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Sample records for infections knowledge attitudes

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding dengue infection in Westmoreland, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Shuaib, Faisal; Todd, Dana; Campbell-Stennett, Dianne; Ehiri, John; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in most tropical and sub-tropical countries of the world. Dengue fever is endemic in Jamaica and continues to be a public health concern. There is a paucity of information on knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of Jamaicans regarding dengue infection. Objective To describe dengue related knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of residents of Westmoreland, Jamaica. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 192 parents attending child health clinics in the Parish of Westmoreland was conducted. Results More than half of the parents (54%) had good knowledge about signs, symptoms, and modes of transmission of dengue. Approximately 47% considered dengue to be a serious but preventable disease to which they are vulnerable. Nevertheless, a majority (77%) did not use effective dengue preventive methods such as screening of homes and 51% did not use bed nets. Educational attainment (OR, 2.98; CI, 1.23–7.23) was positively associated with knowledge of dengue. There was no correlation between knowledge about dengue and preventive practices (p=0.34). Radio and TV were the predominant sources of information about dengue fever. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the good knowledge about dengue fever among residents of Westmoreland did not translate to adoption of preventive measures. Health program planners and practitioners need to identify and facilitate removal of barriers to behavior change related to control of dengue fever among the population. Future campaigns should focus on educating and encouraging individuals and families to adopt such simple, inexpensive preventive actions, such as, use of insecticide treated bed nets and screening of homes. PMID:21132094

  2. A tool to assess knowledge, attitude and behavior of Indonesian health care workers regarding infection control.

    PubMed

    Duerink, D O; Hadi, U; Lestari, E S; Roeshadi, Djoko; Wahyono, Hendro; Nagelkerke, N J D; Van der Meulen, R G; Van den Broek, P J

    2013-07-01

    to investigate knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire and to evaluate the use of the questionnaire as a tool. we investigated knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire to identify problem areas, barriers and facilitators. The target was to include at least 50% of all health care workers (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses and infection control nurses) in each hospital, department and profession. Differences between demographic variables and scores for individual questions and groups of questions were compared using the chi-square statistic and analysis of variance and Spearman's rho was used to test for correlations between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. more than half of the health care workers of the participating departments completed the questionnaire. Of the 1036 respondents (44% nurses, 37% physicians and 19% assistant nurses), 34% were vaccinated against hepatitis B, 77% had experienced needle stick accidents and 93% had been instructed about infection control. The mean of the correct answers to the knowledge questions was 44%; of the answers to the attitude questions 67% were in agreement with the correct attitude; obstacles to compliance with infection control guidelines were perceived in 30% of the questions and the mean self-reported compliance was 63%. Safe handling of sharps, hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment were identified as the most important aspects for interventions. Significant positive correlations were found between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. the questionnaire in conjunction with site visits and interviews was a valuable strategy to identify trouble spots in the hospitals and to determine barriers to facilitators of change that should be taken into

  3. Oral care of HIV infected patients: the knowledge and attitudes of Irish dentists.

    PubMed

    McCartan, B E; Samaranayake, L P

    1991-01-01

    As the numbers of people with HIV infection and AIDS increase, so will the contribution required from dental practitioners. A postal questionnaire survey was therefore conducted among dental practitioners in Ireland to determine their knowledge and attitudes towards HIV infection and the issues it raises for them. Although a majority of dentists were aware of the facts related to AIDS and the spread and oral manifestations of HIV infection, there were considerable gaps in their knowledge with regard to dental management. Only 41% were prepared to be engaged in continued care of HIV infected patients while contradicting opinions were expressed on the risk of HIV transmission in dentistry and attitudes towards HIV seropositive patients and staff. Further educational efforts on HIV infection and its implications in dentistry should be directed towards dentists in Ireland.

  4. Knowledge and attitude of medical science students toward hepatitis B and C infections.

    PubMed

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Roya; Joukar, Farahnaz; Souti, Fatemeh; Atrkar-Roushan, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    The present survey aimed to determine the knowledge level and attitude of medical students in Guilan University toward Hepatitis B and C viruses' infections. In a cross-sectional survey, the knowledge and attitude of 424 medical science undergraduate students of nursing, midwifery, operating room technician, laboratory, anesthesiology and radiology in Guilan University of Medical Sciences toward Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections were investigated using a standardized questionnaire. The mean (SD) knowledge level of the medical students toward HBV and HCV were 17 ± 5 from 28 and 10.58 ± 6.7 from 29 questions respectively. Females, nursing students, forth year students, those who worked in hospital and those who had needle stick injuries (NSI) history showed significantly higher knowledge scores toward HBV (P< 0.05). Married students, anesthesiology students, those who were in their fourth year of study, and those who worked in hospital had significantly higher mean knowledge scores toward HCV (P< 0.05). Also students' attitude toward HBV and HCV was positively correlated with their mean knowledge level (r=0.14, p=0.004), (r=0.18, p=0.0001). Education on the nature, symptoms, transmission, prevention and treatment of HBV and HCV infections may increase the willingness of health care workers to care for infected persons.

  5. A SURVEY OF CROSS-INFECTION CONTROL PROCEDURES: KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF TURKISH DENTISTS

    PubMed Central

    Yüzbaşioglu, Emir; Saraç, Duygu; Canbaz, Sevgi; Saraç, Y. Şinasi; Cengiz, Seda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Turkish dentists in Samsun City regarding cross-infection control. Material and methods: A questionnaire was designed to obtain information about procedures used for the prevention of cross-infection in dental practices and determine the attitudes and perceptions of respondent dental practitioners to their procedures. The study population included all dentists in the city of Samsun, Turkey, in April 2005 (n=184). The questionnaire collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge and practice of infection control procedures, sterilization, wearing of gloves, mask, use of rubber dam, method of storing instruments and disposal methods of contaminated material, etc. Questionnaire data was entered into a computer and analyzed by SPSS statistical software. Results: From the 184 dentists to whom the questionnaires were submitted, 135 participated in the study (overall response rate of 73.36%). As much as 74.10% dentists expressed concern about the risk of cross-infection from patients to themselves and their dental assistants. Forty-three percent of the participants were able to define "cross-infection" correctly. The greatest majority of the respondents (95.60%) stated that all patients have to be considered as infectious and universal precautions must apply to all of them. The overall responses to the questionnaire showed that the dentists had moderate knowledge of infection control procedures. Conclusions: Improved compliance with recommended infection control procedures is required for all dentists evaluated in the present survey. Continuing education programs and short-time courses about cross-infection and infection control procedures are suitable to improve the knowledge of dentists. PMID:20027427

  6. Knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among health sciences students at University of Namibia.

    PubMed

    Ojulong, J; Mitonga, K H; Iipinge, S N

    2013-12-01

    Health Sciences students are exposed early to hospitals and to activities which increase their risk of acquiring infections. Infection control practices are geared towards reduction of occurrence and transmission of infectious diseases. To evaluate knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among Health Science students at University of Namibia. To assess students' knowledge and attitudes regarding infection prevention and control and their sources of information, a self-administered questionnaire was used to look at standard precautions especially hands hygiene. One hundred sixty two students participated in this study of which 31 were medical, 17 were radiography and 114 were nursing students. Medical students had better overall scores (73%) compared to nursing students (66%) and radiology students (61%). There was no significant difference in scores between sexes or location of the high school being either in rural or urban setting. Serious efforts are needed to improve or review curriculum so that health sciences students' knowledge on infection prevention and control is imparted early before they are introduced to the wards.

  7. Knowledge, attitude and behavior of mothers related to acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Peker, Emel; Sahin, Erkan M; Topaloğlu, Naci; Uludağ, Ayşegül; Ağaoğlu, Hasre; Güngör, Selen

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the level of knowledge and general attitude to acute respiratory diseases and behavior of antibiotic usage and related factors. The study included 122 mothers of children between 2 and 16 years of age who applied the complaint of respiratory infections and experienced the respiratory infections previous year, to policlinics between January and May 2012. A survey form was used to evaluate the sociodemographic properties of the mothers, and the level of knowledge, attitude and behavior of mothers to childhood acute respiratory infections, fever and antibiotic use. Of the children, 58.1% applied with cough, and 40.9% applied with fever to the doctor. Before attendance 28.6% of mothers had used antibiotics and 27.8% antipyretics. The rate use of not prescribed antibiotics was 12.3%. Before medical evaluation of children, the use of a variety of traditional and alternative medical methods was at the high rate of 57.4%. The average attitude scores of mothers about the antibiotics use for acute respiratory infections fell into the category of being against antibiotic use and income level toward antibiotic use and a correlation between duration of mother's education against antibiotic use. We found that the level of knowledge of parents about medications used by their children was insufficient and there is a high percentage of non-prescription use of antibiotics. In low income and low education level of parents the use of antibiotics increased. Health workers must correctly inform parents about symptoms, course and medication. The effects of health education in the management of common diseases must be evaluated with studies.

  8. Infection control knowledge, attitudes, and practices among healthcare workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tenna, Admasu; Stenehjem, Edward A; Margoles, Lindsay; Kacha, Ermias; Blumberg, Henry M; Kempker, Russell R

    2013-12-01

    To better understand hospital infection control practices in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional evaluation of healthcare worker (HCW) knowledge, attitudes, and practices about hand hygiene and tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures. An anonymous 76-item questionnaire was administered to HCWs at 2 university hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Knowledge items were scored as correct/incorrect. Attitude and practice items were assessed using a Likert scale. In total, 261 surveys were completed by physicians (51%) and nurses (49%). Fifty-one percent of respondents were male; mean age was 30 years. While hand hygiene knowledge was fair, self-reported practice was suboptimal. Physicians reported performing hand hygiene 7% and 48% before and after patient contact, respectively. Barriers for performing hand hygiene included lack of hand hygiene agents (77%), sinks (30%), and proper training (50%) as well as irritation and dryness (67%) caused by hand sanitizer made in accordance with the World Health Organization formulation. TB infection control knowledge was excellent (more than 90% correct). Most HCWs felt that they were at high risk for occupational acquisition of TB (71%) and that proper TB infection control can prevent nosocomial transmission (92%). Only 12% of HCWs regularly wore a mask when caring for TB patients. Only 8% of HCWs reported that masks were regularly available, and 76% cited a lack of infrastructure to isolate suspected/known TB patients. Training HCWs about the importance and proper practice of hand hygiene along with improving hand sanitizer options may improve patient safety. Additionally, enhanced infrastructure is needed to improve TB infection control practices and allay HCW concerns about acquiring TB in the hospital.

  9. Infection Control Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Healthcare Workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tenna, Admasu; Stenehjem, Edward A.; Margoles, Lindsay; Kacha, Ermias; Blumberg, Henry M.; Kempker, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To better understand hospital infection control practices in Ethiopia. Design A cross-sectional evaluation of healthcare worker (HCW) knowledge, attitudes and practices about hand hygiene and tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures. Methods An anonymous, 76-item questionnaire was administered to HCWs at two university hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Knowledge items were scored as correct/incorrect. Attitude and practice items were assessed using a Likert scale. Results 261 surveys were completed by physicians (51%) and nurses (49%). Fifty-one percent of respondents were male; mean age was 30 years. While hand hygiene knowledge was fair, self-reported practice was suboptimal. Physicians reported performing hand hygiene 7% and 48% before and after patient contact, respectively. Barriers for performing hand hygiene included lack of hand hygiene agents (77%), sinks (30%), proper training (50%), and irritation and dryness (67%) caused by hand sanitizer made per WHO formulation. TB infection control knowledge was excellent (>90% correct). Most HCWs felt at high risk for occupational acquisition of TB (71%) and that proper TB infection control can prevent nosocomial transmission (92%). Only 12% of HCWs regularly wore a mask when caring for TB patients. Only 8% of HCWs reported masks were regularly available and 76% cited a lack of infrastructure to isolate suspected/known TB patients. Conclusions Training HCWs about the importance and proper practice of hand hygiene along with improving hand sanitizer options may improve patient safety. Additionally, enhanced infrastructure is needed to improve TB infection control practices and allay HCW concerns about acquiring TB in the hospital. PMID:24225614

  10. Infection control knowledge, attitudes, and practices among healthcare workers at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ajay K; Acher, Charles W; Kirenga, Bruce; Mead, Scott; Donskey, Curtis J; Katamba, Achilles

    2012-09-01

    Effective implementation of infection control programs and adherence to standard precautions are challenging in resource-limited settings. The objective of this study was to describe infection control knowledge, attitudes, and practices among healthcare workers (HCWs) in Uganda. We conducted a survey of hospital employees who had direct contact with patients or their immediate environment. We also performed an environmental assessment of resource availability and utilization within hospital wards. Surgical, medicine, and obstetrics wards at a national referral hospital in Kampala, Uganda. One hundred eighty-three randomly selected HCWs. Almost all HCWs knew to wash their hands, although nursing and support staff were less likely to perceive that HCWs' hands can be a vector of disease transmission. Hand washing was valued more as a means of self-protection than as a means to prevent patient-to-patient transmission, consistent with the prevailing belief that infection control was important for occupational safety. Sinks were not readily accessible, and soap at sinks was uncommon throughout the medicine and obstetrics wards but more commonly available in the surgery wards. Alcohol gel was rarely available. Changing infection control practices in developing countries will require a multifaceted approach that addresses resource availability, occupational safety, and local understanding and attitudes about infection control.

  11. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning infection control among travelers between Taiwan and mainland China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien Min; Tsai, Jan Sin; Chen, Sheu Hua; Lee, Hong Tau

    2011-09-01

    With an increase in the number of travelers around the world in recent years, widespread efforts to control the human-transmissible influenza and increased surveillance among poultry and humans should be given the highest priority. The purpose of this article is to describe an examination of the passengers traveling via "mini links" from Xiamen (China) to Kinmen (Taiwan) with reference to their knowledge and practice on infection control measures and satisfaction with public health policies. A survey of perceptions, attitudes, and practices was accordingly carried out. Although some research has been conducted on selected health topics and patients, little research has examined the perceptions of normal travelers. The results demonstrate that travelers' perception of risk for infection control was high; by contrast, their practices were not sufficient. The content analysis of this study also provides an empirical starting point for future research into combining travelers' knowledge and practice on disease problems with the worldwide public health policies.

  12. HIV-Infected Patient Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Irina; Sayles, Harlan; Anderson, Matthew J; Furl, Renae; Stimpson, Jim P; Swindells, Susan; Bares, Sara H

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated patient knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding changes present with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). HIV-infected adults attending an academic medical center HIV clinic in Omaha, Nebraska were asked to complete a self-administered survey between November 2013 and March 2014. Information collected included demographics, knowledge regarding healthcare reform policies, as well as attitudes and beliefs regarding the potential impact of the ACA on patient access to healthcare. Basic descriptive statistics were used to assess demographic characteristics of respondents and outcomes of interest. Chi-square tests were used for comparisons of interest among participants; some trends were evaluated with Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Four hundred and six patients completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents 90% were between the ages of 27 and 64, 61% were white, 27% had no health insurance, and 21% reported that they felt they had or will eventually benefit from the ACA. The proportion who responded "I don't know" to this question decreased over the study period (p=0.036). Overall, 57% reported they do not believe that they are informed enough to make decisions about the ACA. In answering four knowledge-based questions, only 3% answered all of them correctly. Knowledge about the ACA was significantly associated with perception of benefit (p=0.018). HIV-infected patients are not well informed about the ACA and few perceive that they will benefit from healthcare reform. Targeted education and outreach are necessary to reduce the knowledge gap for this population that stands to benefit greatly from the ACA.

  13. French Hajj pilgrims' experience with pneumococcal infection and vaccination: A knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Shruti; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Drali, Tassadit; Benkouiten, Samir; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Gautret, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of respiratory infections poses a major public health challenge during the Hajj and Umrah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Acquisition of Streptococcus pneumoniae during Hajj has been studied in the past and recommendations for vaccination against S. pneumoniae have been made for high risk groups. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of French Hajj pilgrims towards pneumococcal vaccination. Adult pilgrims departing from Marseille, France to Mecca for the 2014 Hajj season were administered a face-to-face questionnaire to ascertain their knowledge and attitudes towards pneumococcal vaccination before departing for Hajj. A total of 300 participants took part. Their overall knowledge about the severity of pneumonia and the existence of the vaccine was very low. Out of 101 participants who had an indication for pneumococcal vaccination, irrespective of their travel status, only 7% were advised to have the vaccine by their general practitioner. These results reinforce the need for better dissemination of information either before or during the pre-travel counselling. The visit to the travel clinic for receiving the mandatory meningococcal vaccination for Hajj is a good opportunity to update routine immunizations, including pneumococcal vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of mothers on acute respiratory infection in children under five years

    PubMed Central

    Bham, Shireen Qassim; Saeed, Farhan; Shah, Manzar Alam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of mothers on ARI (Acute Respiratory Tract Infection) in children less than five years of age. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Darul Sehat hospital from 1st December 2014 to 28th February 2015. Mothers(n=335) who were local residents, had at least one child below the age of five years and coming to the hospital for any medical problem along with accompanying women were included. Foreign mothers and/or those having difficulty in perceiving questions were excluded. Language used in the Questionnaire was English which was translated to Urdu for better understanding. Questionnaire was interviewer administered. Researchers and two house physicians took part in questioning the mothers. Results: Total 335 children were studied. Out of 335 children 228(68%) had ARI. Mean age of the children was 20 months ±17 SD while mean Birth weight was 2.7 kg ± 1.8 SD. The most common symptom perceived was cough (n=303, 40%), mostly worsening during winter season (n=255,87%), commonest aggravating factor was dust (n=174,81%), most common complication was Pneumonia (n=135, 83%), and most mothers opted for medical practitioner (n=268,89%) for treatment. Self-medication was practiced by 192(58%) and paracetamol was frequently used medication (n=117,42%). Conclusion: The study reveals good knowledge of mothers on ARI symptoms, worsening environmental conditions, aggravating factors and complications. Their attitude towards ARI was appropriate with early consultation with qualified medical practitioner. Better literacy rate, has a positive influence on the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of mothers. PMID:28083064

  15. A pilot survey of attitudes and knowledge about opioid substitution therapy for HIV-infected prisoners.

    PubMed

    Springer, Sandra A; Bruce, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    A majority of inmates in the state of Connecticut Department of Corrections use opioids or are opioid dependent before incarceration. None of the state's prisons offer opioid substitution therapy other than for detoxification or maintenance therapy for women during pregnancy. On release to the community, most prisoners relapse to drug use and this has been associated with higher recidivism rates, and less adherence to antiretroviral medications for HIV-infected persons. Nationally and internationally, methadone (METH) and buprenorphine (BUP) have been found to decrease relapse to drug use, decrease recidivism rates, improve adherence to antiretroviral medications, decrease HIV-risk taking behaviors, and improve mortality. However, the general knowledge about opioid substitution therapy among correctionalfacility staff has been reported as substandard. This pilot study compiled results of answers to anonymous surveys from 27 individuals who work directly with inmates in a patient-care capacity for the Connecticut Department of Corrections (CT DOC) and CT DOC case-management referral program (Project TLC) in the year 2006. The surveys included questions regarding current attitudes and knowledge about opioid substitution therapy for prisoners. A minority of respondents refer released prisoners with a history of opioid dependency to METH or BUP treatment. The majority of correctional workers and case-management referral workers did not have knowledge about BUP or METH's ability to improve health and decrease HIV risk taking behaviors. This study found that more education of individuals treating and caring for HIV-infected opioid dependent prisoners is needed.

  16. A survey of knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards skin and soft tissue infections in rural Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Joanna; Bulkow, Lisa R.; Kinzer, Michael H.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Klejka, Joseph A.; Bruce, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus infections are common to south-western Alaska and have been associated with traditional steambaths. More than a decade ago, recommendations were made to affected communities that included preventive skin care, cleaning methods for steambath surfaces, and the use of protective barriers while in steambaths to reduce the risk of S. aureus infection. Objective A review of community medical data suggested that the number of skin infection clinical encounters has increased steadily over the last 3 years and we designed a public health investigation to seek root causes. Study design Using a mixed methods approach with in-person surveys, a convenience sample (n=492) from 3 rural communities assessed the range of knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning skin infections, skin infection education messaging, prevention activities and home self-care of skin infections. Results We described barriers to implementing previous recommendations and evaluated the acceptability of potential interventions. Prior public health messages appear to have been effective in reaching community members and appear to have been understood and accepted. We found no major misconceptions regarding what a boil was or how someone got one. Overall, respondents seemed concerned about boils as a health problem and reported that they were motivated to prevent boils. We identified current practices used to avoid skin infections, such as the disinfection of steambaths. We also identified barriers to engaging in protective behaviours, such as lack of access to laundry facilities. Conclusions These findings can be used to help guide public health strategic planning and identify appropriate evidence-based interventions tailored to the specific needs of the region. PMID:26928370

  17. Romanian adolescents' knowledge and attitudes towards human papillomavirus infection and prophylactic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Maier, Călina; Maier, Traian; Neagu, Cristina E; Vlădăreanu, Radu

    2015-12-01

    Since licensure of HPV vaccine in 2006, HPV vaccine coverage among Romanian adolescents remains worryingly low. The objectives of the study were to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards HPV infection and vaccination among Romanian adolescents and to explore the barriers to HPV vaccination with a view to developing strategies for expanding primary HPV infection prevention. This study was conducted in Bucharest between April and June 2015. A total of 524 adolescents aged 16-18 years old were recruited from the first two general highschools in Bucharest (according to the admission grade) and completed a self-administered questionnaire including demographics, HPV related and Papanicolau smear test knowledge. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were used to identify the strength of association. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the effect of demographic characteristics on the level of knowledge and HPV vaccination rate. Associations were considered statistically significant at p<0.05. Of the adolescents interviewed, a very small proportion had heard of HPV infection, HPV vaccine and Papanicolau smear test, that is, 20.22%, 67.92% and 22.9%, respectively. The overall vaccination rate for this group was 2.3%. The most common reason for not receiving the HPV vaccine was the lack of information (80.6%) followed by parents' concerns regarding safety (11%), fear of pain (5.59%) and not being sexually active (2.7%). However, 97.7% of the respondents declared interest in receiving more information about HPV. According to demographic characteristics, age at first sexual intercourse over 16 years old, monthly household income over one thousand euros and self-perceived good relationship with family members were statistically associated on a multivariate logistic regression analysis with a high HPV knowledge score and rate of vaccination. This study shows a low level of knowledge about HPV infection and prophylactic vaccination among Romanian adolescents

  18. Knowledge and Attitudes toward HIV, Hepatitis B Virus, and Hepatitis C Virus Infection among Health-care Workers in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Mtengezo, Jasintha; Lee, Haeok; Ngoma, Jonathan; Kim, Susie; Aronowitz, Teri; DeMarco, Rosanna; Shi, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The highest prevalence of HIV infection occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa and hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence are the second highest in Sub-Saharan Africa including Malawi. Health-care workers (HCWs) play an important role in the prevention of, response to, and management of these infectious diseases. There is, however, no published research about the level of knowledge and attitudes toward HIV, HBV, and HCV infection among Malawian HCWs. The purpose of this study was to explore and determine the knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV, HBV, and HCV among a targeted population of Malawian HCWs. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based participatory research with 194 HCWs was completed employing health survey method. The project was a collaborative effort between nursing faculties in the USA and Malawian. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was used to assess the differences in knowledge and attitude among three subgroups of HCWs. Results: Of 194 of Malawian HCWs surveyed, 41% were support staff, 37% were nursing students, and 22% were health-care professionals. Both health-care professionals and support staff had high knowledge scores related to HIV/AIDS, and their attitudes were mainly positive. However, a series of one-way ANOVAs revealed significant differences in knowledge and attitude toward HIV/AIDs, HBV, and HCV among HCWs (P < 0.01). The majority had less knowledge about HBV and HCV and more negative attitudes toward hepatitis. Conclusions: This study highlights the ongoing need for reducing negative attitudes toward HIV, HBV, and HCV; and providing health education among HCWs, especially focusing on HBV and HCV prevention. The findings of the research project can be used to develop interventions addressing low HBV- and HCV-related knowledge and attitudes. PMID:28083551

  19. Gender differences in characteristics, infection control practices, knowledge and attitudes related to HIV among Ontario dentists.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, G M; MacDonald, J K

    1996-12-01

    We surveyed 5,997 dentists in Ontario to investigate gender differences in the characteristics, infection control practices, knowledge and attitudes regarding the treatment of HIV-infected patients. The response rate was 70.3%. Reports indicated that female dentists are younger and more likely to work in larger urban centres (P < 0.00001), and in general practice (P < 0.0001) than their male counterparts. Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that many significant gender differences in the univariate analyses could be explained by the confounding influence of age, practice location, and specialty; however, some differences remain significant: Women were more likely than men to report attending continuing education dealing with HIV/AIDS in the past two years (P < 0.001), and to use masks and eye protection (P < 0.00001). Men reported more economic concerns than women: they were more concerned about the financial burden of infection control costs (P < 0.00001), and losing patients from their practice if it is known that they treat patients with HIV (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in willingness to provide treatment for patients with HIV. We conclude that there is little evidence to show that access to oral care for patients with HIV is affected by gender differences.

  20. A Critical Review of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection--And Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-Related Research: The Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Janice M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the research literature related to nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), human immunodeficiency virus infection, and care of people with AIDS. Gaps in knowledge and negative, fearful attitudes were identified; negative fears and attitudes decreased with the gain in accurate…

  1. Mothers' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding acute respiratory infections in children in Baringo District, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Simiyu, D E; Wafula, E M; Nduati, R W

    2003-06-01

    Control of acute respiratory infections (ARI) is a major public health problem in developing countries. Implementation of case management protocols requires participation of the community to reduce morbidity and mortality from ARI. Health education programmes can only be effective when designed to take into account the prevailing knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of the community towards ARI in their children. To determine the KAP of mothers regarding ARI in their children aged less than five years. Community based cross-sectional survey. Baringo District, Kenya. Mothers with children aged 0-5 years were recruited following stratified random sampling in three areas of Baringo District to represent low, medium and high potential areas based on agricultural productivity. A mixed structured and unstructured questionnaire was administered to each of the respondent mothers by the investigator; with the help of an interpreter where necessary. A total of 309 mothers were interviewed. Their mean age was 31.5 years (range 16-51) and 34% had no formal education. Only 18% of mothers described pneumonia satisfactorily. 60.2% knew that measles is preventable by immunisation. 87.1% of the mothers said they would seek health centre services for severe ARI. Formal education had a positive influence on the KAP of the mothers. The study reveals that the mothers had good knowledge of mild forms of ARI but not the severe forms. Their attitude to ARI was appropriate but subsequent practices were not. Low utilisation of health services for moderate ARI may result in continued high mortality because of delayed identification of seriously ill children.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practice of standard precautions of infection control by hospital workers in two tertiary hospitals in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pondei, Kemebradikumo; Adetunji, Babatunde; Chima, George; Isichei, Christian; Gidado, Sanusi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Standard precautions are recommended to prevent transmission of infection in hospitals. However, their implementation is dependent on the knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers (HCW). This study describes the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of standard precautions of infection control among HCW of two tertiary hospitals in Nigeria is described. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 2011/2012 among HCW in two tertiary hospitals in Nigeria. Data was collected via a structured self-administered questionnaire assessing core elements of KAP of standard precautions. Percentage KAP scores were calculated and professional differences in median percentage KAP scores were ascertained. Results: A total of 290 HCW participated in the study (76% response rate), including 111 (38.3%) doctors, 147 (50.7%) nurses and 32 (11%) laboratory scientists. Overall median knowledge and attitude scores toward standard precautions were above 90%, but median practice score was 50.8%. The majority of the HCW had poor knowledge of injection safety and complained of inadequate resources to practise standard precautions. House officers, laboratory scientists and junior cadres of nurses had lower knowledge and compliance with standard precautions than more experienced doctors and nurses. Conclusion: Our results suggest generally poor compliance with standard precautions of infection control among HCW in Nigeria. Policies that foster training of HCW in standard precautions and guarantee regular provision of infection control and prevention resources in health facilities are required in Nigeria.

  3. [A survey on infection control practices, knowledge and attitudes toward AIDS/HIV among dental practitioners].

    PubMed

    Aizawa, F; Yonemitsu, M; Aizawa, Y; Hanada, N; Akada, H

    1996-05-01

    A survey was conducted in December 1993 by sending questionnaires to all 566 dentists of the Iwate Dental Association. The questionnaires consisted of 68 items including infection control practices, knowledge, and attitudes towards AIDS/HIV. The response rate was 51.1 percent (N = 289). The average age of dentists in the sample was 43.7 +/- 9.5 (S.D.) (range: 28 to 85). Data was evaluated statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney's U test and Chi-square test, and significant differences were observed. Gloves, masks, and other protective garments were generally worn, but most dentists did not always use them during the full course of treatment limiting usage to surgical treatment, and when treating patients in "high-risk groups". Other infection control procedures, such as instrument sterilization, did not comply with the guidelines of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Two dentists responded that they had treated AIDS patients and three dentists treated possible AIDS/HIV patients in their dental offices. Despite 71.3% expressing a belief that they have a moral responsibility as a dentist to treat AIDS/HIV patients only 15.6% were willing to treat AIDS/HIV patients. Over 40% of the respondents were not certain as to whether they had treated AIDS/HIV patients or not, and over 60% believed AIDS/HIV patients would come to their dental offices in the near future. Therefore, to practice dentistry on AIDS/HIV patients safely, dentists must provide effective infection control in their dental offices on the assumption that all patients are AIDS/HIV positive, and additional information about AIDS/HIV and adequate training on procedures in the care of AIDS/HIV patients are needed.

  4. Retesting for repeat chlamydial infection: family planning provider knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    PubMed

    Park, Ina U; Amey, Annette; Creegan, Linda; Barandas, Aileen; Bauer, Heidi M

    2010-06-01

    Repeated genital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis are common and associated with serious adverse reproductive sequelae in women such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. Retesting for repeat chlamydial infection is recommended 3 months after treatment for an initial infection; however, retesting rates in various settings are low. In order to design interventions to increase retesting rates, understanding provider barriers and practices around retesting is crucial. Therefore, in this survey of family planning providers we sought to describe: (1) knowledge about retesting for chlamydia; (2) attitudes and barriers toward retesting; (3) practices currently utilized to ensure retesting, and predictors associated with their use. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-administered, Internet-based survey of a convenience sample of family planning providers in California inquiring about strategies utilized to ensure retesting in their practice setting. High-intensity strategies included chart flagging, tickler (reminder) systems, follow-up appointments, and phone/mail reminders. Of 268 respondents, 82% of providers reported at least 1 barrier to retesting, and only 44% utilized high-intensity interventions to ensure that patients returned. Predictors associated with use of high-intensity interventions included existence of clinic-level retesting policies (OR 3.95, 95% CI 1.98-7.88), and perception of a high/moderate level of clinic priority toward retesting (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.12-.6.63). Emphasizing the importance of retesting to providers through adoption of clinic policies will likely be an important component of a multimodal strategy to ensure that patients are retested and that provider/clinic staff take advantage of opportunities to retest patients. Innovative approaches such as home-based retesting with self-collected vaginal swabs and use of cost-effective technologies to generate patient reminders should also be considered.

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Regarding Risk to Human Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis among Cattle Farming Communities in Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kazoora, H B; Majalija, S; Kiwanuka, N; Kaneene, J B

    2016-12-01

    A cross-sectional study involving multistage cluster sampling was undertaken in Kashari county, Mbarara district, western Uganda, in which quantitative and qualitative approaches were utilized to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding risk of human infection with zoonotic tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis among cattle farmers. Of 496 respondents, 50% were farm owners and 50% herdsmen. Males were 70.9% of all the study participants. Among these, 37.5% had good knowledge, 41.4% had positive attitudes and 75.2% good practices regarding zoonotic tuberculosis. In the multivariable model, good knowledge was associated with having ever received health education, spending more than 5 years keeping cattle, having heard of cattle condemned at the abattoir due to tuberculosis and marital status. Positive attitudes were associated with having ever received health education, having heard of cattle condemned at the abattoir due to tuberculosis and being a farm owner versus being a herdsman. Good practices were associated with health education and good knowledge of the disease. Overall, knowledge and attitudes towards zoonotic tuberculosis due to M. bovis in humans was found to be low. While the majority of the respondents reported good practices, there were some still consuming raw milk and its products, which may predispose them to infection and indicates the need for greater outreach for zoonotic tuberculosis education.

  6. Knowledge, awareness, and attitude regarding infection prevention and control among medical students: a call for educational intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Awab Ali; Elshafie, Sittana Shamseldin

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical students can be exposed to serious health care-associated infections, if they are not following infection prevention and control (IPC) measures. There is limited information regarding the knowledge, awareness, and practices of medical students regarding IPC and the educational approaches used to teach them these practices. Aim To evaluate the knowledge, awareness, and attitude of medical students toward IPC guidelines, and the learning approaches to help improve their knowledge. Methods A cross-sectional, interview-based survey included 73 medical students from Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar. Students completed a questionnaire concerning awareness, knowledge, and attitude regarding IPC practices. Students’ knowledge was assessed by their correct answers to the survey questions. Findings A total of 48.44% of the respondents were aware of standard isolation precautions, 61.90% were satisfied with their training in IPC, 66.13% were exposed to hand hygiene training, while 85.48% had sufficient knowledge about hand hygiene and practiced it on a routine basis, but only 33.87% knew the duration of the hand hygiene procedure. Conclusion Knowledge, attitude, and awareness of IPC measures among Weill Cornell Medical Students in Qatar were found to be inadequate. Multifaceted training programs may have to target newly graduated medical practitioners or the training has to be included in the graduate medical curriculum to enable them to adopt and adhere to IPC guidelines. PMID:27579002

  7. Knowledge, awareness, and attitude regarding infection prevention and control among medical students: a call for educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Awab Ali; Elshafie, Sittana Shamseldin

    2016-01-01

    Medical students can be exposed to serious health care-associated infections, if they are not following infection prevention and control (IPC) measures. There is limited information regarding the knowledge, awareness, and practices of medical students regarding IPC and the educational approaches used to teach them these practices. To evaluate the knowledge, awareness, and attitude of medical students toward IPC guidelines, and the learning approaches to help improve their knowledge. A cross-sectional, interview-based survey included 73 medical students from Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar. Students completed a questionnaire concerning awareness, knowledge, and attitude regarding IPC practices. Students' knowledge was assessed by their correct answers to the survey questions. A total of 48.44% of the respondents were aware of standard isolation precautions, 61.90% were satisfied with their training in IPC, 66.13% were exposed to hand hygiene training, while 85.48% had sufficient knowledge about hand hygiene and practiced it on a routine basis, but only 33.87% knew the duration of the hand hygiene procedure. Knowledge, attitude, and awareness of IPC measures among Weill Cornell Medical Students in Qatar were found to be inadequate. Multifaceted training programs may have to target newly graduated medical practitioners or the training has to be included in the graduate medical curriculum to enable them to adopt and adhere to IPC guidelines.

  8. Human Papillomavirus Infection and its Vaccines: Knowledge and Attitudes of Primary Health Clinic Nurses in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jeyachelvi, K; Juwita, S; Norwati, D

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer though preventable is still the leading cause of cancer death among women secondary to breast cancer. Persistent infection with HPV has been causally linked to the disease. A school based HPV vaccination program was introduced in late 2010 in Malaysia and nurse support is essential for its success. To determine nurses knowledge and attitudes about HPV infection and its vaccines, and factors associated with their knowledge. This cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses working at primary health clinics in Kelantan from mid-June till the end of July 2014. Its involved 330 nurses selected through multistage random sampling. A validated self-administered questionnaire consisting of 11 items for the knowledge domain and eight items for the attitude domain was used. The response rate of the study was 93.7%. The mean knowledge and mean attitude (SD) scores were 5.37 (1.76) and 29.8 (3.51) respectively. Only 24% knew that HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and 67% correctly answered that Gardasil vaccine can protect against four types of HPV. Nearly 60% of participants wrongly answered that HPV vaccines cannot be offered to sexually active women. Likewise, 70.9% participants were not aware that HPV vaccine may be appropriate for females aged 9 through 26 years. Though 90% of participants believed that the vaccine is safe, nearly half of them were unsure about efficacy. From multiple linear regression analysis, among the factors tested only participant's level of education showed a statistically significant association with the HPV knowledge score (<0.001). This study indicates nurses have favorable attitudes towards HPV vaccination; however they have significant knowledge deficit and major misunderstanding in critical knowledge items. Among the factors tested, nursing qualification is the only factor that is significantly associated with the nurses knowledge score.

  9. Knowledge and attitude of health care professionals regarding hepatitis B virus infection and its vaccination, University of Gondar Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Horssa, Boressa Adugna; Getachew, Nardose; Amare, Sitotaw; Getnet, Ashenafi

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B is a global public health problem affecting approximately 10% of the world population. Health care professionals (HCPs) are at an increased risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection due to occupational exposure. Having enough knowledge and proper attitudes toward the infection and its vaccination is crucial in preventing the infection. This study aimed to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection as well as its vaccination among HCPs working in University of Gondar Hospital. Methods An institution-based cross-sectional study design was employed from April 1 to May 1, 2016 on 297 HCPs working at University of Gondar Hospital. A self-administered questionnaire prepared in the English language was used to collect the data. The questionnaire contained sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude-related questions. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS software version 20.1. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, and binary logistic regression were utilized. P<0.05 was used to declare association. Results From a total of 297 HCPs participated in the study 73.1% have good knowledge of HBV transmission, progress, and its vaccination. The majority (91.3%) of the respondents believe that their job puts them at risk of HBV infection. The majority of study participants (94%) believe vaccination is necessary. Medical doctors have 8.4 times better knowledge of HBV and its vaccination than other professionals (adjusted odds ratio =8.399, CI =1.536–45.936). Conclusion The majority of HCPs working in University of Gondar Hospital have good knowledge of HBV transmission, progress, and its vaccination. The majority of HCPs believe that their job puts them at greater risk for HBV and vaccination is necessary. Knowledge of the HCPs significantly varies across professions. PMID:28008291

  10. Knowledge, attitude and practice of school nurses in the United Arab Emirates about HPV infection and vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ortashi, Osman; Shallal, Musa; Osman, Nawal; Raheel, Hina

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Health Authority in Abu Dhabi (the capital of the United Arab Emirates) introduced HPV vaccine free of charge for high school girls entering grade 11, becoming the first state in the Middle East to do so. The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of school nurses in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi about HPV infection and the vaccine. A quantitative study was designed and conducted from June to August 2012 in Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Data were collected through direct face to face interviews. from one hundred and twenty five nurses. Knowledge of HPV infection and HPV vaccine was almost universal among the school nurses (97%). The majority of the participants (71%) thought that the HPV vaccine was good. Cultural unacceptability (45%) and lack of women's concern about their own health (21%) were rated as the top barriers for the successful introduction of the vaccine in the UAE. More than half of the sampled nurses (58%) have either given this vaccine to school girls or taken it themselves. The majority (95%) did not come across any side effects from the vaccine. The level of qualification and the place of work did not significantly affect the correct knowledge of HPV infection or cervical cancer prevention methods. The knowledge and attitude of the sampled school nurses in Abu Dhabi State about HPV infection and vaccine is very good in both the public and private sectors. However, a knowledge gap in cervical cancer screening methods was identified.

  11. Knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes of HIV-infected men about syphilis.

    PubMed

    Valdes, A; Cazanave, C; Dabis, F; Neau, D; Lacoste, D; Gaborieau, V; Farbos, S; Dworkin, M S

    2017-09-21

    To explore knowledge on syphilis, sexual behaviors, and attitudes in men living with HIV in southwestern France. In the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort of people living with HIV (PLHIV), a self-administered questionnaire was proposed to all male PLHIV attending one of the seven participating clinics between September 22 and October 24, 2014. The 15 questions explored patient knowledge about syphilis disease, attitudes, and behaviors during sexual intercourse. Among 302 patients surveyed, 101 reported at least one episode of syphilis. A history of syphilis was associated with awareness that syphilis was on the rise in men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Aquitaine region (46% vs. 22%, P<0.0001). Knowledge that syphilis could be transmitted by oral sex was low in both patients with (37%) and without (20%) a history of syphilis (P=0.0045). Patients with a history of syphilis more often used recreational drugs (RR 1.6; P=0.0028). Among 160 patients who had sexual intercourse with a man in the past 12 months, 23% reported using condoms for oral intercourse and 80% reported using condoms for anal intercourse. Sixty-two per cent of MSM declared being ready to change their practice if informed about the rise in syphilis. This survey revealed important information gaps in PLHIV about syphilis and related behavior. The reported receptiveness of this population to behavioral change may help inform educational interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccines: knowledge, attitude and perception among female students at the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Makwe, Christian Chigozie; Anorlu, Rose Ihuoma; Odeyemi, Kofoworola Abimbola

    2012-12-01

    This study sought to determine knowledge of and attitude towards human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccines among female undergraduate students at the University of Lagos. A self-administered questionnaire was administered between May and July 2010, to 368 female students aged 16-29years, who were selected from two faculties of the University of Lagos using two-stage sampling method. Data collected included: socio-demographic characteristics, sexual history, awareness and knowledge of HPV infection, cervical cancer and genital warts, and HPV vaccine; the perceived risk of acquiring genital HPV infection and developing cervical cancer or genital warts, and the willingness to receive an HPV vaccine. Only 64 (17.7%) and 52 (14.4%) of the students had ever heard of HPV infection and HPV vaccines respectively. The median HPV knowledge on a 15-item score was 2. Overall, only 11.1% knew that genital HPV infection can cause cervical cancer. Fourteen (6.9%) of those who were aware of cervical cancer agreed they were at risk of developing the disease. Of the 52 students who had heard of the HPV vaccine, 24 (46.2%) knew it was given for cervical cancer prevention and 30 (57.7%) expressed their willingness to receive the vaccine. The knowledge of and the perceived susceptibility to HPV infection and HPV-related diseases among female students in the University of Lagos were generally low. The need for a well-designed HPV-educational program to bridge the knowledge gap cannot be overemphasized. Copyright © 2012 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of infection control strategy on knowledge, attitude and practice towards hepatitis B transmission and prevention in vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawil, M M; El-Gohary, E E; El-Sayed, M H

    2013-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) and hematological patients needing blood/ blood product transfusion are particularly vulnerable to blood born infections (BBI) including viral hepatitis. To evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of these target groups regarding viral hepatitis B (HBV) transmission and its change with implementing infection control policy and procedures. An anonymous questionnaire with closed questions was used to evaluate KAP including vaccination status in 2 target groups, in Children Hospital, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt: 184 nurses and 210 children and adolescents with blood diseases. One year after instituting infection control as a part of hospital procedures, the same questionnaire was reused to evaluate KAP towards HBV. Baseline knowledge regarding HBV transmission, sequelae and preventive measures, was poor in both groups. Among nurses, only 62% wore gloves on withdrawing or giving blood to patients, 43.5% routinely washed hands between patients and 37.5% reported exposure after sharp injury. Only 38% of patients and 40% of nurses received HBV vaccination. Targeted infection control policy and procedures significantly improved KAP regarding HBV in both groups. Vaccination coverage significantly increased and reached 88.7% for nurses and 72% for patients. Hospital based infection control units with established policy and procedures against BBI significantly improved KAP towards HBV including a significant increase in vaccination intake.

  14. Association of Knowledge of HIV and Other Factors with Individuals’ Attitudes toward HIV Infection: A National Cross-Sectional Survey among the Japanese Non-Medical Working Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoqin; Wada, Koji; Hoshi, Keika; Sasaki, Nanae; Ezoe, Satoshi; Satoh, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Background The stigma of and discrimination because of HIV has been described as the most important obstacle to prevention and treatment efforts. The purpose of this study was to investigate negative attitudes and prejudice toward HIV among the Japanese non-medical working population and to explore contributing factors. Methods An online anonymous nationwide survey involving approximately 3,000 individuals was conducted in Japan. Questions ranged from background information and HIV knowledge to individuals’ attitudes towards HIV infection in the workplace. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were applied for analysis. Results Thirty-three percent of participants feared transmission of HIV from infected colleagues, 34% tended to avoid contact with them and 40% had prejudiced opinions about HIV infection. Despite a relatively high level of knowledge of HIV/AIDS overall (11.9±3.3 from 15 points), only 50% of individuals were aware of some issues. Greater knowledge was associated with less negative attitudes towards HIV infection (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.31–0.48 for prejudiced opinion, high compared with low level of knowledge), whereas greater health consciousness was inversely related to attitude (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.50–2.58 for prejudiced opinion, high compared with low health consciousness). Conclusion Knowledge neutralizes peoples’ negative attitudes towards HIV infection, whereas greater health consciousness may worsen them. Educational programs should balance knowledge with health consciousness to improve the efficacy of HIV interventions. PMID:23874644

  15. Knowledge of HBV and HCV and individuals' attitudes toward HBV- and HCV-infected colleagues: a national cross-sectional study among a working population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Hisashi; Wada, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Prejudice and discrimination in the workplace regarding the risk of transmission of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are increased by excess concerns due to a lack of relevant knowledge. Education to increase knowledge about HBV and HCV and their prevention could be the first step to reduce prejudice and discrimination. This study aimed to determine the association between the level of knowledge and negative attitudes toward HBV- and HCV-infected colleagues among the Japanese working population. An online anonymous nationwide survey involving about 3,000 individuals was conducted in Japan. The questionnaire consisted of knowledge of HBV and HCV, and attitudes toward HBV- and HCV-infected colleagues in the workplace. Knowledge was divided into three categories: "ensuring daily activities not to be infected"; "risk of infection"; and "characteristics of HBV/HCV hepatitis", based on the result of factor analysis. Multiple logistic regression analysis was applied. A total of 3,129 persons responded to the survey: 36.0% reported they worried about the possibility of transmission of HBV and HCV from infected colleagues; 32.1% avoided contact with infected colleagues; and 23.7% had prejudiced opinions about HBV and HCV infection. The participants were classified into tertiles. A higher level of knowledge of HBV and HCV was significantly associated with these three negative attitudes (P for trend < 0.005). This study suggests that increasing knowledge may decrease individuals' negative attitudes towards HBV- and HCV-infected colleagues. Thus, we should promote increased knowledge of HBV and HCV in stages to reduce negative attitudes toward HBV- and HCV-infected colleagues.

  16. A knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices (KABP) survey on HIV infection and AIDS among doctors and dental surgeons in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R; Khoo, L; Goh, C L; Lam, M S

    1997-09-01

    An anonymous postal questionnaire survey studying the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was conducted among all registered medical and dental practitioners in Singapore in 1996. In all, 1523 replies were received, yielding a response rate of 29.3%. The level of knowledge regarding transmission and prevention was generally good, although there were a number who believed that HIV could be transmitted by the respiratory and oral routes. However, knowledge regarding diagnosis and medical management was unsatisfactory. Although a large majority felt they had the ethical obligation to treat HIV patients, only half of them indicated their willingness to do so if they were given the choice. The majority (62.3%) supported the idea of routine preoperative HIV testing for patients, but fewer (40%) supported mandatory HIV testing for health care workers. Dentists seemed more sensitive to issues involving transmission in the workplace, and 95% of them practised universal precautions. Continuing medical education on HIV infection is required to improve and maintain the level of knowledge and competency of doctors and dentists in Singapore.

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antiretroviral management, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk behavior among perinatally HIV-infected youth in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Durier, Yuitiang; Nuchanard, Wipada; Tarugsa, Jariya; Punpanich, Warunee; Pattanasin, Sarika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of perinatally HIV-infected children in Thailand are 12 years and older. As these youth become sexually active, there is a risk that they will transmit HIV to their partners. Data on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of HIV-infected youth in Thailand are limited. Therefore, we assessed the KAP of perinatally HIV-infected youth and youth reporting sexual risk behaviors receiving care at two tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand and living in an orphanage in Lopburi, Thailand. From October 2010 to July 2011, 197 HIV-infected youth completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview to assess their KAP regarding antiretroviral (ARV) management, reproductive health, sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A majority of youth in this study correctly answered questions about HIV transmission and prevention and the importance of taking ARVs regularly. More than half of the youth in this study demonstrated a lack of family planning, reproductive health, and STI knowledge. Girls had more appropriate attitudes toward safe sex and risk behaviors than boys. Although only 5% of the youth reported that they had engaged in sexual intercourse, about a third reported sexual risk behaviors (e.g., having or kissing boy/girlfriend or consuming an alcoholic beverage). We found low condom use and other family planning practices, increasing the risk of HIV and/or STI transmission to sexual partners. Additional resources are needed to improve reproductive health knowledge and reduce risk behavior among HIV-infected youth in Thailand.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antiretroviral management, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk behavior among perinatally HIV-infected youth in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Durier, Yuitiang; Nuchanard, Wipada; Tarugsa, Jariya; Punpanich, Warunee; Pattanasin, Sarika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of perinatally HIV-infected children in Thailand are 12 years and older. As these youth become sexually active, there is a risk that they will transmit HIV to their partners. Data on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of HIV-infected youth in Thailand are limited. Therefore, we assessed the KAP of perinatally HIV-infected youth and youth reporting sexual risk behaviors receiving care at two tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand and living in an orphanage in Lopburi, Thailand. From October 2010 to July 2011, 197 HIV-infected youth completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview to assess their KAP regarding antiretroviral (ARV) management, reproductive health, sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A majority of youth in this study correctly answered questions about HIV transmission and prevention and the importance of taking ARVs regularly. More than half of the youth in this study demonstrated a lack of family planning, reproductive health, and STI knowledge. Girls had more appropriate attitudes toward safe sex and risk behaviors than boys. Although only 5% of the youth reported that they had engaged in sexual intercourse, about a third reported sexual risk behaviors (e.g., having or kissing boy/girlfriend or consuming an alcoholic beverage). We found low condom use and other family planning practices, increasing the risk of HIV and/or STI transmission to sexual partners. Additional resources are needed to improve reproductive health knowledge and reduce risk behavior among HIV-infected youth in Thailand. PMID:25506754

  19. Clinicians’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juyan Julia; Patel, Sameer J.; Jia, Haomiao; Weisenberg, Scott A.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Kubin, Christine J.; Alba, Luis; Rhee, Kyu; Saiman, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess how healthcare professionals caring for patients in intensive care units (ICUs) understand and use antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) for multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (MDR-GNB). Design A knowledge, attitude and practice survey assessed ICU clinicians knowledge of antimicrobial resistance, confidence interpreting susceptibility testing, and beliefs regarding the impact of susceptibility testing on patient outcomes. Setting 16 ICUs affiliated with New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Participants Attending physicians and subspecialty residents with primary clinical responsibilities in adult or pediatric ICUs and infectious diseases (ID) subspecialists and clinical pharmacists. Methods Participants completed an anonymous electronic survey. Responses included 4-level Likert scales dichotomized for analysis. Multivariate analyses were performed using Generalized Estimating Equations logistic regression to account for correlation of respondents from the same ICU. Results The response rate was 51% (178/349 eligible participants) of whom 120 (67%) were ICU physicians. Those caring for adult patients were more knowledgeable about antimicrobial activity and more familiar with MDR-GNB infections. Only 33% and 12% of ICU physicians were familiar with standardized and specialized AST methods, respectively, but >95% believed AST improved patient outcomes. When adjusted for demographic and healthcare provider characteristics, those familiar with treatment of MDR-GNB bloodstream infections, those aware of resistance mechanisms, and those aware of AST methods were more confident they could interpret AST and/or request additional in vitro testing. Conclusions Our study uncovered knowledge gaps and educational needs that could serve as the foundation for future interventions. Familiarity with MDR-GNB increased overall knowledge and familiarity with AST increased confidence interpreting these results. PMID:23388362

  20. Knowledge and attitudes of Spanish adolescent girls towards human papillomavirus infection: where to intervene to improve vaccination coverage”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HPV vaccine coverage is far from ideal in Valencia, Spain, and this could be partially related to the low knowledge about the disease and the vaccine, therefore we assessed these, as well as the attitude towards vaccination in adolescent girls, and tried to identify independently associated factors that could potentially be modified by an intervention in order to increase vaccine coverage. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in a random selection of schools of the Spanish region of Valencia. We asked mothers of 1278 girls, who should have been vaccinated in the 2011 campaign, for informed consent. Those that accepted their daughters’ participation, a questionnaire regarding the Knowledge of HPV infection and vaccine was passed to the girls in the school. Results 833 mothers (65.1%) accepted participation. All their daughters’ responded the questionnaire. Of those, 89.9% had heard about HPV and they associated it to cervical cancer. Only 14% related it to other problems like genital warts. The knowledge score of the girls who had heard about HPV was 6.1/10. Knowledge was unrelated to the number of contacts with the health system (Pediatrician or nurse), and positively correlated with the discussions with classmates about the vaccine. Adolescents Spanish in origin or with an older sister vaccinated, had higher punctuation. 67% of the girls thought that the vaccine prevented cancer, and 22.6% felt that although prevented cancer the vaccine had important safety problems. 6.4% of the girls rejected the vaccine for safety problems or for not considering themselves at risk of infection. 71.5% of the girls had received at least one vaccine dose. Vaccinated girls scored higher knowledge (p = 0.05). Conclusion Knowledge about HPV infection and vaccine was fair in adolescents of Valencia, and is independent to the number of contacts with the health system, it is however correlated to the conversations about the vaccine with their peers and the

  1. [Knowledge, attitude and practice in relation with HIV/AIDS infection in high-school and vocational training in Mieres].

    PubMed

    Alvarez García, B; López Menéndez, C; García-Bobia, L; Fernández Corrales, E

    1996-10-31

    To find the students' level of knowledge, attitudes and conduct concerning HIV/AIDS. Data-gathering by means of a self-administered questionnaire. 450 students (60.8%), average age 17, took part. 52.9% answered questions on the disease correctly. 48.9% believed they had sufficient knowledge/information. More men than women thought they were well-informed. 89.6% said they would accept someone with AIDS in their class. 65% said they were worried about the possibility of being infected. 31.6% said they were sexually active. All of these affirmed that they knew of and took preventive measures. 83% said they always used a condom, the reason being to avoid pregnancy. 0.9% took intravenous drugs, but have never shared syringes. 100% knew that this protected them from infection. 42% (more men than women) believed that today's youth is changing its life-style because of AIDS. In spite of knowing the basic facts about HIV/AIDS, students have many mistaken ideas. They do not think that these facts have given rise to changes in their behaviour. These results could be useful for the design of a future health education intervention.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults attending private and public clinics in India.

    PubMed

    Ramchandani, Suneil R; Mehta, Shruti H; Saple, Dattatray G; Vaidya, Satish B; Pandey, Ved P; Vadrevu, Ravi; Rajasekaran, Sikhamani; Bhatia, Vandana; Chowdhary, Abhay; Bollinger, Robert C; Gupta, Amita

    2007-02-01

    India has approximately 5.2 million persons infected with HIV. Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being widely introduced in public clinics, many HIV-infected persons still seek care via the private sector. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2004 at six public and private sites to characterize the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of ART among patients with HIV receiving care in India. Of 1667 persons surveyed, 609 (36%) had heard of ART and 19% of these persons reported that ART could cure HIV. Twenty-four percent reported that they were currently taking ART, with 18% of these patients not actually on ART according to their provider. Major barriers to taking ART were cost (33%), lack of knowledge of ART (41%), and deferral by physician (30%). More than half of all public and private patients had not heard of CD4 (57%) or viral load testing (80%), and even fewer had received these tests (32% and 11%, respectively). Private clinic attendees were almost 4 times more likely to be on ART (35% versus 9%, p < 0.0001), more likely to be male, have a higher education, be partnered, have a higher income, and have had a CD4 or viral load (p < 0.0001). Overall, low levels of ART knowledge and access were observed among HIV infected patients, with access to ART being particularly low among patients attending public clinics. In order to make widespread dissemination of ART effective in India, further educational and programmatic efforts are likely needed to optimize access, treatment awareness, and compliance among patients with HIV.

  3. Knowledge, attitudes and risk of HIV, HBV and HCV infections in hairdressers of Palermo city (South Italy).

    PubMed

    Amodio, Emanuele; Di Benedetto, Maria Antonella; Gennaro, Liborio; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Romano, Nino

    2010-08-01

    The hairdressing trade may potentially expose its practitioners and their customers to blood-borne infections. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards occupational risk of HIV, HBV and HCV infections were evaluated in a cross-sectional survey, conducted during spring 2008, in 105 out of 112 randomly selected hairdressers of Palermo. Participants were queried by answering to an anonymous questionnaire. Most of hairdressers (93.3%) knew that HIV and hepatitis are transmitted through parenteral route and could also be transmitted by razors. The availability of gloves was inadequate, up to 30% of the participants never used them and up to 50% usually reused them. In total, 90 respondents stated to perform a sterilization process of the cutting instruments by ultraviolet light, but only 70 sterilized the articles between two customers and only 34.3% executed a daily disinfection of the hair brushes. Statistical analysis showed that younger age and post-primary school instruction were significantly associated with knowledge and procedures that could prevent transmission of blood-borne virus (P = 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, only 32 hairdressers agreed to participate to a free specific course on occupational risk offered by the University of Palermo. Although the level of awareness among hairdressers about HIV, hepatitis and risk of transmission was good, there were some unsafe practices that may lead to infections due to blood-borne viruses. The present article highlights the need to improve specific health messages in media campaigns carried out to general population, diffusing more appropriate educational materials for salons and organizing obligatory refresher courses for the hairdressing sector.

  4. Impact of an infection-control program on nurses' knowledge and attitude in pediatric intensive care units at Cairo University hospitals.

    PubMed

    Galal, Yasmine S; Labib, John R; Abouelhamd, Walaa A

    2014-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a prominent problem among patients in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) as it could result in significant morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, and increase in medical care costs. The role of nurses is extremely important in preventing hazards and sequela of healthcare-associated infections. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a health education program regarding infection-control measures on nurses' knowledge and attitude in PICUs at Cairo University hospitals. This was a pre-post test interventional study in which a convenient sample of 125 nurses was taken from the nursing staff in different PICUs at Cairo University hospitals. The study took place in three phases. In the first phase, the nursing staff's knowledge, attitude and practice concerning infection-control measures were tested using a self-administered pretested questionnaire and an observation checklist. The second phase included health education sessions in the form of powerpoint and video presentations; and in the third phase the nurses' knowledge and attitude on infection-control measures were reassessed. A significantly higher level of knowledge was revealed in the postintervention phase as compared with the preintervention phase with regards to the types of nosocomial infections (94.4 vs. 76.8%, P<0.001), the at-risk groups for acquiring infection (95.2 vs. 86.4%, P=0.035) and the measures applied to control nosocomial infections (89.6 vs. 68%, P<0.001). Nurses in the postintervention phase had significantly more knowledge about the types of hand washing (99.2 vs. 91.2%, P=0.006). A significantly higher percent of nurses in the postintervention phase knew the importance of avoiding recapping syringes (72.8 vs. 34.4%, P<0.001) and believed that infection-control measures could protect them completely from acquiring infection (79.2 vs. 65.6%, P=0.033). Statistically significant higher total knowledge and attitude scores were revealed in the

  5. General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia: findings and implications.

    PubMed

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Kamil, Tengku Karmila Tengku; Md Yusof, Faridah Aryani; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Yusoff, Zuraidah Mohd; Saleem, Fahad; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah; Wong, Zhi Yen; Aljadhey, Hisham; Godman, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics are widely prescribed especially for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Their irrational use can increase costs and resistance. Assess knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for URTIs in Selangor, Malaysia, using a cross-sectional survey among general practitioners (GPs) working in private clinics in 2011. One hundred and thirty-nine physicians completed the questionnaire (response rate = 34.8%). 49.6% (n = 69) agreed antibiotics are helpful in treating URTIs, with most GPs agreeing antibiotics may reduce URTI duration and complications. The majority of GPs reported they felt patients expected antibiotics, with 36.7% (n = 51) agreeing patients would change doctors if they did not prescribe antibiotics and 21.6% (n = 30) agreeing when requested they prescribe antibiotics even if they believe them to be unnecessary. When assessed against six criteria, most GPs had a moderate level of knowledge of prescribing for URTIs. However, antibiotic prescriptions could be appreciably reduced. Further programs are needed to educate GPs and patients about antibiotics building on current initiatives.

  6. Knowledge, attitude and practices in relation to prevention and control of schistosomiasis infection in Mwea Kirinyaga county, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mwai, J; Njenga, S; Barasa, M

    2016-08-18

    Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in Kenya. Inadequate knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) on causative factors are some of the critical factors for the increased prevalence. The study assessed KAP on the control and prevention of schistosomiasis infection in Mwea division, Kirinyaga County-Kenya. Four hundred and sixty five house-hold heads were enrolled in this study by use of simple random sampling technique. The study employed an analytical descriptive cross sectional design utilizing both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. A pretested structured questionnaire, Focus Group Discusions (FGDs) and Key Informant Interviews (KII) guides were used for data collection. Descriptive statistics and Chi square tests and Fisher's exact tests were computed where applicable. Data from the FGDs and KIIs were analyzed using NUID.IST NUIRO.6 software. Significant associations between knowledge and demographic factors i.e. age (p = 0.011), education level (p = 0.046), were reported. Handwashing after visiting the toilet (p = 0.001), having a toilet facility at home (p = 0.014); raring animals at home (p = 0.031), households being affected by floods (p = 0.005) and frequency of visits to the paddies (p = 0.037) had a significant association with respondents practices and schistosomiasis infection. Further significance was reported on households being affected by floods during the rainy season (p < 0.001), sources of water in a household (p < 0.047) and having a temporary water body in the area (p = 0.024) with increase in schistosomiasis infection. Results revealed that respondents practices were not significantly associated with gender (p = 0.060), marital status (p = 0.71), wearing of protective gear (p = 0.142) and working on the paddies (p = 0.144). This study reveals that knowledge about the cause, transmission, symptoms and prevention of schistosomiasis among the Mwea

  7. Cervical Cancer Prevention in Malaysia: Knowledge and Attitude of Undergraduate Pharmacy Students Towards Human Papillomavirus Infection, Screening and Vaccination in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Sze Fang, Kelly Num; Lui, Lai Yun

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate knowledge of undergraduate pharmacy students about human papillomavirus infection and their attitude towards its prevention. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 270 undergraduate pharmacy students using a validated questionnaire to assess knowledge about human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer and their attitudes towards human papillomavirus vaccines. Eighty-one percent of the respondents knew that human papillomavirus is a cause of cervical cancer, and 87.8 % knew that this infection is preventable. The gender of the respondents showed the strongest correlations with human papillomavirus knowledge. There were no significant correlations between the ethnic group of the respondents and their human papillomavirus-related knowledge. Higher perceptions of risk were associated with relationship status, and respondents who were in a relationship showed greater interest in vaccinating themselves; relationship status emerged as a unique predictor. The results indicated a moderately high level of knowledge and positive attitude towards human papillomavirus vaccination with few disagreements. The results of this study will help to develop and plan appropriate education campaigns for pharmacy students that aim to reduce human papillomavirus infection and, consequently, the incidence of and mortality caused by cervical cancer in Malaysia.

  8. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae carriers in acute care hospitals and postacute-care facilities: The effect of organizational culture on staff attitudes, knowledge, practices, and infection acquisition rates.

    PubMed

    Fedorowsky, Rina; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Masarwa, Samira; Liberman, Dvora; Rubinovitch, Bina; Lipkin, Valentina

    2015-09-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) carriers are frequently transferred between acute care hospitals (ACHs) and postacute-care facilities (PACFs). Compliance of health care workers with infection prevention guidelines in both care settings may be influenced by the institution's organizational culture. To assess the association between organizational culture and health care workers' attitudes, knowledge, practices, and CRE acquisition rate and to identify differences between different care settings and health care workers' sectors. Cross-sectional descriptive design. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to a sample of 420 health care workers from 1 ACH and 1 PACF belonging to the same health maintenance organization located in central Israel. The organizational culture factor known as staff engagement was positively correlated with infection prevention attitudes and compliance with contact precaution protocols and negatively correlated with CRE acquisition rate. In the 2 care settings, health care workers' attitudes, knowledge, and practices were found to be similar, but CRE acquisition rate was lower in PACFs. Compliance with contact precaution protocols by physicians was lower than compliance reported by other health care workers. Auxiliary staff reported lower knowledge. In a setting of endemic CRE where a multifaceted intervention is already being implemented, organizational culture variables can predict health care workers' attitudes, knowledge, and practices and in turn can affect CRE acquisition rates. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of Iranian health sciences students regarding hepatitis B and C virus infections: A national survey.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Bayatpoor, Mohammad Ehsan; Aftabi Khotbesara, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Motahare Sadat; Sattari, Zahra; Sattari, Paria; Saberi Shakib, Narges; Taheri, Hanie; Abdolrahim Poor Heravi, Sina; Dinizadeh, Mahsa; Vahed, Pedram; Shirsavar, Kiyana; Hosseini, Hediye; Rashvand, Sara; Jalaei, Dorsa; Azarafraz, Mahdi; Naderi, Mohebullah; Pourzakaria, Mahtab; Firoozbakht, Mohammad; Khosravi, Mohammad Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2017-09-08

    The World Health Organization seeks to achieve the goal of viral hepatitis elimination by 2030 and lack of general knowledge about viral hepatitis seems to be a barrier to reaching this goal. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among Iranian health sciences students in 12 Iranian medical sciences universities using a national survey. This survey was conducted during the second Hepatitis Awareness Campaign, which was held during the Iranian National Hepatitis Week (October 22-28, 2016). Students who visited our booths and were willing to participate in our survey were selected using convenience sampling and their HBV- and HCV-related KAP were evaluated. Two thousand one hundred fifty-six health sciences students with mean age of 21.24 years participated in our survey. The mean KAP scores were 7.35 (out of 10), 4.88 (possible score, -20 to +20), and 5.67 (out of 9). Students with experience of accidental exposures to blood (21.6%) had better KAP scores compared with the students without such experiences. The mean KAP scores were associated with subjects' year of education, field of study, university, and province (P < .05). Our study showed that HBV- and HCV-related KAP in a sample of Iranian health sciences students was not satisfying. The results also demonstrated priority of needing intervention regarding KAP in some subject areas, lower years of education, and some universities compared with others. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Parents Regarding Antibiotic Usage in Treating Children's Upper Respiratory Tract Infection at Primary Health Clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Teck, Koh Chee; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Bin Ahmad, Mohd Ikhwan; Binti Abdul Samad, Nuraqilah; Ee Yu, Karen Lai; Binti Ismail, Nurul Farhana; Bin Esa, Muhammad Amirul Aizat

    2016-01-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of parents regarding antibiotic usage for treating upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) among children. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 320 randomly selected parents attending a primary health clinic using self-administered questionnaires. About two-thirds (69.1%) of the parents had poor knowledge level. Only 25.2% and 21.6% of the parents could correctly identify amoxicillin and penicillin as the treatment of children's URTI. However, about two-thirds (67.5%) of the parents were aware of the antibiotic resistance caused by overuse of antibiotics. A significant association was noted between the father's and mother's educational level and family income with the knowledge level. Only mother's educational level depicted a significant association with the attitude. The knowledge of parents regarding antibiotic usage for URTI was poor. More numbers of health promotions and educational campaigns are required to help parents understand about antibiotic usage.

  11. Differences in Knowledge, Attitude, and Behavior towards HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections between Sexually Active Foreign and Chinese Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Kuete, Martin; Huang, Qiao; Rashid, Abid; Ma, Xiu Lan; Yuan, HongFang; Escalera Antezana, Juan Pablo; Yeltay, Rakhmanov; Rao, Meng; He, Qian; Xiong, ChengLiang; Zhang, HuiPing

    2016-01-01

    Although the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) decreased in the last decade worldwide, the number of deaths due to HIV/AIDS and communicable diseases including syphilis, hepatitis, and tuberculosis had dramatically increased in developing countries. Education and behavior are incredibly important factors to prevent these diseases' spread. This study highlights the range of differences in knowledge, attitude, and behavior of 434 sexually active medical students towards HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Because the surveyed population constitutes the forefront of healthcare providers and was originated from different area of the world, this is the first time a study sought to investigate the behavioral attitude of this group of population irrespective of the three levels of their academic and professional knowledge. Several factors including sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behavior, HIV/AIDS, and STIs related patterns play a key role in medical student attitude and behavior towards people infected with HIV/AIDS and STIs. Our findings add consistent value in prior studies which aimed to stop new infections and also imply further investigations on the management of the studied infections by medical students. The present study arouses much interest among participants and provides evidence of reinforcing medical students' education on HIV/AIDS and STIs. PMID:27195287

  12. Differences in Knowledge, Attitude, and Behavior towards HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections between Sexually Active Foreign and Chinese Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Kuete, Martin; Huang, Qiao; Rashid, Abid; Ma, Xiu Lan; Yuan, HongFang; Escalera Antezana, Juan Pablo; Yeltay, Rakhmanov; Rao, Meng; He, Qian; Xiong, ChengLiang; Zhang, HuiPing

    2016-01-01

    Although the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) decreased in the last decade worldwide, the number of deaths due to HIV/AIDS and communicable diseases including syphilis, hepatitis, and tuberculosis had dramatically increased in developing countries. Education and behavior are incredibly important factors to prevent these diseases' spread. This study highlights the range of differences in knowledge, attitude, and behavior of 434 sexually active medical students towards HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Because the surveyed population constitutes the forefront of healthcare providers and was originated from different area of the world, this is the first time a study sought to investigate the behavioral attitude of this group of population irrespective of the three levels of their academic and professional knowledge. Several factors including sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behavior, HIV/AIDS, and STIs related patterns play a key role in medical student attitude and behavior towards people infected with HIV/AIDS and STIs. Our findings add consistent value in prior studies which aimed to stop new infections and also imply further investigations on the management of the studied infections by medical students. The present study arouses much interest among participants and provides evidence of reinforcing medical students' education on HIV/AIDS and STIs.

  13. Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Students' Knowledge and Attitudes about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Ashvind N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of knowledge and attitudes of 220 adolescents with severe emotional disturbances toward AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection found most students knew the main modes of HIV transmission. Student age, race, and gender were related to level of knowledge and attitudes toward people with…

  14. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Parents Regarding Antibiotic Usage in Treating Children’s Upper Respiratory Tract Infection at Primary Health Clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Teck, Koh Chee; Bin Ahmad, Mohd Ikhwan; Binti Abdul Samad, Nuraqilah; Ee Yu, Karen Lai; Binti Ismail, Nurul Farhana; Bin Esa, Muhammad Amirul Aizat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of parents regarding antibiotic usage for treating upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) among children. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 320 randomly selected parents attending a primary health clinic using self-administered questionnaires. Results: About two-thirds (69.1%) of the parents had poor knowledge level. Only 25.2% and 21.6% of the parents could correctly identify amoxicillin and penicillin as the treatment of children’s URTI. However, about two-thirds (67.5%) of the parents were aware of the antibiotic resistance caused by overuse of antibiotics. A significant association was noted between the father’s and mother’s educational level and family income with the knowledge level. Only mother’s educational level depicted a significant association with the attitude. Conclusion: The knowledge of parents regarding antibiotic usage for URTI was poor. More numbers of health promotions and educational campaigns are required to help parents understand about antibiotic usage. PMID:28462275

  15. Towards an effective control programme of soil-transmitted helminth infections among Orang Asli in rural Malaysia. Part 2: Knowledge, attitude, and practices.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Nabil A; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Roslan, Muhammad Aidil; Bulgiba, Awang

    2013-01-28

    In the first part of this study, we investigated the prevalence and associated key factors of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections among Orang Asli children in rural Malaysia; an alarming high prevalence and five key factors significantly associated with infections were reported. Part 2 of this study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on STH infections among Orang Asli in Peninsular Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 215 households from 13 villages in Lipis district, Pahang, Malaysia. Demographic and socioeconomic information of the participants and their KAP on STH were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Overall, 61.4% of the participants had prior knowledge about intestinal helminths with a lack of knowledge on the transmission (28.8%), signs and symptoms (29.3%) as well as the prevention (16.3%). Half of the respondents considered STH as harmful, while their practices to prevent infections were still inadequate. Significant associations between the KAP and age, gender, educational and employment status, family size, and household monthly income were reported. Moreover, significantly lower prevalence of STH infections was reported among children of respondents who wear shoes/slippers when outside the house (72.8%; 95% CI= 62.6, 80.5 vs 87.0%; 95% CI= 81.4, 91.1), wash their hands before eating (32.4%; 95% CI= 24.3, 42.2 vs 51.4%; 95% CI= 44.7, 60.1), and wash their hands after defecation (47.8%; 95% CI= 35.7, 57.1 vs 69.2%; 95% CI= 63.7, 78.7) as compared to their counterparts. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the educational level of the respondents was the most important factor significantly associated with the KAP on STH among this population. This study reveals inadequate knowledge, attitude and practices on STH infections among Orang Asli in rural Malaysia. Hence, there is a great need for a proper health education programme and community mobilisation to enhance prevention

  16. Towards an effective control programme of soil-transmitted helminth infections among Orang Asli in rural Malaysia. Part 2: Knowledge, attitude, and practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the first part of this study, we investigated the prevalence and associated key factors of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections among Orang Asli children in rural Malaysia; an alarming high prevalence and five key factors significantly associated with infections were reported. Part 2 of this study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on STH infections among Orang Asli in Peninsular Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 215 households from 13 villages in Lipis district, Pahang, Malaysia. Demographic and socioeconomic information of the participants and their KAP on STH were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results Overall, 61.4% of the participants had prior knowledge about intestinal helminths with a lack of knowledge on the transmission (28.8%), signs and symptoms (29.3%) as well as the prevention (16.3%). Half of the respondents considered STH as harmful, while their practices to prevent infections were still inadequate. Significant associations between the KAP and age, gender, educational and employment status, family size, and household monthly income were reported. Moreover, significantly lower prevalence of STH infections was reported among children of respondents who wear shoes/slippers when outside the house (72.8%; 95% CI= 62.6, 80.5 vs 87.0%; 95% CI= 81.4, 91.1), wash their hands before eating (32.4%; 95% CI= 24.3, 42.2 vs 51.4%; 95% CI= 44.7, 60.1), and wash their hands after defecation (47.8%; 95% CI= 35.7, 57.1 vs 69.2%; 95% CI= 63.7, 78.7) as compared to their counterparts. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the educational level of the respondents was the most important factor significantly associated with the KAP on STH among this population. Conclusion This study reveals inadequate knowledge, attitude and practices on STH infections among Orang Asli in rural Malaysia. Hence, there is a great need for a proper health education programme and

  17. Knowledge, attitude and practices of adults of the reproductive years on reproductive health matters, with emphasis on HIV infected people in a Caribbean society.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Paul A; South-Bourne, Neva; Francis, Cynthia G

    2010-08-01

    South and Southeast Asia represent the largest number of new HIV infections, while Sub-Saharan Africa represents the highest rate of new infections, followed by Latin America and the Caribbean. Yet no study that has emerged in the Caribbean has comprehensively examined young people's sexual and reproductive health attitudes, knowledge and practices, comparing the result with those who are HIV infected. The present study examines core issues of sexual and reproductive health among youths, particularly with respect to HIV. The sample was 1,800 respondents ages 15-49 years. Multivariate logistic regressions were fitted using one outcome measure: self-reported confirmed positive HIV test results. Almost 34% of the sample had been tested for HIV, and 16.9% had done this in the past 12 months. Only 0.2% of the sample knew that they were HIV positive and 4% had positive HIV test results when they did the test. Of those with a positive HIV test result, 58.1% were females. Approximately 16% of those with HIV have had an STI infection in the past, and 61% were actively practicing religion. The mean age of first sexual relations for the sample was 15.4 years (SD = 3.2 years), and 15.6 years for those infected with HIV. Four variables emerged as statistically significant factors of Jamaicans' willingness to do an HIV test in the future. The findings of this research are far-reaching and can be used to guide public health policy formulation.

  18. A computerized education module improves patient knowledge and attitudes about appropriate antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Price, Erika Leemann; Mackenzie, Thomas D; Metlay, Joshua P; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    Over-use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) increases antimicrobial resistance, treatment costs, and side effects. Patient desire for antibiotics contributes to over-use. To explore whether a point-of-care interactive computerized education module increases patient knowledge and decreases desire for antibiotics. Bilingual (English/Spanish) interactive kiosks were available in 8 emergency departments as part of a multidimensional intervention to reduce antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. The symptom-tailored module included assessment of symptoms, knowledge about ARIs (3 items), and desire for antibiotics on a 10-point visual analog scale. Multivariable analysis assessed predictors of change in desire for antibiotics. Of 686 adults with ARI symptoms, 63% initially thought antibiotics might help. The proportion of patients with low (1-3 on the scale) desire for antibiotics increased from 22% pre-module to 49% post-module (p<.001). Self-report of "learning something new" was associated with decreased desire for antibiotics, after adjusting for baseline characteristics (p=.001). An interactive educational kiosk improved knowledge about antibiotics and ARIs. Learning correlated with changes in personal desire for antibiotics. By reducing desire for antibiotics, point-of-care interactive educational computer technology may help decrease inappropriate use for antibiotics for ARIs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge, attitude, the perceived risks of infection and sources of information about HIV/AIDS among pregnant women in an urban population of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saudan; Fukuda, Hideki; Ingle, G K; Tatara, Kozo

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge, attitude, perceived risks of infection and sources of information about HIV/AIDS were assessed among pregnant women. Large proportion of study subjects was illiterate (44.5%) and least was graduate or more (3.5%). Subjects mainly belonged to middle (46.1%) and lower socioe-conomic status (53.8%). Only 39.3% of subjects heard of AIDS. There was rising trend on heard of AIDS with various educational levels. Only 45% subjects responded correctly that AIDS was not transmitted by mosquito bite. Lower level of correct knowledge was also observed among all educational groups and it was lowest 21.1% among illiterate. Senior secondary or graduate or more educated responded 100% correct to question that one could get AIDS by having sex with prostitutes while illiterate responded 78.9% correctly. More educated had higher correct knowledge on modes of transmission compared to illiterate and less educated. Among various groups of educational status, the relationship of correct knowledge on modes of transmission was statistically significant. Of those heard of AIDS 79.3% perceived threat of AIDS to the health of local community. Mass media was source of information on HIV/AIDS among 86.3% out of which television was most popular source (74.6%). Large proportion of subjects (48.6%) had preference to get information on AIDS from doctors.

  20. A survey of Tennessee veterinarian and physician attitudes, knowledge, and practices regarding zoonoses prevention among animal owners with HIV infection or AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hill, William Allen; Petty, Gregory C; Erwin, Paul C; Souza, Marcy J

    2012-06-15

    To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and practices of Tennessee veterinarians and physicians engaged in clinical practice regarding the risk for and prevention of zoonoses in people with HIV infection or AIDS. Cross-sectional survey. Licensed Tennessee veterinarians and physicians engaged in clinical practice. A survey was mailed in January 2010 to 454 licensed veterinarians and 1,737 licensed physicians. 181 of 419 (43.20%) eligible veterinarians and 201 of 1,376 (14.61%) eligible physicians responded to the survey. A majority of both veterinarians (131/179 [73.18%]) and physicians (97/192 [50.52%]) indicated that veterinarians should always or almost always be involved in advising clients with HIV infection or AIDS. The majority of veterinarians (120/173 [69.36%]) indicated they always or almost always discussed with clients the potential risk to immune-compromised persons after diagnosing a zoonosis. A high proportion (88/94 [93.62%]) of physicians indicated they never or rarely initiated discussions about zoonoses with patients with HIV infection or AIDS. All physicians (94/94 [100%]) indicated they never or rarely contacted veterinarians for advice on zoonoses. Similarly, 174 of 180 (96.76%) veterinarians had never or rarely contacted physicians for advice on zoonoses risks. Only 25.97% of veterinarians and 33.33% of physicians were correctly able to identify zoonotic pathogens of greatest concern to people with HIV infection or AIDS. We identified several implications for veterinary medical and medical practice that may reduce zoonoses transmission risks for people with HIV infection or AIDS, including increased communication between veterinarians and physicians, increased communication between people with HIV infection or AIDS and health-care providers, increased availability of client educational materials, and increased participation in zoonoses continuing education opportunities by health-care providers.

  1. College Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors regarding Sex and Contraceptives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toews, Michelle L.; Yazedjian, Ani

    2012-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in college students' knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behaviors of 1,004 predominantly heterosexual students. Results indicated that students had limited knowledge about contraceptives and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Females had a more positive view about contraceptives and males had more…

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practices of adults of the reproductive years on reproductive health matters, with emphasis on HIV infected people in a Caribbean society

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Paul A.; South-Bourne, Neva; Francis, Cynthia G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: South and Southeast Asia represent the largest number of new HIV infections, while Sub-Saharan Africa represents the highest rate of new infections, followed by Latin America and the Caribbean. Yet no study that has emerged in the Caribbean has comprehensively examined young people's sexual and reproductive health attitudes, knowledge and practices, comparing the result with those who are HIV infected. Aim: The present study examines core issues of sexual and reproductive health among youths, particularly with respect to HIV. Material and Methods: The sample was 1,800 respondents ages 15-49 years. Multivariate logistic regressions were fitted using one outcome measure: self-reported confirmed positive HIV test results. Results: Almost 34% of the sample had been tested for HIV, and 16.9% had done this in the past 12 months. Only 0.2% of the sample knew that they were HIV positive and 4% had positive HIV test results when they did the test. Of those with a positive HIV test result, 58.1% were females. Approximately 16% of those with HIV have had an STI infection in the past, and 61% were actively practicing religion. The mean age of first sexual relations for the sample was 15.4 years (SD = 3.2 years), and 15.6 years for those infected with HIV. Four variables emerged as statistically significant factors of Jamaicans’ willingness to do an HIV test in the future. Conclusion: The findings of this research are far-reaching and can be used to guide public health policy formulation. PMID:22737677

  3. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of South African healthcare workers regarding the prevention and treatment of influenza among HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gaga, Sisanda; Clark, David; Muller, Madeleine; Kuwane, Bulenani; Cohen, Cheryl; Walaza, Sibongile; Tempia, Stefano; Ramatoboe, Puleng; Furumele, Tsakani; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; McMorrow, Meredith L.; Cohen, Adam L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The South African Department of Health (DOH) publishes annual guidelines identifying priority groups, including immunosuppressed individuals and healthcare workers (HCW), for influenza vaccination and treatment. How these guidelines have impacted HCW and their patients, particularly those infected with HIV, remains unknown. Methods We aimed to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza and the vaccine among South African HCW. Surveys were distributed by two local non-governmental organizations in public health clinics and hospitals in 21 districts/municipalities (5 of 9 provinces). Results There were 1164 respondents; median age 41 years; 978/1126 (87%) female; 801/1122 (71%) nurses. One-third (34%) of HCW reported getting influenza vaccine 2013/2014 and most (94%) recommended influenza vaccine to patients infected with HIV. Ability to get vaccine free of charge (aOR 1.69; 95% CI 1.21–2.37) and having received influenza government training (aOR 1.50; 95% CI 1.04–2.15) were significantly associated with self-reported vaccination in 2013/2014. Self-reported 2013/2014 vaccination (aOR 3.76; 95% CI 1.28–11.03) and availability of influenza vaccine during the healthcare visit (aOR 2.56; 95% CI 1.18–5.57) were significantly associated with recommending influenza vaccine to patients infected with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion Only one-third of participants were vaccinated in 2013–2014 but those who were vaccinated were more likely to recommend vaccination to their patients. Free and close access to influenza vaccine were associated with a higher likelihood of getting vaccinated in 2013/2014. HCW who reported getting the influenza vaccine themselves, had vaccine to offer during the patient consult and were familiar with DOH guidelines/trainings were more likely to recommend vaccine to HIV-infected patients. PMID:28301593

  4. Physician's knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infections of humans in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, A Danielle; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Storms, Aaron D; Samaan, Gina; Ariawan, Iwan; Soeharno, Nugroho; Kreslake, Jennifer M; Storey, J Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    Indonesia has reported highest number of fatal human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N1) virus infection worldwide since 2005. There are limited data available on seasonal and pandemic influenza in Indonesia. During 2012, we conducted a survey of clinicians in two districts in western Java, Indonesia, to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of clinical diagnosis, testing, and treatment of patients with seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, or HPAI H5N1 virus infections. Overall, a very low percentage of physician participants reported ever diagnosing hospitalized patients with seasonal, pandemic, or HPAI H5N1 influenza. Use of influenza testing was low in outpatients and hospitalized patients, and use of antiviral treatment was very low for clinically diagnosed influenza patients. Further research is needed to explore health system barriers for influenza diagnostic testing and availability of antivirals for treatment of influenza in Indonesia. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Assessment of Reporting, Attitudes and Knowledge About the Stab Incidents and Professional Risk of Viral Infection among Health Care Professionals in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Sabina; Pranjic, Nurka; Sarajlic-Spahic, Selvedina; Ahmetagic, Sead; Huseinagic, Senad

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Goal The goal of the research is to determine the relationship between frequency and reporting of stab incidents, attitudes and knowledge about stab incidents and occupational risk for transmission of viral infection with HBV, HCV or HIV among health care professionals employed in primary health care. Material and methods Conducted is prospective, cross-section study by questionnaires in 2012. The survey included health professionals in Primary Health Care Center in Tuzla. The final sample has 131 respondents (85% women). Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical package SPSS version 20.0. Results The prevalence rate of stab incidents throughout their career in our study was 66%; while the rate of reported incidents was 4.83 ˜ 5 times lower than the actual prevalence. In 49 out of 87 cases this was a case of hollow needle prick. The most common causes of stab incidents are the time pressure, unforeseen reactions of patients and lack of concentration. Conclusion Stab incidents are often not reported in in developing countries. Training in order to raise awareness and knowledge about the problem, proper procedures, good organization of work and anti-stress program, safer disposal, conducting prophylaxis before and after exposure monitored by the relevant institutions of occupational medicine should contribute to solving this problem. PMID:24082835

  6. Counseling Psychologists' Attitudes and Knowledge about Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaud, Lois I.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes held by counseling psychologists about alcoholics and alcoholism, and to determine the relationship between these attitudes and the individual's level of experience, knowledge and training in the alcoholism domain. Although counseling psychologists typically deal with developmental issues,…

  7. Improvement of the low knowledge, attitude and practice of hepatitis B virus infection among Saudi national guard personnel after educational intervention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was reported to be higher in military personnel than the general population in Saudi Arabia (SA), there is lack of studies assessing HBV awareness among them. The objective was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of HBV infection among military personnel. Methods An intervention design with pre- and post-education KAP questionnaire was completed among National Guard soldiers working in Jeddah during January 2009. Educational intervention was provided through educational leaflets, group and individual discussions, visual show, and a lecture. A score was created from the correct answers to 58 questions. Results A total of 400 male soldiers with mean age 30.7 ± 6.1 years completed both questionnaires. The majority had school education (96.8%) and in the lower military ranks (66.0%). Only 19.5% of soldiers reported HBV vaccine intake. The low median and inter-quartile range of the pre-intervention score (16, 6–26) markedly increased after education (to 53, 50–55, p<0.001). The overall improvement of mean KAP score (204%) was also observed in all its component scores; disease nature (272%), methods of transmission (206%), prevention and control (109%), attitude (155%), and practice (192%). The improvement was evident irrespective of socio-demographic characteristics and history of HBV vaccine. KAP scores were significantly associated with higher educational levels, higher monthly income, administrative jobs, and higher job ranks. Conclusion We are reporting a low level of HBV awareness among Saudi military population. The study confirms the need and effectiveness of focused multifaceted educational campaigns among the military population. PMID:23111118

  8. Improvement of the low knowledge, attitude and practice of hepatitis B virus infection among Saudi national guard personnel after educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Al-Thaqafy, Majid S; Balkhy, Hanan H; Memish, Ziad; Makhdom, Yahya M; Ibrahim, Adel; Al-Amri, Abdulfattah; Al-Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem

    2012-10-30

    Although the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was reported to be higher in military personnel than the general population in Saudi Arabia (SA), there is lack of studies assessing HBV awareness among them. The objective was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of HBV infection among military personnel. An intervention design with pre- and post-education KAP questionnaire was completed among National Guard soldiers working in Jeddah during January 2009. Educational intervention was provided through educational leaflets, group and individual discussions, visual show, and a lecture. A score was created from the correct answers to 58 questions. A total of 400 male soldiers with mean age 30.7 ± 6.1 years completed both questionnaires. The majority had school education (96.8%) and in the lower military ranks (66.0%). Only 19.5% of soldiers reported HBV vaccine intake. The low median and inter-quartile range of the pre-intervention score (16, 6-26) markedly increased after education (to 53, 50-55, p<0.001). The overall improvement of mean KAP score (204%) was also observed in all its component scores; disease nature (272%), methods of transmission (206%), prevention and control (109%), attitude (155%), and practice (192%). The improvement was evident irrespective of socio-demographic characteristics and history of HBV vaccine. KAP scores were significantly associated with higher educational levels, higher monthly income, administrative jobs, and higher job ranks. We are reporting a low level of HBV awareness among Saudi military population. The study confirms the need and effectiveness of focused multifaceted educational campaigns among the military population.

  9. Antibiotic use for upper respiratory tract infections in children: A cross-sectional survey of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of parents in Greece

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are common in children. The cause of URTIs is usually viral, but parents' attitudes often contribute to inappropriate prescription of antibiotics, promoting antibiotic resistance. The objective of this study was to document and analyse parental beliefs on antibiotic use for children with URTIs in Greece, a country with high levels of antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. Methods A knowledge-attitude-practice questionnaire was developed and distributed to Greek parents caring for children who were 5-6 years old, between January and July of the same school year. The sample of the study contained parents from all geographic areas of Greece. Results The majority of Greek parents (80%) believed that UTRIs are mostly self-limited, although 74% of them expected to receive antibiotics when such a diagnosis was given. Earache was the most common reason for which parents expected antibiotics (45%). Greek parents rarely gave antibiotics to their children without medical advice (10%) and most (88%) believed that unnecessary antibiotic use drives antibiotic resistance and they were happy to receive symptomatic therapy if instructed by their physician. Almost 70% of parents confused antibiotics with other medicines used for symptomatic therapy for a child with URTI. Conclusion Greek parents have a trusted relationship with their paediatrician and rarely give antibiotics without medical advice, indicating that parents contribute less than expected to antibiotic misuse. Parents also appreciate the benign course of most URTIs and the fact that unnecessary antibiotic use is harmful. More time needs to be invested in educating mostly physicians on the potential benefit from reducing antibiotic prescribing for children with URTI. PMID:21729266

  10. The effects of a systematically developed photo-novella on knowledge, attitudes, communication and behavioural intentions with respect to sexually transmitted infections among secondary school learners in South Africa.

    PubMed

    James, Shamagonam; Reddy, Priscilla S; Ruiter, Robert A C; Taylor, Myra; Jinabhai, Champaklal C; Van Empelen, Pepijn; Van den Borne, Bart

    2005-06-01

    A pre-post test follow-up design was used to test the effects of a systematically developed photo-novella (Laduma) on knowledge, attitudes, communication and behavioural intentions with respect to sexually transmitted infections, after a single reading by 1168 secondary school learners in South Africa. The reading resulted in an increase in knowledge on the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), change in attitude to condom use and towards people with STIs and/or HIV/AIDS, as well as increased intention to practice safe sex. Laduma did not influence communication about sexually transmitted infections and reported sexual behaviour and condom use. While print media proved to be an effective strategy to reach large numbers of youth and prepare them for adequate preventive behaviours, the study also identified the need to combine print media with other planned theory-based interventions that build confidence and skills to initiate the preventive behaviour.

  11. Descriptive study on parents' knowledge, attitudes and practices on antibiotic use and misuse in children with upper respiratory tract infections in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Rousounidis, Andreas; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Panagakou, Sotiria; Theodoridou, Maria; Syrogiannopoulos, George; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2011-08-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are common in children and represent a significant cause of antibiotic abuse which contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance. A survey was conducted in Cyprus in 2006 to assess parents' and pediatricians' Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) concerning the role of antibiotics in children with URTIs. A school-based stratified geographic clustering sampling was used and a pre-tested KAP questionnaire was distributed. A different questionnaire was distributed to paediatricians. Demographic factors associated with antibiotic misuse were identified by backward logistic regression analysis. The parental overall response rate was 69.3%. Parents (N = 1,462) follow pediatricians advice and rarely administer antibiotics acquired over the counter. Although a third expects an antibiotic prescription for URTI symptoms, most deny pressuring their doctors. Low parental education was the most important independent risk factor positively related to antibiotic misuse (OR = 2.88, 95%CI 2.02 to 4.12, p < 0.001). Pediatricians (N = 33) denied prescribing antibiotics after parental pressure but admit that parents ask for antibiotics and believe they expect antibiotic prescriptions even when not needed. In conclusion, Cypriotic parents trust their primary care providers. Although it appears that antibiotic misuse is not driven by parental pressure, the pediatricians' view differs.

  12. Descriptive Study on Parents’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices on Antibiotic Use and Misuse in Children with Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Rousounidis, Andreas; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Panagakou, Sotiria; Theodoridou, Maria; Syrogiannopoulos, George; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2011-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are common in children and represent a significant cause of antibiotic abuse which contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance. A survey was conducted in Cyprus in 2006 to assess parents’ and pediatricians’ Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) concerning the role of antibiotics in children with URTIs. A school-based stratified geographic clustering sampling was used and a pre-tested KAP questionnaire was distributed. A different questionnaire was distributed to paediatricians. Demographic factors associated with antibiotic misuse were identified by backward logistic regression analysis. The parental overall response rate was 69.3%. Parents (N = 1,462) follow pediatricians advice and rarely administer antibiotics acquired over the counter. Although a third expects an antibiotic prescription for URTI symptoms, most deny pressuring their doctors. Low parental education was the most important independent risk factor positively related to antibiotic misuse (OR = 2.88, 95%CI 2.02 to 4.12, p < 0.001). Pediatricians (N = 33) denied prescribing antibiotics after parental pressure but admit that parents ask for antibiotics and believe they expect antibiotic prescriptions even when not needed. In conclusion, Cypriotic parents trust their primary care providers. Although it appears that antibiotic misuse is not driven by parental pressure, the pediatricians’ view differs. PMID:21909304

  13. Parental knowledge, attitudes and antibiotic use for acute upper respiratory tract infection in children attending a primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chan, G C; Tang, S F

    2006-04-01

    A study was carried out in a primary healthcare clinic in the Hulu Langat district of Malaysia to assess the parental knowledge, attitudes and antibiotic use for common childhood acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). A cross-sectional study involving 421 parents, who were surveyed by using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, from April to June 2001. Approximately 59 percent of parents from this study believed that weather was the main cause of acute URTI of their children, 13 percent thought it was due to food, and only about 27 percent said it was caused by germs. Nearly 68 percent, 69 percent and 76 percent of them believed that antibiotics was helpful in treating the common cold, cough and fever, respectively. 29 percent of parents who thought that their child with acute URTI needed antibiotics were not prescribed with any. On the other hand, 17 percent believed that antibiotics were unnecessary when prescribed. 28 percent of parents had requested for antibiotics, and 93 percent received what they requested for their child with acute URTI. About 31 percent of parents who did not request any antibiotics claimed that private general practitioners habitually prescribed antibiotics. The antibiotic compliance was poor with only 74 percent completing the entire course, with 85 percent of them stopping once they improved symptomatically. 15 percent of parents gave "leftover" antibiotics, 24 percent gave "shared" antibiotics, and 5.5 percent bought antibiotics for their child with acute URTI without consulting a doctor. This study shows that parents often have inadequate knowledge and misconceptions on antibiotic use for acute URTI in children. Improved parental education may reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescription and antimicrobial resistance in the community.

  14. Menopause knowledge and attitude among Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Taherpour, M; Sefidi, F; Afsharinia, S; Hamissi, JH

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was done to assess the effects of training on knowledge and attitude level promotion of post menopause women about menopause. Methods & Material: The research communication included 100 menopausal women aged 45-60 years, who were selected in a stratified manner (according to the economic status: poor, average, and good). The tool used was an examiners-made questionnaire, which contained 3 parts: demographic characteristics, knowledge and attitude measurement. Results: Eleven percent of the studied women had a low knowledge regarding menopause and 1% was good. After training, 27% got a good knowledge and no one remained at the low level. The attitude of 59% of the studied women regarding menopause was positive and 80% got a positive attitude after training. A significant relation was found between knowledge and attitude, before and after training. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the majority of women judge menopause as a positive incident, it seems that paying attention to their training caused the bringing to their knowledge of the natural menopause and having a healthy and jolly life. PMID:28255401

  15. Attitudes towards and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Andrew; Hiday, Virginia Aldige'

    Most research on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been medical and most social science research on AIDS has been concerned with social factors in its spread and with social-psychological effects of contracting AIDS. This study was conducted to examine public attitudes toward, and public knowledge about AIDS. Knowledge about AIDS was…

  16. Public knowledge and attitudes about diazepam.

    PubMed

    Mansbridge, B; Fisher, S

    1984-01-01

    A total of 147 outpatients waiting for a prescription to be filled at a hospital pharmacy were tested on their knowledge about diazepam (Valium). Subjects scored highest on questions about the effects of a small overdose, the drug's interaction with alcohol and hypnotics, and the relative contraindications of pregnancy and breast-feeding. Subjects were least knowledgeable about the drug's generic name, side effects, and interaction with minor stimulants (coffee, tea, cola, and cigarettes). Subjects who had previously used diazepam (N = 97) knew significantly more than subjects who had never taken it, but subjects waiting for a diazepam prescription to be filled (N = 40) were not more knowledgeable than subjects having another type of prescription filled. In contrast to recent findings that increasing patients' drug knowledge via "Patient Package Inserts" (PPIs) may also create an overcautious attitude toward the drug, the present study finds that diazepam knowledge gained experimentally is accompanied by an attitude shift away from such overcautiousness.

  17. Librarians' Attitudes toward Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop an understanding of the factors that support or constrain the individual's sharing knowledge in the organization. The current study seeks to explore whether personality (self-efficacy and self-esteem) and situational (cognitive appraisal: threat versus challenge) characteristics influence participants'…

  18. Librarians' Attitudes toward Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop an understanding of the factors that support or constrain the individual's sharing knowledge in the organization. The current study seeks to explore whether personality (self-efficacy and self-esteem) and situational (cognitive appraisal: threat versus challenge) characteristics influence participants'…

  19. Father attitudes and knowledge about breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    García-Fragoso, Lourdes; Jiménez, Dorka; Ortiz, Nerian; Quintero, María

    2013-01-01

    Studies have identified fathers' attitude as the strongest indicator of whether her partner will breastfeed. To determine the attitudes and knowledge of fathers toward breastfeeding. The study included 84 volunteer fathers who answered a survey. Mean age of participants was 27 years. Most fathers (88%) would like their partners to breastfeed. Most men (56%) reported that it is acceptable for a woman to breastfeed in public. Negative attitudes included feeling jealous about breastfeeding (10%), thinking that breastfeeding is bad for breasts (17%), breastfeeding makes breasts look ugly (26%), and breastfeeding separates the baby from the father (7%). A few misconceptions about breastfeeding were identified. Most fathers have positive attitudes towards breastfeeding. We should emphasize the importance of exclusive breastfeeding and clarify misconceptions that may cause early discontinuation of breastfeeding. Programs directed toward educating fathers will help them serve as sources of support for their partners.

  20. Nutritional knowledge and attitudes of dental students.

    PubMed

    Pietz, C L; Fryer, B A; Fryer, H C

    1980-03-01

    The nutritional knowledge and attitudes of 230 dental students were studied. The students answered 68.6% of the nutritional knowledge questions currectly, but the test scores were low because they were adversely affected by the degree of certainty. First-year students scored significantly higher than fourth-year students. There was no significant difference between scores of men and women. Knowledge scores were highest for questions on nutrition and oral health and lowest for those on nutritional assessment. Dental students generally expressed favorable attitudes toward nutrition and nutritional care of patients. They agreed that dentists were vital members of the health team and had a responsibility to become involved in health screening and nutrition education of patients. Dietitians were seen as valuable resources to be consulted about nutrition education of the dental patient. More first-year students supported the idea that dentists should prescribe nutritoinal supplements for patients, whereas more fourth-year students were undecided about this matter. There were no differences in nutrition attitude scores attributable to gender of the student or year in dental school. In this study, nutritional knowledge scores did not correlate with nutrition attitude scores.

  1. Turkish school teachers' knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nur, Naim

    2012-06-01

    To assess Turkish school teachers' knowledge, attitudes, and misconceptions of HIV/AIDS. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in Sivas, Middle Anatolian province of Turkey, from January to May 2009. We selected and interviewed 898 teachers using a simple systematic sampling method. All respondents heard about AIDS. Most knew that it could be transmitted by infected blood (98.0%) and sexual contact (93.4%) and some (33.2%) thought that it could be transmitted by mosquitoes. Although the majority of them strongly agreed or agreed with the statement that "people with AIDS should be helped, supported and treated" (98.0%), about 40% and 70% of them, respectively, agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that infected people should be quarantined. Young teachers with a higher level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS had more positive attitudes. This study provided basic information on school teachers' AIDS knowledge and attitudes and showed that various misconceptions of HIV transmission were a matter of concern. A considerable number of respondents with undesirable attitudes toward HIV/AIDS indicates the need for education of teachers on the subject.

  2. Risk and vulnerability of key populations to HIV infection in Iran; knowledge, attitude and practises of female sex workers, prison inmates and people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Khajehkazemi, Razieh; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Navadeh, Soodabeh; Setayesh, Hamidreza; Sajadi, Leily; Osooli, Mehdi; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    Background In this study data of three national surveys conducted among female sex workers (FSW), prison inmates and people who inject drugs (PWID) were presented and compared in relation to knowledge, attitude, and practises. The surveys were conducted in 2009 and 2010 and included 2546 PWID, 872 FSW and 5530 prison inmates. Knowledge, attitude and practises towards HIV were measured through similar questions for each category. Over 90% of all participants had ever heard of HIV/AIDS, although only approximately half of them perceived themselves at risk of contracting HIV. More than 80% were able to correctly identify the ways of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV; while more than two-thirds did not use condom in their last sexual contact. Approximately 20% of prisoners and FSW had a history of injecting drugs. Among all participants who have injected drugs, prisoners had the highest unsafe injecting behaviour at the last injection (61%), followed by FSW (11%) and PWID (3%). Despite major efforts to control the HIV epidemic in Iran, the level of risk and vulnerability among prisoners, FSW and PWID is still high. The level of comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS is relatively good; however, their risk perception of contracting HIV is low and high-risk behaviours are prevalent. Therefore, HIV prevention programs should be redesigned in a more comprehensive way to identify the best venues to reach the largest number of people at a higher risk of contracting HIV and decrease their risk overlaps and vulnerability factors.

  3. Changing Attitudes and Knowledge Toward SNAP Application.

    PubMed

    Bird, Carolyn L; McClelland, Jacquelyn W

    2017-01-01

    To examine effectiveness of an educational intervention on attitude and knowledge related to accessing and qualifying for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Cross-sectional survey. Community sites (38) in North Carolina. Low-income adult participants who provided data (n = 558). Participants completed pre- and postsurveys for the 45-minute program. Theoretically based surveys measured knowledge requisite to the decision to apply for SNAP benefits. Paired sample t tests tested the hypothesis of "no difference" in postintervention knowledge. Knowledge gains were statistically significant on all questions ( P < .01) including the amount of food a minimum benefit could purchase, how to apply for SNAP, how the electronic benefit transfer card and benefits work, eligibility restrictions, and how to receive application assistance. Subsequent percentage change analyses revealed the strongest intervention effects to be how to apply and accessing application assistance. Effective theory-based programs can improve knowledge and dispel myths concerning SNAP participation among low-income participants.

  4. A Survey of Students' Attitudes and Knowledge on Energy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1982-01-01

    A 64-item questionnaire was used to determine college students' (N=1,515) attitudes/knowledge on energy issues. Comparisons were made between classroom (nonvolunteers) and library (volunteers) participants on opinions regarding energy situation, attitudes regarding energy future, energy-related knowledge questions, and attitude/knowledge change…

  5. University students' knowledge and attitudes toward emergency contraception pills.

    PubMed

    Downing, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess university students' knowledge and attitudes toward emergency contraception pills (ECPs). A written survey was administered to a convenience sample at a university. Study findings showed favorable student attitudes toward ECP and poor knowledge levels. Knowledge and attitude scores were not influenced by gender. Students who reported receiving health care provider ECP counseling had more positive attitudes toward ECP than those who did not receive counseling, but no knowledge level difference existed. More research is needed on methods to educate students on ECP and on the relationship between knowledge, attitudes and ECP utilization.

  6. [Beliefs, attitudes and knowledge about sex education].

    PubMed

    Fernández, L; Bustos, L; González, L; Palma, D; Villagrán, J; Muñoz, S

    2000-06-01

    Previous reports show that Chilean teenagers have an inadequate knowledge about sexuality and reproduction. To compare the knowledge about sexuality among adolescents coming from private and public schools, with and without sexual education programs. A structured anonymous inquiry, containing multiple choice and open questions, was applied to a sample of 229 adolescents attending seventh and eighth grade of junior school, in private and public schools of Temuco, Chile. Eleven percent of adolescents had already their first sexual intercourse at a mean age of 12.2 +/- 2.4 years old. Of these, 96% came from public schools. An overall analysis of tests, disclosed a 53% of correct answers to the inquiry. Adolescents coming from private schools had a better performance than those coming from public schools. Sexual attitudes were not influenced by sexual education programs. Adolescents coming from private schools have a better sexual knowledge level and more conservative attitudes towards sexuality. Overall knowledge is inadequate albeit overvalued. These teenagers are high risk group for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases and require efficient sexual education programs.

  7. Consumer knowledge and attitudes toward nutritional labels.

    PubMed

    Cannoosamy, Komeela; Pugo-Gunsam, Prity; Jeewon, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    To determine Mauritian consumers' attitudes toward nutritional labels based on the Kano model and to identify determinants of the use and understanding of nutrition labels. The researchers also used a Kano model questionnaire to determine consumers' attitudes toward nutrition labeling. Four hundred consumers residing in Mauritius. Information was elicited via a questionnaire that assessed nutritional knowledge and information about the use and understanding of nutritional labels and demographic factors. Nutritional label use and understanding, nutrition knowledge, and association of demographic factors with label use. Statistical tests performed included 1-way ANOVA and independent samples t tests. Statistically significant relationships (P < .05) were found for nutritional knowledge and nutritional label usage with demographic factors. All demographic factors with the exception of gender were significantly associated (P < .05) with nutritional label understanding. Based on the outcome of the Kano survey, calorie content, trans fat content, protein content, and cholesterol content were found to be must-be attributes: that is, attributes that, when not present, result in consumer dissatisfaction. Age, education, income, household size, and nutrition knowledge had an impact on nutritional label use. Health promoters should aim to increase the use of nutritional labels. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Knowledge, attitude and behavioral intention to act regarding HIV infection and prevention in immigrants from the Former Soviet Union in Germany: a comparative study with the native population.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Laura; Matterne, Uwe; Crispin, Alexander; Ruzicka, Thomas; Zippel, Stefan A; Kuznetsov, Alexander V

    2013-02-01

    In Germany, immigrants from Former Soviet Union (FSU) countries represent one of the largest immigrant groups. Some FSU countries face the highest HIV prevalence in the region of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. However, the HIV knowledge, attitude and behavioral intent have not been investigated in FSU immigrants compared to the native population yet. A cross-sectional anonymous survey among 1,205 FSU immigrants and 435 native Germans (aged 18-65 years) in Bavaria. Data analysis from the participating 435 (36 %) immigrants and 334 (76.8 %) natives showed that the immigrants were less knowledgeable (p < .001) about HIV transmission (median score 8 vs. 9, ranged from 0 to 10) and HIV prevention (4 vs. 5, ranged from 0 to 6) than the native Germans, especially with regard to HIV transmission during anal (67 vs. 79.1 %; OR = 1.86 [1.32-2.62]) and oral (49.7 vs. 61.8 %; OR = 1.63 [1.21-2.20]) intercourse and showed a high misconception rate. Age and education were associated with knowledge about sexual HIV transmission; male gender, age and education with HIV prevention by single-use of needles/syringes. In case of a suspected HIV contraction, fewer immigrants would request a test; in case of a confirmed HIV diagnosis fewer would use a condom or inform their sexual partner(s). This first comparative study indicates an urgent need for HIV/AIDS education among FSU immigrants.

  9. Public knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic use in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Zajmi, Drita; Berisha, Merita; Begolli, Ilir; Hoxha, Rina; Mehmeti, Rukije; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Kurti, Arsim; Loku, Afrim; Raka, Lul

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a major public health challenge worldwide, caused primarily by the misuse of antibiotics. Antibiotic use is closely related to the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a population. The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices about antibiotic use among the general public in Kosovo. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was carried out with a sample of 811 randomly selected Kosovo residents. The methodology used for this survey was based on the European Commission Eurobarometer survey on antimicrobial resistance. More than half of respondents (58.7%) have used antibiotics during the past year. A quarter of respondents consumed antibiotics without a medical prescription. The most common reasons for usage were flu (23.8%), followed by sore throat (20.2%), cold (13%) and common cold (7.6%). 42.5% of respondents think that antibiotics are effective against viral infections. Almost half of respondents (46.7%) received information about the unnecessary use of antibiotics and 32.5% of them report having changed their views and behaviours after receiving this information. Health care workers were identified as the most trustworthy source of information on antibiotic use (67.2%). These results provide quantitative baseline data on Kosovar knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding the use of antibiotic. These findings have potential to empower educational campaigns to promote the prudent use of antibiotics in both community and health care settings.

  10. Public knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic use in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Zajmi, Drita; Berisha, Merita; Begolli, Ilir; Hoxha, Rina; Mehmeti, Rukije; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Kurti, Arsim; Loku, Afrim; Raka, Lul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a major public health challenge worldwide, caused primarily by the misuse of antibiotics. Antibiotic use is closely related to the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a population. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices about antibiotic use among the general public in Kosovo. Methods: A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was carried out with a sample of 811 randomly selected Kosovo residents. The methodology used for this survey was based on the European Commission Eurobarometer survey on antimicrobial resistance. Results: More than half of respondents (58.7%) have used antibiotics during the past year. A quarter of respondents consumed antibiotics without a medical prescription. The most common reasons for usage were flu (23.8%), followed by sore throat (20.2%), cold (13%) and common cold (7.6%). 42.5% of respondents think that antibiotics are effective against viral infections. Almost half of respondents (46.7%) received information about the unnecessary use of antibiotics and 32.5% of them report having changed their views and behaviours after receiving this information. Health care workers were identified as the most trustworthy source of information on antibiotic use (67.2%). Conclusion: These results provide quantitative baseline data on Kosovar knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding the use of antibiotic. These findings have potential to empower educational campaigns to promote the prudent use of antibiotics in both community and health care settings. PMID:28503216

  11. Differences in HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavior among psychiatric outpatients with and without a history of a sexually transmitted infection.

    PubMed

    Vanable, Peter A; Carey, Michael P; Carey, Kate B; Maisto, Stephen A

    2007-01-01

    HIV infection among the mentally ill is estimated to be at least eight times the prevalence in the general population. Psychiatric patients may also be disproportionately vulnerable to other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but this has not been well studied. We sought to characterize the prevalence and correlates of STIs in a sample of psychiatric outpatients (N=464). Over one-third of the sample (38%) reported a lifetime history of one or more STIs. Multivariate analyses showed that, relative to those without an STI history, patients with a lifetime STI history were more knowledgeable about HIV, expressed stronger intentions to use condoms, and perceived themselves to be at greater risk for HIV. However, those with a past STI were also more likely to report sex with multiple partners and reported more frequent unprotected sex in the past 3 months. Treatment for an STI may increase HIV knowledge and risk reduction motivation, but does not necessarily lead to changes in sexual risk behavior among psychiatric patients. Findings highlight the need for STI/ HIV risk reduction interventions in psychiatric settings, particularly for patients with high-risk profiles.

  12. Therapeutic Recreation Professionals' Attitudes toward and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Cherie; Dattilo, John

    1993-01-01

    Survey of therapeutic recreation professionals' attitudes toward persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and knowledge of AIDS found no significant relationship between knowledge and attitudes but a positive relationship between attendance at workshops and knowledge. Professionals who knowingly cared for persons with AIDS expressed…

  13. High School Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Biotechnology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozel, Murat; Erdogan, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet; Prokop, Pavol

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate high school students' knowledge and attitudes regarding biotechnology and its various applications. In addition, whether students' knowledge and attitudes differed according to age and gender were also explored. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire (BKQ) with 16 items and the Biotechnology Attitude…

  14. Adolescent knowledge and attitudes about abortion.

    PubMed

    Stone, R; Waszak, C

    1992-01-01

    A focus-group study of adolescents from cities across the United States revealed that they lacked accurate knowledge about abortion and the laws governing it. Most expressed erroneous beliefs about abortion, describing it as medically dangerous, emotionally damaging and widely illegal. The study also revealed that antiabortion views, conservative morality and religious beliefs were the primary sources of these adolescents' attitudes toward abortion. In general, the participants in the study said they were personally opposed to abortion, but supported its continued legality as a woman's choice. Although most of the teenagers expressed positive feelings toward parents, they did not feel that mandatory parental involvement would be helpful, and in some cases could cause harm.

  15. Knowledge and Attitude of Nursing Students toward Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitasha; Ghai, Sandhya; Grover, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the commonly used treatment modalities for patients with severe mental disorders. However, acceptance of ECT by the patient and relatives often depends on how the health-care professionals themselves present the treatment modality to the patients and their relatives. There is a lack of information about the knowledge and attitude toward ECT among health professionals. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge about and attitude toward ECT among nursing students. Methodology: Knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT among nursing students were assessed using ECT knowledge and attitude questionnaires. Results: The study included 183 nursing students. Majority (n = 62; 60.8%) of the participants obtained information about ECT from media (movies, television, print media, etc.). None of the students had full knowledge about ECT. Although a significant proportion of students had knowledge about the ECT procedure and consent procedure, majority of them had poor knowledge about the effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, and side effects of ECT. Negative attitudes were also highly prevalent, with more than two-thirds of the participants having negative attitudes toward ECT on more than half of the attitude items of the scale. Total knowledge score positively correlated with total attitude score, suggesting that higher knowledge was associated with more positive attitude. Conclusions: Although nursing students have knowledge about basic ECT procedure and consent, they lack knowledge about the effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, and side effects of ECT. Negative attitude toward ECT is also highly prevalent among nursing students. Accordingly, there is a need to improve the knowledge and address the negative attitude of nursing students, which may ultimately lead to better acceptance of the treatment. PMID:28936064

  16. Medical students and interns’ knowledge about and attitude towards homosexuality

    PubMed Central

    Banwari, G; Mistry, K; Soni, A; Parikh, N; Gandhi, H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Medical professionals’ attitude towards homosexuals affects health care offered to such patients with a different sexual orientation. There is absence of literature that explores the attitudes of Indian medical students or physicians towards homosexuality. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate Indian medical students and interns’ knowledge about homosexuality and attitude towards homosexuals. Materials and Methods: After IEC approval and written informed consent, a cross-sectional study was conducted on a purposive sample of undergraduate medical students and interns studying in one Indian medical college. The response rate was 80.5%. Only completely and validly filled responses (N = 244) were analyzed. The participants filled the Sex Education and Knowledge about Homosexuality Questionnaire (SEKHQ) and the Attitudes towards Homosexuals Questionnaire (AHQ). SEKHQ consisted of 32 statements with response chosen from ‘true’, ‘false’, or ‘don’t know’. AHQ consisted of 20 statements scorable on a 5-point Likert scale. Multiple linear regression was used to find the predictors of knowledge and attitude. Results: Medical students and interns had inadequate knowledge about homosexuality, although they endorsed a neutral stance insofar as their attitude towards homosexuals is concerned. Females had more positive attitudes towards homosexuals. Knowledge emerged as the most significant predictor of attitude; those having higher knowledge had more positive attitudes. Conclusion: Enhancing knowledge of medical students by incorporation of homosexuality related health issues in the curriculum could help reduce prejudice towards the sexual minority and thus impact their future clinical practice. PMID:25766341

  17. Medical students and interns' knowledge about and attitude towards homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Banwari, G; Mistry, K; Soni, A; Parikh, N; Gandhi, H

    2015-01-01

    Medical professionals' attitude towards homosexuals affects health care offered to such patients with a different sexual orientation. There is absence of literature that explores the attitudes of Indian medical students or physicians towards homosexuality. This study aimed to evaluate Indian medical students and interns' knowledge about homosexuality and attitude towards homosexuals. After IEC approval and written informed consent, a cross-sectional study was conducted on a purposive sample of undergraduate medical students and interns studying in one Indian medical college. The response rate was 80.5%. Only completely and validly filled responses (N = 244) were analyzed. The participants filled the Sex Education and Knowledge about Homosexuality Questionnaire (SEKHQ) and the Attitudes towards Homosexuals Questionnaire (AHQ). SEKHQ consisted of 32 statements with response chosen from 'true', 'false', or 'don't know'. AHQ consisted of 20 statements scorable on a 5-point Likert scale. Multiple linear regression was used to find the predictors of knowledge and attitude. Medical students and interns had inadequate knowledge about homosexuality, although they endorsed a neutral stance insofar as their attitude towards homosexuals is concerned. Females had more positive attitudes towards homosexuals. Knowledge emerged as the most significant predictor of attitude; those having higher knowledge had more positive attitudes. Enhancing knowledge of medical students by incorporation of homosexuality related health issues in the curriculum could help reduce prejudice towards the sexual minority and thus impact their future clinical practice.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against hepatitis A and B in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a survey of family medicine and internal medicine physicians in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tenner, C T; Herzog, K; Chaudhari, S; Bini, E J; Weinshel, E H

    2012-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended for all patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, physician vaccination practices are suboptimal. Since training for family medicine (FM) and internal medicine (IM) physicians differ, we hypothesised that there are differences in knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV between these two groups. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to 3000 primary care (FM and IM) physicians randomly selected from the AMA Physician Masterfile in 2005. The survey included questions about physician demographics, knowledge and attitudes regarding vaccination. Among the 3000 physicians surveyed, 1209 (42.2%) returned completed surveys. There were no differences between respondents and non-respondents with regard to age, gender, geographic location or specialty. More FM than IM physicians stated that HCV+ patients should not be vaccinated against HAV (23.7% vs. 11.8%, p < 0.001) or HBV (21.9% vs. 10.6%, p < 0.001). FM physicians were also less likely than IM physicians to usually/always test HCV+ patients for immunity against HAV (33.9% vs. 48.6%, p < 0.001) or against HBV (50.8% vs. 68.0%, p < 0.001). There were numerous barriers to HAV and HBV vaccination identified. The median number of barriers was 3 for FM physicians and 2 for IM physicians (p < 0.001). Despite recommendations to vaccinate against HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV infection, physicians often do not test or vaccinate susceptible individuals. Interventions are needed to overcome the barriers identified and improve vaccination rates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. [Knowledge and attitudes on breastfeeding among parturients].

    PubMed

    Mujkić, Aida; Vuletić, Gorka

    2004-01-01

    During human history, the natural process of breastfeeding has become ever less present as a mode of infant feeding. Numerous incentives have been introduced worldwide to stop this unfavorable trend. The aim of the study was to find the basic attitudes and knowledge about breastfeeding among mothers after delivery while they were at maternity wards. Two surveys were conducted, with 940 participants in 1989-1990, and 626 participants in 1997. The women answered a self administered questionnaire with multiple choice questions. Data from the 1989-1990 and 1997 surveys were analyzed and compared. A high percentage of women (98%), stated that they wanted to breastfeed their children, but only about 44% of them expected it to be problem-free. A great number of women did not know how and when to estimate milk secretion, or its adequacy for the baby. A significant proportion of the mothers believe that milk of some women is "watery" and thus inappropriate for their children. A great number of mothers (83%), answered correctly that the child need to be fed on demand rather than according to a strict schedule. In the second phase of the survey some positive changes in their knowledge were found, however, yet quite inadequate. Comprehensive and continuing education about breastfeeding of future mothers and fathers and the society as a whole is required.

  20. Student Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Psychotropic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Kia J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 260 graduate social work students found their knowledge of and attitudes toward psychotropic medication uneven and lower than desirable. Results also suggest personal and professional experiences influence knowledge and attitudes. It is recommended that social work course content be expanded to include relevant information on these…

  1. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  2. Combating Ageism: Change in Student Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottle, Nate R.; Glover, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the ability of a lifespan course to create positive change in both knowledge of, and attitudes toward, aging of undergraduate students. Additionally, we questioned whether students define the point at which one is considered to be old in similar ways. Findings indicated positive change in both knowledge and attitudes, but…

  3. Slovakian Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Leskova, Andrea; Kubiatko, Milan; Diran, Carla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined university students' knowledge of and attitudes (n = 378) toward biotechnology in Slovakia, a conservative country where the distribution of genetically engineered products are banned by law. We found a significant positive correlation between attitudes and the level of knowledge; however, although students enrolled in biology…

  4. Influencing University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes toward Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Jan; Boivin, Meghan; Rice, Desiree.; McGraw, Katie; Munson, Elin; Walter, Katherine Corcoran; Bloch, Mary K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Spending a few minutes reading about the benefits of breastfeeding had a significant, positive effect on university students' knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding on post-surveys and follow-up surveys one month later. Since lactation duration is correlated with both knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, implications of these…

  5. Zoo Visitor Knowledge and Attitudes toward Gorillas and Chimpanzees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, K. E.; Ross, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors conducted an evaluation of visitor knowledge and conservation attitudes toward African apes at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo. Using S. R. Kellert's and J. Dunlap's (1989) analysis of zoo visitor knowledge and attitudes as a model, they modified and administered a survey to 1,000 visitors to the ape facility. On average, visitors correctly…

  6. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  7. Zoo Visitor Knowledge and Attitudes toward Gorillas and Chimpanzees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, K. E.; Ross, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors conducted an evaluation of visitor knowledge and conservation attitudes toward African apes at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo. Using S. R. Kellert's and J. Dunlap's (1989) analysis of zoo visitor knowledge and attitudes as a model, they modified and administered a survey to 1,000 visitors to the ape facility. On average, visitors correctly…

  8. Influencing University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes toward Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Jan; Boivin, Meghan; Rice, Desiree.; McGraw, Katie; Munson, Elin; Walter, Katherine Corcoran; Bloch, Mary K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Spending a few minutes reading about the benefits of breastfeeding had a significant, positive effect on university students' knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding on post-surveys and follow-up surveys one month later. Since lactation duration is correlated with both knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, implications of these…

  9. Slovakian Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Leskova, Andrea; Kubiatko, Milan; Diran, Carla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined university students' knowledge of and attitudes (n = 378) toward biotechnology in Slovakia, a conservative country where the distribution of genetically engineered products are banned by law. We found a significant positive correlation between attitudes and the level of knowledge; however, although students enrolled in biology…

  10. [Knowledge, attitudes and practices ABOUT HIV/AIDS in peruvian women].

    PubMed

    Pernaz-Linsuy, Guillermo; Cárcamo-Cavagnaro, César

    2015-10-01

    To determine the level of knowledge, proper attitudes and safe sex practices regarding the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection in Peruvian women ages 15 to 49 years. We used the results of the Continuous 2004-2007 Peruvian Demographic and Health survey (DHS). The dependent variable comprised the level of knowledge and attitudes regarding the disease and safe sexual practices. Descriptive statistical analysis and logistic regression was performed to find association between variables. A good level of knowledge about sexually transmitted infection (including HIV infection) was found in 47.8% of women from the population surveyed; 50.7% showed proper attitudes in relation to the disease and the people affected by it, while safe sexual practices were observed in 48.8% of the persons surveyed. Higher educational level, high index of socio-economic welfare, residence in the capital city during childhood, working as professional, technical, business women or clerical position; and frequent media access, were related to greater knowledge, good attitudes and safe practices. The level of knowledge, attitudes and practices shown by 15 to 49 year old Peruvian women regarding sexually transmitted infections is not adequate.

  11. Gender differences in knowledge and attitude towards biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard M

    2010-11-01

    The relationship between gender, knowledge of biotechnology, attitudes toward biotechnology, and various socio-demographic variables was investigated using the Eurobarometer 52.1. It was found that neither socio-demographics, nor differing levels of scientific knowledge could explain females' greater probability of being pessimistic toward biotechnology. After running separate models for males and females, it was discovered that, for males, more knowledge of biotechnology decreased their probability of being pessimistic about science, but for females more knowledge of biotechnology actually lead to a greater probability of being pessimistic. Further, a gender-education interaction was discovered that revealed that, for males, education and knowledge of biotechnology have independent effects on attitudes, but for females education has no effect on attitudes towards biotechnology when knowledge is controlled. The results for females complicate the deficit model of social support for science, which posits that more knowledge of science always leads to more positive attitudes.

  12. [Breast feeding: knowledge, attitudes and sociocultural ambiguity].

    PubMed

    Paricio Talayero, J M; Santos Serrano, L; Fernández Feijoo, A; Martí Barranco, E; Bernal Ferrer, A; Ferriol Camacho, M; Sánchez Palomares, M; Lucas Abad, M L

    1999-10-15

    Found sociocultural attitude with regard to breast-feeding (BF) between the sanitary (SP) and no sanitary personnel (NSP) of health centers. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. 4 health centres and 3 hospitals of Valencia. 442 workers of these centres. Structured questionnaire. 88% of SP and 76% of NSP (p < 0.05) believed that BF has many advantages comparing with artificial-feeding in a developed country. SP said more advantages of BF than NSP (p < 0.0001). Most renowned advantages were immunological, affective relationship and comfort. Main inconveniences were dependence, work reasons, aesthetic nature and insecurity in the ingested amount. 56% of SP and 86% of NSP (p < 0.0001) believed milk's analysis necessary. 56% women and 38% men (p < 0.001) didn't see correct give BF in public. Men were more concerned than women (p < 0.05) for local problems of chest, aesthetic results, milk's quality and transmission of illnesses. It's necessary to support knowledge and re-evaluating the trust in the nutritious capacity of maternal milk between the personnel of health centers and hospitals. Generic ambiguity toward functions of feminine breast exists and public'BF isn't acceptable. It's necessary recover socioculturally the image of BF and keep in mind the existent ambiguity upon designing campaigns of promotion.

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practices regarding HIV/AIDS among adult fishermen in coastal areas of Karachi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Migrant populations are at high risk of Human Immuno Deficiency Virus infection (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Studies of HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and practices among fishermen in developing countries have shown gaps in knowledge and fear of contagion with ambivalent attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and inconsistent universal precautions adherence. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding HIV/AIDS among adult fishermen in a coastal area of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods Community based cross sectional study was conducted among fishermen in coastal area of Karachi from June to September 2012. A total of 297 adult fishermen were selected by using simple random sampling technique from different sectors of coastal village. Data were collected using a structured validated questionnaire. The frequency distribution of both dependent and independent variables were worked out. Comparisons of knowledge, attitude and practices regarding HIV/AIDS by socio-demographic characteristics were made using logistic regression. Results Out of 297 fishermen, majority had in-appropriate knowledge (93.6%), negative attitude (75.8%) and less adherent sexual practices (91.6%). In univariate analysis, lower education and higher income were significantly associated (OR 2.25, 95% CI, 1.11, 4.55), (OR = 3.04 CI 1.03-9.02, p value 0.04) with negative attitude and un-safe practices towards HIV/AIDS respectively, whereas no significant association of socio-economic characteristics with knowledge, attitude and practices were observed in multivariate analysis. Conclusions This study suggests that fishermen had very poor knowledge, negative attitudes towards HIV and AIDS and had unsafe sexual practices which suggest that they lack the basic understanding of HIV/AIDS infection. Extensive health education campaign should be provided to the vulnerable sections of the society for the control of HIV/AIDS. PMID:24886122

  14. African-American Adolescents' Knowledge, Health-Related Attitudes, Sexual Behavior, and Contraceptive Decisions: Implications for the Prevention of Adolescent HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lawrence, Janet S.

    1993-01-01

    African-American adolescents (n=195) completed measures on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) knowledge, condoms, health locus of control, vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus, peer sexual norms, sexual behavior, and contraceptive preferences. Girls were more knowledgeable about AIDS, reported fewer sexual partners, held more…

  15. Knowledge, attitudes, and label use among college students.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ranjita

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the relationships among nutrition education, knowledge, attitude, use of nutritional supplements, and label reading behavior among 537 randomly selected college students using a conceptual model. The majority of the respondents were women, undergraduate students, and nonsmokers. The mean age was 23+/-6.1 years. A higher percentage of undergraduate students and women had prior exposure to nutrition education, a positive attitude, and greater knowledge of food labels as compared to their graduate and male peers. The structural equation model indicated nutrition education, age, sex, and attitude predicted label use; prior nutrition education and a positive attitude exhibited the strongest (direct) effects on label reading behavior. Attitude mediated the relationship between knowledge and label reading behavior. The indexes of fit for the tested model indicated a good fit; the predictors accounted for 44% of the variance in label usage.

  16. Integrating family planning and HIV services in western Kenya: the impact on HIV-infected patients' knowledge of family planning and male attitudes toward family planning.

    PubMed

    Onono, Maricianah; Guzé, Mary A; Grossman, Daniel; Steinfeld, Rachel; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Shade, Starley; Cohen, Craig R; Newmann, Sara J

    2015-01-01

    Little information exists on the impact of integrating family planning (FP) services into HIV care and treatment on patients' familiarity with and attitudes toward FP. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial in 18 public HIV clinics with 12 randomized to integrated FP and HIV services and 6 to the standard referral-based system where patients are referred to an FP clinic. Serial cross-sectional surveys were done before (n = 488 women, 486 men) and after (n = 479 women, 481 men) the intervention to compare changes in familiarity with FP methods and attitudes toward FP between integrated and nonintegrated (NI) sites. We created an FP familiarity score based on the number of more effective FP methods patients could identify (score range: 0-6). Generalized estimating equations were used to control for clustering within sites. An increase in mean familiarity score between baseline (mean = 5.16) and post-intervention (mean = 5.46) occurred with an overall mean change of 0.26 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.09, 0.45; p = 0.003) across all sites. At end line, there was no difference in increase of mean FP familiarity scores at intervention versus control sites (mean = 5.41 vs. 5.49, p = 0.94). We observed a relative decrease in the proportion of males agreeing that FP was "women's business" at integrated sites (baseline 42% to end line 30%; reduction of 12%) compared to males at NI sites (baseline 35% to end line 42%; increase of 7%; adjusted odds ration [aOR] = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.22, 0.85). Following FP-HIV integration, familiarity with FP methods increased but did not differ by study arm. Integration was associated with a decrease in negative attitudes toward FP among men.

  17. Computer Use, Confidence, Attitudes, and Knowledge: A Causal Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Tamar; Donitsa-Schmidt, Smadar

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a causal model which links measures of computer experience, computer-related attitudes, computer-related confidence, and perceived computer-based knowledge. The causal model suggests that computer use has a positive effect on perceived computer self-confidence, as well as on computer-related attitudes. Questionnaires were administered…

  18. Civil Defense: An Analysis of Attitudes and Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marko, George Franklin

    The study aimed at constructing, validating, and testing two instruments, one of which measured attitude change toward Civil Defense adult education, and one which measured level of knowledge about Civil Defense practices; and evaluating the effectiveness of the Personal and Family Survival (PFS) Course in terms of attitude change and knowledge…

  19. Law Related Education: Assessing Adolescents' Knowledge and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, James L.; And Others

    A study is described which examined the relationships between law-related knowledge, attitudes, and demographic characteristics of high school students. Participants were 457 students in grades nine through 12 from four high schools near Phoenix, Arizona. Three questionnaires were administered: (1) a 65-item social attitude questionnaire on…

  20. Environmental knowledge and attitudes and behaviours towards energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Paço, Arminda; Lavrador, Tânia

    2017-07-15

    Numerous investigations have arisen in order to study and characterise environmentally friendly consumer profiles, with some authors applying the relationship between knowledge, attitudes and behaviour to this end. The present research approach, based upon the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), seeks to verify the existence of relationships between knowledge and attitudes and between knowledge and environmental behaviour. In this instance, data collection involved a questionnaire aimed at assessing the overall environmental knowledge of respondents as well as their attitudes and behaviours regarding energy issues (savings, consumption, interest, use). The results pointed to the lack of relationship between knowledge and attitudes, and between knowledge and behaviour whilst the relationship between attitudes and behaviour proved to be only weak. The results also found that males, older students and those studying Engineering and the Social and Human Sciences are those reporting higher levels of environmental knowledge. However, when it comes to attitudes and behaviours, females seem to display more awareness around these issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice towards HIV Patients among Dentists.

    PubMed

    Dhanya, R S; Hegde, Vijaya; Anila, S; Sam, George; Khajuria, Rajat R; Singh, Rishav

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination by some health care workers, including dentists, against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons has been noted. The main aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice towards HIV patients among the dentists of Trichur district, Kerala. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 206 dentists practicing in Trichur district of Kerala. Data was collected using a pretested, self-administered 26-item questionnaire and was statistically analyzed using SPSS software version 20. Out of 206 participants, 39.3% were unwilling to treat HIV patients. A statistical significance was found between willingness to treat HIV infected patients and age groups (P = 0.0001) as well as between the willingness to treat HIV infected patients and ethical responsibility (P = 0.0001). Staff fears and increased personal risk are found to be the most frequently reported concerns in treating HIV patients among dentists of Trichur district, Kerala. Senior dentists showed more reluctance to treat HIV positive individuals.

  2. Men of diverse cultures: knowledge and attitudes about breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Christine A; Bustamante-Forest, Rosa; Giarratano, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was three-fold: (a) to describe the knowledge of and attitudes on breastfeeding of men from diverse racial backgrounds, (b) to determine the relationship between knowledge and attitude toward breastfeeding, and (c) to determine the relationship between specified demographic variables and men's knowledge or attitudes on breastfeeding. Descriptive An inner-city teaching hospital and its associated prenatal clinic located in the southern United States. One hundred men from diverse cultures who spoke either English or Spanish, were 18 years of age or older, and were present at either the hospital maternity units or associated prenatal clinic. Eighty-one percent (81%) of the men in this study indicated that they would prefer their infants to be breastfed. Ethnicity and age were found to be linked to attitudes and knowledge of breastfeeding. This study demonstrated that men had a strong desire that their infants be breastfed and wanted to be included in decisions concerning breastfeeding.

  3. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  4. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  5. Gendered contexts: masculinity, knowledge, and attitudes toward biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    Research into the public understanding of science has revealed that the effect of scientific knowledge on attitudes toward science is contextualized by gender; however there has not yet been an account of how gender contextualizes knowledge. This paper investigates how gender identification affects attitudes toward science, and tempers the effects of scientific knowledge on attitudes toward science. Utilizing data from the Eurobarometer 52.1, it is predicted that when males perceive a threat to their masculinity (as measured by a perceived threat to their financial security) they will become more likely to be aversive to biotechnology, and that increased levels of perceived threat will reduce the effects of knowledge on attitudes toward biotechnology. Moreover, it is predicted that these effects will be smaller than their female counterparts. All predictions are affirmed.

  6. Knowledge and attitudes to HIV/AIDS in Chinese registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Yinglan; Zeng, Kai; Wu, Ying

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the current knowledge and attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PWHAs) in Chinese registered nurses (RNs) and describe the relationships between the nurses' HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes towards PWHAs. A cohort of 1350 RNs from 51 comprehensive hospitals in Hunan, China were studied over a 4-month period. A 3-stage random sampling method was used. The total correct rate in AIDS Knowledge Scale was 63.2%. Most nurses were good at conceptions of routes of AIDS infection and some basic characteristics, with more than 80% of the correct responses rate of relevant items. Their weakness was in the knowledge of some activities which would not transfer AIDS, such as "eating in a restaurant where the cook has AIDS may infect HIV", with less than 50% of the correct response rate of relevant items. As for attitudes, 94% of the nurses sympathized with HIV patients. About 82.7% of the nurses showed little sympathy to patients getting HIV by sexual promiscuity. Among all the AIDS related knowledge, nurses' conception of non-infectious activities was significantly related to their attitudes to HIV/AIDS. Chinese nurses waster well about HIV/AIDS basic characteristics and the routes of infection, and most nurses sympathize with PWHAs. Their weakness is in the knowledge of non-HIV-infectious activities and they hold different attitudes to those patients getting HIV/AIDS in different ways. There are some barriers for Chinese nurses to take care of all patients equally. Professional development programs are urgently needed to remedy this situation including clarifying the nurses' misconceptions on AIDS related knowledge, developing non-judgmental professional attitudes, and using universal prevention measures when they take care of all patients.

  7. Construction of knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire for assessing plagiarism.

    PubMed

    Poorolajal, J; Cheraghi, P; Irani, A Doosti; Cheraghi, Z; Mirfakhraei, M

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a questionnaire in order to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of the faculty members and students toward plagiarism. A KAP study was conducted from June to October 2011 enrolling 390 volunteers anonymously (response rate 96%). The questionnaire included the following four parts: (a) general characteristics like gender, academic degree and education level; (b) nine questions regarding knowledge (Min=0, Max=9); (c) nine questions regarding attitude (Min=9, Max=27); and (d) eight questions regarding practice (Min=0, Max=8). A pilot study was conducted to assess reliability of the questions regarding knowledge and attitude. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the knowledge and attitude questions was 0.70 and 0.74 respectively. The overall prevalence of at least once plagiarism commission was 38% (SD=0.035). The overall mean score of knowledge, attitude and practice was 5.94 (SD=1.66), 24.12 (SD=2.99), and 0.66 (SD=1.15) respectively. Knowledge of plagiarism was significantly higher among higher academic degrees and females. Their negative attitude toward plagiarism was stronger too. No statistically significant difference regarding plagiarism commission was observed among different academic degrees in both sexes. According to linear regression analysis, plagiarism commission decreased 13% per one unit increase in score of knowledge (P=0.005) and 16% per one unit increase in score of attitude (P<0.001). This knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) questionnaire was developed as a standard tool in order to assess perception of subjects toward plagiarism and to estimate the prevalence and the type of plagiarism commission.

  8. Construction of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Questionnaire for Assessing Plagiarism

    PubMed Central

    Poorolajal, J; Cheraghi, P; Irani, A Doosti; Cheraghi, Z; Mirfakhraei, M

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to develop a questionnaire in order to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of the faculty members and students toward plagiarism. Methods: A KAP study was conducted from June to October 2011 enrolling 390 volunteers anonymously (response rate 96%). The questionnaire included the following four parts: (a) general characteristics like gender, academic degree and education level; (b) nine questions regarding knowledge (Min=0, Max=9); (c) nine questions regarding attitude (Min=9, Max=27); and (d) eight questions regarding practice (Min=0, Max=8). A pilot study was conducted to assess reliability of the questions regarding knowledge and attitude. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the knowledge and attitude questions was 0.70 and 0.74 respectively. Results: The overall prevalence of at least once plagiarism commission was 38% (SD=0.035). The overall mean score of knowledge, attitude and practice was 5.94 (SD=1.66), 24.12 (SD=2.99), and 0.66 (SD=1.15) respectively. Knowledge of plagiarism was significantly higher among higher academic degrees and females. Their negative attitude toward plagiarism was stronger too. No statistically significant difference regarding plagiarism commission was observed among different academic degrees in both sexes. According to linear regression analysis, plagiarism commission decreased 13% per one unit increase in score of knowledge (P=0.005) and 16% per one unit increase in score of attitude (P<0.001). Conclusions: This knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) questionnaire was developed as a standard tool in order to assess perception of subjects toward plagiarism and to estimate the prevalence and the type of plagiarism commission. PMID:23304676

  9. A Snapshot: South African University Students' Attitudes, Perceptions and Knowledge of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, L. R.; Pretorius, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a survey conducted in August 2004 of students' attitudes, perceptions and knowledge about sexually transmitted infections, HIV/AIDS and sexual practices at an Institution of Higher Education. The study was set against the backdrop of the 2004 South African national survey, conducted by the Reproductive Health…

  10. A Snapshot: South African University Students' Attitudes, Perceptions and Knowledge of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, L. R.; Pretorius, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a survey conducted in August 2004 of students' attitudes, perceptions and knowledge about sexually transmitted infections, HIV/AIDS and sexual practices at an Institution of Higher Education. The study was set against the backdrop of the 2004 South African national survey, conducted by the Reproductive Health…

  11. Portuguese nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Tavares, João Paulo; da Silva, Alcione Leite; Sá-Couto, Pedro; Boltz, Marie; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Portugal is impacted by the rapid growth of the aging population, which has significant implications for its health care system. However, nurses have received little education focusing on the unique and complex care needs of older adults. This gap in the nurses' education has an enormous impact in their knowledge and attitudes and affects the quality of nursing care provided to older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1068 Portuguese nurses in five hospitals (northern and central region) with the following purposes: (i) explore the knowledge and attitudes of nurses about four common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcer, incontinence, restraint use and sleep disturbance) in Portuguese hospitals; and (ii) evaluate the influence of demographic, professional and nurses' perception about hospital educational support, geriatric knowledge, and burden of caring for older adults upon geriatric nursing knowledge and attitudes. The mean knowledge and attitudes scores were 0.41 ± 0.15 and 0.40 ± 0.21, respectively (the maximum score was 1). Knowledge of nurses in Portuguese hospitals about the four geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, sleep disturbance, urinary incontinence and restraint use) was found inadequate. The nurses' attitudes towards caring for hospitalized older adults were generally negative. Nurses who work in academic hospitals demonstrated significantly more knowledge than nurses in hospital centers. The attitudes of nurses were significantly associated with the hospital and unit type, region, hospital educational support, staff knowledge, and perceived burden of caring for older adults. The study findings support the need for improving nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards hospitalized older adults and implementing evidence-based guidelines in their practice.

  12. Breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes among Egyptian baccalaureate students.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A; el-Guindy, S R

    2011-09-01

    To assess the breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes and perceived adequacy of breastfeeding education among baccalaureate nursing students in Cairo, Egypt. Self-confidence to provide breastfeeding support for mothers was also investigated. Nurses play a crucial role in promoting breastfeeding. Studies in Western countries have found inadequate breastfeeding knowledge among undergraduate nursing students. No published literature about breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes among nursing students in Egypt was found. An exploratory descriptive study used a sample of 110 baccalaureate nursing students from Cairo, Egypt. Students who had completed maternal/child nursing didactic and clinical courses were eligible to participate. Ninety two (83.6%) students completed the survey during spring 2009. We used a Breastfeeding Knowledge Questionnaire adapted from Brodribb et al. to measure breastfeeding knowledge and the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale to test students' breastfeeding attitudes. Students' age ranged from 18 to 21 years with a mean of 19.5±1.2 with 75% being female. The mean breastfeeding knowledge score was 12.41 points out of 24, which represents 52% of the total score. The attitudes mean score was 3.13±0.64. There was a significant relationship between the students' knowledge and attitudes scores (r=0.236, P=0.011). Eighty per cent of the students reported that they received adequate breastfeeding knowledge and skills in their nursing programme, and 70% were confident in their ability to provide breastfeeding support. Results revealed weak breastfeeding knowledge scores among students and neutral breastfeeding attitudes. Strategies to improve breastfeeding education in nursing curriculum focusing on breastfeeding management skills are warranted. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  13. High School Football Players' Knowledge and Attitudes About Concussions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brit L; Gittelman, Michael A; Mann, Jessica K; Cyriac, RoseAnn L; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2016-05-01

    To assess high school (HS) football players' knowledge of concussions and to determine whether increased knowledge is correlated with better attitudes toward reporting concussion symptoms and abstaining from play. Two survey tools were used to assess athletes' knowledge and attitudes about concussions. Surveys collected information about demographics, knowledge about concussions, and attitudes about playing sports after a concussion. All athletes present completed one of the 2 surveys. A knowledge and attitude score for each survey was calculated. Frequencies and mean values were used to characterize the population; regression analysis, analysis of variance, and t tests were used to look for associations. A football camp for HS athletes in the Cincinnati area. Male HS football players from competitive football programs in the Cincinnati area. None. Scores on knowledge and attitude sections; responses to individual questions. One hundred twenty (100%) athletes were enrolled although not every athlete responded to every question. Thirty (25%) reported history of a concussion; 82 (70%) reported receiving prior concussion education. More than 75% correctly recognized all concussion symptoms that were asked, except "feeling in a fog" [n = 63 (53%)]. One hundred nine (92%) recognized a risk of serious injury if they return to play too quickly. Sixty-four (54%) athletes would report symptoms of a concussion to their coach; 62 (53%) would continue to play with a headache from an injury. There was no association between knowledge score and attitude score (P = 0.08). Despite having knowledge about the symptoms and danger of concussions, many HS football athletes in our sample did not have a positive attitude toward reporting symptoms or abstaining from play after a concussion. Physicians should be aware that young athletes may not report concussion symptoms.

  14. Knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists towards prophylaxis after exposure to blood and body fluids.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghian, S; Pardis, S; Mansoori, Z

    2014-07-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis plays an important role in prevention of bloodborne diseases after occupational exposures. To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists towards post-exposure prophylaxis. In a cross-sectional study, 140 dentists in Shiraz were selected through a systematic randomized sampling. They filled out a self-made questionnaire including 30 knowledge, 4 attitude and 10 practice questions. Mean of knowledge and percentage of various items of attitude and practice were reported. The mean±SD knowledge score of dentists was 18.5±6.2. Knowledge had a significant relationship with the level of education (p<0.001), attending infection control seminars (p<0.001), and working in public clinics (p<0.001). A total of 63 (43%) dentists believed that immediate washing of the exposed area has no effect on the prevention of hepatitis and AIDS. Of the studied dentists, 13%, 11%, and 34% believed that prophylaxis after exposure to patients' blood had no effect on prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infections, respectively. Only 170 (53%) exposed dentists immediately washed the exposed area and only 43 (13.4%) of them evaluated the source patient for risk factors of hepatitis and AIDS. Knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists working in Shiraz towards postexposure prophylaxis are not desirable. Interventions to raise their awareness are therefore warranted.

  15. Effect of Physicians' Attitudes and Knowledge on the Quality of Antibiotic Prescription: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Cristian; López-Vázquez, Paula; Vázquez-Lago, Juan Manuel; Piñeiro-Lamas, María; Herdeiro, Maria Teresa; Arzamendi, Pilar Chávarri; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Resistance increases with the use and abuse of antibiotics. Since physicians are primarily responsible for the decision to use antibiotics, ascertaining the attitudes and knowledge that underlie their prescribing habits is thus a prerequisite for improving prescription. Three-year follow-up cohort study (2008-2010) targeting primary-care physicians (n = 2100) in Galicia, a region in NW Spain. We used data obtained from a postal survey to assess knowledge and attitudes. A physician was deemed to have demonstrated Appropriate Quality Prescription of Antibiotics (dependent variable) in any case where half or more of the indicators proposed by the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption had values that were better than the reference values for Spain. The mail-questionnaire response rate was 68·0% (1428/2100). The adjusted increase in the interquartile OR of displaying good prescribing of antibiotics for each attitude was: 205% for fear ("When in doubt, it is better to ensure that a patient is cured of an infection by using a broad-spectrum antibiotic"; 95%CI: 125% to 321%); 119% for better knowledge ("Amoxicillin is useful for resolving most respiratory infections in primary care"; 95%CI: 67% to 193%); and 21% for complacency with patients' demands ("Antibiotics are often prescribed due to patients' demands"; 95%CI: 0% to 45%). Due to the fact that physicians' knowledge and attitudes are potentially modifiable, the implementation of purpose-designed educational interventions based on the attitudes identified may well serve to improve antibiotic prescription.

  16. Effect of Physicians' Attitudes and Knowledge on the Quality of Antibiotic Prescription: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Resistance increases with the use and abuse of antibiotics. Since physicians are primarily responsible for the decision to use antibiotics, ascertaining the attitudes and knowledge that underlie their prescribing habits is thus a prerequisite for improving prescription. Three-year follow-up cohort study (2008–2010) targeting primary-care physicians (n = 2100) in Galicia, a region in NW Spain. We used data obtained from a postal survey to assess knowledge and attitudes. A physician was deemed to have demonstrated Appropriate Quality Prescription of Antibiotics (dependent variable) in any case where half or more of the indicators proposed by the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption had values that were better than the reference values for Spain. The mail-questionnaire response rate was 68·0% (1428/2100). The adjusted increase in the interquartile OR of displaying good prescribing of antibiotics for each attitude was: 205% for fear ("When in doubt, it is better to ensure that a patient is cured of an infection by using a broad-spectrum antibiotic"; 95%CI: 125% to 321%); 119% for better knowledge ("Amoxicillin is useful for resolving most respiratory infections in primary care"; 95%CI: 67% to 193%); and 21% for complacency with patients' demands ("Antibiotics are often prescribed due to patients' demands"; 95%CI: 0% to 45%). Due to the fact that physicians' knowledge and attitudes are potentially modifiable, the implementation of purpose-designed educational interventions based on the attitudes identified may well serve to improve antibiotic prescription. PMID:26509966

  17. Nutrition and shiftwork: evaluation of new paramedics' knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Amanda B; Rossiter, Melissa D; Jensen, Jan L

    2013-01-01

    The effect of an oral education intervention on nutrition knowledge was evaluated in new paramedic employees. The evaluation involved measuring knowledge of and attitudes toward nutrition and shiftwork before and after the directed intervention. A convenience sample of 30 new paramedic shiftworkers attended a 15-minute education session focused on nutrition management strategies. This matched cohort study included three self-administered surveys. Survey 1 was completed before education, survey 2 immediately after education, and survey 3 after one month of concurrent post-education and employment experience. Knowledge and attitude scores were analyzed for differences between all surveys. Participants were primary care paramedics, 59% of whom were male. They reported that previously they had not received this type of information or had received only a brief lecture. Mean knowledge scores increased significantly from survey 1 to survey 2; knowledge retention was identified in survey 3. A significant difference was found between surveys 2 and 3 for attitudes toward meal timing; no other significant differences were found between attitude response scores. The education session was successful in improving shiftwork nutrition knowledge among paramedics. Paramedics' attitudes toward proper nutrition practices were positive before the education intervention.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding in an African American male population.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Lisa; Pagels, Patti; Woodfin, Grant; Silver, Mandy; Kindratt, Tiffany; Gimpel, Nora

    2013-01-01

    To measure knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding among African American men. Cross-sectional survey. Three barbershops in Dallas, Texas. African American adult men (N = 81). Surveys were completed by African American men to evaluate their knowledge, attitudes, and involvement in breastfeeding. One half of the participants were age 26 to 40. Eighty-five percent were U.S.-born, and others were born in several African countries. Education varied from some high school to postgraduate. Most had some college or a degree (78%). One half were fathers (51%), and most were single (61%). Most had witnessed breastfeeding (85%), and 58% preferred their infants to be breastfed. Only 47% knew that breastfeeding helps prevent infant infections, and 15% knew it can prevent breast cancer in the mother. Significant differences were found when comparing knowledge and attitudes by place of birth and age. Almost one half of men age 18 to 25 (43%) and age 25 to 40 (48%) felt that breastfeeding should not occur in public compared to only 4% of men older than 40 (p = .005). Overall, we found that African American men were supportive of breastfeeding, knew that breastfeeding was best for infants, and had positive attitudes toward breastfeeding. However, we found consistent gaps in knowledge about the actual health benefits to mothers and infants and conflicting attitudes toward breastfeeding. Results emphasize the need for health education efforts to improve attitudes toward breastfeeding in public. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices Regarding Vector-borne Diseases in Western Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Alobuia, Wilson M; Missikpode, Celestin; Aung, Maung; Jolly, Pauline E

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) such as dengue and malaria can overwhelm health systems in resource-poor countries. Environmental management strategies that reduce or eliminate vector breeding sites combined with improved personal prevention strategies can help to significantly reduce transmission of these infections. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) of residents in western Jamaica regarding control of mosquito vectors and protection from mosquito bites. A cross-sectional study was conducted between May and August 2010 among patients or family members of patients waiting to be seen at hospitals in western Jamaica. Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on sociodemographic factors and KAPs regarding VBDs. KAP scores were calculated and categorized as high or low based on the number of correct or positive responses. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of KAP and linear regression analysis conducted to determine if knowledge and attitude scores predicted practice scores. In all, 361 (85 men and 276 women) people participated in the study. Most participants (87%) scored low on knowledge and practice items (78%). Conversely, 78% scored high on attitude items. By multivariate logistic regression, housewives were 82% less likely than laborers to have high attitude scores; homeowners were 65% less likely than renters to have high attitude scores. Participants from households with 1 to 2 children were 3.4 times more likely to have high attitude scores compared with those from households with no children. Participants from households with at least 5 people were 65% less likely than those from households with fewer than 5 people to have high practice scores. By multivariable linear regression knowledge and attitude scores were significant predictors of practice score. The study revealed poor knowledge of VBDs and poor prevention practices among participants. It

  20. Knowledge, Attitude and practices regarding vector-borne diseases in Western Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Alobuia, Wilson M; Missikpode, Celestin; Aung, Maung; Jolly, Pauline E

    2015-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of vector-borne diseases such as dengue, and malaria can overwhelm health systems in resource-poor countries. Environmental management strategies that reduce/eliminate vector breeding sites combined with improved personal prevention strategies can help to significantly reduce transmission of these infections. Objective This study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) of residents in Western Jamaica regarding control of mosquito vectors and protection from mosquito bites. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between May and August 2010 among patients or family members of patients waiting to be seen at hospitals in Western Jamaica. Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on sociodemographic factors and KAPs regarding vector-borne diseases. KAP scores were calculated and categorized as high or low based on number of correct/positive responses. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of KAP and linear regression analysis conducted to determine if knowledge and attitude scores predicted practice scores. Results Three-hundred and sixty-one people (85 males and 276 females) participated in the study. Most participants (87%) scored low on knowledge and practice items (78%). Conversely, 78% scored high on attitudes items. By multivariate logistic regression, housewives were 82% less likely to have high attitude scores than laborers, and homeowners were 65% less likely to have high attitude scores than renters. Participants from households with 1–2 children were 3.4 times more likely to have high attitude scores compared to those from households with no children. Participants from households ≥5 people were 65% less likely to have high practice scores compared to those from households with <5. By multivariable linear regression knowledge and attitude scores were significant predictors of practice score. Conclusion The study revealed poor knowledge of vector

  1. A Cross Sectional Study of Public Knowledge and Attitude towards Antibiotics in Putrajaya, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ka Keat; Teh, Chew Charn

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to assess public knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic utilization in Putrajaya, Malaysia. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted among public attending a local hospital. The four-part questionnaire collected responses on demographic characteristics, recent use of antibiotics, knowledge and attitude statements. Cronbach’s alpha for knowledge and attitude statements were 0.68 and 0.74 respectively. Only questionnaires with complete responses were analysed. General linear modelling was used to identify demographic characteristics which contributed significantly to knowledge and attitude. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the adjusted odds ratios of obtaining an inappropriate response for each knowledge and attitude statement. The relationship between antibiotic knowledge and attitude was examined using Pearson’s correlation and correlation between related statements was performed using the Chi-square test. In all statistical analyses, a p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There was positive correlation (p<0.001) between mean knowledge (6.07±2.52) and attitude scores (5.59±1.67). Highest education level (p<0.001) and healthcare-related occupation (p=0.001) contributed significantly to knowledge. Gender (p=0.010), race (p=0.005), highest education level (p<0.001), employment status (p=0.016) and healthcare-related occupation (p=0.005) contributed significantly to attitude. The differences in score between demographic groups were small. Misconceptions that antibiotics would work on both bacterial and viral infections were reported. Approximately three quarters of respondents expected antibiotics for treatment of coughs and colds. Close to two thirds (60%) believed that taking antibiotics would improve recovery. Several demographic groups were identified as ‘high risk’ with respect to gaps in knowledge and attitude. Conclusions: This study

  2. Public knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic use in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Sun; Moon, Seongmi; Kim, Eun Jung

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to examine public level of knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic use and potential drug resistance. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey of 1,177 residents aged 18 or over was conducted in Korea. A quota sampling method was used. Most respondents (70%) did not know that antibiotics are ineffective in treating coughs and colds. Two-thirds of the respondents were unaware of the conditions under which antibiotic resistance occurs, despite understanding the concept of resistance. Lower education level and older age were independently associated with inadequate knowledge. Lower education level, older age, inadequate knowledge and no exposure to the education campaign were independently associated with poor attitude. The results of this study demonstrate that the general public has misunderstandings and a lack of knowledge with regard to antibiotic use, despite a national educational campaign. However, the campaign may have had an effect on the public's attitudes towards antibiotics.

  3. [Gender violence: Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Valdés Sánchez, Carmen Ana; García Fernández, Carla; Sierra Díaz, Ángela

    2016-12-01

    To determine the knowledge and attitudes of nurses in Primary Care as regards gender violence and their relationship with socio-demographic factors and cases detected. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Urban health centres. A total of 167 nurses working in Primary Care. A questionnaire was used that included questions related to knowledge, knowledge perception and attitudes to gender violence attitudes. Variables such as age, gender, marital status, work place and health area were also analysed. The response rate was 114 (68.26%). The percentage of correct responses in the knowledge questions was 62.2%, with a medium level of knowledge being observed. Married nurses or couples living in a stable relationship obtained a higher score (95.2%, P=.077). The low detection (29%) is associated with marital status (P=.004), low knowledge (P=0,008), low knowledge perception (P=.001), lack of training (P=.03) and non-implementation of the gender violence protocol (P=.001). Nurses with low self-perception of their knowledge implement the protocol less often (OR=0.26; 95% CI: 0.1-0.7), and they consider that the lack of training is the main problem in determining the diagnosis (OR=11.24; 95% CI: 1.5-81.1). The level of knowledge was adequate. Nurses have a lack of confidence in terms of their knowledge about gender violence. The detection and diagnosis attitudes are more related to self-perception of levels of knowledge than their real knowledge. Marital status influences the level of knowledge. Professionals state that the lack of training is the main problem to give an efficient healthcare response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Hepatitis B Among Healthcare Professionals in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sara; Malik, Saad M; Haris Iqbal, Muhammad; Aadil, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Aim Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a blood-borne infectious disease. It is one of the most common causes of end-stage liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Healthcare professionals, including medical and dental students, are at a high risk of acquiring this infection. The aim of this study was to compare and contrast the knowledge and attitudes toward HBV infection amongst doctors, dentists, nurses, and undergraduate final year medical and dental students. Subjects and method A cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample size of 381 medical professionals, which included doctors (59), dentists (77), nurses (71), final year medical students (126), and final year dental students (48) at Combined Military Hospital Lahore Medical College and Institute of Dentistry (CMH LMC). A questionnaire comprising 27 multiple choice questions was distributed amongst the groups mentioned above. The questionnaire aimed to assess basic knowledge, attitudes towards those infected, and knowledge about vaccination against HBV. Results The total response rate was 88.8% (382/430 respondents returned the questionnaire). The mean ± standard deviation (SD) score for all healthcare professionals in knowledge was 15.54 ± 3.69 and attitude were 4.67 ± 1.37, which indicated that majority of the healthcare professionals were well informed about hepatitis B and generally exhibited positive attitudes. However, results revealed that medical students lacked adequate knowledge about various aspects of HBV infection, including modes of transmission and prevention methods against the disease. On the other hand, dental students were better informed and exhibited a more positive attitude towards the disease. Conclusion According to the results of our study, medical students showed poor knowledge about hepatitis B disease, including its modes of transmission and the option of vaccination. Lack of knowledge contributed significantly to their negative attitudes towards those

  5. Knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning in Israel.

    PubMed

    Barnoy, Sivia; Ehrenfeld, Malka; Sharon, Rina; Tabak, Nili

    2006-04-01

    The success of mammal cloning in 1997 has brought the issue of human cloning into public discussion. Human cloning has several aspects and potential applications for use in both reproductive and non-reproductive matters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning in Israel. Data from 120 respondents (68 health professionals and 52 non-health professionals), all Jewish, Hebrew speaking with at least 15 years of education each, were collected using two questionnaires that dealt with knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning. Results showed that although health professionals had significantly more knowledge that non-health professionals, all respondents had poor knowledge about cloning. No difference in attitudes was found between the groups. Most respondents opposed human cloning, but more positive attitudes toward non-reproductive cloning were found. The results are discussed in the context of the deficit model. The findings indicate a need to provide information about human cloning to allow people to form their attitudes based on factual knowledge.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes towards and acceptability of genetic modification in Germany.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Inken B; Bruhn, Maike; Roosen, Jutta

    2008-07-01

    Genetic modification remains a controversial issue. The aim of this study is to analyse the attitudes towards genetic modification, the knowledge about it and its acceptability in different application areas among German consumers. Results are based on a survey from spring 2005. An exploratory factor analysis is conducted to identify the attitudes towards genetic modification. The identified factors are used in a cluster analysis that identified a cluster of supporters, of opponents and a group of indifferent consumers. Respondents' knowledge of genetics and biotechnology differs among the found clusters without revealing a clear relationship between knowledge and support of genetic modification. The acceptability of genetic modification varies by application area and cluster, and genetically modified non-food products are more widely accepted than food products. The perception of personal health risks has high explanatory power for attitudes and acceptability.

  7. Parental knowledge and attitudes towards dental radiography for children.

    PubMed

    Chiri, R; Awan, S; Archibald, S; Abbott, P V

    2013-06-01

    Radiographs are an essential part of most clinical dental examinations and diagnoses. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of parents towards dental radiographs for their children. A 21-item questionnaire, covering parental level of radiation knowledge and socio-demographics was applied. Sliding scales were used to assess attitude towards dental radiographs. There were 1467 questionnaires distributed between five primary schools in the Perth (Western Australia) metropolitan area, with 309 surveys (21%) returned for collection. Most parents displayed a low level of knowledge, but had a positive attitude towards dental radiographs. Parents with children who have previously had dental radiographs perceived dental radiographs as 'good', 'useful' and 'pleasant'. A higher level of education and parents with children who have previously had radiographs were significantly associated with a higher level of knowledge about dental radiography. Parents who had higher scores on questions assessing radiation knowledge were more likely to perceive dental radiographs as 'safe' and 'beneficial'. Most parents have a positive attitude towards dental radiographs on their children. However, the majority of parents lack knowledge regarding dental radiography, especially regarding the risks involved. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Health Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Among Iranian Pilgrims

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Aminreza; Mortazavi, Seyyed Mostafa; Shamspour, Navvab; Shushtarizadeh, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has the highest number of Umrah pilgrims among Islamic countries. Health care plays a major role in fulfilling the Umrah rites. Pilgrims' health situation depends on their health knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP). Objectives: In this study, we aimed to determine the health KAP among Iranian Umrah pilgrims. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 157 Iranian Umrah pilgrims were randomly selected in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in June 2011. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information (sex, age, degree of education, and resource of health knowledge), health knowledge (5 questions), health attitude (5 questions) and health practice (10 questions). Results: Level of knowledge were very low in 12.1%, low in 25.2%, average in 38.1%, good in 20.4% and very good in 4.2% of respondents. Mean and standard deviation of attitude score was 18.58 ± 2.20 out of 25 (ranged between 13.00 and 25.00). The pilgrims were given 74.2 % out of total score. The Mean and standard deviation of practice score was 8.19 ± 1.32 out of 10 (ranged between 3 and 10). Although the old and low educated pilgrims had little knowledge of health tips, they had a good health attitude and practice. Conclusions: Educational strategy to improve knowledge regarding health-related problems and to develop health practices among pilgrims is needed. PMID:25838929

  9. Health knowledge, attitude and practice among Iranian pilgrims.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Aminreza; Mortazavi, Seyyed Mostafa; Shamspour, Navvab; Shushtarizadeh, Naser

    2015-02-01

    Iran has the highest number of Umrah pilgrims among Islamic countries. Health care plays a major role in fulfilling the Umrah rites. Pilgrims' health situation depends on their health knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP). In this study, we aimed to determine the health KAP among Iranian Umrah pilgrims. In this cross-sectional study, 157 Iranian Umrah pilgrims were randomly selected in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in June 2011. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information (sex, age, degree of education, and resource of health knowledge), health knowledge (5 questions), health attitude (5 questions) and health practice (10 questions). Level of knowledge were very low in 12.1%, low in 25.2%, average in 38.1%, good in 20.4% and very good in 4.2% of respondents. Mean and standard deviation of attitude score was 18.58 ± 2.20 out of 25 (ranged between 13.00 and 25.00). The pilgrims were given 74.2 % out of total score. The Mean and standard deviation of practice score was 8.19 ± 1.32 out of 10 (ranged between 3 and 10). Although the old and low educated pilgrims had little knowledge of health tips, they had a good health attitude and practice. Educational strategy to improve knowledge regarding health-related problems and to develop health practices among pilgrims is needed.

  10. Knowledge and attitudes of Japanese dental health care workers towards HIV-related disease.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, H; Adachi, N; Kobayashi, K; Yamada, T

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate knowledge of AIDS and HIV infection among Japanese dental health care workers, the source of that knowledge and attitudes of dental workers towards infected patients. The study population surveyed by means of a self-administered questionnaire consisted of 174 dental health workers at Nagasaki University Dental Hospital, including students and trainee hygienists. Most respondents (100% response) claimed their major source of AIDS knowledge to be derived from the media. Almost all considered their knowledge of AIDS and HIV infection to be more than moderate but still inadequate. The majority of respondents would be hesitant about performing dental treatment on HIV-positive patients. It was widely anticipated that dental patients infected with HIV would increase in the next few years and many were anxious about the increasing occupational risk of HIV infection. Only 22.4% of respondents had the same attitude towards treating HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Most also considered that they would be able to take care of the oral opportunistic diseases associated with HIV. Over 90.0% of respondents requested additional education about HIV, particularly information about the prevention and spread of the virus and cross-infection requirements. It is concluded that further training in the medical and psychological aspects of treating HIV-positive patients is indicated in Japan.

  11. An Investigation of Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Disinfection Procedures in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study assessed the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practice regarding disinfection procedures among nurses in Italian hospitals. Methods A face-to-face interview gathered the following information: demographic and practice characteristics; knowledge about the healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and the disinfection practices; attitudes towards the utility of guidelines/protocols and perception of the risks of acquiring/transmitting HAIs; compliance with antisepsis/disinfection procedures; and sources of information. Results Only 29% acknowledged that urinary and respiratory tract infections were the two most common HAIs and this knowledge was significantly higher in those with a higher level of education. Attitudes towards the utility of guidelines/protocols for disinfection procedures showed a mean score of 9.1. The results of the linear regression model indicated a more positive attitude in female nurses, in those with a lower number of years of activity, and in those needing additional information about disinfection procedures. Nurses with higher educational level and with a higher perception of risk of transmitting an infectious disease while working were more likely to perform appropriate antisepsis of the surgical wound and handwashing before and after medication. Conclusions Plan of successful prevention activities about HAIs and provide pointers to help optimize disinfection procedures and infection prophylaxis and management are needed. PMID:21612613

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior of Nigerian Students Toward Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Randhawa, G

    2017-10-01

    The Nigerian transplantation program is evolving but is currently over-reliant on living donors. If deceased donation is to be viable in Nigeria, it is important to ascertain the views of the public. The objective of the study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of Nigerian international students toward organ donation. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Nigerian international students of the University of Bedfordshire through the use of a modified self-administered questionnaire. The participants were recruited by means of purposive sampling. Of the 110 questionnaires distributed, 103 were returned fully completed (response rate = 93.6%). A significant majority (93.2%) of the participants are aware of organ donation, and 76.7% have a good knowledge on the subject. Furthermore, more than half (52.8%) of the participants have a positive attitude toward organ donation, and less than half (42.8%) have favorable behavior toward it. Higher knowledge does not correlate to either positive attitude or behavior, but a positive attitude is correlated with favorable behavior toward donation. The attitudes and behavior of the respondents toward organ donation is not commensurate with the level of knowledge they possess. This highlights the urgent need for well-structured educational programs on deceased organ donation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, prior exposure, and intent among undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Katherine F; Lou, Zixin; Nicklas, Jennifer C; Habibi, Mona F; Murphy, Lee T

    2012-11-01

    Understanding breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and exposures among nonpregnant youth who are likely to be future parents may provide significant pathways to successfully increasing breastfeeding as the normal, accepted way of feeding infants. However, based on a recent review of the literature, only 3 studies have assessed these factors in nonpregnant, young adults in the United States in the past 10 years. The objective of this study was to gather more recent data regarding breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and prior exposure among undergraduate university students. This was a cross-sectional survey, conducted in November 2010. A convenience sample, consisting of undergraduates in attendance in 2 sections of an introductory nutrition class at a large research university, was used for this project (N = 248). Breastfeeding knowledge was relatively good. However, overall breastfeeding attitudes were more neutral, which appeared to be explained by the belief that breastfeeding is painful, restrictive, and inconvenient, both in general and specifically for the working mother. Though support for breastfeeding in public was low, men were significantly less likely than women to believe it to be embarrassing or unacceptable. In addition, breastfeeding attitudes were more positive among older students and those who were breastfed as infants. Those who were breastfed as infants were also significantly more likely to intend to breastfeed future children. Though this sample indicates good breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes were more neutral, and support for breastfeeding in public appears low. This finding is contradictory and warrants further exploration.

  14. High School Knowledge and Attitudes towards Thalassemia in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Motaharitabar, Eisa; Erfannia, Leila; Dashipour, Alireza; Houshvar, Marziyeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thalassemia (thal) is the most single gene disorders in southeast of Iran. About one quarter of total Iranian new thal cases were born in the Sistan and Balouchistan province so the aim of this study is to assess knowledge level and attitudes towards thal in high school students in Zahedan, capital of Sistan and Balouchistan province in Iran. Study design Cross-sectional descriptive survey. Methods This study was conducted on 762 Zahedan high school boys and girls students in 2009. The structured questionnaires were completed by students which consisted of three parts, namely demographic characteristics, knowledge part by 20 multiple choice questions and attitude part by 9 questions. Results The results indicated that only 14.7% students had good knowledge, good knowledge towards thal was 16.2% in boys and 29.1% in girls (P-value<0.001), positive attitude was 76.7% in boys and 84.7% in girls (P-value<0.029). Negative attitude in students who were born in villages and cities were 33.3% and 20.7% respectively (P-value=0.04). Good knowledge level in experimental field studied was between 2-4-fold more than other field students. Students in the last year high school had more knowledge and more positive attitude. Students’ knowledge score had no significant relationship with father education level (P-value=0.11) but had considerable difference with mother educational level (P-value=0.03). Conclusions It is concluded that long term and target based programs are suggested for high school students and local population of Sistan and Balouchistan where the trend of family marriages is quite high. These programs would impart valuable education and improve knowledge of people towards thal being couples in pre-marriage period and then after becoming parents thereby reducing the effects of disease. PMID:24505548

  15. Knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in Mongolian nurses.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    The World Health Organization and the International Association for Study of Pain cite the significance of pediatric pain as a significant global health issue. Developing countries may have increased needs compared with developed countries because of limited resources and lack of training. In Mongolia a paucity of data exist regarding nursing knowledge of pediatric pain management. The purpose of this project was to assess the current knowledge of pediatric pain and to assess the effectiveness of educational intervention on improving knowledge and attitudes of pediatric nurses working at a major children's hospital in Mongolia. Knowledge and attitudes of Mongolian nurses were evaluated before and after a 2-hour educational intervention. The translated Modified Mongolian Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Shriner's Revision survey was used as a pre- and postintervention assessment instrument with local nurses at a pediatric hospital in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. One hundred sixty-seven nurses attended the conference, with 155 nurses completing the pre- and postsurveys. The mean score on the presurvey was 12.7 out of 35 (26.4% correct), whereas the mean score on the postsurvey score was 16.7 out of 35 (47.8% correct). A paired t test showed a significant statistical difference between scores (p < .0001). Pediatric nurses in Mongolia demonstrate insufficient knowledge of pediatric pain management. The educational intervention was effective in improving pediatric pain knowledge and attitudes in Mongolian nurses. It is recommended to establish similar educational endeavors with nurses around the world to improve pain knowledge and attitudes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV-related knowledge and attitudes among Indonesian prison officers.

    PubMed

    Hinduan, Zahrotur R; Suherman, Harry; Pinxten, W J Lucas; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Hospers, Harm J

    2013-01-01

    Prison officers have a vital role in running a secure and healthy living environment for the inmates. The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and attitude towards inmates living with HIV among the officers in an Indonesian narcotics prison. A total of 93 officers from a narcotics prison in Bandung, Indonesia voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study by completing a self-reported questionnaire. A Prior focus group discussion was also held among selected participants. Statistical data analyses indicate that all domains of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, i.e. knowledge of HIV-transmission, general HIV/AIDS knowledge and knowledge of HIV-prevention, have substantial positive correlations with the prison officers' attitude towards inmates living with HIV. These results show that the more knowledgeable the officers are, the less likely they are to respond in an unfavourable manner to inmates living with HIV and vice versa. Despite the limited participants involved in this study, the knowledge gaps that are identified in this study should be the starting point for the development of educational interventions for prison officers. Sufficient educational programs and the latest materials need to be made available within the prison. Commitment from prison authorities as well as a proper policy are also needed. This study helped prison authorities to identify areas for knowledge development of the officers. Hopefully the positive attitude towards inmates living with HIV will be developed.

  17. Effects of Knowledge and Persuasion on High-School Students' Attitudes toward Nuclear Power Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showers, Dennis E.; Shrigley, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Reports a study designed to investigate the relationship between nuclear knowledge and nuclear attitudes and to the understanding of Science-Technology-Society attitudes involving technological attitude objects. Principal finding was that nuclear knowledge and nuclear attitude each can be changed independently of the other. Although knowledge and…

  18. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Anna; Church, Terri; Fancher-Gonzalez, Kim; Shackelford, Jamie; Lofton, Annelle

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure knowledge and attitudes of nursing about pain management in patients before education, immediately after, and 6 months later. The end-point measure was Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems quarterly scores and percentile rank. This longitudinal, quasi-experimental, quantitative study used survey method with pretest and posttest scores to measure immediate learning and 6 months later to measure sustained changes in knowledge and attitudes for nurses in this facility. The setting was a 360-bed acute care community hospital in the midsouth. The sample consisted of approximately 206 bedside nurses who worked in an acute care facility and 164 final posttest participants. The survey was used in a group setting immediately prior to a didactic learning experience. Immediately after the session, a posttest survey was administered. The 6-month follow-up occurred via an online module developed by the principal investigator. A repeated-measures analysis of variance, a pairwise comparison with a paired t test, and a Bonferroni correction were performed to determine if sustained knowledge and attitudes have changed. Posttest scores were significantly higher than pretest scores on the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain immediately after a didactic education session and 6 months later (P < .017). Six months later, scores remained higher than pretest or immediate posttest scores. Nurses with a stronger knowledge base may lead to better pain management, improved outcomes, and higher patient satisfaction scores.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and attitude among general dentists in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alkandari, Sarah A.; Alyahya, Lolwa; Abdulwahab, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dentists as health care providers should maintain a competence in resuscitation. This cannot be overemphasized by the fact that the population in our country is living longer with an increasing proportion of medically compromised persons in the general population. This preliminary study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of general dentists towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 licensed general dental practitioners working in ministry of health. Data were obtained through electronic self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data of general dentists, and their experience, attitude and knowledge about CPR based on the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines update for CPR. RESULTS: Totally 208 general dentists took part in the present study giving a response rate of 83.2%. Only 36% of the participants demonstrated high knowledge on CPR, while 64% demonstrated low knowledge. Participants’ age, gender, nationality, years of experience, career hierarchy, and formal CPR training were associated significantly with CPR knowledge. Almost all the participants (99%) felt that dentists needed to be competent in basic resuscitation skills and showed a positive attitude towards attending continuing dental educational programs on CPR. CONCLUSION: This study showed that majority of general dental practitioners in Kuwait had inadequate knowledge on CPR. It was also found that CPR training significantly influenced the CPR knowledge of the participants. Therefore, training courses on CPR should be regularly provided to general dentists in the country. PMID:28123615

  20. Knowledge Management: Changing Cultures, Changing Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidorf, Robin

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of knowledge management focuses on a case study of an organizational research department that began implementing information management initiatives. Highlights include the role of the department, including organizing and disseminating different types of information; identifying stakeholders; upgrading skills; communications to all…

  1. Knowledge, attitude and practices of Egyptian industrial and tourist workers towards HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyed, N; Kabbash, I A; El-Gueniedy, M

    2008-01-01

    This study explored knowledge, attitudes and practices towards HIV/AIDS infection among 1256 Egyptian industrial and tourism workers aged 16-40 years. Compared with industrial workers, tourism workers had a significantly better perception of the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS problem worldwide as well as in Egypt and of the likelihood of the problem worsening. Knowledge of tourism workers was also significantly better about causative agent of AIDS and methods of transmission. Both groups had negative attitudes towards patients living with HIV/AIDS concerning their right to confidentiality and to work. Both groups had a positive attitude towards behaviour change for protection from HIV/AIDS, principally via avoidance of extramarital sexual relations and adherence to religious beliefs. Use of condoms as a way to avoid HIV/AIDS was reported by only 0.4% of workers.

  2. A cross-sectional assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice among Hepatitis-B patients in Quetta, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Noman; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Saleem, Fahad; Farooqui, Maryam; Haseeb, Abdul; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2013-05-06

    Hepatitis-B is a life threatening infection resulting in 0.6 million deaths annually. The prevalence of Hepatitis-B is rising in Pakistan and furthermore, there is paucity of information about Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Hepatitis-B patients. Better disease related knowledge is important to have positive attitude and that will bring the good practices which will prevent the further spread of infection. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice of Hepatitis-B Patients in Quetta city, Pakistan. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was undertaken with 390 Hepatitis-B patients attending two public hospitals in Quetta city, Pakistan. Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding Hepatitis-B were assessed using a pre-validated questionnaire containing 20, 7 and 8 questions for knowledge, attitude and practice, respectively. Descriptive statistics were used for elaborating patients' demographic characteristics and mean scores for knowledge, attitude and practice of Hepatitis-B patients. Inferential statistics (Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal Wallis tests, p < 0.05) were used to establish association between study variables. Spearman's rho correlation was used to identify the association between the knowledge, attitude and practice scores. Out of 390 patients, 223 (57.2%) were males, with the majority (136, 34.9%) in the age group of 38-47 years. Mean age of the study cohort was 32.6 ± 9.5 years. One hundred and four (26.7%) had primary level education, with 110 (28.2%) working in the private sector. The mean scores for knowledge, attitude and practice were 8.48 ± 2.7, 3.87 ± 1.2 and 2.37 ± 1.0, respectively. Education, locality and occupation were significantly associated with knowledge, attitude and practice scores. Significant positive linear correlations between knowledge-attitude (r = 0.466, p < 0.01) knowledge-practice (r = 0.221, p < 0.01) and attitude-practice (r = 0.224, p < 0.01) were

  3. Knowledge, attitude and practice of malaysian medical and pharmacy students towards human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Hesham H; Saat, Nur Zakiah N Mohd; Abd Manan, Dahlia Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and oncogenic HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer. However, HPV vaccination is already available as the primary preventive method against cervical cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice of HPV vaccination among Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) and Universiti Malaya (UM) students. This study was conducted from March until August 2009. Pre-tested and validated questionnaires were filled by the third year UKM (n=156) and UM (n=149) students from medical, dentistry and pharmacy faculties. The results showed that the overall level of knowledge on HPV infection, cervical cancer and its prevention among respondents was high and the majority of them had positive attitude towards HPV vaccination. Medical students had the highest level of knowledge (p<0.05). Very few students (3.6%) had already taken the vaccine with no significant difference between the two Universities (p=0.399). In conclusion, the knowledge and attitude of the respondents were high and positive, respectively. Only few students took HPV vaccination. Thus, more awareness campaigns and HPV vaccination services should be provided at universities' campuses with the price of the HPV vaccine reduced for the students.

  4. Parental knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Reljić, Vesna; Gazibara, Tatjana; Nikolić, Miloš; Zarić, Milica; Maksimović, Nataša

    2017-03-01

    Successful control of atopic dermatitis (AD) in children depends on parents' knowledge on the disease and attitude toward ill child, but there is a lack studies exploring parental knowledge, attitude, and behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate parents' knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward AD. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, between February 2015 and March 2016. Parents of children with AD were invited to complete the questionnaire, which was comprised of five parts: parental sociodemographic characteristics, demographic and clinical characteristics of children, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. To assess factors associated with a higher knowledge level on AD, stronger positive attitude, and more supportive behavior, we performed two multiple linear regression models. The average parental knowledge score was 9.5 ± 1.9 out of 12. The level of knowledge did not correlate with parental conviction that they were well-informed on AD (ρ = -0.121; P = 0.319). Older (β = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00-0.16, P = 0.040), married/partnered parents (β = -2.14, 95% CI -3.55 to 0.72, P = 0.004), and those who have had AD themselves were more likely to be more knowledgeable on AD. Older (β = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01-0.34, P = 0.036) and employed (β = 3.99, 95% CI 1.59-6.38, P = 0.002) parents had stronger positive attitudes toward their children with AD. More supportive behavior of parents of children with AD was associated with being older (β = 0.24, 95% CI 0.04-0.45, P = 0.020) and less educated (β = -0.76, 95% CI -1.24 to 0.28, P = 0.003). The importance of understanding AD and accounting for attitudes by family members is obvious for successful control of the disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Knowledge, attitude, and practice toward epilepsy among rural Tanzanian residents.

    PubMed

    Rwiza, H T; Matuja, W B; Kilonzo, G P; Haule, J; Mbena, P; Mwang'ombola, R; Jilek-Aall, L

    1993-01-01

    Before a health education program can be established, one must first know what the target population believes and does with respect to the disease in question. Therefore, we performed a study among Tanzanian rural inhabitants to identify their knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) toward epilepsy: 3,256 heads of households (mean age 40.2 years, range 15-90 years; M/F ratio 1:1) were interviewed. Of the respondents, 32.9% said they had never seen a seizure; 67.7% said they did not know the cause of epilepsy; 33.3% mentioned various causes including heredity, witchcraft, infection of the spinal cord, hernia; 40.6% believed epilepsy was infectious through physical contact, flatus, breath, excretions, sharing food; 36.8% believed epilepsy could not be cured and 17.1% believed it could not even be controlled; 45.3% believed epilepsy could be treated by traditional healers, and only 50.8% believed hospital drugs were of any use; and 62.7% of the respondents would not allow an epileptic child to go to school for various reasons, including mental subnormality (54.0%), fear of the child falling while alone (65.9%), and fear that the epileptic child would infect other children (11.2%). Concerning what is to be done when a seizure occurs, 33.5% of the respondents would keep away and not touch the person; 16.5% would take some potentially harmful measure such as forcing a mouth gag or forcing a drink such as water (1 even mentioned urine); 5.2% would take unnecessary measures such as rushing the patient to a hospital. Only 35.7% of respondents would perform at least some of the currently recommended first-aid measures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Bioterrorism education effect on knowledge and attitudes of nurses

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Nahid; Nesami, Masoumeh Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Context: The most important way against bioterrorism is reinforcement of knowledge of health and medical team to diagnose and rapid reaction during these events. Aims: To assess the effect of bioterrorism education on knowledge and attitudes of nurses. Settings and Design: the setting of study was one of the infectious disease wards, emergency rooms or internal wards of the hospitals under supervision of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this pre-experimental study, 65 nurses who had all inclusion criteria are selected by accessible sampling method. Data on nurses knowledge and attitudes toward bioterrorism were collected using a self-administered questionnaire before and after two two-h sessions education. After a month of education, the units responded to questionnaire again. Statistical Analysis Used: A descriptive statistics Wilcoxon tests and Spearman correlation coefficient were used. Results: Before education, the majority of units (96.9%) had low knowledge about bioterrorism (0-33.3% score of 100%),whereas after education, the majority of them (100%) had good knowledge(well done) (66.7-100% score of 100%). And majority of units (96.9%) before education had indifferent attitude toward bioterrorism (33.4-66.6% score of 100%), whereas a majority of them (98.5%) after education had positive attitude (66.7-100% score of 100%). Conclusions: The education has a positive effect on nurses’ knowledge and attitudes and it can be a guideline for administrators of the Ministry of Health and medicine for planning to achieve the goals of preventive and defense against bioterrorism. PMID:23723614

  7. Palliative care for advanced dementia in Japan: knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Miyamoto, Yuki

    This study examined factors contributing to the knowledge and attitudes of nursing home staff regarding palliative care for advanced dementia in Japan. A cross-sectional survey of 275 nurses and other care workers from 74 long-term care facilities was conducted across three prefectures in August 2014. The Japanese versions of the Questionnaire on Palliative Care for Advanced Dementia (qPAD) and Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying scale, Form B (FATCOD-B-J) were used. Greater knowledge was exhibited among nursing home staff in facilities that established a manual for end-of-life care. Higher levels of positive attitudes were observed among nursing home staff in facilities that had established a manual and those in facilities with a physician's written opinions on end-of-life care. An organisational effort should be explored to establish end-of-life care policies among nursing home staff for advanced dementia.

  8. Dental habits, knowledge, and attitudes of young drug addicts.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, F

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain information about a group of young drug addicts' dental habits, knowledge, and attitudes. Semistructured interviews with open-ended questions based on well-defined hypotheses were obtained with 20 intravenous drug addicts attending a Danish addiction clinic. All the interviews were taped and typed out verbatim. The analysis of the interviews was primarily carried out qualitatively. Almost all the addicts had been enrolled in the Public Child Dental Care system and the majority vividly remembered this as an unpleasant experience. None of the addicts attended a dentist regularly after having finished school, when the drug abuse usually started. Only a need for acute relief could generally motivate the addicts to visit a dentist, and in the few instances they were questioned about any drug abuse or viral hepatitis infection they usually concealed this. They evidenced very limited knowledge concerning the causes and prevention of dental decay and periodontal disease, and the high prevalence of dental caries was often believed to be caused solely or partly by the ascorbic acid or citric acid that is mixed and injected together with the drugs. A distinct behaviour with a neglected oral hygiene and an excessive intake of candy, soft drinks, and other food with a high sugar content was common. The dietary habits were related to the injection of the drugs in a ritual manner. The drug addicts only realized how deplorable their dental health had become during periods of abstinence, and then they were often embarrassed or ashamed of their esthetic appearance, although this was not perceived to have a negative influence on attempts at resocialization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. [Knowledge and attitudes on reproductive health among adolescents].

    PubMed

    Donati, S; Grandolfo, M; Spinelli, A; Medda, E

    1996-01-01

    During 1993-94, 5 sex information programs were conducted in various secondary schools in Rome, involving a total of 292 students whose age ranged from 14 to 21 years. The courses were organized in 5 sessions lasting 2 hours each and were held by a specialist in obstetrics and gynecology. Visual teaching materials were presented, followed by discussions. The initiative was evaluated by means of 3 questionnaires: the pretest questionnaire on attitudes and knowledge about reproductive health; the second was administered at the end of the course about recommendations; and the third one verified the modification of the knowledge level 4 months later. 20-50% of the students answered correctly all questions about reproductive health before the course and 70-100% of them at the end of 4 months. 95% of the sample thought that the school should provide information about sexuality and 74% of the students suggested that it should be introduced in the lower grades of secondary schools. The major subjects requested were hygiene and sexually transmitted diseases (75%), sexuality and psychological aspects (68%), and infections (65%). Information about reproductive physiology and contraception among young people was obtained from friends (74%), books and journals (57%), parents (42% for boys and 56% for girls), the school (25%), family counseling (4%), and the family physician (3%). The fertile period of the menstrual cycle was correctly stated by 48% in the pretest sample, 88% after the course, and 93% 4 months later. 87% of the subjects knew that the condom also offers protection against sexually transmitted diseases, but 25% said that it has no expiration date. 23% of the students did not know that abortion is legal in Italy. Family counseling should focus on prevention activities for the school-age population.

  10. Nutrition knowledge, attitude and practice of college sportsmen.

    PubMed

    Nazni, Peerkhan; Vimala, Srinivasan

    2010-06-01

    Nutrition is an important component of any physical fitness program. The main dietary goal for active individuals is to obtain adequate nutrition to optimize health fitness and to increase sports performance. The present study aims to assess the nutrition knowledge, attitude and practice among the selected athletes. Athletes from five different private colleges situated in Salem District, Tamilnadu, India were selected. A total number of 102 athletes, 32 sportsmen belong to Volleyball discipline, 25 belongs to weightlifter discipline and 45 belong to runners discipline in sports. All the selected athletes were including in the study. The Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) questionnaire contained ten questions about nutrition knowledge, nine questions about attitudes, and ten questions about dietary practice were collected from the selected athletes. Dietary composition of the sportsmen is also assessed. The collected data was coded and used for evaluation. Results about KAP revealed that 42 per cent of the volleyball players had good nutritional knowledge (60-69per cent) compared to weight lifters (43per cent) who had satisfactory (50-59per cent) knowledge about nutrition. Twenty nine per cent of the runners had very good (70-79per cent) knowledge about nutrition. Regarding food consumption pattern intake of cereals, other vegetables and milk was found to be less compared to the RDA for the athletes. Among the three disciplines sports persons, the mean nutrient intake of the runners is high compared to volleyball and weight lifters. The sports disciplines strongly affected the nutrition knowledge, attitudes and practices of sportsmen. The overall scores indicate that most sportsmen had good knowledge of nutrition and supplements.

  11. Nutrition Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of College Sportsmen

    PubMed Central

    Nazni, Peerkhan; Vimala, Srinivasan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Nutrition is an important component of any physical fitness program. The main dietary goal for active individuals is to obtain adequate nutrition to optimize health fitness and to increase sports performance. The present study aims to assess the nutrition knowledge, attitude and practice among the selected athletes. Methods Athletes from five different private colleges situated in Salem District, Tamilnadu, India were selected. A total number of 102 athletes, 32 sportsmen belong to Volleyball discipline, 25 belongs to weightlifter discipline and 45 belong to runners discipline in sports. All the selected athletes were including in the study. The Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) questionnaire contained ten questions about nutrition knowledge, nine questions about attitudes, and ten questions about dietary practice were collected from the selected athletes. Dietary composition of the sportsmen is also assessed. The collected data was coded and used for evaluation. Results Results about KAP revealed that 42 per cent of the volleyball players had good nutritional knowledge (60–69per cent) compared to weight lifters (43per cent) who had satisfactory (50–59per cent) knowledge about nutrition. Twenty nine per cent of the runners had very good (70–79per cent) knowledge about nutrition. Regarding food consumption pattern intake of cereals, other vegetables and milk was found to be less compared to the RDA for the athletes. Among the three disciplines sports persons, the mean nutrient intake of the runners is high compared to volleyball and weight lifters. Conclusion The sports disciplines strongly affected the nutrition knowledge, attitudes and practices of sportsmen. The overall scores indicate that most sportsmen had good knowledge of nutrition and supplements. PMID:22375196

  12. Modifying Knowledge, Emotions, and Attitudes Regarding Genetically Modified Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heddy, Benjamin C.; Danielson, Robert W.; Sinatra, Gale M.; Graham, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether conceptual change predicted emotional and attitudinal change while learning about genetically modified foods (GMFs). Participants were 322 college students; half read a refutation text designed to shift conceptual knowledge, emotions, and attitudes, while the other half served as a control group.…

  13. Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, and Clinical Behaviors: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the impact of practitioners' attitudes and knowledge of sexual health on clinical behaviors. Sexual health topics are often areas of concern for clients of any age in counseling. Thus, counselors must be trained and equipped to address sexual health across the life span. This study explored whether child and adolescent…

  14. Drug Education Based on a Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, John A.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a questionnaire concerning factual knowledge of attitudes toward, and experience with a variety of drugs are reported. It was concluded that marihuana and other drugs are readily available to secondary school students, and widespread experimentation exists; however, a strict dichotomy exists between marihuana and other drugs. (Author/BY)

  15. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-01-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly…

  16. Pollution Attitudes, Knowledge and Behavior of Farmers and Urban Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronus, Carol L.; van Es, J. C.

    Data were gathered through telephone survey of a random sample of 91 urban men and 97 farm operators to study pollution attitudes, knowledge, and household pollution abatement behavior among urban residents and farmers. The results indicate that urban men are more concerned about pollution, more willing to allocate tax money to clean up pollution,…

  17. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  18. Knowledge and Attitudes about Colon Cancer Screening among African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Aimee S.; Daley, Christine M.; Greiner, K. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To explore knowledge and attitudes about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among African American patients age 45 and older at a community health center serving low-income and uninsured patients. Methods: We conducted 7 focus groups and 17 additional semistructured interviews. Sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed…

  19. Biotechnology: An Assessment of Agricultural Science Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowen, Diana L.; Roberts, T. Grady; Wingenbach, Gary J.; Harlin, Julie F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore agricultural science teachers' knowledge levels and attitudes toward biotechnology topics. The average agricultural science teacher in this study was a 37-year-old male who had taught for 12 years. He had a bachelor's degree and had lived or worked on a farm or ranch. He had not attended…

  20. Secondary School Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Renewable Energy Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Gavrilakis, Costas; Flouri, Eleni

    2009-01-01

    Investigating knowledge, perceptions as well as attitudes of the public that concern various aspects of environmental issues is of high importance for Environmental Education. An integrated understanding of these parameters can properly support the planning of Environmental Education curriculum and relevant educational materials. In this survey we…

  1. Secondary School Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Renewable Energy Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Gavrilakis, Costas; Flouri, Eleni

    2009-01-01

    Investigating knowledge, perceptions as well as attitudes of the public that concern various aspects of environmental issues is of high importance for Environmental Education. An integrated understanding of these parameters can properly support the planning of Environmental Education curriculum and relevant educational materials. In this survey we…

  2. The Ignored Facets of Environmental Attitude and Knowledge Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin, Ozgur

    This paper redefines and clarifies the standpoints of environmental attitudes (EA), knowledge scales (EK), and affiliated studies. Considering the quality of environmental education studies, this paper tries to give a sharp and concrete message to environmental science educators and researchers and strengthen the paths of environmental education…

  3. Sunbathing: College Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail-Smith, Karen; Felts, W. Michael

    1993-01-01

    This study assessed Caucasian college students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding sunbathing. Surveys indicated concern with attractiveness was a major motivation for frequent sunbathing. Frequent sunbathers were more likely to be women and to report fewer self-perceived risk factors and less likely to use sunscreen. (SM)

  4. Knowledge and Attitudes about Colon Cancer Screening among African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Aimee S.; Daley, Christine M.; Greiner, K. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To explore knowledge and attitudes about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among African American patients age 45 and older at a community health center serving low-income and uninsured patients. Methods: We conducted 7 focus groups and 17 additional semistructured interviews. Sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed…

  5. Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, and Clinical Behaviors: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the impact of practitioners' attitudes and knowledge of sexual health on clinical behaviors. Sexual health topics are often areas of concern for clients of any age in counseling. Thus, counselors must be trained and equipped to address sexual health across the life span. This study explored whether child and adolescent…

  6. Students' Knowledge of Energy and Attitudes to Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlahov, Stephen J.; Treagust, David F.

    1988-01-01

    Data were collected by pencil-and-paper instruments from 33 students in grade 10 in Perth, Western Australia. Data indicated that students were only slightly knowledgeable about energy and energy conservation; they had slightly positive attitudes toward energy conservation. (MNS)

  7. Knowledge and Attitudes toward Hookah Usage among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Babinski, Dara; Merlo, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Hookah smoking is a popular form of tobacco use on university campuses. This study documented use, attitudes, and knowledge of hookah smoking among college students. Participants: The sample included 943 university students recruited between February 2009 and January 2010. Respondents ("M" age = 20.02) included 376 males, 533…

  8. Interrelationships among Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, Behaviors and Body Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissen, Anthony R.; Policastro, Peggy; Quick, Virginia; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about interrelationships among nutrition knowledge, attitude, dietary intake, and body satisfaction, which are important variables that play a role in nutrition education interventions. This paper aims to focus on these interrelationships. Design/methodology/approach: Students (n = 279; 20.12 plus or minus 1.75SD years)…

  9. Drug Education Based on a Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, John A.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a questionnaire concerning factual knowledge of attitudes toward, and experience with a variety of drugs are reported. It was concluded that marihuana and other drugs are readily available to secondary school students, and widespread experimentation exists; however, a strict dichotomy exists between marihuana and other drugs. (Author/BY)

  10. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  11. Sun Safety Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Beachgoing Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merten, Julie Williams; Higgins, Sue; Rowan, Alan; Pragle, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Skin cancer rates are rising and could be reduced with better sun protection behaviors. Adolescent exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is damaging because it can lead to skin cancer. This descriptive study extends understanding of adolescent sun exposure attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors. Methods: A sample of 423 beachgoing…

  12. Sunbathing: College Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail-Smith, Karen; Felts, W. Michael

    1993-01-01

    This study assessed Caucasian college students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding sunbathing. Surveys indicated concern with attractiveness was a major motivation for frequent sunbathing. Frequent sunbathers were more likely to be women and to report fewer self-perceived risk factors and less likely to use sunscreen. (SM)

  13. Interrelationships among Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, Behaviors and Body Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissen, Anthony R.; Policastro, Peggy; Quick, Virginia; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about interrelationships among nutrition knowledge, attitude, dietary intake, and body satisfaction, which are important variables that play a role in nutrition education interventions. This paper aims to focus on these interrelationships. Design/methodology/approach: Students (n = 279; 20.12 plus or minus 1.75SD years)…

  14. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-01-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly…

  15. Nutrition knowledge, attitude, and behavior of Taiwanese elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Yang, Hsiao-Chi; Hang, Chi-Ming; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand nutrition knowledge, attitude, and behavior in Taiwanese elementary school children, and the relationship of these various components. The results indicated that children's knowledge was fair in nutrition basics, but poor in 'the physiological function of nutrients', 'relationships between diet/nutrients and disease', and 'the daily serving requirement for different food groups'. Children in general valued the importance of nutrition, but they did not concern the health benefit of foods in food selections. Their dietary quality was not satisfactory, and the diet of most children did not meet the recommended serving requirements for milk, vegetable, fruit, and cereals and grains groups. Positive relationships were found among nutrition knowledge, attitude, caring- about-nutrition behavior and dietary quality score. The restraint or disinhibited eating behavior of 4th to 6th graders was not serious, but a large number of children already performed some self-controlling practices to avoid obesity, but not frequently. One fourth of the students skipped meals, especially breakfast, and one quarter of 4th to 6th graders prepared their own breakfast; which may have some impact on children's diet quality. A gap was found between nutrition knowledge, attitude and eating behavior, especially vegetable and fruit consumption, indicating that the attitude toward eating for health was not strong in this age group. Future nutrition education for school children should not only include food serving requirements of food groups, but also apply appropriate theories to improve the motivation for healthy eating.

  16. Pollution Attitudes, Knowledge and Behavior of Farmers and Urban Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronus, Carol L.; van Es, J. C.

    Data were gathered through telephone survey of a random sample of 91 urban men and 97 farm operators to study pollution attitudes, knowledge, and household pollution abatement behavior among urban residents and farmers. The results indicate that urban men are more concerned about pollution, more willing to allocate tax money to clean up pollution,…

  17. Factors Affecting Environmental Knowledge and Attitudes among Lebanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oweini, Ahmad; Houri, Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study aimed at assessing the variables that would positively affect the knowledge and attitude of a group of Lebanese college students regarding the environment, namely such factors as gender, age, previous hiking experience and living abroad. A purposeful sample of students attending the Lebanese American University, was asked to…

  18. Sun Safety Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Beachgoing Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merten, Julie Williams; Higgins, Sue; Rowan, Alan; Pragle, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Skin cancer rates are rising and could be reduced with better sun protection behaviors. Adolescent exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is damaging because it can lead to skin cancer. This descriptive study extends understanding of adolescent sun exposure attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors. Methods: A sample of 423 beachgoing…

  19. Knowledge and Attitudes toward Hookah Usage among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Babinski, Dara; Merlo, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Hookah smoking is a popular form of tobacco use on university campuses. This study documented use, attitudes, and knowledge of hookah smoking among college students. Participants: The sample included 943 university students recruited between February 2009 and January 2010. Respondents ("M" age = 20.02) included 376 males, 533…

  20. Effects of Parent Education on Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Mary Beth; Pearl, Peggy T.; Behle, Pamela D.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated 42 pregnant and parenting adolescents (aged 13 to 20 years) and adults (who began parenting as adolescents) enrolled in parenting classes. The Parent as a Teacher Inventory and the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory were used to measure change in knowledge and attitudes following participation in the classes. The findings…

  1. The Knowledge, Attitude, and Perception towards Epilepsy amongst Medical Students in Uyo, Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ekeh, Bertha C.; Ekrikpo, Udeme E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Epilepsy remains a stigmatized disease especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Lack of information and illiteracy has been blamed as the cause of the stigmatization. This stigmatization stems from the fact that the traditional African belief views epilepsy as a spiritual disease. We studied the knowledge, attitude, and perception towards epilepsy amongst medical students comparing the knowledge of the clinical students with that of the basic medical (preclinical) students. Methodology. The participants were medical students in University of Uyo. We administered questionnaires which explored the knowledge of etiology (perceived and medically proven). We studied the beliefs in infectivity of epilepsy, treatment together with their attitudes, and perception to persons with epilepsy. Results. Most of the participants do not have a good knowledge of epilepsy. The knowledge, however, was much better amongst the clinical students. There is some difference in the attitudes of the clinical students compared with the basic students. Conclusion. There is a knowledge gap in epilepsy even amongst medical students. Participants still harbor the traditional African beliefs that epilepsy is a spiritual disease. Mercifully, the knowledge is better amongst the clinical students. This is not surprising since the clinical students have had clinical exposure to epilepsy. PMID:26556558

  2. Wrestling with the hymen: knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Loeber, Olga

    2014-08-01

    There is a cultural gap between girls with virginity problems and the western healthcare professionals (HCPs) they approach for help. The lack of knowledge concerning virginity-related issues among non-Western migrants in the Netherlands is illustrated by means of a selection of quotations from messages received by a single sexual health service. The differences in cultural beliefs between non-Western and Western societies are also overviewed. HCPs should have a better grasp of the ins and outs of the virginity norms prevailing in migrant communities. This would enable them to counsel the young women concerned more efficiently and to find practical, culturally acceptable solutions to their dilemmas.

  3. Nutrition knowledge, attitudes and dietary restriction behaviour of Taiwanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Lee, Ya-Wen

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand knowledge about and general attitudes towards nutrition, dietary restriction attitudes, and dietary restriction behavior in the Taiwanese elderly, and the relationship of these various components to each other. Data from the Elderly Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (1999-2000) were used for analysis and included 1937 elderly persons aged over 65. The results indicated that the elderly had poor nutrition knowledge, especially about the relationship between nutrition and disease. Elderly nutrition attitudes were fair; they tended to disagree with misconceptions about "healthy" or functional foods and also had quite positive general eating attitudes. However, the Taiwanese elderly hold quite strong attitudes influenced by Chinese traditional or food-texture-related dietary restrictions. Elderly people frequently avoid eating foods considered unhealthy by modern medical science (e.g. high fat/cholesterol foods) as well as foods forbidden by Chinese traditional medicine (e.g. "heating" foods, "cooling" foods). Most of the elderly regularly eat three meals a day, however, they seldom pay attention to dietary and nutrition information. The most important sources of nutrition information are offspring or family members, TV, and medical practitioners. In general, elderly men with a higher educational level and living in less remote areas had better nutrition knowledge, held more positive nutrition attitudes, and kept to dietary restrictions less frequently. Elderly people's nutrition knowledge was positively related to their health-care attitudes, general eating attitudes, high- fat or high-cholesterol food restriction behavior, fermented or pickled food restriction behavior, attention to nutrition information, and regularity of meals. However, nutrition knowledge was inversely related to Chinese traditional or food-texture-related dietary restriction behaviors. The results of this study suggest that education of elderly

  4. Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Sea Turtles in Elementary Students on Zakynthos, Greece.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimopoulos, Dimitrios I.; Pantis, John D.

    2003-01-01

    Utilizes a 32-item survey instrument to measure knowledge and attitudes of 5th and 6th grade students regarding sea turtle conservation on Zakynthos, Greece. Results indicate low knowledge scores and high scores for attitudes, but an overall positive correlation between knowledge and attitudes. Knowledge, understanding and/or concern, and locus of…

  5. Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Sea Turtles in Elementary Students on Zakynthos, Greece.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimopoulos, Dimitrios I.; Pantis, John D.

    2003-01-01

    Utilizes a 32-item survey instrument to measure knowledge and attitudes of 5th and 6th grade students regarding sea turtle conservation on Zakynthos, Greece. Results indicate low knowledge scores and high scores for attitudes, but an overall positive correlation between knowledge and attitudes. Knowledge, understanding and/or concern, and locus of…

  6. Nurses' knowledge, attitudes and behavior toward Deaf patients.

    PubMed

    Velonaki, Venetia-Sofia; Kampouroglou, Georgios; Velonaki, Martha; Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Sourtzi, Panayiota; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2015-01-01

    Deaf sign language users experience severe health disparities which could be decreased with the modification of some factors associated with health professionals' attitudes, knowledge and behaviors. Relevant research referring to nurses is almost inexistent. This study aimed to examine Greek nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices toward Deaf people and determine the factors that influence these parameters. The sample consisted of 200 randomly selected nurses working in 2 public hospitals and 2 public health centers in Attica, Greece. Data was collected from November 2010 to May 2011, using a questionnaire inquiring for demographics, previous contact with Deaf people or other people with disabilities, relevant education, practices, feelings and self-efficacy for caring for Deaf patients, knowledge and attitudes toward them and interest in being educated in such issues. A lack of relevant knowledge and education was observed. Relevant education was found to be positively correlated with knowledge (rho = 0.225, p = 0.003). Self-efficacy was found to be positively correlated with the contact with Deaf people score (rho = 0.358, p < 0.001). The participants who have avoided caring for Deaf patients had a statistically significantly lower mean score of self-efficacy (p < 0.001). No correlation was found between the contact and knowledge scores and between relevant education or contact and attitudes. The majority (64.8%) were interested in attending a relevant educational program. Our findings support that appropriate educational programs, including contact with Deaf people, could contribute to the improvement of nurses' knowledge and behavior toward Deaf people and would be welcomed by the majority. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  8. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  9. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes in pain management practice.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Elizabeth; Malcolm, Colette

    Nursing a patient in pain is a challenging task requiring up-to-date knowledge, skilled interventions and attitudes that convey trust, care and an honest belief in what the patient says (Carr, 1997). This study examined the knowledge and attitudes of nurses who have completed a knowledge and competency training programme within an orthopaedic centre (Group one) against a group of nurses who were attending a pain conference who had not completed this programme (Group two). The questionnaire used was the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (Ferrell and McCaffery, 2002). Findings from the survey revealed that there was no significant difference in the total correct responses between the two groups and there was a severe deficit in knowledge relating to questions about non-pharmacological methods of treating pain and opioid use in chronic pain conditions. However Group one had a higher correct response rate (p=0.001) in the vignettes that are based on daily nursing practice.

  10. Stem cells in Dentistry: knowledge and attitude of Nigerian Dentists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several controversies exist about the methods of harvesting and eventual utilization of stem cells in Medicine and Dentistry. The objective of the study was to investigate the awareness, attitude and knowledge of the use of stem cells in Dentistry among Nigerian Dentists. Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted among dentists selected from both private and public health sectors, in some of the major cities in Nigeria. Results The majority of the participants were ≤35 years in age, male, Pentecostal Christians, possessed a postgraduate qualification, had practiced for ≤5 years and were specialists or specializing. In this study, 153(81.0%) of the participants reported awareness about the use of stem cells in dentistry which was significantly associated with qualification and type of practice. Most of the respondents 114 (60.3%) had a poor knowledge of the use of stem cells in Dentistry. This was significantly associated with type of practice and awareness about stem cell use in dentistry but binary logistic regression showed awareness as the only determinant of knowledge. About three-quarters 142 (75.1%) of the participants exhibited positive attitude towards stem cell use. This had a positive non-significant association with knowledge and reported awareness. Conclusion Data from this study revealed a high level of awareness, positive attitude to and poor knowledge of the use of stem cells in Dentistry among a cross section of Nigerian Dentists. PMID:23767980

  11. Contraceptive knowledge, attitude and practice among rural women.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Rozina; Afreen, Uzma; Hashmi, Haleema A

    2008-09-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitude regarding family planning and the practice of contraceptives among rural women. A cross-sectional observational study. The gynaecological outpatient clinic of Fatima Hospital, Baqai Medical University, Karachi, from July to December 2005. One-hundred women between the ages 15-45, living with their husbands and coming from rural area (villages) were interviewed. Women who were pregnant, had a child younger than 2 years, or had any medical disorder were excluded. Their knowledge, attitude and practice on contraceptives were evaluated with the help of a predesigned questionnaire. The other variables used were the age of women, parity and educational status. Descriptive analysis was conducted to obtain percentages. Out of 100 interviewed women with mean age of 29.7 years, 81(81%) had some knowledge about family planning methods. The media provided information of contraceptives in 52 out of 81 (64%) women. Regarding the usage of contraceptive methods, only 53 (53%) of the respondents were using some sort of contraception. Barrier method (condoms) was in practice by 18 (33.9%) and 12 (22.6%) of women had already undergone tubal ligation. The women using injectables and intrauterine contraceptive devices were 10 (18.8%) and 7 (13.2%) respectively. Six were using oral contraceptive pills (11.3%). Positive attitude towards contraception was shown by 76 (76%) of them, while 41(41%) stated their husbands' positive attitude towards contraception. In the present study, there was a low contraceptive use among women of rural origin despite good knowledge. Motivation of couples through media and health personnel can help to achieve positive attitude of husbands for effective use of contraceptives.

  12. Knowledge of Acute Human Immnuodeficiency Virus Infection among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods: A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  13. Knowledge of Acute Human Immnuodeficiency Virus Infection among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods: A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  14. Knowledge About Hospice: Exploring Misconceptions, Attitudes, and Preferences for Care.

    PubMed

    Cagle, John G; Van Dussen, Daniel J; Culler, Krystal L; Carrion, Iraida; Hong, Seokho; Guralnik, Jack; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-02-01

    Poor knowledge and misperceptions about hospice are believed to be common, but there is scant evidence about the public's understanding of hospice. To examine hospice knowledge among geographically diverse adults; and describe linkages between knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about hospice care, and demographics. A small cross-sectional telephone survey of adults living in the contiguous US was conducted using randomly selected numbers (cell phone and landline) and over-sampling of minorities. Measures assessed knowledge (23-item test), attitudes (8-item scale), experiences and preferences related to hospice. 123 participants completed surveys (response rate 46%). 106 (86%) had heard about hospice, 65 (54%) of whom had a personal experience with hospice. Participants had an average hospice knowledge test score of 18 (SD = 3.4) indicating moderate knowledge of hospice. A majority of respondents (62%) did not know that hospice cannot provide concurrent cure-oriented care. Misperceptions about eligibility, coverage of hospice, the provision of hospice in nursing homes or to persons who live alone were not uncommon (missed by >20%). Greater knowledge of hospice was associated with more favorable attitudes about the hospice philosophy of care (r = .22, p = .023) and a greater preference for hospice (p = .049). Respondents who were more educated, worked in the medical field, were non-Hispanic White, and had direct experience with hospice were also more likely to be more knowledgeable about hospice. Despite relatively high hospice awareness and favorability, myths and misperceptions about hospice still abound--and may drive ethnic disparities in end-of-life care. Educational interventions and future study are needed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Maternal knowledge, attitudes and practice in diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, P; Rajput, V J

    1993-01-01

    In developing countries where diarrhea is a major health problem, mothers are often ignorant about the cause and management of the disease and tend to restrict fluid intake instead of taking steps to prevent dehydration. 300 mothers of children hospitalized in Rewa, India, were interviewed with a pretested questionnaire on their diarrhea knowledge. 74.3% were rural and 80.6% were aged 20-30 years. 70% were illiterate and belonged to the upper lower or lower middle class. Causes of diarrhea cited by the mothers included teething (64.3%), evil eye (46%), contact with another case (36.6%), malnutrition (28.3), worm infestation (22.6%), eating mud (18.6%), mother's food habits (17.6%), eating sweets (17.3%), dirty water (15.3%), hot/cold foods (10.6%), change of food (8.3), and dirty environment (6%). During diarrhea, 266 mothers allowed breast milk, 118 pulses and rice gruel, 104 diluted cow's milk, 57 undiluted cow's milk, 25 boiled pulses water, 23 boiled rice water, 16 banana, 13 oral rehydration solution, 10 a whole diet, 8 tea, and 7 curd. Half of the mothers considered passage of liquid stools 3-5 times a day as diarrhea. Only 3% of the mothers listed dehydration as an important complication of the disease. Of the mothers using oral rehydration therapy, the fluid was often not reconstituted properly, and inadequate amounts were administered. Improved health education for mothers, with information on general hygiene, adequate diet during illness, and the use of oral rehydration solution in diarrhea would reduce diarrhea deaths.

  16. The Development of Instruments to Measure Attitudes toward Abortion and Knowledge of Abortion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snegroff, Stanley

    1976-01-01

    This study developed an abortion attitude scale and abortion knowledge inventory that may be utilized by health educators, counselors, and researchers for assessing attitudes toward abortion and knowledge about it. (SK)

  17. The Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Concerning Alcohol Use of Resident Assistants and Residence Hall Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Marsha L.

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationship between knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward alcohol among resident assistants and residence hall students at midwestern university. Found no statistically significant difference between assistants and students. Data revealed statistically significant relationship between students' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior…

  18. The Development of Instruments to Measure Attitudes toward Abortion and Knowledge of Abortion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snegroff, Stanley

    1976-01-01

    This study developed an abortion attitude scale and abortion knowledge inventory that may be utilized by health educators, counselors, and researchers for assessing attitudes toward abortion and knowledge about it. (SK)

  19. Palliative Care: Improving Nursing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors
.

    PubMed

    Harden, Karen; Price, Deborah; Duffy, Elizabeth; Galunas, Laura; Rodgers, Cheryl

    2017-10-01

    Oncology nurses affect patient care at every point along the cancer journey. This creates the perfect opportunity to educate patients and caregivers about palliative care early and often throughout treatment. However, healthcare providers frequently do not have the knowledge and confidence to engage in meaningful conversations about palliative care.
. The specific aims were to improve oncology nurses' palliative care knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors by providing a palliative care nursing education program. An additional aim was to increase the number of conversations with patients and families about palliative care.
. This project had a pre-/post-test design to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors at baseline and one month after implementation of an established education curriculum. The teaching strategy included one four-hour class for oncology RNs with topics about the definition of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and how to have palliative care conversations.
. Results showed a statistically significant difference after the educational intervention for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The number of conversations with patients and caregivers about palliative and end-of-life care increased significantly.

  20. Food Label Knowledge, Usage and Attitudes of Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Jackey, Beverly A; Cotugna, Nancy; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Few recent studies have investigated food label practices in older adults. This cross-sectional study surveyed adults, 60 years and older in Delaware (n = 100, 82% female, 74% between 60 and 79 years, 49% Caucasian, 45% African Americans) to examine associations between food label knowledge, attitudes, and usage patterns. A 28-item questionnaire assessed knowledge, attitudes, usage, and demographic information. Bivariate analysis results showed food label knowledge was associated with education and monthly income. Those reporting a high school education or less incorrectly identified calorie (P < 0.05) and carbohydrate information (P < 0.03). Monthly income ≤$2000 was associated with incorrectly interpreting carbohydrate information (P < 0.03). Label usage was associated with being female (P < 0.001), having a high school education or less (P < 0.000), being 70 years or older (P < 0.05), and having a monthly income ≤$2000 (P < 0.001). Respondent's usage and perceived label comprehension was high; however less than half could correctly interpret label information. When shown samples of the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed new labels, subjects had a very favorable attitude toward the new changes. Increasing nutrition knowledge through education interventions appropriate for older adult consumers may improve comprehension of information on the food labels.

  1. Dental students' knowledge and attitudes toward patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan M; Mahmoud, Ahmad Abd Al-Aziz; Ryalat, Soukaina M; Sawair, Faleh A

    2014-07-01

    Inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy can affect the provision of health services for patients with epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy among clinical dental students in Jordan. The study was conducted using a 21-item questionnaire to assess professional experience with epilepsy, knowledge about epilepsy, social tolerance, and willingness to care for patients with epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. More than one-third of dental students believed that epilepsy is due to insanity or mental illness. Only 45% were able to identify convulsion or shaking as a sign of epilepsy, and more than one-third did not know how to act in case of an epileptic seizure in the dental clinic. Disappointingly, 43.4% of the respondents were of the opinion that people with epilepsy should not have children, and only 38.6% thought that people with epilepsy should be employed at the same jobs as other people. About 50% indicated that their families would be concerned about them treating patients with epilepsy, and 30% believed that knowing that patients with epilepsy were treated in their clinic might make other patients reluctant to continue their treatment there. The results revealed an inadequate level of knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. There is an urgent need to educate dental students about epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Portuguese Medical Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lucas; Gato, Jorge; Esteves, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people still face discrimination in healthcare environments and physicians often report lack of knowledge on this population's specific healthcare needs. In fact, recommendations have been put forward to include lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender health in medical curricula. This study aimed to explore factors associated with medical students' knowledge and attitudes towards homosexuality in different years of the medical course. An anonymous online-based questionnaire was sent to all medical students enrolled at the Faculty of Medicine - University of Porto, Portugal, in December 2015. The questionnaire included socio-demographic questions, the Multidimensional Scale of Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (27 items) and a Homosexuality Knowledge Questionnaire (17 items). Descriptive statistics, ANOVAs, Chi-square tests and Pearson's correlations were used in the analysis. A total of 489 completed responses was analyzed. Male gender, religiosity and absence of lesbian, gay or bisexual friends were associated with more negative attitudes towards homosexuality. Attitudinal scores did not correlate with advanced years in medical course or contact with lesbian, gay or bisexual patients. Students aiming to pursue technique-oriented specialties presented higher scores in the 'Modern Heterosexism' subscale than students seeking patient-oriented specialties. Although advanced years in medical course correlated significantly with higher knowledge scores, items related with lesbian, gay or bisexual health showed the lowest percentage of correct answers. There seems to be a lack of exploration of medical students' personal attitudes towards lesbians and gay men, and also a lack of knowledge on lesbian, gay or bisexual specific healthcare needs. This study highlights the importance of inclusive undergraduate curriculum development in order to foster quality healthcare.

  3. Japanese mothers' breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes assessed by the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitudes Scale.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Madoka; Binns, Colin W; Katsuki, Yoko; Ouchi, Mikio

    2013-01-01

    This study describes Japanese mothers' knowledge and attitudes towards breastfeeding using the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitudes Scale (IIFAS). A cross-sectional survey of 1,612 mothers was conducted in Japan in 2007. The participants were recruited at the free health checks conducted for infants at 18 months of age. The survey was self-administered using the Japanese version of the IIFAS. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise sample characteristics and IIFAS score followed by multiple logistic regression to identify association between total IIFAS score and breastfeeding duration. While the IIFAS showed that the majority recognized some benefits of breastfeeding, their overall knowledge and attitudes towards breastfeeding were neutral and more positive towards the use of infant formula. It is important to provide accurate prenatal education that focuses on methods and long-term benefits of infant feeding to mothers, family and health professionals.

  4. Knowledge and attitudes of mariners about AIDS in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Acaroglu, Rengin

    2007-01-01

    Given the significant high risks of both being exposed to the virus and spreading it, mariners traveling across countries on a regular basis fall into one of the top-priority populations of those to whom education on HIV/AIDS should be given. However, there have been no reports regarding HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes on the part of mariners in Turkey. Therefore, this study was carried out with the aim of defining the knowledge and attitudes of 660 Turkish mariners. Data were determined using a self-completed questionnaire. Percentage and mean scores were used in data analysis. Results show that the mariners' knowledge was inadequate (mean score was 52.31 +/- 20.46 over a total of 100 points). The lowest knowledge pertained to HIV/AIDS prevention (mean score was 44.62 +/- 19.97). About half of the mariners considered themselves to be in the risk group. Very few of them (10%) have had an AIDS test. Most (68%) were informed about HIV/AIDS by the media. These results show that the mariners need to increase HIV/AIDS knowledge about prevention, transmission, treatment information, motivation, and behavioral skills to decrease HIV/AIDS risky behaviors. The mariners had the least knowledge about HIV/AIDS protection. Having a critical role in preventing the transmission and spreading of diseases, nurses should conduct more extensive and advanced research into HIV/AIDS and assume educational and counseling responsibilities in illuminating society.

  5. Nurses knowledge and attitudes regarding nutrition in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Endevelt, R; Werner, P; Goldman, D; Karpati, T

    2009-06-01

    Nurses in the community are in contact with the elderly at different levels of care. The aim of this study was to assess nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding nutritional-care for the elderly, and the impact of their attitude on the quality of assessment-care they provide to this growing population in need of nutritional-care. A structured questionnaire was distributed by mail to 600 nurses working in Maccabi-Health-Care-Services (MHS). The questionnaire assessed different aspects of elderly nutrition. The vast majority (91%) of the participants reported treating elderly in their practice. Religious nurses and the nurses with an individual orientation specialty reported more positive attitudes about nutritional-care for the elderly than others did (p=0.05). Nurses with a bachelor's degree had better attitudes than registered nurses about the importance of nutrition for the elderly (p < 0.01). Younger nurses were found to be more knowledgeable than older ones (p < 0.04). The nurses perceived nutrition as influencing different health conditions, and 85% pointed to the importance of feeding at the end of life. Nurses working in the community recognize the impact of proper nutrition on elderly patients' health, but need more training in screening for nutritional problems in the elderly.

  6. Provider knowledge, attitudes and treatment preferences for early pregnancy failure

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Vanessa K.; Harris, Lisa H.; Gold, Katherine J.; Kane-Low, Lisa; Schulkin, Jay; Guire, Ken; Fendrick, A. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe health care provider knowledge, attitudes and treatment preferences for early pregnancy failure (EPF). Study Design We surveyed 976 obstetrician/gynecologists, midwives and family medicine practitioners on their knowledge and attitudes toward treatment options for EPF, and barriers to adopting misoprostol and office uterine evacuations. We used descriptive statistics to compare practices by provider specialty and logistic regression to identify associations between provider factors and treatment practices. Results Seventy percent of providers have not used misoprostol and 91% have not used an office uterine evacuation to treat EPF in the past 6 months. Beliefs about safety and patient preferences, and prior induced abortion training were significantly associated with use of both of these treatments. Conclusions Increasing education and training on the use of misoprostol and office uterine evacuation, and clarifying patient treatment preferences may increase the willingness of providers to adopt new practices for EPF treatment. PMID:20227674

  7. Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Medical Marijuana

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students’ knowledge of and attitudes toward medical marijuana and to determine if pharmacy students need additional education on the topic. Methods. Pharmacy students were asked to complete a survey on medical marijuana that assessed their knowledge of, medical uses of, adverse effects with, and attitudes toward medical marijuana through 23 Likert-scale questions. Results. Three hundred eleven students completed the survey. Fifty-eight percent of the students felt that medical marijuana should be legalized in all states. However, the majority of students did not feel comfortable answering consumers’ questions regarding efficacy, safety, or drug interactions related to the substance. Accurate responses for diseases or conditions for permitted medical marijuana use was low, with only cancer (91%) and glaucoma (57%) identified by more than half the students. Conclusion. With an increasing number of states adopting medical marijuana use, pharmacy schools need to evaluate the adequacy of medical marijuana education in their curriculum. PMID:26430272

  8. Age dependence of attitudes and knowledge in cyclists.

    PubMed

    Maring, W; van Schagen, I

    1990-04-01

    A number of factors related to bicycle accidents were studied, namely, knowledge of priority rules, attitude and self-reported behavior regarding traffic rules, and general opinions about the safety of the traffic behavior of cyclists and drivers. In order to get an indication of the influence of these factors at different stages of the life span, subjects ranging from 9 to 83 years of age were represented in the study. The relationship between age and the various measures was found to be U-shaped in most cases. The older cyclists and the 9 to 11 year olds, the two groups that are most at risk, were deficient regarding knowledge while showing the most positive attitudes. Implications with respect to possible counter measures are discussed.

  9. Taiwanese farm workers' pesticide knowledge, attitudes, behaviors and clothing practices.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chen-Yu; Black, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Taiwanese fruit farm workers' knowledge, attitudes, behaviours, and clothing practices regarding pesticide activities. Seventy-seven fruit farm workers from four districts of Tainan City, Taiwan completed the questionnaire. Results indicated that farmer workers had a good overall level of knowledge of the adverse effects of pesticides on human health and most had experienced symptoms of pesticide poisoning. Farm workers' attitudes toward pesticide use and handling indicated that they saw pesticides useful in controlling pests. Farm workers indicated the limited availability of comfortable clothing designed for a hot and humid climate while still providing sufficient protection was the main reason for not wearing personal protective clothing (PPC) and personal protective equipment (PPE). Emphasis on safety precautions is needed when using pesticides, and the importance of PPC and PPE is essential for the health of farm workers.

  10. The Relationship between Attitudes, Knowledge, and Demographic Variables of High School Teachers Regarding Food Irradiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, B. M.; Ribera, K. P.; Wingenbach, G. J.; Vestal, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a validated instrument to determine the attitudes and knowledge of high school teachers regarding food irradiation, and to determine the correlations among their knowledge and attitudes and certain demographic variables. Knowledge and attitudes about food irradiation were measured in selected high school family…

  11. Environmental Attitudes, Knowledge, and Alternative Conceptions of Primary School Children in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandrakis, Georgios; Chatzakis, Stergios

    2014-01-01

    In this study the environmental attitudes, knowledge, and alternative conceptions of 281 primary school children from 5th and 6th grade, ages 10-12 years were explored. Low knowledge scores, indicate a substantial lack of knowledge on basic environmental issues, while attitude scores were relatively high. Children's environmental attitudes and…

  12. Disability and Sexuality: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Level of Comfort among Certified Rehabilitation Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazukauskas, Kelly A.; Lam, Chow S.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated certified rehabilitation counselors' (CRCs) attitudes, knowledge, and comfort in addressing disability and sexuality issues. One hundred ninety-nine CRCs completed a modified version of the "Knowledge, Comfort, Approach and Attitudes toward Sexuality Scale" to determine the effect of knowledge and attitudes on level of…

  13. Environmental Attitudes, Knowledge, and Alternative Conceptions of Primary School Children in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandrakis, Georgios; Chatzakis, Stergios

    2014-01-01

    In this study the environmental attitudes, knowledge, and alternative conceptions of 281 primary school children from 5th and 6th grade, ages 10-12 years were explored. Low knowledge scores, indicate a substantial lack of knowledge on basic environmental issues, while attitude scores were relatively high. Children's environmental attitudes and…

  14. Knowledge and Attitudes of Selected Home Economists toward Irradiation in Food Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Faye C. Stucy

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the knowledge and attitudes of 485 California home economists toward the use of irradiation to preserve food revealed that they lacked the knowledge although they had a positive attitude toward it. An interactive teleconference on irradiation increased positive attitudes and improved knowledge. (JOW)

  15. The Knowledge About Drugs, Attitudes Towards Them And Drug Use Rates Of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fejer, Dianne; Smart, Reginald G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of attitudes towards drugs, knowledge about them and the use of alcohol, tobacco, illicit and psychoactive drugs was conducted among 4,693 high school students. Knowledge level and permissive attitudes tended to increase with grade level. Knowledge scores also increased, but attitudes became less permissive with increasing academic…

  16. The Relationship between Attitudes, Knowledge, and Demographic Variables of High School Teachers Regarding Food Irradiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, B. M.; Ribera, K. P.; Wingenbach, G. J.; Vestal, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a validated instrument to determine the attitudes and knowledge of high school teachers regarding food irradiation, and to determine the correlations among their knowledge and attitudes and certain demographic variables. Knowledge and attitudes about food irradiation were measured in selected high school family…

  17. Concussions in Community-Level Rugby: Risk, Knowledge, and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Martin, R Kyle; Hrubeniuk, Travis J; Witiw, Christopher D; MacDonald, Peter; Leiter, Jeff

    Rugby is a popular collision sport where participants are at risk of sustaining concussions. Most research focuses on elite-level or youth divisions. Comparatively, little is known about adult community rugby. The aim of this research was to estimate the risk of sustaining a concussion during participation in community-level rugby and summarize the collective knowledge and attitudes toward concussions. Concussion symptoms will be reported frequently among community-level rugby players and a substantial proportion will report a willingness to continue participation despite the risk. Cross-sectional analysis. Level 3. An anonymous, voluntary survey was administered to all 464 senior rugby players registered in the province of Manitoba in 2015. Two primary domains were assessed: (1) concussion history from the preceding season including occurrence, symptomatology, and impact on daily activities and (2) knowledge and attitudes toward concussion risks and management. In total, 284 (61.2%) rugby players responded. Concussive symptoms were reported by 106 (37.3%). Of those, 87% were formally diagnosed with a concussion and 27% missed school and/or work as a result. The danger of playing while symptomatic was recognized by 93.7% of participants, yet 29% indicated they would continue while symptomatic. Furthermore, 39% felt they were letting others down if they stopped playing due to a concussion. Concussive symptoms were common among the study cohort and had a notable impact on daily activities. A high proportion of players were willing to continue while experiencing symptoms despite recognizing the danger. The observed discord between knowledge and attitudes implicates a culture of "playing injured." Understanding the risk of injury may affect an individual's decision to participate in community-level rugby. Moreover, evidence of discord between the knowledge and attitudes of players may direct future research initiatives and league governance.

  18. Abused and neglected children in court: knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Block, Stephanie D; Oran, Howard; Oran, Diane; Baumrind, Nikki; Goodman, Gail S

    2010-09-01

    After maltreated children are taken into protective custody, dependency courts determine the children's placements. Many, if not most, maltreated children never attend their dependency court hearings. We had the rare opportunity to interview children in a jurisdiction where children regularly attend their detention hearings in dependency court. Our main goals were to assess maltreated children's knowledge and attitudes about their court experiences and identify predictors thereof. We also examined if the maltreated children desired greater participation in dependency court decisions. Immediately after attending their dependency court hearings, 7- to 10-year-olds were interviewed about their knowledge of, attitudes concerning, and participation in dependency court. Information was also extracted from the children's dependency court files. Lack of understanding and negative attitudes were common. Age predicted court knowledge, and age, anxiety, court knowledge, abuse type, and criminal court referral predicted attitudes. Qualitative findings included that a substantial minority of children did not feel believed or listened to, and most children wanted to return home. This research is relevant to current debates about the extent to which children should be involved in legal decisions. The results suggest that maltreated children may profit from greater understanding of dependency court. Moreover, the findings indicate that children often wish to have greater influence in dependency court decisions. Professionals should consider providing children involved in dependency court hearings with age-appropriate information about the legal proceedings. Children may also benefit in dependency hearings from the opportunity, directly or indirectly (through their attorneys), to give voice to their wishes and needs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students’ Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Nabilou, Bahram; Feizi, Aram; Seyedin, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students’ perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students studying medicine, nursing, and midwifery were recruited through census for the study. A questionnaire was used for collecting data, which were then analyzed through SPSS statistical software (version 16.0), using Chi-square test, Spearman correlation coefficient, F and LSD tests. A total of 121 questionnaires were completed, and 50% of the students demonstrated good knowledge about patient safety. The relationships between students’ attitudes to patient safety and years of study, sex and course were significant (0.003, 0.001 and 0.017, respectively). F and LSD tests indicated that regarding the difference between the mean scores of perceptions of patient safety and attitudes to patient safety education, there was a significant difference among medical and nursing/midwifery students. Little knowledge of students regarding patient safety indicates the inefficiency of informal education to fill the gap; therefore, it is recommended to consider patient safety in the curriculums of all medical and paramedical sciences and formulate better policies for patient safety. PMID:26322897

  20. Oncofertility Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Canadian Breast Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Warner, Ellen; Yee, Samantha; Kennedy, Erin; Glass, Karen; Foong, Shu; Seminsky, Maureen; Quan, May Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Guidelines recommend that oncologists discuss treatment-related fertility issues with young cancer patients as early as possible after diagnosis and, if appropriate, expedite referral for fertility preservation (FP). This study sought to determine the attitudes and practices of Canadian breast surgeons regarding fertility issues, as well as barriers to and facilitators of fertility discussion and referrals. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 28 site lead surgeons (SLSs) at 28 (97 %) of 29 centers (25 % cancer centers, 64 % teaching hospitals) across Canada participating in RUBY, a pan-Canadian research program for young women with breast cancer. In addition, 56 (65 %) of 86 of their surgical colleagues (non-site lead surgeons [NSLSs]) completed an online survey of their oncofertility knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Of the 28 SLSs (43 % male, 36 % in practice <10 years), 46 % had inadequate oncofertility knowledge, 25 % discussed fertility only if mentioned by the patient, 21 % believed fertility discussion and referral were the mandate of the medical oncologist, and 45 % did not know of an FP center in their area. More than 80 % of the NSLSs (54 % male, 30 % in practice <10 years) were unfamiliar with oocyte or embryo cryopreservation; 36 % never or rarely discussed fertility issues; and 51 % thought referral to a fertility specialist was not their responsibility. Oncofertility knowledge was low among the SLSs, especially the NSLSs, and barriers to referral were identified. An oncofertility knowledge translation intervention specifically for breast surgeons is being developed to increase surgeon knowledge and awareness of oncofertility issues and referral.

  1. Dental students and bloodborne pathogens: occupational exposures, knowledge, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Julie E; Myers, Ronnie; Wheat, Mary E; Yin, Michael T

    2012-04-01

    Dental professionals may be exposed to bloodborne pathogens in their work, and dental students may be a particularly vulnerable group. Fear of exposure has also been linked to discriminatory practices. A cross-sectional survey of dental students was conducted at one U.S. dental school to assess their knowledge about the transmission of bloodborne pathogens and management of exposures; the frequency of their bloodborne pathogen exposures (BBPEs); and associations among their prior exposure, knowledge, perception of knowledge, and attitudes toward practice. Overall, 220 students (72.1 percent) responded to the survey, and 215 (70.5 percent) answered questions about exposures. The prevalence of BBPE was 19.1 percent and was greater among clinical than preclinical students (p<0.01). Percutaneous injuries occurred in 87.5 percent of those exposed. All students (preclinical and clinical combined) answered more survey questions correctly about transmission of bloodborne pathogens (66.7 percent) than about post-exposure management (25.0 percent). Fewer than half reported adequate knowledge of transmission and management (47.5 percent and 37.3 percent, respectively). In this context, 8.2 percent of the respondents acknowledged an unwillingness to perform procedures on patients with HIV. Since knowledge gaps may lead to failure to report incidents and delays in appropriate exposure management and some negative attitudes towards treating individuals with HIV persist, these findings justify improving BBPE education at U.S. dental schools.

  2. Sun protection among Spanish beachgoers: knowledge, attitude and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cercato, M C; Ramazzotti, V; Sperduti, I; Asensio-Pascual, A; Ribes, I; Guillén, C; Nagore, E

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the level of awareness on the risks related to sun exposure, attitude towards sun protection and sun protection behaviour in Spanish beachgoers. During the summer of 2009, trained assistants conducted a structured interview with 630 sunbathers at the beaches of Valencia, Spain, via administrating a questionnaire including the following: (a) general data (age, gender, education, profession), (b) "knowledge" and "attitude" items and (c) self-assessed sun sensitivity, sun exposure and sun protection characteristics. The health belief model was used to evaluate factors that may influence on engaging healthy behaviour. The median age was 30 (2-82) years; the M/F ratio was 0.60. Despite the widespread regular ("often" or "always", 80%) use of high (>15) sun-protective factor sunscreens, current recommendations on sun protection were not regularly followed, and a history of sunburns is very common (70%). At multivariate analysis, female gender, age, fair hair, freckles, all-day use of sunscreens and wearing sunglasses were independent factors associated with having sunburn history. A high knowledge and a fairly good attitude emerged (median scores, 6/7 and 22/30, respectively). Age class (p = 0.032), educational level (p < 0.0001), sunscreen use (p = 0.048) and adequate timing of the first application of sunscreens (p = 0.015) were predictors of awareness, while factors associated with a more favourable attitude were educational level (p < 0.0001) and regular use of hats (p = 0.001). Wrong beliefs mainly concern sunscreens (false safety); the attractiveness of a tanned look is the main unfavourable attitude. Physical and motivational barriers are common (80%). The findings by highlighting constitutional and psychosocial factors involved in unhealthy behaviour provide useful information to promote sun-safe interventions in this population.

  3. Trends in attitudes toward people living with HIV, homophobia, and HIV transmission knowledge in Quebec, Canada (1996, 2002, and 2010).

    PubMed

    Adrien, Alix; Beaulieu, Marianne; Leaune, Viviane; Perron, Michèle; Dassa, Clément

    2013-01-01

    People living with HIV (PWHIV) face negative attitudes that isolate and discourage them from accessing services. Understanding negative attitudes and the social environment can lead to more effective health promotion strategies and programs. However, a scale to measure attitudes has been lacking. We developed and validated attitudes toward PWHIV Scale to examine trends in attitudes toward PWHIV in Quebec in 1996, 2002, and 2010. We also examined the relationship between negative attitudes toward PWHIV, homophobia, and knowledge about HIV transmission. The scale included 16 items and had a five-factor structure: F1 (fear of being infected), F2 (fear of contact with PWHIV), F3 (prejudicial beliefs toward groups at high risk of HIV), F4 (tolerance regarding sexual mores and behaviors), and F5 (social support for PWHIV). The validity and reliability of the scale were assessed and found to be high. Overall, Quebecers had positive attitudes toward PWHIV, with more negative attitudes observed in subgroups defined as male, ≥50 years of age, <14 years of education, higher levels of homophobia, and below-average knowledge about HIV transmission. Scores were stable between 1996 and 2002, and increased in 2010. Negative attitudes were correlated with higher levels of homophobia and lesser knowledge about HIV transmission. The lowest scores for each factor were observed in the same subgroups that had low overall scores on the Attitudes Scale. The findings from this study can be used to intensify interventions that promote compassion for PWHIV, address attitudes toward homosexuality, and encourage greater knowledge about the transmission of HIV in these subgroups.

  4. Parental knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding infant basic life support

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Patricia Ching Yen; Lian, Wee Bin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) in children is rare but significant, with poor survival rates and high morbidity. Asystole is the most common dysrhythmia, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is of great importance in such cases. We aimed to survey the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of parents in Singapore regarding infant basic life support (IBLS). METHODS A questionnaire survey was administered to parents of children managed at the Neonatal Department of Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, between 1 September and 31 December 2008. The questionnaire consisted of three sections – section A collected demographic data, section B included questions on knowledge, and section C explored attitudes and perceptions. Knowledge T-scores were analysed for the entire cohort and subanalysed with respect to prior IBLS training. RESULTS In our study cohort (n = 375), the median Basic Knowledge (BK) T-score was 7 (range 1–9) and the pass rate was 55%. Median BK T-scores were significantly different between untrained (6; range 3 –9) and previously trained (8; range 3–9) participants. A majority of the trained participants obtained pass marks. Median Total Knowledge T-score, involving advanced questions, for previously trained participants was 11 (range 3–14), but pass rate was low (35.7%). Higher educational qualification was a significant factor impacting all scores. Untrained participants indicated interest in attending IBLS courses, while trained participants were interested in refresher courses. CONCLUSION IBLS training, as part of basic cardiac life support training, is important given that CPR can significantly alter the outcome in children with CPA. Our survey revealed knowledge gaps that could be bridged through formal training. Refresher courses to regularly update parents’ knowledge are recommended. PMID:24664380

  5. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of mosque imams regarding organ donation.

    PubMed

    Keten, Hamit Sirri; Keten, Derya; Ucer, Huseyin; Cerit, Mustafa; Isik, Oguz; Miniksar, Okkes Hakan; Ersoy, Ozgur

    2014-11-17

    In this study we aimed to determine knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of mosque imams regarding organ donation. This study involved 322 mosque imams working in Kahramanmaras, a city in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. A questionnaire was used to determine participants' sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding organ donation. Out of a total of 322 participants, 253 (78.6%) stated that organ donation is allowed in Islam, while 5 (1.6%) expressed that it is religiously forbidden, and 64 (19.9%) stated that they have no idea about the issue. Only 2 (0.6%) participants were registered organ/tissue donors, wile 320 (99.4%) were not. Out of all participants, 72 (22.4%) imams were willing to donate organs. Forty-six (14.3%) imams had previously received basic training about organ donation, and 166 (51.6%) were willing to attend a related training. Television programs and healthcare professionals were the most common means of learning about organ donation. Educational programs by healthcare professionals for imams and the public were proposed to be effective in increasing the number of organ donations. This study revealed that the knowledge of mosque imams regarding organ donation is poor and they had little willingness to donate their organs. Interestingly, many imams had no knowledge about organ donation under Islam. Collaboration of media, healthcare professionals, and mosque imams regarding organ donation might help increase organ donation.

  6. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  7. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  8. HIV-related knowledge, attitudes and practice among health care workers in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Gledović, Zorana; Rakočević, Božidarka; Mugoša, Boban; Grgurević, Anita

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and practice of health care workers (HCWs) in Montenegro. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the University Clinical Centre of Montenegro in Podgorica. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was used for data collecting. Out of 526 HCWs, 422 were included in the survey and response rate was 80%. An insufficient level of knowledge on HIV transmission and the risk after exposure was observed generally, although the knowledge was better in physicians compared to other HCWs categories. A rather high proportion of HCWs showed inappropriate attitude regarding the need of HIV testing of all hospitalized patients (64.7%) and obligation of HIV+ patient to report his/her HIV status (88.9%) in order to practice universal precaution. Additionally, 6.2% HCWs would refuse to treat an HIV+ patient. More than a half (55.7%) of study participants were educated in HIV/AIDS and 15.9% of them were HIV tested. Majority of HCWs (67.5%) always applied universal precautions during their daily work with patients. In spite of applying protective devices, number of accidents was great. A continuous education is necessary to increase the level of knowledge of HCWs about the risk of infection at the workplace. This would potentially influence the modification of their attitudes regarding HIV patients and improve prevention at the workplace. Continuous research regarding the professional risk would provide better health and safety among medical staff.

  9. Population Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Regarding Helicobacter pylori Transmission and Outcomes: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Lisa J; Brown, Heidi E; Harris, Robin B; Oren, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Current clinical recommendations are that H. pylori test-and-treat should be individualized based on comorbidities and patient preferences among populations at increased risk for certain morbidities. However, knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding H. pylori among potential patient populations are largely unknown. We conducted a literature review to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices of patients or community populations around H. pylori transmission, prevention, and associated morbidity. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria, all published between 1997 and 2014. Eight studies evaluated perception of H. pylori among at-risk populations, while one study evaluated perception among a general population. The studies suggest inconsistencies between the perceptions of these populations and the established understanding of knowledge, attitude, and preventive practices for H. pylori among even at-risk populations. To adequately respond to current test-and-treat recommendations for treatment of H. pylori, general population education must be implemented, especially among at-risk populations. Further work is needed within at-risk populations in the United States to determine prevalence of H. pylori and their current knowledge if adequate prevention strategies are to be designed.

  10. Nurses' Attitudes and Knowledge of Their Roles in Newborn Abandonment

    PubMed Central

    Cesario, Sandra K.

    2003-01-01

    The practice of abandoning newborns shortly after birth has always existed. Occurring in primitive and contemporary societies, the motivations for newborn abandonment are varied and dependent upon the social norms of a specific geographic region at a given point in time. Because the desire to abandon an infant has had no support system in American society, such unwanted infants have been abandoned in a manner leading to their deaths. In response, many states have passed safe-haven legislation to save the lives of unwanted newborns. The laws typically specify a mother's ability to “abandon” her child to a medical service provider. However, judgmental attitudes and a lack of accurate information may impede a health care provider's ability to carry out a safe-haven law. The study described here examines a sample of nurses in a state with a safe-haven law. The study revealed no significant correlation between a nurse's knowledge, attitude, and self-perception of preparedness to manage a newborn abandonment event. owever, the outcomes highlight the negative attitudes and lack of knowledge many nurses possess regarding newborn abandonment and the women who commit this act. Educational programs for all health care providers and the community are essential to the efficacy of the legislation that currently exists. Continued multidisciplinary strategizing and general awareness are needed to serve as catalysts to build supports for unwanted newborns and their safe assimilation into the community. PMID:17273338

  11. Knowledge and Attitudes of University Health Service Clients about Genital Herpes: Implications for Patient Education and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillard, James R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Genital herpes virus infection can cause both psychological and medical consequences. A study surveyed knowledge and attitudes of college students to assess degree of familiarity with this disease. Findings suggest misconceptions that could be dealt with in health education programs. (Author/DF)

  12. Students' Knowledge Base and Attitudes on Safer Sex, Condoms and AIDS: A Study of Three Colleges of Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noormohamed, Saleem E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 848 pharmacy students at 3 universities investigated their knowledge and attitudes about safe sex practices and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), sources of AIDS information, role of the pharmacists in AIDS prevention, and willingness to associate with or serve human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals.…

  13. Knowledge and Attitudes of University Health Service Clients about Genital Herpes: Implications for Patient Education and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillard, James R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Genital herpes virus infection can cause both psychological and medical consequences. A study surveyed knowledge and attitudes of college students to assess degree of familiarity with this disease. Findings suggest misconceptions that could be dealt with in health education programs. (Author/DF)

  14. HIV/AIDS and clinical dentistry: assessment of knowledge and attitude of patients attending a university dental centre.

    PubMed

    Arigbede, A O; Ogunrinde, T J; Okoje, V N; Adeyemi, B F

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive test of knowledge of the public about HIV/AIDS, particularly as it relates to dentistry is not common in the literature. The objectives of this study are: to determine the current knowledge of dental patients about HIV/AIDS and its relationship with clinical dentistry; and to determine the general attitude and practice of dental patients as it relates to HIV infection. This clinic study was conducted in the outpatient clinics, Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan. A structured anonymous questionnaire was used to collect data from randomly selected respondents. The formula n= z2pq/d2 was employed to determine the sample size. The items requested includes: educational background, awareness of HIV infection and source of knowledge, features of AIDS, high risk groups, HIV prognosis and routes of infection. Others include attitudes of respondents to HIV epidemics, infected patients, and safe sexual practices. Majority of the respondents (96.6%) was aware of HIV infection and the commonest source of information was TV and radio. Weight loss was the only feature of AIDS known to most of the respondents and only very few of them were aware of oral features like bleeding and painful gum (HIV gingivitis) and Kaposi's sarcoma. Most of the respondents were not aware that intravenous drug abusers and long distance drivers were high risk groups and most were not aware of the types of dental procedures during which infection could occur. Most of the respondents were aware that HIV infection has a good prognosis and most (64.3%) would like infected patients to have a special designated dental clinic for treatment of infected persons. Only about one-third use condom regularly or occasionally. Knowledge of the general and oral features of AIDS, the high risk groups and the routes of infection in dental clinical practice were not satisfactory. A cross-section of the respondents showed negative attitudes to infected patients and infection prevention

  15. Concussion in rugby: knowledge and attitudes of players.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, E; Molloy, M G

    2016-05-01

    Concussion is a traumatic brain injury, resulting in the alteration of mental status with or without loss of consciousness. There is increasing awareness that recurrent concussion may contribute to long-term neurological complication. To determine player knowledge and attitudes regarding concussion. To identify sources of information and medical care, and to estimate the incidence of concussion in this group. To determine if player gender and grade of competition are associated with differences in knowledge, attitudes, medical care, and incidence. Five rugby teams were recruited and players invited to complete a paper-based questionnaire. The questionnaire sought information on player demographics, knowledge level, attitudes and concussion experience. 90.8 % of players knew they should not continue playing when concussed. 75 % of players would continue an important game even if concussed. Of those concussed, 39.1 % have tried to influence medical assessment with 78.2 % stating it is possible or quite easy to do so. Males are less likely to worry about long-term effects of concussion (χ (2) = 9.23, p = 0.026). Club players are less likely to have medical care at training (χ (2) = 28.2, p < 0.001) or matches (χ (2) = 19.47 p < 0.001). Despite good knowledge of concussion complications, management players engage in unsafe behaviour with little difference between gender and competition grades. Information regarding symptoms and management should be available to all players, coaches, and parents. Provision of medical care should be mandatory at every level of competition.

  16. Knowledge and Attitudes towards Antibiotic Use and Resistance - A Latent Class Analysis of a Swedish Population-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Tegmark Wisell, Karin; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2006, a study investigating knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic use and resistance in Sweden, indicated high level of knowledge but also areas in need of improvement. Objective (i) To provide an update on the knowledge and attitudes to antibiotic use and resistance of the Swedish population, and (ii) to identify which groups within the population are in particular need of improved knowledge or attitudes. Methods A questionnaire was sent by post in 2013 to 2,500 randomly-selected individuals aged 18–74, living in Sweden. Latent class analyses were conducted to group respondents based on their responses. The association between socio-demographic characteristics and the probability of belonging to each latent class was assessed. Results The response rate was 57%. Ninety-four per cent of the responders knew that bacteria could become resistant to antibiotics and the majority answered correctly to the questions regarding antibiotic resistance development. The respondents expressed confidence in doctors who decided not to prescribe antibiotics. Three latent classes related to ‘knowledge regarding antibiotic use and resistance’, two regarding ‘attitudes towards antibiotic accessibility and infection prevention’ and three regarding ‘attitudes towards antibiotic use and effects’ were revealed. Men, younger and more educated people were more knowledgeable but males had a less restrictive attitude. Respondents with high levels of knowledge on antibiotics were more likely to have appropriate restrictive attitudes to antibiotics. Conclusion Knowledge on antibiotic use and resistance is maintained high and has improved in Sweden compared to 2006. People with lower education and elderly are especially in need of improved knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance. PMID:27096751

  17. Knowledge and Attitudes towards Antibiotic Use and Resistance - A Latent Class Analysis of a Swedish Population-Based Sample.

    PubMed

    Vallin, Martina; Polyzoi, Maria; Marrone, Gaetano; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Tegmark Wisell, Karin; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, a study investigating knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic use and resistance in Sweden, indicated high level of knowledge but also areas in need of improvement. (i) To provide an update on the knowledge and attitudes to antibiotic use and resistance of the Swedish population, and (ii) to identify which groups within the population are in particular need of improved knowledge or attitudes. A questionnaire was sent by post in 2013 to 2,500 randomly-selected individuals aged 18-74, living in Sweden. Latent class analyses were conducted to group respondents based on their responses. The association between socio-demographic characteristics and the probability of belonging to each latent class was assessed. The response rate was 57%. Ninety-four per cent of the responders knew that bacteria could become resistant to antibiotics and the majority answered correctly to the questions regarding antibiotic resistance development. The respondents expressed confidence in doctors who decided not to prescribe antibiotics. Three latent classes related to 'knowledge regarding antibiotic use and resistance', two regarding 'attitudes towards antibiotic accessibility and infection prevention' and three regarding 'attitudes towards antibiotic use and effects' were revealed. Men, younger and more educated people were more knowledgeable but males had a less restrictive attitude. Respondents with high levels of knowledge on antibiotics were more likely to have appropriate restrictive attitudes to antibiotics. Knowledge on antibiotic use and resistance is maintained high and has improved in Sweden compared to 2006. People with lower education and elderly are especially in need of improved knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance.

  18. Tehran dentists' knowledge and attitudes towards hepatitis B and their willingness to treat simulated hepatitis B positive patients.

    PubMed

    Khosravanifard, B; Rakhshan, V; Najafi-Salehi, L; Sherafat, S

    2014-08-19

    The dental profession has a high risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) contamination and can play a crucial role in controlling HBV cross-contamination. In this cross-sectional study we used unique methods to assess Tehran dentists' knowledge, attitude and behaviour regarding HBV. Two simulated HBV-positive patients visited 300 general/specialist dentists in their offices and recorded dentists' willingness to treat them. Later, the dentists were interviewed regarding their knowledge about hepatitis B and attitude to HBV-positive patients. The mean knowledge score of dentists was 14.3 (SD 6.9) out of 44 and the mean attitude score was 20.0 (SD 3.6) out of 39. A majority of dentists (55.6%) were willing to treat a patient with HBV, unconditionally or with conditions. Some individual attitude items correlated with knowledge items concerning transmission of the virus and its prevention. Dentists' willingness to treat patients did not correlate with knowledge or attitude, except for the attitude item on concern about becoming infected.

  19. Young Egyptians' perceptions, attitudes and knowledge of injuries.

    PubMed

    Day, Hannah R; El-Setouhy, Maged; El-Shinawi, Mohamed; Assem, Amr; Ismail, Mona; Salem, Marwa; Smith, Gordon S; Hirshon, Jon Mark

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to qualitatively evaluate young Egyptians' perceptions, attitudes, knowledge and behaviour towards injuries before implementation of an extensive questionnaire about injuries among Egyptian youth. In 2008, five focus groups of three to nine participants each were conducted in Cairo, Egypt in Arabic to evaluate young Egyptians' attitudes towards injuries, injury prevention, and their understanding of 'accidents' and fatalism. Participants were 14-26 years of age and were from medium to high socioeconomic status. Focus group participants noted that the concept of hadthah ('accident') signified an event determined by destiny, whereas esabah ('injury') was the result of human actions. The results of these focus groups indicate that young, educated Egyptians are interested in injury prevention programmes despite low confidence in the preventability of injuries.

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practice assessment of construction workers for HIV/AIDS in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Koji; Obayashi, Yoshi; Ditangco, Rossana A; Matibag, Gino C; Yamashina, Hiroko; Okumura, Shoko; Silva, K Tudor; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2009-09-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence is relatively lower in Sri Lanka than in other Asian countries; however, the number of HIV-infected persons has rapidly increased in recent years. A baseline study on HIV, acquired immunodeficiency virus (AIDS), and sexually transmitted infections (STI) knowledge, attitude, and practice was conducted at two construction sites in Sri Lanka from January to February 2007 to design an effective intervention strategy for the construction workers. Among 611 respondents (mostly males, mean age 32.8 years), nearly two-thirds lived away from home. Knowledge was fairly good on AIDS prevention but poorer on STI than on HIV. Some misconceptions were also observed. A high percentage did not consider HIV/AIDS as their own personal issue, and over 50% respondents expressed discriminatory attitudes towards HIV positives. Condom access was limited due to social and cultural norms. Mobility was not significantly associated with practice of prevention of HIV and STI. This study showed that the construction workers were not specially at higher risk of HIV at that time. In order to minimize the potential risk of infection, however, it would be effective to reduce stigma and discrimination among them through the prevention program, working together with community or religious leaders in the areas. More comprehensive assessment among other population groups would also be beneficial to identify their risk of infection.

  1. Analysis of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Prevalence of Hepatitis B and C Seromarkers Among Barbers in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Khairkhah, Tahereh; Shamsa, Ayat; Roohi, Azam; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Vand-Rajabpour, Fatemeh; Tabrizi, Mina; Zarei, Saeed; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are major health problem in the world. Hairdressers (barbers) are in continuous contact with scissors and blades, and are considered a high-risk group for these infections. Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of hepatitis B and C infections in barbers in Tehran and to evaluate their attitudes and knowledge about the occupational risk of these infections. Methods Six hundred eleven barbers were included in this study. A group of 556 bakers were also selected from the same regions, as a low-risk control group. Serum levels of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBsAg-specific antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis B core antigen-specific antibody (HBcAb), and hepatitis C virus-specific (anti-HCV) antibody markers were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Participants were interviewed using a questionnaire consisting of four sections: demographic information, awareness, behavior, and personal attitudes. Results There were no significant differences in the frequency of HBsAg between the two groups. However, the frequency of HCV Ab in barbers was significantly higher than that in bakers (P < 0.005). In addition, the frequency of HBsAb marker in barbers was significantly correlated with increased awareness (P < 0.05) and number of tattoos (P < 0.001). HBcAb marker was significantly correlated with age (P < 0.001) and duration of professional career (P < 0.005). With age, barbers’ attitudes improved significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusions Being a barber alone is not a potential risk factor for HBV infection, while HCV infection is still an occupational health hazards for barbers. We suggest more extensive case-control studies with regard to rates of hepatitis B and C markers among barbers in other Iranian cities to assess the incidence of hepatitis B and C infections among this population. PMID:27822265

  2. Street youth in Colombia: lifestyle, attitudes and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J

    1994-01-01

    Gamines in Bogota, Colombia, are youths who live on the streets sometimes keeping loose family ties. They belong to informal gangs, use drugs, and survive by doing itinerant informal sector work, begging, and stealing. The New Life Program (NLP) of the Corporacion SOS Aldea de Ninos worked with three other agencies to investigate the lifestyle, attitudes, and knowledge of gamines about HIV/STDs for the purpose of designing AIDS/STD educational activities for the population. Focus group discussions and educational activities were conducted with 12 girls and 18 boys aged 14-25 years who had started living in NLP's shelter while working on the streets. Participants had spent an average of 7 years on the street typically from age 10. Concentrating primarily upon daily survival, these youths act on the basis of intuition and emotions. Verbal communication is essential to gain and maintain their trust. Although their sexual lives are influenced by the family of origin, institutions in which they have resided, and peers, and their daily lifestyles have much influence. Steady partners are sought for affection and romance, while sexual intercourse is had for pleasure and to satisfy biological need. Some homosexuality and prostitution are tolerated. Gangs also gang-rape and expel members thought to be traitors. The idea of birth control exists among the girls, but the boys overwhelmingly reject condom use. The boys got information on sex from prostitutes, erotic magazines, and adults, but girls rarely talk about sex. Many have had STDs and are generally aware about AIDS, but misinformed about transmission modes, symptoms, and treatment. The boys were especially negative about meeting a person with AIDS. Overall, the youths did not perceive themselves as being at risk for HIV infection. Participants also strongly distrusted the health system because many had been turned away for being dirty or received only callous treatment. The author concludes that we must acknowledge that

  3. Effects of Knowledge on Attitude Formation and Change Toward Genetically Modified Foods.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xie, Xiaofei

    2015-05-01

    In three waves, this study investigates the impact of risk and benefit knowledge on attitude formation toward genetically modified (GM) foods as well as the moderating effect of knowledge level on attitude change caused by receiving information. The data in Wave 1 (N = 561) demonstrate that both benefit and risk knowledge either directly contribute to attitude formation or indirectly affect attitudes through the mediating roles of benefit and risk perceptions. Overall, benefit and risk knowledge affect consumer attitudes positively and negatively, respectively. In Wave 2, 486 participants from Wave 1 were provided with information about GM foods, and their attitudes were assessed. Three weeks later, 433 of these participants again reported their attitudes. The results indicate that compared with the benefit and mixed information, risk information has a greater and longer lasting impact on attitude change, which results in lower acceptance of GM foods. Furthermore, risk information more strongly influences participants with a higher knowledge level. The moderating effect of knowledge on attitude change may result from these participants' better understanding of and greater trust in the information. These findings highlight the important role of knowledge in attitude formation and attitude change toward GM foods as well as the necessity of considering the determinants of attitude formation in attitude change studies.

  4. University students and HIV in Namibia: an HIV prevalence survey and a knowledge and attitude survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With an overall adult HIV prevalence of 15.3%, Namibia is facing one of the largest HIV epidemics in Africa. Young people aged 20 to 34 years constitute one of the groups at highest risk of HIV infection in Namibia. However, little is known about the impact of HIV on this group and its access to healthcare. The purpose of this study was to estimate HIV prevalence, to assess the knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS, and to assess access to healthcare among university students in Namibia. Methods We assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes, HIV prevalence and access to healthcare among students at the Polytechnic of Namibia and the University of Namibia. HIV prevalence was tested through anonymous oral fluid-based tests. Results Half (n = 2790/5568) of the university students and 45% (n = 2807/6302) of the Polytechnic students participated in the knowledge and attitudes surveys. HIV/AIDS knowledge was reasonable, except for misperceptions about transmission. Awareness of one's own HIV status and risks was low. In all, 55% (n = 3055/5568) of university students and 58% (n = 3680/6302) of Polytechnic students participated in the HIV prevalence survey; 54 (1.8%) university students and 103 (2.8%) Polytechnic students tested HIV positive. Campus clinics were not the major providers of healthcare to the students. Conclusions Meaningful strategies addressing the gap between knowledge, attitude and young people's perception of risk of HIV acquisition should be implemented. HIV prevalence among Namibian university students appears relatively low. Voluntary counselling and testing should be stimulated. Efforts should be made to increase access to healthcare through the campus clinics. PMID:22353579

  5. University students and HIV in Namibia: an HIV prevalence survey and a knowledge and attitude survey.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Ingrid H; Gelderblom, Huub C; Schellekens, Onno; Gaeb, Esegiel; van Rooy, Gert; McNally, Alta; Wit, Ferdinand W; Tobias, Rinke de Wit F

    2012-02-22

    With an overall adult HIV prevalence of 15.3%, Namibia is facing one of the largest HIV epidemics in Africa. Young people aged 20 to 34 years constitute one of the groups at highest risk of HIV infection in Namibia. However, little is known about the impact of HIV on this group and its access to healthcare. The purpose of this study was to estimate HIV prevalence, to assess the knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS, and to assess access to healthcare among university students in Namibia. We assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes, HIV prevalence and access to healthcare among students at the Polytechnic of Namibia and the University of Namibia. HIV prevalence was tested through anonymous oral fluid-based tests. Half (n = 2790/5568) of the university students and 45% (n = 2807/6302) of the Polytechnic students participated in the knowledge and attitudes surveys. HIV/AIDS knowledge was reasonable, except for misperceptions about transmission. Awareness of one's own HIV status and risks was low. In all, 55% (n = 3055/5568) of university students and 58% (n = 3680/6302) of Polytechnic students participated in the HIV prevalence survey; 54 (1.8%) university students and 103 (2.8%) Polytechnic students tested HIV positive. Campus clinics were not the major providers of healthcare to the students. Meaningful strategies addressing the gap between knowledge, attitude and young people's perception of risk of HIV acquisition should be implemented. HIV prevalence among Namibian university students appears relatively low. Voluntary counselling and testing should be stimulated. Efforts should be made to increase access to healthcare through the campus clinics.

  6. Ethiopian teachers: their knowledge, attitude and practice towards epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gebrewold, Meron Awraris; Enquselassie, Fikre; Teklehaimanot, Redda; Gugssa, Seid Ali

    2016-09-08

    In Ethiopia where the burden of epilepsy is highest among school age children and teenagers, and where people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives suffers from high level of perceived stigma, there had not been any study that assessed the knowledge, attitude and practice of teachers towards PWE. This study aims to assess and understand the social and demographic determinants of knowledge, attitude and practice of teachers towards PLW in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Multistage cluster sampling procedure was used to identify twenty schools from three sub cities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Standardized self administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 845 volunteer teachers in the pre identified schools. Frequencies were used to characterize the demographic variables while multiple response frequencies were used to characterize the multiple response variable sets. Non-parametric statistical methods were used to describe the association among the demographic variables of interest and the count sums of multiple response variables which were grouped into biologically and culturally plausible responses. The most common biologically plausible responses were: brain diseases (26.5 %) from causes, allow my offspring to play with PWE (19.1 %) from attitude, protect the subject from injury (20.4 %) from first aid measures and seek help from medical doctors (52.2 %) from epilepsy treatment. On the contrary, the most common culturally plausible responses were: psychiatric illness (12.9 %) from causes, epilepsy be cured before attendance to school (21.6 %) from attitude, smelling the smoke of struck match (14.2 %) from first aid measures and Holy water treatment (20.3 %) from epilepsy treatment suggestions. The biologically and culturally plausible responses were negatively correlated. Level of education was positively associated with biologically plausible responses while teaching experience was negatively correlated with culturally plausible responses. A high

  7. [Smoking behavior, knowledge and attitudes of freshmen students].

    PubMed

    Shiota, M; Matsubara, S; Kamei, M; Iwamoto, K

    1997-04-01

    A questionnaire on smoking behavior, knowledge of smoking-related diseases and attitudes toward the passive exposure to smoking was administered and results analyzed for differences in (1) region, (2) major area of study in the university, (3) grade and (4) date of survey on smoking behavior, knowledge and attitude of the freshmen students. (1) 294 urban and 217 provincial university students, (2) 138 freshmen at the Department of Pharmacology and 156 freshmen at the Department of Technology, (3) 136 freshmen of Y. University and 158 freshmen in senior high school of Yamaguchi prefecture, and (4) 217 freshmen surveyed in 1990 and 136 freshmen surveyed in 1995 were the subjects. The results were as follows; 1) The percentage who had smoked once ranged from 0 to 3% among the senior high school girls and female students at minor universities. However, the percentage for male students ranged from 26% to 44% in each survey. There were clear gender differences in smoking behavior. 2) The proportion of students who admitted that they had smoked cigarettes was 30.9% for urban students and 38.6% for provincial university students, but was not a significant difference. There were no significant differences between urban and provincial students regarding knowledge of smoking-related diseases or attitudes toward passive smoke. 3) The proportion of students who admitted that they had smoked cigarettes was 44.0% for the Department of Pharmacology and 26.2% for the Department of Technology, a significant difference. There were no significant differences between pharmaceutical and engineering students in knowledge of smoking-related diseases or attitudes toward passive smoke. 4) The proportion of students who admitted that they had smoked cigarettes was 27.4% for university freshmen and 1.6% for senior high school freshmen. There was a significant difference between the two. The percentage who replied that the smoker must be considerate to non-smokers tended to be higher in the

  8. Nursing faculties’ knowledge and attitude on evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Neda; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Joulaee, Azadeh; Bahrani, Naser

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is one of the main professional competencies for health care professionals and a priority for medicine and nursing curriculum as well. EBP leads to improve effective and efficient care and patient outcomes. Nurse educators have responsibility to teach the future nurses, and an opportunity to promote patient outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurse educators’ knowledge and attitude on EBP. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in nursing faculties of two major universities of medical sciences affiliated to Ministry of Health and Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered using a three-section questionnaire. Content and face validity was further enhanced by submitting it to nursing research and education experts. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 11 software. Results: According the results, nursing faculties’ knowledge of EBP was mainly moderate (47.1%). Significant statistical relationship was found between the level of knowledge with education and teaching experience in different nursing programs. Nurses generally held positive attitudes toward EBP (88.6%) and there was no statistical significant relationship with demographic variables. Conclusion: Nursing educators are in a position to influence nursing research in clinical practice in the future. Therefore, it is critical to achieve implementation of EBP and be a change agent for a paradigm shift toward EBP. PMID:23922597

  9. Breastfeeding Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Attitudes of Canadian Physicians.

    PubMed

    Pound, Catherine M; Williams, Kathryn; Grenon, Renee; Aglipay, Mary; Plint, Amy C

    2014-08-01

    Physicians' attitudes and recommendations directly affect breastfeeding duration. Yet, studies in many nations have shown that physicians lack the skills to offer proper guidance to breastfeeding mothers. This study aims to assess breastfeeding knowledge, confidence, beliefs, and attitudes of Canadian physicians. A breastfeeding questionnaire was developed and piloted prior to study enrollment. These questionnaires were sent to 1429 pediatricians (PED), 1329 family physicians (FP), and final-year pediatric and final-year family medicine residents (PR and FMR). The analysis included 397 PED, 322 FP, 17 PR, and 44 FMR who completed the questionnaire. Mean overall correct knowledge score was 67.8% for PED, 64.3% for FP, 72.7% for PR, and 66.8% for FMR. Two hundred eighty-five PED (74.2%), 228 FP (73.1%), 7 PR (41.2%), and 21 FMR (53.8%) felt confident with their breastfeeding counseling skills. Less than half (49.6% of PED and 45.4% of FP) believed that evaluating breastfeeding was a primary care physician's responsibility, and few PED or FP (5.1% and 11.3%) routinely observed breastfeeding in mother-infant pairs. Several areas of potential deficits were identified in Canadian physicians' breastfeeding knowledge. Physicians would benefit from greater education and support, to optimize care of infants and their mothers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of dyeing and printing workers.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Parimalam; Raghavan, Premalatha Mundankandath; Srinivasan, Padmini Dasu; Kumar, Ganguli Anindya

    2010-10-01

    Millions of workers are occupationally exposed to dyes in the world, but little is known about their knowledge and attitudes toward the effects of dye on their health.. The aim of this study was to assess the fabric dyers' and fabric printers' knowledge, attitude, and practice toward the health hazard of dyes. The present study was taken up in the Madurai district which is situated in the Southern Tamil Nadu, India. One hundred and forty-two workers employed in small-scale dyeing and printing units participated in a face-to-face confidential interview. The mean age of fabric dyers and fabric printers was 42 years (±10.7). When enquired about whether dyes affect body organ(s), all the workers agreed that dye(s) will affect skin, but they were not aware that dyes could affect other parts of the body. All the workers believed that safe methods of handling of dyes and disposal of contaminated packaging used for dyes need to be considered. It was found that 34% of the workers were using personal protective equipment (PPE) such as rubber hand gloves during work. The workers had knowledge regarding the occupational hazards, and their attitudinal approach toward the betterment of the work environment is positive.

  11. Revealing sexuality: have nurses' knowledge and attitudes changed?

    PubMed

    Giddings, L S; Wood, P J

    1998-07-01

    All nurses should be adequately prepared for assisting clients with issues relating to sexuality. This article describes a descriptive study undertaken between 1988 and 1991 which used a questionnaire to survey the knowledge and attitudes of New Zealand pre- and post-registration nursing students regarding sexuality. The results of this study have previously been available only in an unpublished report. As interest in this area of research is increasing overseas, and as it is now time to consider resurveying New Zealand nurses, it is useful to have a summary of the findings available to a wider audience. Phase One analysed the responses of a convenience sample of 319 registered nurses undertaking a one-year post-registration programme in four New Zealand schools of nursing in either 1988 or 1989. Phase Two analysed 575 questionnaires completed by a convenience sample of nursing students in their first and/or third years of a three-year programme leading to nursing registration. Analysis of the 35 true/false items showed that students near the completion of their programme were as knowledgeable or more knowledgeable than registered nurses, although there were areas where both groups lacked information. Analysis of the 33 items measuring attitudes on a 5-point Likert scale suggested that the attitudes of both pre- and post-registration students were more liberal than conservative, but with some differences discernible when participants were grouped by demographic variables. Importantly, the study found that 55% of pre-registration students, and 88% of registered nurse participants, felt that nurses were inadequately prepared for helping clients with concerns about sexual matters. The findings are compared with those of studies undertaken overseas this decade.

  12. Knowledge and attitude of university students towards premarital screening program.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Rahma; Al Rujaibi, Salha; Al Kendi, Maya

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program. A cross-sectional study conducted at the students' clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students' knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program. Most of the participants (n=469; 79%) were aware about the availability of premarital screening program in Oman. The main sources of information were: school/college (n=212; 36%), media (n=209; 35%), family and friends (n=197; 33%), and/or health services (n=181, 31%). The vast majority of the participants (n=540; 92%) thought it is important to carry out premarital screening and agreed to do it. Around half of the participants (n=313; 53%) favored having premarital screening as an obligatory procedure before marriage and about one third (n=212; 36%) favored making laws and regulation to prevent marriage in case of positive results. Even though the majority of the participants thought it is important to carry out premarital screening; only half favored making it obligatory before marriage and one third favored making laws and regulations to prevent marriage in case of positive results. This reflects the importance of health education as a keystone in improving knowledge and attitude towards premarital screening program.

  13. Knowledge and Attitude of University Students Towards Premarital Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Al Kindi, Rahma; Al Rujaibi, Salha; Al Kendi, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted at the students’ clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students’ knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program. Results Most of the participants (n=469; 79%) were aware about the availability of premarital screening program in Oman. The main sources of information were: school/college (n=212; 36%), media (n=209; 35%), family and friends (n=197; 33%), and/or health services (n=181, 31%). The vast majority of the participants (n=540; 92%) thought it is important to carry out premarital screening and agreed to do it. Around half of the participants (n=313; 53%) favored having premarital screening as an obligatory procedure before marriage and about one third (n=212; 36%) favored making laws and regulation to prevent marriage in case of positive results. Conclusion Even though the majority of the participants thought it is important to carry out premarital screening; only half favored making it obligatory before marriage and one third favored making laws and regulations to prevent marriage in case of positive results. This reflects the importance of health education as a keystone in improving knowledge and attitude towards premarital screening program. PMID:23071880

  14. South Asian migrant women and HIV/STIs: knowledge, attitudes and practices and the role of sexual power.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Anita J; Merry, Lisa; Bocking, Jacqueline; Rosenberg, Ellen; Oxman-Martinez, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Differences in relationship power dynamics or migration factors may affect knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in resettling Migrant women. A sample of 122 women and men born in India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan or Bangladesh and residing in Montreal completed questionnaires on HIV/STI KAP and decision-making power Within sexual relationships. Knowledge gaps and stigmatizing attitudes were found. STI/HIV information available in one's language and other educational strategies that consider women's Power may improve KAP among South Asian migrant women.

  15. The influence of death attitudes and knowledge of end of life options on attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Steven W

    End of life decisions, such as physician-assisted suicide (PAS), have continued to be controversial as health care policy, moral, and individual health care issues. This study considers knowledge of end of life options and death attitudes as predictors of attitudes toward PAS. Data were gathered from approximately 300 adults through a mailing sent to a household research panel. Validated measures of attitudes toward PAS, knowledge about that state's assisted suicide laws, demographics, and attitudes toward death as measured through the Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R) were collected and analyzed. The data indicate that attitudes toward PAS are a function of knowledge of end of life options as well as death attitudinal factors.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of malaria in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Colombia has witnessed an important decrease in malaria transmission, the disease remains a public health problem with an estimated ~10 million people currently living in areas with malaria risk and ~61,000 cases reported in 2012. This study aimed to determine and compare the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) about malaria in three endemic communities of Colombia to provide the knowledge framework for development of new intervention strategies for malaria elimination. Methods A cross-sectional KAP survey was conducted in the municipalities of Tierralta, Buenaventura and Tumaco, categorized according to high risk (HR) and moderate risk (MR) based on the annual parasite index (API). Surveys were managed using REDCap and analysed using MATLAB and GraphPad Prism. Results A total of 267 residents, mostly women (74%) were surveyed. Although no differences were observed on the knowledge of classical malaria symptoms between HR and MR regions, significant differences were found in knowledge and attitudes about transmission mechanisms, anti-malarial use and malaria diagnosis. Most responders in both regions (93.5% in MR, and 94.3% in HR areas) indicated use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) to protect themselves from malaria, and 75.5% of responders in HR indicated they did nothing to prevent malaria transmission outdoors. Despite a high level of knowledge in the study regions, significant gaps persisted relating to practices. Self-medication and poor adherence to treatment, as well as lack of both indoor and outdoor vector control measures, were significantly associated with higher malaria risk. Conclusions Although significant efforts are currently being made by the Ministry of Health to use community education as one of the main components of the control strategy, these generic education programmes may not be applicable to all endemic regions of Colombia given the substantial geographic, ethnic and cultural diversity. PMID:24885909

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of malaria in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Forero, David A; Chaparro, Pablo E; Vallejo, Andres F; Benavides, Yoldy; Gutiérrez, Juan B; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2014-05-01

    Although Colombia has witnessed an important decrease in malaria transmission, the disease remains a public health problem with an estimated ~10 million people currently living in areas with malaria risk and ~61,000 cases reported in 2012. This study aimed to determine and compare the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) about malaria in three endemic communities of Colombia to provide the knowledge framework for development of new intervention strategies for malaria elimination. A cross-sectional KAP survey was conducted in the municipalities of Tierralta, Buenaventura and Tumaco, categorized according to high risk (HR) and moderate risk (MR) based on the annual parasite index (API). Surveys were managed using REDCap and analysed using MATLAB and GraphPad Prism. A total of 267 residents, mostly women (74%) were surveyed. Although no differences were observed on the knowledge of classical malaria symptoms between HR and MR regions, significant differences were found in knowledge and attitudes about transmission mechanisms, anti-malarial use and malaria diagnosis. Most responders in both regions (93.5% in MR, and 94.3% in HR areas) indicated use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) to protect themselves from malaria, and 75.5% of responders in HR indicated they did nothing to prevent malaria transmission outdoors. Despite a high level of knowledge in the study regions, significant gaps persisted relating to practices. Self-medication and poor adherence to treatment, as well as lack of both indoor and outdoor vector control measures, were significantly associated with higher malaria risk. Although significant efforts are currently being made by the Ministry of Health to use community education as one of the main components of the control strategy, these generic education programmes may not be applicable to all endemic regions of Colombia given the substantial geographic, ethnic and cultural diversity.

  18. Cypriot nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Zoe, Roupa; Charalambous, Charalambos; Popi, Sotiropoulou; Maria, Rekleiti; Aris, Vasilopoulos; Agoritsa, Koulouri; Evangelia, Kotrotsiou

    2014-02-01

    To investigate Cypriot nurses' knowledge and attitude towards alternative treatments. Two hundred randomly selected registered Nurses from public hospitals in Cyprus were administered an anonymous self-report questionnaire with closed-type questions. The particular questionnaire has previously been used in similar surveys. Six questions referred to demographic data and 14 questions to attitudes and knowledge towards alternative medicine. One hundred and thirty-eight questionnaires were adequately completed and evaluated. Descriptive and inferential statistics was performed. SPSS 17.0 was used. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Over 1/3 of our sample nurses reported that they had turned to some form of alternative treatment at some point in their lives in order to deal with a certain medical situation. Most of these nurses who reported some knowledge on specific alternative treatment methods, (75.9%) also reported using such methods within their clinical practice. The nurses who had received some form of alternative treatment reported using them more often in their clinical practice, in comparison to those who had never received such treatment (Mann-Whitney U = 1137, p = 0.006). The more frequently nurses used alternative treatment in their clinical practice, the more interested they got in expanding their knowledge on the subject (Pearson's r = 0.250, p = 0.006). Most nurses are familiar with alternative medicine and interested in expanding their knowledge on subject, despite the fact that they do not usually practice it. Special education and training as well as legislative actions are necessary for alternative medicine to be broadly accepted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Knowledge and attitude of adolescent girls regarding folic acid use].

    PubMed

    Benítez, Ania; Benítez, Omar; Irizarry, Luis; Ginel Rodríguez, José; Vélez-Crespo, Michael

    2006-01-01

    To determine the adolescent's knowledge and attitude on the use of folic acid to avoid congenital neural tube defects. Three hundred and three (303) adolescent students from two different schools, one private and one public, were asked to complete a pre-test survey. After completing the survey, a lecture was given addressing the importance of folic acid and the benefits of taking this vitamin at an early stage to avoid neural tube defect. Two weeks later a post-test was administered to evaluate the knowledge acquired. The variables were grouped based on the knowledge of folic acid used, the attitudes toward folic acid consumption and the economic level of the participants. On the pre-test the adolescents demonstrated 52.5% of knowledge on the use of folic acid. After the educational conference, the tested knowledge increased to 87.5%. Eighteen percent (18%) of the adolescents reported on the pre-test that they consumed folic acid; this result increased to 69.3% on the post-test. On the pre-test, 31.7% of the participants related folic acid as an etiology of neural tube defect. Following the post-test, 96% of the adolescents were able to provide correct answers about the benefits of folic acid. Less than 50% of the adolescents recognized that folic acid is a vitamin. More than 80% of the surveyed adolescents do not consume folic acid. In general, the majority of the adolescents did not know the benefits of folic acid during the pre-conception period.

  20. Knowledge and attitudes about intrauterine devices among women's health care providers in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Heather Lyn; Cremer, Miriam L; Gonzalez, Enrique; Maza, Mauricio

    2011-03-01

    In order to gain an understanding of Salvadoran health care providers' clinical knowledge, attitudes, and practice toward the intrauterine device (IUD), Ministry of Health providers completed a self-administered, anonymous survey. Surveys were completed by 135 participants. The majority (94.7% and 97.0%) agreed the IUD is a safe and effective form of contraception. Only 46.6% of participants had ever received training in IUD placement, and 32.0% of them had ever inserted more than 10 IUDs. The majority of providers (54.2%) believed that the IUD was associated with a higher rate of infection than is described in the literature. Lack of formal training and knowledge about persistent infection rates associated with IUDs may contribute to low IUD placement by Salvadoran providers. Health care providers surveyed are open to learning more about the IUD and sharing the information with their patients.

  1. Israeli Dying Patient Act: physician knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Doron, Dana; Wexler, Isaiah D; Shabtai, Esther; Corn, Benjamin W

    2014-12-01

    The recently enacted Israeli Dying Patient Act was designed to strike balance between enhancing patient autonomy in end-of-life decision making and cultural/religious norms that are in opposition to active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS). The current study evaluated physician attitudes regarding active and passive euthanasia, and their knowledge of specific aspects of the law. A survey was administered to a convenience sample of hospital-based physicians treating terminal patients. Physicians were queried about their attitudes regarding euthanasia and PAS. Physicians were also queried about specific aspects of the law and whether they had sufficient resources to uphold the law. Surveys were distributed to 270 physicians and 100 were returned and evaluated (37%). Nearly all physicians supported passive euthanasia (withholding treatment), whereas over 40% maintained that active forms of euthanasia should be allowed for terminal patients in severe physical pain. Multivariate analysis showed a negative relationship between support for more active forms of euthanasia and physicians' self-reported religiosity. Physicians cited lack of time as a reason for not complying with the new law. Physicians had a familiarity with the general aspects of the new legislation, but a large proportion was not aware of the specifics of the law. Compared with previous surveys, a larger number of physicians support passive euthanasia. A sizable percentage of physicians would be willing to participate in active euthanasia and even PAS. Attitudes toward euthanasia are influenced by religious factors.

  2. Knowledge, attitude, and willingness of Nigerian physiotherapy students to provide care for patients living with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje; Utti, Victor; Oyeyemi, Luqman; Onigbinde, Teslim

    2007-01-01

    In the current AIDS pandemics, equipping health professional students with adequate knowledge and positive attitude is necessary to produce graduates who can deliver appropriate intervention to patients infected with HIV or who have developed AIDS. The purpose of this study was 1) to investigate the Nigerian physiotherapy students' knowledge, attitude, and their willingness to provide care for patients living with AIDS (PWA) and to 2) determine the sociodemographic variables that could influence the students' attitude and willingness to provide care for PWA. Physiotherapy students (N = 104) in four training programs in Nigeria were surveyed using a two-part questionnaire. Part I elicited sociodemographic and previous AIDS encounter information, and Part II assessed knowledge, attitude, and willingness to provide care to PWA. Nigerian students showed unsatisfactory knowledge, harbored negative attitude, and many of them were unwilling to render care for PWA. Religious affiliation, training programs, long-term career goals, and previous instructions on AIDS influenced the students' attitude. The study identified the need for a comprehensive AIDS curriculum and recommend that all programs in Nigeria include clinical clerkship, small group discussions, and seminars on ethical and medico-legal issues on AIDS in their curriculum.

  3. Infection control attitudes and perceptions among dental students in Latin America: implications for dental education.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Gío, A E; Borges-Yáñez, S A; Flores, M; Herrera, A; Jerónimo, J; Martínez, M; Meneses, P; Peralta, H; Pérez, L; Portocarrero, R; Rodríguez, L; Castillo, L; Molina, M; Larrondo, M; Maupomé, G; Soriano, I

    2008-08-01

    Latin American dental schools are at diverse stages in the continuum of implementation of infection control (IC) programmes that comply with evidence-based recommendations. Poor IC training may result in low compliance and negative attitudes against patients infected with blood borne pathogens (BBP). To evaluate students' knowledge on IC and attitudes toward occupational BBP risks, in six dental schools in Latin America. This survey was administered to convenience samples of dental students at one school in Costa Rica; four schools in Mexico, and one in Venezuela. The questionnaire included Likert-type scale evaluations of agreement with statements. Study variables included knowledge about and confidence in recommended IC procedures, degree of concern about HIV and HBV transmission in dental settings, and attitudes toward patients infected with BBP. Possible associations between variables were analysed using Pearson's Chi square and Kruskal Wallis tests. Substantial numbers of students had incomplete knowledge and often lacked confidence on IC and procedures; believed that HIV and HBV could be transmitted during clinical procedures; felt worried about occupational exposure to BBP, and held prejudices towards HIV and HBV infected individuals. Educational efforts are needed to enhance IC teaching and compliance. Diverse educational resources and international networks for research collaboration are available from organisations specialised in IC, hopefully paving the way to harmonising regional standards.

  4. Public Knowledge of and Attitudes Toward Genetics and Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Barry, William T.; Mills, Rachel; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Svetkey, Laura; Sullivan, Jennifer; Willard, Huntington F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Variable health literacy and genetic knowledge may pose significant challenges to engaging the general public in personal genomics, specifically with respect to promoting risk comprehension and healthy behaviors. Methods: We are conducting a multistage study of individual responses to genomic risk information for Type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 300 individuals were recruited from the general public in Durham, North Carolina: 60% self-identified as White; 70% female; and 65% have a college degree. As part of the baseline survey, we assessed genetic knowledge and attitudes toward genetic testing. Results: Scores of factual knowledge of genetics ranged from 50% to 100% (average=84%), with significant differences in relation to racial groups, the education level, and age. Scores were significantly higher on questions pertaining to the inheritance and causes of disease (mean score 90%) compared to scientific questions (mean score 77.4%). Scores on the knowledge survey were significantly higher than scores from European populations. Participants' perceived knowledge of the social consequences of genetic testing was significantly lower than their perceived knowledge of the medical uses of testing. More than half agreed with the statement that testing may affect a person's ability to obtain health insurance (51.3%) and 16% were worried about the consequences of testing for chances of finding a job. Conclusions: Despite the relatively high educational status and genetic knowledge of the study population, we find an imbalance of knowledge between scientific and medical concepts related to genetics as well as between the medical applications and societal consequences of testing, suggesting that more effort is needed to present the benefits, risks, and limitations of genetic testing, particularly, at the social and personal levels, to ensure informed decision making. PMID:23406207

  5. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: a survey on otorhinolaryngologists' knowledge and attitudes on prevention.

    PubMed

    Odone, A; Visciarelli, S; Lalic, T; Pezzetti, F; Spagnoli, F; Pasquarella, C; Ferrari, G; Signorelli, C

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a recognised causal factor associated with oropharyngeal cancers. The global burden of HPVrelated oropharyngeal cancers is on the increase and is predicted to surpass the burden of cervical cancer in the near future. As evidence is accumulating on the potential effectiveness of an HPV vaccine in controlling the oropharyngeal cancer epidemic; otorhinolaryngologists assume a key role - not only in the diagnosis and treatment of HPV-related cancers - but also in educating and advocating on HPV prevention. We conducted a survey to assess Italian otorhinolaryngologists' knowledge and attitudes regarding HPV infection, HPV-related oropharyngeal diseases and cancers and available prevention measures, including vaccines. This is the first study conducted in Italy and Europe on this topic. A total of 262 Italian otorhinolaryngologists were recruited during the National Conference of the Italian Association of Otorhinolaryngologists. Our results show that Italian otorhinolaryngologists are knowledgeable regarding HPV infection and have a positive attitude towards HPV vaccine. Our findings provide a useful basis to plan, implement and evaluate targeted educational programmes and training. As we show herein, educational programmes and training specifically focusing on HPV are effective in increasing physicians' knowledge and positive attitudes towards prevention; this ultimately contributes to enhance vaccine uptake among patients and the general population. With the overall aim of controlling the burden of HPV-related cancers, resources and efforts should be devoted to promote continuing education among otorhinolaryngologists and the general medical community and to increase awareness on the role of vaccines in prevention of HPV-related cancers. In this context, there is tremendous opportunity for healthcare providers across fields to cooperate and for public health and otorhinolaryngologist communities to join forces and engage in

  6. Urban Youth Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Lead Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bogar, Sandra; Szabo, Aniko; Woodruff, Shane; Johnson, Sheri

    2017-05-20

    Environmental health literacy (EHL) is a promising and evolving field of research that could benefit from youth engagement. Yet studies focused on youths' environmental health awareness and concerns are limited. For example, although lead exposure remains a threat to youth development in urban environments, no published studies have measured urban youth's knowledge of lead poisoning. A CBPR partnership established a youth advisory council (YAC) who helped to design, interpret and disseminate a mixed methods study exploring environmental health perceptions among urban youths ages 10-18. Surveys assessed awareness, attitudes, and knowledge regarding lead poisoning and five environmental health issues determined by the YAC. Focus group questions further contextualized youths' lead knowledge and understanding of youths' environmental health concerns. A majority of youth could identify specific sources of lead exposure but had minimal knowledge of prevention strategies, and focus group data revealed misinformation regarding lead sources and consequences. Survey and focus group respondents' level of awareness and concern regarding YAC-selected EH issues was high in comparison to lead poisoning. In particular, job opportunities and police brutality were endorsed as both neighborhood concerns and priorities. Awareness and knowledge of environmental health issues among urban youth have not been well described. These findings reinforce the importance of addressing problems of local relevance. Moving forward, lead poisoning prevention education for youth and youth EHL partnerships may benefit from incorporating an ecological approach wherein connections to the social and economic context are made explicit.

  7. Rural doctors' attitudes to and knowledge of medicinal cannabis.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Graham

    2006-08-01

    The use of cannabis for medical purposes remains controversial. Since support from general practitioners would be needed for the successful operation of a legalised prescription regime, New South Wales Northern Rivers general practitioners were surveyed on their attitudes to and knowledge of medicinal cannabis. A representative random sample of general practitioners, stratified by age and gender, was derived and interviewed. Results indicated generally high levels of knowledge of cannabis's medical uses. The mean number of patients seen in 2004 with medicinal cannabis-treatable conditions was 66.8, with chronic pain patients accounting for 36.7. Overwhelming majorities of respondents reported they would prescribe medicinal cannabis if it were legal, professionally supported and backed by research and that they would approve of clinical trials and a legalised regulatory scheme under such conditions. These results suggest the need to conduct a Statewide general practitioners' survey to confirm or refute the present findings.

  8. Taking Geoscience to Public Schools: Attitude and Knowledge Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silliman, J. E.; Hansen, A.; McDonald, J.; Martinez, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Cabeza de Vaca Earthmobile Program is an ongoing project that is designed to strengthen geoscience education in South Texas public schools. It began in June 2003 and is funded by the National Science Foundation. This outreach program involves collaboration between Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and four independent school districts in South Texas with support from the South Texas Rural Systemic Initiative, another NSF-funded project. Additional curriculum support has been provided by various local and state organizations. Across Texas, fifth grade students are demonstrating a weakness in geoscience concepts as evidenced by their scores on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills. As a result, fifth and sixth grade public school students from low-income school districts were selected to participate in this program. At this age students are already making decisions that will affect their high school and college years. The main purpose of this project is to encourage these students, many of whom are Hispanic, to become geoscientists. This purpose is accomplished by enhancing their geoscience knowledge, nurturing their interest in geoscience and showing them what careers are available in the geosciences. Educators and scientists collaborate to engage students in scientific discovery through hands-on laboratory exercises and exposure to state-of-the-art technology (laptop computers, weather stations, telescopes, etc.). Students' family members become involved in the geoscience learning process as they participate in Family Science Night activities. Family Science Nights constitute an effective venue to reach the public. During the course of the Cabeza de Vaca Earthmobile Program, investigators have measured success in two ways: improvement in students' knowledge of geoscience concepts and change in students' attitudes towards geoscience. Findings include significant improvement in students' knowledge of geoscience. Students also report more positive

  9. Evidence-Based Practice: Attitude and Knowledge of Social Workers across Geographic Regions.

    PubMed

    Abrefa-Gyan, Tina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the author in this article was to examine possible differences in knowledge and attitudes toward evidence-based practice (EBP) among social workers across geographic regions. A random national sample of 180 NASW members was obtained from mail and Internet groups. MANOVA analysis was performed to determine possible differences in knowledge and attitudes toward EBP among these social workers. Findings suggest that knowledge and attitude toward EBP did not differ among these practitioners. Despite increasing efficacy and widespread knowledge of EBPs, there is little or no empirical evidence to support any differences in attitudes and knowledge of EBP among social workers across geographic regions.

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices towards blood donation in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Atherley, A E; Taylor, C G; Whittington, A; Jonker, C

    2016-12-01

    To obtain information to devise strategies for a voluntary blood donor mobilisation campaign in Barbados. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that 100% blood should be collected from voluntary non-remunerated donors (VNRD), yet the majority of blood donations (75%) in Barbados are family/replacement donations. Increasing VNRD is paramount to achieving a safe, reliable blood supply, and understanding the population is a strategy suggested by the WHO to inform donor recruitment and education. Participants in Barbados (n = 429) completed a self-administered questionnaire in 2014. The questionnaire comprised 31 questions, including demographics (age, gender, highest educational attainment) and blood donation-related knowledge, attitudes and practices. Analysis of variance, t-test and linear regression were used to analyse data. A total of 53% (n = 219) of participants had previously donated blood; almost half were family/replacement donors, and over one-third (36·2%) were lapsed donors and had not donated within the past 2 years. Knowledge deficits included blood donation requirements, deferral factors and maximum yearly donations. Most participants (79%) were willing to donate with more information. Participants with higher educational attainment and previous donors had higher total knowledge and attitude scores (P < 0·01). Single, female and younger participants were less likely to donate blood (P < 0·05). Barbados can likely increase voluntary blood donation rates by addressing knowledge deficits through education campaigns and increasing awareness of the need for donation. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Knowledge and attitude of elderly persons towards dental implants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Frauke; Salem, Kamel; Barbezat, Cindy; Herrmann, François R; Schimmel, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Despite their unrivalled place in restorative treatment, dental implants are still scarcely used in elderly patients. The aim of this survey was therefore to identify potential barriers for accepting an implant treatment. Participants were recruited from a geriatric hospital, two long-term-care facilities and a private clinic. The final study sample comprised 92 persons, 61 women and 31 men with an average age of 81.2 ± 8.0 years. In a semi-structured interview, the participants' knowledge of implants and attitude towards a hypothetical treatment with dental implants were evaluated. Twenty-seven participants had never heard of dental implants, and another 13 participants could not describe them. The strongest apprehensions against implants were cost, lack of perceived necessity and old age. Univariate and multiple linear regression analysis identified being women, type and quality of denture, having little knowledge on implants and being hospitalised as the risk factors for refusing implants. However, old age as such was not associated with a negative attitude. The acceptance of dental implants in the elderly population might be increased by providing further information and promoting oral health in general. Regardless of the age, dental implants should be placed when patients are still in good health and live independently. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Airbags: an exploratory survey of public knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T F; Sussman, D; Graham, J D

    1999-07-01

    The present study examines public knowledge and opinion in the United States on issues related to airbag safety. Data were obtained through a national random digit-dial telephone survey of 1005 people living in the contiguous 48 United States. A majority of respondents (1) know that airbags can harm drivers seated too close to the steering wheel; (2) know that rear-facing infant seats should not be placed in the front seat of a car with passenger-side airbags; and (3) know that airbags are saving more lives of women drivers than are being lost. However, most respondents did not know that (1) airbags are killing more children than they are saving; (2) airbags can injure properly belted drivers; and (3) the majority of the lives saved by airbags have been among people who were not wearing safety belts. Knowledge of airbag risks to children and properly belted drivers was significantly associated with a less favorable attitude toward airbags, and with opposition toward the law mandating airbags on all new cars. Drivers of vehicles equipped with airbags held more favorable attitudes toward airbag technology. Further analysis suggests that as the public begins to understand the risks associated with airbags, the current high level of public support for the technology and the mandatory regulation may decline.

  13. Religious beliefs, knowledge about science and attitudes towards medical genetics.

    PubMed

    Allum, Nick; Sibley, Elissa; Sturgis, Patrick; Stoneman, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The use of genetics in medical research is one of the most important avenues currently being explored to enhance human health. For some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be at minimum worrying and at most repugnant. In particular, religious doctrines are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. The key ingredient for acceptance of genetics, on the other hand, is prototypically assumed to be scientific literacy - familiarity and understanding of the critical facts and methods of science. However, this binary opposition between science and religion runs counter to what is often found in practice. In this paper, we examine the association between religiosity, science knowledge and attitudes to medical genetics amongst the British public. In particular, we test the hypothesis that religion acts as a 'perceptual filter' through which citizens acquire and use scientific knowledge in the formation of attitudes towards medical genetics in various ways.

  14. Dietitian preceptor knowledge, skills, attitudes, and training: key informant perceptions.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Roseann; Morley, Catherine; Cook, Stephanie L; Coleman, Jean; Berenbaum, Shawna

    2011-01-01

    Through consultation with Canadian dietitian informants, we aimed to identify the desired knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA) for preceptors, training opportunities, and the barriers that prevent preceptor training. In this qualitative study, an open-ended survey was sent electronically to 100 key informants across Canada. Informants had experience as preceptors or with dietitian preceptors. Informants were asked to reflect upon the desired KSA, training needs, and barriers to training for dietitian preceptors. Categories of responses under each of these headings were developed on the basis of informants' responses. Forty-nine key informants completed the survey, for a 49% response rate. Of the respondents, 41% (20/49) were in clinical practice and 35% (17/49) worked in community/public health areas. The knowledge and skills domains consisted of themes related to teaching and learning, including assessing, planning, and evaluating. Attitudes expressed included considering learners as colleagues and the training of learners as a professional responsibility. Perceived barriers to training preceptors included workload demands and a lack of recognition from peers and employers for this work. Dietitian preceptor training opportunities ranged from no training to formal programs. These findings are integral to the basic understanding of the desired KSA and training needs of Canadian dietitian preceptors.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and noise exposure of baristas.

    PubMed

    Pursley, Alyssa J; Saunders, Gabrielle H

    2016-01-01

    To examine the daily noise exposure of baristas working in cafés, and to measure their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding hearing conservation and perceptions of noise in their work environment. Fifteen baristas from six cafés in Portland completed the Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors questionnaire, a sound disturbance survey, and a structured interview to document perceptions of noise in the work environment. To measure daily noise exposure, a subset of eight participants wore a personal dosimeter for three different work shifts. A total of 11 females and four males, aged between 19 and 36 years old (mean: 26.3, SD: 4.6) recruited from independently owned cafés in the Portland metro area. Dosimetry measurements revealed Leq measurements between 71 and 83 dBA, with noise doses ranging from 4% to 74%, indicating that baristas are not exposed to sound levels above the regulatory criterion. Questionnaire results indicated that baristas have low awareness about the hazards of noise, are not opposed to hearing conservation, and rarely use hearing protection when engaged in noisy activities. Baristas here lacked the pertinent education and motivation to commit to invaluable hearing conservation practices.

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, Behaviors and Noise Exposure of Baristas

    PubMed Central

    Pursley, Alyssa J.; Saunders, Gabrielle H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the daily noise exposure of baristas working in cafés, and to measure their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding hearing conservation and perceptions of noise in their work environment. Design Fifteen baristas from six cafés in Portland completed the Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors questionnaire, a sound disturbance survey, and a structured interview to document perceptions of noise in the work environment. To measure daily noise exposure, a subset of eight participants wore a personal dosimeter for three different work shifts. Study Sample 11 females and 4 males aged between 19 and 36 years old (mean: 26.3, SD: 4.6) recruited from independently owned cafés in the Portland metro area. Results Dosimetry measurements revealed Leq measurements between 71 dBA and 83 dBA, with noise doses ranging from 4% to 74%, indicating that baristas are not exposed to sound levels above the regulatory criterion. Questionnaire results indicated that baristas have low awareness about the hazards of noise, are not opposed to hearing conservation, and rarely use hearing protection when engaged in noisy activities. Conclusions Baristas here lacked the pertinent education and motivation to commit to invaluable hearing conservation practices. PMID:26795371

  17. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of dental students towards obesity

    PubMed Central

    Awan, K.H.; Khan, S.; Abadeen, Z.; Khalid, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Obesity is a chronic medical condition associated with various oral health problems. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of dental students towards obesity. Material and methods Second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students completed a self-administered questionnaire. An ethics committee approved the study. Participants were asked questions focused on three areas: (i) knowledge, (ii) perceptions, and (iii) attitudes about obesity. Data analyses were carried out using SPSS version 20. Results Among the dental students, 78.9% received 0–1 h of formal education about obesity. The mean score of the total time allocated for obesity-related education was 1.31 ± 0.23 h. Eighty-nine percent of the dental students agreed that obesity is a chronic medical condition, 30% agreed that they would modify their equipment and office furniture to accommodate obese patients, and 46.8% were interested in learning more about obesity in dental school. Conclusion Obesity-related education should be implemented as a formal component of dental student training. Oral health practitioners should also provide their patients with information about how weight loss is beneficial to both general and oral health. PMID:26792969

  18. Parents' knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and barriers to promoting condom use among their adolescent sons.

    PubMed

    Tipwareerom, Worawan; Weglicki, Linda

    2017-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is increasing in Thai youth. Consequently, a school-based National Condom Strategy program was launched in 2015 to reduce the rate of HIV and sexually transmitted infections. We conducted in-depth interviews of 31 parents/adoptive guardians of high-school age Thai boys to explore parents' knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and barriers to promoting condom use and its role in preventing HIV/sexually transmitted infections. A descriptive phenomenological approach and thematic analysis was used. Most participants had knowledge and positive attitudes about condom use. Half disagreed with the National Condom Strategy of placing condom vending machines in schools. More than half did not initiate teaching male youth about condom use until the youth had broached the question or only intended to do so when the youths were older. Barriers included parents' lack of condom experience and knowledge, embarrassment/discomfort when talking about condoms, and belief that youth were not sexually active. Parents are a key factor for supporting condom use in Thailand. This study supports the need for education programs for parents. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Medical and psychology students' knowledge and attitudes regarding aging and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Rachel J; Zweig, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    The current study surveys medical and doctoral psychology students (N = 100) from an urban northeastern university regarding knowledge and attitudes toward elderly sexuality and aging using the Facts on Aging Quiz, the Aging Sexuality Knowledge and Attitudes Scale, and measures of interest in gerontology, academic/clinical exposure to aging and sexuality, and contact with elders. The current study found that psychology students demonstrated greater aging knowledge than medical students; however, both groups showed gaps in knowledge about sexuality. Married students had greater academic/clinical exposure and greater knowledge about aging but less permissive attitudes toward elderly sexuality. Generally, knowledge about aging was the strongest correlate of knowledge about sexuality. Level of knowledge about sexuality was not associated with attitudes. Attitudes toward sexuality and aging may be more strongly tied to demographic variables reflective of religious beliefs or adherence to sociocultural norms.

  20. Knowledge and attitudes toward brain stem death among university undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Leung, K K H; Fung, C O Y; Au, C C; Chan, D M K; Leung, G K K

    2009-06-01

    Withdrawal of life support and organ procurement for transplantation are the main implications of a diagnosis of brain stem death (BSD). Various factors may impact this important decision-making process. The present study sought to investigate the knowledge and attitudes about BSD among university undergraduates as a "well-informed" subgroup of our local population. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of nonmedical university undergraduate students in Hong Kong. The subjects' overall knowledge of BSD was unsatisfactory. Only 24% of subjects knew that BSD was the equivalent of legal death in Hong Kong. Among subjects who agreed to withdraw life support treatment from themselves upon the diagnosis of BSD, 30% and 24% refused to do so for their family members or a stranger, respectively. Subjects who agreed to withdraw life support showed significantly better knowledge about BSD than did those who did not agree. Concerns about doctors' inclination to diagnose BSD to save resources and extract organs for transplantation were not observed to negatively affect subjects' decisions about life support withdrawal. The level of knowledge is an important factor affecting an individual's decision concerning withdrawal of life support therapy upon the diagnosis of BSD. Adequate explanation and counseling are important to facilitate family members in coping with this important end-of-life issue.

  1. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES REGARDING CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Nina; Muratbegovic, Amra Arslanagic; Kobaslija, Sedin; Bajric, Elmedin; Selimovic-Dragas, Mediha; Huseinbegovic, Amina; Cuković-Bagic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess knowledge and attitude of dentists in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH) regarding signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect (CAN), reporting procedure and level of education. Methods: Data were collected through a self-administrated structured questionnaire adopted and modified from previous studies. It was administrated to 300 dentists out of which a total number of 210 subjects were in final sample for statistical analyses. Response rate was seventy percent. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used to analyze statistical differences in responses. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Dentists in BH are very rarely provided (80%) with training related to recognition and reporting of CAN. Sixty six percent of dentists had never suspected CAN in their practice. Only nine percent of dentists would report suspicious of CAN. Prevailing reasons for not reporting suspected case of CAN was lack of knowledge of the reporting procedure (43%), and combination of indicated answers that never had a case and lack of knowledge about the procedure (31%). Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that dentists need an effective education to increase their knowledge and awareness of all aspects of CAN. PMID:26889093

  2. Pharmacy students' knowledge and attitudes about antibiotics in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Fejza, Albina; Kryeziu, Zeqir; Kadrija, Kushtrim; Musa, Malbora

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude among Pharmacy students of the University of Prishtina in regards to the antibiotics. 144 pharmacy students at the University of Prishtina were recruited in this study to complete a self-administered questionnaire. The total number of questions in this questionnaire was eight (8), covering two (2) major themes: self-report of the current and past antibiotic use and behavior; and anticipated prescription behavior of antibiotics upon graduation. The data was statistically analyzed through using SPSS for Windows. Descriptive analysis was employed, and the results were expressed in frequency and percentages. The results showcased a good knowledge of antibiotic among students. The most common answer of students' knowledge about antibiotics was good or moderate (82 %), while 63.2% of the subjects used antibiotics by self-decision, most of them (45 %) for sore throat. Upon graduation, 56.9 % of the students will not sell antibiotics without prescription and 85.4% think that module for rational use of antibiotics is very necessary to be inside the pharmacy syllabus. The study showed good and moderate knowledge of pharmacy students regarding the antibiotics. Half of them use antibiotics by self-decision but the majority of them stated that they will not serve the antibiotics without medical prescription. Specific modules and training for proper antibiotic use should be implemented within the Pharmacy program in The Faculty of Medicine.

  3. Knowledge and attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Pulford, Andrew; Malcolm, William

    The reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by health professionals forms an important component of ongoing surveillance of post-marketing drug safety. The extension of responsibility for all health professionals to report ADRs has coincided with national immunization programmes, such as the national childhood immunization, human papillomavirus (HPV), and seasonal and H1N1 influenza programmes. The study objective was to evaluate knowledge of, and attitudes to, reporting ADRs among the professional groups most likely to see suspected reactions to vaccines. This included nursing professionals, whose views have not been included in previous studies. A survey of 91 practice nurses, health visitors, school nurses and GPs working in Ayrshire and Arran during June, July and August 2007 was undertaken. The respondents' knowledge of ADR reporting varied considerably. Although the majority of respondents recognized that it is the responsibility of health professionals to report suspected ADRs, there were lower levels of knowledge about the purpose of the Yellow Card system specifically; less than 50% of the respondents reported good knowledge about the system. The study suggests implications for practice with regard to the implementation of large-scale immunization programmes and potential solutions to under-reporting among these professional groups.

  4. Knowledge and attitude of European urology residents about ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Haluk; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Penbegül, Necmettin; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Atar, Murat; Altunoluk, Bülent; Bodakci, Mehmet Nuri; Hatipoglu, Namık Kemal

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the attitude and knowledge of urology residents concerning ionizing radiation, we undertook a survey of European urology residents. The questionnaire was sent to 1184 urology residents within the database of the European Society of Residents in Urology (ESRU) by e-mail between November 2011 and January 2012. The questionnaire was composed of demographic questions and questions about the frequency of radiation exposure and use of radiation safety measures during fluoroscopy-guided endourologic procedures. In addition, there were questions about education programs and respondents' knowledge about diagnostic imaging modalities. A total of 124 questionnaires were returned from urology residents in 20 different European countries. All of the respondents reported that they were routinely exposed to ionizing radiation, and 69 (72.5%) were exposed more than 3 times per week. Despite the common but not sufficient use of lead aprons (75%), use of other radiation protection measures was very low. Although 55% of the respondents had attended an education program in Europe about radiation safety, attendance was highest in Poland (82.6%). The level of knowledge about ionizing radiation was low among urology residents, and approximately half of responders had no idea that commonly used imaging modalities have a fatal cancer risk. The results of this study showed the lack of knowledge and awareness about the importance of ionizing radiation protection among urology residents in Europe. We therefore suggest radiation safety courses in every step of medical life for doctors, especially for endourologists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Statistical Analysis of Children's Environmental Knowledge and Attitudes in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alp, Elvan; Ertepinar, Hamide; Tekkaya, Ceren; Yilmaz, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was three-fold: (1) to determine 6th, 8th and 10th grade students' environmental knowledge and attitudes in Turkey; (2) to investigate the effect of the grade level and gender on students' environmental knowledge and attitudes; (3) to explore how environmentally responsible behaviour is related to environmental knowledge,…

  6. HIV, AIDS, and Universal Precautions: The Optometry Curriculum's Effect on Students' Knowledge, Attitudes and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengren, Kenneth J.; Zoltoski, Rebecca K.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed entering optometry students (n=404) and again during their fourth year (n=314) for knowledge about and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS. Analysis indicated significant improvement from pre- to post-test for general HIV/AIDS knowledge and optometric-specific HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes. For universal precautions implementation, no change in…

  7. Nigerian dentists' knowledge and attitudes towards mouthguard protection.

    PubMed

    Onyeaso, C O; Arowojolu, M O; Okoje, V N

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Nigerian dentists towards mouthguard protection. A pre-tested 15-item, one-page questionnaire was distributed to 185 dentists practising in different parts of the country with government hospitals or private establishments, by 'hand-delivery' system. Filled and returned forms were 170 (response rate of 92%). The period of the survey was between April and August 2003. Dental graduates from the different dental schools in the country responded to this survey. About 49% of the respondents indicated having only classroom lectures on mouthguards during their undergraduate trainings, 11% said they had some laboratory sessions in addition while no form of education on mouthguards was received by 40%. About 82% had never recommended mouthguard protection for athletic patients, and the major reason was no formal training in the subject. Only 58.5% were familiar with the different types of mouthguards, 75.9% would not be able to supervise or fabricate mouthguards and 50.6% would prefer custom-made mouthguard for their athletic patients. About 84% felt the current training on mouthguards in Nigerian dental schools is inadequate. Over 98% agreed that mouthguard usage in contact sports should be encouraged with the involvement of the dentists. The knowledge and attitudes of the respondents towards mouthguard protection did not vary significantly across years of postqualification from dental schools as well as the professional status of the dentists (P > 0.05). Although Nigerian dentists support mouthguard protection in contact sports and want to be involved in the provision of mouthguards for athletes, their knowledge of the protective device is inadequate. There is need for attention to be given to this subject in the undergraduate curricula of our dental schools. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004.

  8. Knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception in rural kashmir.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Humera; Khan, Parwez Sajad; Imtiyaz, Bhat; Hayat, Gazala; Hayat, Rehana

    2013-12-01

    Human fertility is determined by many factors such as customs, morals and habits of social groups with regard to marital obligation of life. Acceptance of family planning methods varies within and between societies and there are many factors which are responsible for such variation at community, family and individual level. Socioeconomic environment, culture and education are few of them that play a vital role. Jammu and Kashmir state in general and Kashmir valley in particular is a Muslim-dominated population with traditionally a conservative society. Apart from family customs and influence of the elders, religious background has always been behind the passive resistance, or at the best indifference towards contraception. This study makes an attempt to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception in rural Kashmir. To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception in rural Kashmir. Community-based Cross-Sectional study. December 2006 to May 2008. 1900 currently married women in the age group of 15-49 years of age. Rural households. 1900 currently married women, aged 15-49 years, selected by multi-stage random sampling technique from three districts of Kashmir valley who were interviewed at home using a pretested oral questionnaire. The assessment of various socioeconomic and other variables made as per the available standard procedures and scales. Percentage, Chi square test and Bivariate analysis. Knowledge of the contraceptive methods was fairly good especially for terminal methods i.e. female sterilization (97.7 %). Main source of information on contraception was obtained from mass media (60.4 %). Contraceptive practice was significantly related to number of living children, literacy, socioeconomic status and type of family. What is needed is to promote and stress contraceptive methods and their advantages using mass media approach and to explore more and more participation of private sector.

  9. Adverse Childhood Experiences: Survey of Resident Practice, Knowledge, and Attitude.

    PubMed

    Tink, Wendy; Tink, Jessica C; Turin, Tanvir C; Kelly, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) affect 20%-50% of adults and are associated with considerable adult chronic disease, unhealthy behavior, and early mortality. Physicians seldom identify this history although identification can improve health. Low screening rates are attributed to poor physician knowledge of ACEs and barriers to screening, including a lack of confidence to screen and insufficient training. Female physicians and physicians with personal ACE histories report more confidence to screen and fewer time barriers. Our aims were to identify resident screening practices, ACE knowledge, attitudes, and personal ACE histories and to determine preferred ways to learn more, if required. Family medicine residents were surveyed, using a previously published survey. Items included ACE screening practices, ACE knowledge, attitudes, and personal ACE histories. The response rate was 97% (112/115), and 58% were female. Two percent of residents screened females and males at the first visit, thereafter residents screened women (6.3%) more than men (0.9%). One third of residents identified the correct prevalence of ACE in women and one tenth male prevalence. Unhealthy behaviors or physical chronic disease were not associated with ACE histories. Sixty-five percent of residents were not confident to screen. Twenty-nine percent of residents reported a trauma history. Eighty percent believed it was their role to screen. Formal medical training to screen was received by 45.5%; only five residents recalled training during residency. Resident ACE screening rates were extremely low. Physician educational initiatives are recommended to increase confidence to screen and actual screening prior to graduation.

  10. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Tobacco Cessation Among Indian Dentists.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabiha; Reddy, Srikanth; Doshi, Dolar; Reddy, Padma; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2015-01-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice regarding tobacco cessation among dentists in Hyderabad city, India. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 264 dentists registered in the local Indian Dental Association branch, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. The questionnaire comprised of 35 items and used a five-point Likert scale to assess tobacco use prevention and cessation counseling. The majority of the study participants were females (55.7%) with a mean age of 29.9 ± 7.5 years. No significant gender difference was observed for any of the mean domain scores. A statistically significant difference was noted between age groups in the 'Knowledge' domain, 'professional role and identity' item (P = 0.03) vs the 'Practice' domain, 'social influences' item (P = 0.05) with 40+ years having a higher mean score (6.5 ± 1.5). In terms of the education, those possessing Bachelor's of Dental Science had a significantly higher mean score (10.8 ± 2.2) for the 'Attitude' question 'belief about consequences' (P = 0.05) than did those with a Master's degree. The reported barriers were insufficient reimbursement (48.1%), lack of tobacco-related self-help material/pamphlets for patients (46.5%) and lack of patient motivation to receive tobacco cessation counseling (43.6%). In the present study, although dentists possessed knowledge about tobacco cessation, it was not adequate. Dental professionals play an important role in educating patients regarding the oral health risks of tobacco use and motivating them to quit.

  11. Comparison of knowledge and attitudes toward cancer among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Natalie; Ragin, Camille; Heron, Dwight E; Alford, Renae J; Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Bondzi, Cornelius; Butcher, Jamila A; Coleman, Jamison C; Glass, Charity; Klewien, Barbara; Minor, Aerie T; Williams, Diana J; Taioli, Emanuela

    2009-02-10

    It has been noted that the African American population in the U.S. bears disproportionately higher cancer morbidity and mortality rates than any racial and ethnic group for most major cancers. Many studies also document that decreased longevity is associated with low educational attainment and other markers of low socioeconomic status (SES), both of which are prevalent in African American communities across the nation. Evidence suggests that this phenomenon may be due to attitudes that reflect a lack of knowledge surrounding facts about cancer awareness and prevention. This study was designed to yield data concerning the general population's attitudes toward cancer, taking into consideration racial and/or socioeconomic differences in the population studied. Two hundred and fifteen subjects participated in the survey, of which 74% (159/215) defined themselves as African-American, 20% were White, and 6% were of other races. While only 38% of the study population was able to identify at least 5 risk factors associated with cancer, a lower proportion of African Americans identified at least 5 risk factors than whites (34% vs. 53%, p = 0.03). In addition, a slightly higher percentage of African Americans (10%) were not aware of the definition of a clinical trial when compared to whites (8%, p > 0.1). Of those aware of the definition of a clinical trial, African Americans were more reluctant to participate in clinical trials, with 53% answering no to participation compared to 15% of whites (p = 0.002). When comparing results to a similar study conducted in 1981, a slight increase in cancer knowledge in the African American population was observed. Our results suggest that while knowledge of cancer facts has increased over the years amongst the general population, African Americans and lower income populations are still behind. This may affect their risk profile and cancer early detection.

  12. Comparison of knowledge and attitudes toward cancer among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Natalie; Ragin, Camille; Heron, Dwight E; Alford, Renae J; Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Bondzi, Cornelius; Butcher, Jamila A; Coleman, Jamison C; Glass, Charity; Klewien, Barbara; Minor, Aerie T; Williams, Diana J; Taioli, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been noted that the African American population in the U.S. bears disproportionately higher cancer morbidity and mortality rates than any racial and ethnic group for most major cancers. Many studies also document that decreased longevity is associated with low educational attainment and other markers of low socioeconomic status (SES), both of which are prevalent in African American communities across the nation. Evidence suggests that this phenomenon may be due to attitudes that reflect a lack of knowledge surrounding facts about cancer awareness and prevention. This study was designed to yield data concerning the general population's attitudes toward cancer, taking into consideration racial and/or socioeconomic differences in the population studied. Results Two hundred and fifteen subjects participated in the survey, of which 74% (159/215) defined themselves as African-American, 20% were White, and 6% were of other races. While only 38% of the study population was able to identify at least 5 risk factors associated with cancer, a lower proportion of African Americans identified at least 5 risk factors than whites (34% vs. 53%, p = 0.03). In addition, a slightly higher percentage of African Americans (10%) were not aware of the definition of a clinical trial when compared to whites (8%, p > 0.1). Of those aware of the definition of a clinical trial, African Americans were more reluctant to participate in clinical trials, with 53% answering no to participation compared to 15% of whites (p = 0.002). Conclusion When comparing results to a similar study conducted in 1981, a slight increase in cancer knowledge in the African American population was observed. Our results suggest that while knowledge of cancer facts has increased over the years amongst the general population, African Americans and lower income populations are still behind. This may affect their risk profile and cancer early detection. PMID:19208206

  13. Nursing home nurses' and community-dwelling older adults' reported knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Christine E; Beeber, Anna; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Ward, Kimberly; Meade, Megan; Ross, Brittany; Sloane, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic overuse causes antibiotic resistance, one of the most important threats to human health. Older adults, particularly those in nursing homes, often receive antibiotics when they are not indicated. To understand knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of nursing home (NH) nurses and community-dwelling older adults towards antibiotic use, especially in clinical situations consistent with antibiotic overuse, we conducted a mixed-method survey in two NHs and one Family Medicine clinic in North Carolina, among English-speaking nurses and community-dwelling, cognitively intact adults aged 65 years or older. Based on the Knowledge-Attitude-Practice model, the survey assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behavior towards antibiotic use, including three vignettes designed to elicit possible antibiotic overuse: asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a viral upper respiratory illness (URI), and a wound from a fall. Of 31 NH nurses and 66 community-dwelling older adults, 70% reported knowledge of the dangers of taking antibiotics. Nurses more often reported evidence-based attitudes towards antibiotics than older adults, except 39% agreed with the statement "by the time I am sick enough to go to the doctor with a cold, I expect an antibiotic", while only 28% of older adults agreed with it. A majority of nurses did not see the need for antibiotics in any of the three vignettes: 77% for the ASB vignette, 87% for the URI vignette, and 97% for the wound vignette. Among older adults, 50% did not perceive a need for antibiotics in the ASB vignette, 58% in the URI vignette, and 74% in the wound vignette. While a substantial minority had no knowledge of the dangers of antibiotic use, non-evidence-based attitudes towards antibiotics, and behaviors indicating inappropriate management of suspected infections, most NH nurses and community-dwelling older adults know the harms of antibiotic use and demonstrate evidence-based attitudes and behaviors. However, more work is needed to improve the

  14. Knowledge on, and attitude toward, HIV/AIDS among staff of an international organization in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Tajul; Mostafa, Golam; Bhuiya, Abbas Uddin; Hawkes, Sarah; de Francisco, Andres

    2002-09-01

    Two hundred and ninety-three randomly-selected members of the staff of ICDDR,B: Centre for Health and Population Research were surveyed anonymously in June 1998, using a pre-tested and self-administered questionnaire, to assess their knowledge on, and attitude toward, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). All except 4 (1.4%) heard of AIDS. Main sources of information were radio and television (93%), newspapers and magazines (84.8%), posters and leaflets (70.2%), and friends (59.2%). About 94% of the respondents believed that HIV might spread in Bangladesh. Only 61.6% knew about the causative agent for AIDS. More than 96% had knowledge that HIV could be detected through blood test. The respondents were aware that unprotected sexual intercourse (92%), transfusion of blood and blood components (93.8%), sharing unsterile needles for injections (94.1%), and delivery of babies by infected mothers (82.7%) could transmit HIV. Similarly, the respondents had the knowledge that HIV infection could be prevented by using condom during sexual intercourse (85.5%), having sex only with an HIV-negative faithful partner (87.2%), avoiding transfusion of blood not screened for HIV (88.9%), and taking injections with sterile needles (86.5%). However, only 33.0% had the knowledge that HIV-infected persons can look healthy, and 56.4% were unaware of transmission through breastmilk. Most members of the staff, particularly at lower level, had misconceptions about transmission and prevention of HIV/AIDS. More than 40% of the respondents had the attitude that HIV-infected persons should not be allowed to work, while another 10% did not have any idea about it. The findings of the study suggest that the members of the Centre's staff have a satisfactory level of essential knowledge on HIV/AIDS, although half of them have poor attitudes toward persons with HIV/AIDS. Therefore, preventive strategy for the staff should be directed toward behaviour change

  15. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of parents towards varicella and its vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Luigi; Santagati, Gabriella; Angelillo, Italo F

    2017-02-27

    The aims of this cross-sectional survey were to examine the knowledge, the attitudes, and the behavior regarding the varicella infection and its vaccination and to get insight into their determinants among parents of children in Italy. From May to June 2015 in the geographic area of Naples (Italy) a random sample of 675 parents of children aged 4-7 years received a self-administered anonymous questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors towards varicella and its vaccination. A total of 414 parents responded to the questionnaire, for a response rate of 61.3%. A history of varicella was reported in 163 children (39.6%). Only 26.6% parents knew that the vaccine was available and the number of doses and this knowledge was significantly higher in those who had a university degree, in those who had received information on the vaccination from a health care provider, and in those who had vaccinated their child. The perceived utility towards vaccination had a mean value of 5.7. The positive attitude towards the utility of the vaccination was higher in parents with a level of education not higher than middle school, in those who had vaccinated their child, in those who considered the varicella a dangerous disease, and in those who had received information from a health care provider. More than one-third had vaccinated their child. Immunization was more frequent in parents who had knowledge about the vaccination, who beliefs that the immunization was useful, who believed that the disease was not dangerous, and who had not a history of varicella among their children. Educational programs are needed among parents as support to improve knowledge about vaccination and immunization coverage.

  16. Attitude, Acceptability and Knowledge of HPV Vaccination among Local University Students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Vico Chung Lim; Wong, Ho Ting; Yeung, Pui Chun Au; Choi, Yuk Ki; Fok, Michelle Sum Yue; Mak, Oi In; Wong, Hing Yu; Wong, Kim Ho; Wong, Shui Yan; Wong, Yee Shan; Wong, Eugene Ying Yeung

    2016-05-11

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the great potential to prevent HPV-related infections for millions of women and men worldwide. However, the success of the vaccine is highly dependent on the vaccination rate. Factors influencing the attitudes of undergraduate students towards HPV vaccination should be studied. This is a cross-sectional survey that was conducted to estimate the HPV vaccination rate among undergraduate students in Hong Kong, and to identify the predictors of their attitude towards HPV vaccination. The results showed that the HPV vaccination rate was 13.3%. Factors related to knowledge of vaccination were the main predictors of the students' attitude towards vaccination (there were seven predictors, with B = 1.36 to 2.30; p < 0.05), followed by gender (B = -1.40; p < 0.05), acceptable maximum price (B = 0.35; p < 0.05), and willingness to receive the HPV vaccine if it can protect against cervical/anal cancer and genital warts (B = -1.90; p < 0.001). The regression model that was developed based on the predictors had a moderate effect size (adj-R² = 0.33). To conclude, the HPV vaccination rate among undergraduate students in Hong Kong was low. They should be provided with more active education and activities to promote HPV vaccination to improve their knowledge on the subject.

  17. Attitude, Acceptability and Knowledge of HPV Vaccination among Local University Students in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Vico Chung Lim; Wong, Ho Ting; Yeung, Pui Chun Au; Choi, Yuk Ki; Fok, Michelle Sum Yue; Mak, Oi In; Wong, Hing Yu; Wong, Kim Ho; Wong, Shui Yan; Wong, Yee Shan; Wong, Eugene Ying Yeung

    2016-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the great potential to prevent HPV-related infections for millions of women and men worldwide. However, the success of the vaccine is highly dependent on the vaccination rate. Factors influencing the attitudes of undergraduate students towards HPV vaccination should be studied. This is a cross-sectional survey that was conducted to estimate the HPV vaccination rate among undergraduate students in Hong Kong, and to identify the predictors of their attitude towards HPV vaccination. The results showed that the HPV vaccination rate was 13.3%. Factors related to knowledge of vaccination were the main predictors of the students’ attitude towards vaccination (there were seven predictors, with B = 1.36 to 2.30; p < 0.05), followed by gender (B = −1.40; p < 0.05), acceptable maximum price (B = 0.35; p < 0.05), and willingness to receive the HPV vaccine if it can protect against cervical/anal cancer and genital warts (B = −1.90; p < 0.001). The regression model that was developed based on the predictors had a moderate effect size (adj-R2 = 0.33). To conclude, the HPV vaccination rate among undergraduate students in Hong Kong was low. They should be provided with more active education and activities to promote HPV vaccination to improve their knowledge on the subject. PMID:27187424

  18. Men's knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating to fertility.

    PubMed

    Hammarberg, Karin; Collins, Veronica; Holden, Carol; Young, Kate; McLachlan, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The increasingly common practice in high-income countries to delay childbearing to the fourth and fifth decades of life increases the risk of involuntary childlessness or having fewer children than desired. Older age also increases the risk of age-related infertility, the need for ART to conceive, and obstetric and neonatal complications. Existing research relating to childbearing focusses almost exclusively on women, and in public discourse declining fertility rates are often assumed to be the result of women delaying childbearing to pursue other life goals such as a career and travel. However, evidence suggests that the lack of a partner or a partner willing to commit to parenthood is the main reason for later childbearing. To better understand men's contributions to childbearing decisions and outcomes, the literature pertaining to men's fertility-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours was reviewed. The electronic databases of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO were searched to identify investigations of men's knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating to fertility, infertility, reproductive health or childbearing using relevant fertility keyword search terms. Studies were included if they had investigated factors associated with men's fertility-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours, had been conducted in a high-income country and were published in an English language peer-reviewed journal between January 2005 and August 2016. The search yielded 1349 citations. Of these, 47 papers representing 43 unique studies were included in the review. Where response rate was reported, it ranged between 13 and 94%. Studies varied in terms of research design; inclusion and exclusion criteria; recruitment strategies; adequacy of sample size; recruitment and retention rates and data collection tools. However, findings were consistent and indicate that men almost universally value parenthood, want and expect to become fathers, and aspire to have at least two children. Yet

  19. Arab men who have sex with men in Israel: knowledge, attitudes and sexual practices.

    PubMed

    Mor, Z; Grayeb, E; Beany, A

    2016-04-01

    Arab men who have sex with men (AMSM) are becoming visible in society, and reports of HIV infection and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are emerging. This study aimed to assess the knowledge of AMSM regarding HIV transmission, their attitudes towards condom use and their sexual practices compared with Jewish MSM (JMSM), and to evaluate AMSM-JMSM friendships and sexual encounters. Participants in this cross-sectional study completed questionnaires in Arabic or Hebrew. The outcome variable was unprotected anal sex (UAI) in the previous 6 months with a partner(s) whose HIV status was discordant or unknown. AMSM and JMSM indicated if they had friends or sexual encounters from the other ethnic group. The questionnaires were completed by 342 (16.2%) AMSM and 1775 (83.8%) JMSM in 2012. AMSM were more likely to be religious, 'closeted' and married than JMSM; their knowledge regarding HIV transmission was inferior and attitudes towards condom use were less favourable. AMSM reported less alcohol and drug use than JMSM, were more likely to be attracted to and have sex with women, and reported a greater number of sexual partners and more UAI. Being AMSM was a predictive variable for UAI in the multivariate model. While 178 AMSM (52.0%) reported that most of their close friends were JMSM, 251 (73.4%) had only/mostly sexual encounters with JMSM. Among JMSM, 41 (2.3%) reported that their close friends were AMSM, and 308 (17.3%) had only/mostly sexual encounters with AMSM. The knowledge of AMSM regarding HIV transmission and their attitudes towards condom use were less favourable than those of JMSM, and they performed more UAI. AMSM may benefit from targeted interventions, including reconciling their same-sex attraction in positive terms. Same-sex attraction and gay identity may provide common ground to strengthen Arab-Jew communication in Israel. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  20. Development and Validation of the ACSI: Measuring Students' Science Attitudes, Pro-Environmental Behaviour, Climate Change Attitudes and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, E. M.; Goedhart, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Attitudes towards Climate Change and Science Instrument. This 63-item questionnaire measures students' pro-environmental behaviour, their climate change knowledge and their attitudes towards school science, societal implications of science, scientists, a career in science and the urgency…

  1. Development and Validation of the ACSI: Measuring Students' Science Attitudes, Pro-Environmental Behaviour, Climate Change Attitudes and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, E. M.; Goedhart, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Attitudes towards Climate Change and Science Instrument. This 63-item questionnaire measures students' pro-environmental behaviour, their climate change knowledge and their attitudes towards school science, societal implications of science, scientists, a career in science and the urgency…

  2. Knowledge and attitudes towards food safety among Canadian dairy producers.

    PubMed

    Young, I; Hendrick, S; Parker, S; Rajić, A; McClure, J T; Sanchez, J; McEwen, S A

    2010-04-01

    The Canadian dairy industry has recently begun implementing an on-farm food-safety (OFFS) program called Canadian Quality Milk (CQM). For CQM to be effective, producers should be familiar with food-safety hazards in their industry and have an adequate understanding of on-farm good production practices that are necessary to ensure safe food. To assess their knowledge and attitudes towards food safety, a postal questionnaire was administered to all (n=10,474) Canadian dairy producers enrolled in dairy herd-improvement organizations in 2008. The response rate was 20.9% (2185/10,474). Most producers (88.7%) reported that they or their families consume unpasteurized milk from their bulk milk tanks and 36.3% indicated that consumers should be able to purchase unpasteurized milk in Canada. Producers who reported completion of a dairy-health management course (OR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.92) and participation in CQM (OR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.97) were less likely to support the availability of unpasteurized milk for consumers, while organic producers (OR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.27, 3.47), younger producers (aged <30) and producers with smaller herds were more likely to favour this practice. Two-thirds of producers (66.7%) were concerned that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) might preclude successful treatment of sick cattle. Producers who completed a dairy-health management course (OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.69), organic producers (OR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.09, 3.69) and producers from Quebec compared to each other province were more likely to indicate concern about AMR. Most producers reported that Salmonella (74.2%) and Escherichia coli (73.0%) could be transmitted through contaminated beef or milk to humans, while most were not sure or did not think that Brucella (70.3%) and Cryptosporidium (88.5%) could be transmitted via these routes. Most producers did not perceive that any type of farm visitor has a high risk of introducing infectious agents into their herds. Producers rated veterinarians

  3. Public knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy in Majmaah

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Aqeel Munahi; Ansari, Tahir; Sami, Waqas; Baz, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Epilepsy is very common in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, occurring in 6.54 out of every 1000 individuals. The current study was conducted to determine the level of public awareness of and attitudes toward epilepsy in the city of Majmaah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in Majmaah, Saudi Arabia. The study population included respondents derived from preselected public places in the city. Stratified random sampling was used, and the sample size was made up of 706 individuals. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection from respondents after receiving their verbal consent. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 2.0. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Majmaah University. Results: The results showed that 575 (81.4%) of the respondents had heard or read about epilepsy. Almost 50% of the respondents knew someone who had epilepsy, and 393 (55.7%) had witnessed what they believed to be a seizure. Results showed that 555 (78.6%) respondents believed that epilepsy was neither a contagious disease nor a type of insanity. It was found that 335 (47.5%) stated that epilepsy was a brain disease, and almost one-quarter of the respondents said that the manifestation of an epileptic episode is a convulsion. Regarding attitude, 49% and 47.3% of respondents stated that they would not allow their children to interact with individuals with epilepsy and would object to marrying an individual with epilepsy, respectively. Conclusion: Although knowledge about epilepsy is improving, it is still not adequate. The study showed that the attitude toward epilepsy is poor. PMID:27695227

  4. Knowledge and attitudes of Swedish politicians concerning induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Sydsjö, Adam; Josefsson, Ann; Bladh, Marie; Muhrbeck, Måns; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2012-12-01

    Induced abortion is more frequent in Sweden than in many other Western countries. We wanted to investigate attitudes and knowledge about induced abortion among politicians responsible for healthcare in three Swedish counties. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all 375 elected politicians in three counties; 192 (51%) responded. The politicians stated that they were knowledgeable about the Swedish abortion law. More than half did not consider themselves, in their capacity as politicians, sufficiently informed about abortion-related matters. Most politicians (72%) considered induced abortion to be primarily a 'women's rights issue' rather than an ethical one, and 54% considered 12 weeks' gestational age an adequate upper limit for induced abortion. Only about a third of the respondents were correctly informed about the number of induced abortions annually carried out in Sweden. Information and knowledge on induced abortion among Swedish county politicians seem not to be optimal. Changes aimed at reducing the current high abortion rates will probably not be easy to achieve as politicians seem to be reluctant to commit themselves on ethical issues and consider induced abortion mainly a women's rights issue.

  5. Client knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding zoonoses: a metropolitan experience.

    PubMed

    Steele, S G; Mor, S M

    2015-12-01

    To assess knowledge, attitudes and practices in relation to zoonoses among pet owners. Questionnaire completed by 81 clients attending a small animal practice in Sydney, Australia. Most (64.5%) clients reported that they were not concerned about contracting a disease from their pet, but 7.9% and 3.9% of clients were a little or very concerned, respectively; 23.7% of clients stated that they had not considered the possibility. Although respondents indicated that they had heard of a number of zoonoses, knowledge of animal sources and exposure pathways was generally low, particularly for the more important zoonoses in Australia such as toxoplasmosis, psittacosis and Q fever. Only 37.0%, 12.3% and 11.1%, respectively, of clients had heard of these diseases. Most respondents (84.1%) indicated that they viewed veterinarians as having the primary responsibility for providing information about zoonoses, yet less than half (48.1%) recalled ever getting information from their veterinarian. Likewise, many respondents (48.1%) indicated that medical professionals played a role in providing information about zoonoses, yet less than one-quarter (23.5%) recalled ever getting information from their doctor. The low level of knowledge among pet owners about sources and exposure pathways indicates a need to strengthen communication between veterinarians, doctors and their clients around the possible risks of zoonoses and appropriate prevention strategies. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  6. Paediatrician knowledge, attitudes, and counselling patterns on teen driving.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeffrey C; O'Neil, Joseph; Shope, Jean T; O'Connor, Karen G; Levin, Rebecca A

    2012-02-01

    Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are the leading cause of death among teenagers. Little is known about the content of US paediatrician counselling about teen driving. To examine US paediatrician knowledge, attitudes, and counselling patterns regarding teen driving. A random sample questionnaire was mailed to American Academy of Pediatrics members in 2009 (n=1606; response=875 (55%)). Analysis was limited to 596 paediatricians who provide adolescent checkups. Questions addressed counselling and attitudes towards roles in promoting safe driving. Logistic regression assessed the relationship between counselling topics and practice characteristics. Most (89%) respondents provide some counselling about driving. Two topics commonly discussed by paediatricians were seatbelts (87%) and alcohol use (82%). Less frequently discussed were: cell phones (47%), speeding (43%), and dangers of transporting teen passengers (41%). Topics rarely discussed were: night driving (21%), graduated driver licensing laws (13%), safe cars (9%), driver education (9%), fatigue (25%), and parental limit setting (23%). Only 10% ever recommend a parent-teen driver agreement. Paediatricians who had a patient injured or killed in an MVC were more likely to discuss night driving (OR=2.86). Physicians caring for a high proportion of adolescents (OR=1.83) or patients with private insurance (OR=1.85) counsel more about the risks of driving with teen passengers. Paediatricians in the USA support counselling on teen driving during routine office visits, but omit many important risk factors. Few recommend parent-teen driver agreements. Methods that help clinicians efficiently and effectively counsel families about teen driving should be developed.

  7. Women's knowledge of and attitude towards disability in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Simkhada, Padam P; Shyangdan, Deepson; van Teijlingen, Edwin R; Kadel, Santosh; Stephen, Jane; Gurung, Tara

    2013-04-01

    What is perceived to be a disability is both culturally specific and related to levels of development and modernity. This paper explores knowledge and attitudes towards people with disabilities among rural women in Nepal, one of the poorer countries in South Asia. Four hundred and twelve married women of reproductive age (aged 15-49 years), from four villages in two different parts of Nepal, who had delivered a child within the last 24 months preceding the study, completed a standard questionnaire. The majority of the participants only considered physical conditions that limit function of an individual and are visible to naked eyes, such as missing a leg or arm, to be disability. Attitudes towards people with disability were generally positive, for example most women believed that disabled people should have equal rights and should be allowed to sit on committees or get married. Most respondents thought that disability could result from: (i) accidents; (ii) medical conditions; or (iii) genetic inheritance. Fewer women thought that disability was caused by fate or bad spirits. There is need to educate the general population on disability, especially the invisible disabilities. There is also a need for further research on disability and its social impact. • There is need to educate the general population on disability, especially the invisible disabilities and its rehabilitation. There is also a need for further research on disability and its social impact.

  8. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  9. Knowledge and attitudes towards sun protection in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Vurnek Zivković, Maja; Dediol, Iva; Zeljko Penavić, Jasna; Simić, Dubravka

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer; the World Health Organization estimates that more than 2 million cases of skin cancer are being diagnosed each year worldwide. Excessive sun exposure and ultraviolet (UV) radiation are the major avoidable risk factors for skin cancer, including melanoma. Sun protection can be achieved through behavioral modification, social changes and environmental changes: regular use of sunscreen, wearing hats and protective clothes, staying in the shade, creating shade by planting trees or constructing canopies, practicing work and sport activities during the time of the day when the sun is not the strongest and many others. The aim of this paper was to investigate the knowledge and attitudes about sun protection and sun behavior patterns in Croatia, as well as the perception of melanoma among general population. Our results indicate relatively good sun behavior patterns among our participants and their mostly correct perception of melanoma.

  10. A Study to Assess Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Hand Hygiene amongst Residents and Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Health Care Setting of Bhopal City

    PubMed Central

    kaore, Navin Chandra M; Ramnani, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Borle, Amod; Kaushal, Rituja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infection due to hospital-acquired microbes is an evolving problem worldwide, and horizontal transmission of bacterial organism continues to cause a high nosocomial infection rate in health care settings. Most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of health care workers.The application of hand hygiene is effective in reducing infection rates. Objectives: To assess the level of knowledge and attitude regarding hand hygiene practices amongst the health care professionals and to identify areas of gaps in their knowledge and attitude. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study. Result: A total 160 respondents were studied about their knowledge and attitude towards hand hygiene practices and significant difference with a p-value of 0.0025 was observed regarding most frequent source of germs responsible for health care associated infections among resident and nurses. A significant difference with p-value of 0.0001 & 0.04 was observed in colonization due to jewellery and artificial nail among the study groups. The attitude regarding correct hand hygiene practices to be followed at all times was found to be better among nurses (62.5%) as compared to residents (21.3%) which was found to be highly significant with p-value <0.001. Conclusion: Present study highlights the need of repeated training sessions regarding hand hygiene practices among the health care workers to provide the current knowledge in the area with a behavioral change in attitudes and practices leading to reduction of nosocomial infections. PMID:25302193

  11. Physicians’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Implantable Cardioverter- Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Sherazi, Saadia; Zareba, Wojciech; Daubert, James P.; McNitt, Scott; Shah, Abrar H.; Aktas, Mehmet K.; Block, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Information is limited regarding the knowledge and attitudes of physicians typically involved in the referral of patients for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Methods We conducted a survey of primary care physicians and cardiologists at the University of Rochester Medical Center and the Unity Health System Rochester, NY from December 2008 to February 2009. The survey collected information regarding knowledge and attitudes of physicians towards ICD therapy. Results Of the 332 surveys distributed, 110 (33%) were returned. Over-all 94 (87%) physicians reported referring patients for ICD implantation. Eighteen (17%) physicians reported unawareness of guidelines for ICD use. Sixty-four (59%) physicians recommended ICD in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 35%. Sixty-five (62%) physicians use ≤ 35% as LVEF criteria for ICD referral in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Cardiologists were more familiar than primary care physicians with LVEF criteria for implantation of ICD in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (p value 0.005 and 0.002 respectively). Twenty-nine (27%) participants were unsure regarding benefits of ICDs in eligible women and Blacks. Eighty two (76%) physicians believed that an ICD could benefit patients ≥70 years whereas only 53 (49%) indicated that an ICD would benefit patients ≥ 80 years of age. A lack of familiarity with current clinical guidelines regarding ICD implantation exists. Primary care physicians are less aware of clinical guidelines than are cardiologists. This finding highlights the need to improve the dissemination of guidelines to primary care physicians in an effort to improve ICD utilization. PMID:20535717

  12. Mothers and vaccination: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo, I. F.; Ricciardi, G.; Rossi, P.; Pantisano, P.; Langiano, E.; Pavia, M.

    1999-01-01

    The study evaluates knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of mothers regarding the immunization of 841 infants who attended public kindergarten in Cassino and Crotone, Italy. Overall, 57.8% of mothers were aware about all four mandatory vaccinations for infants (poliomyelitis, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B). The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that this knowledge was significantly greater among mothers with a higher education level and among those who were older at the time of the child's birth. Respondents' attitudes towards the utility of vaccinations for preventing infectious diseases were very favourable. Almost all children (94.4%) were vaccinated with all three doses of diphtheria-tetanus (DT), oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), and hepatitis B. The proportion of children vaccinated who received all three doses of OPV, DT or diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), and hepatitis B vaccines within 1 month of becoming age-eligible ranged from 56.6% for the third dose of hepatitis B to 95.7% for the first dose of OPV. Results of the regression analysis performed on the responses of mothers who had adhered to the schedule for all mandatory vaccinations indicated that birth order significantly predicted vaccination nonadherence, since children who had at least one older sibling in the household were significantly less likely to be age-appropriately vaccinated. The coverage for the optional vaccines was only 22.5% and 31% for measles-mumps-rubella and for all three doses against pertussis, respectively. Education programmes promoting paediatric immunization, accessibility, and follow-up should be targeted to the entire population. PMID:10212512

  13. [Knowledge and attitudes of the population about the living wills].

    PubMed

    Angel-López-Rey, Esther; Romero-Cano, Marta; Tébar-Morales, Juan Pablo; Mora-García, Cristina; Fernández-Rodríguez, Olga

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate knowledge of living wills and attitudes to these documents in the populations of two basic health areas in Toledo (Spain). We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in primary care centers. Participants consisted of the populations of two basic health areas selected by systematic stratified sampling. Inclusion criteria comprised age between 18 and 80 years, and absence of mental or terminal illnesses. The participants were contacted by telephone before a personal interview was carried out. Data on demographic variables and knowledge of living wills and attitudes to these documents were recorded. A total of 395 participants were interviewed (58% women) with a mean age of 46.22 years (SD: 17.13). The vast majority (88.6%) were unaware of living wills, with no significant differences in sex or religious beliefs. Most (67.8%) would sign a living will in the case of terminal illness whereas 56.3% would sign at the present moment, with no significant differences in sex or religious beliefs. More than half of the men (57.5%) would agree to modify the living will if requested by relatives versus 42.6% of the women. More than three-quarters (76.2%) believed that information on living wills was insufficient. One-third (34.5%) would allow a relative's organs to be donated even without the relative leaving express wishes, while 49.2% would donate their own organs. There was a huge lack of awareness on living wills in our population, which nevertheless proved to be highly receptive to, and in agreement with, the implications of these documents after receiving information on the topic.

  14. Report Card: Environmental Attitudes and Knowledge in America. The Fifth Annual Survey of Adult Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education and Training Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study investigates environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behavior among adult Americans. The fifth survey, conducted by Roper Starch, explores the relationship between attitudes about the environment and how those attitudes are affected by learning. This report concludes that Americans have very positive views toward the need to conserve…

  15. Report Card: Environmental Attitudes and Knowledge in America. The Fifth Annual Survey of Adult Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education and Training Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study investigates environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behavior among adult Americans. The fifth survey, conducted by Roper Starch, explores the relationship between attitudes about the environment and how those attitudes are affected by learning. This report concludes that Americans have very positive views toward the need to conserve…

  16. Medical student intrauterine device knowledge and attitudes: an assessment of clerkship training.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Deborah; Tang, Jennifer; Maurer, Rie; Janiak, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    Studies demonstrate that many clinician populations have poor knowledge of and harbor negative attitudes towards intrauterine devices (IUDs). We set out to assess the impact of the clinical clerkship in obstetrics and gynecology on medical student IUD knowledge and attitudes. In this prospective cohort study, students at seven diverse US medical schools were surveyed at the start and completion of their obstetrics and gynecology clinical clerkships regarding IUD exposure, knowledge and attitudes. Subject responses were compared pre- and postclerkship. One hundred six students returned completed paired surveys (response rate 82%). The preclerkship mean knowledge percent correct (54%, SD 17%) increased significantly at postclerkship assessment (72%, SD 18%) (p<.0001). The mean attitudes score also increased significantly from pre- (34%, SD 31%) to postclerkship (59%, SD 26%) (p<.0001). US medical student IUD knowledge and attitudes are significantly improved through the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. However, significant gaps in knowledge persist postclerkship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Turkish adolescents' knowledge on and attitude toward emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Nuray; Korucuoğlu, Umit; Aksakal, F Nur; Biri, Aydan; Ciftçi, Banu; Maral, Işil; Tiraş, Bülent

    2006-12-01

    Adolescents tend to be at risk for unwanted pregnancies, so detecting their level of knowledge on emergency contraception and providing them information is important to prevent such pregnancies. Hence, in two faculties at Gazi University, this study aimed to detect freshman students' level and need of knowledge on emergency contraception and to evaluate their attitude towards emergency contraception. The study was performed with freshman students of the Occupational Education Faculty and the Technical Education Faculty. A questionnaire including questions about demographic properties, obstetrical history, status of contraceptive use, level of knowledge and opinions on emergency contraception was administered to the students. Data was analyzed statistically with the computer program EPI Info 6.0. A total number of 385 adolescents were included in the studys; 157 of whom were males (40.8%) and 228 of whom were females (59.2%). To the question "is there any way to prevent a possible pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse?", 166 students replied "yes" (50.5%), 39 "no" (11.9%) and 124 "I do not know" (37.7%). Of 166 students replying "yes," 114 (68.7%) listed a possible contraceptive method. The mostly cited method was "morning after pills" (n = 62; 54.4%), followed by curettage (n = 15; 13.2%). Among all students, 158 (49.8%) informed us that they were aware of the presence of "morning after pills" whereas 159 (50.2%) claimed they were not. Eighty-six male students (70.5%) and 115 female students (72%) emphasized that they would use emergency contraception upon necessity. Half of the participants were familiar with various options to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse episode, but they lacked specific knowledge about possible methods and ways to use them. Thus, it is essential that information about emergency contraception be included in adolescents' educational programs and that adolescents be provided with easily accessible medical

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practice about malaria in rural Tigray, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Paulander, Johan; Olsson, Henrik; Lemma, Hailemariam; Getachew, Asefaw; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) regarding malaria and their determinants in a rural population of northern Ethiopia. Methods The study was conducted in the district of Samre Saharti, Tigray, northern Ethiopia. A structured questionnaire collecting socio-demographic and malaria-related KAP information was administered to the mothers from a representative sample of households. Results A total of 1652 questionnaires were available for analysis. Most of the respondents (92.7%) were able to mention at least one symptom of malaria. Mosquito as a cause of malaria was recognized by nearly half of the respondents (48.8%). Most of the households had a bed net (85.9%). To have a literate person at home, to belong to the lowland stratum, to have received some type of health education and to own a radio were associated with the knowledge of malaria. A strong association remained between living in the lowland stratum, to own a radio and to live close to the health post and the use of ITN. Being a housewife, lack of health education and to live further than 60 minutes walking distance to the health post were related to a delay on treatment finding. Conclusion This study has identified some aspects which the MCP might need to improve. The knowledge about malaria transmission should be strengthened. Promotion of literacy and participation in health education are vital components in terms of malaria knowledge and practice. Issues related to geographical location and accessibility to health post should be also carefully examined. PMID:20027277

  19. Knowledge: a possible tool in shaping medical professionals' attitudes towards homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Dunjić-Kostić, Bojana; Pantović, Maja; Vuković, Vuk; Randjelović, Dunja; Totić-Poznanović, Sanja; Damjanović, Aleksandar; Jašović-Gašić, Miroslava; Ivković, Maja

    2012-06-01

    The attitudes of medical professionals towards homosexuals can influence their willingness to provide these individuals with medical help. The study evaluated the medical professionals' knowledge about homosexuality and their attitudes towards it. The sample consisted of 177 participants (physicians n=79 and students n=98). The study respondents anonymously completed three questionnaires (socio-demographic questionnaire, the questionnaire on knowledge, and the questionnaire on attitudes towards homosexuals). Male and religious participants showed a lower level of knowledge and a greater tendency to stigmatize. Furthermore, the subjects who knew more about homosexuality tended to hold less stigmatizing attitude. Age group, specialty (psychiatry, gynecology, internal medicine and surgery), and student's/physician's status had no effect on stigmatization. The study showed that the final year students/ residents had more knowledge than the second year students/specialists did. Knowledge had significant negative predictive effect on attitudes in the analyzed predictive model. To our knowledge, this has been the first study in Serbia and Eastern Europe, which provides information on knowledge and attitudes of health professionals towards homosexuality. We would like to point out the degree of knowledge on homosexuality as a possible, but not exclusive tool in shaping the attitudes towards homosexuals and reducing stigmatization. However, regardless of the personal attitude, knowledge and variable acceptance of the homosexuals' rights, medical professionals' main task is to resist discriminative behavior and provide professional medical help to both homosexual and heterosexual patients.

  20. Parents' knowledge, attitudes, and practice in childhood fever: an internet-based survey.

    PubMed

    de Bont, Eefje Gpm; Francis, Nick A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen Wl

    2014-01-01

    Fever in children is common and mostly caused by self-limiting infections. However, the number of (re)consultations in primary care is high, driven by lack of knowledge and fear among parents. These drivers have only been studied in parents when consulting with their sick child. To study knowledge, attitudes, and practice in childhood fever in parents within the general population. Internet-based survey of a sample of 1000 parents from the general population of the Netherlands. A 26-item cross-sectional survey was conducted of parents with one or more children aged < 5 years. Of 625 responders (average age 34.9 years), 63.4% and 43.7% indicated ever visiting their GP or GP's out-of-hours centre with a febrile child, respectively: 88.3% knew the definition of fever (>38°C), 55.2% correctly stated that antibiotics are effective in treating bacterial infections and not viral infections, and 72.0% knew that not every child with a fever needs treatment with antibiotics or paracetamol. When asked to prioritise aspects of a GP's consultation, 53.6% considered physical examination as most important. Obtaining a prescription for antibiotics or antipyretics was considered least important. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning childhood fever varied among parents with young children. Parents generally expect thorough physical examination and information, but not a prescription for medication (antibiotics or antipyretics) when consulting with a feverish child. GPs must be aware of these expectations as these provide opportunities to enhance consultations in general and prescription strategies in particular.

  1. Knowledge, Awareness and Attitudes Regarding Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Caregivers of Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Arnab; Rand, Cynthia; Perl, Trish M.; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To explore knowledge, awareness and attitudes among caregivers of hospitalized children regarding MRSA. Study Design We developed and administered a bedside questionnaire to caregivers of hospitalized children in contact isolation for MRSA colonization or infection. Results Out of 104 caregivers approached, 100 (96%) consented to participate. The caregivers’ children included 28 (28%) newly recognized as MRSA colonized or infected during the hospitalization and 72 (72%) previously identified as MRSA colonized or infected. Eighteen (18%) caregivers had no knowledge of MRSA. Twenty nine (29%) were unaware that their child had MRSA, including caregivers of 9 newly identified MRSA patients and 20 previously identified MRSA patients. Of the 71 caregivers aware of their child's MRSA status, 89% had concerns; 77% worried about risks of future MRSA infection, 51% worried about spreading MRSA, and 16% described a feeling of stigma. Worries were more common among caregivers of children with newly identified MRSA (P<0.05). Conclusion Caregivers of children hospitalized with MRSA are frequently unaware that their child has MRSA. Among those aware of their child's MRSA status, many have concerns and worries. Caregivers of children with newly identified MRSA more often are worried and may need additional education and reassurance. PMID:20961568

  2. Male students' behaviour, knowledge, attitudes, and needs in sexual and reproductive health matters.

    PubMed

    Makenzius, Marlene; Gådin, Katja Gillander; Tydén, Tanja; Romild, Ulla; Larsson, Margareta

    2009-08-01

    To investigate young male students' behaviour, knowledge, attitudes, and needs related to sexual and reproductive health (SRH). Differences between students on vocational and academic study programmes were also investigated. A questionnaire consisting of 87 multiple choice questions was distributed to 253 male students attending three upper secondary schools in a single Swedish county. A response rate of 76% (n = 192) was achieved. Vocational students displayed more risk behaviour than those in academic study programmes regarding use of tobacco and sexual behaviour. Eighteen percent of those who were sexually experienced had suggested or provided the emergency contraception pill (ECP) to a girl. Insufficient knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) was identified, especially among the vocational students. No one reported the upper secondary school as their main source of knowledge and both groups requested more information about both genders' reproductive systems, and STIs. Some discriminatory attitudes regarding gender equality in SRH matters were identified. Both groups stated that male-friendly Youth Health Clinics (YHCs), easier access to condoms and Internet-service for Chlamydia test are important. Improvements in the quality and quantity of sex education in upper secondary schools are needed; they should be tailored to the spectrum of students' situations and needs. A structure of the YHC adapted to male youths' needs and alternative, easily accessible STI tests are important factors for reaching young men and having them participate in a responsible way in protecting their own and their partners' SRH.

  3. Knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive and AIDS patients among dental auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Kaimenyi, J T; Ndung'u, F L

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive and AIDS patients amongst 71 dental auxiliaries using on a self administered questionnaire. 65 (91.5%) returned the questionnaire. In general, respondents' knowledge was fair. 87.7% felt that dentistry as practised in Kenya today carries a high risk of transmission of HIV primarily because of improper sterilization of instruments. 72.3% had changed their sex habits since they became aware of the dangers posed by indiscriminate sex. Over 67% used gloves and masks routinely when assisting in the management of AIDS patients. Over 33% did not use protective eye wear and protective covers on operatories routinely because they were not provided by the employer. 27.7% felt that AIDS and HIV positive health workers should stop treating patients. 64.6% advocated that the cost of buying materials and equipment to prevent cross infection be met by the patient and the employer or dentist. 23.1% supported the idea that HIV positive and AIDS patients be isolated from uninfected individuals. In conclusion, a substantial number of dental auxiliaries were wanting in their knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive/AIDS patients.

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practice in primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention among young adult Italian women.

    PubMed

    Donati, Serena; Giambi, Cristina; Declich, Silvia; Salmaso, Stefania; Filia, Antonietta; Ciofi degli Atti, Marta Luisa; Alibrandi, Maria Pia; Brezzi, Silvia; Carozzi, Francesca; Collina, Natalina; Franchi, Daniela; Lattanzi, Amedeo; Meda, Margherita; Minna, Maria Carmela; Nannini, Roberto; Gallicchio, Giuseppina; Bella, Antonino

    2012-03-09

    In Italy since 2007 vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is offered to 11-year-old females, whereas vaccination for older age groups is still a matter of debate. To assess Italian young women's knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention a cross-sectional study among young women aged 18-26 years was conducted in 2008. The survey collected information on in-depth awareness and knowledge regarding Pap testing, HPV infection, HPV vaccine and cervical cancer. The response rate was 57.7% with a wide range of variability (34-84%) amongst local health units. Among 667 women who participated in the survey poor awareness and various misconceptions regarding HPV and cervical cancer prevention were detected. Overall women were found to be more knowledgeable about Pap smears and cervical cancer than about HPV infection and the HPV vaccine. Respondents pointed to their healthcare providers as their most trusted source for medical information. Understanding women's knowledge on cervical cancer prevention, as well as related factors is important in helping to achieve and maintain adherence to cervical cancer preventive strategies. Moreover in order to minimize cervical cancer risk by improving women's adherence to preventive strategies, appropriate and adequate information dissemination, and guidance from health professionals appear to be crucial elements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Men's knowledge and attitudes about cervical cancer screening in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Joelle I; Zakaras, Jennifer M; Hamisi, Sabina; Huchko, Megan J

    2014-11-22

    A number of studies have identified male involvement as an important factor affecting reproductive health outcomes, particularly in the areas of family planning, antenatal care, and HIV care. As access to cervical cancer screening programs improves in resource-poor settings, particularly through the integration of HIV and cervical cancer services, it is important to understand the role of male partner support in women's utilization of screening and treatment. We administered an oral survey to 110 men in Western Kenya about their knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening. Men who had female partners eligible for cervical cancer screening were recruited from government health facilities where screening was offered free of charge. Specific knowledge about cervical cancer risk factors, prevention, and treatment was low. Only half of the men perceived their partners to be at risk for cervical cancer, and many reported that a positive screen would be emotionally upsetting. Nevertheless, all participants said they would encourage their partners to get screened. Future interventions should tailor cervical cancer educational opportunities towards men. Further research is needed among both men and couples to better understand barriers to male support for screening and treatment and to determine how to best involve men in cervical cancer prevention efforts.

  6. Mexican adolescent sexuality: attitudes, knowledge, and sources of information.

    PubMed

    Baird, T L

    1993-08-01

    Data from a study of the attitudes, knowledge, and sources of information of Mexican adolescents are presented. 24 male and 57 female unmarried adolescents of mean age 16.2-16.5 years (range 14-19 years) from Cuernavaca and Guadajara responded to a 66-item questionnaire. Participants were from a broad range of socioeconomic levels and 86% self-identified as being Catholic. 12 males and 4 females had experienced sexual intercourse. Responses to the questionnaire indicate that 85% had received some sex education in school, yet only 8% thought that teachers should be responsible for sex education. Further, the majority were satisfied with what they knew about sex, but the greatest mean score was 5.5 on a series of 9 knowledge questions. The youths were generally conservative, holding that people, especially females, should be married before having sex and that sex without love is unacceptable. The author hopes that these findings will help health education providers plan programs for this population in Mexico and the US.

  7. Consumer attitudes, knowledge, and consumption of organic yogurt.

    PubMed

    Van Loo, Ellen J; Diem, My Nguyen Hoang; Pieniak, Zuzanna; Verbeke, Wim

    2013-04-01

    The segment of organic products occupies an increasingly important place in dairy assortments. The European Union (EU) introduced a new EU organic logo in 2010 with the aim of harmonizing its organic sector and boosting consumer trust in organic food. This study focuses on organic yogurt and investigates consumer awareness and knowledge of the new EU logo. Consumers evaluate organic yogurt as superior compared with conventional yogurt on healthiness, environmental friendliness, quality, and safety. More frequent buyers of organic yogurt have a stronger belief that organic yogurt is superior. The willingness-to-pay for organic yogurt ranged from a premium of 15% for nonbuyers to 40% for habitual buyers, indicating the market potential for this product. A structural equations model reveals the positive association between knowledge, attitudes, and the frequency of purchasing and consuming organic yogurt. Nevertheless, consumer awareness of the EU organic logo remains rather low, which suggests a need for more effective information campaigns and marketing actions. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An Experimental Study of the Relationship between Attitude toward and Knowledge of Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between gain in attitude toward and increases in knowledge of educational research was investigated in preservice social studies teachers. Results indicated that increases in knowledge did not result in gains in attitude. There were no significant differences between individual-workbook and lecture-workbook instructional…

  9. Ethnic Differences in Knowledge and Attitudes about BRCA1 Testing in Women at Increased Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chanita; Gomez-Caminero, Andres; Benkendorf, Judith; Kerner, Jon; Isaacs, Claudine; Barter, James; Lerman, Caryn

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge about the inheritance of breast cancer and attitudes about genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility in women at increased risk were studied in Caucasian and African-American women (N=407). Participants had at least one first-degree relative with cancer. Differences in knowledge and attitudes toward risk may be attributed…

  10. HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among College Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Wei-Chen; Hu, Jie; Efird, Jimmy Thomas; Yu, Liping; Su, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes, sources of HIV information and behaviours related to HIV, and to explore the difference in the HIV knowledge and attitudes between genders and school years among college students in China. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional. Setting: 475 college students from two universities in China. Method: Data…

  11. Knowledge of and Attitude towards Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder among Primary School Teachers in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Hasan; Al-Motlaq, Mohammad A.; Al-Modallal, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    International studies have revealed variable levels of knowledge and attitudes among teachers regarding attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study investigated Jordanian teachers' ADHD knowledge and their attitudes towards children with this condition. A standardised self-report questionnaire was completed by a convenience sample…

  12. Knowledge and Attitudes of Health-Care Providers toward Sexuality in the Institutionalized Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relationship between the knowledge and attitudes of nursing home caretakers toward elderly sexuality, looking at certain sociodemographic and institutional factors. The more knowledge providers possessed, the more restrictive their attitudes toward elderly sexuality. Education, religiosity, position, nursing education, time in current…

  13. Predictors of College Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Elderly Sexuality: The Relevance of Grandparental Contact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Jennifer L.; Stricker, George

    1996-01-01

    Young and middle-age adult college students (n=241) completed an attitude scale indicating that age is associated with their knowledge of elderly sexuality. Contact and closeness with grandparents predicted more favorable attitudes toward elderly sexuality. For young adults without grandparent contact, the relationship between knowledge and…

  14. A Linkage of Knowledge and Attitudes toward Elderly Sexuality: Not Necessarily a Uniform Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Jennifer L.; Stricker, George

    1994-01-01

    Presents critical review of literature regarding individuals' knowledge and their attitudes toward elderly sexuality. Notes generally positive relationship discovered between various age cohorts' depth of knowledge and their permissiveness of attitudes. Also notes that some health care providers demonstrated negative relationship between their…

  15. Ethnic Differences in Knowledge and Attitudes about BRCA1 Testing in Women at Increased Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chanita; Gomez-Caminero, Andres; Benkendorf, Judith; Kerner, Jon; Isaacs, Claudine; Barter, James; Lerman, Caryn

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge about the inheritance of breast cancer and attitudes about genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility in women at increased risk were studied in Caucasian and African-American women (N=407). Participants had at least one first-degree relative with cancer. Differences in knowledge and attitudes toward risk may be attributed…

  16. Development of a Sex Knowledge and Attitude Test for the Moderately and Mildly Retarded. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Barbara; And Others

    The Socio-Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Test was designed to measure the attitudes and knowledge of retarded individuals in fourteen areas: (1) anatomy/terminology; (2) dating; (3) marriage; (4) intimacy; (5) intercourse; (6) pregnancy, childbirth and childrearing; (8) masturbation; (9) homosexuality; (10) alcohol and drugs; (11) community risks…

  17. Knowledge of, and Attitudes to, Indoor Air Pollution in Kuwaiti Students, Teachers and University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khamees, Nedaa A.; Alamari, Hanaa

    2009-01-01

    The concentrations of air pollutants in residences can be many times those in outside air, and many of these pollutants are known to have adverse health consequences. Despite this, there have been very few attempts to delineate knowledge of, and attitudes to, indoor air pollution. This study aimed to establish the knowledge of, and attitudes to,…

  18. Profile of Knowledge Management, Basic Sanitation and Attitudes towards Clean and Health Community in Kupang City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikmah; Ardi, Muhammad; Yahya, Mohamad; Upa, Muhamad D. Pua; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2017-01-01

    The objective of research is to describe the knowledge and attitude of basic sanitation management community in Kupang City. This type of research is a survey research using quantitative approach. Data were collected by using the instrument in the form of test knowledge of basic sanitation management and attitude questionnaire. The data was then…

  19. Effects of Puppetry on Elementary Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.

    2012-01-01

    Findings from two studies investigating the effects of Kids on the Block (KOB) puppet shows on elementary school students' knowledge of and attitude toward individuals with disabilities are described. KOB is a troupe of life-size hand-and-rod puppets used to improve knowledge and change attitudes toward persons with disabilities. Results from both…

  20. [Development of knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on prevention and control of occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Feng, Yuchao; Wang, Min; Su, Yiwei; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Zhi; Tang, Shihao

    2015-04-01

    To develop the knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for occupational groups, and to provide a convenient and effective tool for the survey of knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the prevention and control of occupational diseases in occupational groups and the evaluation of intervention effect. The initial questionnaire which was evaluated by the experts was used to carry out a pre-survey in Guangzhou, China. The survey results were statistically analyzed by t test, identification index method, correlation analysis, and Cronbach's a coefficient method. And then the questionnaire was further modified, and the content of the questionnaire was determined finally. After modification, there were 18 items on knowledge, 16 items on attitude, and 12 items on behavior in the "Knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for enterprise managers"; there were 19 items on knowledge, 10 items on attitude, and 11 items on behavior in the "Knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for workers". The knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for occupational groups is developed successfully, and it is a convenient and effective tool for the survey of knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the prevention and control of occupational diseases in occupational groups and the evaluation of intervention effect.

  1. Science and Mathematics Teacher Candidates' Environmental Knowledge, Awareness, Behavior and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yumusak, Ahmet; Sargin, Seyid Ahmet; Baltaci, Furkan; Kelani, Raphael R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure science and mathematics teacher candidates' environmental knowledge level, awareness, behavior and environmental attitudes. Four instruments comprising Environmental Sensitivity Scale, environmental Behavior Scale, Environmental Attitudes Scale and Environmental Knowledge Test were administered to a total…

  2. Examining Athletes' Attitudes toward Using Anabolic Steroids and Their Knowledge of the Possible Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anshel, Mark H.; Russell, Kenneth G.

    1997-01-01

    Examined the relationships between athletes' (N=291) knowledge about the long-term effects of anabolic steroids and their attitudes toward this type of drug. Results show low correlation between greater knowledge and attitudes about the use of steroids in sports, suggesting that drug education programs regarding steroids may have limited value.…

  3. Examining Athletes' Attitudes toward Using Anabolic Steroids and Their Knowledge of the Possible Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anshel, Mark H.; Russell, Kenneth G.

    1997-01-01

    Examined the relationships between athletes' (N=291) knowledge about the long-term effects of anabolic steroids and their attitudes toward this type of drug. Results show low correlation between greater knowledge and attitudes about the use of steroids in sports, suggesting that drug education programs regarding steroids may have limited value.…

  4. Measuring the Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Staff toward Older People: Sensitivity of Measurement Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, David T.; Fitzpatrick, Joanne M.; Roberts, Julia D.; While, Alison E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the sensitivity of instruments used to measure knowledge and attitudes toward older people. Existing standardized measurement instruments are reviewed, including a detailed examination of Palmore's Facts on Ageing Quiz (FAQ). A recent study conducted by the research team into the knowledge and attitudes of support workers…

  5. Attitudes, Perceptions, and Aging Knowledge of Future Law Enforcement and Recreation Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Maria L.; Intrieri, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    The present study assessed knowledge of aging, ageism, and attitudes toward aging in undergraduate recreation and law enforcement majors. Past research with psychology, social work, and nursing majors showed that greater knowledge of aging was related to fewer ageist attitudes and beliefs. The results showed that law enforcement students possessed…

  6. Measuring Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Sustainable Development among Tenth Grade Students in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Creech, Heather; Swayze, Natalie; Kahlke, P. Maurine; Buckler, Carolee; Rempel, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present standardized measures of tenth grade students' knowledge, attitudes and behaviours concerning sustainable development as those concepts are understood in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and we test the hypothesis that knowledge and favourable attitudes toward SD lead to favourable…

  7. HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among College Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Wei-Chen; Hu, Jie; Efird, Jimmy Thomas; Yu, Liping; Su, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes, sources of HIV information and behaviours related to HIV, and to explore the difference in the HIV knowledge and attitudes between genders and school years among college students in China. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional. Setting: 475 college students from two universities in China. Method: Data…

  8. Plants Have a Chance: Outdoor Educational Programmes Alter Students' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Outdoor educational programmes are generally believed to be a suitable alternative to conventional biology settings that improve participants' environmental attitudes and knowledge. Here we examine whether outdoor educational programmes focused solely on practical work with plants influence participants' knowledge of and attitudes towards plants.…

  9. Environmental Literacy in Teacher Training: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Environmental Behavior of Beginning Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pe'er, Sara; Goldman, Daphne; Yavetz, Bela

    2007-01-01

    The authors report the environmental attitudes and knowledge of 765 1st-year students in 3 teacher-training colleges in Israel and examine the relationship between these variables and background factors and their relationship to environmental behavior. Although the students' environmental knowledge was limited, their overall attitudes toward the…

  10. The Relationship of Attitudes, Knowledge, and Processes to Initial Teaching Behaviors in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Ryda Dwarys

    Relationships of science attitudes, science content, and process knowledge to initial science teaching behaviors were studied among 25 student teachers of a liberal arts college. The 13-subject experimental group was subjected to an elementary school methods course with emphases upon positive attitudes and process knowledge. The control group was…

  11. Environmental Literacy in Teacher Training: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Environmental Behavior of Beginning Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pe'er, Sara; Goldman, Daphne; Yavetz, Bela

    2007-01-01

    The authors report the environmental attitudes and knowledge of 765 1st-year students in 3 teacher-training colleges in Israel and examine the relationship between these variables and background factors and their relationship to environmental behavior. Although the students' environmental knowledge was limited, their overall attitudes toward the…

  12. Integrating Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes: Conceptualising Learning Processes towards Vocational Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baartman, Liesbeth K. J.; de Bruijn, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Current research focuses on competence development and complex professional tasks. However, "learning processes" towards the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes largely remain a black box. This article conceptualises three integration processes, in analogy to theories on transfer. Knowledge, skills and attitudes are defined, reconciling…

  13. Adolescent Boys' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Testicular Self-Examination: Evaluating an Outreach Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Sauter, Marcia; Day, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed adolescent boys who had participated in a brief outreach program to high school health education classes designed to increase boys' knowledge about and improve their attitudes toward testicular self-examination (TSE) and early cancer detection. Results indicated that the 1-hour outreach improved students' knowledge and attitudes regarding…

  14. Knowledge of, and Attitudes to, Indoor Air Pollution in Kuwaiti Students, Teachers and University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khamees, Nedaa A.; Alamari, Hanaa

    2009-01-01

    The concentrations of air pollutants in residences can be many times those in outside air, and many of these pollutants are known to have adverse health consequences. Despite this, there have been very few attempts to delineate knowledge of, and attitudes to, indoor air pollution. This study aimed to establish the knowledge of, and attitudes to,…

  15. Knowledge and Attitude regarding Recovery among Mental Health Practitioners in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klockmo, Carolina; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno; Nordenmark, Mikael; Dalin, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the knowledge and the attitude regarding recovery among practitioners working in the Swedish mental health system, Personligt Ombud (PO), Supported Housing Team (SHT) and Psychiatric Out Patient Service (POPS), to determine whether and how knowledge and attitude regarding recovery differ between the three services. A…

  16. A Field Study of First Aid Knowledge and Attitudes of College Students in Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khamees, Nedaa

    2006-01-01

    A random sample of 562 students completed a questionnaire including demographic data; 20 questions testing knowledge (right answers scored 1 and wrong answers 0); and 20 exploring attitudes ("yes", "not sure" and "no"). Overall, students scored 0.49 for knowledge and 2.30 (of a maximum 3) for attitude. Knowledge…

  17. Change in Knowledge and Attitudes among Students in an Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohr-Preston, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Non-parent college students enrolled in a lifespan developmental psychology course were assessed at two time points (beginning of the semester and shortly after midterm) on knowledge and attitudes that would likely to be useful for the transition to parenthood. Students reported perceived change in knowledge and attitudes, and repeated measures…

  18. Medical and Psychology Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Aging and Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Rachel J.; Zweig, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The current study surveys medical and doctoral psychology students (N = 100) from an urban northeastern university regarding knowledge and attitudes toward elderly sexuality and aging using the Facts on Aging Quiz, the Aging Sexuality Knowledge and Attitudes Scale, and measures of interest in gerontology, academic/clinical exposure to aging and…

  19. Pre-Service Teachers' Perception toward Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borhan, Mohamad Termizi; Ismail, Zurida

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The study investigated the environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviours exhibited by the pre-service teachers and determined if there was any significant relationship between environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Method: This descriptive study adopted a quantitative approach using questionnaires to obtain information on…

  20. Plants Have a Chance: Outdoor Educational Programmes Alter Students' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Outdoor educational programmes are generally believed to be a suitable alternative to conventional biology settings that improve participants' environmental attitudes and knowledge. Here we examine whether outdoor educational programmes focused solely on practical work with plants influence participants' knowledge of and attitudes towards plants.…

  1. Measuring Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Sustainable Development among Tenth Grade Students in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Creech, Heather; Swayze, Natalie; Kahlke, P. Maurine; Buckler, Carolee; Rempel, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present standardized measures of tenth grade students' knowledge, attitudes and behaviours concerning sustainable development as those concepts are understood in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and we test the hypothesis that knowledge and favourable attitudes toward SD lead to favourable…

  2. A Survey of Natural Resource and National Parks Knowledge and Attitudes of Dominican Republic Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berroa, Juan Leonel Batista; Roth, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a study designed to ascertain the level of ecological knowledge and attitudes of citizens of the Dominican Republic regarding national parks and natural resources. Overall, the level of ecological knowledge was determined to be very low and attitudes toward parks and resources seemed to be negative. (CW)

  3. Knowledge and Attitude regarding Recovery among Mental Health Practitioners in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klockmo, Carolina; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno; Nordenmark, Mikael; Dalin, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the knowledge and the attitude regarding recovery among practitioners working in the Swedish mental health system, Personligt Ombud (PO), Supported Housing Team (SHT) and Psychiatric Out Patient Service (POPS), to determine whether and how knowledge and attitude regarding recovery differ between the three services. A…

  4. Knowledge of and Attitude towards Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder among Primary School Teachers in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Hasan; Al-Motlaq, Mohammad A.; Al-Modallal, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    International studies have revealed variable levels of knowledge and attitudes among teachers regarding attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study investigated Jordanian teachers' ADHD knowledge and their attitudes towards children with this condition. A standardised self-report questionnaire was completed by a convenience sample…

  5. Integrating Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes: Conceptualising Learning Processes towards Vocational Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baartman, Liesbeth K. J.; de Bruijn, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Current research focuses on competence development and complex professional tasks. However, "learning processes" towards the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes largely remain a black box. This article conceptualises three integration processes, in analogy to theories on transfer. Knowledge, skills and attitudes are defined, reconciling…

  6. Examination of the Alcohol Knowledge-Attitudes-Behavior Model with Incoming College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolberg, Victor B.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the validity of the knowledge-attitudes-behavior model of alcohol consumption with a group of first-time, full-time college students (N=432) at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Asserts that there is a relationship between people's knowledge about alcohol, their attitudes concerning alcohol, and their behavior relating to…

  7. Voices of Teacher Candidates: Positive Changes in Multicultural Attitudes and Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capella-Santana, Nadya

    2003-01-01

    Explored changes in preservice teachers' multicultural attitudes and knowledge, as well as factors that contributed positively to those changes. Student teachers were followed throughout their preparation program. Data from questionnaires and interviews indicated that respondents' multicultural attitudes and knowledge change in a positive…

  8. Knowledge and Attitudes toward Sexuality in Adolescents and Their Association with the Family and Other Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta-Franco, Raquel; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studies family structure and function and their association with knowledge and attitudes toward sexuality, contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in student and adolescent factory workers. Finds female workers at higher risk for unwanted pregnancies and STDs. Factors associated with knowledge and attitudes included age, schooling…

  9. Medical and Psychology Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Aging and Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Rachel J.; Zweig, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The current study surveys medical and doctoral psychology students (N = 100) from an urban northeastern university regarding knowledge and attitudes toward elderly sexuality and aging using the Facts on Aging Quiz, the Aging Sexuality Knowledge and Attitudes Scale, and measures of interest in gerontology, academic/clinical exposure to aging and…

  10. An Experimental Study of the Relationship between Attitude toward and Knowledge of Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between gain in attitude toward and increases in knowledge of educational research was investigated in preservice social studies teachers. Results indicated that increases in knowledge did not result in gains in attitude. There were no significant differences between individual-workbook and lecture-workbook instructional…

  11. A Survey of Natural Resource and National Parks Knowledge and Attitudes of Dominican Republic Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berroa, Juan Leonel Batista; Roth, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a study designed to ascertain the level of ecological knowledge and attitudes of citizens of the Dominican Republic regarding national parks and natural resources. Overall, the level of ecological knowledge was determined to be very low and attitudes toward parks and resources seemed to be negative. (CW)

  12. Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes of Preservice and Inservice Teachers in Educational Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkharusi, Hussain; Kazem, Ali Mahdi; Al-Musawai, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Optimal outcomes of the educational assessment of students require that teachers should have adequate knowledge of, strong skills in, and favourable attitudes toward educational measurement. The present study investigated differences between preservice and inservice teachers' knowledge of, perceived skills in, and attitudes toward educational…

  13. Short-Term Effects of Teenage Parenting Programs on Knowledge and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosa, Mark W.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effects of teenage parenting programs upon the knowledge and attitudes of pregnant teenagers (N=31). The programs studied produced a significant change in the teenagers' knowledge of sexuality and child development while having no apparent effect on the teenagers' parenting attitudes. (Author/JAC)

  14. An evaluation of knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy in Eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kiyak, Emine; Dayapoglu, Nuray

    2017-08-23

    This study was designed to determine the knowledge and attitudes regarding epilepsy among individuals in eastern Turkey. This descriptive study involved 530 healthy individuals who came to the Research and Application Hospital of Ataturk University in Erzurum, Turkey. A questionnaire and the epilepsy knowledge and attitude scale were administered to collect data. Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Spearman's correlation tests were used to analyze the data. The participants' epilepsy knowledge mean score was 6.34 (SD=3.71), and their attitude mean score was 50.22 (SD=11.17). There was a positive (r=0.404) correlation between the knowledge and the attitude scores (p<0.001), and negative correlations between age and the knowledge (p=0.036) and the attitude scores (p<0.001). The mean knowledge and attitude scores were higher for the participants who were high school and university graduates, had expenses equal to income, and lived in nuclear families and in the city center (p<0.001). Civil servants and housewives had significantly higher mean knowledge scores, and students had significantly higher mean attitude scores (p<0.001). Significantly higher knowledge and attitude mean scores were also found for those who knew patients with epilepsy, had witnessed epileptic seizures, obtained information from healthcare personnel, and did not believe that epilepsy was associated with religion (p<0.001). The study participants had low knowledge about epilepsy but displayed positive attitudes toward it. Higher knowledge positively affected attitude, and younger individuals had greater knowledge and, thus, more positive attitudes. Women, civil servants, and housewives had higher knowledge, whereas singles and students had better attitudes. The participants who had high educational levels and expenses equal to income and lived in nuclear families and the city center had more knowledge and displayed more positive attitudes. Greater knowledge and more positive attitudes were also

  15. [Obstetricians/gynaecologists and breastfeeding: practice, attitudes, training and knowledge].

    PubMed

    Simard-Émond, Laurence; Sansregret, Andrée; Dubé, Johanne; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène

    2011-02-01

    Sole use of breastfeeding is recommended during the first six months of life. The treating physician's opinion influences whether or not the patient will opt for breastfeeding. We wanted to ascertain if obstetricians-gynaecologists and obstetrics and gynaecology residents from Quebec offered counselling on breastfeeding and to examine various aspects of their disposition towards such counselling. A questionnaire evaluating five aspects of physicians' disposition towards breastfeeding was used: practice and confidence, attitudes, training, knowledge. We emailed obstetrics and gynaecology residents from Quebec and members of the Association des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Québec who had a valid email address to invite them to complete the questionnaire, which was offered on a secured website. Only 49% of obstetricians-gynaecologists and 35% of residents periodically offer counselling on breastfeeding. Furthermore, 56% and 35% respectively of both groups have confidence in their ability to meet the needs of breastfeeding patients, while 79% of the former and 93% of the latter believe that such counselling comes under their authority. On average, obstetricians-gynaecologists answered correctly 82% of the questions concerning theoretical knowledge. Only 16% of obstetricians-gynaecologists and 22% of residents believe they have received an "at least adequate" training on how to support breastfeeding women. Respondents have not adequately integrated breastfeeding counselling into their practice, in spite of the fact that they had adequate theoretical knowledge on the matter and that they were convinced that such a role was important and that it came under their authority. A more practical form of training could enhance their confidence level and encourage them to integrate such counselling into the obstetrical follow-up.

  16. Adolescent Reproductive Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs and Future Fatherhood.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Craig F; Duncan, Greg; Peters, Sarah; Rutsohn, Joshua; McDade, Thomas W; Adam, Emma K; Coley, Rebekah Levine; Chase-Lansdale, Patricia Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    With a growing focus on the importance of men's reproductive health, including preconception health, the ways in which young men's knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB) predict their reproductive paths are understudied. To determine if reproductive KAB predicts fatherhood status, timing and residency (living with child or not). Reproductive KAB and fatherhood outcomes were analyzed from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a 20-year, nationally representative study of individuals from adolescence into adulthood. Four measures of reproductive KAB were assessed during adolescence in waves I and II. A generalized linear latent and mixed model predicted future fatherhood status (nonfather, resident/nonresident father, adolescent father) and timing while controlling for other socio-demographic variables. Of the 10,253 men, 3,425 were fathers (686 nonresident/2,739 resident) by wave IV. Higher risky sexual behavior scores significantly increased the odds of becoming nonresident father (odds ratio [OR], 1.30; p < .0001), resident father (OR, 1.07; p = .007), and adolescent father (OR, 1.71; p < .0001); higher pregnancy attitudes scores significantly increased the odds of becoming a nonresident father (OR, 1.20; p < .0001) and resident father (OR, 1.11; p < .0001); higher birth control self-efficacy scores significantly decreased the odds of becoming a nonresident father (OR, .72; p < .0001) and adolescent father (OR, .56; p = .01). Young men's KAB in adolescence predicts their future fatherhood and residency status. Strategies that address adolescent males' reproductive KAB are needed in the prevention of unintended reproductive consequences such as early and nonresident fatherhood. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adolescent Reproductive Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs and Future Fatherhood

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Craig F.; Duncan, Greg; Peters, Sarah; Rutsohn, Joshua; McDade, Thomas W.; Adam, Emma K.; Coley, Rebekah Levine; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Background With a growing focus on the importance of men’s reproductive health--including preconception health--the ways in which young men’s knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB) predict their reproductive paths are understudied. Objective To determine if reproductive KAB predicts fatherhood status, timing and residency (living with child or not). Methods Reproductive KAB and fatherhood outcomes were analyzed from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a 20-year, nationally representative study of individuals from adolescence into adulthood. Four measures of reproductive KAB were assessed during adolescence in Waves I and II. A generalized linear latent and mixed model predicted future fatherhood status (non-father, resident/nonresident father, adolescent father) and timing while controlling for other socio-demographic variables. Results Of the 10,253 males, 3425 were fathers (686 non-resident/2739 resident) by wave IV. Higher risky sexual behavior scores significantly increased the odds of becoming nonresident father (OR=1.30, p < 0.0001), resident father (OR=1.07, p = 0.007), and adolescent father (OR=1.71, p < 0.0001); higher pregnancy attitudes scores significantly increased the odds of becoming a nonresident father (OR=1.20, p < 0.0001) and resident father (O =1.11, p < 0.0001); higher birth control self-efficacy scores significantly decreased the odds of becoming a nonresident father (O =0.72, p < 0.0001), and adolescent father (OR=0.56, p = 0.01). Conclusion Young men’s KAB in adolescence predicts their future fatherhood and residency status. Strategies that address adolescent males' reproductive KAB are needed in the prevention of unintended reproductive consequences such as early and nonresident fatherhood. PMID:26896211

  18. Knowledge and attitudes in regard to pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in a multiethnic community of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping; Sam, I-Ching

    2011-06-01

    Assessment of general public's knowledge and attitudes toward the development and prevention of new disease outbreaks is imperative because they have profound effects on health behaviors and may contribute to the control of the epidemic. To investigate the level of knowledge and attitudes towards the influenza A(H1N1) outbreak across various ethnic groups and socio-demographic backgrounds in Malaysia. A cross-sectional, population-based, computer-assisted telephone interview exploring knowledge and attitudes regarding influenza A(H1N1) was conducted in Malaysia. Between July 11 and September 12, 2009, a total of 1,050 respondents were interviewed (response rate 69.3%). The mean total knowledge score for the overall sample was 7.30 (SD ± 1.961) out of a possible score of 13 (Chinese had the highest scores, followed by Indians, then Malays). Some erroneous beliefs about the modes of transmission were identified. The majority of the participants (73.8%) perceived the A(H1N1) infection as often deadly. Despite the overestimation of the severity of A(H1N1) infection, high confidence in preventing infection and low perceived susceptibility of infection were reported. Influenza A(H1N1)-related stigma was prevalent and exhibited differences across ethnic groups. Findings suggest that provision of education and clear information are essential to correct the misconceptions, and increase perceived susceptibility to infection so that the general public will take precautions against A(H1N1) infection.

  19. Effects of knowledge and persuasion on high-school students' attitudes toward nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, Dennis E.; Shrigley, Robert L.

    Researchers report finding correlational data to identify a positive relationship between nuclear knowledge and positive attitudes toward the use of nuclear energy. This study investigated the relationship between nuclear knowledge and nuclear attitudes and to the understanding of Science-Technology-Society attitudes involving technological attitude objects. This quasi-experimental study tested the causal relationship between knowledge about nuclear power plants and attitudes toward their use in electrical generation. Subjects were presented with systematically designed communications developed to change either their knowledge about or attitude toward nuclear plants. The Standard Events of Instruction was the basis of the knowledge instruction, whereas the Learning Theory Approach and the Theory of Reasoned Action were the theoretical bases of the persuasive communication. The principal finding was that nuclear knowledge and nuclear attitude each can be changed independently of the other. Although knowledge and attitudes are correlationally linked, this study shows no evidence of a cause-effect relationship.Received: 4 May 1994; Revised: 14 July 1994;

  20. Summer sun exposure: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Midwest adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J K; Rademaker, A W; Sylvester, J A; Cook, B

    1997-01-01

    Extensive print, radio, and television coverage about the dangers of sun exposure and benefits of sun protection occurred over the past decade. Illinois teen knowledge and attitudes about sun exposure/protection, sun-exposure/protection behavior, and information sources were determined by a summer telephone survey. Telephone interviews with 658 teenagers between ages 11 and 19 included African-American, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, and white teenagers. Teens knew that too much sun was harmful as it caused skin cancer and sunburn. Sunburn was mentioned more often by those with skin types that burned easily and tanned poorly (I,II) (P < 0.001), was better known to girls than to boys (P < 0.001), and was recognized more by those with higher socioeconomic status (P < 0.001) but was not associated with age. Widely held sun exposure attitudes were socializing with friends and feeling better when outdoors. On weekdays, boys averaged 5.3 hr (SD, 1.65 hr) outside compared with 3.9 hr (SD, 0.75 hr) for girls (P < 0.001). Teenage boys were more likely to obtain occupational sun exposure, and girls sunbathed. Subjects with skin types I and II reported an average of 3.3 sunburns in the past year. During unprotected sun exposure, extensive numbers of teens with moderate-risk skin type experienced at least 1 sunburn per year. Indoor tanning use was more prevalent among older girls and those with skin types I and II. Sunscreen use was associated with water recreational activities (swimming, water sports, and going to the beach) by girls slightly more than by boys (P < 0.001). Hat-wearing was more common among boys than among girls. Teen knowledge that excessive sun exposure causes skin cancer and sunburns and that wearing sunscreens and hats were sun-protective methods did not enable sun protection that prevented burning. This is particularly troublesome because severe sunburns in youth are associated with an increased risk of melanoma. Existing teen sunscreen use could be

  1. Helmet wearing in Kenya: prevalence, knowledge, attitude, practice and implications.

    PubMed

    Bachani, A M; Hung, Y W; Mogere, S; Akunga, D; Nyamari, J; Hyder, A A

    2017-03-01

    In light of the increasing prevalence of motorcycles on Kenyan roads, there is a need to address the safety of individuals using this mode of transport. Helmet use has been proven to be effective in preventing head injuries and fatalities in the event of a crash. This study aims to understand the prevalence of helmet use as well as knowledge, attitudes, and practices in two districts in Kenya over a 5-year period (2010-2014). Observational studies on helmet use at randomly selected locations throughout each district were done every quarter to estimate the prevalence of helmet use. Roadside knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) surveys were done two times a year in each district. Helmet use among motorcycle drivers and passengers in Thika and Naivasha was assessed through systematic observations at randomly selected locations in the two districts between August 2010 and December 2014. Roadside KAP surveys were administered in both sites to motorcyclists in areas where they stopped, including motorcycle bays, petrol stations and rest areas near the helmet observation sites. Secondary analysis of trauma registries was also used. Negative binomial regressions were used to assess trends of helmet wearing among motorcyclists over time, and logistic regressions were used to analyze associated risk factors as well as association with health outcomes among those admitted to the four hospitals. A total of 256,851 motorcycles were observed in the two target districts during the study period. Overall, prevalence of helmet use among motorcycle drivers in Thika and Naivasha across all periods was 35.12% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 34.87%-35.38%) and 37.42% (95% CI: 37.15%-37.69%) respectively. Prevalence of helmet wearing remained similar after the passage of a traffic amendment bill. These results were not statistically significant in either Thika or in Naivasha. Data from the KAP survey showed that respondents recognized the life-saving effect of wearing a helmet, but

  2. Drinking and driving in Vietnam: public knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhan T; Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Pham, V Cuong; Lunnen, Jeffrey C; Jo, Youngji; Passmore, Jonathon; Nguyen, Phuong N; Hyder, Adnan A

    2012-01-01

    Injuries are among the 10 leading causes of death for all ages in Vietnam, and road traffic fatalities account for approximately half of those deaths. Despite having what is considered to be one of the most stringent alcohol legislations in the region, alcohol involvement in road traffic crashes remains high. This study aims to illustrate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices around alcohol use and drinking and driving by age and sex in 3 provinces in Vietnam. This study was conducted between January and February 2011, surveying randomly selected road users over the age of 17 years at gas stations in 3 provinces: Ha Nam, Ninh Binh, and Bac Giang, Vietnam. Data were collected for one week at each gas station. A knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) survey was administered in 7 time blocks of 90 min throughout the day, from 07:30 am to 9:30 pm. There were a total of 633 respondents almost evenly divided among the 3 provinces. Males accounted for 69.1 percent of respondents; the majority were 36 years of age or younger. Despite the belief that drinking and driving will increase the risk of a crash, a significant proportion of respondents (44.9%) reported drinking and driving; 56.7 percent admitted to drinking and driving within the last month. Drinking and driving was more common among males, with approximately 60.2 percent indicating a history of drinking and driving. This proportion was particularly high among males aged 17 to 26 (71.4%). It was found that preferred alternatives to drinking and driving when available were leaving with a nondrinker (42%), resting until "feeling conscious" (23%), and drinking less (20%). This study shows that, in general, alcohol use and drinking and driving remain a problem in Vietnam, a major concern given that the country is rapidly motorizing and likewise increasing the likelihood of road traffic crashes in the absence of effective interventions. To target drinking and driving in Vietnam we call for a multifaceted approach

  3. [Survey on knowledge and attitude of schistosomiasis control among villagers in susceptible zones in Poyang Lake area].

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Qiang; Zhao, An; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Gang-Gang

    2011-02-01

    To understand the status of health education on schistosomiasis for residents in susceptible zone and provide a reasonable basis for related study. A questionnaire survey on knowledge, attitude about schistosomiasis of the residents was conducted. Status of education on schistosomiasis of susceptible areas for the residents in general is not optimistic, the frequency of contacting with infected water was high, the demographic characteristics were also significant: (1) The passing rate for the villagers' schistosomiasis knowledge was too low, only 39.6%, the difference between awareness rates of schistosomiasis knowledge among villagers with different educational levels was significant (P < 0.05); (2) The overall level of correct attitude for schistosomiasis control was poor, only 37.7% of the villagers with a good attitude, the differences among villagers with different ages and occupations were significant (both P values < 0.05); (3) 73.5% of the villagers had ever contacted with infected water, and different groups contacted with infected water in different ways, 67.5% of men contacting for bathing, fishing, 63.7% of women contacting for washing clothes. Health education for schistosomiasis control in susceptible zones should be strengthened, the reasons for differences in cognitive level about schistosomiasis control among the villagers with different demographic characteristics and the better models for educational interventions for different villagers need to be explored.

  4. Antenatal HIV screening--knowledge, attitudes and practices of obstetricians in KKH.

    PubMed

    Tan, T Y; Teo, K P; Tan, K H

    1999-12-01

    To determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of obstetricians with regards to HIV screening in pregnant women. This is a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey of all obstetricians in KKH from January to August 1997. Obstetricians' knowledge and beliefs of HIV epidemiology and HIV perinatal transmission, and attitudes and practices with regards to antenatal HIV screening. Forty-one (77.4%) obstetricians responded to the survey. At the time of the survey, only 43.9% of the respondents had offered the HIV serology test to their patients with only 17.1% and 19.5% providing pre-test and post-test counselling respectively. Seventy-eight percent of them were aware of reports that zidovudine could reduce the vertical HIV transmission rate. All the respondents felt that HIV testing should be performed in pregnant women. The majority (70.7%) felt that antenatal HIV testing should be voluntary rather than mandatory and 56.1% felt that the patients' civil rights and confidentiality could be more assured if HIV testing is voluntary than if it was mandatory. Most respondents (56.1%) felt that antenatal HIV screening should be universally offered rather than targeted to those with risk factors. Most obstetricians did not feel comfortable (58.5%) or competent (80.5%) to manage HIV infection in pregnancy. Those who felt competent were more likely to feel comfortable, more likely to have provided HIV test in the clinic, and less likely to opt out of caring for an HIV-infected patient. The majority of the surveyed obstetricians would support a program of voluntary antenatal HIV screening that is universally offered to all pregnant women. The feelings of discomfort and incompetence of the obstetricians towards caring for an HIV-infected pregnant woman need to be addressed further. There is a need for continuing medical education to help obstetricians keep abreast with the advances in HIV screening and its management.

  5. Knowledge, attitudes & barriers to condom use among female sex workers and truck drivers in Uganda: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Matovu, J K B; Ssebadduka, N B

    2013-12-01

    There is limited documentation on knowledge, attitudes and barriers to condom use among female sex workers (FSWs) and truck drivers (truckers). To explore knowledge, attitudes and barriers to condom use among FSWs and truckers operating along major transport corridors in Uganda. Structured questionnaires were administered to explore FSWs' and truckers' knowledge of and attitudes towards condom use among 259 FSWs and 261 truckers. Qualitative data were collected on barriers to condom use using focus group discussions. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS while qualitative data were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analyzed. Condom knowledge was high with 97% of FSWs and 95% of truckers agreeing with the statement, "using condoms properly and consistently reduces risk of HIV infection". Attitudes towards condom use were generally favorable with 91% of FSWs and 82% of truckers agreeing with the statement, "condom use is the best method of HIV prevention". Qualitative findings show that poverty, refusal to use condoms by male partners, alcohol use before sex and beliefs that condoms 'kill the mood for sex' remain key barriers to consistent condom use. Consistent condom use among FSWs and truckers is still hampered by economic and relationship factors.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and practices on HIV/AIDS and prevalence of HIV in the general population of Sucre, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Terán Calderón, Carolina; Gorena Urizar, Dorian; González Blázquez, Cristina; Alejos Ferreras, Belén; Ramírez Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar Montrull, Francisco; Ortiz Rivera, Marta; del Amo Valero, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To analyse knowledge, attitudes and sexual practices on HIV/AIDS, and estimate HIV prevalence among residents of Sucre (Bolivia). Population-based survey of residents aged 15-49 randomly selected during 2008/2009. Blood samples were collected on Whatman-filter paper and tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Knowledge on HIV/AIDS, sexual risk practices and discriminatory attitudes against people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) were modelled with multiple logistic regression. Of 1499 subjects, 59% were women. All subjects were HIV-negative. Inadequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention was observed in 67% and risk factors varied by gender (interaction p-value<0.05). Discriminatory attitudes were displayed by 85% subjects; associated factors were: rural residence, low educational level and low income. Unsafe sex was reported by 10%; risk factors varied by residence area (interaction p-value<0.05). In urban areas, risk factors were male sex, younger age and being in common-law union. Prevalence of HIV infection is very low and unsafe sex is relatively uncommon. Inadequate knowledge on HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes towards PLWHA are extremely high and are associated to gender, ethnic and economic inequalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Associated with Brucellosis in Livestock Owners in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Imadidden I.; Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud N.; Guitian, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated livestock owners' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding brucellosis in Jordan. A questionnaire was administered and biological samples were examined to verify the serological status of animals. Seroprevalence estimates indicated that 18.1% (95% CI: 11–25.3) of cattle herds and 34.3% (95% CI: 28.4–40.4) of small ruminant flocks were seropositive. The results showed that 100% of the interviewed livestock keepers were aware of brucellosis: 87% indicated a high risk of infection if unpasteurized milk is consumed and 75% indicated a high risk if unpasteurized dairy products are consumed. Awareness of the risk of infection through direct contact with fetal membranes or via physical contact with infected livestock is considerably lower, 19% and 13%, respectively. These knowledge gaps manifest in a high frequency of high-risk practices such as assisting in animal parturition (62%), disposing aborted fetuses without protective gloves (71.2%) or masks (65%), and not boiling milk before preparation of dairy products (60%). When brucellosis is suspected, basic hygiene practices are often disregarded and suspect animals are freely traded. Public health education should be enhanced as the disease is likely to remain endemic in the ruminant reservoir as long as a suitable compensation program is not established and trust on available vaccines is regained. PMID:26438029

  8. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Associated with Brucellosis in Livestock Owners in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Musallam, Imadidden I; Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud N; Guitian, Javier

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated livestock owners' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding brucellosis in Jordan. A questionnaire was administered and biological samples were examined to verify the serological status of animals. Seroprevalence estimates indicated that 18.1% (95% CI: 11-25.3) of cattle herds and 34.3% (95% CI: 28.4-40.4) of small ruminant flocks were seropositive. The results showed that 100% of the interviewed livestock keepers were aware of brucellosis: 87% indicated a high risk of infection if unpasteurized milk is consumed and 75% indicated a high risk if unpasteurized dairy products are consumed. Awareness of the risk of infection through direct contact with fetal membranes or via physical contact with infected livestock is considerably lower, 19% and 13%, respectively. These knowledge gaps manifest in a high frequency of high-risk practices such as assisting in animal parturition (62%), disposing aborted fetuses without protective gloves (71.2%) or masks (65%), and not boiling milk before preparation of dairy products (60%). When brucellosis is suspected, basic hygiene practices are often disregarded and suspect animals are freely traded. Public health education should be enhanced as the disease is likely to remain endemic in the ruminant reservoir as long as a suitable compensation program is not established and trust on available vaccines is regained.

  9. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF HEALTH CARE SCIENCE STUDENTS TOWARD OLDER PEOPLE.

    PubMed

    Milutinović, Dragana; Simin, Dragana; Kacavendić, Jelena; Turkulov, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Education of health science students in geriatrics is important in order to provide optimal care for the growing number of elderly people because it is the attitudes of health professionals toward the elderly that play the key role in the quality of care provided. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care science students towards ageing and care for the elderly. The present cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 130 students (medical, nursing and special education and rehabilitation) of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad. The students were divided into two groups. The first group (E) included students having been taught geriatrics and nursing older adults and the other group (C) included students who had not been trained in this subject. The authors used Palmore's facts on Ageing Quiz for the knowledge evaluation and Kogan's Attitude toward Older People Scale for the attitude evaluation. The results of Facts on Aging Quiz showed the average level of students' knowledge and statistically significant difference between E and C group. The analysis of Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale showed that both groups had neutral attitudes toward older people. Furthermore, a positive correlation between students' knowledge and attitudes was found. There is increasing evidence on the correlation between education, knowledge and attitudes toward older people which suggests that by acquiring better insights into all aspects of ageing through their education the students develop more positive attitudes and interest in working with older adults.

  10. Young Hungarian Students' Knowledge about HPV and Their Attitude Toward HPV Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Balla, Bettina Claudia; Terebessy, András; Tóth, Emese; Balázs, Péter

    2016-12-29

    (1) Background: Hungarys's estimated cervical cancer mortality was 6.9/100,000 in 2012, above the average of the EU27 countries (3.7/100,000) in the same year. Since 2014, the bivalent HPV vaccine has been offered to schoolgirls aged 12-13. (2) Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 1022 high school seniors (492 girls, 530 boys) in 19 randomly selected schools in Budapest. Our anonymous questionnaire contained 54 items: basic socio-demographic data, knowledge about HPV infection/cervical cancer and HPV vaccination. (3) Results: 54.9% knew that HPV caused cervical cancer, and 52.1% identified HPV as an STD. Knowledge of risk factors such as promiscuity (46.9%) and early sexual activity (15.6%) was low, but higher than that of further HPV-induced diseases: genital warts (in females 9.9%, in males 9%), anal cancer (in females 2.2%, in males 1.9%), penile cancer (9.4%), and vulvar cancer (7.8%). A percentage of 14.6% feared getting infected, and 35.7% supported compulsory HPV vaccination. A percentage of 51.2% would have their future children vaccinated-significantly more girls than boys. (4) Conclusion: Our results support the findings of previous studies about young adults' HPV-related knowledge, which was poor, especially regarding pathologies in men. Despite the low level of awareness, the students' attitude was mostly positive when asked about vaccinating their future children.

  11. Knowledge and Attitudes about HIV/AIDS among Homoeopathic Practitioners and Educators in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay Pal; Lowe, Ann; Khurana, Anil; Taneja, Divya; George, Sheba; Fahey, John L.

    2008-01-01

    This study is designed to assess AIDS knowledge among Homeopathy educators and physicians in India, which has not been evaluated previously. India now has the largest number of HIV infected persons worldwide, with an estimated cumulative 5.1 million infections. Homeopathy is the dominant system among the nationally-recognized alternative or complementary systems of medicine, which collectively provide health care to around 600 million people in India. Homeopathy, with its holistic and patient-centered approach, has a wide reach to people at risk of contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Participants were 68 homeopathy physicians (34 educators and 34 practitioners) who completed a CDC questionnaire measuring HIV/AIDS Knowledge regarding AIDS. This study reports the current level of knowledge of, and attitudes about, HIV/AIDS among homeopathy educators and practitioners. These findings will assist in the development of an education module to equip homeopathic health care personnel to impart accurate AIDS information and prevention counseling to their patients in an efficient manner. PMID:18604257

  12. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICES OF VOLUNTARY HIV COUNSELING AND TESTING AMONG RURAL MIGRANTS IN SHANGHAI, CHINA

    PubMed Central

    He, Na; Zhang, Jinling; Yao, Jinjian; Tian, Xiuhong; Zhao, Genming; Jiang, Qingwu; Detels, Roger

    2010-01-01

    A study of knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) among rural migrants was conducted in Shanghai, China. An anonymous questionnaire was administered face-to-face. Among 2,690 participants, 78% reported having had lifetime sexual intercourse with 41.3% of singles reporting sexual intercourse, 9.2% having had multiple sex partners in the past year, only 19% of the participants always using condoms whereas 61.6% did not use in their sexual acts in the past month, 80% knew HIV infection was diagnosed through a blood test, 46.5% had heard of VCT ever before, but only 3.5% felt that they were likely to be HIV-infected now or in the future and only 62 (2.3%) had ever had HIV testing with 19 of them getting tested at a VCT site. Gender, working venue, multiple sex partnerships and knowledge of VCT were independently correlated with having had HIV testing. This study suggests that a much greater effort is needed to promote safer sex and to improve VCT knowledge and services among rural migrants particularly those who are engaging in risky behaviors. PMID:20030500

  13. Environmental education and its effect on the knowledge and attitudes of preparatory school students.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Salam, Magda M; El-Naggar, Hesham M; Hussein, Rim A

    2009-01-01

    Considering the serious environmental threats facing Egypt, environmental education (EE) that provides the knowledge, skills, and motivation to take individual or collective action is needed to create a sustainable quality of life. This study was carried out aiming at measuring the level of environmental knowledge among preparatory school students in Alexandria, determining their attitudes towards some environmental concepts, and assessing the effect of EE on these knowledge and attitudes. The study sample was selected by stratified random method, and the assessment was conducted using a questionnaire. Results of the study revealed that 77% of the students had poor level of environmental knowledge and that 23% had fair level. In addition, 80% of the students were found to have negative attitude toward the environment and the remainder 20% were indifferent. Such knowledge and attitudes were positively correlated to their socio-economic levels. Following six EE sessions, an improvement in their knowledge and attitudes was observed where 69% of the students had a satisfactory level of knowledge and 88% had positive attitude toward the environment. Attitude was found to be positively correlated to their level of knowledge prior to and following the EE sessions. These results support the need for development and implementation of environmental education programs as part of the regular school curriculum.

  14. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Students towards HIV/AIDS Patients in Melaka, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra Pal; Osman, Izni Syazana; Rahmat, Nur Amanina; Bakar, Nur Ashikin Abu; Razak, Nurul Fathin Natasha Abdul; Nettem, Sowmya

    2017-05-01

    Cross contamination of HIV is a real threat today. Dental treatment often includes direct contact with a patient's blood and saliva, therefore dental professionals can be easily exposed to HIV microorganisms. Hence, it is essential to gain insight into dental students' knowledge and attitude towards HIV patients. A cross-sectional survey of 186 clinical year dental students (year 3, 4 and 5) in the 2015-2016 academic session at the Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Manipal University, Melaka volunteered to participate in the study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine their knowledge and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients. Among 137 respondents (females 74.5% and males 25.6%), 40.9% were Malay, 46.7% were Chinese, 10.2% were Indian and 2.2% were others. The majority had an excellent (41.6%) to good (56.2%) knowledge and only (18%) had a professional attitude. There was a statistically significant association of knowledge with gender (P = 0.009) and ethnicity (P = 0.024), However, no association was found between attitude and gender (P = 0.756) or ethnicity (P = 0.792), or between knowledge and attitude (P = 0.473) of dental students. Dental students' knowledge was not significantly associated with attitude. However, knowledge was associated with gender and ethnicity, but no association was found between age and knowledge and between age, gender, or ethnicity and attitude.

  15. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Students towards HIV/AIDS Patients in Melaka, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijendra Pal; Osman, Izni Syazana; Rahmat, Nur Amanina; Bakar, Nur Ashikin Abu; Razak, Nurul Fathin Natasha Abdul; Nettem, Sowmya

    2017-01-01

    Background Cross contamination of HIV is a real threat today. Dental treatment often includes direct contact with a patient’s blood and saliva, therefore dental professionals can be easily exposed to HIV microorganisms. Hence, it is essential to gain insight into dental students’ knowledge and attitude towards HIV patients. Method A cross-sectional survey of 186 clinical year dental students (year 3, 4 and 5) in the 2015–2016 academic session at the Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Manipal University, Melaka volunteered to participate in the study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine their knowledge and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients. Results Among 137 respondents (females 74.5% and males 25.6%), 40.9% were Malay, 46.7% were Chinese, 10.2% were Indian and 2.2% were others. The majority had an excellent (41.6%) to good (56.2%) knowledge and only (18%) had a professional attitude. There was a statistically significant association of knowledge with gender (P = 0.009) and ethnicity (P = 0.024), However, no association was found between attitude and gender (P = 0.756) or ethnicity (P = 0.792), or between knowledge and attitude (P = 0.473) of dental students. Conclusion Dental students’ knowledge was not significantly associated with attitude. However, knowledge was associated with gender and ethnicity, but no association was found between age and knowledge and between age, gender, or ethnicity and attitude. PMID:28814935

  16. Parental nutrition knowledge and attitudes as predictors of 5-6-year-old children's healthy food knowledge.

    PubMed

    Zarnowiecki, Dorota; Sinn, Natalie; Petkov, John; Dollman, James

    2012-07-01

    Young children's knowledge about healthy food may influence the formation of their eating behaviours, and parents have a major influence on the development of children's knowledge in the early years. We investigated the extent to which parental nutrition knowledge and attitudes around food predicted young children's knowledge of healthy foods, controlling for other influences such as socio-economic status (SES) and parent education levels in a cross-sectional research design. Children were given a healthy food knowledge activity and parents completed questionnaires. Twenty primary schools in Adelaide, Australia, stratified by SES. We recruited 192 children aged 5-6 years and their parents. Structural equation modelling showed that parent nutrition knowledge predicted children's nutrition knowledge (r = 0·30, P < 0·001) independently of attitudes, SES and education level. Nutrition education for parents, targeted at low-SES areas at higher risk for obesity, may contribute to the development of healthy food knowledge in young children.

  17. Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviours towards Recommended Vaccinations among Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Scalingi, Stefania; Garruto, Veronica; Siclari, Marco; Chiarini, Massimiliano; Mannocci, Alice

    2017-03-07

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are an important group of professionals exposed to biological risk during their work activities. So, the aim of this study is to perform a survey on the knowledge, attitude and behaviour of Italian HCWs towards the vaccinations recommended by the Ministry of Health. A cross-sectional study was carried out during the period September 2014-August 2015 in the Lazio region. The study was conducted by recruiting HCWs and biomedical students. The sample was comprised of 571 responders, of whom 12.4% were physicians, 18.9% were nurses, 34.3% were other HCW, and 34.3% were biomedical students (medical and nurses students). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is perceived as a risk for personal health by 457 (80%) participants; TB is also worrying (434; 76%). Moreover, HBV (70.9%) and tuberculosis (TB) (79.2%) are perceived as a risk for health, while influenza is not considered so by most participants (46.2%). There is an underestimation of the role of influenza, perceived as a risk for 137 respondents (24%). The vaccination rate among these HCWs is highest for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) (82%), and lowest for influenza (28.5%) and varicella (40.3%). The vast majority of responders are in favour of HBV (77.8%) and TB (64.8%) vaccines. For other vaccinations there is less interest (between 33% and 40% for measles, mumps, rubella, pertussis and influenza). This study shows that knowledge of recommended occupational vaccinations is insufficient in HCWs, with few exceptions represented by HBV and TB. There is a need for novel approaches in this field, with the aim of enhancing vaccine coverage among HCW.

  18. Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviours towards Recommended Vaccinations among Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Scalingi, Stefania; Garruto, Veronica; Siclari, Marco; Chiarini, Massimiliano; Mannocci, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are an important group of professionals exposed to biological risk during their work activities. So, the aim of this study is to perform a survey on the knowledge, attitude and behaviour of Italian HCWs towards the vaccinations recommended by the Ministry of Health. A cross-sectional study was carried out during the period September 2014–August 2015 in the Lazio region. The study was conducted by recruiting HCWs and biomedical students. The sample was comprised of 571 responders, of whom 12.4% were physicians, 18.9% were nurses, 34.3% were other HCW, and 34.3% were biomedical students (medical and nurses students). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is perceived as a risk for personal health by 457 (80%) participants; TB is also worrying (434; 76%). Moreover, HBV (70.9%) and tuberculosis (TB) (79.2%) are perceived as a risk for health, while influenza is not considered so by most participants (46.2%). There is an underestimation of the role of influenza, perceived as a risk for 137 respondents (24%). The vaccination rate among these HCWs is highest for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) (82%), and lowest for influenza (28.5%) and varicella (40.3%). The vast majority of responders are in favour of HBV (77.8%) and TB (64.8%) vaccines. For other vaccinations there is less interest (between 33% and 40% for measles, mumps, rubella, pertussis and influenza). This study shows that knowledge of recommended occupational vaccinations is insufficient in HCWs, with few exceptions represented by HBV and TB. There is a need for novel approaches in this field, with the aim of enhancing vaccine coverage among HCW. PMID:28272332

  19. [Sexual knowledge, attitudes and behavior among young Danes. A questionnaire study].

    PubMed

    Graugaard, Christian L; Rasmussen, Bjarne; Boisen, Kirsten A

    2002-10-07

    The aim of this study was to present selected key figures concerning the sexual knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour among Danish teenagers. 7355 Danish adolescents (aged 13-25) participated in a comprehensive questionnaire survey concerning sexual knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour. The median age at coital debut was 16.8 and in all age groups > 13, girls were more experienced and active than boys. The coital frequency was increased by age, as was girls' experience with orgasm in the years following their debut. The prevalence of same-gender sex appeared to be modest, and anal sex was reported by less than 10 per cent. A significant and increasing amount of youngsters did not discuss sexual matters at home, whereas the vast majority had received sexual education in school. One fourth of the girls regarded doctors as desired sexual interlocutors. Almost one fourth of the youngsters did not use contraception at their sexual debut, and 7 per cent of the sexually experienced girls had had an induced abortion. 9 per cent of the girls and 5 per cent of the boys had been infected with chlamydia, and 17 per cent of those sexually active had taken at least one HIV test. The age at coital debut seems to be stable, whereas the prevalences of unsafe sex and STDs are still high. New didactic methods are incessantly needed, just as supplementary empirical studies are encouraged.

  20. Genetic testing among Spanish pediatric neurologists: Knowledge, attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; López-Pisón, J; Macaya, A; Bueno Campaña, M; García-Pérez, M A; Natera-de Benito, D

    2017-02-01

    Advances in genetic testing applied to child neurology have enabled the development of genetic tests with greater sensitivity in elucidating an etiologic diagnosis for common neurological conditions. The objective of the current study was to examine child neurologists' perspectives and insights into genetic testing. We surveyed 118 Spanish child neurologists, exploring their knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning genetic tests. All of them had requested at least one genetic test in the past six months. Global developmental delay or intellectual disability in absence of a strong specific etiologic suspicion and autism spectrum disorders were the disorders for which genetic testing was most frequently requested. The most commonly requested genetic test was CGH-array. Overall, child neurologist perception of readiness for making genetic-related decisions was not bad, although many would like to have a greater support from geneticists and were interested in increasing the time dedicated to genetics within their continuing education program. These data have important implications for future practice, research, and education.

  1. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-10-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly expanding technology, genetic engineering, to food production. The results indicated significant difference in understanding of concepts related with genetically engineered food stuffs between teachers and students. The most common ideas about genetically modified food were that cross bred plants and genetically modified plants are not same, GM organisms are produced by inserting a foreign gene into a plant or animal and are high yielding. More teachers thought that genetically engineered food stuffs were unsafe for the environment. Both teachers and students showed number of misconceptions, for example, the pesticidal proteins produced by GM organisms have indirect effects through bioaccumulation, induces production of allergic proteins, genetic engineering is production of new genes, GM plants are leaky sieves and that transgenes are more likely to introgress into wild species than mutated species. In general, more students saw benefits while teachers were cautious about the advantages of genetically engineered food stuffs.

  2. [Knowledge and attitudes toward vaccination among midwives in Quebec].

    PubMed

    Dubé, Eve; Vivion, Maryline; Valderrama, Alena; Sauvageau, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine acceptability among Quebec midwives is not well documented. The purpose of this study was to examine midwives' knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to immunization in Quebec. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 participants (17 midwives and 8 midwifery students). The mean duration of the interviews was 1 hour. The interviews were conducted in 2010 and were audiotaped, transcribed and submitted to content analysis using NVivo 8 software. In addition to the laws regulating midwifery practice in Quebec, the findings suggest that most midwifery interventions are based on midwifery philosophy. Informed choice is one of the key principles of this philosophy. In order to help women make an informed decision about vaccination, midwives seek to outline the pros and cons of vaccination using government documentation, as well as other sources such as books on naturopathy. Most of the participating midwives recognized that vaccination has advantages, including disease prevention and free vaccines. Various arguments against vaccination were also identified. Most of these were related to the vaccination schedule and to combined vaccines. Some of the participants noted that it was difficult to find unbiased information about vaccination. This study highlights the key role of midwifery philosophy in midwifery practice. Most decisions (such as vaccination) are made on the basis of the principle of informed choice. Most of the participants noted that they lacked information on vaccination.

  3. Teaching Pharmacology in 2010--new knowledge, new tools, new attitudes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ian

    2003-11-01

    Changes in pharmacology teaching are being driven by various pressures. These originate: from changes in the discipline itself; from government; from professional bodies; from students; from changes in teaching styles and opportunities; from academic staff; from ethical/animal rights considerations; from employers and from higher education institutions. These changes will require an alteration in the knowledge, skills and attitudes of academic pharmacologists as much as they will require changes in the way teaching is delivered and learning is facilitated. Pharmacology courses will be provided in a changed environment and must prepare students to work in a changed discipline as well as being appropriate for students who will take employment in non-pharmacology areas. Change is likely to centre around the curriculum, problem based learning, simulated practicals, peer assessment, use of the internet, information technology and interactive computer based learning, virtual learning environments and integrated medical courses. The most effective strategy to achieve the necessary changes is likely to involve collaboration between pharmacology teachers on a global scale and a general consciousness among current academic pharmacologists that we need to ensure tomorrow's academics are well prepared for the changed environment in which they will have to work.

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practice of hospital staff management.

    PubMed

    Lakbala, Parvin; Lakbala, Mahboobeh

    2013-07-01

    The proper handling and disposal of biomedical waste (BMW) is very imperative. There is a defined set of rules for handling BMW worldwide. Unfortunately, laxity and lack of adequate training and awareness in the execution of these rules leads to staid health and environment apprehension. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of hospital staff to BMW management. The cross-sectional study was conducted on 261 healthcare workers from 9 hospitals, which were randomized from 32 hospitals. The most important finding was a significant (P < 0.05) relationship between the level of education attainments and training in BMW management. Twenty-nine (19.9%) members of government hospital staff and 37 (32.2%) members of staff from the private sector agreed that BMW management is not just the government's responsibility, but one that every member of personnel should share. This finding will help to address the issue more appropriately, and plan for better training programs and monitoring of BMW management systems in hospitals.

  5. Genetic susceptibility testing for beryllium: worker knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Silver, Ken; Kukulka, Gary; Gorniewicz, John; Rayman, Kathleen; Sharp, Richard

    2011-07-01

    We sought to gain insight into workers' knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes on the subject of testing for genetic susceptibility to beryllium. Five focus groups were held with 30 current and former beryllium workers and nine family members. Audio recordings were transcribed and assessed by hierarchical coding using an inductive approach. Some workers were unclear about the distinction between genotoxicity and heritability. A key finding is that they perceived the benefits of a positive test result to be related to enhanced autonomous decision-making. The major concern cited by participants was potential abuse of genetic information by employers. Complete financial separation of a prospective testing entity from the employer was seen as crucial. A window of opportunity exists to create regional partnerships for translational research on genetic susceptibility testing. Such partnerships would involve labor, management, public health scientists, primary care professionals, and other stakeholders. They would be critical to identifying testing strategies that maximize worker autonomy along with the public health advantages of genetic testing. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Patient's Knowledge and Attitude towards Tuberculosis in an Urban Setting.

    PubMed

    Tasnim, Saria; Rahman, Aminur; Hoque, F M Anamul

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Bangladesh. This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess knowledge of TB patients about symptoms, ways of transmission and treatment of tuberculosis, and their perception of the illness. Between March and August 2008, 762 adult TB patients were interviewed at selected DOTS centre of Dhaka city. Male and female distribution was 55.6% and 44.4%, respectively. One quarter of them were illiterate, and more than half had extended family and live in a congested situation. Night fever was the most common symptom known (89.9%), and 56% were aware that it could spread through sneezing/coughing. Television was mentioned as a source of information about TB. The majority expressed a helping attitude towards other TB patients. Although most of them were positive about getting family support, 46.6% mentioned discrimination of separate utensils for food or drink. About 50.5% expressed increased sadness, 39.8% had fear of loss of job/wedges, and 21.4% felt socially neglected. Along with drug treatment the psychosocial reactions of TB patients should be addressed at DOTS centers for better control of the disease.

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of food handlers in food safety: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Laís Mariano; da Cunha, Diogo Thimoteo; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera; Capriles, Vanessa Dias; Stedefeldt, Elke

    2017-10-01

    This study presents an overview of the relationship between knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of food handlers with training in food safety, in addition to proposing reflections on the training of food handlers, considering its responsibility for food safety and health of consumers. The review was based on the integrative method. The descriptors used were: (food handler), (knowledge, attitudes and practice) and (training). Six databases were searched, 253 articles were consulted and 36 original articles were included. Fifty per cent of the articles pointed that there was no proper translation of knowledge into attitudes/practices or attitudes into practices after training. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of food handlers are important for identifying how efficient training in food safety is allowing prioritize actions in planning training. The evaluation of KAP is the first step to understand the food handler's point of view. After this evaluation other diagnostic strategies become necessary to enhance this understanding. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Knowledge, attitude and performance of IMNCI trained nursing personnel: an evaluative survey.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Poonam; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-05-01

    A cross-sectional survey of nursing personnel's knowledge, attitude and their consultations with sick children under 5 y of age, at specified levels of health care in terms of IMNCI guidelines, was conducted at six community health centers (CHC) of a selected district of Haryana, India. Total enumeration technique was used to assess knowledge and attitude of 183 IMNCI trained nursing personnel towards the training programme using a pretested structured questionnaire. Total 236 consultations of sick children presenting to the facilities made by conveniently selected 65 nursing personnel were also observed. Majority of nursing personnel had good knowledge 94 (51.4 %) and excellent attitude 98 (53.55 %) scores related to IMNCI programme. Nursing personnel performed best in assessing sick children (2 mo-5 y) in areas of fever (89.7 %, CI 96.9-79.7), cough (89.2 %, CI 96.7-81.6), and identifying treatment (89.1 %, CI 96.7-83.7). Their performance in identifying classifications related to diarrhea (74.1 %, CI 84.7-62.8), malnutrition (67.2 %, CI 78.6-59.0), anemia (77.3 %, CI 87.5-70.0), immunization (78.9 % CI 88.8-71.8) and feeding problem (75.9 %, CI 86.3-66.9) was relatively less. Similarly, in assessing young infants (0-2 mo) performance of nursing personnel was best in the areas of possible serious bacterial infection (PSBI) (88.1 %, CI 99.1-87.3), and identifying the treatment (86.7 %, CI 94.9-80.2) and low in dehydration (70.8 %, CI81.8-52.6), feeding problem (50.5 %, CI 62.7-40.9), feeding assessment (50.6 %, CI 62.8-39.8), and immunization (70 %, CI 81.1-61.2). IMNCI trained nursing personnel have good knowledge and attitude towards child care and their performance can be improved further with drills, exercises and supervised practices.

  9. Service Learning With a Geriatric Population: Changing Attitudes and Improving Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey; Foito, Kim; Pearlin, Nina; Yost, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Relatively few nursing students choose to specialize in geriatric nursing. While increased clinical exposure and improved knowledge of the elderly have been proposed to manage this staffing dilemma, successful strategies have not been identified. This study examined nursing students' attitudes and knowledge about the elderly, before and after service learning experiences in Senior Citizen Centers. Through these interventions, students had significantly improved attitudes and knowledge about the elderly.

  10. Emergency contraception: providers' knowledge and attitudes and their relationship with users' knowledge and attitudes at public health centers/posts of tabriz.

    PubMed

    Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Farshbaf-Khalili, Azizeh; Moeinpoor, Roya

    2012-05-01

    Emergency contraceptives are accessible and acceptable methods for most women, which their proper use could prevent about three quarters of unwanted pregnancies. In this study, we aimed to determine the providers' knowledge, attitudes and their relation with the pills and condoms users' knowledge of and attitudes towards emergency contraception at public health centers/posts in Tabriz, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, subjects were 140 health providers working in randomly selected 19 health centers and 33 health posts and 280 married women aged 15 to 49 years who were using contraceptive pills or condoms (two clients of each selected provider). A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the providers, while the questionnaire for the clients was filled up by face-to-face interview. The relationships were determined by Pearson's correlation test. Mean score of the providers' knowledge and attitude was 69.4 ± 11.8 and 70.1 ± 12.8, respectively (possible score range was 0-100). The providers' knowledge score was good only in 35% (score > 75.0). High majority (95.7%) had positive attitudes (score > 50.0). Overall, there were no sig-nificant relationships, neither between the provider's and users' knowledge nor between their attitudes (p > 0.05). The providers' knowledge was insufficient, and there was no significant association between the providers' and users' knowledge and attitudes. Thus, in addition to the need for promoting providers' knowledge, the other barriers should also be recognized and removed in order to promote using this method.

  11. Knowledge, attitude, and practices towards schistosomiasis among rural population in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Nasr, Nabil A; Dawaki, Salwa; Al-Areeqi, Mona A; Ithoi, Init; Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-08-25

    Schistosomiasis is highly prevalent in Yemen, with an estimated 3 million cases, particularly among rural communities. This community-based study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on schistosomiasis among rural communities in Yemen. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 households from ten rural districts in Yemen. Overall, 400 children were screened for urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis. Moreover, parents were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire to collect information about the demographic and socioeconomic information and their KAP concerning schistosomiasis. A total of 127 (31.8%) children were found to be excreting schistosome eggs in either their urine or faeces (22.5% S. haematobium and 8.0% S. mansoni). Although 92.4% of the respondents had heard about schistosomiasis, 49.8%, 68.0% and 47.2% had knowledge concerning the transmission, signs and symptoms, and prevention, respectively. In addition, 77.1% considered schistosomiasis as harmful while 48.5% believed that schistosomiasis could be prevented, albeit their practices to prevent infections were still inadequate. Significant associations between the KAP and age, education, employment status and household monthly income were reported (P < 0.05). Moreover, a significantly higher level of knowledge was reported among the respondents who had infected children compared to those with no infected family members (P < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the level of education and the history of schistosomiasis were the most important factors associated with the KAP concerning schistosomiasis among this population. This study reveals that knowledge about the cause, transmission, symptoms and prevention of schistosomiasis among the rural population in Yemen was inadequate, and that this could be a challenging obstacle to the elimination of schistosomiasis in these communities. Besides the current mass drug administration

  12. Effects of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Primary Care Providers on Antibiotic Selection, United States

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rebecca M.; Albert, Alison P.; Johnson, Darcia D.; Hicks, Lauri A.

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate selection of antibiotic drugs is critical to optimize treatment of infections and limit the spread of antibiotic resistance. To better inform public health efforts to improve prescribing of antibiotic drugs, we conducted in-depth interviews with 36 primary care providers in the United States (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to explore knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices regarding antibiotic drug resistance and antibiotic drug selection for common infections. Participants were generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection for common infections, but did not always comply with them. Reasons for nonadherence included the belief that nonrecommended agents are more likely to cure an infection, concern for patient or parent satisfaction, and fear of infectious complications. Providers inconsistently defined broad- and narrow-spectrum antibiotic agents. There was widespread concern for antibiotic resistance; however, it was not commonly considered when selecting therapy. Strategies to encourage use of first-line agents are needed in addition to limiting unnecessary prescribing of antibiotic drugs. PMID:25418868

  13. Effects of knowledge, attitudes, and practices of primary care providers on antibiotic selection, United States.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Guillermo V; Roberts, Rebecca M; Albert, Alison P; Johnson, Darcia D; Hicks, Lauri A

    2014-12-01

    Appropriate selection of antibiotic drugs is critical to optimize treatment of infections and limit the spread of antibiotic resistance. To better inform public health efforts to improve prescribing of antibiotic drugs, we conducted in-depth interviews with 36 primary care providers in the United States (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to explore knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices regarding antibiotic drug resistance and antibiotic drug selection for common infections. Participants were generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection for common infections, but did not always comply with them. Reasons for nonadherence included the belief that nonrecommended agents are more likely to cure an infection, concern for patient or parent satisfaction, and fear of infectious complications. Providers inconsistently defined broad- and narrow-spectrum antibiotic agents. There was widespread concern for antibiotic resistance; however, it was not commonly considered when selecting therapy. Strategies to encourage use of first-line agents are needed in addition to limiting unnecessary prescribing of antibiotic drugs.

  14. Gut Instincts: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices regarding Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Louise; Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Linxiu; Medina, Alexis; Smith, Scott; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections affect more than two out of every five schoolchildren in the poorest regions of rural China, an alarmingly high prevalence rate given the low cost and wide availability of safe and effective deworming treatment. Understanding of local knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding STH infection in rural China has until now, been sparse, although such information is critical for prevention and control initiatives. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to elucidate the structural and sociocultural factors that underlie high STH infection rates as well as explain why deworming treatment is rarely sought for children. In-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted in six rural villages in Guizhou Province; participants included schoolchildren, children’s parents and grandparents, and village doctors. Data analysis exposed three predominant reasons for high STH prevalence: (1) lack of awareness and skepticism about the high prevalence of STH infection, (2) local myths about STH infection and deworming treatment, and (3) poor quality of village health care. Conclusions/Significance The findings from this study reveal reasons for why deworming treatment is not sought, and inform specific recommendations for a deworming intervention that can more effectively address underlying barriers to deworming in areas of persistently high STH infection rates. The main barrier to seeking STH treatment is not availability or cost of the drugs, but rather the lack of impetus to seek the drugs. A comprehensive nationwide deworming program in China should involve annual provision of free deworming treatment in village clinics or schools, distribution of culturally appropriate educational materials to inform children and families about STH infection, and improvement of the quality of health care delivered by village clinicians. PMID:25807188

  15. Knowledge of Genetics and Attitudes toward Genetic Testing among College Students in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Olwi, Duaa; Merdad, Leena; Ramadan, Eman

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing has been gradually permeating the practice of medicine. Health-care providers may be confronted with new genetic approaches that require genetically informed decisions which will be influenced by patients' knowledge of genetics and their attitudes toward genetic testing. This study assesses the knowledge of genetics and attitudes toward genetic testing among college students. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a multistage stratified sample of 920 senior college students enrolled at King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. Information regarding knowledge of genetics, attitudes toward genetic testing, and sociodemographic data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. In general, students had a good knowledge of genetics but lacked some fundamentals of genetics. The majority of students showed positive attitudes toward genetic testing, but some students showed negative attitudes toward certain aspects of genetic testing such as resorting to abortion in the case of an untreatable major genetic defect in an unborn fetus. The main significant predictors of knowledge were faculty, gender, academic year, and some prior awareness of 'genetic testing'. The main significant predictors of attitudes were gender, academic year, grade point average, and some prior awareness of 'genetic testing'. The knowledge of genetics among college students was higher than has been reported in other studies, and the attitudes toward genetic testing were fairly positive. Genetics educational programs that target youths may improve knowledge of genetics and create a public perception that further supports genetic testing. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The knowledge-attitude dissociation in geriatric education: can it be overcome?

    PubMed

    Koh, Gerald C H; Merchant, Reshma A; Lim, Wee Shiong; Amin, Zubair

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge-attitude dissociation often exists in geriatrics where knowledge but not attitudes towards elderly patients improve with education. This study aims to determine whether a holistic education programme incorporating multiple educational strategies such as early exposure, ageing simulation and small group teaching results in improving geriatrics knowledge and attitudes among medical students. We administered the 18-item University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Geriatric Knowledge Test (GKT) and the Singapore-modified 16-item UCLA Geriatric Attitudes Test (GAT) to 2nd year students of the old curriculum in 2009 (baseline reference cohort, n = 254), and before and after the new module to students of the new curriculum in 2010 (intervention cohort, n = 261), both at the same time of the year. At baseline, between the baseline reference and intervention cohort, there was no difference in knowledge (UCLA-GKT Score: 31.6 vs 33.5, P = 0.207) but attitudes of the intervention group were worse than the baseline reference group (UCLA-GAT Score: 3.53 vs 3.43, P = 0.003). The new module improved both the geriatric knowledge (UCLA-GKT Score: 34.0 vs 46.0, P <0.001) and attitudes (UCLA-GAT Score: 3.43 vs 3.50, P <0.001) of the intervention cohort. A geriatric education module incorporating sound educational strategies improved both geriatric knowledge and attitudes among medical students.

  17. Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted infections among High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nsuami, M. Jacques; Sanders, Ladatra S.; Taylor, Stephanie N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has not been determined conclusively whether greater knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is associated with lower rates of STIs. Purpose: This study sought to determine STI knowledge among high school students and factors associated with such knowledge, and to determine whether poor STI knowledge is associated with…

  18. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward aged sexuality in Flemish nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Lieslot; de Casterlé, Bernadette Dierckx; Acke, Jolien; Vandermarliere, Hanne; Van Elssen, Kim; Fieuws, Steffen; Gastmans, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Admission to a nursing home does not necessarily diminish an older person's desire for sexual expression and fulfillment. Given that nursing staff directly and indirectly influence the range of acceptable sexual expressions of nursing home residents, their knowledge and attitudes toward aged sexuality can have far-reaching effects on both the quality of care they provide to residents and the self-image and well-being of these residents. To investigate nursing staff's knowledge and attitudes toward aged sexuality, to determine whether certain sociodemographic factors of the nursing staff relate to their knowledge and attitudes toward later-life sexuality, and to examine the relationship between knowledge and attitudes. Descriptive cross-sectional survey study. The administered questionnaire collected sociodemographic data and data from an adapted, Dutch version of the Aging Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Scale. Data were collected from November 2011 through April 2012. A total of 43 geographically dispersed nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium, participated. Out of a potential research sample of 2228 nursing staff respondents, 1166 participated. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine of the KU Leuven. Nursing staff appeared to be moderately knowledgeable about aged sexuality and displayed a rather positive attitude toward sexuality in older people. Significant relationships between various variables were found both at univariable and multivariable levels. Knowledge and attitudes proved to be positively related, indicating that a higher level of knowledge of aged sexuality is associated with a more positive attitude toward sexuality in later life. Research findings are discussed within a broader international context. There is room for improvement for both nursing staff's knowledge and attitudes toward aged sexuality. This might be aided by appropriate educational interventions. Our results identified different target groups

  19. Emotional Intelligence, Pain Knowledge, and Attitudes of Nursing Students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joanne C Y; Hamamura, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    Research on nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes is limited. Although emotions play a role in pain assessment, no study has examined the associations between emotional intelligence and pain knowledge and the attitudes of nursing students. This cross-sectional quantitative study aimed to address this research gap by assessing the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students in Hong Kong and examining associations between emotional intelligence and the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students. A total of 104 postgraduate nursing students (45 Year 1 students and 59 Year 3 students) completed a questionnaire that included demographic information, the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale (SEIS) and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP). Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlational analyses, chi-square test and t-tests. The pain knowledge and attitudes of both Year 1 students (M = 20.40, SD = 3.78) and Year 3 students (M = 21.36, SD = 3.15) were suboptimal, t(102) = -1.41, p = .16. Year 1 students had higher emotional intelligence (M = 122.44, SD = 8.90) than Year 3 students (M = 117.71, SD = 14.34), t(98.35) = 2.07, p = .04. For Year 1 students, emotional intelligence was negatively correlated with pain knowledge and attitudes, but the correlation was not significant (r = -.15, p = .33). For Year 3 students, emotional intelligence, pain knowledge and attitudes were negatively correlated, but the correlation was significant (r = -.31, p = .02). These results suggest that nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes could be improved. Implications for nurse educators to enhance emotional intelligence and pain education for nursing students are discussed.

  20. Change in attitudes and knowledge of problem drug use and harm reduction among a community cohort in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Todd, C S; Stanekzai, M R; Nasir, A; Fiekert, K; Orr, M G; Strathdee, S A; Vlahov, D

    2016-06-15

    This pre-post evaluation aimed to measure changes in knowledge and attitudes towards drug users among community representatives in Kabul, Afghanistan, over a period of expansion of harm reduction and drug dependence programming. A convenience sample of 160 professionals aged 18+ years completed interview questionnaires in 2007 and 2009. Views endorsing programme quality and the provision of condoms, infection counselling/testing and needle/syringe distribution increased significantly over the 2-year period. In 13 of 38 statements, there was a substantial (> 10%) change in agreement level, most commonly among men and medical professionals. Attitudes concerning support of drug users remained largely positive, with substantial attitude changes in some subgroups of the population. Further community education through the media and a more cohesive government drug policy may be needed to strengthen community support for harm reduction/drug treatment in Afghanistan.

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of Greek health professionals, in relation to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Roumeliotou, A; Kornarou, E; Papaevangelou, V; Spiropoulou, P; Ktenas, E; Stergiou, G; Papaevangelou, G

    1992-11-01

    In order to improve educational programmes directed at health care workers we investigated their knowledge, attitudes and practices in relation to HIV/AIDS. An anonymous self-administered questionnaires was distributed to 609 health care workers. Of these, 59.6% agreed to participate (42.4% of the medical doctors, 74.3% of the nurses and 79.6% of the laboratory technicians, health visitors and other health care workers). All studied groups believed that their knowledge of HIV modes of transmission (84.3%) was sufficient. In contrast, a relatively small percentage reported knowledge of the clinical spectrum of HIV infection (48.8%) and the diagnostic assays (57.6%). Nearly all the study participants believe (92.8%) that there is a risk of acquiring HIV infection during the hospitalization of HIV/AIDS patients. Obligatory screening of all patients was reported by nearly all participants (90.6%) as a chance to minimize their occupational risk. Although health care workers reported satisfactory knowledge of safety measures (87.0%), only 56.7% used gloves and 38.8% accept the hospitalization of HIV/AIDS patients. In spite of the educational programmes for AIDS in Greece, this study demonstrates that health professionals' knowledge and precautionary measures are not sufficient. As a result, a small percentage of them treat AIDS patients without discrimination. There is an urgent need to implement specific educational programmes for health professionals so that they will safely provide high quality care to people affected by HIV/AIDS.

  2. A cluster analysis to investigating nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding the clinical management system.

    PubMed

    Chan, M F

    2007-01-01

    Nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding the Clinical Management System are explored by identifying profiles of nurses working in Hong Kong. A total of 282 nurses from four hospitals completed a self-reported questionnaire during the period from December 2004 to May 2005. Two-step cluster analysis yielded two clusters. The first cluster (n = 159, 56.4%) was labeled "negative attitudes, less skillful, and average knowledge" group. The second cluster (n = 123, 43.6%) was labeled "positive attitudes, good knowledge, but less skillful." There was a positive correlation in cluster 1 for nurses' knowledge and attitudes (rs = 0.28) and in cluster 2 for nurses' skills and attitudes (rs = 0.25) toward computerization. The study showed that senior and more highly educated nurses generally held more positive attitudes to computerization, whereas the attitudes among younger and less well educated nurses generally were more negative. Such findings should be used to formulate strategies to encourage nurses to resolve actual problems following computer training and to increase the depth and breadth of nurses' computer knowledge and skills and improve their attitudes toward computerization.

  3. Breastfeeding attitudes and knowledge in bachelor of science in nursing candidates.

    PubMed

    Vandewark, Aurora C

    2014-01-01

    Breastfeeding is an important health topic worldwide, although lack of breastfeeding knowledge is noted among health-care professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes in undergraduate nursing students at the beginning and end of their clinical education. An electronic survey, based on the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale and the Breastfeeding Knowledge Questionnaire, was administered. Attitude scores did not differ significantly between groups. Total knowledge scores between groups differed modestly (p = .006). Correlations between total knowledge and total attitude scores were found (r[89] = .482, p < .000). Respondents reported that nursing education effectively teaches breastfeeding and that breastfeeding advocacy through patient education is a crucial nursing role.

  4. Breastfeeding Attitudes and Knowledge in Bachelor of Science in Nursing Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Vandewark, Aurora C.

    2014-01-01

    Breastfeeding is an important health topic worldwide, although lack of breastfeeding knowledge is noted among health-care professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes in undergraduate nursing students at the beginning and end of their clinical education. An electronic survey, based on the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale and the Breastfeeding Knowledge Questionnaire, was administered. Attitude scores did not differ significantly between groups. Total knowledge scores between groups differed modestly (p = .006). Correlations between total knowledge and total attitude scores were found (r[89] = .482, p < .000). Respondents reported that nursing education effectively teaches breastfeeding and that breastfeeding advocacy through patient education is a crucial nursing role. PMID:25364217

  5. General practitioners' knowledge of ageing and attitudes towards older people in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanni; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Ullah, Shahid; Deng, Lanlan

    2015-06-01

    To explore general practitioners (GPs)knowledge of ageing, attitudes towards older people and factors affecting their knowledge and attitudes in a Chinese context. Four hundred GPs were surveyed using the Chinese version of the Aging Semantic Differential (CASD) and the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz (CFAQ1) scale. The CASD scores indicated that GPs had a neutral attitude towards older people. The CFAQ1 scores indicated a low level of knowledge about ageing. GPs' awareness of the mental and social facts of ageing was poorer compared to that of physical facts. Male GPs had a significantly higher negative bias score than female GPs. No other variables had a statistically significant influence on knowledge and attitudes. The findings suggest the need for education interventions for GPs regarding knowledge of ageing and also provide evidence to guide future development of continuing medical programs for this group of medical doctors. © 2013 ACOTA.

  6. [Investigation of HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitude among 6,487 high school students].

    PubMed

    He, Zhong-hu; Ji, Cheng-ye

    2009-11-01

    To investigate HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitude among high school students in China, and to preliminarily evaluate the effects of the special HIV/AIDS prevention education programme. A total of 6487 high school students from 24 high schools of Beijing, Zhengzhou and Tangshan were investigated by using questionnaire, among which, 6487 students completed the questionnaire (96.08%). chi(2) test, t test and one way ANOVA were used to test the group differences and logistic regression was employed for further analysis. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significance. The mean knowledge and attitude scores of the students were separately 14.42 out of 20 and 6.47 out of 10. Students from Tangshan had the significantly (P < 0.001) highest knowledge and attitude level (average score of knowledge = 15.11, average score of attitude = 7.21) followed by Beijing (average score of knowledge = 14.62, average score of attitude = 6.15) and Zhengzhou (average score of knowledge = 13.56, average score of attitude = 6.07). The significant differences were observed in all except the varying attitude between Zhengzhou and Beijing (Knowledge comparison: t(Tangshan vs Beijing) = 0.49, P < 0.001, t(Tangshan vs Zhengzhou) = 1.56, P < 0.001, t(Zhengzhou vs Beijing) = 1.07, P < 0.001; Attitude Comparison: t(Tangshan vs Beijing) = 1.06, P < 0.001, t(Tangshan vs Zhengzhou) = 1.14, P < 0.001, t(Zhengzhou vs Beijing) = 0.08, P = 0.282). Boys had higher knowledge scores (average score of knowledge = 14.61) than those of girls (average score of knowledge = 14.23, t = 4.22, P < 0.001) but no significant difference was found (average knowledge score of boys = 6.47, average knowledge score of girls = 6.48, t = 0.16, P = 0.869). Higher knowledge level (OR = 1.21, P < 0.001) and being a rural student (OR = 1.31, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with higher attitude level, while higher grade (OR = 0.85, P = 0.003) and better academic performance (OR = 0.94, P = 0.003) were negative

  7. Attitude and knowledge of hearing loss among medical doctors selected to initiate a residency in Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Vázquez, M; Berruecos, P; Lopez, L E; Cacho, J

    2009-03-01

    Early diagnosis and intervention of hearing loss are directly influenced by the knowledge and attitude towards this condition among medical personnel, particularly in countries where screening is not performed routinely. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the attitude and knowledge of hearing loss in a group of physicians. A questionnaire with five Likert-type items and five multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank items was completed by 2727 physicians selected to start a medical residency. Results suggested that physicians' knowledge level on the matter is deficient and their attitude is far from the ideal; however, physicians selected for a residency in audiology showed slightly better results.

  8. Educating parents about youth suicide: knowledge, response to suicidal statements, attitudes, and intention to help.

    PubMed

    Maine, S; Shute, R; Martin, G

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the video Youth Suicide: Recognising the Signs as a parent educational medium. Before and after viewing the video, parents (N = 112) of young people answered questionnaires measuring their (1) knowledge of suicidal signs, (2) responses to a young person showing suicidal signs, (3) attitude to suicide, and (4) intentionalitv toward suicidal people. After the video, parents' knowledge of suicidal signs, responses toward a suicidal person, and intention to help improved. Their attitude was more rejecting of suicide. Knowledge and intentionality predicted response to suicidal statements, but no relationships existed between attitude and the other variables. Implications for youth suicide education programs are discussed.

  9. Attitudes, knowledge, and intentions related to breastfeeding among university undergraduate women and men.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Sonia; Vogeltanz-Holm, Nancy; Holm, Jeffrey

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine university undergraduate women's and men's attitudes and knowledge toward breastfeeding. Data were gathered for 111 women and 50 men. Data showed a significant relationship between positive attitudes toward breastfeeding and exposure to breastfeeding. Women and participants older than 20 years scored higher on measures of knowledge and attitudes. Results indicated that positive attitude toward breastfeeding was a significant predictor of intention to breastfeed among women and men. In conclusion, the results suggest that understanding attitudes among young adults is an important line of research. Further studies are needed to develop and evaluate interventions aimed at improving attitudes about breastfeeding and increasing initiation of breastfeeding among this population.

  10. Assessing Knowledge of, and Attitudes to, HIV/AIDS among University Students in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Dalia; El Saleh, Ola; Wood, Lesley; Mechli, Rola; Al Marzouqi, Nada; Anouti, Samir

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is among the top two regions in the world with the fastest growing HIV epidemic. In this context, risks and vulnerability are high as the epidemic is on the rise with evidence indicating significantly increasing HIV prevalence, new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths. The aim of the survey was to assess HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes related to HIV/AIDS among a wide group of university students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In a cross-sectional survey, a total sample of 2,294 students (406 male; 1,888 female) from four universities in three different Emirates in the UAE were approached to take part in the study. Students self-completed a questionnaire that was designed to measure their knowledge and attitudes to HIV/AIDS. The overall average knowledge score of HIV.AIDS was 61%. Non-Emirati and postgraduates demonstrated higher levels of knowledge compared to Emirati and undergraduate students respectively. No significant differences between males and females; and marital status were found. Eighty-five percent of students expressed negative attitudes towards people living with HIV, with Emirati and single students significantly holding more negative attitudes compared to non-Emiratis and those that are married respectively. The findings provide strong evidence that there is a need to advocate for appropriate National HIV/AIDS awareness raising campaigns in universities to reduce the gaps in knowledge and decrease stigmatizing attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS.

  11. Assessing Knowledge of, and Attitudes to, HIV/AIDS among University Students in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Dalia; El Saleh, Ola; Wood, Lesley; Mechli, Rola; Al Marzouqi, Nada; Anouti, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Background The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is among the top two regions in the world with the fastest growing HIV epidemic. In this context, risks and vulnerability are high as the epidemic is on the rise with evidence indicating significantly increasing HIV prevalence, new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths. Objective The aim of the survey was to assess HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes related to HIV/AIDS among a wide group of university students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods In a cross-sectional survey, a total sample of 2,294 students (406 male; 1,888 female) from four universities in three different Emirates in the UAE were approached to take part in the study. Students self-completed a questionnaire that was designed to measure their knowledge and attitudes to HIV/AIDS. Results The overall average knowledge score of HIV.AIDS was 61%. Non-Emirati and postgraduates demonstrated higher levels of knowledge compared to Emirati and undergraduate students respectively. No significant differences between males and females; and marital status were found. Eighty-five percent of students expressed negative attitudes towards people living with HIV, with Emirati and single students significantly holding more negative attitudes compared to non-Emiratis and those that are married respectively. Conclusions The findings provide strong evidence that there is a need to advocate for appropriate National HIV/AIDS awareness raising campaigns in universities to reduce the gaps in knowledge and decrease stigmatizing attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:26913902

  12. Knowledge and attitude toward menopause phenomenon among women aged 40-45 years.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Ensieh; Dolatabadi, Nayereh Kasiri; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Davari, Soheila

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate understanding of women that certain physical, mental, social and psychological changes occur during menopause helps them with greater readiness to cope with these changes. In all training programs to identify and analyze perceptions of the subjects is a key component. The purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitude of women toward the menopause phenomenon. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 healthy and non-menopaused women aged 40-45 years. The stratified sampling method was used and participation in this study was based on obtaining informed consent. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of three parts: demographic information, questions to assess knowledge and attitude investigation questions. The results showed that the average knowledge score of subjects was 63.57 ± 10.79, and their average attitude score was 61.21 ± 12.73. In this study, 8% of the subjects had poor knowledge, 68% had moderate knowledge and 38.5% had good knowledge. Meanwhile, 81.5% of the women had a positive attitude toward menopause. The correlation test showed that knowledge and attitude are meaningfully related to economic status and education level. But, the relationship between knowledge and attitudes of women under study was not significant. Identifying the quality of women's subjective perception of menopause has an essential role in the development of accurate and appropriate programs to promote women's health during menopausal years.

  13. Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention on Medical Students' Knowledge About and Attitude Towards Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Simiyon, Manjula; Vedachalam, Ahalya

    2016-04-01

    This study was done to determine the effectiveness of a lecture and exposure to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) followed by interaction with patient, on medical students' knowledge about and attitude towards electroconvulsive therapy. A questionnaire was administered to second year medical students to determine their baseline knowledge about and attitude towards electroconvulsive therapy. Following this, they underwent two educational interventions, a lecture on ECT and exposure to the procedure and interaction with the patient and relative, and their knowledge and attitude were reassessed after each intervention using the same questionnaire. Eighty-one students completed all the three assessments. Students' knowledge about ECT at baseline was minimal (mean 3.58 out of 12). Their knowledge increased significantly after the lecture (mean 10.3), and there was further increase following exposure to the procedure and subsequent interaction with the patient and relative (mean 11.1). At baseline, students had an overall negative attitude towards ECT. There was significant improvement on all attitude items following the lecture. Exposure to the procedure resulted in further improvement in attitude regarding whether ECT is a cruel treatment and has to be used as a last resort. Exposure to ECT in lecture and clinical scenarios followed by interaction with the patient should be included in the undergraduate medical curriculum to improve students' knowledge and attitude about this safe, effective, and potentially lifesaving treatment modality.

  14. Pediatrician Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Related to Electronic Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Gorzkowski, Julie A; Whitmore, Regina M; Kaseeska, Kristen R; Brishke, Janet K; Klein, Jonathan D

    2016-07-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have grown rapidly in popularity, creating concerns for pediatricians and families. Evaluating pediatricians' understanding of e-cigarettes is an important first step in effectively addressing these products in practice. This qualitative study assesses pediatricians' knowledge, attitudes, and current clinical practices related to e-cigarettes. We conducted six focus groups with 37 pediatric clinicians in 2014. Groups were led by a trained facilitator using a semistructured discussion guide. Responses were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify relevant themes. Pediatricians know that e-cigarettes generally contain nicotine and that adolescents and young adults are most likely to use them. However, most feel uninformed about the health effects of e-cigarettes and report wanting scientific evidence for safety or harm from credible sources. Pediatricians are skeptical of claims that e-cigarettes are safe, either for users or for those exposed to second-hand e-cigarette vapor or emissions. Participants noted that clinical conversations about e-cigarettes were rare, citing barriers including a lack of systematic screening, competing priorities during clinical visits, and, for some, limited confidence in their ability to address e-cigarettes during clinical encounters. No participants recommended e-cigarettes for cessation. Pediatricians feel poorly informed about e-cigarettes and are concerned about their potential health effects. While clinical discussions about e-cigarettes are rare, recent increases in their use leaves many clinicians wanting guidance about what to say to patients and families. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of business travelers regarding malaria risk and prevention.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roger; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Amsler, Lorenz; Steffen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of Swiss business travelers with regard to malaria. Questionnaires printed in three languages were distributed by employers, travel agencies and tropical medicine specialists to business travelers with destinations in malaria endemic countries. In total, 401 questionnaires were evaluated. Thirty-three percent visited high-risk areas, 27% visited low-risk areas, and 40% visited only malaria-free areas within endemic countries. Among the investigated business travelers, 6% had experienced malaria infection, and 29% had previously had blood smears tested for malaria at least once. Almost all business travelers, 95%, knew that mosquitoes are the main vectors of malaria. The infection risk between dusk and dawn was known to 71%, and the incubation time to 36%. Apart from fever (99%) and headache (63%), other malaria symptoms were known to only 13% to 36% of the travelers. If signs of illness such as fever and headache occurred, 63% would react adequately and seek medical advice within 24 h. Only 16% of the travelers to African high-risk areas followed the recommended behavior concerning anti-mosquito and antimalarial strategies; 31% of those on trips to low-risk areas used an adequate protective strategy. Of the business travelers using chemoprophylaxis during travel, just 50% continued intake post travel, as requested, after leaving the endemic area. Business travelers are well informed regarding the mode of transmission and the risk of malaria at specific destinations but tend to comply poorly with anti-mosquito and chemoprophylactic strategies. The knowledge, attitudes and practices of business travelers with regard to malaria prevention need to be improved.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice of drivers towards traffic regulations in Bandar-Abbas, Iran.

    PubMed

    Tajvar, Abdolhamid; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Aghamolaei, Teamur; Shahraki, Soudabeh Hamedi; Madani, Abdolhossein; Omidi, Leila

    2015-12-01

    Traffic injuries are among the leading causes of death and disability in many countries. The knowledge, attitudes, and practice of drivers towards traffic regulations are key factors in decreasing traffic injuries and deaths. The objectives of this research were to study the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of taxi drivers towards traffic regulations in Bandar-Abbas, Iran, and to determine the relationships between demographic features and knowledge, attitudes, and practice of taxi drivers towards traffic regulations. This cross-sectional study was done in 2014 in Bandar-Abbas, Iran (Hormozgan Province). To study the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of 241 intra-city taxi drivers towards traffic regulations, researchers developed questionnaires and a checklist. The chi-squared test was performed to determine the relationships between knowledge, attitude, and practice of drivers towards traffic regulations and demographic features. Among the 241 drivers, 50 of them (20.7%) thought that the seat belt could cause discomfort while driving, and 107 (44.4%) did not wear a seat belt while driving. The study determined that there was a significant difference between the knowledge and work experience of the drivers (p = 0.014). The 94 drivers (43.5%) in the 31-40 year age group had positive attitudes towards traffic regulations (among 216 drivers expressed positive attitudes) and 92 (44.4%) of the drivers in this age group had safe practices towards traffic regulations (among 207 drivers with safe practice). Many of the taxi drivers in Bandar-Abbas had inadequate knowledge, less positive attitudes, and risky practices towards traffic regulations. Implementation of effective intervention programs may increase the taxi drivers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards traffic regulations.

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice of drivers towards traffic regulations in Bandar-Abbas, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tajvar, Abdolhamid; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Aghamolaei, Teamur; Shahraki, Soudabeh Hamedi; Madani, Abdolhossein; Omidi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traffic injuries are among the leading causes of death and disability in many countries. The knowledge, attitudes, and practice of drivers towards traffic regulations are key factors in decreasing traffic injuries and deaths. The objectives of this research were to study the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of taxi drivers towards traffic regulations in Bandar-Abbas, Iran, and to determine the relationships between demographic features and knowledge, attitudes, and practice of taxi drivers towards traffic regulations. Methods This cross-sectional study was done in 2014 in Bandar-Abbas, Iran (Hormozgan Province). To study the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of 241 intra-city taxi drivers towards traffic regulations, researchers developed questionnaires and a checklist. The chi-squared test was performed to determine the relationships between knowledge, attitude, and practice of drivers towards traffic regulations and demographic features. Results Among the 241 drivers, 50 of them (20.7%) thought that the seat belt could cause discomfort while driving, and 107 (44.4%) did not wear a seat belt while driving. The study determined that there was a significant difference between the knowledge and work experience of the drivers (p = 0.014). The 94 drivers (43.5%) in the 31–40 year age group had positive attitudes towards traffic regulations (among 216 drivers expressed positive attitudes) and 92 (44.4%) of the drivers in this age group had safe practices towards traffic regulations (among 207 drivers with safe practice). Conclusion Many of the taxi drivers in Bandar-Abbas had inadequate knowledge, less positive attitudes, and risky practices towards traffic regulations. Implementation of effective intervention programs may increase the taxi drivers’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards traffic regulations. PMID:26813231

  18. The Impact of a Concussion-U Educational Program on Knowledge of and Attitudes about Concussion.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Matthew E; Bradbury-Squires, David J; Powell, Maria F; Murphy, Justin R; Campbell, Graeme D; Maroun, Falah B

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of a sports-related concussion is often dependent on the athlete self-reporting their symptoms. It has been suggested that improving youth athlete knowledge and attitudes toward concussion may increase self-reporting behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine if a novel Concussion-U educational program improves knowledge of and attitudes about concussion among a cohort of elite male Bantam and Midget AAA hockey players. Fifty-seven male Bantam and Midget AAA-level hockey players (mean age=14.52±1.13 years) were recruited from the local community. Each participant completed a modified version of the Rosenbaum Concussion Knowledge and Attitudes Survey-Student Version immediately before and after a Concussion-U educational presentation. Follow-up sessions were arranged 4 to 6 months after the presentation, and assessed retention of knowledge and attitude changes. Forty-three players completed all three surveys. Concussion knowledge and attitude scores significantly (p<0.01) increased from pre- to post-presentation by 12.79 and 8.41%, respectively. At long-term follow-up, knowledge levels remained significantly (p<0.01) higher than baseline by 8.49%. Mean attitude scores were also increased at follow-up; however, this increase was not statistically significant. A Concussion-U educational program led to an immediate improvement in concussion knowledge and attitudes among elite male Bantam and Midget AAA hockey players. Increased knowledge was maintained at long-term follow-up, but improved attitude was not. Future studies should investigate whether similar educational programs influence symptom reporting and concussion incidence. In addition, they should focus on how to maintain improved concussion attitudes.

  19. Pharmacy students' knowledge, attitudes, and evaluation of direct-to-consumer advertising.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rupali K; Borrego, Matthew E; Gupchup, Gireesh V; Dodd, Melanie; Sather, Mike R

    2007-10-15

    To assess pharmacy students' knowledge, attitudes, and evaluation of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA). A cross sectional, self-administered, 106-item survey instrument was used to assess first, second, and third professional year pharmacy students' knowledge about DTCA regulations, attitudes toward DTCA, and evaluation of DTC advertisements with different brief summary formats (professional labeling and patient labeling) and in different media sources (print and television). One hundred twenty (51.3%) of the 234 students enrolled participated in the study. The mean percentage knowledge score was 48.7% +/- 12.5%. Based on the mean scores per item, pharmacy students had an overall negative attitude toward DTC advertisements. Students had an overall negative attitude toward television and print advertisements using the professional labeling format but an overall positive attitude toward the print advertisement using the patient labeling format. Lectures discussing DTC advertising should be included in the pharmacy curriculum.

  20. Pharmacy Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Evaluation of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Matthew E.; Gupchup, Gireesh V.; Dodd, Melanie; Sather, Mike R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess pharmacy students' knowledge, attitudes, and evaluation of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA). Methods A cross sectional, self-administered, 106-item survey instrument was used to assess first, second, and third professional year pharmacy students' knowledge about DTCA regulations, attitudes toward DTCA, and evaluation of DTC advertisements with different brief summary formats (professional labeling and patient labeling) and in different media sources (print and television). Results One hundred twenty (51.3%) of the 234 students enrolled participated in the study. The mean percentage knowledge score was 48.7% ± 12.5%. Based on the mean scores per item, pharmacy students had an overall negative attitude toward DTC advertisements. Students had an overall negative attitude toward television and print advertisements using the professional labeling format but an overall positive attitude toward the print advertisement using the patient labeling format. Conclusions Lectures discussing DTC advertising should be included in the pharmacy curriculum. PMID:17998983

  1. Primary school teachers' knowledge about and attitudes toward anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Hulya; Ozen, Ahmet; Karatepe, Hande; Berber, Mustafa; Cengizlier, Reha

    2012-08-01

    One in 10,000 children experiences an anaphylactic attack, every year. It has been demonstrated that 82% of these attacks occur in children of school age and that most of the attack-related deaths have occurred in schools. In this study, we aimed to investigate primary school teachers' knowledge about and attitudes toward anaphylaxis. A total of 237 teachers were questioned: 91 working in elementary state schools and 146 in private schools. A questionnaire was completed to obtain data on their knowledge of anaphylaxis and the availability of emergency treatment facilities in schools. Fifty-two percent of the teachers knew which students had an allergic disease. When questioned about agents that can potentially cause anaphylaxis, the most significant causes were thought to be pollen by 54% of the teachers, food by 47%, mites by 40%, and drugs by 30%. Of foods, eggs (30.4%) and strawberries (25.3%) were thought to be the two leading causes. The teachers' responses on what would be their initial reaction in the event of an anaphylactic reaction were: he/she would give first aid in 24.3%, notify the school nurse in 39.7%, and call the emergency services in 19.8%. Only 10% were aware of an epinephrine autoinjector, and only 4% knew where to apply it. While 28% of the teachers reported that they had been informed about anaphylaxis previously, most had formed their ideas from brochures or the media. While 25% of the teachers knew all of the symptoms of anaphylaxis, 54% knew some, and 21% none. Only 6% of the teachers reported that there was a management plan for anaphylaxis in their schools. This study shows that primary school teachers are not well informed about anaphylaxis. Teachers should be given training on the subject, and there should be a re-evaluation of school and health policies with a wider global perspective. There is an urgent need to inquire into the allergy management plans and policies in schools and to develop teacher education organizations on the

  2. Infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged women in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Dungy, Claibourne I; McInnes, Rhona J; Tappin, David M; Wallis, Anne Baber; Oprescu, Florin

    2008-05-01

    This study: (1) investigated infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers in an urban community with historically low breastfeeding rates, (2) examined the influence of women's social networks on infant feeding attitudes and decisions, and (3) validated a measure of infant feeding attitudes and knowledge in this population (Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale, IIFAS). Women attending a prenatal clinic (n=49) reported on: (1) demographics, (2) infant feeding attitudes and knowledge (IIFAS), (3) feeding intent, (4) opinions about breastfeeding in public, and (5) social networks. Feeding method at discharge was abstracted from hospital charts. Social network members (n=47) identified by the prenatal sample completed interviews covering: (1) demographics, (2) infant feeding attitudes and knowledge (IIFAS), (3) prior infant feeding methods and recommendations, and (4) opinions about breastfeeding in public. Mean IIFAS scores were low in both groups, indicating neutral to negative breastfeeding attitudes; mothers' scores were lower than social network members. Higher maternal IIFAS score was significantly associated with intended and actual breastfeeding. A social network positive towards breastfeeding was significantly associated with mothers' positive attitude towards breastfeeding. Both mothers and social network members support breastfeeding in public. IIFAS internal consistency was robust for both mothers and social network members. Predictive validity was demonstrated by significant positive association between score and intended and actual feeding methods. Knowledge and attitude predict breastfeeding initiation in this population. Social network members may influence mothers' feeding choices. This research is important because attitudes and knowledge derived from the IIFAS can be used to develop and evaluate breastfeeding promotion programs.

  3. Exploring AIDS-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors of Female Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organista, Pamela Balls; Organista, Kurt C.; Soloff, Pearl R.

    1998-01-01

    AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were assessed among female migrant laborers (N=32). Results are reported regarding knowledge and beliefs about AIDS transmission, knowledge and beliefs about condom use, and actual use of condoms. Needs for health education and services, sexual power, and other implications of findings are…

  4. Reviewing the Relations between Teachers' Knowledge and Pupils' Attitude in the Field of Primary Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohaan, Ellen J.; Taconis, Ruurd; Jochems, Wim M. G.

    2010-01-01

    This literature review reports on the assumed relations between primary school teachers' knowledge of technology and pupils' attitude towards technology. In order to find relevant aspects of technology-specific teacher knowledge, scientific literature in the field of primary technology education was searched. It is found that teacher knowledge is…

  5. Attitudes Toward Alzheimer's Care-Seeking Among Korean Americans: Effects of Knowledge, Stigma, and Subjective Norm.

    PubMed

    Casado, Banghwa Lee; Hong, Michin; Lee, Sang E

    2017-03-10

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) ensures that affected individuals and their caregivers can make appropriate plans for health care needs, yet many ethnic minorities delay seeking care for AD until the disease has progressed. This study examined attitudes toward care-seeking for AD among Korean Americans (KAs) and identified factors affecting their attitudes. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data from 234 KA adults. We conducted hierarchical regression analyses to examine the effects of sociocultural background (age, gender, education, cultural orientation), AD knowledge and exposure to AD, and beliefs about AD (stigma of pity, shame, and public avoidance) and AD care (subjective norm) on KAs' attitudes toward seeking AD care from primary care physicians (PCPs) and AD specialists. We also tested whether knowledge of AD moderated the impact of beliefs about AD and AD care on KAs' attitudes toward seeking AD care. For both PCPs and AD specialists, the subjective norm had the strongest effect on KAs' attitudes toward care seeking (β = 0.557 for PCPs, β = 0.360 for specialists). Effects of stigma beliefs disappeared in the presence of the subjective norm. AD knowledge moderated the impact of the subjective norm on the attitudes toward both PCPs (β = -1.653) and specialists (β = -1.742). The significance of the subjective norm in KAs' attitudes toward AD care-seeking underscores the importance of public education, and our study suggests that increasing AD knowledge could facilitate a change in public attitudes toward seeking AD care.

  6. Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior toward Charismatic Megafauna: The Case of Dolphins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Erin C.; Mintzes, Joel J.; Yen, Chiung-Fen

    2005-01-01

    Using concept maps, a Kellert-type (S. R. Kellert, 1985) inventory, and self-report behavioral items, this cross-age study assessed public knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward bottlenose dolphins. Results suggest that this important megafaunal species is poorly understood by the public at large, and that negative "utilitarian" attitudes and…

  7. Adolescent Co-Occurring Disorders Treatment: Clinicians' Attitudes, Values, and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denby, Ramona W.; Brinson, Jesse A.; Ayala, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    This study examined community-based clinicians' (N = 294) attitudes, background/experiences, values, and knowledge relating to issues of co-occurring disorders, which occur at a high rate among adolescents involved in the juvenile justice system. Study results reveal that clinicians self-rate their clinical values and attitudes at or above the…

  8. Turkish University Students' Knowledge of Biotechnology and Attitudes toward Biotechnological Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öztürk-Akar, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    This study questions the presumed relation between formal schooling and scientific literacy about biotechnologies. Comparing science and nonscience majors' knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnological applications, conclusions are drawn if their formal learnings improve pupils' understandings of and attitudes toward biotechnology…

  9. Boosting Students' Attitudes & Knowledge about Evolution Sets Them up for College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, B. Elijah; Infanti, Lynn M.; Wiles, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    Students who enter college with a solid grounding in, and positive attitudes toward, evolutionary science are better prepared for and achieve at higher levels in university-level biology courses. We found highly significant, positive relationships between student knowledge of evolution and attitudes toward evolution, as well as between…

  10. Frogs Sell Beer: The Effects of Beer Advertisements on Adolescent Drinking Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Walsh, David A.; Bloomgren, Barry W., Jr.; Atti, Jule A.; Norman, Jessica A.

    This present research reveals how beer advertising affects adolescents' knowledge of beer brands, drinking attitudes, and drinking behaviors. In addition to traditional psychological approaches for measuring media effects on alcohol-related behaviors and attitudes, market research advertising tracking methods were included to permit a clearer and…

  11. Adolescent Environmental Behaviors. Can Knowledge, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meinhold, Jana L.; Malkus, Amy J.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among adolescent environmental behaviors and self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes. It was hypothesized that adolescents who demonstrate more proenvironmental attitudes are more likely to demonstrate proenvironmental behaviors. It was further hypothesized that perceived self-efficacy would have a…

  12. Sexual Behavior, Sexual Knowledge, and Sexual Attitudes of Emerging Adult Women: Implications for Working with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byno, Lucy H.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the sexual behavior of emerging adult women in relation to their sexual knowledge, sexual attitudes, and perceptions of their parents' sexual attitudes; and second, to discuss the implications of this research in working with young adult women. Three hundred and sixty-four college-age women…

  13. Knowledge, Affection and Basic Attitudes Toward Animals in American Society. Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellert, Stephen R.; Berry, Joyce K.

    This paper, third in a series of five reports on results of a national study of American attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors toward wildlife and natural habitats, focuses on the American public's attitudes, perceptions, and understanding of animals. Data were derived from questionnaires administered to 3,107 randomly selected Americans (18 years…

  14. A Study of Steroid Use among Athletes: Knowledge, Attitude and Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye; Moore, Alan

    1990-01-01

    The relationship of knowledge, attitudes, and prevalence of steroid use among college athletes and nonathletes was investigated. Results indicated that the more individuals knew about steroids, the more favorable was their attitude toward use. Powerlifters and bodybuilders were found most likely to use steroids. (JD)

  15. Exploring the Attitudes and Knowledge of Support Workers towards Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Natalie S.; Rose, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to explore support workers' attitudes and knowledge towards individuals with intellectual disabilities (IDs) to see whether a new attitude scale needs to be developed. Method: Support workers from a charitable organization located in the West Midlands in the United Kingdom participated in one of four focus…

  16. Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior toward Charismatic Megafauna: The Case of Dolphins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Erin C.; Mintzes, Joel J.; Yen, Chiung-Fen

    2005-01-01

    Using concept maps, a Kellert-type (S. R. Kellert, 1985) inventory, and self-report behavioral items, this cross-age study assessed public knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward bottlenose dolphins. Results suggest that this important megafaunal species is poorly understood by the public at large, and that negative "utilitarian" attitudes and…

  17. Exploring the Attitudes and Knowledge of Support Workers towards Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Natalie S.; Rose, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to explore support workers' attitudes and knowledge towards individuals with intellectual disabilities (IDs) to see whether a new attitude scale needs to be developed. Method: Support workers from a charitable organization located in the West Midlands in the United Kingdom participated in one of four focus…

  18. Boosting Students' Attitudes & Knowledge about Evolution Sets Them up for College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, B. Elijah; Infanti, Lynn M.; Wiles, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    Students who enter college with a solid grounding in, and positive attitudes toward, evolutionary science are better prepared for and achieve at higher levels in university-level biology courses. We found highly significant, positive relationships between student knowledge of evolution and attitudes toward evolution, as well as between…

  19. Development of Positive Racial Attitudes, Knowledges, and Activities in Pre-Service Social Studies Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.; Lamb, Morris L.

    Information on aspects of social studies teachers' racial attitudes, knowledges, and skill in implementing relevant ethnic-racial activities in the classroom are presented. Major research studies that have examined teacher attitudes toward black and other minority group children are discussed along with information on programs that have attempted…

  20. Relationship between knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV/AIDS among dental school employees and students.

    PubMed

    Börsum, K M; Gjermo, P E

    2004-08-01

    Employees and students at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo responded to a comprehensive questionnaire regarding knowledge and attitudes towards human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The intention of the present study was to describe possible relationships between the two. The questionnaire consisted of 39 closed questions. The response rate was 75% (436/584). The answers were used to construct additive indices for knowledge and attitudes. The knowledge index reflected the number of correct answers concerning risk groups and transmission. A factor analysis revealed three dimensions of attitudes ('legal', 'personal risk', and 'personal consequences'), which were analysed separately against knowledge. Correlation analyses (Spearman r) of all respondents together (n = 436) revealed a weak, but statistically significant, positive correlation between knowledge and the 'legal' and 'personal risk' dimension of attitudes (r = 0.16, P < 0.01; r = 0.21, P < 0.001). The 'personal consequence' dimension was not significantly correlated with knowledge (r = 0.06, P > 0.05). The strongest correlation was found between knowledge and the 'legal' dimension (r = 0.43, P < 0.001), and knowledge and the 'personal risk' dimension (r = 0.41, P < 0.002) amongst fourth year students. No particular group of employees or students displayed a significant correlation between knowledge and the 'personal consequence' dimension of attitudes. Three dimensions on attitudes concerning patients with HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome were identified amongst the respondents. A weak correlation between knowledge and two of the attitudes might indicate that knowledge plays a role in this respect.

  1. Knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS: a survey among dental students in Ajman, UAE.

    PubMed

    Premadasa, Gamini; Sadek, Maha; Ellepola, Arjuna; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary

    2015-05-01

    Encounters between dentists and patients with HIV/AIDS are bound to rise due to increased prevalence and emerging new treatments. This study assessed dental students' knowledge about transmission and oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS, and their attitudes towards patients regarding obligations to treat. Out of 109 students in 4 years of a 6-year dental undergraduate program, 106 responded to a questionnaire on knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS. Knowledge and attitude scores were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis one-way anova and the gender differences with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The median score for students' overall knowledge was 39.5 (67%; maximum possible 59). The median knowledge scores for males and females were 38 and 40 respectively, although the difference was not statistically significant. The knowledge levels in Year 4 (42.5 ± 4.7), Year 3 (44 ± 6.5), and Year 2 (42 ± 5.8), were similar but significantly higher than in Year 1 (33 ± 7.9; P < 0.01). The median attitude score was 14 out of 24, with no significant differences within genders and years of study. Although the level of knowledge of the senior students was higher than that of the first years, the negative attitudes remained largely unchanged. Appropriate educational programs may alter the misconceptions and the negative attitudes. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p < .05) after the 8-week PMP. A PMP can improve the knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management.

  3. Food Allergy Knowledge and Attitudes among School Nurses in an Urban Public School District.

    PubMed