks following periapical surgery. The second case is of a mandibular right first premolar in which paresthesia began 1 day after the initial endodontic treatment. The intracanal medication was formocresol on a cotton pellet that was squeezed dry. The paresthesia was treated by irrigation, antibiotics, and dexamethasone. The paresthesia lasted 7 weeks, and when it resolved the root canal was filled with gutta-percha/eucapercha. Almost 9 months later, the tooth remained asymptomatic.

  10. The epidemiology of HIV infection in Morocco: systematic review and data synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumjian, S P; Mumtaz, G R; Hilmi, N; Zidouh, A; El Rhilani, H; Alami, K; Bennani, A; Gouws, E; Ghys, P D; Abu-Raddad, L J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Morocco has made significant strides in building its HIV research capacity. Based on a wealth of empirical data, the objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic literature review and analytical synthesis of HIV epidemiological evidence in this country. Data were retrieved using three major sources of literature and data. HIV transmission dynamics were found to be focused in high-risk populations, with female sex workers (FSWs) and clients contributing the largest share of new HIV infections. There is a pattern of emerging epidemics among some high-risk populations, and some epidemics, particularly among FSWs, appear to be established and stable. The scale of the local HIV epidemics and populations affected show highly heterogeneous geographical distribution. To optimize the national HIV response, surveillance and prevention efforts need to be expanded among high-risk populations and in geographic settings where low intensity and possibly concentrated HIV epidemics are emerging or are already endemic. PMID:23970764

  11. Infective agents in fixed human cadavers: a brief review and suggested guidelines.

    PubMed

    Demiryürek, Deniz; Bayramoğlu, Alp; Ustaçelebi, Semsettin

    2002-08-15

    Cadavers remain a principal teaching tool for anatomists and medical educators teaching gross anatomy. Infectious pathogens in cadavers that present particular risks include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C, the AIDS virus HIV, and prions that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS). It is often claimed that fixatives are effective in inactivation of these agents. Unfortunately cadavers, even though they are fixed, may still pose infection hazards to those who handle them. Specific safety precautions are necessary to avoid accidental disease transmission from cadavers before and during dissection and to decontaminate the local environment afterward. In this brief review, we describe the infectious pathogens that can be detected in cadavers and suggest safety guidelines for the protection of all who handle cadavers against infectious hazards.

  12. International guideline changes and the incidence of infective endocarditis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Omeair; Shafi, Ahmed Mohamed Abdel; Timmis, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact on incident infective endocarditis (IE) of guideline recommendations to restrict indications for antibiotic prophylaxis. We conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guideline. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published between 2007 and 2015 using mesh terms relevant to the research question. Included were English language articles published after 2009 that provided estimates of IE incidence before-and-after major international guideline changes. Seven studies were identified: 1 conducted in France, 4 in the USA and 2 in the UK. Only 1 study reported an increase in the rate of incident IE following guideline modification, and the remainder showed no change in upward (2 studies) or downward (4 studies) incidence trends. Study quality was generally poor for answering the question posed in this review, with serious risk of bias related to diagnostic ascertainment and unavailability of population risk data to adjust the incidence estimates. Moreover, the studies were often small, and relevant bacteriological data were not always available. Only 2 reported changes in antibiotic prescriptions, but these data were not linked to health records making it impossible to determine causal relations to changes in incident IE. The studies in this review were heterogenous in their design and variably limited by study size, duration of follow-up, diagnostic ascertainment, and absence of relevant prescription and bacteriological data. The studies were inconsistent in their conclusions and it remains uncertain what, if any, has been the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis guideline changes on the incidence of IE.

  13. International guideline changes and the incidence of infective endocarditis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Omeair; Shafi, Ahmed Mohamed Abdel; Timmis, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact on incident infective endocarditis (IE) of guideline recommendations to restrict indications for antibiotic prophylaxis. We conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guideline. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published between 2007 and 2015 using mesh terms relevant to the research question. Included were English language articles published after 2009 that provided estimates of IE incidence before-and-after major international guideline changes. Seven studies were identified: 1 conducted in France, 4 in the USA and 2 in the UK. Only 1 study reported an increase in the rate of incident IE following guideline modification, and the remainder showed no change in upward (2 studies) or downward (4 studies) incidence trends. Study quality was generally poor for answering the question posed in this review, with serious risk of bias related to diagnostic ascertainment and unavailability of population risk data to adjust the incidence estimates. Moreover, the studies were often small, and relevant bacteriological data were not always available. Only 2 reported changes in antibiotic prescriptions, but these data were not linked to health records making it impossible to determine causal relations to changes in incident IE. The studies in this review were heterogenous in their design and variably limited by study size, duration of follow-up, diagnostic ascertainment, and absence of relevant prescription and bacteriological data. The studies were inconsistent in their conclusions and it remains uncertain what, if any, has been the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis guideline changes on the incidence of IE. PMID:27621836

  14. Accuracy of administrative data for surveillance of healthcare-associated infections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Mourik, Maaike S M; van Duijn, Pleun Joppe; Moons, Karel G M; Bonten, Marc J M; Lee, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Measuring the incidence of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) is of increasing importance in current healthcare delivery systems. Administrative data algorithms, including (combinations of) diagnosis codes, are commonly used to determine the occurrence of HAI, either to support within-hospital surveillance programmes or as free-standing quality indicators. We conducted a systematic review evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of administrative data for the detection of HAI. Methods Systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane for relevant studies (1995–2013). Methodological quality assessment was performed using QUADAS-2 criteria; diagnostic accuracy estimates were stratified by HAI type and key study characteristics. Results 57 studies were included, the majority aiming to detect surgical site or bloodstream infections. Study designs were very diverse regarding the specification of their administrative data algorithm (code selections, follow-up) and definitions of HAI presence. One-third of studies had important methodological limitations including differential or incomplete HAI ascertainment or lack of blinding of assessors. Observed sensitivity and positive predictive values of administrative data algorithms for HAI detection were very heterogeneous and generally modest at best, both for within-hospital algorithms and for formal quality indicators; accuracy was particularly poor for the identification of device-associated HAI such as central line associated bloodstream infections. The large heterogeneity in study designs across the included studies precluded formal calculation of summary diagnostic accuracy estimates in most instances. Conclusions Administrative data had limited and highly variable accuracy for the detection of HAI, and their judicious use for internal surveillance efforts and external quality assessment is recommended. If hospitals and policymakers choose to rely on administrative data for HAI surveillance, continued

  15. Fusarium infection in lung transplant patients: report of 6 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Herman A; Coleman, Jeffrey J; Restrepo, Alejandro; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium is a fungal pathogen of immunosuppressed lung transplant patients associated with a high mortality in those with severe and persistent neutropenia. The principle portal of entry for Fusarium species is the airways, and lung involvement almost always occurs among lung transplant patients with disseminated infection. In these patients, the immunoprotective mechanisms of the transplanted lungs are impaired, and they are, therefore, more vulnerable to Fusarium infection. As a result, fusariosis occurs in up to 32% of lung transplant patients. We studied fusariosis in 6 patients following lung transplantation who were treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during an 8-year period and reviewed 3 published cases in the literature. Cases were identified by the microbiology laboratory and through discharge summaries. Patients presented with dyspnea, fever, nonproductive cough, hemoptysis, and headache. Blood tests showed elevated white blood cell counts with granulocytosis and elevated inflammatory markers. Cultures of Fusarium were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage, blood, and sputum specimens.Treatments included amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin, voriconazole, and posaconazole, either alone or in combination. Lung involvement occurred in all patients with disseminated disease and it was associated with a poor outcome. The mortality rate in this group of patients was high (67%), and of those who survived, 1 patient was treated with a combination of amphotericin B and voriconazole, 1 patient with amphotericin B, and 1 patient with posaconazole. Recommended empirical treatment includes voriconazole, amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B first-line, and posaconazole for refractory disease. High-dose amphotericin B is recommended for treatment of most cases of fusariosis. The echinocandins (for example, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin) are generally avoided because Fusarium species have intrinsic resistance to them. Treatment

  16. Infective keratitis in older patients: a 4 year review, 1998–2002

    PubMed Central

    Butler, T K H; Spencer, N A; Chan, C C K; Gilhotra, J Singh; McClellan, K

    2005-01-01

    Background/aim: There are few clinical series in the literature of infective keratitis in the elderly, even though this age group constitutes a significant proportion of those affected by this condition. The authors aimed to determine the incidence and risk factors for infective keratitis in those over 60 years, the causative organisms, antibiotic susceptibilities, visual and tectonic outcome, and surgical intervention rate. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients aged 60 years and over admitted to the Sydney Eye Hospital with a diagnosis of infective keratitis, between September 1998 and December 2002. Results: 190 patients were identified with a mean age of 75.5 (SD 9.6) years (range 60–101). Local risk factors were found in 93.7%, and systemic risk factors in 27.9%. Organisms were cultured in 62.8%, and 7.9% had positive herpes simplex virus (HSV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Perforation or severe thinning occurred in 36% overall, but in 80% with positive HSV PCR. Acute surgical intervention was required in 43.7%, with acute penetrating keratoplasty performed in 17.9%, and 8.9% required evisceration. Mean presenting visual acuity was 1.82 (SD 1.24), equivalent to 6/300, excluding 26.3% with vision of light perception (LP) or worse. Mean final visual acuity was 1.24 (SD 1.16), equivalent to 6/100, excluding 19.5% with vision of LP or worse (p<0.0005). Conclusions: The elderly represent a distinct clinical group in the context of microbial keratitis. Predisposing factors are very common, they present with poor vision, have a high complication and surgical intervention rate, and a poor visual outcome compared to younger patients. The microbiological spectrum is similar to younger age groups, except that HSV is more common and may increase the risk of severe corneal thinning and perforation. Most bacterial isolates remain sensitive to currently available antibiotic preparations. PMID:15834091

  17. Extragenital Infections Caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Philip A; Robinette, Ashley; Montgomery, Madeline; Almonte, Alexi; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Lonks, John R; Chapin, Kimberle C; Kojic, Erna M; Hardy, Erica J

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, sexually transmitted diseases due to Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae continue to be a major public health burden. Screening of extragenital sites including the oropharynx and rectum is an emerging practice based on recent studies highlighting the prevalence of infection at these sites. We reviewed studies reporting the prevalence of extragenital infections in women, men who have sex with men (MSM), and men who have sex only with women (MSW), including distribution by anatomical site. Among women, prevalence was found to be 0.6-35.8% for rectal gonorrhea (median reported prevalence 1.9%), 0-29.6% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.1%), 2.0-77.3% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.7%), and 0.2-3.2% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSM, prevalence was found to be 0.2-24.0% for rectal gonorrhea (median 5.9%), 0.5-16.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 4.6%), 2.1-23.0% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.9%), and 0-3.6% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSW, the prevalence was found to be 0-5.7% for rectal gonorrhea (median 3.4%), 0.4-15.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.2%), 0-11.8% for rectal chlamydia (median 7.7%), and 0-22.0% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.6%). Extragenital infections are often asymptomatic and found in the absence of reported risk behaviors, such as receptive anal and oral intercourse. We discuss current clinical recommendations and future directions for research.

  18. Micafungin: a review of its use in the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive Candida infections.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2012-11-12

    Intravenous micafungin (Mycamine®; Fungard®), an echinocandin, is approved in the EU for the treatment of adult (aged ≥ 16 years) and paediatric patients with invasive candidiasis and for the treatment of adult patients with oesophageal candidiasis. It is also approved in the EU as prophylactic treatment to prevent Candida infections in adult and paediatric patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) or patients who are expected to have neutropenia for ≥ 10 days. This article reviews the therapeutic use of micafungin for the treatment and prophylaxis of Candida infections in adult and paediatric patients, focusing on approved indications in Europe, and briefly discusses the pharmacology of the drug. Micafungin shows very good in vitro activity against clinically relevant isolates of Candida spp., with a low propensity to be associated with the emergence of resistant isolates. The drug has a convenient once-daily dosage regimen and is associated with relatively few drug-drug interactions. In large, multinational trials in adult and/or paediatric patients with invasive candidiasis, micafungin was noninferior to intravenous caspofungin or liposomal amphotericin B. In similarly designed trials in adult patients with oesophageal candidiasis, treatment with micafungin was noninferior to that with intravenous fluconazole or caspofungin. As prophylactic treatment in adult and paediatric patients who had undergone HSCT, micafungin was superior to fluconazole therapy and noninferior to oral itraconazole in large, multicentre trials. Micafungin was generally well tolerated by participants in these clinical trials, given the severe morbidity of the underlying conditions of patients, with a similar tolerability profile to caspofungin and, in general, to fluconazole. It was better tolerated than liposomal amphotericin B or oral itraconazole. Thus, micafungin is a valuable first-line or alternative option to other antifungal agents for the management of

  19. Extragenital Infections Caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Philip A.; Montgomery, Madeline; Almonte, Alexi; Lonks, John R.; Chapin, Kimberle C.; Kojic, Erna M.; Hardy, Erica J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, sexually transmitted diseases due to Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae continue to be a major public health burden. Screening of extragenital sites including the oropharynx and rectum is an emerging practice based on recent studies highlighting the prevalence of infection at these sites. We reviewed studies reporting the prevalence of extragenital infections in women, men who have sex with men (MSM), and men who have sex only with women (MSW), including distribution by anatomical site. Among women, prevalence was found to be 0.6–35.8% for rectal gonorrhea (median reported prevalence 1.9%), 0–29.6% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.1%), 2.0–77.3% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.7%), and 0.2–3.2% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSM, prevalence was found to be 0.2–24.0% for rectal gonorrhea (median 5.9%), 0.5–16.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 4.6%), 2.1–23.0% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.9%), and 0–3.6% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSW, the prevalence was found to be 0–5.7% for rectal gonorrhea (median 3.4%), 0.4–15.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.2%), 0–11.8% for rectal chlamydia (median 7.7%), and 0–22.0% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.6%). Extragenital infections are often asymptomatic and found in the absence of reported risk behaviors, such as receptive anal and oral intercourse. We discuss current clinical recommendations and future directions for research. PMID:27366021

  20. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Risk of Gastric Cancer in Korea: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the context of the global decrease in mortality due to gastric cancer, previous studies have reported that the effect of chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection on the incidence of gastric cancer varies among regions. This systematic review was conducted to investigate H. pylori as a risk factor for gastric cancer in Korea, where the incidence of gastric cancer is among the highest in the world. Methods: A search strategy was established to identify articles published in Korean as well as in English. Ultimately, we included observational studies conducted among Korean patients that designed with an age-matched and sex-matched control group that reported the odds ratio associated with H. pylori. Gastric cancer cases were subdivided into overall (OGC), cardia (CGC), non-cardia (NGC), early (EGC), advanced, intestinal (IGC), and diffuse forms of gastric cancer. Summary odds ratios (SORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in the meta-analysis using a random-effect model. Results: Eleven case-control studies were ultimately selected. H. pylori was associated with an SOR of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.29 to 2.54) for OGC. Additionally, statistically significant risks were observed for CGC, NGC, EGC, and IGC. Conclusions: Chronic H. pylori infection was found to raise the risk of gastric cancer among Koreans, with the highest risk observed for CGC and EGC (SOR=2.88 for both). Follow-up clinical epidemiologic studies are needed to assess the effects of current treatments aimed at eradicating H. pylori infections. PMID:27499162

  1. Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? Common Cold Flu Center How Many Doses of Flu Vaccine ... Cause Long-Term Hearing Loss? Chickenpox Cold Sores Common Cold Diarrhea Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Flu ...

  2. Nephrologists Hate the Dialysis Catheters: A Systemic Review of Dialysis Catheter Associated Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kavita

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old Egyptian female with end stage renal disease, one month after start of hemodialysis via an internal jugular catheter, presented with fever and shortness of breath. She developed desquamating vesiculobullous lesions, widespread on her body. She was in profound septic shock and broad spectrum antibiotics were started with appropriate fluid replenishment. An echocardiogram revealed bulky leaflets of the mitral valve with a highly mobile vegetation about 2.3 cm long attached to the anterior leaflet. CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed bilateral pleural effusions in the chest, with triangular opacities in the lungs suggestive of infarcts. There was splenomegaly with triangular hypodensities consistent with splenic infarcts. Blood cultures repeatedly grew Candida albicans. Despite parenteral antifungal therapy, the patient deteriorated over the course of 5 days. She died due to a subsequent cardiac arrest. Systemic review of literature revealed that the rate of infection varies amongst the various types of accesses, and it is well documented that AV fistulas have a much less rate of infection in comparison to temporary catheters. All dialysis units should strive to make a multidisciplinary effort to have a referral process early on, for access creation, and to avoid catheters associated morbidity.

  3. The impact of sporotrichosis in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José A S; Freitas, Dayvison F S; Lamas, Cristiane C

    2015-06-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection of man and animals caused by Sporothrix complex. It usually presents as a lymphocutaneous form, but disseminated disease may occur. Given the paucity of data about HIV/AIDS and sporotrichosis co-infection, a systematic review of reported cases of HIV-associated sporotrichosis found via Pubmed (1984-2013) was done. A total of 39 papers were included, and 58 patients' data analyzed. Thirty-three (56.9 %) cases were from Brazil and 18 (31 %) from the USA. Patients' mean age was 37.8 ± 10.4 years; males predominated (84.5 %). The median CD4(+) cell count was 97 cells/mm(3). The most common clinical forms were disseminated and disseminated cutaneous with 33 (56.9 %) and 10 (17.5 %) patients, respectively. There was a correlation between CD4(+) count and clinical categories (p = 0.002). Mortality was 30 % and there was a correlation between central nervous system involvement and death (p < 0.001).

  4. A systematic review of antiretroviral adherence interventions for HIV-infected people who use drugs.

    PubMed

    Binford, Meredith Camp; Kahana, Shoshana Y; Altice, Frederick L

    2012-12-01

    HIV-infected persons who use drugs (PWUDs) are particularly vulnerable for suboptimal combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence. A systematic review of interventions to improve cART adherence and virologic outcomes among HIV-infected PWUDs was conducted. Among the 45 eligible studies, randomized controlled trials suggested directly administered antiretroviral therapy, medication-assisted therapy (MAT), contingency management, and multi-component, nurse-delivered interventions provided significant improved short-term adherence and virologic outcomes, but these effects were not sustained after intervention cessation. Cohort and prospective studies suggested short-term increased cART adherence with MAT. More conclusive data regarding the efficacy on cART adherence and HIV treatment outcomes using cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, peer-driven interventions and the integration of MAT into HIV clinical care are warranted. Of great concern was the virtual lack of interventions with sustained post-intervention adherence and virologic benefits. Future research directions, including the development of interventions that promote long-term improvements in adherence and virologic outcomes, are discussed.

  5. Bulk milk ELISA and the diagnosis of parasite infections in dairy herds: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The bulk milk enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) is a rapid and inexpensive method of assessing herd exposure to pathogens that is increasingly being used for the diagnosis of parasite infections in dairy herds. In this paper, with the dairy herd health veterinarian in mind, we review the principles of the assay and the recent literature on the potential role of bulk milk ELISA for the diagnosis of ostertagiosis, fasciolosis, parasitic bronchitis due to cattle lung worm and neosporosis. It is generally accepted that assay results reflect exposure to the parasite rather than the presence of active infection. Bulk milk ELISA can be a useful tool for the veterinary practitioner as a component of a herd health monitoring programme or in the context of a herd health investigation. It can also play a role in regional or national surveillance programmes. However, the results need to be interpreted within the context of the herd-specific health management, the milk production pattern and the parasite life cycle. PMID:23883526

  6. Bulk milk ELISA and the diagnosis of parasite infections in dairy herds: a review.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Mary; Zintl, Annetta; Doherty, Michael L

    2013-07-25

    The bulk milk enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) is a rapid and inexpensive method of assessing herd exposure to pathogens that is increasingly being used for the diagnosis of parasite infections in dairy herds. In this paper, with the dairy herd health veterinarian in mind, we review the principles of the assay and the recent literature on the potential role of bulk milk ELISA for the diagnosis of ostertagiosis, fasciolosis, parasitic bronchitis due to cattle lung worm and neosporosis. It is generally accepted that assay results reflect exposure to the parasite rather than the presence of active infection. Bulk milk ELISA can be a useful tool for the veterinary practitioner as a component of a herd health monitoring programme or in the context of a herd health investigation. It can also play a role in regional or national surveillance programmes. However, the results need to be interpreted within the context of the herd-specific health management, the milk production pattern and the parasite life cycle.

  7. Posaconazole: a review of the gastro-resistant tablet and intravenous solution in invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2015-03-01

    Posaconazole (Noxafil(®)) is a triazole antifungal agent with an extended spectrum of antifungal activity. It is approved for the prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients with neutropenia or in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients undergoing high-dose immunosuppressive therapy for graft-versus-host disease, and for the treatment of fungal infections. The efficacy and good tolerability of posaconazole oral suspension administered three or four times daily is well established. However, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations associated with the suspension, a new gastro-resistant tablet and intravenous (IV) solution were developed. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic properties of the new posaconazole formulations and briefly summarizes efficacy data relating to the suspension. The pharmacokinetic advantages of the posaconazole gastro-resistant tablet compared with the suspension formulation include less interpatient variability, better systemic availability enabling once-daily administration, and absorption that is unaffected by changes in gastric pH or motility; in addition the tablets may be taken with or without food. The posaconazole tablet achieves higher and more consistent mean plasma concentrations than the suspension and, therefore, it is the preferred option to optimize efficacy in the prophylaxis or treatment of invasive fungal disease. The posaconazole IV solution provides an option for these same indications in patients who are unable to receive oral formulations.

  8. Economic and psychosocial impact of rotavirus infection in Spain: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Álvarez Aldeán, Javier; Aristegui, Javier; López-Belmonte, Juan Luis; Pedrós, Montse; Sicilia, José García

    2014-06-24

    Severe rotavirus gastroenteritis is common in children under 5 years of age. A literature review was performed to investigate the economic and psychosocial impact of rotavirus infection in children in this age group. We retrieved 56 articles on the economic burden of the disease in Europe, 18 of them reported data from Spain; 8 articles were retrieved analysing its psychosocial impact. In Spain, rotavirus is responsible for 14% to 30% of all cases of gastroenteritis, and a quarter of these require hospitalisation. It is also associated with high use of health care resources (emergency and primary care visits). Rotavirus gastroenteritis costs the Spanish national health system EUR 28 million a year and causes productivity loss in two-thirds of parents (mean of 4 days). Taking into account these costs, it was estimated that implementing universal vaccination could prevent 76% to 95% of hospital admissions due to rotavirus gastroenteritis, as well as reduce emergency and paediatric visits, nosocomial infections, and days missed from work (77% reduction). Rotavirus gastroenteritis also has a considerable psychosocial impact on the family, although it is difficult to compare results due to the diversity of study designs and the low specificity of the measurement tools used. It also causes high stress among parents, adding to their workload and adversely affecting their quality of life.

  9. Effects of prenatal infection on brain development and behavior: a review of findings from animal models.

    PubMed

    Boksa, Patricia

    2010-08-01

    Epidemiological studies with human populations indicate associations between maternal infection during pregnancy and increased risk in offspring for central nervous system (CNS) disorders including schizophrenia, autism and cerebral palsy. Since 2000, a large number of studies have used rodent models of systemic prenatal infection or prenatal immune activation to characterize changes in brain function and behavior caused by the prenatal insult. This review provides a comprehensive summary of these findings, and examines consistencies and trends across studies in an effort to provide a perspective on our current state of understanding from this body of work. Results from these animal modeling studies clearly indicate that prenatal immune activation can cause both acute and lasting changes in behavior and CNS structure and function in offspring. Across laboratories, studies vary with respect to the type, dose and timing of immunogen administration during gestation, species used, postnatal age examined and specific outcome measure quantified. This makes comparison across studies and assessment of replicability difficult. With regard to mechanisms, evidence for roles for several acute mediators of effects of prenatal immune activation has emerged, including circulating interleukin-6, increased placental cytokines and oxidative stress in the fetal brain. However, information required to describe the complete mechanistic pathway responsible for acute effects of prenatal immune activation on fetal brain is lacking, and no studies have yet addressed the issue of how acute prenatal exposure to an immunogen is transduced into a long-term CNS change in the postnatal animal. Directions for further research are discussed.

  10. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, A L; Bayas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines.

  11. The Potential Danger of Eating Wild Lettuce: A Brief Review of Human Rat Lungworm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anisowicz, Sarah K

    2014-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the causative agent of human rat lungworm disease, is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis worldwide and is endemic throughout Asia Pacific. It is acquired through the consumption of infected freshwater mollusks or contaminated produce. Human angiostrongyliasis is usually a self-limited disease presenting with headache and various neurologic sequelae varying from cranial nerve palsies to radiculitis and/or paresthesias. Fatal cases are rare, and manifest as fulminant meningomyeloencephalitis. The diagnosis is made through the use of clinical history, exam, and laboratory data including peripheral blood counts, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations, and serologic or molecular diagnostic techniques. Medical therapy is largely focused on symptomatic relief, and includes analgesics, lumbar puncture, and corticosteroids. In resource-limited settings, prevention is key, and the use of analgesics can provide symptomatic relief after infection. Efforts to increase disease awareness have been made in endemic areas, as evidenced by the recent Rat Lungworm Disease Scientific Workshop which was held in Honolulu in 2011. The proceedings of the workshop were published in a supplement to this journal (Hawaii J Med Public Health. Jun 2013;72(6):Supp 2). However, wilderness medicine and travel medicine specialists must also be aware of the disease, how it is contracted, its presentation, and treatment options should they encounter a patient who is in or has returned from an endemic area. This brief review highlights eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis, including an example case, an overview of its clinical presentation, treatment options, and prevention. PMID:25478300

  12. Native Brazilian plants against nosocomial infections: a critical review on their potential and the antimicrobial methodology.

    PubMed

    H Moreno, Paulo Roberto; da Costa-Issa, Fabiana Inácio; Rajca-Ferreira, Agnieszka K; Pereira, Marcos A A; Kaneko, Telma M

    2013-01-01

    The growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens have increased the attention on several medicinal plants and their metabolites for antimicrobial properties. These pathogens are the main cause of nosocomial infections which led to an increasing mortality among hospitalized patients. Taking into consideration those factors, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the research on antibacterial agents from native Brazilian plant species related to nosocomial infections as well as the current methods used in the investigations of the antimicrobial activity and points out the differences in techniques employed by the authors. The antimicrobial assays most frequently used were broth microdilution, agar diffusion, agar dilution and bioautography. The broth microdilution method should be the method of choice for testing new antimicrobial agents from plant extracts or isolated compounds due to its advantages. At the moment, only a small part of the rich Brazilian flora has been investigated for antimicrobial activity, mostly with unfractionated extracts presenting a weak or moderate antibacterial activity. The combination of crude extract with conventional antibiotics represents a largely unexploited new form of chemotherapy with novel and multiple mechanisms of action that can overcome microbial resistance that needs to be further investigated. The antibacterial activity of essential oil vapours might also be an interesting alternative treatment of hospital environment due to their ability in preventing biofilm formation. However, in both alternatives more studies should be done on their mode of action and toxicological effects in order to optimize their use.

  13. Clostridium Difficile Infection in Acute Care Hospitals: Systematic Review and Best Practices for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Louh, Irene K; Greendyke, William G; Hermann, Emilia A; Davidson, Karina W; Falzon, Louise; Vawdrey, David K; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Calfee, David P; Furuya, E Yoko; Ting, Henry H

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in acute-care hospitals is a priority for hospitals and clinicians. We performed a qualitative systematic review to update the evidence on interventions to prevent CDI published since 2009. DESIGN We searched Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, the ISI Web of Knowledge, and grey literature databases from January 1, 2009 to August 1, 2015. SETTING We included studies performed in acute-care hospitals. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS We included studies conducted on hospitalized patients that investigated the impact of specific interventions on CDI rates. INTERVENTIONS We used the QI-Minimum Quality Criteria Set (QI-MQCS) to assess the quality of included studies. Interventions were grouped thematically: environmental disinfection, antimicrobial stewardship, hand hygiene, chlorhexidine bathing, probiotics, bundled approaches, and others. A meta-analysis was performed when possible. RESULTS Of 3,236 articles screened, 261 met the criteria for full-text review and 46 studies were ultimately included. The average quality rating was 82% according to the QI-MQCS. The most effective interventions, resulting in a 45% to 85% reduction in CDI, included daily to twice daily disinfection of high-touch surfaces (including bed rails) and terminal cleaning of patient rooms with chlorine-based products. Bundled interventions and antimicrobial stewardship showed promise for reducing CDI rates. Chlorhexidine bathing and intensified hand-hygiene practices were not effective for reducing CDI rates. CONCLUSIONS Daily and terminal cleaning of patient rooms using chlorine-based products were most effective in reducing CDI rates in hospitals. Further studies are needed to identify the components of bundled interventions that reduce CDI rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:476-482.

  14. A Review of Clostridium difficile Infection at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Clare-Pascoe, N; Lee, MG; Murphy, T; Nicholson, A; Ferguson, TS

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: This study examined the frequency of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among hospital admission and diarrhoeal stool samples over a six-year period. Methods: A review of all suspected cases of C difficile positive patients from 2007 to 2012 at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Jamaica, was performed. Clostridium difficile infection was confirmed by clinical features and a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) stool test for Clostridium Toxins A and B. The demographics, clinical features, risk factors, treatment and outcomes were also collated. Results: There were 56 patients reviewed. The most commonly affected age group was 40–59 years of age. The proportion of CDI cases per total stool samples increased from 0.5% in 2007 to 5.9% in 2010 then fell to 2.2% in 2011 but increased again to 4.3% in 2012. The proportion of cases per total UHWI admissions also increased from 0.12 cases per 1000 admissions in 2007 to 1.16 in 2010 and 1.36 in 2012 (p < 0.001). Most CDI cases were nosocomial (76% males, 48.6% females). Co-morbidities included hypertension and end-stage renal disease. Ceftazidime was the most common antibiotic associated with the development of CDI. Resolution occurred in 62.5% of patients. Duration of hospital stay was longer in males than females (≥ 21 versus < 7 days) and males had more adverse outcomes, with death in 23.8% versus 11.4%. Conclusion: There has been an increase in the frequency of CDI at UHWI with a greater than expected frequency of community acquired CDI. Increased awareness is needed of the increasing risk for CDI and measures must be taken to prevent the disease, especially in hospitalized patients. PMID:26624597

  15. Risk Factors for Recurrence, Complications and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Abou Chakra, Claire Nour; Pepin, Jacques; Sirard, Stephanie; Valiquette, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can lead to complications, recurrence, and death. Numerous studies have assessed risk factors for these unfavourable outcomes, but systematic reviews or meta-analyses published so far were limited in scope or in quality. Methods A systematic review was completed according to PRISMA guidelines. An electronic search in five databases was performed. Studies published until October 2013 were included if risk factors for at least one CDI outcome were assessed with multivariate analyses. Results 68 studies were included: 24 assessed risk factors for recurrence, 18 for complicated CDI, 8 for treatment failure, and 30 for mortality. Most studies accounted for mortality in the definition of complicated CDI. Important variables were inconsistently reported, such as previous episodes and use of antibiotics. Substantial heterogeneity and methodological limitations were noted, mainly in the sample size, the definition of the outcomes and periods of follow-up, precluding a meta-analysis. Older age, use of antibiotics after diagnosis, use of proton pump inhibitors, and strain type were the most frequent risk factors for recurrence. Older age, leucocytosis, renal failure and co-morbidities were frequent risk factors for complicated CDI. When considered alone, mortality was associated with age, co-morbidities, hypo-albuminemia, leucocytosis, acute renal failure, and infection with ribotype 027. Conclusion Laboratory parameters currently used in European and American guidelines to define patients at risk of a complicated CDI are adequate. Strategies for the management of CDI should be tailored according to the age of the patient, biological markers of severity, and underlying co-morbidities. PMID:24897375

  16. Systematic Review of Factors Associated with Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Allison; McGrail, Kimberlyn; Patrick, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic use is a modifiable driver of antibiotic resistance. In many circumstances, antibiotic use is overly broad or unnecessary. We systematically assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTI). Studies were included if they used actual (not self-reported or intended) prescribing data, assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for RTIs, and performed multivariable analysis of associations. We searched Medline, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts using keyword and MeSH (medical subject headings) search terms. Two authors reviewed each abstract and independently appraised all included texts. Data on factors affecting antibiotic prescribing were extracted. Our searches retrieved a total of 2,848 abstracts, with 97 included in full-text review and 28 meeting full inclusion criteria. Compared to other factors, diagnosis of acute bronchitis was associated with increased antibiotic prescribing (range of adjusted odds ratios [aOR], 1.56 to 15.9). Features on physical exam, such as fever, purulent sputum, abnormal respiratory exam, and tonsillar exudate, were also associated with higher odds of antibiotic prescribing. Patient desire for an antibiotic was not associated or was modestly associated with prescription (range of aORs, 0.61 to 9.87), in contrast to physician perception of patient desire for antibiotics, which showed a stronger association (range of aORs, 2.11 to 23.3). Physician's perception of patient desire for antibiotics was strongly associated with antibiotic prescribing. Antimicrobial stewardship programs should continue to expand in the outpatient setting and should emphasize clear and direct communication between patients and physicians, as well as signs and symptoms that do and do not predict bacterial etiology of upper respiratory tract infections. PMID:27139474

  17. Mathematical models of radiation action on living cells: From the target theory to the modern approaches. A historical and critical review.

    PubMed

    Bodgi, Larry; Canet, Aurélien; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent; Lesne, Annick; Victor, Jean-Marc; Foray, Nicolas

    2016-04-07

    Cell survival is conventionally defined as the capability of irradiated cells to produce colonies. It is quantified by the clonogenic assays that consist in determining the number of colonies resulting from a known number of irradiated cells. Several mathematical models were proposed to describe the survival curves, notably from the target theory. The Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model, which is to date the most frequently used model in radiobiology and radiotherapy, dominates all the other models by its robustness and simplicity. Its usefulness is particularly important because the ratio of the values of the adjustable parameters, α and β, on which it is based, predicts the occurrence of post-irradiation tissue reactions. However, the biological interpretation of these parameters is still unknown. Throughout this review, we revisit and discuss historically, mathematically and biologically, the different models of the radiation action by providing clues for resolving the enigma of the LQ model.

  18. A historical review of managed honey bee populations in Europe and the United States and the factors that may affect them.

    PubMed

    Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Meixner, Marina Doris

    2010-01-01

    Honey bees are a highly valued resource around the world. They are prized for their honey and wax production and depended upon for pollination of many important crops. While globally honey bee populations have been increasing, the rate of increase is not keeping pace with demand. Further, honey bee populations have not been increasing in all parts of the world, and have declined in many nations in Europe and in North America. Managed honey bee populations are influenced by many factors including diseases, parasites, pesticides, the environment, and socio-economic factors. These factors can act alone or in combination with each other. This review highlights the present day value of honey bees, followed by a detailed description of some of the historical and present day factors that influence honey bee populations, with particular emphasis on colony populations in Europe and the United States.

  19. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  20. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  1. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  2. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  3. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  4. The burden of sepsis in critically ill human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients--a brief review.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, we have seen dramatic changes in morbi-mortality rates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. If on the one hand, the immunologic preservation-associated with the use of current antiretroviral therapy markedly diminishes the incidence of opportunistic infections, on the other hand it extended life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals similarly to the general population. However, the management of critically ill human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients remains challenging and troublesome for practicing clinician. Sepsis - a complex systemic inflammatory syndrome in response to infection - is the second leading cause of intensive care unit admission in both human immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected populations. Recent data have emerged describing a substantial burden of sepsis in the infected population, in addition, to a much poorer prognosis in this group. Many factors contribute to this outcome, including specific etiologies, patterns of inflammation, underlying immune dysregulation related to chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection and delays in prompt diagnosis and treatment. This brief review explores the impact of sepsis in the context of human immunodeficiency virus infection, and proposes future directions for better management and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus-associated sepsis.

  5. The DAIR (debridement, antibiotics and implant retention) procedure for infected total knee replacement – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Sultan Naseer; Swann, Andrew; Ashford, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and third most common cause of revision of TKA with significant morbidity and surgical challenges. Treatment options include non-operative measures with long term antibiotic suppression, debridement and implant retention (DAIR), one- or two-stage revision arthroplasty, arthrodesis and amputation. Implant retention without infection is ideal and DAIR has been reported to have variable success rates depending on patient factors, duration of infection, infecting micro-organisms, choice of procedure, single or multiple debridement procedures, arthroscopic or open, antibiotic choice and duration of antibiotic use. We present a thorough literature review of DAIR for infected TKA. The important factors contributing to failure are presence of sinus, immunocompromised patient, delay between onset of infection and debridement procedure, Staphylococcal infection in particular Meticillin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus, multiple debridement procedures, retention of exchangeable components and short antibiotic duration. In conclusion DAIR can be successful procedure to eradicate infection in TKA in selective patients with factors contributing to failure taken into account. PMID:28074774

  6. Are healthcare workers' mobile phones a potential source of nosocomial infections? Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ulger, Fatma; Dilek, Ahmet; Esen, Saban; Sunbul, Mustafa; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2015-10-29

    Mobile communication devices help accelerate in-hospital flow of medical information, information sharing and querying, and contribute to communications in the event of emergencies through their application and access to wireless media technology. Healthcare-associated infections remain a leading and high-cost problem of global health systems despite improvements in modern therapies. The objective of this article was to review different studies on the relationship between mobile phones (MPs) and bacterial cross-contamination and report common findings. Thirty-nine studies published between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. Of these, 19 (48.7%) identified coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), and 26 (66.7%) identified Staphylococcus aureus; frequency of growth varied. The use of MPs by healthcare workers increases the risk of repetitive cyclic contamination between the hands and face (e.g., nose, ears, and lips), and differences in personal hygiene and behaviors can further contribute to the risks. MPs are rarely cleaned after handling. They may transmit microorganisms, including multiple resistant strains, after contact with patients, and can be a source of bacterial cross-contamination. To prevent bacterial contamination of MPs, hand-washing guidelines must be followed and technical standards for prevention strategies should be developed.

  7. Fungal periprosthetic joint infection in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Oliver; Schoof, Benjamin; Klatte, Till Orla; Schmidl, Stefan; Fensky, Florian; Guenther, Daniel; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-03-03

    Fungal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A standardized procedure regarding an accurate treatment of this serious complication of knee arthroplasty is lacking. In this systematic review, we collected data from 36 studies with a total of 45 reported cases of a TKA complicated by a fungal PJI. Subsequently, an analysis focusing on diagnostic, medicaments and surgical procedures in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period was performed. Candida spp. accounts for about 80% (36 out of 45 cases) of fungal PJIs and is therefore the most frequently reported pathogen. A systemic antifungal therapy was administered in all but one patient whereas a local antifungal therapy, e.g. the use of an impregnated spacer, is of inferior relevance. Resection arthroplasty with delayed re-implantation (two-stage revision) was the surgical treatment of choice. However, in 50% of all reported cases the surgical therapy was heterogeneous. The outcome under a combined therapy was moderate with recurrent fungal PJI in 11 patients and subsequent bacterial PJI as a main complication in 5 patients. In summary, this systematic review integrates data from up to date 45 reported cases of a fungal PJI of a TKA. On the basis of the current literature strategies for the treatment of this devastating complication after TKA are discussed.

  8. Patterns of persistent HPV infection after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Sarah R; Le, Tam; Lockhart, Alexandre; Sanusi, Ayodeji; Dal Santo, Leila; Davis, Meagan; McKinney, Dana A; Brown, Meagan; Poole, Charles; Willame, Corinne; Smith, Jennifer S

    2017-01-25

    A systematic review of the literature was conducted to determine the estimates of and definitions for human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence in women following treatment of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). A total of 45 studies presented data on post-treatment HPV persistence among 6,106 women. Most studies assessed HPV persistence after loop excision (42%), followed by conization (7%), cryotherapy (11%), laser treatment (4%), interferon-alpha, therapeutic vaccination, and photodynamic therapy (2% each) and mixed treatment (38%). Baseline HPV testing was conducted before or at treatment for most studies (96%). Follow-up HPV testing ranged from 1.5 to 80 months after baseline. Median HPV persistence tended to decrease with increasing follow-up time, declining from 27% at 3 months after treatment to 21% at 6 months, 15% at 12 months, and 10% at 24 months. Post-treatment HPV persistence estimates varied widely and were influenced by patient age, HPV-type, detection method, treatment method, and minimum HPV post-treatment testing interval. Loop excision and conization appeared to outperform cryotherapy procedures in terms of their ability to clear HPV infection. This systematic review provides evidence for the substantial heterogeneity in post-treatment HPV DNA testing practices and persistence estimates.

  9. Clinical Significance of Molecular Diagnostic Tools for Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Nyirahabimana, Therese

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) represents any form of invasiveness of the blood circulatory system caused by bacteria and can lead to death among critically ill patients. Thus, there is a need for rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with septicemia. So far, different molecular diagnostic tools have been developed. The majority of these tools focus on amplification based techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which allows the detection of nucleic acids (both DNA and small RNAs) that are specific to bacterial species and sequencing or nucleic acid hybridization that allows the detection of bacteria in order to reduce delay of appropriate antibiotic therapy. However, there is still a need to improve sensitivity of most molecular techniques to enhance their accuracy and allow exact and on time antibiotic therapy treatment. In this regard, we conducted a systematic review of the existing studies conducted in molecular diagnosis of bBSIs, with the main aim of reporting on clinical significance and benefits of molecular diagnosis to patients. We searched both Google Scholar and PubMed. In total, eighteen reviewed papers indicate that shift from conventional diagnostic methods to molecular tools is needed and would lead to accurate diagnosis and treatment of bBSI. PMID:27974890

  10. The effect of qigong exercise on immunity and infections: a systematic review of controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Wen; Ng, Siu-Man; Ho, Rainbow T H; Ziea, Eric T C; Wong, Vivian C W; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize and critically evaluate the clinical evidence of the effect of qigong exercise on immunity and its efficacy in the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases. Thirteen databases were searched from their respective inceptions through January 2011, and all controlled clinical trials of qigong exercise on immunity and infections were included. Quality and validity of the included studies were evaluated using standard scales. Seven studies including two randomized controlled trials (RCTs), two controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and three retrospective observational studies (ROSs) met the inclusion criteria. One study focused on functional measures of immunity (antigen-induced immunity) and six studies on enumerative parameters of immunity. No study on clinical symptoms relevant to infectious diseases could be identified. Overall, the included studies suggested favorable effects of qigong exercise on immunity, but the quality of research for most of the studies examined in this review was poor. Further rigorously designed studies are required, which should adhere to accepted standards of methodology for clinical trials.

  11. Skin Infections in Young People (Aged 14-18 Years): An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambe, Catherine I.; Hoare, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    Skin infections are a major cause of preventable hospitalization, with young people being particularly susceptible. Community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA) infection typically presents as skin infection. CA-MRSA infection rates have increased rapidly in the past decade. Exploration of literature…

  12. The dosimetry system DS86 and the neutron discrepancy in Hiroshima--historical review, present status, and future options.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Kellerer, A M; Korschinek, G; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Rugel, G; Kato, K; Nolte, E

    1998-12-01

    The historical development of the dosimetry systems for Hiroshima and Nagasaki is outlined from the time immediately after the A-bomb explosions to the publication of the dosimetry system DS86 in 1987, and the present status of the so-called Hiroshima neutron discrepancy is summarized. Several long-lived radionuclides are discussed with regard to their production by neutrons from the A-bomb explosions. With the exception of 63Ni, these radionuclides have not, up to now, been measured in samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Two of them, 63Ni in copper samples and 39Ar in granite samples, were predominantly produced by fast neutrons. 63Ni can be determined by accelerator mass spectrometry with a gas-filled analyzing magnet. It should be measurable, in the near future, in copper samples up to 1500 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. 39Ar can be measured in terms of low-level beta-counting. This should be feasible up to a distance of about 1000 m from the hypocenter. Three radionuclides, 10Be, 14C, and 59Ni, were produced predominantly by thermal neutrons with smaller fractions due to the epithermal and fast neutrons, which contribute increasingly more at larger distances from the hypocenter. State-of-the-art accelerator mass spectrometry is likely to permit the determination of 10Be close to the hypocenter and of 14C up to a distance of about 1000 m. 59Ni should be detectable up to a distance of about 1000 m in terms of accelerator mass spectrometry with a gas-filled magnet. The measurements of 10Be, 14C, 39Ar, 59Ni -- and potentially of 131Xe -- can be performed in the same granitic sample that was already analyzed for 36Cl, 41Ca, 6Co, 152Eu, and 154Eu. This will provide extensive information on the neutron spectrum at the specified location, and similarly complete analyses can conceivably be performed on granite samples at other locations.

  13. Elements for an historical review of the 3 June, 1932 tsunami on the coast of Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, L.; Castillo-Aja, M. R.; Estrada-Trejo, M.

    2011-12-01

    On the morning of June 22, 1932 a series of waves between 8 and 10 meters penetrated a mile inland, destroying the town of Cuyutlán in the state of Colima (Mexico), until today it is regarded as one of the strongest tsunamis that have struck the coast of western Mexico in the last 150 years. However, two weeks earlier, on June 3, occurred the largest magnitude earthquake recorded in Mexico (8.2 ms) that cause damages in much of Jalisco, Colima and Nayarit states. The earthquake also produced a tsunami, so far underestimated, and described only as "a wave" that reached the top of the dune in Barra de Navidad (Cumming, 1932), was "observed in the coasts" of Cuyutlán and Manzanillo (Colima), and that caused some damage to Barra de Navidad (Jalisco) and San Blas (Nayarit) (Farreras et al., 1993). The seashore between these two points covers a coastline of over 300 km in length that did not receive any mention . This area, sparsely populated and inaccessible, was hit by a tsunami and its calls for help took so long to be heard that the damage was confused later with those of the Cuyutlan tsunami in June 22. Analysis of notes in the newspapers of the time allow to identify the existence of reports in local media describing that the coast of Jalisco were strongly affected by a tsunami on June 3, 1932. From these data it was possible to trace the exchange of telegrams between municipal authorities and the state government of the time. The information available nowadays let us to document the tsunami penetration up to 8 km, 300 families displaced and 4 people dead, besides the presence of sulfur water. This new evidence helps to historically rethink the tsunami magnitude, and in this way, be able to start a reconsideration of its intensity, geographical distribution and damages.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of urinary tract infections in prenatal hydronephrosis: An updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Easterbrook, Bethany; Capolicchio, John-Paul; Braga, Luis H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: While continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) is currently recommended to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in infants with prenatal hydronephrosis (HN), this recommendation is not evidence-based. The objective of this study was to systematically determine whether CAP reduces UTIs in the HN population. Methods: Applicable trials were identified through an electronic search of MEDLINE (1946–2015), EMBASE (1980–2016), CINAHL (1982–2016), and CENTRAL (1993–2016) and through a hand search of American Urological Association (AUA) (2012–2015) and European Society for Pediatric Urology (ESPU) (2012–2015) abstracts, as well as reference lists of included trials. The search strategy was not limited by language or year of publication. Eligible studies compared CAP to no CAP in patients with antenatal HN, <2 years of age, and reported development of UTI and HN grades. Two independent reviewers performed title and abstract screening, full-text review, and quality appraisal. Results: Of 1518 citations screened, 11 were included, contributing 3909 patients for final analysis. Of these, four (36%) were considered high-quality when assessed by the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Meta-analysis of the non-randomized trials (n=10) provided similar pooled UTI rates, regardless of CAP use: 9.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.4–11.4%) for CAP and 7.5% (95% CI 6.4–8.6%) for no CAP. Conclusions: This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests there may be value in providing CAP to infants with high-grade HN; however, due to the very low-quality data from non-randomized studies, important clinical variables, such as circumcision status, were unable to be assessed. PMID:28265307

  15. Global and regional burden of infective endocarditis, 1990-2010: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bin Abdulhak, Aref A; Baddour, Larry M; Erwin, Patricia J; Hoen, Bruno; Chu, Vivian H; Mensah, George A; Tleyjeh, Imad M

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease associated with serious complications. The GBD 2010 (Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors) study IE expert group conducted a systematic review of IE epidemiology literature to inform estimates of the burden on IE in 21 world regions in 1990 and 2010. The disease model of IE for the GBD 2010 study included IE death and 2 sequelae: stroke and valve surgery. Several medical and science databases were searched for IE epidemiology studies in GBD high-, low-, and middle-income regions published between 1980 and 2008. The epidemiologic parameters of interest were IE incidence, proportions of IE patients who developed stroke or underwent valve surgery, and case fatality. Literature searches yielded 1,975 unique papers, of which 115 published in 10 languages were included in the systematic review. Eligible studies were population-based (17%), multicenter hospital-based (11%), and single-center hospital-based studies (71%). Population-based studies were reported from only 6 world regions. Data were missing or sparse in many low- and middle-income regions. The crude incidence of IE ranged between 1.5 and 11.6 cases per 100,000 people and was reported from 10 countries. The overall mean proportion of IE patients that developed stroke was 0.158 ± 0.091, and the mean proportion of patients that underwent valve surgery was 0.324 ± 0.188. The mean case fatality risk was 0.211 ± 0.104. A systematic review for the GBD 2010 study provided IE epidemiology estimates for many world regions, but highlighted the lack of information about IE in low- and middle-income regions. More complete knowledge of the global burden of IE will require improved IE surveillance in all world regions.

  16. Systemic Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection not associated with endocarditis highlighting bacteriological diagnosis difficulties Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Volard, Bertrand; Mignot, Loïc; Piednoir, Emmanuel; de Champs, Christophe; Limelette, Anne; Guillard, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is mostly isolated in swine causing erysipelas. Human invasive infections due to E. rhusiopathiae remain poorly described and interestingly bacteraemia associated with endocarditis are a source of ineffective empirical antibiotherapy. We report a case of sepsis without endocarditis due to E. rhusiopathiae and a review of the literature.

  17. Public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions for reducing transmission of respiratory infection: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-pharmaceutical public health interventions may provide simple, low-cost, effective ways of minimising the transmission and impact of acute respiratory infections in pandemic and non-pandemic contexts. Understanding what influences the uptake of non-pharmaceutical interventions such as hand and respiratory hygiene, mask wearing and social distancing could help to inform the development of effective public health advice messages. The aim of this synthesis was to explore public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions that aim to reduce the transmission of acute respiratory infections. Methods Five online databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Web of Science) were systematically searched. Reference lists of articles were also examined. We selected papers that used a qualitative research design to explore perceptions and beliefs about non-pharmaceutical interventions to reduce transmission of acute respiratory infections. We excluded papers that only explored how health professionals or children viewed non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control. Three authors performed data extraction and assessment of study quality. Thematic analysis and components of meta-ethnography were adopted to synthesise findings. Results Seventeen articles from 16 studies in 9 countries were identified and reviewed. Seven key themes were identified: perceived benefits of non-pharmaceutical interventions, perceived disadvantages of non-pharmaceutical interventions, personal and cultural beliefs about infection transmission, diagnostic uncertainty in emerging respiratory infections, perceived vulnerability to infection, anxiety about emerging respiratory infections and communications about emerging respiratory infections. The synthesis showed that some aspects of non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control (particularly hand and respiratory hygiene) were viewed as familiar and socially responsible actions to take. There was ambivalence about adopting

  18. [Historical review of the treatment of fractures. Contribution of the Belgian surgery to the origin and development of osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Andrianne, Y; Hinsenkamp, M

    2011-01-01

    The word osteosynthesis was proposed by A. Lambotte in 1904. His definition, given in 1908, is still valid today: "Osteo-synthesis is the artificial contention of the bone fragments of fractures, by special devices acting directly on bones, exposed or not, with the aim to strongly fix them in their original position". The authors review the methods of contention before the invention of osteosynthesis and later the developments of bone fixation techniques. They insist in particular on the durable innovations of various pioneers including A. Lambotte, R. Danis, R. Hoffmann and G. Küntscher. The School of Brussels has been implicated in the developments and conceptualisation of osteo-synthesis.

  19. Do 'Surgical Helmet Systems' or 'Body Exhaust Suits' Affect Contamination and Deep Infection Rates in Arthroplasty? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon W; Zhu, Mark; Shirley, Otis C; Wu, Qing; Spangehl, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review examined whether negative-pressure Charnley-type body exhaust suits (BES) or modern positive-pressure surgical helmet systems (SHS) reduce deep infection rates and/or contamination in arthroplasty. For deep infection, four studies (3990 patients) gave adjusted relative risk for deep infection of 0.11 (P = 0.09) against SHS. Five of 7 (71%) studies found less air contamination and 2 of 4 studies (50%) less wound contamination with BES. One of 4 (25%) found less air contamination with SHS and 0 of 1 (0%) less wound contamination. In contrast to BES, modern SHS designs were not shown to reduce contamination or deep infection during arthroplasty.

  20. Severe infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis taking anakinra, rituximab, or abatacept: a systematic review of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Vanderlea Poeys; Andrade, Carlos Augusto Ferreira de; Passos, Sonia Regina Lambert; Martins, Maria de Fátima Moreira; Hökerberg, Yara Hahr Marques

    2016-10-01

    A question is raised about an increased risk of severe infection from the use of biological drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This systematic review of observational studies aimed at assessing the risk of severe infection associated with the use of anakinra, rituximab, and abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Scirus, Cochrane, Exerpta Medica Database, Scielo, and Lilacs up to July 2010. Severe infections were defined as those life-threatening ones in need of the use of parenteral antibiotics or of hospitalization. Longitudinal observational studies were selected without language restriction, involving adult patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and who used anakinra, rituximab, or abatacept. In four studies related to anakinra, 129 (5.1%) severe infections were related in 2,896 patients, of which three died. With respect to rituximab, two studies reported 72 (5.9%) severe infections in 1,224 patients, of which two died. Abatacept was evaluated in only one study in which 25 (2.4%) severe infections were reported in 1046 patients. The main site of infection for these three drugs was the respiratory tract. One possible explanation for the high frequency of severe infections associated with anakinra may be the longer follow-up time in the selected studies. The high frequency of severe infections associated with rituximab could be credited to the less strict inclusion criteria for the patients studied. Therefore, infection monitoring should be cautious in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in use of these three drugs.